Page 1

LAST CHANCE TO VOTE FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST 2015 AT WWW.OKMAG.COM MARCH 2015

HOME & GARDEN

The latest trends in sustainable living

TAKE A HIKE!

10 of Oklahoma’s great hiking trails

GET YOUR

KICKS On fashionable Route 66

+HEALTHY LIVING AT ANY AGE


#4leafclover #greenisgorgeous #memorymaking #uticasquare

Capture, Share #uticasquare

uticasquare.com

March is made for exploring. So grab a light jacket, your kiddos and head to Utica Square for a day of discovery and fun. Vibrant landscaping, cheerful merchants and delicious treats await you at every turn. Lucky you, getting to make memories at Utica Square, Tulsa’s hometown treasure.


VOL. XIX, NO. 3

FEATURES

44

The Great Outdoors

March 2 015 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

There’s no better time than now to start thinking about opening your doors and enjoying the outdoor spaces your home offers. Find inspiration while touring the gardens and outdoor living areas – one in Tulsa and one in Oklahoma City – featured in this issue. Writer M.J. Van Deventer discusses the details of these beautiful outdoor spaces. Take inspiration from the spaces, and learn how to prolong the seasons in your backyard.

52

These two unique Oklahoma homes have been remodeled with “green” standards in mind. Explore these spaces and uncover ways to reuse, repurpose and recycle when renovating, helping to conserve energy and water, reduce waste and cut future costs.

58

Take A Hike

Oklahoma’s landscape offers a shifting terrain that gives way to great trails and exciting hikes. Across the state, hikers from the amateur to expert are beckoned by biodiversity. Discover waterfalls; join the Rocky Mountains as they meet the short grass prairie; or explore the oak and hickory forest of the Ozarks. Whatever route you choose, you’ll be happy you hiked in Oklahoma.

80

The lifestyles we maintain throughout our years will affect our health as we age. Be proactive and learn how to stay healthy throughout your 20s, 30s, 40s and beyond.

MARCH 2015

March 2015

TAKE A HIKE!

10 of Oklahoma’s great hiking trails

GET YOUR

KICKS On fashionable Route 66

+HEALTHY LIVING AT ANY AGE

2

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

Oklahoma is home to the longest stretch of the country’s most iconic 2,000 miles. Route 66 winds from Chicago to L.A., but this spring’s pure Americana styles are catching a ride in Tulsa. Get behind the wheel of this season’s picks: A little bit retro, a touch of biker babe and a dash of Hollywood glamour.

ON THE COVER: OKLAHOMA CITY RESIDENT LINDA VATER HAS DESIGNED A BEAUTIFUL GARDEN AT HER CROWN HEIGHTS HOME THAT INCLUDES BOXWOODS, A POTAGER AND PLENTY OF POTTED FLOWERS AND PLANTS. PHOTO BY DAVID COBB.

84

Summer Camp Directory

OKMAG.COM

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

VOTE NOW FOR 2014 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM!

LAST CHANCE TO VOTE FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST 2015 AT WWW.OKMAG.COM

The latest trends in sustainable living

Get Your Kicks

SPECIAL SECTION

A Healthy Start

HOME & GARDEN

68

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

Sustainable Spaces

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries. MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!


ST. JOHN HEALTH SYSTEM GIVES BACK. “WHERE YOUR TREASURE IS, THERE YOUR HEART WILL BE ALSO.” – Matthew 6:21

Total estimated three-year cost of care for the poor

$178 Million An average of more than

$78

Million

in cost of total community benefit each year

Total three-year cost of community benefit provided by St. John Health System

$235

Million

Since 1926, St. John Health System has held a tradition of giving back. Over the last three years*, we’ve provided an average of more than $59 million per year in care for persons living in poverty** measured by our cost of care. We’re also investing in the future health of Oklahoma, with a yearly average of more than $18 million contributed by St. John to support medical education programs to train doctors, nurses and other medical professionals, and to support other community benefit activities. It’s all part of our firm belief that the health of a community begins with a heart for giving. Investing in our fellow man is an honor.

To learn more about how St. John gives back to the local community, visit stjohnhealthsystem.com/giving

ST. JOHN MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN SAPULPA | ST. JOHN OWASSO | ST. JOHN BROKEN ARROW JANE PHILLIPS MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN VILLAS | ST. JOHN CLINIC URGENT CARE | ST. JOHN CLINIC STJOHNHEALTHSYSTEM.COM

*2012-2014. **St. John Health System follows the guidance of the U.S. Catholic Health Association and Internal Revenue Service to estimate the cost of community benefit. St. John does not include bad debt, shortfalls in difference between payment for and cost of service to Medicare beneficiaries, payment of property, sales, use, income, payroll and other taxes; or the considerable economic value provided to local communities in which it operates as components of community benefit.


The State

13

Iowa Tribe member Victor Roubidoux had zero experience with birds when he read about a rehabilitation center in New Mexico that catered to them. Roubidoux has turned his fascination with rehabilitation into Grey Snow Eagle House, a sanctuary that rehabilitates injured eagles and other birds, which he operates in Perkins, Okla.

16 18 20 22 24 26

26

Culture 5Qs The Insider Scene Spotlight Living Space

Designer Chris Murphy brought style and sophistication to this midtown Tulsa home by upgrading or repurposing existing furnishings when he could and bringing in new pieces where they were lacking, successfully achieving the “wow” factor the homeowners hoped for.

34 36 38 40 42

Taste

91

Walk through La Crepe Nanou’s bright red doors and enter another world. Enjoy recipes that pay homage to the classic cuisine found in France. After dinner, a grand selection of wine awaits upstairs in the Wine Loft.

94

What We’re Eating

Entertainment

97

This Grammy-winning, country music star continues to hit high notes, both on her records and at the top of the charts. In the last 10 years, Miranda Lambert has experienced all the successes one could hope for in the music industry, and she only continues to rise. Now, she’s on the road again with her Certified Platinum tour and making a stop in Oklahoma City at the beginning of March.

98

104

4

97

91

Calendar of Events

In Person

34

13

Accessorize Style Trend Your Health Destination

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

Photo by John Amatucci.

Contents

DEPARTMENTS


Lynn A. Wiens, M.D. WARREN CLINIC ALLERGY & IMMUNOLOGY

Inspired to become a doctor by his uncle’s stories and a book he read in the second grade, Dr. Lynn Wiens enjoys helping patients cope with their allergies, so they can lead more active lives.

Why did you choose to become a doctor, and what led you to focus on allergies? I’ve never wanted to do anything else. There was a book series, “When I grow up I want to be a…” that I remember from the second grade. I only read the one on becoming a doctor. Later, during my training at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, I had an extremely intelligent mentor who introduced me to the field of allergies and I’ve been there ever since.

What had the biggest influence on you while growing up? I was raised on a farm in southwest Kansas, so I learned the value of hard work and perseverance. Also, my uncle was a doctor in a small Kansas town. When our family would gather at his house for Thanksgiving, he would share his amazing stories.

Is there one thing you wish every patient knew? Patients need to be empowered to have a significant input in the “teamwork” of healthcare. I find this facilitates the best outcome for allergies and asthma. Medical diseases are often a result of risk factors and triggers. What better way to find these than making everyone a part of the healthcare team?

What are your favorite pastimes? I am an avid runner and hiker, and I enjoy Oklahoma’s diverse hiking trails. In Tulsa, we have great running trails throughout the city. I enjoy helping my patients conquer their allergies, so they can take advantage of outdoor activities and get as much out of them as I do.

What part of your job gives you the most satisfaction? I like discovering the reason we develop an allergic reaction to substances in the environment. Once patients understand what triggers their allergies, they can live very normal lives and do the activities they’ve always dreamed of. This takes time and isn’t always easy, but it’s well worth the effort. I never get tired of witnessing patients’ improvement in their allergy symptoms with less medication.

Dr. Wiens appreciates how colleagues share knowledge at Saint Francis. “This collaboration results in better patient care,” he says.

Warren Clinic Allergy & Immunology | 6160 South Yale Avenue Tulsa, OK 74136 918-495-2636 | warrenclinic.com SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL | THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | WARREN CLINIC | HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL SOUTH | LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL | SAINT FRANCIS BROKEN ARROW


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 2014

Thank you Oklahoma for voting us 'The Best of the Best'

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX EDITORIAL ASSISTANT BRITTANY ANICETTI CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN

DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER EMILY HECKER ADVERTISING/OFFICE ASSISTANT ALYSSA HALL CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM

Work Featured on

"Cool Pools"

18651 Caviness.indd 1

Luxury Homes

5/19/14 3:26 PM

JULY 2015

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2015 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily TM represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

You’re cordially invited to join us for an insider's tour of some of Oklahoma’s most innovative and fabulous homes.

2013

Member

440 0 UNDER

Advertising opportunities available Contact advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205 Luxury homes.indd 1

6

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

2/25/15 10:34 AM

TM


Enhance Your Curves BRAZILIAN BUTTOCK LIFT= =Fat GRAFTING LIPOSUCTION Brazilian Buttock Lift = FAT FatGrafting Grafting&&& Liposuction Brazilian Buttock Lift Liposuction

BRAZILIAN BUTTOCK LIFT

Brazilian ButtockLift Lift Brazilian Buttock

Want to improve your backside view?

Tulsa Surgical Arts offers a complete line of surgical procedures to enhance your buttock…. ”Brazilian Butt Lift” is one of Dr. Cuzalina’s most popular surgeries! Call to schedule a free consult, 918-392-7900 Tulsa Surgical Arts offers a full line of Cosmetic Surgical and skin care procedures to help you look and feel your best this summer. Angelo Cuzalina, MD

918.392.7900 | tulsasurgicalarts.com


BE THE BEST. LAHOMA OK

the

BEST of the BEST 2015

MA

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Sustainability. Go green. Eco-friendly. These buzzwords, more than ever, surround us daily as we make decisions, both small and large. From purchasing in-season produce to cars and even homes, it’s important to keep in mind one’s responsibility to the planet when making these decisions. When Chad Burton began a remodel of a midtown Tulsa home, he admits that at the time, he didn’t even recycle. “It never even occurred to me the impact we have on the earth in our day-to-day activity,” he says. Now, he and his family live in the home that he remodeled. It represents 18 months of hard work and has received three designations by organizations that certify sustainable building. Though Burton embraced green building and sustainable living whole-heartedly in the remodel of his home, small changes can also make a difference. Like Burton learned during the renovation, recycling is important. Whether it’s cans and plastic that build up from cooking or scraps of wood and metal that are left over after a large project, utilizing existing resources or recycling can make a huge impact on the environment. What we do today has an impact on our earth tomorrow and beyond. It’s a profound lesson that we should keep in mind. Also in this issue, we highlight some of the area’s summer camps. Schools will be dismissed for the summer before you even know it, so get a head-start on your child’s vacation activities. Whether it’s tennis, soccer, art or acting that they enjoy, there’s a camp to be attended. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

GAZINE

Voting for Oklahoma Magazine’’s The Best of the Best is now open. BY CASTING A BALLOT, YOU HAVE A VOICE IN THE YEAR’S MOST ANTICIPATED ISSUE.

VISIT OKMAG.COM

TO VOTE For Advertising opportunities emAil Advertising@okmAg.com cAll 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA

1/3 Strip.indd 1

8

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

12/19/14 9:35 AM

ALSO

ISSUE, I N T H I S gazine visits ek ma Ma

e Oklaho ashion W ns s-Benz F hio e s d e fa t rc s e te M at the la k o okmag. lo t u a heck o to take C . s ic y a w e run luding ch hitting th a coverage, inc o h p e extr -clos com for s and up s k to o o h lo p g le in street sty e runway, includ iend fr th tos from homa Magazine la k ensO m m ’s fro rc Valvo e. a M n e l lin Carm d optica wear an


S U P E R S T A R S

VanGogh

Rothko

MASTERWORKS FROM THE ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to view 76 masterpieces by 73 superstars of the art world, including Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Mark Rothko, and more. F E B R UARY 21

J U NE 1 , 2015

$10 , FREE for Members and youth ages 18 and under. Reserve tickets online or at guest services (479.418.5700). SPONSORED AT CRYSTAL BRIDGES BY

Harriet and Warren Stephens, Stephens Inc.

Art Agency, Partners Rick and Beverly Chapman Family Stout Executive Search

CrystalBridges.org BENTONVILLE, ARK ANSAS

This exhibition was initiated by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, and was organized by Albright-Knox Chief Curator Emeritus Douglas Dreishpoon. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. Roy Lichtenstein, Head—Red and Yellow, 1962, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 in. Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1962. © 2014 Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY. Bequest of A. Conger Goodyear, 1966. Photograph by Tom Loonan.


OKMAG.COM

S TAY CONNECTED

The State

What’s HOT At

Take a walk through the Brady Art District’s First Friday Art Crawl and view some of the best S T R E E T FA S H I O N Tulsa has to offer. We tour the latest exhibits and discover looks that demonstrate a true sense of style, creativity and originality.

OK

# S U N D AY F U N D AY Sarah Spurgeon of Tulsa sent in a photo of a beautiful sunrise. Spurgeon captured the photo during the recent stint of beautiful February weather. Stay up to date with the latest stories, polls and opportunities to share your photos with Oklahoma Magazine on our social media sites.

T I P S : Get tips for maximizing your outdoor photos from Oklahoma Magazine photographer Nathan Harmon. Whether snapping professional-style photos or taking Instagram shots, boost your photo skills and learn the tools you need to make sure every snap of the shutter produces the best photo possible.

WE’VE DONE IT AGAIN!

We asked. You answered. 40 Under 40’s Class of 2015 is the most impressive yet. OKLAHOMA Be sure to pick up the April issue to see who made the cut. OKLAHOMA Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com Call 918.744.6205

10

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

OKLAHOMA


MANOLO

TULSA, 1780 UTICA SQUARE. 918.744.0200

BLAHNIK

saks.com

Tulsa, Now Open on Sundays


“My integrative treatment plan helps me fight my cancer without slowing me down on the farm.”

Chemotherapy Oncology Radiation Acupuncture Nutrition Therapy Genomic Testing Surgical Oncology

Mike Fincham’s Integrative Care Plan

Chiropractic Care Hormone Therapy Naturopathic Medicine Spiritual Support Gastroenterology

When the 41-year old farmer and father of five was diagnosed with colon cancer, it was a priority for Mike to be able to continue to work as he went through treatment. His team at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® designed a personalized plan for Mike utilizing a comprehensive array of leading cancer technologies and therapeutic options to help him fight his cancer, boost his energy and keep him strong. Allowing Mike to continue living the life he loves.

The of power of integrative care lives here. cancercenter.com/tulsa 888-568-1571 No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results. ©2015 Rising Tide

Atlanta | Chicago | Philadelphia | Phoenix | Tulsa


The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Flight Plan

An Iowa Tribe member operates a safe haven for eagles and other injured birds.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

A

fter a career in the business world, Iowa Tribe member and Perkins resident Victor Roubidoux decided to drastically alter his life’s flight plan. “In about 2002, I saw an article about a rehabilitation center in New Mexico for birds, and I thought it would be a great project for Oklahoma tribes because of the way [their] culture reveres the eagle,” Roubidoux recalls. “So I had the idea, but there was no money available.” In order to raise funds and generate interest in the project, Roubidoux headed to Washington, D.C., to speak with legislators. “I talked to as many people as I could, knocking on doors one after another. Then in 2004, the tribe called me and said they had a grant to open a rehab center, and they asked me if I wanted to run it,” Roubidoux says. During this time, Roubidoux received training from various organizations, including the Birds of Prey Foundation headquartered in Colorado. Roubidoux had no previous experience working with birds. “I told the trainer [at the Birds of Prey Foundation] that she should treat me like a blank piece of paper,” Roubidoux says. “She told me she would take care of that. At that point, I wasn’t completely sure that I wanted to work with birds, but after only two weeks, that’s when it dawned on me that this was what I wanted to do. All you have to do is spend a little time around the birds and they get you.” Roubidoux says he enjoys working with birds of prey because they are “magnificent and intelligent creatures,” but they also hold great significance culturally. “Tribes might have different cultures, languages, dances and everything else, but they all revere the eagle. We believe the eagle is the only one who has seen the face of the creator. They have also been good to us through the use of their feathers. I couldn’t believe eagles were being euthanized, so now it’s our time to take care of them,” Roubidoux says.

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

The center’s name, the Grey Snow Eagle House, comes from the name of Roubidoux’s tribe. In the Iowa language, the name of the tribe, Baxoje, means “people of the gray snow.” The eagle house, located in Perkins, now includes three 100-foot enclosures, two enclosures 18 feet tall and 25 feet wide, and another shorter enclosure for handicapped birds. The center also has a 150-foot-long straightaway designed for monitored rehab flight, Roubidoux says, where recovering birds can exercise to build up their wings and muscles after injuries. When they first arrive, the injured birds are taken to the intensive care facility on the property. They come to Perkins from all over the country. “We’ve had birds from Connecticut, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Arkansas, Nebraska, Utah, Colorado, Idaho and Oregon. These were all birds that were going to be euthanized; we go pick them up and bring them here,” Roubidoux says. “With the Oklahoma birds here, those are the ones we are trying to get well so they can get back in the wild. The vet makes the determination whether they are ready or not.” The most common injury Roubidoux and staff see is injured wings. This occurs more often in winter when food is scarcer. “Sometimes they will go after road kill and gorge themselves on it, making their bodies so much heavier that they can’t get the elevation they need to in order to take off,” Roubidoux says. After an initial diagnosis, the birds are carefully monitored. “We have nine staff members and four interns. In addition to cleaning and prepping food and general maintenance, most of the staff’s time is spent monitoring the birds,” Roubidoux says. When certain birds are deemed ready to return to the wild, Roubidoux says the feeling is amazing. “It feels like we are doing our jobs right when we get to the part of getting them where they belong. We try to release them back in the

14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

EAGLES ROOST ON PERCHES INSIDE THE GREY SNOW EAGLE HOUSE. BELOW, AN EAGLE TAKES FLIGHT INSIDE ONE OF THE CENTER’S THREE ENCLOSURES. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

area where they were found, or if they are juveniles, we try to make sure they’re around other eagles,” Roubidoux says. The Grey Snow Eagle House is currently home to 48 eagles and several varieties of others birds used for educational purposes, including the Mississippi kite, Harlan hawk, barn owl, red-tailed hawk and peregrine falcon. In addition to rehabilitating birds and taking care of those unable to be rereleased, the center emphasizes educating the public. “We want to make sure that school kids know about eagles, what they mean to the tribes, and to our countries and others that use the eagle as a symbol of freedom,” Roubidoux says. “It’s so important to teach them about the balance we maintain with wildlife. Our next big push here is educating the public to ensure the safety of these birds in the future.” Looking forward, Roubidoux says he hopes to increase the number of birds the center can take in. Right now, Grey Snow Eagle House is about “as far as they can go” with current space, which is permitted for 56 birds, but Roubidoux would like to increase the number to 70. The Grey Snow Eagle House is also working with Oklahoma State University on a genome project with golden eagles. “Part of the project includes finding out how turbines and other man-made structures are affecting the birds and figuring out the best ways we can move forward with conservation,” Roubidoux says. Compared to his previous occupation, Roubidoux says he has found peace in his role as a caretaker and defender of eagles. “Dealing with birds is a lot different than dealing with people. It’s less stressful, and they’re easier to work with,” Roubidoux says, laughing. “I get such a sense of satisfaction in seeing them get well. Getting to know them and their personalities and working with them is such a privilege and an honor.” MEGAN MORGAN


The University of Tulsa

Presidential lecture series Sponsored by The Darcy O’Brien Endowed Chair Presents

Jared Diamond March 26, 2015 7:30 p.m. Donald W. Reynolds Center 3208 East 8th Street

Jared Diamond

Jared Diamond is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Guns, Germs and Steel and Collapse. He is a celebrity scientist in the best sense of the term. Audiences at his talks emerge with a fresh outlook on the big questions: Why do some societies prosper while others die? What can we learn from the collective history of every human society? The New York Times calls Diamond’s writing “one of the most significant projects embarked upon by any intellectual of our generation.” A UCLA professor, Diamond has received a MacArthur Genius Grant, Dickson Prize in Science, Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement and National Medal of Science, the highest civilian award in science. Free to the Public book signing to Follow lecture www.utulsa.edu/Pls

The University of Tulsa is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action institution. For EEO/AA information, contact the Office of Human Resources, 918-631-2616; for disability accommodations, contact Dr. Tawny Taylor, 918-631-2315. To ensure availability of an interpreter, five to seven days notice is needed; 48 hours is recommended for all other accommodations. No tickets or registration required. Please call 918-631-2309 for event details. TU#15037


The State

A MUSICAL GROUP PERFORMS AT THE 2013 CREATIVITY WORLD FORUM, WHICH WAS HELD IN BELGIUM. PHOTO COURTESY CREATIVE OKLAHOMA.

CULTURE

A

Global Innovation

The Creativity World Forum returns to Oklahoma.

n international meeting of the minds is about to take place in the Sooner State. “This year’s event will be the second time Oklahoma has hosted the Creativity World Forum, an annual event of the international Districts of Creativity network, based in Flanders, Belgium,” explains Creative Oklahoma President Susan McCalmont. “Oklahoma is the only North American region represented in the network.” Two thousand people from the 13 official districts are expected to attend. “Additionally, there will be representation from three other international regions outside this formal network, with whom Oklahoma is working to advance creativity and innovation – Northern Ireland, Rwanda and Chile,” adds McCalmont. The theme for the 2015 forum is “All Our Futures: Ideas That Matter.” “All Our Futures was the title of Ken Robinson’s seminal work in the UK under Prime Minister Tony Blair that helped to define the role of creativity in education for that country and led to his leadership role in the creativity movement internationally,” says McCalmont. “The tagline of ‘Ideas That Matter’ is an important theme, as it highlights the focus on ideation as a driver for regions that prosper economically and are able to solve some of the most pressing societal issues.” The innovators, entrepreneurs and those aspiring to be among them will discuss the importance of creativity in business through workshops and with the help of forum speakers, including Robinson. Guests will also hear from Michael Strautmanis, a former White House employee and current vice president of Strategic Programs for Corporate Citizenship at the Walt Disney Corporation; Stephan Turnipseed, the president of LEGO Education; and Scott Barry Kaufman, the scientific director of The Imagination Institute. The forum will also showcase performing artists to help inspire guests. The forum provides the attendees an opportunity to network and learn from each other. “It’s always exciting for people to come together around the common theme of new ideas and hope for the future, and I think this year will be no exception with the diversity of individuals from around the U.S. and globe gathering here in Oklahoma to share their common issues but together trying to come up with new solutions to those common problems,” says McCalmont. She encourages anyone who wants to make a difference to come experience what the event has to offer. “I think that attending this forum would be of benefit to anyone interested in expanding their creative and innovative capacities – students, teachers, parents, workers, retirees,” she says. “We want all Oklahomans to know that they are welcome to attend.” BETH WEESE

16

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

FOLLOWUP

S.O.S.

Tulsa native Daniel Wilson left an indelible mark on the science-fiction world with the publication of his debut novel, Robopocalypse. Wilson, who resides in Portland, Ore., hopes to make a splash in the app world with the release of Mayday! Deep Space. The app, which was released in January, capitalizes on Wilson’s interests in technology, robotics and screenwriting. It applies speech recognition to lead the player to save crewmembers on a derelict spaceship from a virus through five levels. “By employing spoken commands, I hoped to forge an intimate, emotional experience,” says Wilson. “My goal for Mayday was simple: create a story that you can play.” Wilson completed his bachelor’s degree at The University of Tulsa, then attended Carnegie Mellon University, where he received a Ph.D. in robotics. He is also the author of How to Survive a Robot Uprising, How to Build a Robot Army and A Boy and His Bot. – Jami Mattox

DANIEL WILSON. PHOTO BY CAMILLE ANNA LONG.


BEST IN THE METRO, BEST IN THE STATE.

U.S. News and World Report has released its 2014-2015 hospital rankings, and for the third year in a row, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center is ranked best hospital in the OKC metro and Oklahoma’s best hospital, with four high-performing specialty areas. These rankings make it easy to find a healthcare provider with a proven track record. And we’re confident that you’ll find the same caliber of care at each of our 19 campuses and 100 clinics across the state, because INTEGRIS Health is Oklahoma’s Most Trusted Name in Healthcare. And we just proved it. Again.

integrisok.com | 405-951-2277

Diabetes & Endocrinology • Gastroenterology & GI Surgery • Nephrology • Pulmonology


The State 5 QS

Learning By Doing

Scissortail Farms uses technology to provide fresh produce year round.

R

ob Walenta and John Sulton, co-founders of Scissortail Farms, operate the aeroponic greenhouse farm in south Tulsa. Scissortail Farms provides greens and premade salads to local grocery stores and restaurants. How is aeroponic farming different from traditional farming? Aeroponics is a style of hydroponics that uses a mist to supply the nutrient solution rather than a thin film or a pool of water. This style maximizes oxygen availability at the root zones, optimizing growth rates and yields. It also allows for a wide variety of products and the ability to change the product mix rapidly as market conditions vary. The vertical aeroponic growing system allows for maximum utilization of space and only requires 10 percent of the land that is typically needed for a traditional farm to generate the same amount of production. We can reduce water usage by up to 90 percent when compared with traditional farming. The nutrient water is recycled within the system, so there is only a small loss to evaporation and the plants themselves.

JOHN SULTON , LEFT, AND ROB WALENTA CHECK ON CROPS AT SCISSORTAIL FARMS, AN AEROPONIC FARM. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

18

What backgrounds do you and John have in farming? Our backgrounds in farming began with this venture. While we were working through the design and construction of the facility, we grew plants in 10 towers at our office in an effort to begin learning the process and evalu-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

ating which varieties of seeds we felt would be most successful. We used the products that we generated to supply Juniper [a farm-to-table restaurant in Tulsa] with some of their produce and began refining our growing cycles based on the feedback we received. Do you think aeroponics is the next step in food production? We think that it is the next step beyond organic farming due to the increased efficiencies in land and water usage, the greater availability of nutrients to the plants and the fact that it is a much cleaner process. Organic and traditional farming methods both utilize biosolids for fertilizer, which can increase the possibility of E. coli infections. We further mitigate E. coli risks by utilizing a municipal water supply and our greenhouse structure helps to prevent intrusion from animals and pests. Over 90 percent of the produce consumed in the U.S. is grown in the southwest and transported throughout the country via truck or plane. Being local, we are able to get our products to the market more quickly after harvest, and keeping the root ball attached helps to extend the life of the plant. The controlled environment of the greenhouses also protects the plants from adverse weather conditions, providing consistent plant quality, supply and pricing throughout the year. What challenges do you face with Oklahoma weather? We still have to make sure that the plants don’t get too cold in the winter or too hot in the summer, that the relative humidity is in the proper range, that there is good airflow, that there is plenty of carbon dioxide and plenty of light. We have controllers that monitor the internal and external conditions and make adjustments like opening the roof vents, running the boiler system and activating the lights. Does Scissortail Farms have plans to expand? We’re excited to bring safe, healthy and nutrient rich products to our local market throughout the year, while also creating high quality jobs. We plan to triple the size of our current facility here in Tulsa and then expand to other markets in the region. The expansion here in town will include a section of greenhouse space designed to begin working with flowering plants as well. SHAUN PERKINS


It was the most successful comprehensive higher education fundraising campaign in state history with more than $1.2 billion given and pledged to fund thousands of new scholarships, add faculty positions, create new programs and build new facilities.


The State

THE INSIDER

The Big Stink

Eighty years ago, a young actress shocked the nation with choice words regarding an Oklahoma city.

T

ACTRESS ROCHELLE HUDSON (LEFT, PICTURED IN A STILL FROM THE 1940 MOVIE, THE ISLAND OF DOOMED MEN) RAISED A RUCKUS IN 1935 WHEN SHE MADE COMMENTS TO NATIONAL MEDIA THAT HER HOMETOWN OF CLAREMORE HAD A FOUL ODOR. PHOTO COURTESY JOHN WOOLEY.

20

his month marks the 99th anniversary of the birth of an Oklahoma actress who may not be one of our state’s best-remembered film stars, but who, for a brief and intense moment exactly 80 years ago, grabbed international headlines with what was perceived as a crude and disparaging remark about her hometown of Claremore. Interestingly enough, Rochelle Hudson, born on March 6, 1916, wasn’t even from Claremore, although many thought she was. Also, historians and others who know about Claremore in the 1930s would say she had a pretty good basis for her alleged comments. But let’s not get ahead of the story. The incident occurred a couple of weeks after Hudson’s 19th birthday (although some sources list her age as 18 at the time). By then, the striking Oklahoma City native was already a film veteran whose substantial list of credits included director William Wellman’s bareknuckled Depression drama Wild Boys of the Road and the Mae West vehicle She Done Him Wrong (both from 1933), as well as ingénue roles in a pair of films starring fellow Oklahoman Will Rogers, Dr. Bull (1933) and Judge Priest (1934). A third Rogers film featuring Hudson, Life Begins at 40, was due

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

to be released in April 1935, the month after Hudson’s faux pas. Sadly, Rogers died in the infamous plane crash with his friend and fellow Oklahoman, Wiley Post, four months later. Eight decades down the road, it’s hard to imagine the height of Will Rogers’ fame. Not only was he one of the top newspaper columnists, humorists and radio stars in the world, he was also a huge box-office attraction, coming in as the No. 1 moneymaking movie star during that golden Hollywood year of 1934. In his movies, broadcasts, columns and personal appearances, he often found ways of acknowledging his hometown of Claremore, the county seat of Rogers County (named after Rogers’ father, a prominent Cherokee senator, judge and rancher). Rogers’ internationally known connection with Claremore goes a long way toward accounting for its mischaracterization as Hudson’s hometown. After Hudson appeared in Dr. Bull, Rogers reportedly took a liking to the young actress, and his studio, 20th Century Fox, subsequently signed her to a new contract and put her in another couple of Rogers movies. In those days of invented biographies and fan-magazine fictions presented as fact, studios did what they deemed necessary to make their contract players intriguing, and moving Hudson’s birthplace 150 miles northeast to capitalize on her connection with the biggest box-office draw in the country was well within the accepted boundaries of press agentry. The connection wasn’t entirely bogus; Hudson had family, including grandparents, in Claremore, and she’d visited the town often, but it was certainly strengthened for publicity’s sake.

The Tinseltown columnists did their part to cement this little deception. In the Jan. 9, 1934, installment of his syndicated column “Hollywood Gossip,” Dan Thomas wrote, “In Hollywood, nobody would even dream of comparing Will Rogers and Rochelle Hudson. But in Claremore, Okla., hometown of both, they are placed on about the same high plane.” Of course, that wasn’t exactly true, and it certainly wasn’t the case after March 23, 1934, when the news wires suddenly erupted with reports of remarks Hudson had made during a publicity tour in New York City. Depending on which source you read, she either said, “I think my home town stinks,” “The city of Claremore stinks,” or, most damningly, “Claremore stinks. They have radium water there, and it stinks also. In


fact, all small towns stink.” Reports indicate that the statement, in one or other of the forms above, made headlines in New York itself. And the statement – considered far more vulgar in 1935 than it would be today – reverberated all across the country. “You’d think I had uttered blasphemy,” she told Associated Press writer Bob Thomas in an interview released to newspapers for publication on Oct. 10, 1963, nearly 30 years after the fact. “The studio was on the phone for me to come home before I said anything else. I received a mountain of mail, half of it condemning me and half patting me on the back for saying what I thought about my hometown.” There weren’t a lot of back pats coming from Claremore. In fact, the people of Claremore seemed eager to make Hudson’s non-residency in the town a matter of public record. “Claremore, Will Rogers’ home town, acknowledges him proudly,” began an unattributed United Press International story running on March 24, 1935, “but as for Rochelle Hudson, youthful film actress who told New York interviewers the town ‘stinks’ – the old-timers say she never lived here. Even her kinfolk say so… “John Goddard, Miss Hudson’s uncle, a real estate man here, said ‘Rochelle never lived in Claremore.’ W.C. Kates, publisher of the Claremore Daily Progress, said he had been here forty years and never heard of Miss Hudson until a film company [undoubtedly 20th Century Fox] began sending out publicity to the effect that she was from Claremore. “‘Will Rogers sort of pushed her along and now she’s pushing us in the face,’ said Mayor J.M. Davis.” Lost in all of this was the good reason for Hudson’s comment. At the time, Claremore was famed for its mineral waters, said to have curative powers. People came from all over the world to bathe in them, hoping for relief from various ailments. Next to the city’s most famous son, the waters were what the Rogers County town was most famous for – and all of those “radium baths” gave the town a distinct and memorable odor.

It’s not easy to

Still, Hudson knew she’d blundered – and, more to the point, so did 20th Century Fox. The day after Hudson’s comments ran, the Associated Press released a story indicating her deep sense of penitence – whether real, studio-ordered or a bit of both. “Rochelle Hudson,” it began, “the budding movie star from OklahomaYes, at Monte Cassino we’re known as “the saints,” but it’s not simply a moniker students in Yes, at Monte Cassino we’re known as “the saints,” but it’s not simply who went to New York for a taste of acquire after enrolling, it’s an honor and a reputation we also want them to earn. sophistication, apologized today to a moniker studentsCassino instantlyclasses, acquire being after enrolling, an honor andtoa what is impo Claremore, erstwhile home of her- From the first day of Monte a “saint” it’s is tantamount self and Will Rogers, the comedian, in being successful: hard work, for others, reputation we alsorespect want them to earn. a passion to overachieve, a strong moral co emphatically denying she ever used such a horrid word as ‘stinking’and to the ability to make good day-to-day decisions. From the first day of Monte Cassino classes, being a “saint” is describe it. So for all the other excellent reasons to attend Monte Cassino It’s not easy to (nationally recognized acad “This is the import of a letter tantamount to what is important in being successful: work, respect social for skills p access to team-building athletics, safety and security), our unique, hard creative Catholic received here today from Mrs. Mae are what set us apart from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will also set your son a Hudson, mother of Rochelle, who others, a passion to overachieve, a strong moral compass, and the ability to daughter apart as well. explained: make good day-to-day decisions. “‘Rochelle was talking about the Want your children to have a better opportunity to succeed in life? radium water in Claremore. We were other excellent reasons to attend Monte Cassino all chatting about it and explain- Be a Saint. So for all the but worth Yes, at Monte Cassino we’re known asit’s “the saints,” but it’s notit. simply a moniker students instan ing the wells and the odor. Imagine (nationally recognized academics, access to team-building athletics, safety instantly acquire after enrolling, it’s an honor and a reputation we also want them earn. students our surprise when we read that Yes, at Monte Cassino we’re known as “the saints,” but it’s not simply atomoniker headline.’” acquirethe after enrolling, an honor and aclasses, reputation we also want them to earn. to what is importan From first of it’s Monte being a “saint” tantamount andday security), ourCassino unique, creative Catholic social is skills programs are what The piece ended snidely, noting in being From successful: hard respect forclasses, others,being a passion to isoverachieve, a strong comp the first day work, of Monte Cassino a “saint” tantamount to what is moral important that Hudson was “on her way back set us apart from our academic competitors. importantly, it willmoral also compass, in being successful: hard work, respect for others, a passionMore to overachieve, a strong and the ability to make good day-to-day decisions. to Hollywood now, ending her short and the ability to make good day-to-day decisions. search for sophistication.” So for all thesetother reasons to attend yourexcellent son and/or daughter apart asMonte well. Cassino (nationally recognized academi LOCATED IN THE HEART OF to MID-TOWN AT 21ST AND LEWIS / 918.742.3364 Hudson herself told another wireSo for all the other excellent reasons attend Monte Cassino (nationally recognized academics, access to team-building athletics, safety and security), our unique, creative Catholic social skills prog service writer at the time, “Appar- access to team-building Want your children to have a better opportunity to succeed in life? athletics, safety and security), our unique, creative Catholic social skills programs MonteCassino.org are what set us apart from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will also set your son and/ ently, I was in Claremore before the are what set us apart from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will also set your son and/or apart as well. Be a Saint. wells were capped. Before theydaughter put daughter apart as well. caps on them you could smell the Want your children to have a better opportunity to succeed in life? Want your children to have a better opportunity to succeed in life? odor all over town.” Saint. Rogers himself also stepped up Be a Be a Saint. for Hudson, “asserting,” according to an April 3, 1935 AP story, “he did not believe Miss Hudson had said anything uncomplimentary to Claremore.” Noting Hudson’s gaffe in his LOCATED IN THE HEART OF MID-TOWN AT 21ST AND LEWIS / 918.742.3364 Whatever Became of . . . ? Vol. III LOCATED IN THE HEART OF MID-TOWN AT 21ST AND LEWIS / 918.742.3364 (Ace Star, 1970), film historian MonteCassino.org MonteCassino.org Richard Lamparski wrote, “Women’s clubs threatened to ban her films and the studio was beside itself.” But the controversy eventually blew over, and Hudson went on to a long career in movies and TV, continuing to act until a few years before her 1972 death at age 55. She was, in fact, in the midst of a small comeback in 1963, when Bob Thomas talked to her for the story quoted above. And in the course of the interview, Thomas wrote, he felt compelledJOB “toNUMBER ask her one question.” FILENAME ART DIRECTOR PUBLICAT HNK1182 HNK1182 MC FP NB T_PEOPLE JIM KNIGHT TULSA PE “Yes,” she answered. “It still TITLE LANGUAGE COPY WRITER FULL PAG stinks.” MONTE CASSINO ENGLISH BILL HINKLE 8 INCHES

but it’s worth it.

It’s not easy to

but it’s worth it.

PAGE NON-BLEED JOHNFULL WOOLEY TULSA PEOPLE AD CLIENT MONTE CASSINO COLORS USED CMYK

REVISION DATE 11/22/2013 4:43 AM AD VERSION 1

18452v Monte Cassino.indd 1

9.875 INC

CREATIVE DIRECTOR BILL HINKLE JIM KNIGHT

MARCH 2015 | ACCOUNT WWW.OKMAG.COM EXECUTIVE

BILL HINKLE

PHOTOGRAPHER

21

ADOBE® A PRODUCED

7457PM SOUT 12/13/13 4:16 TULSA, OK

918.691.11


The State

SCENE

STACIE CARMEN, KRYSTAL RODRIGUEZ AND TERI MALTESE-JAMES ENJOYED SWEET DELIGHTS AT CHOCOLATE DECADENCE. DAVID BOREN AND MOLLY SHI BOREN ATTENDED HEART OF HENRY, AT WHICH BOREN WAS THIS YEAR’S HONOREE.

PAULA AND GERRY CLANCY CELEBRATED AT THE HEART OF HENRY, THE THIRD ANNUAL EVENT THAT RAISES FUNDS FOR THE TULSA DAY CENTER FOR THE HOMELESS.

CINDY BOTTOMLEY, SUSIE WELLEDORF AND WENDY AND GENTNER DRUMMOND ENJOYED THE JULIETTE CINDY BOTTOMLEY, SUSIE WELLEDORF AND WENDY AND GENTNER DRUMMOND LOW LEADERSHIP SOCIETY KICKOFF EVENT. SOCIETY KICKOFF EVENT. ENJOYED THE JULIETTE LOW LEADERSHIP

HEATHER SKEITH, ASHLEY BRACKEN, LAURA COLGAN AND JULIE NICKEL ENJOYED TEA AT THE NATIONAL CHARITY LEAGUE MOTHER DAUGHTER TEA AT SOUTHERN HILLS.

HEATHER SKEITH, ASHLEY BRACKEN, LAURA COLGAN AND JULIE NICKEL ENJOYED TEA AT THE NATIONAL CHARITY LEAGUE MOTHER DAUGHTER TEA AT SOUTHERN HILLS.

ANGELA DEWALK AND JULIE CHIN WERE THRILLED WITH THE TURNOUT OF MY FURRY VALENTINE. BRIAN HUGHES, TONI GARNER, DAN BURNSTEIN AND MARTIN MARTINEZ CELEBRATED AT THE RED RIBBON GALA PATRON PARTY.

DAN HIGGINS, RENEE HUFFAKER, RYAN LEFLER AND SHELLEY HOLMES HAD SOME FUN SHOOTING PUBLICITY PHOTOS FOR THE RHINESTONE COWBOY - A TRIBUTE TO THE GLAMOROUS WEST EVENT, WHICH WILL BE HELD MAY 1 AT CAIN’S BALLROOM.

GARY AND DIANNE BRYANT AND CHERYL AND TOM FRALEY ENJOYED THE ANNUAL BOOTS & BALL GOWNS GALA, WHICH BENEFITED INFANT CRISIS CENTER.

JOSEPHINE AND MARLON JOHNSON WERE ALL SMILES AT TOAST TO THE ARTS.

MARCELO AND DANIELA ANGELINI AND JIM AND SUZANNE KNEALE ENJOYED THE FESTVITIES AT THIS YEAR’S ICONS & IDOLS, WHICH BENEFITED TULSA BALLET.

22

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

HEATHER, ERIN AND DOUG MAY HAD LOTS OF FUN AT THE TULSA HEART BALL SPONSORED BY THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION.

DONORS ZEB TROUTMAN, SANDY CATER, LINDA BARTLEY, ROMAN WHITEHAIR AND FRANK TROUTMAN ATTENDED THIS YEAR’S PINK STILETTO SOIREE.


Patient-Centered Cancer Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility.

As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home.

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer 800 NE 10th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73104

centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-6822 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


The State

ZANG TOI

CARMEN MARC VALVO

SP OTLIGHT

MERCEDESBENZ FASHION WEEK The temperatures were low, but the fashion sizzled at

Mercedes-Benz’s New York Fashion Week. Designers and fashionistas crammed the tents to take in the latest creations from the world’s top designers.

ZUZU THE DOG RECEIVED A PRIMO SEAT AT CARMEN MARC VALVO.

CARMEN MARC VALVO

DENNIS BASSO

THE FRONT ROW Actors, celebutantes, reality stars and those with exquisite taste huddled around the catwalks at Fashion Week. Even the occasional pampered pup made an appearance, with hair and attire of the pawfect kind.

VANESSA WILLIAMS WAS UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL AT CARMEN MARC VALVO.

STREET STYLE Sub-zero temps meant that the street fashion often associated with New York Fashion Week moved inside, but those devoted to style didn’t let that stop them from bringing their A-game.

24

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

STASSI SCHROEDER OF VANDERPUMP RULES FAME ENJOYED THE SHOW.

OLIVIA PALERMO SITS RINGSIDE AT DENNIS BASSO.


©2015 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Porsche recommends seat belt usage and observance of all traffic laws at all times.

Pick your Porsche. 2015 Cayman or Boxter, there’s no wrong answer. They never lose their cool. $599 a month.

93rd and Memorial | 918-249-9393 jackie-cooper.porschedealer.com Lease a 2015 Boxter for $599 per month for 27 months, $5,399 due at signing. Or a Cayman for $599 per month for 27 months, $5,699 due at signing. Total due at signing includes first month’s payment, acquisition fee, and capitalized cost reduction. Excludes tax, title and license fees. No security deposit is required. For additional information, see your participating authorized Porsche Dealer or visit Porsche.com/usa. Offers expire 3/31/15.

THE ABSOLUTE OPPOSITE OF ORDINARY GRANTURISMO MC

L A M A S E R AT I

GRANTURISMO CONVERTIBLE MC

QUATTROPORTE GHIBLI

STYLE AND PERFORMANCE REIMAGINED. From the Quattroporte S Q4 intelligent all-wheel drive and GTS—the fastest Maserati on the road today—to the world’s most coveted GranTurismo coupes and convertibles, and the incredible new Ghibli, no other family of luxury cars blend unique Italian style with performance and exclusivity like Maserati. The Maserati range starts from $69,800*

MASERATI OF TULSA Call 866-938-6535 or e-mail adean@cooperautogroup.com to schedule your private test drive. www.MaseratiTulsa.com / 9393 S. Memorial Drive, Tulsa, OK 74133 *MASERATI GHIBLI MY2015 BASE MSRP $69,800; GHIBLI S Q4 MY2015 BASE MSRP $77,900. NOT INCLUDING DEALER PREP AND TRANSPORTATION. ACTUAL SELLING PRICE MAY VARY. TAXES, TITLE, LICENSE AND REGISTRATION FEES NOT INCLUDED. ©2015 MASERATI NORTH AMERICA, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MASERATI AND THE TRIDENT LOGO ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF MASERATI SPA. MASERATI URGES YOU TO OBEY ALL POSTED SPEED LIMITS.


The State

BLUE VELVET UPHOLSTERED SOFA AND CHAIRS CREATE A SOPHISTICATED LIVING SPACE, WITH JEWEL TONED PILLOWS THAT BLEND ACCENT COLORS USED THROUGHOUT THE HOUSE. LEFT: THE MASTER BEDROOM WAS UPDATED WITH A LARSON FLOCKED WALLCOVERING AND A LARGE MIRROR INSTALLED ON BARN DOOR SLIDING HARDWARE.

L I V I N G S PA C E

The Wow Factor

Big personalities serve as inspiration for this design renovation.

T

Photography by Nathan Harmon

his midtown Tulsa home, built in 2000, was definitely ready for an update. So when the homeowners purchased the property, the couple turned to Chris Murphy, principal at Christopher Murphy Designs, for assistance with a major renovation. “Both of them have big personalities, and it was important that the design reflect their style,” says Murphy. So with a tight, six-month timeline for the project, Murphy went to work. “They have acquired some great art, and they aren’t afraid of color,” adds Murphy. “My goal was to create a neutral shell showcasing the art and furnishings.” The oak flooring was refinished in a matte charcoal gray, and the soft gray walls are contrasted with a crisp, white trim. “They were looking for the ‘wow’ factor,” explains Murphy. The feel of a sophisticated nightclub, with a blend of New York City, L.A. and Miami style, is evident with the first step into their home. The living room features inviting, plush ‘70s-style sofa and chairs, upholstered in blue velvet. The jewel toned pillows blend accent colors used throughout the house, especially the deep yellow. On either side of the existing fireplace are two niches that Murphy mirrored with a diagonal pattern inspired by the Park Hyatt during a trip to Moscow. “It really opens up the room,” he says.

26

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


BEFORE

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

27


The State

BEFORE

ABOVE: IN THE KITCHEN, EXISTING BIRCH CABINETS WERE PAINTED GRAY, AND NEW COUNTERTOPS AND BACKSPLASH WERE ADDED. LEFT: A STAINLESS STEEL FRAME SURROUNDS THE FIREPLACE, HELPING TO BLEND THE KITCHEN WITH THIS SITTING AREA, FEATURING A B&B ITALIA SOFA.

And since one of the homeowners plays piano, and music is an important part of their frequent entertaining, a black baby grand anchors the other end of the living room. Murphy had several goals with the design. “While many items were changed or upgraded when possible, I repurposed or utilized existing built-ins and furnishings,” he says.

28

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

For example, in the master bath, while a metallic ribbed wallcovering and gray limestone floor, along with a steam shower, were added, the original bathtub was kept intact, as was the cabinetry, with some modifications. Murphy added legs for additional height and then painted the stained birch. The countertop is honed black granite. In the dining room, he utilized an existing table base but used a larger glass tabletop.

The light fixture was moved from the master bedroom. The new photographic wallpaper simulating padded leather aligns with the existing three windows. Lighting and blends of texture envelop each room with shading, shadows and sparkle. Recessed fixtures were adapted with LEDs, and various spaces feature strategically placed uplighting along with the soft glow of ambient lighting. Area rugs and carpet


SHOWCASE Kitchens And Baths, Inc.

8122-B South Lewis The Plaza

Showroom Hours: M-F 9-5 Sat 10-4

918.299.4232 KitchenAndBathShowcase.com

20628 Showcase.indd 1

2/17/15 4:07 PM

2014

Walter & associates realtors 1319 East 35th Street,Tulsa, OK 74105 918.743.2001 | walterandassociates.com

10403 Walter & Associates.indd 1

5/15/14 20576 5:00 PM Jack Arnold.indd 1

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29 1/22/15

4:20 PM


The State throughout the house add another layer of texture and pattern. In the kitchen, existing stained birch kitchen cabinets were painted with the hardware, sink and faucet changed. The new countertops and backsplash are from Midwest Marble. The existing stove and vent are accented by a custom stainless piece simulating a flue, fabricated by Empire Laser & Metal Work. Murphy blends stainless steel into the adjacent sitting area, used for the fireplace surround. The existing gas logs were replaced with a more modern inset from Tulsa Fireplace Supply. The purple B&B Italia sofa uses contrasting red stitching, and Murphy had a tall table fabricated and wrapped in yellow wool felt, creating a casual and convenient place for drinks. Originally, the master bedroom’s walls were covered in heavy, dark grass cloth with black trim. Murphy replaced it with a uniquely patterned Larsen flocked wallcovering juxtaposed with a mint and yellow floral painting over the purple upholstered headboard. The bed is flanked by a pair of birdseye maple and white lacquer nightstands with glass lamps. Murphy used barn door sliding hardware to install the

30

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

ABOVE: A PURPLE UPHOLSTERD HEADBOARD IS FLANKED BY MAPLE AND WHITE LACQUER NIGHTSTANDS WITH GLASS LAMPS IN THE UPDATED MASTER BEDROOM. RIGHT: THE MASTER BATH KEPT THE EXISTING TUB, WHILE ADDING A METALLIC RIBBED WALLCOVERING, GRAY LIMESTONE FLOOR TILES AND A STEAM SHOWER. BELOW: A PERGOLA WAS BUILT AROUND THE FIREPLACE WITH FABRIC BACKS AND UP-LIGHTING WITH LINEAR LEDS. NEW FURNITURE, THE CONCRETE SURFACE WITH AN UPDATED COLOR AND NEW POOL TILES HELP REFRESH THIS OUTDOOR ENTERTAINMENT SPACE.

BEFORE

BEFORE


The Place for Paint...Since 1972 Where the Pros & Do-It-Yourselfers Shop for Quality Products & Unbeatable Service!

3 OKC Metro Locations South OKC 8808 S Western 405.634.1419

Downtown 1801 W Reno 405.232.2077

Edmond 521 E Memorial Rd 405.748.4797

Mon-Fri 7:00am to 5:00pm Saturdays 8:00am to 1:00pm www.hispaint.com

Thank You Oklahoma! 20630 H.I.S. Paint.indd 1

3549 South Harvard, Tulsa 918-742-9027 2/20/15 11989 5:03 PM Toni's.indd 1

2/8/13 10:30 AM

We Are Your Complete Source For

CUSTOM

AUDIO VIDEO We are headquarters for the best selection of cutting-edge technology for that ultimate home theater experience—indoor and outdoors —plus business environments. We invite you to consult with our skilled professionals when considering a home theater, home automation and business communication. We proudly offer the best products and expert installation, backed by our 30 years of experience serving northeastern Oklahoma.

7030 South Lewis Avenue (Northwest Corner of 71st & Lewis)

918-495-0586 www.VideoRevolution.com 4 201

Barco • Definitive Technology • Digital Projection • Integra • JVC • Klipsch • Lutron • Panasonic • Pioneer Elite RTI • Samsung • Seura • Sharp • Sonace • Sonos • Sony • Toshiba • Universal Remote Control • Yamaha

16328 Video Revolution.indd 1

5/16/14 10:13 AM

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

31


The State

BEFORE

ABOVE: THE HOMEOWNERS’ ART IS SHOWCASED IN THIS GUEST BEDROOM. LEFT: AN UPSTAIRS GUEST BATH INCLUDES MATTE GRAY PORCELAIN TILES, HIGH GLOSS YELLOW ACCENT TILES AND MATTE GRAY PENNY ROUNDS ON THE FLOOR. BELOW: IN THE DINING ROOM, A NEW, LARGER, GLASS TABLETOP WAS ADDED TO AN EXISTING BASE. RIGHT: VARIOUS SIZES OF CUSTOM CUT MIRRORS FLOW DOWN THE WALL OF THE POWDER BATH.

large mirror that reflects the view of the pool through the exterior doors. Another surprise occurs in the powder bath, since it is completely devoid of color. Twohundred-and-fifty square feet of interlocking dimensional tiles line all walls from floor to ceiling. “I didn’t want to cover the tile with a mirror,” says Murphy. So inspired by Curtis Jere’s Mid-century Modern Raindrops mirror, various sizes of custom cut mirrors flow down the wall. The “wow” factor was achieved. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON

32

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


Shop Goodwill Tulsa

Since 1964

For Spring Fashions & Seasonal Décor!!!

Specializing

in frameless

heavy glass

shower doors,

mirrors,

framed shower doors, glass tops and insulated glass units.

Shop Often—Selection Changes Daily In All Stores Hours: M—S 9 am—6:30 pm ● Sunday Noon—6:00 pm Tulsa Locations: 3110 Southwest Blvd., 102 S. Garnett Rd., 19021 E. 51st St. Broken Arrow: 2210 W. Washington Glenpool: 502 West 125th Place Owasso: 8525 N. 117th East Ave. Claremore - Bartlesville - Carthage - Joplin - McAlester

www.goodwilltulsa.org

BOLD IS A WEALTH OF POSSIBILITIES

20601 Goodwill.indd 1

Don Tracy Glass Co. 1335 S. HARVARD ● TULSA, OK 74112 OFFICE: (918) 744-1815 FAX: (918) 744-0917

www.dontracyglass.com

1/28/15 20589 3:57 PM Don Tracy Glass.indd 1

1/28/15 4:50 PM

Make a striking design statement in three simple steps. Choose a spout, handles and faucet finish from the Artifacts™ collection to create a look all your own.

KOHLER.com/Artifacts

Uncover the possibilities at Heatwave Supply. 1347 South Sheridan Road Tulsa, OK 74112 918.838.9841

20328 Heatwave.indd 1

9/22/14 10:54 AM MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

33


The State

AIDAN MATTOX DRESS WITH FRINGE SKIRT, $220, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

FENDI

NAEEM KHAN

KARINA GRIMALDI STUDDED TANK, $262, AND TAN FRINGED JACKET, $297, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ACCESSORIZE

Fringe Benefits

MISHA NONOO

REBECCA MINKOFF STUDDED LEATHER CLUTCH, $445, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

REBECCA MINKOFF CROSSBODY BAG WITH FRINGE, $445, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

Designers prove that swinging strands aren’t just for cowboys, anymore. REBECCA MINKOFF FRINGED CROSSBODY BAG, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SACHIN & BABI FRINGED TOP, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

34

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

REBECCA MINKOFF BUCKET BAG, $375, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SONIA RYKIEL

SONIA RYKIEL

BCBGMAXAZRIA FAUX LEATHER FRINGE JACKET, $468, AND SKIRT, $298, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


Take Advantage of THE

BEST Prices Of THE YEAR! $300 off $200 off

ANY SECTIONAL ANY SOFA ANY CHAIR

$100 off (Custom Orders Only) 10% off WINDOW TREATMENTS

FURNITURE & DESIGN 9922 S. Riverside Parkway | Tulsa, OK 74137 Offer Valid March 1-31, 2015.

www.LuxeTulsa.com | 918.459.8950


DIANE VON FURSTENBERG LACE ENVELOPE CLUTCH, $248, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TRACY REESE

TRACY REESE

SONIA RYKIEL

Ethereal dresses and exquisite tops give a ladylike glimpse of bare skin, while finely woven bags and delicate shoes add a touch of sophistication.

NAEEM KHAN

Lovely In Lace

JASON WU

The State

STYLE

BAILEY 44 CUT-OUT WAIST LACE DRESS, $319, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

BCBGMAXAZRIA LACE AND SEQUIN DRESS, $368, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. REBECCA TAYLOR SILK TOP WITH LACE EMBROIDERY, $275, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

BCBGMAXAZRIA MAUVE AND BLACK LACE DRESS, $338, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

36

MANOLO BLAHNIK LASER-CUT PUMPS, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

REBECCA TAYLOR CAPSLEEVE LACE DRESS, $375, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

JIMMY CHOO LASERCUT SUEDE AND MESH PUMPS, $995, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


Petal Pushers 1660 E. 71st, Tulsa, OK 74136 918.494.0999

was abandoned 11040 PetalEmily Pushers.indd 1 by her mother.

So were her three sisters.

lunteer o V A S CA E. n HER Steps i

1/24/11 12:17:42 PM

They live in four different foster homes.

And will likely never see each other again.

A LOVING FAMILY L. ADOPTS THEM AL

Be the Difference. 20612 CASA.indd 1

20622 Vintage Pearl.indd 1

918-584-2272 www.tulsacasa.org

Buy OK Local

Fine apparel

www.traversmahanapparel.com

South Lewis at 81st • The Plaza • 918-296-4100

2/2/15 20598 4:29 PM Travers Mahan.indd 1

2/3/15 8:57 AM

2/10/15 3:51 PM MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

37


38

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


UPCOMING EVENTS Managed by

EQUALITY GALA 2015

35years

Celebrating

of Oklahomans for Equality

Chairs: Dr. Angela and Mary Sivadon.

Saturday April 25, 2015 Cocktail reception begins at 6:30 COX Business Center 100 Civic Center Tulsa Oklahoma

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT BOKCenter.com 1-866-7-BOK-CTR Arby’s Box Office

20571 BOK CENTER.indd 1

Let Us Help

Ticket information www.okeq.org 918-743-4297 2/3/15 12:39 20615PM EQUALITY center.indd 1

With The Loss Of Your Beloved Pet

2/6/15 5:07 PM

Foliart Huff Ottaway & Bottom

RClientsepresenting for over 60years LAW FIRM

Established in 1996 7442 E. 46th St. • Tulsa, OK 74145 •918.610.0348

18842 Companions Forever.indd 1

201 Robert S. Kerr, Suite 1200 Oklahoma City, OK 73102

4/8/14 16336 2:29 PM Foliart Huff Ottaway & Bottom.indd 1

Phone: 405-232-4633 Email: foliartfirm@ oklahomacounsel.com

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

39

6/11/13 4:42 PM


The State

YO U R H E A L T H

In The Genes

You are the map of your health and treatments.

T

oday we have the ability to gather more information about ourselves than ever before. Progress in genetic research and genetic testing has led to new discoveries and a greater understanding of genetic conditions. Genetic testing is becoming more convenient and financially accessible. However, while genetic data may be easily obtainable, experts in the field recommend seeking professional assistance in the comprehension and application of results. Susan Hassed, Ph.D., is a licensed certified genetic counselor. She is also the director of the Masters of Science in Genetic Counseling program and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Section of Genetics, at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC) in Oklahoma City. As a genetic counselor, Hassed helps individuals and families through the process of examining and understanding the impact of genetic testing. It’s a journey that can include helping identify the genetic component of an individual’s disease to assist in treatment as well as determining a person’s risk of developing an inherited medical condition. “My work is a mixture of cool science, psychology and caring,” says Hassed. “Genes are the recipes in our bodies that make us who we are. We all have genes that aren’t working correctly, but if we’re not experiencing problems, we don’t usually care.” Hassed explains that there is a broad range of genetic diseases that manifest in

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


various ways – genetically, physically and psychologically. While some infants have a problem at birth, other disorders may not develop until adulthood. “For instance, in a child with a disorder, if we can find the underlying cause, it can help us provide a prognosis. We can assist parents in preparing for expected challenges, make goals for accomplishments and provide an idea of what their future might look like,” says Hassed. She adds that families also use genetic testing when discussing family planning. Couples may want to discover their chances of passing along an inherited condition or want to understand the chance of a second child having a disorder their sibling was born with. Lori Carpenter, a licensed genetic counselor for Saint Francis Genetics in Tulsa, shares an example of how genetic testing can be very beneficial to patients, in helping to decide on a specific medical treatment. “Breast and ovarian cancer syndrome [can be] caused by genetic changes in one of two genes, BRCA1 or BRCA2,” says Carpenter. “If a variant is identified in one of those genes, these individuals have a significantly higher risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. There are specific, recommended surgical options to help these women dramatically reduce their risk of developing those cancers by 80 to 90 percent.” Carpenter says that for other individuals born with a collection of medical problems (cleft lip, structural heart defect or spina bifida, for example), genetic testing may be the only way to diagnose the underlying cause.

“Having a genetic diagnosis may help to guide medical management and offer opportunities to participate in research studies, but often times it is most beneficial in providing families with a diagnosis and some guidance on future expectations,” says Carpenter. Dr. Lara Theobald, a medical oncologist

“There are many ethical, legal and psychological issues related to genetic testing.” at INTEGRIS Cancer Institute in Oklahoma City, explains that genetic testing in oncology is primarily used for predictive purposes – helping to identify patients and families at high risk for developing cancer and, on occasion, helping to guide treatment decisions. “The benefit in testing unaffected individuals rests in guiding management of risk, such as increased screening tests, prophylactic surgeries or medications,” says Theobald. “Determining whether a patient is in an increased risk group for breast cancer can be helpful in optimizing strategies for screening and clinical management. The limitation is that testing doesn’t necessarily accurately predict an individual’s risk for developing cancer over a specified time frame. Penetrance, environmental factors, exposure…all may play a role in an individual’s susceptibility to developing a cancer.”

While genetic testing provides a wealth of information, Hassed says it’s important to understand that even if you are considered “high risk” for a specific condition, it doesn’t provide a guarantee that you will develop it. “Among a population with an 85 percent chance of getting breast cancer due to an inherited predisposition, 15 percent will never develop it for an unknown reason,” says Hassed. “Good nutrition and normal care still count in predicting your health and genes continue to change. We have to do the best we can with what we have and use the information we have to our benefit.” Carpenter encourages individuals or families interested in genetic counseling or testing to talk to their physician, who can refer them to a genetic counselor. “Genetic counselors are specially trained to help patients make informed, personalized decisions about their genetic health,” says Carpenter. “Genetic counselors also have the knowledge to identify reputable labs to conduct testing and help the patients and the providers understand the genetic results; seeking genetic counseling prior to and after genetic testing is always recommended.” When speaking with patients about the use of genetic testing, Theobald tries to always be upfront about the issues involved. “There are many ethical, legal and psychological issues related to genetic testing,” she says. “Positive and negative results can be empowering. Management of risk takes commitment from both the physician and the patient.” REBECCA FAST

Genetic testing detects changes in an individual’s chromosomes, genes or protein. The tests usually include studying the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) extracted from a person’s blood or other body fluids such as saliva or tissue. Genetic testing assists in diagnosing a suspected genetic condition and helps individuals discover their chances of developing or passing on a genetic disorder. According the National Human Genome Research Institute, there are typically three types of genetic tests. • Gene tests (individual genes or relatively short lengths of DNA or RNA are tested) • Chromosomal tests (whole chromosomes or very long lengths of DNA are tested) • Biochemical tests (protein levels or enzyme activities are tested)

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

41


City Of Oaks

Every city has a history to share, and in Raleigh, N.C., it pairs nicely with standout beer, food, art and entertainment.

M

any times, when we wonder where in the world we want to go next, our minds travel outside the United States, but there are many gems within our coasts that have been overlooked and underexplored. For those hoping their next destination lands on U.S. soil, the mild weather, rich history, burgeoning breweries, fresh tastes, explosion of art and creativity, small town with big ambitions feel and friendly, southern charm of its loyals welcome you to the City of Oaks. A whirlwind of culture, entertainment and exploration beckon travelers to Raleigh, N.C. This year, Raleigh was ranked No. 4 on Forbes’ list of America’s Fastest-Growing Cities, and Huffington Post called Raleigh “a true Southern treasure” and named it No. 3 on its list of 5 American Cities You Should Visit in 2015. These accolades come as no surprise to local Raleighites who’ve seen the enormous growth and exciting

42

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

changes their beloved city has gone through in the last 10 years. For travelers whose Raleigh radars haven’t yet gone off during their “next destination” searches, these rankings may be enough to sound the alarm. With spring and summer symptoms ris-

PHOTO BY TED RICHARDSON.

The State D E S T I N AT I O N

ing, there’s no better time than now to visit North Carolina’s temperate climate, and there’s many ways to enjoy North Carolina weather in the state’s capital. When sunshine offers play, jump on a Raleigh trolley or Segway tour and explore the rich history of a city named for Sir Walter Raleigh, whose failed attempt to establish the first English colony in The New World on Roanoke Island, now North Carolina, in the 1580s paved the way for the future. Glide past historic landmarks: the buildings that have been revamped and repurposed along downtown’s Fayetteville Street; the Joel Lane House, a restoration of an 18th-century manor house; City Market’s cobblestone drives lined with shops and dining; The State Capitol and Legislative Buildings; and the Governor’s Mansion. If your trip gets interrupted by rain or cold, go indoors at the North Carolina Museum of History to get your fix. This May 2 and 3, enjoy the Oakwood Tour and Victorian Tea, a tour through the garden of Oakwood, Raleigh’s oldest neighborhood, an experience Southern Living named No. 6 on their list of the South’s Best Garden Tours. After soaking up all the history one can handle, and thirsty for something a little more quenching, explore the hops at one of Raleigh’s long list of breweries or watering holes. Craft beer in North Carolina is pouring ahead with the best of them, and Raleigh continues its trek to the tap. With more than 10 breweries, and the number growing, there is a unique beer culture in Raleigh that continues to take notice. Local breweries have repurposed old warehouses and constructed new structures to house their operations. Their beers are winning experiments with witty names that nod to the city or the brewery’s brand. Brew tours have become a frequent Saturday or Sunday happening. Many breweries


TOP LEFT: A STATUE OF SIR WALTER RALEIGH STANDS OUTSIDE THE CONVENTION CENTER. BOTTOM LEFT: INSIDE POOLE’S DINER, A POPULAR DINING SPOT IN DOWNTOWN RALEIGH NAMED IN SOUTHERN LIVING’S LIST OF 100 BEST BARS IN THE SOUTH. ABOVE CENTER: CROWDS ENJOY FOOD TRUCKS AND FUN ALONG THE HAPPENING FAYETTEVILLE STREET. MIDDLE CENTER: THE UNIQUE ENTRANCE TO CAM RALEIGH, A CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUM IN RALEIGH’S WAREHOUSE DISTRICT. LEFT: THE BEST VIEW OF RALEIGH’S SKYLINE CAN BE SEEN FROM THE PATIO AT BOYLAN BRIDGE BREWPUB. RIGHT: THE PIT IN DOWNTOWN RALEIGH’S WAREHOUSE DISTRICT SERVES UP SOME GREAT SOUTHERN BARBEQUE.

vegetarian cuisine that tickles the taste buds of even the most certified carnivores, Poole’s Diner, American – named in Southern Livings list of 100 Best Bars in the South – and countless other dining destinations. Raleigh has some great grub; the tastes are well worth the trip. If the sun’s still shining, burn those calories with a bike ride through Raleigh’s warehouse district – named on USA Today’s 2014 list of 10 Best City Art Districts Around the USA. A grid of historic brick buildings with the ever so often mural or artistic flair to grab your eye, this trendy territory boasts art, fashion and food. Chain your bike to a bicycle rack made from old bicycles frames – one of five racks placed around downtown as a result of a country-wide design contest – and explore the art within the Contemporary Art Museum (CAM), Designbox or Visual Art Exchange. To further the Raleigh art experience, ride along a string of capital area greenways and find your way to the North Carolina Museum of Art. After the sun has set, the Lincoln Theatre and The Pour House Music Hall – two popular, downtown music venues featuring local and international talents – lure crowds to the front of their stages. If this trip was planned just right, there may be a big act or two playing in the downtown, outdoor Red Hat amphitheater. You can also make your way to Midtown’s North Hills and see what evening entertainment they’ve got lined up; right now, they’re probably gearing up for their spring/ summer Midtown Beach Music Series. After a long day’s adventure, whether you’re returning to a quaint bed and breakfast near the popular Cameron Village shopping center, the five-star Umstead Hotel, or a friend or relative’s, you won’t be disappointed by the energy and possibility that abound the streets of Raleigh, N.C., and “what should we do tomorrow” is all you’ll think about next. BRITTANY ANICETTI

PHOTO BY CHRIS ADAMCZYK.

PHOTO BY SANDY FREEMAN.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL ROBSON.

position their tanks in view of the dining room or bar, giving patrons a more unique experience. Some don’t sell food, but there’s always a food truck outside to keep their patrons happy. For the best view of Raleigh’s skyline, join locals, and their pets, on the patio of Boylan Bridge Brewpub, hang out at a new kind of “biker bar” at Crank Arm, taste the pies at Trophy, named Best Pizzeria in N.C. in 2014 by Thrillist; or explore the likes of Big Boss, Raleigh Brewing Company or Lonerider, to name a few others. You can also cool off with a cold one at The Raleigh Times, a 100-year-old building turned restaurant and bar that made Draft’s list of America’s 100 Best Beer Bars in 2015, along with Busy Bee Café – another popular downtown hangout. As the beer flows, appetites get anxious for more substantial snacks, and thankfully, Raleigh’s restaurants offer fresh flavors and worldly selections. Along the streets of downtown, enjoy the taste of Bida Manda, Asian; Sitti, Lebanese; The Pit, southern barbecue; Caffe Luna, Italian; Fiction Kitchen, vegan/

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE GREATER RALEIGH CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU/VISITRALEIGH.COM.

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

43


The

Great Outdoors Two very different designs showcase what’s possible in outdoor living.

44

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

By M.J. Van Deventer


English Inspiration

LINDA VATER’S GARDEN, 20 YEARS IN THE MAKING, FEATURES BOXWOODS, MATURE TREES AND A POTAGER.

Photography by David Cobb Linda Vater grew up appreciating gardens, but they were not her passion until 20 years ago. It was then that she discovered, on a whim, that she loved gardening. There was an early clue, however, regarding her interest in plants. “I’m probably the only person in college who selected my dorm room based on the best window exposure for my plants, which I kept on a ladder plant holder,” Vater notes. Now, her name is synonymous with exquisite garden designs. She is the “Garden Guru” on Oklahoma City KFOR’s “Four Your Garden” segment. She also writes regularly for Southern Living and HGTV magazines. She conducts seminars and workshops and is a member of the Garden Writers Association. The gardens surrounding her Tudor-style home in Oklahoma City’s historic Crown Heights neighborhood are what Vater calls “an English garden on the prairie.” Mature trees shade a front lawn showcasing boxwood, hollies, perennials and ground covers. In spring, Vater’s garden resembles an Easter basket with azaleas, pansies, chamomile, cabbages and tulips, her favorite flower. A southern-style porch curves around the home’s front. It conjures images of guests relaxing in wicker chairs, sipping refreshing summer drinks. A profusion of multi-sized pots are generously planted with a rainbow of colors and mixed greenery. The secluded rear garden is where Vater and her family especially enjoy the densely planted gardens and outdoor living area. They love this heavily shaded enclave with mature trees and plants marking the changing seasons. “Our favorite place depends on the season… what is at peak, how the quality of light is at that time. My favorite view is probably of the potager – an English-style kitchen garden – standing on the back bench, looking toward the west in the evening. The light on the potager’s boxwood creates a view of this ornamental space that is magical,” Vater says. The outdoor living area cozies up to the home’s rear entrance, with French doors providing easy access to the kitchen and laundry area, convenient for cleaning up after gardening or dining al fresco. Seating areas are well shaded and chaise lounges invite naps, reading or pleasant conversations, all in view of this sheltered garden. “The garden is perfect for frequent entertaining,” Vater says. “We have coffee and cocktails in the garden, as well as meals whenever the weather is kind. I love impromptu brunches, or wine and potluck appetizer get-togethers. For MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


larger groups, we set up a buffet and bring out blankets for picnic seating. The garden has seen many a party.” Vater always tells guests, “Don’t miss the potager.” Flagstone and brick walks lead toward this cloistered area, its entrance defined by a tall gateway. The centerpiece of this small, secluded space is a labyrinth of framed boxwood, gently sculpted in plump circles. To guests, the potager is a work of art. To Vater, this is the garden’s “vegetable farm.” Inside the four quadrants of each of these four sculpted boxwoods, she grows tomatoes, basil, kale, lettuce, spinach, radishes, Swiss chard and poblano and jalapeno peppers. Guests are encouraged to help themselves to the bounty. The potager has the aura of a secret garden. Small benches and hidden nooks are perfect places to sit a while and enjoy this English-

COMFORTABLE SITTING AREAS ARE SCATTERED THROUGHOUT VATER’S GARDEN.

style paradise where a prairie once stood. It is a dramatic setting where Vater revels in nature’s beauty. She plants a mix of perennials and annuals – sedums, hostas, ferns – nestled among peonies, hibiscus and calibrichoa. Unusual plants include golden feverfew, foxglove, allium and deutzia. Boxwood and tulips are stars in this setting. Always aware of new garden design trends, Vater sees the line between indoor and outdoor liv-

A MIX OF PERENNIALS AND ANNUALS ARE FOUND IN VATER’S GARDEN, ALONG WITH A POTAGER, WHICH VATER CALLS HER “VEGETABLE FARM.”

46

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

ing spaces continuing to blur. “Growing your own veggies and herbs – urban gardening – will remain big. Berryproducing plants and dwarf fruit trees will be very popular, and container gardening is always au courant. Locally, I see much greater use of succulents, natives and drought tolerant plants.” Always willing to share her expertise about gardening, she says, “Don’t let your plants boss you. When in doubt, use gravel or boxwood. And if some plants fail, remember, there’s always next year.”


THE OUTDOOR DINING TABLE SEATS EIGHT, MAKING THIS OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE IDEAL FOR ENTERTAINING. RIGHT: A STONE FIREPLACE ANCHORS THIS SLEEK OUTDOOR LIVING AREA AND PROVIDES WARMTH DURING CHILLY MONTHS.

48

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


High-Tech Style

Photography by Jenifer Jordan When the Tulsa design firm Austin Bean was asked to create an outdoor living space for a traditional period home in Tulsa’s Utica Square area, they relished the opportunity to meet the family’s desires. The Mediterranean-style home was built in the 1920s with a stucco exterior and a Spanish tile roof. Its charming exterior appearance does not reveal the spacious back lawn – it spans more than two lots – that makes this a perfect outdoor living retreat. Architect Bailey Austin Bird says the family’s expectations for the project revolved around their home-centered lifestyle. They wanted to prolong the seasons in their outdoor living area. The firm spent six months in the architecture and design stage and a little more than six months in construction. What Bird designed offers a sleek, fresh look in a rectangular shape that contains all the elements the family desired. What is so special are the unique design elements that make this outdoor living space a pleasure to use nearly year round. The open-air, roofed addition is built close to the home’s kitchen and living room for easy access. It was designed to block wind and sun so guests do not have to contend with nature’s mercurial personality while enjoying the outdoors. Spruce wood was used, rather than the typical cedar or fir, because it provides a more Mediterranean aesthetic. A natural gray-green stone with an ashlar pattern graces the floor. Phantom mosquito screens not only block out the sun, but also keep insects at bay. MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

49


A stone fireplace anchors the center of the long, large space, providing warmth when necessary. The kitchen area features a grill and a sink and is adjacent to the dining area with easy access for the family’s frequent casual entertaining. The dining area features a long table with a weatherproof zinc top. It seats eight comfortably and is adjacent to the cozy living area, where the ample seating areas have a good view of the wall-mounted television, the fireplace and the expansive lawn. A built-in music system complements nature’s sounds. The children’s play needs were a priority in the planning of this inviting space. A splash pad, similar to a high tech sprinkler, was designed especially for them. The swimming pool, which was present when the current owners purchased the home, is a comfortable distance from the outdoor living area. It is gated, for the protection and safety of the children and guests. When the project was completed, to the homeowners’ great satisfaction, Bird was pleased with the appearance of this contemporary outdoor living area. “There’s a good overall feeling in the space,” she says. “I would love to have an outdoor living area like this.” THIS OUTDOOR SPACE WAS DESIGNED BY TULSABASED ARCHITECTURE FIRM, AUSTIN BEAN. INSET: PHANTOM MOSQUITO SCREENS CAN BE USED TO BLOCK OUT THE SUN AND PESKY INSECTS.

50

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


Transform your dreams inTo realiTy

General conTracTors inc. 1424 south Harvard Tulsa, oklahoma 918-749-7904 www.barronandmcclary.com

10824 Barron & McClary.indd 1

We're Moving

NEW AND EXPANDED SHOWROOM

The Farm Shopping Center 6502 East 51st Street 918.949.9017 www.chdkitchenandbath.com 2/4/14 20593 3:08 PM Carriage House Design.indd 1

1/26/15 11:25 AM

INCREDIBLE REBATES ! SPRING SPECIAL

86

$

• Up to $1,700 from • Up to $1,950 from Oklahoma Natural Gas • Up to $5,000 from PSO • Up to $450 Trade-in Rebate Call Airco for Details.

20603 Airco.indd 1

Only

CALL TODAY!

918-252-5667

= BIG SAVINGS

00

on a 26 Point A/C System Tune Up Call Airco for details. Expires 3-31-15

May not combine with other offers

OK Mech. #598 Plumbing #94510 Electrical #73798 1/30/15 4:59 2/25/15 2:03 PM

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

51


Sustainable

SPACES Two homeowners transform dated houses into homes that are both stylish and eco-friendly. “I didn’t

ABOVE: BURTON CREATED AN OPEN LIVING, DINING AND KITCHEN AREA WHILE USING RECESSED LIGHTING AND LED BULBS TO ASSIST NATURAL LIGHT WITH BRIGHTENING THE SPACE AT A LOW COST. RIGHT: WASTE MANAGMENT AND RECYCLING WAS IMPORTANT GIVEN THE CONDITION OF THE HOME BURTON FOUND IT IN. PHOTOS COURTESY CHAD BURTON.

52

even recycle,” muses Chad Burton as he reflects on the irony of his perspective that has vastly changed over the last few years. “It never even occurred to me the impact we have on the earth in our day-to-day activity.” Then Burton spent more than 18 months remodeling a home that is now certified by the National Green Building Standard and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), National Green Building Standard and the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) popular ENERGY STAR program. “To my knowledge, it is the only house in

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

By Tamara Logsdon Hawkinson

Oklahoma that has all three of those certifications,” says Burton. Craig Immel, founder of STEADYSTATE Geothermal in Tulsa and LEED Accredited Professional, who also serves as Chair for the U.S. Green Building Council Oklahoma Chapter, agrees. “I’m unaware of anyone else who has gone through the process of LEED and NAHB accreditation,” says Immel, explaining the standards required to rate a home or commercial building for “greenness.” “A point system is used to rate energy efficiency, water use, materials, construction waste disposal and much more,” he says. “It is an extensive process.” A Tulsan and Oklahoma State University graduate, Immel moved to Colorado and sold real estate in the mountains for eight years. “Because of the location, many of the homes had to be innovative about energy and water because they were off the grid,” says Immel. That piqued his interest, so when he moved to Denver, Immel began to apply what he’d learned in the mountains to urban areas, and it was there he was introduced to information about LEED certification. Burton’s conversion was accidental. “I finished a tour with the Navy in 2000 and realized around 2007 that my time to take advantage of the GI Bill was running out,” he says. While working full time with the responsibilities of a growing family, he started night school at the OSU-Tulsa campus majoring in environmental science, although he wasn’t sure what direction he’d take with the degree. Gradually, Burton became interested in the concept of sustainable building. At the same time, the house next door to him, previously owned by


a hoarder, continued to deteriorate, unoccupied for nearly eight years due to a mix-up in records that identified the home’s owner. Although most of the neighbors thought the house should be demolished, Burton was intrigued about renovating it using sustainable, often called “green,” building standards. Burton and his wife, Amy, were eventually able to purchase the home in Tulsa. It was built in 1941 with three bedrooms and one bath, plus a screened in side porch. There is also a studio apartment over the garage. Because of the dilapidated state of the house, Burton’s first step was to clear the house in order to begin the remodel. Blue barrels lined the front of the house as Burton focused on recycling as much as possible. Waste management is a big part of LEED and NAHB certification. By the time the renovation was over, Burton had been able to direct more than 5,000 pounds of metal and 2,000 pounds of cardboard away from landfills. Burton partnered with locally owned Harley Hollan Companies, which hauls away recyclable materials from building and renovation sites, including asphalt, shingles, sheetrock and wood. Burton also discovered another Tulsa resource, ReRock Materials, Inc., which he had tear out and dispose of the broken concrete driveway. “Instead of just taking the load to the landfill, I had it delivered to the rock crushing site,” says Burton.

And Reclamation Station, a local architectural salvage company, also assisted in removing, repurposing and recycling an enormous amount of materials not reused, including the original single-pane windows and the 1970s-era storm windows. “We worked with many local suppliers, and because of the publicity this project received, we were often able to purchase building products at a discount,” says Burton. Where he chose to invest in a higher priced product because of design, were the windows. “If you look at the old windows, the top was a divided light style,” he says. “And the only true divided light windows we could find are wood.” The couple chose Pella’s Architect Series Low-E, double pane, double hung argon gas filled windows. And because natural light helps reduce energy costs during the day, the Burtons installed five Solatubes throughout the home. Newer models also come equipped with nighttime and dimmer switches. And all other recessed lighting used LED light bulbs that last longer and use less energy. More than 50 percent of the original wood floors were salvaged and reused. The metal roof has a 50-year warranty. And to conserve water, low flow toilets were installed and drought resistant plants were selected. The original design of the house was typical of that era – the living room and dining room ran across the front of the house with the kitchen and a bedroom on one side and two bedrooms and a single bath on the other. Burton opened up one side of the house for an open living, dining and kitchen area. The screened in porch was enclosed and is part of the master bedroom; a master bath was added. Even with the added space, the home is still a compact 1,426 square feet for the family of five. So, to maximize space, shelving was installed around the room near the ceiling for trophies and other kid collections. The original doors were used, but to conserve space, they were installed as pocket doors – sliding doors that disappear when fully open. Jay Rambo Co. supplied the kitchen cabinets using bamboo by Plyboo on the exterior and low formaldehyde-emitting fiberboard for the interiors. They are one of the few cabinet manufacturers in Oklahoma who qualify for the Kitchen Cabinet Manufactures Association’s Environmental Stewardship Program. The countertop is concrete made with 75 percent recycled clear glass. Burton will always have a personal attachment to this house, since the residential retrofit served as the basis of his extensive report – the final requirement to achieve his Master of Science in Environmental Science MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

53


BEEDON REMOVED THE ALUMINUM AWNING AND REPLACED THE FRONT DOOR WITH A USED, ENERGY EFFICIENT, SOLID WOOD DOOR, ATTEMPTING TO BRING BACK ITS ORIGINAL LOOK. RIGHT: WALLS SEPERATING THE LIVING ROOM, DINING ROOM AND KITCHEN WERE REMOVED TO CREATE ONE LARGE SPACE. PHOTOS COURTESY JOHN BEEDON.

from OSU. But with a growing family, he knows before long he will probably need more space. “This will be an easily maintained, energy efficient home for other families to enjoy for decades to come,” he says proudly. And while there is a growing demand for green homes, not everyone is concerned about their residence being certified. In Oklahoma City, builder John Beedon, owner of Beehold Reinventions, recently purchased a 1910 home in Mesta Park, a neighborhood listed on the National Register of Historic places and designated a Historic Preservation District by the City of Oklahoma City. Beedon has been passionate about sustainable building for years, but combining that practice with the specific requirements and restrictions of remodeling in a historic preservation area requires a special commitment. Any changes to the front of the home have to be approved. Although it wasn’t Beedon’s intention to get the house certified, he is knowledgeable of the various tax credits available for certain energy efficiency changes as well as historical preservation projects. Beedon feels that using sustainable methods in building is the right thing to do – from recycling waste materials to using repurposed materials to creating the most energy efficient residence possible. The previous owner had planned to remodel

54

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

the house but had to sell it before completion. “The house had been stripped to the studs when I bought it,” says Beedon. It was obvious that there had been many changes over the years that were not historical, from the aluminum awning over the front door to the heavy wrought iron security door. Unfortunately, the original front door was gone. Beedon removed the awning and replaced the front door with a used, energy efficient, solid wood door that he found at Habitat for Humanity. “I’m not so sure everyone likes the color,” laughs Beedon. He planned to paint the windows black because that would have been typical of the old farmhouse style, and as they worked through layers of old paint, he discovered that black had indeed been the original window color. Inexpensive light fixtures hung on either side of the door, in the place of the originals. Beedon chose a lantern-style fixture to restore a more historic look. He installed a new mailbox to the left of the front door, opposite of the original box on the right that is equipped with dials for the family to leave the milkman their order. “One of the first things we discovered was there were five layers of asphalt shingles over the original cedar roofing,” says Beedon. He estimates those shingles added up to about 50,000 pounds more than the house was structurally built to support. After removing the existing roofing materials, the new roof was covered with asphalt shingles from the roofing options approved for the historic neighborhood. The house was constructed from unique T-shaped concrete blocks that even the most experienced local contractors haven’t seen before. Because of that, there is some speculation that this might be one of the first concrete block homes built in Oklahoma City. “For aesthetics and historic preservation requirements, we rebuilt the windows, most of which still had the original glass,” he says. Beedon has perfected a process for making the vintage double hung windows energy efficient. He takes the casing off, removes the ropes, pulleys and counter weights then fills the cavities with backing and spray foam insulation. He then adds two sets of sash springs per operable window to make the windows fit tight and limit air intrusion. “I love the shadows cast in the room from the irregularities in the old glass panes,” he says. “My goal is to keep as much of the historic elements as possible while making the space more efficient.” The layout of the house was typical of a bungalow style at the time. One side of the house was divided into three rooms – the living room, dining room and the kitchen. An angled fireplace in the living room was not structurally sound, so it was removed along with the walls, making one large area with a 13-foot ceiling.


2014


THE HOME’S PREVIOUS OWNER HAD TO SELL BEFORE COMPLETING A REMODEL. WHEN BEEDON TOOK OVER, THE HOUSE HAD BEEN STRIPPED TO THE STUDS. PHOTOS BY JOHN BEEDON.

save money on utility bills in the future. There are many sustainable green building alternatives available to consumers that have little or no additional out-of-pocket upfront costs, like ENERGY STAR cool roof asphalt shingles and energy efficient vinyl windows. Also for a minimal investment, the collection of rainwater, also known as ‘rainwater harvesting’ can be used to water lawns and gardens. When Immel moved back to Tulsa in 2008, he found that the market for green building was behind what he had experienced in Denver. So he and a friend built the first family LEED certified home in Tulsa’s Brookside area. And while everyone might not respond positively to products promoted as being ‘environmentally friendly,’ there is a big interest in saving on utility bills. “I try to help homeowners understand the long term benefit of investing in energy efficient products from the heat and air system to appliances,” says Immel, since the average household spends at least $2,000 a year on energy bills. Another big consideration for green building is for health and wellness purposes. “Most people don’t realize how their home could be affecting their health,” says Immel. A home could be drafty or the air quality not optimal if the ductwork isn’t properly sealed and is drawing air from an attic or crawlspace. Using low or zero VOC paints, such as those manufactured by Tulsa’s Anchor Paint, is a good www.usgbc-oklahoma.org choice to improve interiwww.oshba.org/green-building or air quality. And if you www.energystar.gov are unsure if a product is really green, check for sustainabletulsa.org third-party certification www.sustainableokc.org standards.

Beedon worked alongside Jarod Tracy and John Butti during the design and construction. “They are craftsmen often working within the constraints of existing conditions, who come up with solutions mindful of energy efficiency and the efficiency of space,” says Beedon. Originally it was three bedrooms with only one bathroom. “And the front bedroom was eight feet by 14,” says Beedon. “Not very usable.” So, along with reworking some interior walls, he used the space just inside the front door to create a second bathroom. The old dormer attic vent, visible on the front of the house, was converted to a window that provides the bathroom with some natural light. The original doors were found in the garage along with the original hardware that he is restoring. Because old closets were typically small, custom armoires were built in the closet niches that go up to the nine-foot ceiling. The original pine flooring wasn’t usable, so a layer of insulation was added and then a hardwood floor installed. A tankless water heater was used since it is both energy efficient and takes up much less space, an important factor when working with 1,297 square feet. And while the exterior walls are energy efficient concrete block, foam insulation was used in the attic space. An oversized heating and cooling unit was installed because of the vaulted ceilings. “Even the best energy efficient system won’t be efficient if it has to run all the time,” says Beedon. Many homeowners assume using sustainable building methods will be substantially more expensive, and while some initial investments might be somewhat higher, the payoff in lower energy costs is just one of the advantages. According to Immel, in a remodel or when building a new home, it could just be a matter of cost shifting – looking at all the costs of the project to see if making a little higher investment in one area could

GREEN BUILDING RESOURCES USGBC-OK Chapter Oklahoma State Home Builders Association EPA’s ENERGY STAR Sustainable Tulsa Sustainable OKC

56

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


Home. It’s where the story of your life plays out. Neighbors. Holidays. The trees your kids climb. It may be the biggest investment you’ll ever make. But will it be a bold investment in your future? Will it redefine what you call home? Will it set new standards in style, comfort and healthy living? Will it nurture the very souls it shelters? Will it be worthy of your family?

A true balance of form and function, LEED Certified homes, using best building practices, are 50% more energy efficient, while improving comfort and wellness. Before planning your new home or remodel, ask a USGBC Oklahoma Member how to build a better home at little-to-no additional cost. Visit usgbc-oklahoma.org to learn more and to find an experienced LEED AP builder, architect or real estate professional near you.

Oklahoma

U.S. Green Building Council


E K A T – —A E K I H By Megan Morgan

From long

treks for the outdoorsy to shorter jaunts for the whole family,

Oklahoma has something to offer everyone.

58

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


E K – E

Oklahoma

does not fit into a neat regional category. It’s not quite the west, and it isn’t the south. Oklahoma stands on its own. The state’s location, however, means that its biodiversity is unparalleled, and this bodes well for hikers. “One of the best aspects of hiking in Oklahoma is the diversity of its terrain,” says Kent Frates, co-author of the book Oklahoma Hiking Trails. “Oklahoma has everything from a high desert setting, like in Black Mesa State Park, to rocky plains in the Wichita Wildlife Refuge, to rugged, dense piney woods in the southeastern part of the state. It’s also possible to hike in Oklahoma year round.” Oklahoma’s best hikes are scattered all over the state, and many can be found in state parks.

High Point Trail

Black Mesa State Park A lot of Oklahoma is very flat, but on the High Point Trail at Black Mesa State Park, hikers can reach the state’s highest point: 4,973 feet above sea level. Black Mesa State Park is located on the very tip of the panhandle, barely within Oklahoma’s state boundary. West Regional Park Manager Bruce Divis says the summit point on High Point Trail is what often brings visitors. “The landscape and vistas are like no other in Oklahoma,” Divis says of the High Point Trail. “And people like to say that they have hiked to the highest point in Oklahoma. A granite obelisk monument marks the spot, and the views from the mesa look into Oklahoma, Colorado and New Mexico.” Divis estimates the trail’s level of difficulty to ranges between medium and difficult. The High Point Trail is nearly eight miles round-trip to the end and back and can take an estimated four or five hours at a leisurely pace. “The first two miles are on relatively gentle, sloping terrain, and then the trail ascends for about three-quarters of a mile. Then there is one mile on level ground to the high point summit,” Divis says. But the hike isn’t just about the summit; Divis says the trail’s interesting terrain makes this one of the best Oklahoma hikes. “The Black Mesa area is where the Rocky Mountains meet the short grass prairie. It is unique in that it represents an area where many species are at the easternmost or westernmost portions of their range,” Divis says. No matter what time of year, this area is “a birder’s paradise,” Divis says. Larry Floyd, co-author of the book Oklahoma Hiking Trails, says the High Summit Trail is one of his favorites. “For me, Black Mesa is Oklahoma’s gateway to the west. So this trail is high in ‘exotic factor,’” Floyd says. He recommends visiting this state park in the winter during the “snake-free” months; he says copperheads and rattlesnakes can be real concerns in the spring and early fall. The High Point Trail is located on the nature preserve portion of Black Mesa State Park, about 12 miles from the HIKE TO OKLAHOMA’S camping area. Kenton is the closest town, about five miles HIGHEST POINT ON away, but has no gas or food; but Boise City, 35 miles away, THIS TRAIL AT BLACK MESA STATE PARK, offers amenities. AND ENJOY VIEWS THAT LOOK INTO OKLAHOMA, COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM AND RECREATION.

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

59


Dripping Springs Trail

Natural Falls State Park The Dripping Springs Trail, located in the northeast corner of the state, is one that lives up to its name. Tracey Robertson, Natural Falls State Park manager, says this trail is by far the most popular at Natural Falls State Park. “The first portion of the trail takes you to the overlook at the top of the 77-foot Ozarks springs. For those that would like to, they can travel down the 47 steps to the base of the falls. This area includes an elevated boardwalk to help protect our natural resource,” Robertson says. The trail entrance to the overlook is ADA-accessible, but the remaining part ranges from moderate to difficult. The total length of the trail is a half-mile and takes an estimated 45 minutes, Robertson says, but hikers can also choose to either make the loop and walk back or access one of the park’s other four trails. This trail has been a visitor destination for nearly 100 years. “Dripping Springs has been a tourism attraction since the early 1920s. As local folklore goes, the falls area was an encampment to Native American tribes before the Trail of Tears and also, both the Union and Confederate soldiers during the Civil War,” Robertson says. The waterfall definitely draws people to this area, Robertson says, but a family of freshwater river otters can also occasionally be spotted. “The most common thing we hear from first-time visitors is, ‘We never knew something so beautiful existed here,’” Robertson says. Ferns, mosses, liverworts and other native plant species can be found along the Dripping Springs Trail.

AN ELEVATED BOARDWALK HELPS PROTECT THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT ON THE DRIPPING SRINGS TRAIL. PHOTOS COURTESY OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM & RECREATION.

Skyline Trail

Beavers Bend State Park Imagine starting a hike above a river, transitioning into a walk among rolling hills, crossing a creek several times, following switchbacks to get to a waterfall, passing old logging roads and traipsing through the woods, and you’ve imagined the Skyline Trail. The Skyline is part of the David Boren trail system at Beavers Bend State Park. The series of trails is seven miles long, with the Skyline portion consisting of four miles. “It’s fairly rough terrain with some areas that are pretty steep, so we recommend it for serious hikers,” says Beavers Bend Naturalist Frank Griffith. “The time the trail takes always depends on the hiker, but I tell people to estimate about one mile per hour to allow time to take in the scenery and take pictures.” A camera might come in handy for many sections of the Skyline. “There is some great scenery all along the trail and always something to look at,” Griffith says. Hikers can find lots of deer, rabbits and squirrels, with the occasional turkey as well, Griffith says, and bald eagles can be spotted at certain times of the year, generally from winter to early spring. “But that’s just to name a few things you can find,” Griffith says. “Visitors always love the waterfall on this trail.” Beavers Bend is located in McCurtain County in the southeast corner of the state, close to the Texas and Arkansas borders, in the Kiamichi wilderness area. The Kiamichi Range is part of the larger Ouachita Mountains.

60

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

ENJOY THE GREAT SCENERY, WHILE HIKING SKYLINE TRAIL AT BEAVERS BEND STATE PARK.


David and Eileen Echols

Echols & Associates is a matrimonial law firm established in 1979 by David and Eileen Echols. Through the years the firm has received numerous accolades and has been recognized by their clients and their peers for their legal ability and adherence to the highest profes-

Jonathan D. Echols

sional standards of conduct, ethics, reliability and diligence. The firm’s outstanding work has been recognized by Martindale-Hubbell’s Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers, and as “The Best of the Best” in 2012, 2013, and 2014, by the readers of Oklahoma Magazine. M. Eileen Echols, managing attorney and chief litigator, is a former family law judge, twice named “Outstanding Family Law Judge” for the State of Oklahoma by the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Family Law Section. David W. Echols is a Fellow in the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and has been an AV rated attorney by Martindale-Hubbell for more than twenty years. Both are Lifetime Charter Members of the Rue Ratings “Best Attorneys of America”, and have been recognized by their peers as Oklahoma SuperLawyers. They both have been adjunct professors of family law and are frequent lecturers on topics of family law to Oklahoma lawyers.

Amy L. Howe

Lindsey W. Andrews

The firm’s other member,s pictured below are also excellent attorneys and have been recognized in their own right. Jonathan D. Echols graduated first in his law school class at OCU. He has been selected to the Oklahoma SuperLawyers Rising Stars list since 2011. Amy L. Howe has been selected to the Oklahoma SuperLawyers Rising Stars list since 2013. In 2014, she was named to The National Trial Lawyers “Top 40 Under 40,” and the National Academy of Family Law Attorneys “Top 10 Under 40.” Lindsey W. Andrews was recipient of the 2013 Journal Record Leadership in Law Award from the Oklahoma County Bar Association. Benjamin P. Sisney, who, prior to joining the firm, clerked for United States District Judge Gregory K. Frizzell in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Ashley D. Rahill is the newest attorney to join our firm. She was a recipient of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s President’s Award in 2012, and graduated from the OBA’s Leadership Academy in 2014.

Benjamin P. Sisney

9925 S. Pennsylvania, Suite 100, Oklahoma City, OK 73159 PH:405-691-2648 FX: 405-691-5648

Ashley D. Rahill


North Woods Trail

Oxley Nature Center Located on the northern edge of Tulsa’s city limits, Oxley Nature Center is a popular source of escape from city life for residents and other visitors. “Thousands of people come here every year, but it’s easy to go in and not see another human being. It makes you feel like you’re way out in the wilderness,” says Oxley Nature Center Director Eddie Reese. Reese says although it’s hard to choose, the North Woods Trail is one of the best at the nature center. North Woods is a one-mile loop with a half-mile trail that leads to the trailhead. “You can see some extra-large trees on this trail and lots of deer. And some of the plants to look out for are green dragons (those can be found in large numbers), lily pads on the water and plenty of wild-

flowers,” Reese says. Hikers walk along a lake, through hardwood trees and along several creeks on the North Woods, experiencing different habitat types along the way. “You go through prairie, woodlands and wetlands in this area,” Reese says. “Basically any type of terrain in northeast Oklahoma you can find, it’s here.” Those paying close attention might be able to spot ospreys or nesting eagles, Reese says. Most of the trails at Oxley Nature Center, including the North Woods Trail, are shorter and loop together, ranging in length from a third of a mile to one mile. The land was set aside as a wildlife area in the 1970s.

FAMILIES CAN ENJOY THE PAVED AND ADA-ACCESSIBLE FAMILY FUN TRAIL AT GREENLEAF STATE PARK. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF TOURSIM AND RECREATION.

Greenleaf Lake Hiking Trail

Greenleaf State Park For those seeking a “real wilderness experience,” says Greenleaf State Park Naturalist Steve Evans, the Greenleaf Lake Hiking Trail provides an opportunity that should not be missed. This hiking and mountain bike trail wanders through part of the oak and hickory forest of the Ozarks in eastern Oklahoma. “The trail is about 19 miles long, and the average hiker should allow at least 13 hours to hike the whole trail. There are two primitive campsites along the trail, and most visitors that want to hike the whole trail take backpacking equipment and spend the night on the trail, making it a twoday hike,” Evans says. The trail consists of two large loops, the South Loop (eight miles) and the North Loop (six miles). To reach this area from the park, hikers first travel about two-and-a-half miles to arrive at a suspension bridge that

62

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

marks the beginning of the South Loop portion. Evans advises caution on sections of the North Loop because some areas are currently overgrown. The Greenleaf Lake Hiking Trail is classified as between medium and difficult. Most of the hike is fairly level, with some steep areas through the Ozark Uplift hills, Evans says, and the trail passes over and through some boulder-covered areas in the North Loop. “Anyone in fairly good shape can hike it, but it is a reasonable challenge to most people. Be prepared to hike a real trail; it is not a city park,” Evans says. He adds that on a busy day in the summer, there may be 50 or so hikers on the trail. The park also offers a Family Fun Trail that is paved and ADAaccessible.


Inspiration Point Trail

Roman Nose State Park Roman Nose State Park Ranger Jerret Sanders says the park’s Inspiration Point Trail gets its name from its viewpoints. “You can see the entire canyon from the point, and it has spectacular views of the surrounding areas,” Sanders says. “It also gives our guests the chance to use their imaginations to picture what it all looked like back when the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes made this their winter camp. It’s a great place to go and reflect on the many changes that the land has seen through the years as it changed from a grassland to a park built for people’s enjoyment.” Inspiration Point is part of a trail system at Roman Nose, so visitors have the option of creating their own customized hikes, but this trail itself is a round-trip of about three miles and is estimated as moderate to difficult. Sanders says the trail would take about two hours depending on the size of the hiking group. “The trail winds along the side of the canyon and has very different terrain throughout the hike. We have really good trails, but there are some pretty steep inclines and declines along the way,” Sanders says. The trailhead for Inspiration Point Trail is located near the Lake Watonga parking lot. In addition to the view, this hike is unique due to the gypsum outcroppings, white in color, that hikers scale throughout the hike. Watonga, located about seven miles from the park, is the closest town to Roman Nose. The park is named after Cheyenne Chief Henry Roman Nose, who lived in the canyon area for several decades before he died in 1917. Roman Nose State Park is one of Oklahoma’s original seven state parks established in 1937 by the Civilian Conservation Corps.

ENJOY VARYING TERRAINS ON THE INSPIRATION TRAIL, AS IT WINDS ALONG THE SIDE OF THE CANYON. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM AND RECREATION.

will roll out the red carpet and proudly cut the ribbon on their new corporate headquarters... April, 2015 808 N. 161st. E. Ave. Tulsa, OK 74116

Learn more and apply at: www.meltontruck.com/careers 20626 Melton Truck line.indd 1

2/12/15 4:54 PM

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

63


The Narrows

Wichita Wildlife Refuge Randy Hale has been employed at the Wichita Wildlife Refuge as an environmental education specialist for 20 years, but he says he will never get tired of the hikes the refuge has to offer. “My boss makes me go hike. I go every day, and I always enjoy it. I’d have to say that the Narrows is the prettiest hike though, and I’ve had more and more people tell me that is their favorite,” he says. The distance can be as long or as short as you want, Hale says; the Narrows runs about two miles round-trip, but hikers can also go farther south and double the length. Another benefit of this trail is that it is usually not as crowded as some of the better-known trails at the Wichita Wildlife Refuge. “On a nice three-day weekend, it can be hard to find parking close to the trailhead, but once you’re out there, it does not feel overrun like some of

the other trails. But for me anyway, the best thing about hiking is meeting people along the way. I value solitude, but I also think others enhance the experience,” Hale says. The trail follows a creek for most of the hike and later crosses through trees to reach a plateau. At this point, some people choose to turn back, Hale says, but hikers can continue on to switchbacks at the bottom of the creek and then gain elevation to reach an area that is popular with rock climbers. “At the bottom of the creek, the trail is changing all the time, and it’s good even when wet; it doesn’t get too muddy. When it’s hot outside, there is also plenty of shade along the way. And it’s just so pretty,” Hale says. He recommends stopping at the visitors center for a map and directions to the Narrows.

Yellow Trail

Turkey Mountain Each of Turkey Mountain’s trails – color-coded as Red, Blue and Yellow – provide different benefits, but Tonja Carrigg with the River Parks Authority says her favorite is the Yellow Trail. “I like the Yellow Trail because of the more challenging terrain, the bluffs and the views of the river and Tulsa skyline,” Carrigg says. The Red Trail is short and provides a quick workout, Carrigg says, while the Blue includes elevations and meanders near a small pond, but the Yellow Trail, at nearly four-and-a-half miles, includes a little bit of everything. “The area can be described as a cross timber area that represents the transition between the Great Plains and the Ozark Plateau. The terrain is generally rocky but contains a lot of clay soils as well,” Carrigg says. “Since it adjoins the Arkansas River, there are many bluffs and rock faces as well.” The forest includes oak, hickory, ash and elm trees with an understory of redbud, dogwood, hawthorn and more. Wildlife includes deer, foxes, bald eagles, coyotes and many migratory birds. The land now consists of more than 300 acres, and Carrigg says Tulsa residents can be thanked for part of that. “The original tract of land was acquired in 1978 and has grown in size since. Turkey Mountain’s success has largely been the result of community donors who have not only helped acquire property, but have also developed the first-class facilities located at the trail head,” Carrigg says. Along the Yellow Trail, hikers might be able to spot relics of oil field equipment from the 1920s. There are also rumors of Viking petroglyphs on one of the bluffs facing the river. ENJOY THE VARIETY OF TREES AND WILDLIFE ALONG THE YELLOW TRAIL AT TURKEY MOUNTAIN. PHOTO COURTESY RIVER PARKS AUTHORITY.

64

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


are s k r a z O e Th s r e v o L r e e B for

Attached Teeth in a Day • call for a complimentary x-ray and Free Consultation.

Ale Trail. Fayetteville all along the e ar city’s seven s e ew th br of finest u visit each yo as The Ozarks’ rs rt at the ge la le Trail passpo ue malts and pick up an A y, . Sample uniq ne re ur ua jo sq ur n wntow start yo ter in the do breweries. To Visitors Cen n. Fayetteville e informatio 5776 for mor 152 947 ll or ca illealetrail.com Visit fayettev

Implant, Sedation, and Cosmetic Dentistry

2014

Chris Ward, DDS

918-274-4466 • owassodentalimplants.com 20585 Fayetteville.indd 1

18861 Champagne Penthouse.indd 1

1/22/15 12641 4:24 PM Chris Ward DDS.indd 1

10/8/14 4:46 PM

4/15/14 3:59 PM MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

65


HIKE ALONG A CREEK AND EXPERIENCE THE SANDSTONE CLIFFS AND ROCK FORMATIONS ON THE ROUGH CANYON TRAIL AT ROBBERS CAVE STATE PARK. PHOTOS COURTESY OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM AND RECREATION.

Rough Canyon Trail

Robbers Cave State Park Animal spotting on the Rough Canyon Trail can take place when you least expect it – just ask Robbers Cave State Park Naturalist Ted Daniels. “You go along a creek for about a quarter-mile, and, oh, wow, a bald eagle just flew by! There he goes!” Daniels says of the trail. Rough Canyon Trail is about two miles long and makes a full loop back to the parking lot, following a creek for about a quarter-mile. “I really like this trail because along the way there are a lot of little pools, and you can sit down, relax and take your shoes off when the weather is nice. There are sandstone cliffs and some cool rock formations, too,” Daniels says. Robbers Cave State Park is known for its interesting history, as well as its trails. Outlaws Jesse James and Belle Starr once hid out in this area, located in eastern Oklahoma. “It used to be a stopping point for thieves. Because it was Choctaw Indian territory, their leaders couldn’t arrest non-tribe members, and the

U.S. federal marshals nearby already had their hands full. It was a stopover point between California and Texas for a lot of these people,” Daniels says. The famous cave itself is often crowded during busier times, Daniels says, but during May and June and the fall, hikers might run into other people on the Rough Canyon Trail only on occasion. Information for a self-guided tour of the Rough Canyon Trail is available at the visitors center. Using GPS locations, the tour points out interesting spots along the way. “It’s to let people stop and think and enjoy where they are, while they’re here,” Daniels said. Hikers can also access longer trails from the Rough Canyon path. Robbers Cave State Park is located in the Sans Bois Mountains near Wilburton in southeastern Oklahoma.

Paths

Bluff Creek Park It’s not always necessary to hop in the car and drive to the middle of nowhere to experience a good hike in Oklahoma. Urban hiking can occur far from the pristine scenery usually associated with hiking. Luckily for Oklahoman City metropolitan area residents, Bluff Creek Park provides a serene landscape that traditional hikers usually expect, as well as paved trails and easy access for urban hikers to enjoy. Located off West Hefner Road in Oklahoma City, Bluff Creek Park offers two miles of paved trail and three miles of single-track dirt trail through a wooded area.

66

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

“Bluff Creek Park is one of Oklahoma City’s hidden secrets,” says Oklahoma City Parks & Recreation Public Information and Marketing Manager Jennifer Lindsey-McClintock. “It’s popular with walkers, runners and bikers.” Lindsey-McClintok also says there is a handicapped-accessible trail project in the works at Martin Nature Park. “The project is still in its infancy, but when completed, it will really help the Parks & Recreation Department open new doors to nature for individuals who have been otherwise excluded due to physical limitations,” Lindsey-McClintok says.


Cancer News

Cancer

Are you making the right choices?

There’s more to cancer care than ridding the body of cancer cells. Equally important is the goal of maintaining quality of life while undergoing treatment. Staying strong enough to fight the disease and maintain work and family routines during treatment should be part of any cancer care program. That’s why patients should be offered integrative therapies to supplement conventional surgical, radiation and chemotherapy treatments.

Know your options.

The importance of nutrition.

Every cancer is different, as is every cancer patient. Both traditional and integrative oncology therapies should be customized for every treatment plan. It’s important to work with a knowledgeable oncology team to understand your options, how they work, and whether they’re offered at your treatment center.

Fully eight out of ten cancer patients show symptoms of malnutrition. This can compromise the function of the immune system and weaken the patient. Nutritional therapy is therefore crucial for restoring digestive health and helping you stay strong to maintain your prescribed cancer treatment plan.

What exactly is integrative care?

Naturopathic medicine.

Therapy The benefits of

Maintains the immune system, which can be compromised by cancer treatment

Prevents malnutrition that could weaken a patient

Manages fatigue and pain that can accompany cancer treatment

Lessens stress, anxiety and depression that can accompany cancer diagnosis

Treatments for cancer typically consist of some Naturopathic care should also be considered — therapies combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. that help manage symptoms and encourage healing. The combination of these options with therapies Naturopathic clinicians address a variety of conditions designed to maintain quality of life is known as an associated with cancer including digestive issues, nerve integrative approach to cancer care. Therapies to damage, respiratory conditions and cancer-related improve energy, maintain the immune fatigue. Your naturopathic clinician should have system, manage fatigue and guard extensive knowledge of radiation therapy Mind-Body against malnutrition are all critical. and chemotherapy, plus a comprehensive Therapy The more therapeutic choices you understanding of your treatment plan. Pain Management have, the better you’ll be able Spiritual Support Team work. to customize a treatment Meditation Surgeons, doctors, clinicians and other plan that’s right for you. oncology professionals should all be Integrative therapies may Chemotherapy Nutritional part of your care team. It’s also helpful include nutritional Therapy if all your team members are counseling, naturopathic Radiation Therapy located in the same hospital to medicine, physical Acupuncture Surgery facilitate collaboration and speed therapy, chiropractic of care. Having your care team all Diagnostic care, acupuncture, Imaging Naturopathic under one roof allows you to mind-body therapy, Medicine schedule all your appointments at Advanced meditation and Genomic one time, which reduces wait time Pet Therapy Testing spiritual support. between appointments and allows you to focus on your treatment.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) is a national network of five hospitals in the U.S. with expertise in treating patients who are fighting complex or advanced-stage cancer, although many patients with an early-stage diagnosis seek our expertise as well. We combine world-class treatment with an integrative approach to care to reduce side effects and maintain quality of life during cancer treatment. If you or someone you love has complex or advanced-stage cancer, call 888-568-1571 or go to cancercenter.com.

Philadelphia Chicago Atlanta Tulsa Phoenix


Get Your The Mother Road

Kicks

takes on fashion. The rules for spring: Bright colors, flirty cuts and sophisticated accessories. Photography by Nathan Harmon

HAIR STYLED BY SHAWNA BURROUGHS, JARA HERRON SALON. MAKEUP BY TAYLOR LEDBETTER. MODELS PROVIDED BY LINDA LAYMAN AGENCY AND BRINK MANAGEMENT. SPECIAL THANKS TO CAMPBELL HOTEL, LEAKE CAR AUCTION, REEDER’S SERVICE CENTER, TALLY’S GOOD FOOD CAFÉ AND MIKE’S MANTIQUES & OLD PINK TRUCK.

ON SIERRA: REED KRAKOFF BLACK DRESS, $1,690; LANVIN BLACK HEELS, $920; PROENZA SCHOULER CLUTCH, $885, ABERSONS. ALEXIS BITTAR DROP PENDANT NECKLACE, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ON DAVID: BOGLIOLI LINEN SUIT, $1,345, WHITE BUTTON-UP SHIRT, $295; BUTTERO SHOES, $260; BILLY REID TRAVEL BAG, $695, ABERSONS.

68

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


ON LAKYN: KATE SPADE HOT-AIR BALLOON DRESS, $278, EARRINGS, $48, BARREL NECKLACE, $98, BANGLE BRACELET, $98; ALEXANDRE BIRMAN WHITE SNAKE EMBOSSED MULES, $650; JIMMY CHOO PINK PATENT LEATHER ENVELOPE CLUTCH, $825, BALLIETS. IC BERLIN WHITE AVIATOR SUNGLASSES, $499, VISIONS. ON DAVID: MICHAEL KORS BLACK LEATHER-AND-KNIT HOODIE SWEATSHIRT, $295; MICHAEL KORS INDIGO JEANS, $145; SAKS FIFTH AVENUE COLLECTION SUEDE DRIVERS, $278, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

69


ON SIERRA: LANVIN BLACK TOP, $1,505; RALPH LAUREN WHITE SHORTS, $395; ROBERT CLERGERIE WEDGE SHOES, $395; THE ROW SLING BAG, $2,950, ABERSONS. ALEXIS BITTAR TASSEL EARRINGS, $225, AND LUCITE BANGLES, $155-$195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ON LAKYN: ETRO PAISLEY PRINT BLOUSE, $425, AND WHITE SIDE-ZIP PANTS, $450; PAIGE DENIM JACKET, $190, SILVER HOOPS, $190, AND SNAKE CHAIN BRACELET, $370, BALLIETS. JIMMY CHOO BLUE PRINT PUMPS, $625, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ON DAVID: TOMMY BAHAMA PLAID BUTTON-DOWN SHIRT, $118; CITIZENS OF HUMANITY JEANS, $225; TOMMY BAHAMA SLIP-ON SNEAKERS, $98, TRAVERS MAHAN.

70

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


ON LAKYN: LES COPAINS CROPPED SHIRT, $745, AND CIRCLE SKIRT, $495; JIMMY CHOO LASER-CUT PEEP-TOE BOOTIES, $1,575, AND BLACK STUDDED HOBO BAG, $1,895; ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL CLUSTER NECKLACE, $195, AND CRYSTAL CLUSTER RING, $245, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

71


ON SIERRA: M MISSONI KNIT TOP, $445; KORAL JEANS, $160; ERIC JAVITS TOTE, $380, ETHNIC WOOD AND BEADED NECKLACE, $95, SHELL BANGLE CUFF, $150, BALLIETS. ON LAKYN: ST. JOHN BOUCLE JACKET, $1,295; PAIGE DISTRESSED JEANS, $249; STUART WEITZMAN METALLIC AND SNAKE EMBOSSED LEATHER MULES, $435; JIMMY CHOO BLACK FLORAL EMBOSSED ENVELOPE CLUTCH, $895; NEST HAMMERED SILVER TEARDROP EARRINGS, $195, AND STRETCH BEADED BRACELET, $250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ON DAVID: BARENA VENEZIA NAVY LINEN BLAZER, $690; RAG AND BONE WHITE T-SHIRT, $75, ABERSONS. ALEXANDER MCQUEEN SIGNATURE SKULL SCARF, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

72

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

73


ON SIERRA: LES COPAINS NAVY FIT AND FLARE DRESS, $545; JIMMY CHOO DENIM PUMPS, $595; TORI BURCH WHITE CROSSBODY BAG, $365; STEPHANIE KANTIS OVAL AND HOOP DROP EARRINGS, $175; ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE BANGLES, $155-$185, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. LAFONT RED AND BABY BLUE SUNGLASSES, $389, VISIONS. ON LAKYN: JIL SANDER BLUE DRESS, $1,000; STUART WEITZMAN GRAY PUMPS, $355; PROENZA SCHOULER WHITE CROSSBODY BAG, $1,625, ABERSONS. ALEXIS BITTAR BANGLE, $185, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. CHANEL RED SUNGLASSES, $339, VISIONS. ON DAVID: BYRON PLAID JACKET, $825; HERTLING SLACKS, $295; TRAVERS MAHAN STRIPED BUTTONUP SHIRT, $250, TRAVERS MAHAN. COMMON PROJECTS BLUE LEATHER SNEAKERS, $449; BILLY REID MESSENGER BAG, $395, ABERSONS. OLIVER PEOPLES MIRROR AVIATORS, $299, VISIONS.

74

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


put the spring

Back in Your Skin Ultherapy is the only FDA-cleared non-invasive way to lift & tighten sagging skin on the brow, neck & chin. Ultherapy stimulates the deepest layers of the skin for natural-looking results with no surgery or downtime. Before Receive aAfter FREE Neck Treatment

When you have a Full Face Treatment Before

After 120 Days

Schedule Your Free Consultation: 918.948.6375 MODEL

www.skincareinstitute.net 6565 South Yale, Suite 110 | Tulsa, Oklahoma 74136 Special promotion valid until 3.31.15, and may not be combined. Must mention this ad to receive special. Individual results vary. Other restrictions may apply. 20606 Skin Care Institute.indd 1

1/29/15 11:45 AM

Girls Night Out Date Night Corporate Team Building Private Parties Birthday Parties Bachelorette Parties

Paint. Drink. Have Fun. 20056 Pinots Palette.indd 1

Cherry Street - Broken Arrow - Riverwalk - Bricktown OKC 7/10/14 3:32 PM MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

75


ON SIERRA: THE ROW RED GOWN, $3,390; STUART WEITZMAN SILVER SANDALS, $398, ABERSONS. ALEXIS BITTAR FLOATING STONE EARRINGS, $225, CRYSTAL AND GLASS CUFF BRACELET, $275, AND CRYSTAL HINGED BRACELET, $325, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

76

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


ON LAKYN: BCBG OPEN-BACK BRUSHSTROKE SATIN GOWN, $468; ALEXIS BITTAR PENDANT NECKLACE, $125, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

77


Creative Director: Todd Pyland, Photographer: Jeremy Charles, Art Director: Tony Li, Cinematographer: Brad Knull, Assistant Cameraman: Tanner Herriott, Photography Assistant: Jamie Alsabrook, Lighting Assistant: Marissa Berger, Stylist: Shannon Schroeder, Set Decorator: Stacy Suvino, Makeup: Jordan Best and Donna Powell, Hair: Valerie Timmons, Styling Assistants: Kailey Gullett, Regan Wallace and Ofelia Patrick, Extras: Anabella Pope, Carly Bender, Cori Beth Cunningham, Kale Bloemker and Madeline Slack


Special thanks to: Tulsa Little Theater, Linda Layman Agency, New York Vintage, Tulsa Ballet, Tulsa Stage, Omni Lighting, I-44 Antique Mall, Bix Antiques, Cheap Thrills Vintage, Saks Fifth Avenue, Miss Jackson’s, Beshara’s Formal Wear, Kent Hammond/Epoxy Films, Rob Nickels, Talmadge Powell Creative Staff: Nate Leitz and Jennifer Dory


A Healthy Start You’re never too young to begin focusing on health. By Lindsay Cuomo

Y

our health is tied to all aspects of life, both your physical abilities and your mental and emotional well being. While your focus on healthy living might shift throughout life, there are specific areas that are particularly important during different stages of life. “Regardless of the age group, staying healthy can be pretty simple in theory but proves to be more difficult to live out on a daily basis, especially as we get older and our free time becomes more limited,” says Dr. Patrick Martin, a physician with INTEGRIS Family Care Moore. In order to maintain health, Martin gives tips of what to eat and how to treat your body. “Eating a healthy and balanced diet, which means consuming 50 percent or fewer of your calories from carbohydrates, 20 to 30 percent from protein and only 10 to 20 percent from fats; exercising four to five times a week and getting eight hours of sleep a night are paramount to living a long and healthy life.” A healthy lifestyle is simply that: a lifestyle.

80

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

“Diets just don’t work. Lifestyle changes do,” adds Dr. Castel Santana, family physician with Mercy Health Network’s Midwest City office. “There isn’t a quick fix.” According to Santana, you should use anything you have at your disposal, even your smart phone. “Use technology to help you. Apps are helpful to track calories and exercise,” he says. We all know that healthy eating and exercise are important at any age. But what more can we do to ensure our health at each step of our life as we age? Many feel that old age is far away, and they don’t need to worry about their future health. However, what you do in your youthful years will have an impact on your health in your later years. Improving and maintaining healthy behavior early in life can improve your health when you’re older. “It is important to be proactive so you don’t have to be reactive later,” advises Santana. “The things you are doing right now might catch up with you.” Setting the standard for healthy behavior begins from the moment we leave the nest.


20s

In our teens and early 20s, we are more likely to engage in risky behaviors. “Individuals in this age group tend to be more open to trying or experimenting with new things, have more of a mindset on the present and still have somewhat of an attitude of invincibility, which I think carries over into some of the decisions that they make,” says Martin. Dr. Jeff Galles, chief medical officer at Utica Park Clinics in Tulsa, agrees. “Traumatic injuries are more common in our teens and 20s,” says Galles. All three physicians interviewed say it is important to remind teens and those in their 20s to make simple, basic decisions in their everyday life. Wear seat belts, use safe sexual practices and limit alcohol and tobacco use. “Your lifestyle will heavily affect overall health as you move through your 20s,” says Martin. The body you create in your 20s will be the one you work with later. Mental health is also a key issue in your 20s. At this age, young adults often ignore psychological difficulties or deal with those difficulties in unhealthy ways. Depression and anxiety are common health concerns and, as a result, are leading causes of death at this age. “We might not all need treatment for depression or any other mental illnesses, but I do feel it important to have a support system in place to discuss the everyday stressors that might affect your daily mental well being,” says Santana. Being healthy physically can improve mental health, but often it is not enough. “Diet, exercise and medications can be effective mental health treatments, but in some cases seeing a specialist is also very important part of treatment,” says Santana. Going to the doctor isn’t often a high priority for people in their 20s; however, doctors highly recommend routine visits. “Regular visits allow patients to educate themselves on their health and the process so you won’t be surprised later,” says Galles. “Developing relationships with primary care providers is important as we enter our adult lives. Dental and vision care are also important.”

30s

As we enter our 30s, we often find ourselves more involved in our careers or parenthood and are quickly distracted from our health. Our lives tend to be less about our individuality and more focused on the groups we are involved in, be it a young family or the needs of the workplace. “Most have graduated college, begun families and embarked on a career path. Our lives begin to take on more shape as we gain more

Make a change.

Go Red Luncheon

May 8, 2015

tulsagored.heart.org | 918.877.8361

Media Sponsors

TM Go Red trademark of AHA, Red Dress trademark of DHHS.

20602 Go Red.indd 1

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

81 1/29/15

8:41 AM


responsibility,” says Martin. “If we only focus all our efforts on keeping our physical bodies healthy without paying attention to our minds, our emotional well-being, and our soul, we miss the mark. Everything is interconnected, and at times emotional pain can manifest itself in very physical ways.” Finding a balance between work and life is a key health concern for many people as they enter this portion of their lives. “Work-life balance is always important and is facilitated by strong communications with spouse or life partners,” says Galles. “Make efforts to maintain stable relationships.” It is during this period that shedding the independence we established earlier can aid in improving our health. “Strong support groups, church or social group support can be critical,” says Galles. “Strong family support is also very helpful if available during the child-rearing years.” Santana sees spiritual health as one of his five pillars of wellness and a key to overall health. “Your spiritual denomination isn’t what is important,” explains Santana. “What is important is a well being with your soul, whether that is through meditation, yoga, prayer or any other form of relaxation and spiritual cleansing.” As our lists of responsibilites grow, so does the impact of our health choices. “I begin to see more people struggling with anxiety and depression, which sometimes stem from previous relationships, problems coping with stress at work or with increasing family demands,” says Martin. “I also see chronic diseases, such as diabetes, start to crop up in this age group, which will have an enormous impact on an individual’s future health.” Galles advises 30-year-olds to get wellness screenings every three to five years with a particular focus on family history. These screenings

provide for baselines that your doctor will use to better assess your health as you age.

40s

It is when we reach our 40s that our health becomes a more prevalent factor in our lives. All the previous stressors of work and family are still prevalent. However, we now often begin to notice issues with our physical wellbeing. Concerns like chronic diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and high cholesterol, make our 40s seem like the end of our youth, [but] it is not. “It is the beginning of middle age,” says Galles. “Patients begin to feel their age and are looking for ways to feel young again,” adds Santana. It is during this stage in life where people more commonly face and deal with the health issues and mortality of those closest to them. “In your 40s, patients are often seeing their parents deal with health issues like heart disease and cancer,” explains Galles. “Patients, often for the first time, are seeking out ways to keep it from happening to them.” This awakens in patients the need to make changes in their own health, but despite not having the exuberance of their younger selves, there is still plenty of time to proactively affect their health with valuable and lasting benefits. “I would like to see people begin to see their health in terms of prevention. Doing things to prevent themselves from ever developing a disease, instead of deciding to make some lifestyle changes after they are diagnosed,” says Martin. “People will try to eat right and make healthier choices after they begin to have symptoms when the illnesses likely could possibly have been prevented.” All physicians interviewed remind us of those important lifestyle choices we all know and love: healthy eating, exercise, the importance of sleep and avoiding risky behaviors like tobacco use. It is during this period that making changes in these areas can have immediate and noticeable effects on our lives. “We all get into the habit of unconsciously living,” says Santana. “Know what you are putting in your body and understand the importance.” Galles suggests varying your physical activities by using your body in different ways. “Try not to limit your exercise to one type of activity,” offers Galles. “Cross training, biking, running, swimming are all good activities to mix in to limit joint stress.”

And Beyond

Health as you enter your 50s looks much like it does during your 40s. The main change should be the adding of additional health screenings. Routine exams are more important than ever. The advanced screenings will help you and your doctor recognize changes sooner. Early prevention and diagnosing diseases such as heart disease and cancer can drastically improve your chances of survival. It can also have positive effects financially. “We know that the cost of health care is reduced when you have an

82

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015


established relationship with your primary care provider,” explains Galles. At this age, specific screenings are more common as doctors focus on the more common issues patients face. “Most organizations recommend that patients begin the process of screening for colon cancer as well as breast cancer. Some earlier based on family history,” says Galles. “For smokers and recent non-smokers, we also discuss lung cancer screening between the ages of 55 and 74.” It is when you are in your 60s that heart disease becomes a major concern. At this age it is the leading cause of death. “It is increasingly important to monitor cholesterol levels and maintain a normal blood pressure,” advises Galles. During this time your body begins to have less defense against disease than it did when you were younger. As your body is less able to fight off diseases, vaccinations become a priority again. “Infectious diseases become more prevalent in our 60s,” says Galles. “Vaccinations are important as our immune systems begin to falter and we need boost them. Obtain a shingles vaccine at 60. At 65, providers recommend updating pneumonia vaccinations.” For women, bone health becomes an

important concern. “Women should begin screening for osteoporosis in this decade of life,” says Galles. It is during our 70s that we need to take stock and be aware of what we are physically capable of. Mobility and safe independent living move into focus as our health will have more affect on our physical safety. Fall prevention and safe driving are key concerns at this age. “We encourage family members to accompany their older family members when they drive to evaluate their driving skills,” says Galles. “Also, establish a network of support for when you need help.” Though our physical abilities are decreased, exercise is still important into your 70s and beyond. A strong body is much more likely to be a healthy body. Your body’s abilities allow you to have your independence safely for as long as possible. Doctors agree, the best thing you can do to be as healthy as possible at the latest stages of your life is to take an active, educated approach to your health early. This begins by eating right, exercising and staying connected to your primary care physician.

Advertising | Video | Corporate | Celebrating 25 Years in 2015

Miller Photography, Inc. | 1442 E. 3rd Street | Tulsa, OK 74120 918-587-2505 | millerphotographyinc.com

Miller Photography ad_Jan 20611 Scott Miller.indd 1 2015.indd 1

1/12/15 8:24 PM AM 2/2/15 2:43 MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

83


Summer Camp Directory

Summer Camp Directory

Find the best summer camp for your future artist or tennis pro.

K

eep your kids moving and their minds sharp this summer with one of these camps. Just because school’s out doesn’t mean your kids have to stop learning. Get them out of the house and into an art class or swimming pool, onto a tennis court or theater stage, or involved in the other fun activities these camps offer. Your kids will come home from camp with fun stories and new friends. Whatever your summer schedule has in store, you’ll be able to find a camp for your kids to enjoy in May, June, July and August, with a time slot that fits your agenda. For the working parent, there’s no need to worry about what your kids are doing during the summer while you’re at the office. At these safe and affordable camps, you can rest easy knowing they’re in good hands and having a blast developing useful life skills around positive role models. Summer sunshine, adventure and discovery await your children. Let them form or further develop fun hobbies that can last a lifetime. Enroll your children in one of these camps, and, “You’re the best,” is all you’ll hear until next year when they’ll say, “What are my options this summer?”

Kanakuk

Since 1926, kids have enjoyed fun at Kanakok. This premier experience includes 70 activities, sports and themed parties. Fulltime and summer staff are committed to developing dynamic Christian leaders. Kanakuk is a co-ed camp for ages 6-18. The camp is located in Branson, Mo., and includes dates from May 30 to Aug. 8. For more information, contact Bri Coon at 888.263.3960 or bjcoon@kanakuk.com, or visit www.kanakuk.com.

84

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

Brook Fine Arts Summer Musical Theatre Camp

Summer musical theater camps allow students to learn various songs, choreography and dialogue from popular musicals and perform for family and friends. These camps are offered at Brook Fine Arts for boys and girls in second grade through 12th

grade. Camps vary through June and July and are 3-4 hours per day, depending on the camp, with a performance at the end of the week. For more information, email music@ brookfinearts.com or visit www. brookfinearts.com.

Mac’s National Soccer School

For 20 years, Mac’s has offered camps for soccer enthusiasts of all levels. Camps are offered for boys and girls from recreational, competitive and advanced backgrounds. Camps take place in Tulsa June 8-12, June 15-19 and July 19-23. Times vary by camp. For more information, contact Denise McIntosh at 918.688.8737 or denise@ macssoccerschool.com, or visit www. macssoccerschool.com.

Gilrease Museum and Zarrow Center’s Summer Art Camp

Explore the museum, gardens and the Brady Arts District at summer art camp. Our creative art activities will inspire young artists ages 5-12. Join us for summer art fun. Co-ed camps run at Gilcrease Museum June 8-26 and July 13-31 and at Zarrow Center June 8-Aug. 7 – full day and half day slots are available. For more infor-


SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

mation, contact Melani Hamilton at 918.596.2774 or melani-hamilton@utulsa.edu, or visit www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu.

Holland Hall Summer Programs

With more than 80 one-week classes or camps, designed both for fun and education, there is a program for everyone of every age at Holland Hall this summer. Adventure camps, art classes, language studies, sports opportunities and Star Wars are just a few of the offerings. Co-ed camps run during the day June 1-July 24. For more information, call 918.481.1111, ext 716, or visit www.hollandhall.org.

Philcrest Hills Tennis Camp

Camps dates are June 1-5, 8-12, 15-19, 22-26, June 29-July 3, July 6-10, 13-17, 20-24, 27-31 and Aug. 3-7. Every day, participants ages 4-16 will play tennis from 10 to 11:30 a.m., eat lunch from 11:30 to noon and have fun swimming from noon to 2 p.m. Camps are offered at Philcrest Hills Tennis Club. For more information, contact Russell Warner at 918.299.2643 or philcrest@philcrest.net, or visit www.philcrest.net.

Camp Incredible

Camp Incredible consists of six one-week day camps offering exciting themed classes that combine learning and fun. Students will explore and learn while having incredible summer adventures. Camps are offered at University School at the University of Tulsa for those 4-years old to 8th grade. Camps are co-ed and run June 1-26 and July 6-17 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, contact Shelly McCollum at 918.631.5060 or shelly-mccollum@utulsa. edu, or visit www.utulsa.edu/uschool.

Monte Cassino Summer and Athletic Camps

W I T H M O R E T H A N 80 S U M M E R CLASSES AND CAMPS. . .

THERE IS SOMETHING F O R E V E RYO N E !

Full and half-day arts, academic and athletic camps are available in June and July to ages Pre-K through 8th grade! Please consider Monte Cassino summer camps for your student’s camp adventure! For more information, contact Caitriona Harris at 918.742.4190 or charris@montecassino.org, or visit www.montecassino.org.

Including. . . Adventure Camps Photography Movie Making Mad about Museums Writing Workshops Sports Camps Batik Starry Nights

Camp Shalom

Camp Shalom – a summer of fun and lifetime of memories. Camp Shalom offers 10 weekly sessions and a safe, fun environment for your camper. 3-year olds through Kindergarten have weekly themes; 1st6th graders have over 50 specialty camps to pick from. 7th-10th graders participate in the CIT (counselor in training) program. These co-ed camps are offered May 26th-July 31st from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Before care starts at 7:30 a.m., and after care ends at 6 p.m. For more information, contact Martha Kelley at 918.495.1111 or mkelley@jewishtulsa.org, or visit www.csjcc.org.

And More! To learn more, check out our website, www.hollandhall.org/summerprograms or call 918.481.1111, ext 716.

www.hollandhall.org

summer 20624 Holland ad.inddHall.indd 1 1

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

85 2/9/15

8:50 AM 9:25


SUMMER CAMP GUIDE AUGUST 2015

Ed ucation Issue Our annual look at issues affecting students and their families.

Charles Schusterman Jewish Community Center

Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205

3 Years-Kindergarten Theme Weeks

1st-6th Grade

Over 50 Specialty Camps

7th-10th Grade

Counselor In Training (CIT) Camp

2/17/15 4:29 PM

Production at the end of the week. Camps for Grades 2-12.

Camp Register at www.csjcc.org

Brook Fine Arts Summer Musical Theatre Camps

918.495.1111 • 2021 East 71st Street/Tulsa, OK 20625 Camp Shalom.indd 1

Education 1-8h.indd 1

8138 S Harvard Ave Tulsa 918-491-6011

DISCOVER THE FUN OF SUMMER CAMP 2/16/15 10:18 20613AM Brook Fine Arts.indd 1

2/3/15 8:44 AM

START YOUR EXPERIENCE ONLINE AT WWW.KANAKUK.COM

KANAKUK HAS PROVIDED OVER 300,000 BOYS AND GIRLS:

u EXCITEMENT & ADVENTURE u FUN EXPERIENCE u CONFIDENCE BUILDING u GODLY FRIENDSHIPS

SUMMER CAMPS SINCE 1926 FOR BOYS AND GIRLS 6618 Kanakuk Ministries | 1353 Lake Shore Drive Branson, Missouri 65616 | 1.888.263.3960 20609 kanakuk.indd 1

86

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

1/30/15 11:54 AM


SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

SUMMER ART CAMP

SUMMER

TENNIS DAY CAMP

Gilcrease Museum offers art activities at two locations during the summer Gilcrease Museum 5-6 year olds (June 8-26, July 13-31) Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education 7-12 year olds (June 8-26, July 13-August 7)

At Philcrest Hills Tennis Club Join us for a fun week of tennis lessons, outdoor matches, and swimming!

Explore the museum, gardens and the Brady Arts District. 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. & 1 - 4 p.m. Half Day Class: Monday-Friday: $100/members, $125/not-yet-members

Camps Commence Mon., June 1st . New Camps beginning every Monday from 10 am to 2 pm. Ages 4-14. • We’ll provide rackets and lunch • Bring your tennis shoes, towel, and sunscreen • Swim time at pool on site with lifeguards and adult staff Camps starting at just $139/week or $40/day *Non Member Prices are $165/week or $50/day

All Day Class: $200/members, $250/not-yet-members Registration is required. Museum members can register beginning March 1; not-yet members beginning March 23.

For more information visit, gilcrease.utulsa.edu/camp.

1400 North Gilcrease Museum Road • gilcrease.utulsa.edu •

20621 Philcrest Hills Tennis.indd 1

2/6/15 20594 3:44 PM Gilcrease Museum.indd 1

TU is an EEO/AA institution.

1/26/15 5:00 PM

University School

Educating Gifted Students

Since 1982

Call for a Tour

918-631-5060 • www.utulsa.edu/uschool The University of Tulsa is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

20617 Macs Soccer school.indd 1

2/5/15 20588 8:03 AM University School.indd 1

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

87

1/23/15 10:48 AM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR What is the difference between “living” and “existing” in a marriage or partnership? There are always two people who are completely separate and interdependent within a marriage. They are each responsible for their own behaviors and make choices that define and COURTNEY LINSENMEYERO’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR direct his or her future. These decisions are personal and are either destructive or productive, leading to failures, successes, shame or answers. Over time, individual choices create patterns of “living” or “existing” in the marriage in which persons can and do direct their own fate. If they are “living” in the marriage, they feel secure and accomplished at trusting his or herself with making healthy future decisions, in or out of the marriage; Boundaries are clearly defined, respect is given as a reflection of the self, and accountability is a consequence when mistakes are made. If the couple is “existing” in the marriage, one or both may feel stuck, shameful, victimized and/or trapped as repetitive attempts to rescue or justify disordered behaviors continue define their partnership. As relationship patterns shift, so does the nature of the marriage. Living or existing in an unsatisfactory relationship with ourselves or with a partner is a choice. We are never trapped or held captive by another person, mistake or disorder. Choosing to live is a choice.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

VETERINARIAN Does your pet suffer from seasonal allergies? Spring is right around the corner, and along with the blooms comes allergy season. There are primarily two types of allergies in pets: food allergies and environmental allergies. If your pet gets itchy when seasons change, they DR. RODNEY ROBARDS are probably reacting to seasonal, environmental allergens. But if symptoms continue year-round, it's more likely a sensitivity to something in the environment, or to something in their diet. There are a some exceptions to this rule, however. If you live in an area that doesn't have a hard freeze in the winter, environmental allergens can build up and cause year-round issues for your pet. In addition, seasonal allergies can progress to year-round allergies. Allergies in dogs and cats more often take the form of skin irritation or inflammation – a condition called allergic dermatitis. If your pet has allergies, their skin will become very itchy. You will notice that they start scratching excessively, bite or chew at certain areas of their body, rub against furniture or slide their face against the carpet. You may also notice hair loss, open sores, hot spots or scabbing and flaking of the skin. If you notice any of these symptoms consult your veterinarian.

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl., Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

88

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

PERSONAL TRAINER I’m happy with my weight; can I change my diet now? Yes, you can now start moving towards your maintenance phase, which will help you stay at your target weight. Start allowing yourself 100 more calories a day until you stop losing weight. For JOHN JACKSON example, if your caloric intake was 1,500 a day while you were in your slim-down phase, you should increase it to 1,600 a day for the next week. As long as your weight stays the same, continue with the same amount of calories. You will also need to stick with at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (jogging, zumba, spin) five days a week. Moreover, if you are fit enough to participate, do 30 minutes of vigorous exercise like basketball, tennis or BOOTCAMP offered at St. John’s Health Plaza. Ballistic exercise should not be done more than three times a week and rarely in back-to-back workouts.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL How do you know if an insurance company is financially strong? The financial strength of an insurance company is certainly important. First and foremost, it depicts their ability to pay claims to customers including at times of catastrophe. In JARED PETERSON the property and casualty industry, one of the key measurements is the premium to surplus ratio. This evaluates how much premium a company has versus its surplus (money in the bank). Anything under a 2-1 ratio is often considered strong and many regulators expect at least a 3-1 ratio. One of the most respected third party rating agencies for insurance company financial strength is A.M. Best. They use a school grade scale in accessing the financial strength of a company. A+ is considered the best, and it goes downward from there. Many advisors will recommend A- rated companies or higher to be safe. If you don’t know the A.M. Best financial rating of your insurance company, just ask. Company representatives should know. If you have questions involving auto, home, or life insurance, contact a AAA agent near you.

Jared Peterson, AAA Oklahoma 2121 E 15th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.748.1030 Jared.Peterson@aaaok.org

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT There has been a lot of buzz about public relations, but I don’t know where to start or even if it is worth it. You have probably heard the saying, “Image is everything,” and it’s true. It is important to know that PR isn’t just about being in the news; it JESSICA DYER is about how you and your business are perceived by your target audience. When developing a PR strategy, take into account your current marketing and advertising efforts and goals. It is important to ensure that it is consistent with and supported by your business vision and practices. A solid PR campaign should be a well-rounded mix of media, community, internal and customer relations. When done well this can give your current marketing efforts or advertising campaign a power punch. It’s not uncommon for our clients to see ROI of 50% to70%. An expertly crafted PR strategy will mean an increase in your bottom line, something that is definitely worth it.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539.777.6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

PHYSICAL THERAPY Should my pain be measured by a number scale or by my function? Clinicians that use validated outcome measures for pain assessment, can better determine a persons function and ability. The most commonly used scales for pain rating TIM MINNICK, PT are the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). What is more important is how does your pain affect your daily function despite its presence? Your doctor has probably asked you a question of, “How bad does it hurt on a scale of 1 to 10?” But, your improved function is the most important measure for you, as well as your clinician, insurance company and your physician. There are many highly sophisticated questionnaires that the physical therapist may use as a tool to accurately measure your function. So when your Physical Therapist asks for a few extra measurements and functionality tests, it may be to help you better understand how your pain is affecting your function. If you have questions about the rating scales, please discuss this with your physical therapist or your physician.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. HOSPICE CARE

LEGAL SERVICES

My father has Alzheimer’s disease, and he is declining quickly. We have recently discussed bringing in hospice care. How can we determine if he is ready?

In Oklahoma, what is the difference between “intoxicating” and “non-intoxicating” beverages? All beverages containing more than three and two-tenths percent (3.2%) alcohol by weight and all BRAD BEASLEY mixed beverage coolers (as defined in Okla. Stat. tit. 37Section 506), regardless of percent of alcoholic content, are deemed “intoxicating.” All beverages containing more than one-half of one percent (1/2 of 1%) alcohol by volume and not more than three and twotenths percent (3.2%) alcohol by weight are defined to be low-point beer. Wherever the term “non-intoxicating beverage” or “non-intoxicating malt beverage” appears in the Oklahoma Statutes, it is construed to mean “lowpoint beer.” The distinction between intoxicating and non-intoxicating is important in many respects, including licensing required to sell such beverages, applicable taxes and when and where such beverages may be offered for sale.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

DEVELOPMENTAL OPTOMETRIST Is 20/20 really perfect vision for children? 20/20 is eyesight which only covers about five percent of total vision skills necessary for efficient learning and reading. Good vision involves much more than seeing clearly with or without glasses. The MEGAN KIRKPATRICK, OD other 95 percent of vision skills comes from the three pillars of vision, which include: eye teaming, eye tracking and eye focusing. If needed, these pillars can be strengthened through training (Vision Therapy). Most children usually receive a brief screening at school that only checks their distance vision using an eye chart. Each year thousands of children suffer from undetected vision problems that make school and life challenging. Many are misdiagnosed as having a learning disability or ADD. Children with poor visual skills may struggle to read, have short attention spans, perform poorly in sports, develop low self-esteem, and have doors closed to future careers.

Megan Kirkpatrick, OD South Tulsa Vision Development Center 8988- D1 S Sheridan Tulsa, OK 74133 918.992.2343 www.tulsavisiondevelopment.com

The first step is to visit with his physician about his condition and prognosis. There are Medicare regulations in place to help doctors determine if and when a patient qualifies for hospice care. First, the patient must have a life-limiting illness with a prognosis of six months or less left to live. Two physicians must make this determination and certify in writing. At Grace Hospice, we will have one of our registered nurses evaluate your father, following Medicare’s guidelines. If all parties determine that a patient is eligible, that person can elect to use their hospice benefit. At Grace Hospice, we provide care during the course of the disease and also provide support to the family throughout the duration of care and for a 13-month period of grief and bereavement after the death. Please contact Grace Hospice for more information at 918.744.7223. AVA HANCOCK

Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT I am one of those guys who is very comfortable wearing bold colors and patterns, but what is acceptable for the professional atmosphere? Please don’t be afraid to let out your personal style; this is one of the greatest components of dressing AUTUMN POHL successfully. I steer fashionably adventurous men away from the basic color box (blue and white) and open their eyes to pink, yellow, lavender, jade, etc. The key with colors like these is to choose one that complements skin-tone and goes with a softer shade so it doesn’t stand out. The subtler, the more respect is earned. Guys are looking at other men, sizing them up, and the last thing you want a business associate to think is that you are completely consumed with yourself. So keep it low key and focus in on one detail. Whether it’s the color or pattern, make sure that it fits your personality flawlessly. And if you ever hesitate or doubt your color/ pattern choice, mix it with something more classic and familiar so your extreme confidence is what is noticed only second to your impeccable personal style.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST What is the risk of deficiencies of testosterone and vitamin D in men? Studies show a very complex interplay of vitamin D and androgen metabolism that suggests that a deficiency of both hormones can be bad for your health. For example, MALISSA SPACEK one recent study showed that for men there was an increased risk of all fatal events in patients who were being referred for coronary angiography who had both low free testosterone and low vitamin D. In short, this means that for men who had combined deficiency in their free testosterone and vitamin D death rates were higher, for cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular events. Simply put, low testosterone levels plus low vitamin D levels equals death. Men need to have their testosterone and vitamin D levels checked. If you have any questions on this matter or if you would like to schedule to have your levels checked please call us at 918.872.9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR I recently heard a friend speaking of nutritional psychology. Could you explain the meaning and what it treats? Nutritional psychology focuses on how the foods we eat influence how we feel and resulting behavior. Nutrition psychologists apply the principles and techniques of cognitive-behavioral psychology to AMY KESNER, help people get and stay healthy. Some PHD, LPC, LADC steps a nutritional psychologist may utilize include researching and testing a patient’s unique bio-chemical make-up, helping discover nutritional deficiencies that could be contributing to a patient’s symptoms, encouraging a patient to explore diet and lifestyle changes that would best support your goals related to emotional and behavioral symptoms. Researchers are focusing on ways that various herbs, spices, vitamins and other nutrients affect our brain and overall health. Growing research is demonstrating how spices can improve brain functioning and how other foods may increase negative symptoms and decline in cognition. Some psychologists are utilizing the results of these studies as treatment of symptoms related to depression, anxiety and bipolar disorders. It is not recommended that any individual being treated for these disorders stop current treatments but may consult with their doctor or psychologist to see if adding certain spices, vitamins, nutrients and herbs may be a healthy addition or alternative.

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

89


Fun Italian Auto Tulsa in

3737 S Memorial Drive • 355-5000


Taste

PAN SAUMON POELE FEATURES PAN-SEARED SALMON OVER RICE PILAF SERVED WITH LEMON CAPER BUERRE BLANC AND ASPARAGUS. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

FOOD, DRINK, AND OTHER PLEASURES

T

French Feast

In search of a second career, a Tulsa native strikes gold with French cuisine.

here’s a brand-new, upscale shopping mall in south Tulsa whose stores join to form a vast, crenellated castle. Barely noticed below the castle battlements is a bright red door. Step through that door and, like Alice down the rabbit’s tunnel, you’re suddenly in another world, a world of enchantment, elegance and whimsy. The oxblood walls, dimly illuminated by sconces, stretch upward. Pass through a low archway to enter a cozy space with a light-spangled, low ceiling supported by bright white pillars and walls of Pompeian red. “We sometimes call the first room the Great Room and this room the bistro,” says Jenna Krimbill. “I want everybody who walks in to feel they are some place other than Tulsa, Oklahoma.” In her elegant black dress, with a bit of movie-star charisma thrown in, Krimbill might be mistaken for a hostess, and indeed she’s filled that post. But before that (and after graduating Holland Hall and the University of Oklahoma) she was a hard-charging advertising executive. “And then I realized that I was working 80 hours a week, and it just wasn’t what I was looking for. My life was spent on a computer,” she says. She moved back to her hometown, Tulsa, and enrolled at The

University of Tulsa to pursue a master’s degree. To pay the bills, she worked as a restaurant server. To her surprise, she loved it. She worked her way up to bartender and then manager. “And at some point I realized, ‘I can do this!’” she says. So La Crepe Nanou was born. The original Crepe Nanou was founded by an expatriate Frenchman in New Orleans. He started out serving just crepes but quickly expanded his menu to feature the kind of quintessentially Parisian dishes you might find in a back-street bistro in Montmartre. Though she’s acquired the right to use the original New Orleans recipes, Krimbill’s Crepe Nanou is independent, not part of a chain. Krimbill, along with Cory Kester (the general manager) and Executive Chef Jake Smith, spent, says Krimbill, “countless hours in the kitchen changing the recipes, perfecting them.” “I believe in the elegance of simplicity,” says Smith. “Some chefs add so many ingredients, you can’t find the food in there,” adds Krimbill. “Our view is, let’s make what we can of the core ingredient. And we take special care to get the finest, freshest ingredients. We make just about everything in-house.” Another magic door, at the corner of the bistro, leads to the kitchen – bright from its gleaming stoves and utensils. In one corner, a huge MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

91


Taste

ON WHEELS JENNA KRIMBILL, OWNER OF LA CREPE NANOU, LOCATED IN THE VINEYARD SHOPPING CENTER IN SOUTH TULSA.

frying pan sits atop a flame, the workhorse of the kitchen, adds one of the line cooks. It makes the crepes. With intent gaze and quick balletic motions, a young woman pours the batter, and slowly turns it as the batter sizzles. On another stovetop, filling for the crepe, Beef Bourguignon, braises. “A fine, hearty dish for a winter’s night,” says Smith. Nearby sits a pot of Sauce Gribiche, a lively mayonnaise-like French sauce made with eggs, mustard, capers and tarragon. It adds a zest to the Crepe Saumon Fume, which features smoked salmon made in-house. Just to the left, tongues of flame slowly roast a whole rack of lamb. Smith has a way with meat, and the lamb chops that come off the grill are as juicy and packed with flavor as you could wish. Meanwhile, a line cook calmly plates a huge portion of roast chicken. The bird was marinated for two days. The meat is juicy and tender, and the skin is addictively crispy. That chicken is $17. So is a large, pan-sautéed salmon fillet, also with crispy skin, served with lemon caper butter. The prices are far gentler than you’d expect in fine dining restaurants. “And our wine prices are even lower,” says Kester, walking through a low archway near the hostess podium. Beyond the archway is a dazzling, ultramodern space. A gleaming steel spiral staircase lazily climbs past gray, spot lit walls and glittery chandeliers toward a ceiling seemingly high as a cathedral. Long racks of wine bottles stretch rearward behind glass walls. There are almost 200 wines to choose from, more than 60 by the glass, and they are also served to restaurant patrons. This is the Wine Loft. Though there are Wine Lofts in other cities, the architecture here is unique. “No other Wine Loft looks like this,” says Kester. Like the restaurant, he adds, “this is Jenna’s vision.” 7890 E. 106th Pl. S., Tulsa.

92

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

MASA

MASA, a fairly new food truck rolling around Tulsa, is on fire: The truck boasts BACON a quickly growing following BOMBS ARE THE BOMB AT that increases with every MASA FOOD taste. And, oh yeah, MASA TRUCK. also has Bacon Bombs that PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN. are exploding in popularity. MASA serves South American fusion cuisine in downtown Tulsa and surrounding areas. Recipes that span generations, with an updated twist of the times, continue to get rave reviews and give truth to the truck’s popular slogan, “These are not your grandmother’s empanadas.” From the fan favorites, mix-and-match empanadas and Bacon Bombs – shrimp stuffed with green chilies and cheese, and then wrapped in bacon – to daily shifting entrée options like El Jefe Cubano, an herb-crusted pork loin with prosciutto, Swiss cheese, pickles and Cuban mojo; and arepas, tasty food keeps customers coming back for more. Traveling all over the city, MASA’s common stops include Hodges Bend and the downtown bar Mixed Company. Track MASA’s movement on the truck’s website, but don’t look at the gallery unless you plan on eating there within the hour – it’s irresistible. www.masatulsa. com – Brittany Anicetti T H E B UZ Z

PIZZERIA GUSTO

In late 2013, investors in Pizzeria Gusto began tearing away at an old building located in Oklahoma City’s Uptown district, unsure of what awaited them. To their surprise a beautiful Deco façade was waiting under the layers of material that had covered the front of the building many years before. It’s a perfect metaphor for a restaurant that strips excess from a classic Italian dish, pizza, and creates a simple, straightforward and delicious pie. With a wood-fired oven hand-crafted in Italy, Pizzeria Gusto creates Neopolitan-style pizzas that lean on the freshness of ingredients, rather than the quantity, for flavor. Butternut squash, Italian sausage, salmon and meatballs all make appearances on Gusto’s pies. Of course, the Margherita, the original pizza, is a star. Fresh mozzarella and parmesan are layered with basil and glugs of extra virgin olive oil on a crust sauced simply with San Marzano tomatoes. It’s a fine bite when paired with a wine or beer from Gusto’s extensive list. 2415 N. Walker Ave., Oklahoma City. www.pizzeria-gusto.com – Jami Mattox

FROM TOP: CHOCOLATE TART, ARANCINI AND THE CHERRY TOMATO PIZZA ARE ALL FAVORITES AT PIZZERIA GUSTO. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.


A s clo

se to home cooking as it gets!

A Northeast Oklahoma Tradition Since 1969 T-Sa 11am-9pm • Sun 11am-8pm • Daily Specials 1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd. • Next to the Will Rogers Memorial Museum

918-341-7333 • hammetthouse.com

12527 Hammett House.indd 1

1/21/13 1:53 PM

Visit US At

Celebrating our 52nd Year OPEN 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. DAILY

918-742-4563

okmag.com 1/16 web.indd 1

20545 Tropical Lanna.indd 1

3310 E. 32nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma Across from Walmart Neighborhood Market

1 11/9/14 11798 12:56 PhillsDiner.indd PM

Reserve an evening of “World Class” Caesar Salad with Steak, Lobster, Chicken or Fish. Friday & Saturday night featuring Mark Bryan.

3109 South Yale • 918.743.1 800 • celebritytulsa.com

5/2/14 12:41 12786PM Celebrity Restaurant.indd 1

12/13/14 20596 4:38 PM Hideaway.indd 1

12/11/14 8:45 AM

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

93 2/3/15

8:38 AM


Taste W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

Kilkenny’s March is the perfect month to get your Irish up. But celebrating St. Patrick’s Day is not all about drinking green beer. A major part of the festivities is enjoying traditional Irish foods. Corned beef and cabbage, potatoes in every form and shepherd’s pie. At Kilkenny’s, the Irish-themed hotspot in Tulsa, the Traditional Irish Stew is a great meal with which to ring in St. Patty’s Day. Chunks of beef are cooked slowly with carrots, onions, potatoes and fresh herbs. The meat and vegetables are served in a rich broth and makes the perfect celebratory dinner. Enjoy the Irish classic with a pint of Guinness and a few slices of Irish soda bread. 1413 E. 15th St., Tulsa. www.tulsairishpub. com – Jami Mattox

TRADITIONAL IRISH STEW AND A PINT OF GUINNESS ARE THE PERFECT ST. PATRICK’S DAY PAIR. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

FAB FAVAS The first time I saw fava bean pods in the grocery store, I did a double take. The pods are large and daunting, and they require specific preparation for use. But look past the pod and the tough cover around each bean, and a delicate, flavorful legume awaits. The beans are a great source of protein, magnesium, iron and fiber. In Oklahoma, fava plants planted in the fall can produce beans in March through May. Look for them to begin arriving in grocery stores then. Fava beans are easily shelled but must be removed from their tough, outer husks. Inside is the bean, which can be prepared in myriad ways. – J.M.

Fava Bean Dip 2-3 lbs. 1 tbsp. 4 cloves

fresh fava beans, shelled (about 2 cups) salt chopped garlic olive oil 1 tsp. lemon zest 2 tbsp. lemon juice 1/4 c. or more water 5 oz. goat cheese kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Remove the outer shell from the fava beans. Bring two quarts of water to a boil. Add 1 tablespoon salt. Add the shelled beans and simmer for five minutes. Use a slotted spoon to remove beans from the hot water and place in a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking and to shock the beans into maintaining their bright green color. When the beans have sunk to the bottom of the bowl of ice water, fish them out and remove and discard the outer peel. In a small skillet, heat a tablespoon of olive oil on medium. Add the chopped garlic cloves and cook until softened, but not browned, three to four minutes. Place beans in a food processor with softened garlic, lemon zest, lemon juice and water. Pulse until smooth. Stream in a tablespoon or two more of olive oil while puréeing. Scoop the bean mixture into a bowl. Mix in the goat cheese until well combined. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper.

94

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

WILLIAM BROWN SHOWS OFF SOME OF BROWN BAKERY’S FAMOUS CINNAMON ROLLS THAT COME COVERED IN JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF ICING. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.


SWEET TOOTH

Have A Taste

I

The sweet history of an Oklahoma City bakery adds to its delicious treats.

n a growing area in Oklahoma City sits a landmark, whose owners and staff greet its customers with consistency. Run by three generations and worked by four, Brown’s Bakery has deep roots in Oklahoma City and in brother-and-sisterduo Brenda and William Brown’s hearts. “We were raised in the business,” William says. “We’ve always been a part of it.” William has been involved with Brown’s since he was 10 years old. He remembers a lot of kids following him home from school back then. The bakery was open until 6 p.m., and his grandparents were always there in the afternoon running the kitchen. “They knew they’d get some donuts,” he laughs. Brenda, current manager and cake decorator, also remembers good memories of Brown’s Bakery as a child. “We started working as soon as we could walk,” she says. “We’d make the boxes. A penny a box.” Brenda moved to Texas at 21. She was gone for 30 years, but during holidays she and her sister would bring their kids up to make their own memories. Their grandfather would put the kids up on a bucket so they could reach the counter, and they would help him in the kitchen icing the donuts, she remembers. William and Brenda’s grandfather started Brown’s Bakery in 1946. He had worked for a continental bakery, and when he was passed over for a foreman position, he left the company to start his own. Their dad, Bill, did a lot of the baking, and his brother, Bob, helped with delivery and sales. Brenda recalls her grandmother, Anna Fae, being a great saleswoman, too; she was frequently heard enticing customers walking by with, “Come taste what Mr. Brown made.” When the bakery moved the store to its current location in 1991, the Browns were afraid it wouldn’t be as successful. Other than St. Anthony’s Hospital and Kaiser’s American Bistro, empty buildings, a liquor store and a

convenience market were all that welcomed Brown’s Bakery to the neighborhood. It wasn’t a good area. Walking around at night wasn’t safe. Still, the business grew, and it continued to get better as the area developed. Next year will be Brown’s 70th anniversary, and who knows how the bakery will celebrate. During the week of the 50th anniversary, Brown’s offered its famous applesauce doughnuts priced as they would have been in 1946: 69 cents a dozen. “We had made over 300 dozen,” says Brenda. “They were gone before 10 o’clock [a.m.].” Like she did for many holidays and big events, Brenda returned home from Texas for the 50th. Her most recent trip home, though, wasn’t for such a celebration. Last year, Brenda came home to help take care of her ailing mom, and the family business kept her. Now, Brenda works alongside her dad, Bill, her uncle, Bob, her younger brother, William, his son Chase and some other great staff members they’ve hired along the way. The girls decorate and the boys bake. That’s how it’s always been; Bill taught his wife how to decorate, and she taught Brenda and her sister. Almost every morning between 6:30 and 9:30 a.m., a line forces the door ajar. Bill calls everyone out from the back, and they all help move the line through. “Sometimes it’s people getting one doughnut to eat right then or a couple dozen to take with them,” says Brenda. Brown’s Bakery is a fun environment. Brenda and the rest of the staff welcome the noise of customers and their families. “It’s not a strict, professional kind of place,” she says. “The sales girls have really good personalities. One lady just came in the other day asking about the cookies. [She said,] ‘I didn’t really come in to buy anything, just to talk to Ellen ‘cause I’m feeling a little down.’” You can believe she left with a smile and a cured sweet tooth. 1100 N. Walker Ave., Oklahoma City. 405.232.0363 – Brittany Anicetti MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

95


Entertainment

PHOTO BY RANDEE ST NICHOLAS.

G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

S

Full Throttle

Miranda Lambert and her music are Certified Platinum.

ince 2004, when Miranda Lambert released her debut album, Kerosene, her career has been on full throttle. From a very young age, Lambert knew she wanted to be a singer, songwriter, performer; the game-changer came when she learned to play the guitar, allowing her to write her own material. The icing on the cake was Lambert’s success on the nationally televised talent show Nashville Star in 2003. Now, in 2015, at 30 years old, Lambert is traveling the country on her Certified Platinum Tour, promoting her latest album, Platinum, the same album that earned her a Grammy for Best Country Album at this year’s Grammys on Feb. 8. She was also nominated for Best Country Song, Best

Country Solo Performance and Best Country Duo/Group Peformance. For a fifth consecutive year, Lambert was named Female Vocalist of the Year at the 2014 Country Music Awards, also taking home Album of the Year honors for Platinum. In February, Lambert graced the cover of Country Weekly magazine, and now she’s coming to Oklahoma to perform for excited fans. On Feb. 28, she rocked Tulsa’s BOK Center, and on March 6, she will be in Oklahoma City with Justin Moore and Sunny Sweeney. The show will start at 7:30 p.m., at Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 West Reno Ave. Don’t let her leave the state without seeing her wild performance. This woman’s on fire, and the heat will only continue to rise. BRITTANY ANICETTI MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

97


PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

In Concert

FLEETWOOD MAC

PHOTO BY DANNY CLINCH.

Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES The Lost Pages of Wonderland March 1 See sword fights, pyrotechnics, beautiful sets and costumes on the Tulsa Little Theatre stage as beloved fairy tales come together in a fun and unique adventure. www.encore-tulsa.com Young Frankenstein March 1, 5-8 Enjoy this

electrifying adaptation of Mel Brooks’ monstrously funny film at TCC’s Van Trease PACE. www.myticketoffice.com

Venice Baroque Orchestra Avi Avital, Mandolin March 3 Join mandolinist Avi Avital and the Venice Baroque Orchestra as they present concerti and innovative transcriptions for the mandolin in a program of Baroque masterpieces from Vivaldi, Galuppi, Locatelli and Paisiello. www.armstrongauditorium.org

Camelot March 3-8 Enjoy this Tony Award-

winning Broadway musical as it recounts the legend of King Arthur at the Tulsa PAC. www. tulsapac.com

The iconic rock band that has survived almost five decades as Fleetwood Mac will perform for fans on the Chesapeake Energy Arena stage March 12. The band last toured in 2009 with its sold-out Unleashed tour. The current tour, On With the Show, which kicked off nearly two years ago, has taken Fleetwood Mac on the road again and just in time for the 35th anniversary of the release of the classic Rumours album, one of the most successful albums in recorded history with sales toping 40 million. Band mates Mick Fleetwood, John McVie, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks give quite the performance and are just as excited as fans for their current tour. Due to an overwhelming demand to see Fleetwood Mac in concert, 11 new shows have been added to the 2015 lineup. Make sure to get your tickets before they run out. Tickets range from $60-$200. The show starts at 8 p.m. at the Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 W. Reno, Oklahoma City. For more information, visit www.chesapeakearena.com.

Jenny McCarthy’s Dirty, Sexy, Funny March 5 The Joint, Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Holcombe Waller: Surfacing March 6,7 The Living Arts of Tulsa: New Genre Arts Festival presents this multidisciplinary performance reassembling stories and characters collected in a living room one January evening in Manhattan playing at the Tulsa PAC. www.tulsapac.com

Masterworks III Concert March 7 The

Symphony of Northwest Arkansas (SoNA) continues its 60th anniversary season with this performance at Walton Arts Center’s Baum Walker Hall. www.sonamusic.org

Same Time, Next Year March 6-8, 12-15 One of the most popular romantic comedies of the 20th century, a love affair between two people, Doris and George, married to others, who rendezvous once a year, will be showing at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac. com

Superior Donuts March 6-8, 12-14 An aging

hippie who owns a doughnut shop is challenged by his young, enthusiastic employee to make the business more friendly, outgoing and healthy. Enjoy this comedy at the Tulsa PAC. www. tulsapac.com

Terror and Triumph March 7 Enjoy Louis Lortie on the piano at the OKC Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcciviccenter.com

An Evening with Jason Alexander March

Elvis Costello

98

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

13, 14 Enjoy a memorable evening of singing, dancing and comedy with award-winning actor Jason Alexander as he offers selections from his favorite Broadway musicals with symphony orchestra. www.okcciviccenter.com

Tulsa Symphony: Simply Tragic March 14 Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 6 in A minor (“Tragische”) is the only work in this concert. Gerhardt Zimmermann of the University of Texas at Austin is guest conductor. www. tulsapac.com Dennis Miller Live Stand-Up Tour March 15 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www. hardrocktulsa.com

Dual Pianos Ragtime Concert: Kirby & Majchrzak March 17 Scott Kirby has appeared

at every major ragtime festival in the U.S., plus events in Hungary, Norway, New Zealand, England and France. David Majchrzak, in addition to being a ragtime and early jazz pianist, is artistic director of the Scott Joplin International Ragtime Festival. See them together at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac. com

Music of War and Remembrance March 16, 17 This concert will include Igor Stravinsky’s “L’histoire du Soldat,” Edward Elgar’s Piano Quintet in A Minor and Paul Schoenfield’s “Sparks of Glory.” www.brightmusic.org

Shen Yun March 17 Through authentic clas-

sical Chinese dance, Shen Yun takes you on an extraordinary journey through 5,000 years of genuine Chinese culture. www.tulsapac.com

Academy of St. Martin in the Fields March

farce by Patrick Barlow is based on Alfred Hitchcock’s 1939 nail-biter, only this time it’s played for laughs. This performance, at the Tulsa PAC, is a must see. www.tulsapac.com

Corpus Christi March 20-April 4 See this play at the Oklahoma City Civic Center as Joshua, raised in Corpus Christi, Texas, flees home in search of a more accepting environment, gathering followers along with way. www. okcciviccenter.com Takacs Quartet March 22 Tulsa Performing

Arts Center eagerly awaits Takacs Quartet’s return to Tulsa with their irresistible blend of drama and virtuosity, warmth and humor. www. tulsapac.com

Murder for Two March 25-April 12 Everyone

is a suspect in this hilarious musical murder mystery where one actor investigates the crime while the other plays all the suspects. www. lyrictheatreokc.com

Little Women: The Musical March 2629 Enjoy Little Women: The Musical presented by University of Tulsa Theatre Department. www. myticketoffice.com

Chris Tucker Live 2015 March 27 Don’t

miss the hilarious Chris Tucker at the Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Tulsa Ballet: The Three Musketeers March 27-29 This swashbuckling tale choreographed by Andre Prokovsky swings into Tulsa for the first time in over a decade, playing at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. Based on the 1844 novel by Alexandre Dumas, the adventures of The Three Musketeers come to life in a full-length ballet described by the New York Times as “a rollicking fast-paced production.” www.tulsapac.com

The Dream of America March 28 Harry Parker as director, Dvorak: Symphony No. 9 (From the New World) and Boyer: Ellis Island: The Dream of America. www.okcciviccenter.com Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca March 31-Apr. 1 Formed in Spain in 1993 by Martín Santangelo and his Bessie award-winning wife, Soledad Barrio, the company has successfully brought to the stage the essence, purity and integrity of one of the world’s most complex and mysterious art forms without the use of tricks or gimmicks. www.tulsapac.com

IN CONCERT Winter Jam March 1 BOK Center. www. bokcenter.com

Cold War Kids March 3 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Sarah McLachlan March 3 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Sleeping With Sirens & Pierce The Veil March 4 Diamond Ballroom. www.

diamondballroom.net

Brett Eldredge March 5 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Kari Jobe March 5 Mabee Center. www. mabeecenter.com

Miranda Lambert March 6 Chesapeake

Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

Elvis Costello March 6 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Ledisi March 6 Brady Theater. www. bradytheater.com Journey & Tower of Power March 6 Winstar World Casino www.winstarworldcasino.com

Bob Wills Birthday Celebration with The Texas Playboys March 7 Cain’s Ballroom.

18 Pianist Jeremy Denk will join The Academy of St. Martin in the Fields – one of the finest chamber orchestras in the world – in a program of Bach and Stravinsky concerti. www. armstrongauditorium.org

Winter Jam March 7 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

The 39 Steps March 20-22, 26-29 An irreverent

An Evening with Penny & Sparrow March

homage to the master of suspense, this fast-paced

www.cainballroom.com

7 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com


than 25 Marvel characters together on one epic quest at the Chesapeake Energy Arena. www. chesapeakearena.com Akdar Shrine Circus March 1 Let the magic of the circus take over your senses. Enjoy face painting and the breathtaking circus acts filled with clowns, trapeze artists, larger-than-life elephants, jugglers, daredevils, tigers and more. www.akdarshrine.org

Bright Nights at Science Museum Oklahoma March 20 Explore science exhibits

and perform hands-on experiments, travel through the Milky Way in the planetarium, feel the heat of live explosions in Science Live and enjoy an IMAX movie with the whole family. www. sciencemuseumok.org

Sesame Street Live: Let’s Dance! March 27-29 Elmo’s got the moves. Have you got the moves? Get up and get moving with Elmo, Abby Cadabby and everyone’s favorite Sesame Street friends at Cox Business Center. www. coxcentertulsa.com

Concert for the Planet March 29 Enjoy this salute to Earth Day with the whole family in this musical tribute to Mother Nature. www. okcciviccenter.com

Sports

MONSTER JAM

This action-packed show will have audience members on their feet in applause and awe on March 7 and 8 inside the BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., in downtown Tulsa. The floor of the arena will transform into a dirt racetrack, obstacle course and battle zone, where some of the world’s most popular Monster Jam trucks race, perform stunts and amaze loyal fans and anticipating newcomers. It’ll take 100,000 square feet of plastic, 7,500 tons of dirt, 1,500 gallons of fuel and more to put on this crowd-revving show. See trucks that stand 12 feet tall and 12 feet wide and weigh upwards of 10,000 pounds. Enjoy the Monster Jam freestyle where competitors rack up points through a variety of tricks, obstacles, doughnuts, skillful driving maneuvers to avoid roll overs or crashes, wheelies, sky wheelies and other wowing combinations. If you hear spurts of “boos” throughout the crowd, trucks are most likely receiving deductions; rollovers, reversing and stopping are not allowed at Monster Jam, and the audience always hopes to see defeat over retreat. Get to the show early for the Party in the Pits and meet your favorite drivers, get their autographs and see the towering Monster Jam trucks up-close. Experience the excitement on Saturday, March 7, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, March 8 at 3 p.m. The pre-show, Party in the Pits, will be held Saturday from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. Tickets range from $10 to $35. For more information, visit www.bokcenter.com.

American Aquarium March 9 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Dwight Yoakam March 26 The Joint, Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Greensky Bluegrass March 10 Cain’s

Granger Smith March 27 Cain’s Ballroom.

Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Bush March 10 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net

www.cainsballroom.com Kansas March 27 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort. www.grandresortok.com

Fleetwood Mac March 12 Chesapeake

A Lot Like Birds March 28 BOK Center. www.

Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

bokcenter.com

Third Day March 13 Cox Business Center.

Pentatonix March 28 Brady Theater. www.

Bob Schneider March 13 Cain’s Ballroom.

Sturgill Simpson March 29 Cain’s Ballroom.

Aaron Lewis March 13 Riverwind Casino.

MilkDrive March 28 The Blue Door. www.

www.coxcentertulsa.com www.cainsballroom.com

bluedoorokc.com

Caravan of Thieves March 29 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

www.bluedoorokc.com

Vanilla Ice March 14 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort. www.grandresortok.com

Joel Rafael March 15 The Blue Door. www.

bluedoorokc.com

Santana: The Corazon Tour March 17 OKC

Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcciviccenter.com

The Australian Bee Gees Show March 17 Rose State Performing Arts Theatre. www. okcciviccenter.com

of Montreal and Deerhoof March 17 ACM@

UCO www.acm.uco.edu

Coal Chamber March 18 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

In Distress Fest 2015 March 20

BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com

Styx March 20 Riverwind Casino. www.riverwind.

com

Monte Montgomery March 20, 21 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Little Big Town March 21 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com Charlie Wilson March 21 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com Chase Bryant March 21 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Memphis May Fire March 22 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

www.nba.com/thunder v. Philadelphia v. Toronto v. L.A. Clippers v. Minnesota v. Chicago v. Boston v. Atlanta v. Miami v. L.A. Lakers

Oklahoma City Blue

March 4 March 8 March 11 March 13 March 15 March 18 March 20 March 22 March 24

www.nba.com/dleague/oklahomacity v. Bakersfield v. Rio Grande Valley v. Santa Cruz v. Grand Rapids v. Delaware

March 4 March 8 March 10, 12 March 15 March 22 Oklahoma City Barons www.okcbarons.com v. Milwaukee v. Charlotte v. Milwaukee v. San Antonio v. Chicago

March 10 March 14, 15 March 17 March 20 March 21, 22

takes many forms in this exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark., and explores its use and art through time and around the world. www.crystalbridges.org

Oklahoma Dance Film Festival: First Friday Feature March 6 Enjoy the March

First Friday featured screening of Darn Good Dancing at Tulsa Hardesty Arts Center (AHHA). www.okdancefilms.com

Drought: A Landscape Within March 6-April 23 This installation at Living Arts in Tulsa depicts the loneliness of the life “as seen as a string of stimulations that emulate an experience we will never be able to have or simply an apparition to divert our emotions.” www.livingarts. org Wundrain: JP Morrison Lans March 6-April 23 Reflect with this exhibit as it explores what the symbol of a house truly represents. www.livingarts.org The You and the I-Micaela De Vivero March 6-April 23 Enjoy this new room installation made from glass rods, dyed sisal and painted urethane as it intends to trigger memories through its very tactile and visually engaging presence. www. livingarts.org

SPORTS

Oklahoma City Thunder

ART Born of Fire: Ceramic Art from Regional Collections Thru March 2 Fired clay

6, 7 Living Arts of Tulsa celebrates 22 years of its annual festival by again bringing stimulating new artwork to the area. www.livingarts.org

www.cainsballroom.com

The Stray Birds March 14 The Blue Door.

new musical about compromise, based on the Caldecott award-winning book by Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin. Cox Business Center. www. coxcentertulsa.com

New Genre Arts Festival XXII-A March

bradytheater.com

www.riverwind.com

Literature LIVE! Presents Click, Clack, Moo March 31 Take your kids to this hilarious

The Three Musketeers Tulsa Oilers www.tulsaoilers.com v. Wichita v. Brampton v. Allen

March 13 March 14, 15 March 25, 31 OSU Men’s Basketball www.okstate.com v. TCU

March 4 OU Men’s Basketball www.soonersports.com v. Kansas

March 7

TU Men’s Basketball www.tulsahurricane.com v. Cincinnati

March 4

OSU Women’s Basketball www.okstate.com v. Oklahoma

March 2

OK State High School Basketball Championships March 5-7, 12-13 Oklahoma

State Fairgrounds. www.okstatefair.com

Monster Jam March 7, 8 BOK Center. www. bokcenter.com

St. Patrick’s Day 5K March 14 The 33rd

Annual St. Patrick’s 5K Run, presented by RunnersWorld Tulsa, will benefit Special Olympics Oklahoma and Tulsa. The route will begin on

Brookside on Peoria in Tulsa. www.sook.org

Drama, Death, Dirge: Frederic Remington’s American West Thru March 8 The

O’Connell’s St. Patrick’s Day 8K March 14 The 13th Annual O’Connell’s St. Patrick’s Day 8K in Norman will benefit Special Olympics Oklahoma and will host an 8K as well as a 1 mile fun run. www.sook.org

Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art exhibits four exceptional pieces by the famed painter that display the attributes for which he was most loved. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Bellator MMA March 27 The exciting,

March 15 Pop art’s hold into the 1970s is the focus of a new exhibition at Philbrook Downtown and examines the contributions of Claes Oldenburg, Eduardo Paolozzi and others. The exhibit also features an album of Polaroid photos by Andy Warhol. www.philbrook.org

hard-hitting action of Bellator MMA returns to WinStar World Casino and Resort. www. winstarworldcasino.com

2015 NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Regional March 27-29 The Road

to the Final Four will once against go through OKC as Chesapeake Energy Arena hosts the 2015 NCAA Division I Women’s Basketball Championship’s Oklahoma City Regional. www. chesapeakearena.com

FAMILY Marvel Universe Live! March 1 Marvel

Universe LIVE! will captivate audiences with an authentic and original story that brings more

Fever & Flash: Pop in the 1970s Thru

The Nature of Man: Paintings and Drawings of Harold Stevenson Thru March 15 The artist’s exploration of masculinity and the human form is explored in an exhibition at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. www. ou.edu/fjjma

24-Hour Video Race Screening March 19 Philbrook will again host the screening of all videos while they give special recognition to the teams who have made videos for most of the 10 years of the event. www.livingarts.org

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

99


Art

GL I T C H /A NA L O G OUS

Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the Oklahoma

Artists, handpicked by curator Laura Reese, use traditional art techniques alongside new media including video and digital art in Glitch/Analogous, an exhibit that brings local and national artists, whose work has touched this genre, together, allowing audiences to experience a new form of art that has not yet gained overwhelming popularity. This exhibit includes a diverse scope of artists, each with unique techniques, allowing audiences to see how artists are approaching this somewhat new art form in different ways. Artist Grace Grothaus from Tulsa will combine the popular backlighting we see in the media with paintings; Brian Dunn, of Norman, mixes lithographs and electronic glitch art; Julianna Clark from Tulsa creates light boxes while using photography and insect specimens; Aaron Robinson, also from Norman, will provide the music for the night in a way that mixes live music, visuals, audience participation and digital technologies; and Matthew Kaney out of New York City, but a Oklahoma native, makes sound using electronic switches, motors and speakers. Glitch/Analogous will run through March 26. For more information, visit www.livingarts.org.

City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa.com

A World Unconquered: The Art of Oscar Brousse Jacobson Ongoing Jacobson arrived

at the University of Oklahoma in 1915 and greatly influenced their School of Art. His career includes over 600 works of art with inspiration from the landscapes of Colorado, New Mexico and Oklahoma. www.ou.edu/fjjma

First Friday Gallery Walk Ongoing The

galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo.com

First Friday Art Crawl Ongoing Stroll the

Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at the Guthrie Green and other venues. www.thebradyartsdistrict.com.

2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman.com

CHARITABLE EVENTS Tulsa Coffee Crawl March 1 Join other

Coffee Crawlers in downtown Tulsa, and walk, bike, jog or drive the 3.6-mile route while enjoying food and drink samplers. “Coffee Talk” and volunteer service opportunities are at each of the seven coffee shops/cafes. www.volunteertulsa.org

Eighth Annual Wish Luncheon: A Bag ARTWORK BY BRIAN DUNN.

Entertainment

Brazilian-born photographer Alex Leme captures the mood of Cotton Plant, a small town in rural northeast Arkansas. www.oklahomacontemporary. org

Full of Wishes March 3 Bid on purses and hear from a special Make-A-Wish Oklahoma family about their experiences and how the power of a wish continues to touch their lives at Oklahoma City Golf and Country Club. www.oklahoma.wish. org The JA Investor Challenge March 4, 5 High school students learn the basics of trading, markets and business on the stock exchange floor with mentors and activities. www.jaok.org Memory Gala Big Picture March 6 Pre-

Apron Strings: Ties to the Past Thru March 22 Explore an exhibit of 51 vintage and contemporary aprons at the Fort Smith Regional Art Museum in Fort Smith, Ark., that chronicles the changing attitudes toward women and domestic work from the late 1930s through the present. www.fsram.org

Frontier to Foundry: The Making of Small Bronze Sculpture in the Gilcrease Collection Thru March 23 The Gilcrease Mu-

seum collection of art contains more than 200 small bronze sculptures by such names as Frederic Remington, Henry Kirke Brown and Charles M. Russell. A new exhibit reveals the development of the bronze casting craft and industry and how 19th century American sculptors shaped it and art. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Glitch/Analogous Thru March 26 Explore this

exhibition at Living Arts in Tulsa as it investigates the intersection of traditional art with digital formats, and how digital technology changes our perspective of the physical world. www.livingarts.org

The patent-pending, dermal micro-channeling system that offers simultaneous delivery of infused ingredients in a pain-free, no downtime treatment.

Private Collections to Public Treasures: New Acquisitions at Gilcrease Museum Thru March 29 The exhibit looks at some of the latest art works to be added to the collection of Gilcrease Museum. The show will include work by such diverse artists as Joseph Henry Sharp, Pablita Verlarde and Edgar Payne, among others. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Chris Ramsay: Meditations in Stillwater Thru March 29 More than 30 mixed media works

tracing the passage of time by Oklahoma State University professor Chris Ramsay are on exhibit at the Zarrow Center for Art & Education. www. gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Oklahoma Dance Film Festival Exhibit Thru March 31 See Uniquely Human, a delight-

ful collection of films performed by a variety of unique human groups, at Tulsa Hardesty Arts Center (AHHA). www.ahhatulsa.org

Whistler and the British Etching Revival Thru April 5 This exhibition, drawn from

Philbrook’s permanent collection, presents a selection of prints by Whistler and Haden, along with withers by several artists of the next generation, highlighting the wide range of subjects and visual effects captured by the etcher’s needle. www.philbrook.org

Shifting Focus: Historical Photos, Contemporary Art Thru April 26 Historical photos by the likes of Edward S. Curtis and others of American Indian leaders and ordinary people provide the inspiration for works by contemporary American Indian artists, who translate images and portraits of old into modern media and works in an exhibit at Philbrook Downtown. www.philbrook.org

Stories and Art: Beyond Illustration Thru

Now offered at

April Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahhatulsa.org

Center for Poets & Writers Exhibition Thru April Hardesty Arts Center. www.

ahhatulsa.org

918-712-3223

Coyote Songs - Desperado Dreams: The Art of Robby McMurtry Thru May 10 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum remembers the artist, illustrator,

Skin 100Care.indd OKLAHOMA 2015 1:00 PM 20623 Utica 1 MAGAZINE | MARCH 2/7/15

writer and mentor to countless youth, the late Robby McMurtry. The exhibition looks across his career with 35 pieces spanning 1973 to 2012. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Ansel Adams: Masterworks from the Collection of the Turtle Bay Exploration Park Thru May 10 Ansel Adams’ best-loved and

most famous photographs, which he called “The Museum Set,” go on display at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum and reveal the artist’s elegant eye for nature. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org

Madonnas of the Prairie: Depictions of Women in the American West Thru May 10 This exhibit features over 100 works focusing on women in the late 19th century through the present who stood bravely through a myriad of difficulties, tragedies and losses to help build the nation. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Beyond the Battlefield: Depictions of War Thru May 10 An exhibition at Fred Jones Jr.

Museum of Art examines war through the eyes of artists. Beyond the Battlefield focuses on conflicts of the 20th century with paintings, prints and photography. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World Thru May 10 See the works

of some of the most notorious and accomplished art frauds and forgers alongside original works of art by modern masters such as Charles Courtney Curran, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Paul Signac and others.

Identity & Inspiration Ongoing Philbrook Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s extensive collection of American Indian artwork and artifacts. www.philbrook.org

Opening Abstraction Ongoing Philbrook Downtown exhibits abstract work in all its manifestations. www.philbrook.org Conflict Cast in Bronze Ongoing This ex-

hibit centers around art which remembers the fallen and honors those who served in war. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org

Van Gogh to Rothko: Masterworks from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Ongo-

ing Enjoy masterpieces by some of the most prominent names in art history including Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, Salvador Dali, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol and Mark Rothko. www.crystalbridges.org

Focus on Favorites Ongoing This Gilcrease

Museum exhibit highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

On Common Ground Ongoing Through the

mixing of these many works of art and cultural items depicting a great variety of people, one is reminded that all human beings have similar needs that bring us to a common ground. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

Orly Genger: Terra Ongoing This massive

outdoor art installation – made of more than a million feet of lobster-fishing rope woven, painted and stretched across Oklahoma’s City’s Campbell Park – creates a unique experience. www.oklahomacontemporary.org

Small Town: Portraits of a Disappearing America Ongoing Intrigued by the continu-

ing disappearance of rural towns in America,

Small Town: Portraits of a Disappearing America

sented by the Alzheimer’s Association. www. memorygala.org

Omelette Party: Eggsquisite House of Fabergeeg March 6 Celebrate eggs and art

while benefiting the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Enjoy an art raffle, live music and entertainment and gourmet omelettes, egg dishes and egg-inspired foods prepared by local chefs. www.okcmoa.com

Red Ribbon Gala March 7 Spend an evening at Cox Business Center at Tulsa CARES’ largest fundraiser, with entertainment and a live auction, and support those affected by HIV/AIDS. Sponsored by Oklahoma Magazine. www.redribbongala.org Fur Ball 2015: Phantom of the Pawpera March 7 Enjoy a night of fun while contributing to Oklahoma Alliance for Animals’ mission to end Oklahoma’s pet overpopulation problem, promote responsible pet ownership and ensure the humane treatment of animals. www.animalallianceok.org Dream Builders’ Gala March 7 The 16th annual dinner event will feature silent and live auctions plus other entertainment and highlights of the Habitat for Humanity organization’s work. www.tulsahabitat.org 2015 Gospel, Grits and Gershwin March 7 Breakfast is served at the Greenwood Cultural Center for this annual fundraiser for Booker T. Washington High School. www.btwfoundation.net

Ms. Senior Oklahoma March 7 The ninth annual Ms. Seniors Oklahoma Pageant, benefiting Grace Hospice Foundation, celebrates senior women in Tulsa and the greater metropolitan area. www.gracehospicefoundation.org Post Oak Lodge Challenge March 7, 8 Tulsa Runner Club hosts its annual challenge that hosts a 50k, 25k, 10k, marathon, half marathon and quarter marathon. The challenge benefits local charity organizations. www.postoakrun.com

Souper Sunday March 8 Dress in your ‘70s best for this years disco themed Souper Sunday – TSHA’s annual fundraiser. www.tsha.cc

2015 Kingpins for Kids March 9 Help Op-

eration Aware of Oklahoma strike out alcohol, drug abuse and bullying in the community at Dustbowl downtown and have some fun doing it. www. operationaware.org.


The Tulsa Workshop March 18-21 Join other

dedicated Christians, mission-minded churches and evangelistic individuals looking to grow their churches and ministries at this four-day event that includes nationally known speakers and more than 200 exhibitors. www.tulsaworkshop.org

Transportation & Construction Job Fair March 19 This event at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds is free to the public. www.okladot. state.ok.us

OKC Home & Outdoor Living Show March 20-22 Find innovative products, new ideas, practical advice and great deals in remodeling, home improvement and décor with hundreds of experts all under one roof. www.homeshowokc.com PHOTO COURTESY SUPER! BITCON.

Spirit, Mind & Body Psychic Expo March

Community

SUPER! BITCON VIDEO GAME EXPO If you’re a gamer or collector of any kind, you won’t want to miss SUPER! BitCon 2015, the region’s largest gaming-centric show, where gaming vendors, developers and special guests will fill Oklahoma Expo Hall with anything and everything from arcade games, apparel, the latest gaming developments and new releases, modern gaming, tabletop games, artists and more. For those interested in the evolution of gaming over the years, there will be educational material on its history available. Buckle up for fun and exciting competitions and tournaments and enjoy the free play area that will house pinball machines, arcade cabinets and consoles for you to enjoy at a whim. Last year, more than 2,000 attendees joined in on the action, and this year SUPER! Bitcon hopes to draw a larger crowd for a show that’s even bigger and better than its predecessors. For gamers, the mission begins on Saturday, March 28 at 10 a.m. and you will have until 6 p.m. to search and collect all things game. It will continue on Sunday, March 29 at 11 a.m., but the doors will close at 5 p.m., so make sure to plan your escape route accordingly. To enter, purchase tickets ranging from $5-$10 and press start. For more information, visit www.superbitcon.com. Horse Show March 1 Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www.okstatefair.com

Oklahoma City Bead Market March 1 Find

wholesale and retail fashion accessories, gift merchandise, lapidary and beads at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www.okstatefair.com

Bridges with Culinary Director Case Dighero and Executive Chef Bill Lyle and get a glimpse of how art inspires the culinary world. www.crystalbridges. org

Backwoods Hunting & Fishing Expo March

Neil Gaiman March 10 Bestselling author Neil

1 This 3-day show includes attractions, exhibits and seminars with guest experts in many fields. There is plenty for the entire family to see and do with several youth and adult competitions. www. okstatefair.com

The Grand National Gun Show March 1 Don’t miss the final day of this show at Tulsa’s Expo Square. www.grandamericanarmsshow.com

Just Between Friends Tulsa Spring Sale March 1-7 Enjoy a spring sale with lots of

Orly Genger’s Terra TulsaFest March 24 Oklahoma Restaurant Association hosts this annual event at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa. This popular festival will feature a luncheon, educational sessions and the popular TulsaFest Culinary Tasting. www.okrestaurants.com

Abersons & Friends Warehouse Sale March 25-27 Purchase designer clothing, home décor items and more from select retailers at a discount that benefits Family & Children’s Services. www.fcsok. org

Rooftop Rendezvous March 26 Enjoy live

music, food and drink and an amazing silent auction that benefits services for domestic abuse survivors and sexual assault victims. www.dvis.org

Carnivale 2015: Cabaret March 28 Enjoy a night of fine dining, lively dancing and plenty of surprises at Cox Business Center. All proceeds benefit Mental Health Association Oklahoma’s house programs among other services. www. bestpartyintown.org Derby Dash 5k March 28 Enjoy a fun run starting in downtown Tulsa at Guthrie Green. www. tbhjuniorwomen.com

Lung Force Walk March 28 Join others on the

University of Tulsa campus and walk to benefit the American Lung Assocation. www.lungforce.org

Sweet Cravings March 28 Sweet or savory, the

scrumptious delights at this benefit helping pregnant

teens and teen mothers continue their education is for adults only. www.margarethudson. org/sweet-cravings

Four Decades: Mizel, Music & Memories March 28 The fun includes a reception, dinner

and entertainment at the Marriot Tulsa Hotel Southern Hills for this great gala supporting The Flo and Morris Mizel Jewish Community Day School. www.mizelschool.org

Fashion Show and Luncheon March 29 The

show benefits the arts organization and takes place a t T h e O a k s C o u n t r y C l u b . w w w. theguildoftulsaopera.wildapricot.org

CAN Superhero Challenge March 29 The Child Abuse Network hosts two runs that will include obstacle courses making participants jump, climb, crawl, pull and throw on either a half mile or 1.8 mile run. www.childabusenetwork.org

The 2015 Oklahoma Creativity Ambassadors Gala March 30 The gala will honor Oklahoma Creativity Ambassadors with a dinner and awards presentation at the Civic Center’s Meinders Hall of Mirrors in Oklahoma City. www. wciconferences.org

COMMUNITY Greater Oklahoma Horse Jumper March

Cr(eat)e Food Series: Art Inspires Cuisine March 8 Enjoy cocktails and dinner at Crystal

great finds at Tulsa’s Expo Square. www.exposquare. com

OK Avant-Garde March 5 Collaborate with

poets and writers as the read their works at Living Arts in Tulsa. www.livingarts.org

Gaiman is listed in the Dictionary of Literary Biography as one of the top 10 living post-modern writers. A prolific creator of works of prose, poetry, film, journalism, comics, song lyrics, and drama, Gaiman’s latest book is The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains. www.tulsapac.com

Psychic John Edwards March 12 The star of

two internationally syndicated talk shows, psychic John Edward’s compelling, often startling and occasionally humorous manner has earned him a vast and loyal following. An author of numerous New York Times bestsellers and named one of People magazine’s Most Intriguing People of the Year, John Edwards will be at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center for one night only. www.tulsapac.com

7 For the collector in everyone, this show will be filled with vendors selling sci-fi, fantasy, horror, steampunk and low-brow arts and crafts, as well as comics, books, movies, toys and apparel. www. undergroundmonstercarnival.com

John Ford Film Festival March 7 In com-

memoration of the life and work of filmmaker John Ford, the museum will host a two-day festival of four classic movies. Gilcrease Museum. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

to business excellence, Disney Institute is a one-day professional development course. Mabee Center. www.mabeecenter.com

Tulip Extravaganza March 23-April 10 Walk a path surrounded by 135,000 beautiful tulips at Garvan Woodland Gardens in Hot Springs, Ark. Every type of tulip and every color of the rainbow will be on display. www.garvangardens.org MidSouth Tackle Hunting & Boat Show 2015 March 27-29 This show is host to a variety of

outdoor entertainment products and good family fun. Find boats, fishing tackle, guides and outfitters, guns and knifes, hunting gear and apparel and more at Tulsa’s Expo Square. www.midsouthtackleshow.com

Oaklawn Boat & Truck Giveaway March 28 Thoroughbred racing is underway at Oaklawn Racing and Gaming in Hot Springs, Ark. Come see the magnificent animals race, and enter to win a boat or a truck! Admission is free. www.oaklawn. com

Kite Festival March 28 Enjoy a kite festival safe

for the whole family at Turpentine Creek Wildlife Refuge in Eureka Springs, Ark. Admission is free, but donations support the more than 135 tigers, lions, cougars and other wildlife that call the sanctuary home. www.turpentinecreek.org

Ultimate Indoor Garage Sale 2015 March 28 Enjoy this huge, indoor garage sale at Tulsa’s Expo Square. www.exposquare.com

SUPER! Bitcon Video Game Expo March 28, 29 With arcade games, modern gaming, tabletop games, vendors, exhibitors, artists, special guest and much more, you won’t want to miss Oklahoma’s premier gaming celebration at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www. superbitcon.com

Household Pollutant Collection Event March 28, 29 If you have left over

The Hall of Fame Gun Show March 28,

46th Annual RV Super Show March 12-15 Don’t

Underground Monster Carnival 4 March

Disney Institute March 24 Disney’s approach

Greater Tulsa Home & Garden Show March

EWomen Conference March 6,7 Mabee and exquisite shopping opportunities abound in the Oklahoma Exposition Hall complex. www. okcautoshow.org

reputation for bringing you the highest quality gun show and is continually increasing in size and quality. www.rkshows.com

chemicals lying around your house, take them to the trained volunteers at this semi-annual collection event and they will properly dispose of them for you. www.metrecycle.com

writer Brian Posehn takes the Performance Lab stage at ACM@UCO. www.acm.uco.edu

Center. www.mabeecenter.com 800-526-8673

R.K. Gun Show March 21, 22 R.K. Shows has a

Brian Posehn March 12 Comedian/actor/

Ducks Unlimited 2015 State Convention March 6, 7 Enjoy special games, raffles and a luncheon and dinner banquet with live and silent auctions with fellow members, volunteers and anyone wanting to know more about Ducks Unlimited at Oklahoma City’s Hampton Inn and Suites in Bricktown. www.ok.ducks.org. OKC Auto Show March 6-8 Dynamic displays

21, 22 Enjoy vendors, spiritual counselors and free lectures that cover a vast array of subjects from metaphysical properties and crystals, to the awakening of spirit, to the journey towards enlightenment at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www. operaok.com

12-15 Knock your home improvement list out of the park at Oklahoma’s largest home and garden products trade show with more than 500 exhibitors. www.exposquare.com miss this annual show at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. To find out more about tickets and vendors, visit www.okcrvshows.com

Oklahoma Youth Expo March 13-20 See Oklahoma youth compete with the best livestock their generation has to offer at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www.okyouthexpo.com Oklahoma City Reptile & Exotic Animal Show March 14, 15 This event features vendors

offering reptile pets, supplies, feeders, cages and merchandise as well as live animal seminars and frequent raffles for coveted prizes. www.repticon. com/oklahomacity.html OKC Gun Show March 14, 15 Enjoy this Oklahoma City monthly gun show at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www.okcgunshow.com

29 Visit the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds in Oklahoma City for this event. www.grandamericanarmsshows.com

Motorcycle Swap Meet March 29 Enjoy this motorcycle event at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www.jwswapmeet.com To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR

MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

101


MARKETPLACE NOW CARRYING BUTTERFLY TWISTS FOLDABLE RAIN BOOTS. THEY COME WITH A WATERPROOF CARRY BAG, AND ARE AVAILABLE IN ASSORTED COLORS.

THEY GO GREAT WITH OUR NEW VINRELLA UMBRELLAS!

Z

$10 for 10 consecutive days of yoga* 1708 Utica Square and 8931 S. Yale, Suite S

ZOLLER

www.saltyogatulsa.com

DESIGNS

*new clients only, please

& ANTIQUES, INC. 1343 E 15TH ST, TULSA • 918-583-1966

20590 Zoller Designs.indd 1

1/23/15 12:07 20577PM Salt yoga.indd 1

1/22/15 2:27 PM

Shop Online Now

2020 Utica Square www.hicksbrunson.com 918.743.6478

The Ultimate Luxury Eyewear Experience

20572 Hicks Brunson.indd 1

1/26/15 20738 9:16 AM Lawn America.indd 1

1/9/15 10:43 AM

ON SALE

FEB 27 - MARCH 31

Experience “The World’s Most Beautiful Teeth” JOHN ROGERS, DDS 918.933.4889 | refreshdentistrytulsa.com

102 OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015 20707 Refresh.indd 1

1512 E 15TH STREET \\\ TULSA, OK \\\ 918.794.0071 \\\ FIFTEENTHANDHOME.COM

1/12/15 20597 9:35 AM 15th And Home.indd 1

1/27/15 2:30 PM


MARKETPLACE

North of Woodland Hills 6837 S. Memorial Dr.

TRUNK SHOW

North of Utica Square 2139 E. 21st St.

THURSDAY - SATURDAY APRIL 2ND - 4TH

www.visionsunique.com

918.254.1611

ONLY AT

Voted Tulsa's The Best of the

Best

10051 S. Yale, Suite 105 | 918.299.6565 | donnasfashions.com

A

1/26/15 20595 10:55 AM Visions.indd 1

of T S BE EST the B the

BE THE BEST.

Vote for Oklahoma Magazine’’s The Best of the Best. BY CASTING A BALLOT, YOU HAVE A VOICE IN THE YEAR’S MOST ANTICIPATED ISSUE.

ZI

NE

O KL

AH O

20591 Donna's M Fashion.indd 1

G

A

2015 M A

tbob marketplace special.indd 1

20560 David Cobb.indd 1

For Advertising opportunities•emAil Advertising@okmAg.com •cAll 918.744.6205

2/4/15 3:36 PM

VISIT OKMAG.COM

TO VOTE 2/17/15 4:43 PM

11/7/14 3:56 PM MARCH 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

103


IN PERSON

L

A Family Tradition

Shawnee-based Round House has manufactured denim workwear for more than a century.

ayer upon layer of denim stretches across a 32-yard table. With steady precision, a worker makes a series of cuts, initiating a process that will eventually yield a sturdy pair of overalls – thousands of pairs, in fact. In one of the offices adjacent to the factory sits the man in charge of it all. Tall, thin and exceedingly good-natured, he is not the first in his family to hold this position, nor is he likely to be the last. “When I was in high school, I was planning to be a chemical engineer,” says Jim Antosh, owner and president of Round House Workwear, which has manufactured jeans and overalls in Shawnee since 1903. “But then one summer I worked here and found out that I like manufacturing.” Antosh majored in industrial engineering and earned his MBA from Oklahoma State University, all the while planning to return to Round House. In 1978 he joined the company in a managerial role. In 1986 he became president, taking over for his father, Edward Antosh, who had purchased the company in the 1960s. Antosh’s son, David, currently serves as vice president, thus representing a third generation. The vast majority of family businesses do not make it that far, Antosh says. “There’s a myriad of reasons why they don’t make it,” he says. “But come around for our 200th, I think we’ll be here.” David Antosh is equally optimistic. “It seems like that’s kind of the way the family works,” he says. “We’ve always been involved in the business, and so even growing up I worked out at Round House doing different things.” While the Antosh name imparts a sense of continuity, the last 112 years have brought many changes to the industry in general and the company in particular. Since Antosh took the reins, the NAFTA era has seen much of the American manufacturing base move overseas, 104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2015

leaving Round House the only company of its kind to carry on the tradition of “Made in the United States,” he says. “As far as work clothing, we’re about it, so it gives us a real niche that way,” he says. Perhaps ironically, this domestic emphasis has become an international selling point. Japan, for example, is a loyal and enthusiastic customer of the Round House product, which seems to embody notions of rugged individualism and traditional Americana, he says. “They like that John Waynetype image,” Antosh says. Other changes have been more technological in nature. Because individual sewing machines with their own small motors were not quite a reality in the 1910s and 1920s, one large electric motor was manipulated by pulleys on a shaft running down the table at which the workers sat, he says. Antosh recalls meeting a woman, now deceased, who worked for Round House in 1922, at which time this system would have been in place. She appears in a period photograph hanging in a nearby ROUND HOUSE CEO JIM ANTOSH DISPLAYS hallway. THE COMPANY’S It is a type of history for ICONIC OVERALLS. which Antosh feels an obviPHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. ous affection. He is constantly on the lookout for photos and other memorabilia from previous decades, with the hope of eventually establishing a museum. But for now, a small gallery of photographs must suffice. It reflects a century of history – for Round House and, by extension, for Shawnee – with more recent photos showing celebrities from Donald Trump to Miranda Lambert bedecked in the company’s gear. Meanwhile, the overalls continue their rounds across the factory floor, gradually taking shape through a combination of computerized technology and the same type of old-fashioned handiwork that was necessary 100 years ago – and, one assumes, will still be occurring under Round House’s roof 100 years from today. ERIC MILLER


Hadleigh’s

our stores include: Akris . Alexander McQueen . Anne Fontaine . Balenciaga . Beretta Gallery . Billy Reid Brunello Cucinelli . Carolina Herrera . Chanel . Christian Louboutin . Cole Haan . Diane von Furstenberg . Dior Ellis Hill . Emily Summers Studio 54 . Ermenegildo Zegna . Escada . Five and Ten . Hadleigh’s . Harry Winston . Hermès James Perse . Jimmy Choo . Kiehl’s Since 1851 . LAFCO New York . Leggiadro . Lela Rose . Loro Piana . Madison . Peeper’s Rag & Bone . Ralph Lauren . Roberta Roller Rabbit . Saint Laurent . Scoop NYC . St. John . St. Michael’s Woman’s Exchange Stella McCartney . Tom Ford . Tory Burch . Trina Turk . Vince . William Noble Rare Jewels partial listing

complimentary valet parking . gift cards available . hpvillage.com at mockingbird lane and preston road


THE 2015

RC

Fasten Your Everything

LEXUSOFTULSA.COM | 918.665.3987

March 2015 Oklahoma Magazine  

The Great Outdoors There’s no better time than now to start thinking about opening your doors and enjoying the outdoor spaces your home of...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you