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Life & Style

LEFT: A CRISP, STREAMLINED, MODERN LOOK GREETS CLIENTS AT TPC STUDIOS. DIFFERENT SHADES OF WARM RED ARE AMONG HIGHLIGHTS IN THE COLOR PALETTE. BOTTOM: A LONDON-STYLE BRITISH RED PHONE BOOTH IS A CLEVER CONVERSATION PIECE IN THE TPC RECEPTION AREA. “IT WAS A PROP FROM A FUND-RAISING EVENT WE PLANNED AND WE DECIDED TO GIVE IT A HOME IN THIS AREA,” TODD REMARKED.

a river of water inside the abandoned, 13,000-square-foot building that was in total disrepair,” Pyland says. Prospects for any architectural or design revival seemed bleak, yet the partners could see sunshine and promise beyond the rain. Plus, they loved the old windows and high ceilings in the derelict building. Working with Tulsa’s Selser Schaefer Architects, Pyland, TPC’s principal and creative director, says, “We gave them a tall order. We wanted multiple conference rooms, a props area, kitchen, photography studio, floral rental warehouse and an efficient loading dock for the varied merchandise arriving daily for special events the firm plans.” Pyland says Selser Schaefer was “so thoughtful” in considering the needs of a business based on branding development and fund-raising events for Tulsa’s nonprofit and corporate communities. The architectural firm also studied the Beryl Ford Archives at the Tulsa City-County Library to research the hardware store’s architectural history. The building’s historic position in Tulsa was a plus, enabling TPC to utilize tax credits available for historic properties from Oklahoma’s Urban Renewal and historical societies. Perhaps the biggest challenge that Powell and Pyland gave to Selser Schaefer was, “everything has to blend together.” And it does. Shannon West, Selser Schaefer’s project manager, says the firm used a planar style of architecture rather than the typical enclosed box-like spaces in homes and some offices. “Two major white walls define the open space of the office and gallery,” West says. “Other walls use accents of red, green and yellow, defining the separation between offices and other spaces. The offices still have a sense of privacy but have a visual connection with other spaces. Those vibrant pops of color add architectural interest. “This is a very mid-century modernist way of composing an interior space. I’m influenced by that era of architecture. It’s an aesthetic that has a clean, interesting impact. We

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2017

Oklahoma Magazine March 2017