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JUNE 2017

Wedding Guide

271 doctors in 54 specialties

DOCTORS POFATRHRTEE3

Downtown Renaissance

The thriving entertainment hubs of Tulsa and OKC

Summer Travel

The best ideas for vacations in the region


Patient-Centered Patient-Centered Cancer Cancer Care Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home. home.

800 NE 10th Street 800 NECity, 10th OK Street Oklahoma 73104 Oklahoma City, 271-1112 OK 73104 Phone (405)

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top three cancer The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top three cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-1112 Fax (405) 271-5797 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


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Features JUNE

45 Top Doctors

2017 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXI, No. 6

Oklahoma physicians in a range of specialties make their mark on medicine.

69 The City’s Playground

Growing entertainment options in downtown Tulsa and Oklahoma City provide both revenue and enticing reasons to visit these areas.

SPECIAL SECTIONS

60

Head for an Adventure Summer means traveling, and Oklahoma and the surrounding states have plenty to offer to tourists.

WANT SOME MORE? June 2017

73

Wedding Guide 

80

Senior Living 

Wedding experts weigh in on how to keep the wedding planning period stress-free. Retirement homes, assisted living facilities and nursing homes: How do you know which one is right for your situation?

DOCTORS RT 3 PA OF THREE

The thriving entertainment hubs of Tulsa and OKC

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

271 doctors in 54 specialties

Downtown Renaissance

Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES

JUNE 2017

Wedding Guide

Summer Travel

The best ideas for vacations in the region

MORE PHOTOS ON THE COVER: OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE IS THE STATE’S EXCLUSIVE SOURCE TO FIND TOP DOCTORS, A PEER-SURVEY BASED LISTING BY CASTLE CONNOLLY.

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes even more great Oklahoma events.


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Brandon, Candice and Vaughn Tinlin


Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

11 State 14 15 16 18 20 21 22

An old-school arcade game is making a comeback in Oklahoma.

Nature History Design Sports Makers Automotive Insider

25 Life and Style 26 30 32 34 36 38 42

Interiors An old Midtown home becomes new for a Tulsa couple.

In the Know FYI City Life Health Style Don’t forget your summer

11

26

38

swimwear essentials, like killer bikinis, hats and sandals, on the way to the beach.

Scene

83 Taste 84 86 87

Tulsa’s newest woodfired restaurant, Amelia’s, serves from-scratch fare with expert wine pairings.

Local Flavor Chef Chat Random Flavors

89 Where and When 90 94

The annual cycling competition, Saint Francis Tulsa Tough, rolls through the city in June.

83

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

96 Closing Thoughts

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

89


WARREN CLINIC URGENT CARE

Save time. Schedule online. For sudden illnesses, minor injuries and after-hours care that can’t wait, visit one of our conveniently located Warren Clinic Urgent Care locations. Tulsa Springer Building

Broken Arrow Elm Place

6160 South Yale Avenue Mon–Sat: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sun: Noon to 8 p.m.

2950 South Elm Place, Suite 120 (101st Street & Elm Place) Mon–Fri: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sat–Sun: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Tulsa Hills 7858 South Olympia Avenue Mon–Fri: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat–Sun: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

South Memorial 10506 South Memorial Drive Mon–Sat: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat–Sun: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Kenosha 1801 East Kenosha Street (71st Street and OK-51) Mon–Fri: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat–Sun: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Online scheduling is available at warrenclinic.com/urgentcare. For additional information, call 918-488-6688.


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA FACES FACES of of

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

OKLAHOMA

DANIEL SCHUMAN

FACES ofFACES of PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K . SCHUMAN

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FACES FACES of of CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

ELITE. UNIQUE. THE FACE OF OKLAHOMA.

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CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOT T MILLER, DAN MORGAN, DAVID COBB, MARC RAINS, SCOT T JOHNSON

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OKLAHOMA

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[ ] Save the Date

5/16/17 4:55 PM

This is your special day; celebrate in style with help from Oklahoma Magazine. Start with our June Wedding Guide, and be sure to keep an eye out for the 2018 Wedding Issue and the Oklahoma Wedding Show, both coming in January.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2017 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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For more information, call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

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The Oklahoma Wedding Show is returning Saturday January 13, 2018. Booth spaces are now available.

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LET TER FROM THE EDITOR Health care choices can be overwhelming, which is why Oklahoma Magazine is proud to be the state’s exclusive provider of Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors. Medical professionals honored as Top Doctors are chosen by their peers in an exhaustive survey. Top Doctors includes 271 doctors in more than 50 specialties and is a valuable tool that will take some of the stress out of finding a doctor who best fits your needs. While summer vacations can be as elaborate and ambitious as you choose, there are many great destinations in Oklahoma and the surrounding states that don’t require an airline ticket. Oklahoma Magazine takes a state-by-state look at entertaining destinations in the region. Whether you’re an art aficionado, nature lover, sport enthusiast or foodie, you’re sure to find something that piques your interest for an adventure. Finally, we wrap up our three-part Downtown Renaissance feature with a look at the growth of dining and entertainment in Tulsa’s and Oklahoma City’s downtown districts. These types of businesses are crucial to building an inviting, thriving downtown, and large entertainment venues provide options for residents, encourage tourism and are important drivers in the economy of Oklahoma’s major cities. Next month, we present The Best of the Best, the definitive guide to our readers’ favorite places, services, people and businesses in Oklahoma. Don’t miss the biggest issue of the year – we’re already working hard to make it the best yet. As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com.

FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES EMAIL ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

2017

OKLAHOMA

Sincerely,

Justin Martino Justin Martino Managing Editor

LOOK FOR THE RESULTS IN THE UPCOMING JULY EDITION.

FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST ARE IN!

Votes THE

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OKMAG.COM S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

COMING UP IN JUNE Oklahoma Magazine’s web-exclusive video interviews showcase community leaders, artists and entrepreneurs around the state. This month, we talk to two of our Top Doctors, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Yogesh Mittal and Dr. Douglas Beall, a diplomate of the American Academy of Pain. Next, we visit Tulsa art dealer Royce Myers, whose gallery is available to the public after 25 years of business. We also speak with chef Candace Conley from The Girl Can Cook! to learn about her recent appearance on Food Network’s Cooks vs. Cons and discover her unique approach to preparing delicious meals.

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Each week, we send fresh content directly to you in our OKMag email newsletter. Subscribe to receive web exclusive stories, stay notified of upcoming events and be automatically entered to win prizes. Last month, we randomly selected newsletter subscriber Jill R. from Tulsa to win our Mother’s Day prize package, valued at over $400. The package included a family portrait session with Apertures Photo, dinner at The Tropical, a flower arrangement from Toni’s Flowers and Gifts and tickets to the inaugural MisFEST music festival. To subscribe, head to okmag.com and look for the sign up form on the home page. Not only will you receive great content, but you could also be our next giveaway winner.

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ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Pinball Wizards

Oklahoma’s community of pinball fans proves true classics never go out of style.

CACTUS JACK’S ARCADE HOSTS MANY TOURNAMENTS AND LEAGUES FOR PINBALL ENTHUSIASTS IN OKLAHOMA AND SURROUNDING STATES. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

O

nce upon a time, pinball was considered to be quite literally sinful. Banned for more than 30 years as a “gambling device” – most famously by New York City’s Mayor LaGuardia – the pinball machine languished in obscurity until one historian and devotee was

determined to save it. In 1976, Roger Sharpe succeeded in “calling his shot” and demonstrating to the NYC City Council that pinball was a game of skill and did not deserve its reputation as a pastime of vice. New York City lifted the ban, and as other cities followed, pinball fever swept the nation. This tale is a favorite of pinball

fan Shawn Lee. By day, Lee is a doctor of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Mercy Health Center in Oklahoma City. In his spare time, he is a founding member of the Oklahoma Pinball Enthusiasts, a group of self-described “pinheads” who meet regularly for tournaments, leagues and social gatherings, or chat online about technical support or memJUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

PARTICIPANTS IN OKLAHOMA PINBALL LEAGUES SAY THE LEAGUES ARE FRIENDLY AND OPEN TO BEGINNERS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

bers’ latest quests to collect these mythical machines. The group meets regularly inperson for events at Cactus Jack’s Arcade in Oklahoma City. Lee says he was a fan of pinball as a child of the 1980s, particularly Space Shuttle and Pinbot, but that the heyday of the arcade was passing. It wasn’t until the days of his medical residency, and his discovery of arcade auctions, that his passion for the game began in earnest. His first purchase at auction was a Galaga, followed by a 1991 Bride of Pinbot. By the time financial stability and space became less of an issue, Lee was hooked. “Priority number one was to add another machine to my collection,” he says. “I began scouring Craigslist and lucked upon a beautiful Bally 1993 Creature from the Black Lagoon. I fell entirely under the spell of this gorgeous machine and soon my conversion to a true pinhead was confirmed when I sold off my Galaga to make room for another pin. My collection began to balloon, but I was not satisfied. I wanted people with which to share my passion. So in late 2012, I founded the Oklahoma Pinball Enthusiasts. I had no idea if anyone would even care, but to my surprise I was not alone in my love for the silver ball, and soon I was meeting numerous fellow pinheads and making more friends than I had ever before.” Wes Johnson, known to some as Tulsa’s very own “Pinball Doctor,” has seen the likes of Lee many times over the course of his 32 years maintaining and repairing machines. He grew up playing pinball at Skyline Park in Jenks and was enamored of all things mechanical from an early age. His favorite machine, he says, is the Circus Voltaire, while his wife’s is the Harley Davidson game. “I think people love to play pinball for several reasons,” Johnson says. “First and

BELLES AND CHIMES Oklahoma City is home to one of the 10 foremost, it is great fun. You can play by yourself, pitting man against machine. You can play with others, which draws out our competitive nature to attain the highest score. All ages from young to old can play. For many, it brings back fond childhood memories.” He says many collect because they can afford the games now, and to preserve these increasingly rare machines as fewer and fewer are made. While collecting is a popular way to indulge a love for pinball, it’s not the only way. Timothy Larsen, of Enid, says he played less than two hours before participating in his first tournament at Cactus Jack’s. “I will never forget it,” he says. “There were 48 people at the event, and I finished 46th. But you know what? I enjoyed it and had fun, and I’ve been going back ever since.” The easy camaraderie of the tournament encouraged Larsen and his friend, Brian Kaiser, to form Enid Pinball. The group holds four six-week leagues a year

national chapters of Belles and Chimes, a nationwide network of women’s pinball leagues started in 2013 in Oakland, California. The Oklahoma City chapter was started by Carolyn Dawson, general manager at Cactus Jack’s Arcade. She says the women’s only league has helped encourage more women to play pinball, and many of the women’s league players are beginning to compete in the other tournaments held on the location as well. Belles and Chimes meets on every other Thursday.

along with four tournaments. They play on a collection of privately owned machines – Larsen said the group usually has 10 machines available at any time. The group started with around six or seven people, but has grown quickly in a short period of time. The biggest league held by the group had nearly 30 people participating, and Larsen says he has been pleasantly surprised by walk-ins that read about the tournaments on Facebook. “That’s the one good thing about this community,” he says. “Anybody willing to show up is going to be treated well. As long as you can walk into a room full of people and [introduce yourself], you’re good to go. It really is that easy.” TARA MALONE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017


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The State N AT U R E

The Bear Facts

S

Increased sightings of black bears are attributed to more outdoor cameras ... and DNA at work.

ightings of black bears in Broken Arrow, Wewoka and Ada in 2015 led to discussions about the animals moving out of their preferred forests and streams in eastern Oklahoma. The population of black bears has increased in those habitats – the Ozark foothills in the northeast and the Ouachita Mountains in the southeast – but it has been a slow, steady growth, says Jeff Ford, a biologist for the LeFlore unit of the Ouachita

Wildlife Management Area. He attributes the increased numbers between Interstate 35 and those hilly, wooded areas to more people having outdoor cameras … and Bubba Bear not liking to get hit by Mama. Most of what wildlife conservationists call irregular sightings (those outside normal habitats) are of juvenile male black bears run off by their mothers. “It’s all in their DNA,” says Ford, adding that sows want to have genetic diversity for their next breeding periods. “The young males get the hint after they get smacked around by their mothers.” The “teenage” males may be big, but the “sows are smarter,” says Ford, likening the behavior to a small-statured mother getting a towering son to do anything with just a glare. “There’s going to be a larger boar for the sows, so those younger males look for their own territory,” he says, “which includes food, water and shelter. Unfortunately, they can find that in a person’s backyard. They’re

sly. It’s not that they haven’t been there before. It’s just that a lot of people have more cameras out day and night.” Jena Donnell with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation says black bears heavily populated eastern Oklahoma before farming changed the land in the early 1900s. “We took over their habitat a long time ago,” she says. Wildlife officials reintroduced black bears into western Arkansas in the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s; subsequent generations migrated into the Sooner State. Oklahoma State University’s Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management is conducting studies to determine black bears’ precise number, but a solid estimate is around 2,000. The mating season for black bears ends around June 30, Ford says, then their activity will increase again in August, when vegetation dries out until berries ripen in the fall. BRIAN WILSON

WHAT TO DO IF YOU SEE A BLACK BEAR Jeff Ford, a Ouachita Wildlife Management Area biologist, says encounters with black bears THE OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE CONSERVATION CONDUCTS RESEARCH ON BLACK BEARS IN SOUTHEAST OKLAHOMA. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

are usually uneventful. “Most of the time it’s going to run off. It’s just as curious seeing you as you it. If the bear doesn’t run, stop and stand still. You may be the first person it’s ever seen. If you’re wearing sunglasses, take them off because the lenses look like a wide-eyed sign of aggression to them. Don’t take off running. Just back away from the bear, make some noise and let that bear know that you know it’s there. Take bear spray with you. It will shoot 25 yards. Don’t walk toward the bear. Don’t threaten the bear. But beware that the wind could blow the spray back into you.”


HISTORY

T

Still a Community Hub

he Eskridge Hotel “Today, it is still a place for Museum stands in meetings, receptions and special the heart of Wynevents and is the location for many newood in southern of the community library’s sumOklahoma. The mer reading programs,” Waters reason for the hotel’s existence says. (and one could argue the existence The museum showcases items The century-old Eskridge Hotel, now a museum, of the entire town) lies a few blocks from the beginnings of Wynaway in miles of railroad tracks. serves as a gathering place, just like it used to do. newood dating to the 1880s. Today, the Eskridge is a museum “The Eskridge is a storehouse the hotel while they were on the road to sell chock-full of late-19th century and earlyfor the community’s history and an opportutheir wares,” says Luann Sewell Waters, the 20th century items of interest, but it is also nity for a ‘stroll down memory lane’ for a lot Wynnewood Historical Society secretary and the center of the community, just like in its of people,” Waters says. treasurer. heyday a century ago. There is a fascinating collection includWhen the Eskridge Hotel opened in 1907, Pinckney Reid Eskridge, a cotton salesing turn-of-the-20th-century and older it became the lifeblood of Wynnewood. man with an entrepreneurial spirit, saw a clothing, as well as displays of the period’s “Community groups, such as the Kiwanis, need and met it. He spent much time travelmedical and dental equipment, a barber shop had their meetings in the hotel dining room, ing on trains between Oklahoma City and complete with chairs, funeral parlor, doll and families came from far around for meals Dallas during the last part of the 1800s, and collection, kitchen and general store. Each and fried chicken on Sundays, as well,” none of the hotels available was particularly of the old hotel rooms holds treasures from Waters says. pleasant. So he built his own and designed the past and many are arranged in carefully Locals met with family, friends and neighit to meet the needs of his fellow traveling curated displays. bors in the restaurant, and the dining room salesmen – with comfort and good food. The Eskridge Hotel Museum is owned and was a popular place to hold parties and meetEskridge outfitted the beds with top-ofoperated by the Wynnewood Historical Sociings for community groups. Some of those the-line Ostermoor mattresses and even had ety, and tours are available by appointment. traditions continue. some extra long beds for taller men. The Once a monument to modern conrestaurant in the hotel was famous for its venience and comfort, the Eskridge fried chicken dinners and was a faHotel shows its age in many vorite spot for locals and travelers respects. But, due to the hard alike. The Eskridge gained work and dedication of its fans, the reputation as the finest the stately building stands as hotel between Oklahoma a tip of the hat to the past – a City and Dallas. reminder of where we’ve “It was a hub of been and whence we’ve activity because of the come. salesmen who stayed at BONNIE RUCKER

THE ESKRIDGE HOTEL OPENED IN 1907 AND QUICKLY BECAME A HUB OF ACTIVITY. PHOTO COURTESY THE ESKRIDGE HOTEL MUSEUM

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

15


The State

UNIT CORPORATION’S CORPORATE OFFICE, DESIGNED BY KKT, IS 196,000 SQUARE FEET.

PHOTO BY ADAM MURPHY

DESIGN

Building Collaboration

staff is composed of a wide range of ages, backgrounds and professional experiences,” says Debbie Jones, business development and marketing director. “The other is industry KKT Architects uses an open, work-together atmosphere or market segments. We specialize in office, to create dynamic projects throughout the state. education, medical, retail, commercial residential, unique hospitality hether making new projects and historic renovations. structures or makThis ensures a broad business ing structures new, base and stabilizes the ebb and KKT Architects flow of ever-changing market looks to bring peoconditions.” ple together. By creating spaces for people to Diversity not only benefits come together and maintaining space where the bottom line, it also provides staff can work together, KKT and its clients expertise to projects that might make projects come together. not be available if the firm A full-service architectural, interiors, focuses on one particular type structural and civil engineering firm based of structure. For example, what in Tulsa, KKT designs everything from fullKKT architects, designers and scale new construction to small and large engineers learn from an educarenovation projects. The company works tion or hospitality project can primarily in northeastern Oklahoma but has be used to affect the design of a projects in and out of state. medical facility for children. KKT averages 3 million square feet of de“There is a lot of crossover signed space each year. Andy Kinslow, KKT knowledge that can benefit partner and founder, and his fellow leaders each market segment during the credit KKT’s diversity with much of the sucdesign process of our missioncess and growth they’ve seen since the firm critical goal to ensure our clients began in 1989. get the highest return on the “One focus [for diversity] is ensuring our

W

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

investment in their business,” says Sarah Gould, architecture principal. One look at the KKT offices provides an example of how everyone reaches this level of collaboration. Kinslow describes the atmosphere as “loud, joyful, passionate and incredibly productive. We work in a giant open office where collaboration happens everyday. We navigate timelines and design changes faster because all the experts are in one place.” Walking through the KKT offices reveals a flexible design that encourages staff to interact. People move workstations frequently so that they can be close to co-workers on the same project. They are also moving to a laptop-computer-for-everyone model, allowing for more flexibility. This collaborative atmosphere and focus on diversity of both people and projects are a successful recipe. KKT has seen tremendous growth since its beginnings and has doubled its staff to more than 60 people in the last eight years. KKT has worked on dynamic projects such as the Woody


incorporating impactful operational and aesthetic details,” Gould says. “The staff working in those buildings have some of the hardest jobs in town. This is one way we can give back to them.” The team spirit and atmosphere at the firm are illustrated by Kinslow when he describes the attendance at a recent open meeting to determine interest on a proposal for the Arkansas River pedestrian bridge. “Fifteen passionate team members showed up to collaborate,” he says. “That’s the kind of excitement that happens at KKT everyday.” BONNIE RUCKER

The Crossing

KKT Architects designed one of the two bridges that have been selected as finalists to replace the Arkansas River Pedestrian Bridge. The City of Tulsa requested conceptual bridge designs in March and received more than 234 responses and 14,000 comments about core components the bridge should have. The selection committee narrowed it to four finalists, and two bridges are in consideration. The final design will be chosen this month. The bridge designed by KKT (pictured below) proposes to turn the bridge into far more than a way to cross the river. The proposed design includes a fishing dock, an amphitheater, viewing platforms and gardens.

PHOTO COURTESY KKT ARCHITECTS

Guthrie Center, the St. Jude Affiliate Clinic at the Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, the Lodge at Sequoyah State Park and the Children’s Center Rehabilitation Hospital in Bethany. The company is designing the Tulsa Children’s Museum, which will be part of A Gathering Place, Tulsa’s grand park slated to open late this year. KKT also gives back to the community by working on the special needs, challenges and opportunities presented by nonprofit clients. “We work closely with each [nonprofit] organization [by] respecting budgets and

ANDY KINSLOW, SARAH GOULD AND DEBBIE JONES OF KKT ARCHIECTS PRIDE THEMSELVES ON A DIVERSE WORK ENVIRONMENT. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

ABOVE: KKT CREATED A CONTEMPORARY DESIGN FOR WINE LOFT. PHOTO BY AMATUCCI PHOTOGRAPHY

LEFT: TRI COUNTY TECH’S DESIGN ENCOURAGES COLLABORATION. PHOTO BY ADAM MURPHY

FAR LEFT: ST. JUDE AFFLIATE CLINIC AT SAINT FRANCIS WAS DESIGNED WITH MANY COLORS. PHOTO COURTESY ST. JUDE CHILDREN’S RESEARCH HOSPITAL

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

17


The State SPORTS

Ohio State Bound An Oklahoma teen finds a path forward in volleyball after a tragic loss.

G

loria Mutiri excels in just about every sport available to girls at Charles Page High School in Sand Springs. But it’s her prowess on the volleyball court and the mutual support of her siblings that committed her to an out-of-state college scholarship – and helped her to survive the deaths of her parents. After volleyball games, receiving business cards from visiting coaches became such a common occurrence that Mutiri and her sisters would sort the cards to decide which collegiate volleyball programs to investigate. “We didn’t know anything about

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

Ohio but that it gets really cold there,” she says with a laugh. “But the third time the coach left a card, I called and we had a great conversation. I knew I wanted to be in a large city but not in-state or in the Big 12 [conference]. “I want to experience new places, try new things. Eventually I felt like Ohio State is the right school for me, and I just went for it. I want to study broadcast journalism, and I’ll be graduating high school early and starting college in December.” As Mutiri finishes her last season as a high school athlete this fall, she says it was a long road to get to this point. The Mutiri sisters lost their father to cancer in 2012, and then their mother succumbed to chronic heart complications in 2014. This meant many challenges and transitions just to survive. “My sisters and I were raised with a lot of culture growing up and we moved a lot because my dad was a minister,” she says. “But once we came back to Oklahoma in 2012, a lot went downhill fast. My sisters and I are very close, and we’ve always been very supportive of each other. “My oldest sister, Faith, had planned on Oklahoma University, but she changed her plans to take care of us all. Now she’s in real estate; one sister is into modeling and another is into dance. It’s been a long journey to get here, to get past just surviving.” The sisters had help in the dark years. “When my dad died and we didn’t have anything, we had to start from the bottom and our mom needed help,” Mutiri says. “So many people gave us gas money, meals, took us to school. All this help got us to where we are now and without them, and without each other, we would not have gotten to this point.” Mutiri will not “start from the bottom” when she moves to Columbus. Her trainer has family in that city, so she will achieve the dream of living in a new place with new experiences and have some familiar folks nearby for support. “When I visited Columbus for the first time, I got to attend the Ohio State vs. Michigan game and saw how the entire campus comes alive,” she says. But ties to Oklahoma will remain

strong. “My sisters and I … we always knew we were going to make it, no matter how bad it got,” she says. “Because if you do something every day to get to where you want to be, like when I thought I wanted to be an Olympian, I’d do pushups every day. My sisters and I believe in ourselves and each other. I’m so grateful because I know that has shaped me as a person. “I know how to appreciate what I have.” TRACY LEGRAND

MUTIRI EXCELS IN ALMOST EVERY SPORT, BUT IT’S HER PROWESS ON THE VOLLEYBALL COURT THAT HAS HER COMMITTING TO OHIO STATE ON SCHOLARSHIP. PHOTO COURTESY CLEARVIEW SPORTS


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The State

MAKERS

The Finishing Touch

that, my mother’s decorator friend asked if I could build some curtain rods, then a coffee table and so on. “Next thing I knew, I was building decorative metal products on a regular basis. I never knew I had a creative side, but when I found out that I did, it turned into a passion at a young age.” Oklahoma furniture and specialty metalwork artist Going from labors of love for family and friends to a follows a passion inspired by his mom. full-time, creative career was ome artists work with watercolhelped by tours of wholesale metal furniture ors and oil pigments; for others, companies near the Mexican border. Hodges it’s marble or stone. For Justin realized the pieces he saw weren’t, to his Hodges, woods, metals, patinas mind, finished. and stains form a melange of “I thought, ‘Wow, I can bring these pieces custom furniture and specialty metal works back, work on them a little, put a stone or gracing homes, restaurants, bars, conference wood top on them and still make a 200 rooms and hotels across the world via his percent margin,’” he says. “They were great Oklahoma City company, Urban Ironcraft. at forging large heavy material, but their And it all began with a request from his welding and grinding were horrible. The mom. hard part was done, so all I needed to do “I started around the age of 18, when was clean it up and put the finishing touches my mother asked me to build a queen-size to it. So I came back home on fire with my bed for my younger sister,” Hodges says. new idea.” “I worked in the family trucking business For the past 15 years, Hodges’s custom welding shop during summers, and I had fabrication workshop has turned out pieces gotten good enough to give it a try. After meant to last for generations. Works include

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brackets, fireplace screens, towel rings and bars, decorative table legs, bathroom vanities, desks, conference tables, dining tables and coffee tables. The company’s distinct, highly decorative corbels – brackets that serve as structural pieces jutting from a wall to carry weight – are in great demand. “There was a part of me that knew people would love [the corbels] as much as I did, but I didn’t know if my pricing was where it needed to be,” he says. “There wasn’t anything on the market like them, so I had that going for me.” Every day presents an exciting challenge. “I love the idea of taking raw materials and turning them into something amazing,” Hodges says. “I get a lot of satisfaction from seeing something I had in my mind come to fruition. Aside from that, I just love to work with steel. I’ve been around it my entire life.” Urban Ironcraft is a labor of love for Hodges and his staff of artisans, including Craig Lewis, the first employee hired, who fabricates everything from hot rods and motorcycles to high-end metal furniture. “I love to design new products that have never been done before,” Hodges says. “In a way I get to be a creative inventor on a regular basis.” TRACY LEGRAND

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

“I love the idea of taking raw materials and turning them into something amazing.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017


JASON ENGEL CREATES WHAT HE CALLS RESTOMODS, SUCH AS THESE MUSTANGS. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

AUTOMOTIVE

Saving Classics

Specialists can restore a car to factory specs or create a modern upgrade beneath an original shell.

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Then there are those who adhere to original design and construction, such as Mike Jones, a former MG technician. His restoration shop reflects his love of MGs, classic British roadsters made in their original Morris Garage incarnation between 1923 and 1980. Jones calls the MG a “working man’s sports car.” He says that when most people see a restoration at a car show, for example, they just observe the paint and body work and think that’s 90 percent of the process. In fact, that part of the job is only 10 percent of the work, Jones says. “I farm out that 10 percent to shops that are experts in paint and body work. I then work everyday to make sure the other 90 percent is as close to original as possible,” says Jones, whose definition of restoration is “to put the car back into the state that it was made in.” Jones studies factory specifications, color codes and the history of the manufacturing process and runs far away from modification. On the opposite end of the spectrum is Jason Engel, who uses the genius of classic car builders and technology from the 21st century. With each project, Ingle creates a car with a classic look and a modern feel. He combines the old road map of quality with modern innovation to get a new destination of design … what he calls a restomod. Engel’s company, Classic Recreations in Yukon, builds dream machines beneath classic body shells that have appealed to a worldwide customer base. “I build a vintage car with all of the modern amenities,” he says. Engel’s restoration process is unique in that his cars come from designs that he and his team develop. In addition, late automotive designer Shelby Carroll of Mustang fame worked with Engel to mesh old and new ideas. Engel’s cars, for example, have fuel-injected engines, custom-built suspensions and modern braking systems wrapped up beneach restored vintage shells. Carroll worked with Engel after discovering, and being impressed by, the Mustangs modified by Classic Recreations. As a hobby or profession, car restoration can certainly create a dent in one’s wallet that a body shop can’t repair. Depending on the type of restoration or modification, prices can range from $5,000 to $100,000, plus the cost of the vehicle. Classic Recreations’ restomods can run as much as $254,000, Engel says.

hether it’s a memory from days gone by or a passion to possess a machine that speaks to us, cars can get our motors running. A classic look and feel from an era passed into the distance of a long lost highway never stop firing the pistons of car enthusiasts. Restorations often follow the realization that many beautiful cars from the past (with their precision personalities) can escape bone yards and the jaws of a crusher, so many turn to those who refurbish vintage autos. Oklahoma is full of these rebuilders, who, working with their own ideas or the visions of customers, can make unique modes of transport … or who pay much more attention to original detail. Either way, a classic car is reborn. Many rebuilders tackle the basics, such as retro-fitting an engine (like replacing an original Chevy 350-cubicinch with a 327-cubic-inch). They may also change the color away from an official factory hue and switch the C.L. HARMON interior from vinyl to leather or cloth. The result is a customized rebuild or ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Bonus photo gallery @ OKmag.com modified restoration. JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State INSIDER

Reunion Reflections

High school classmates, especially from 50 years ago, create something bigger than themselves. “And the class of ’57 had its dreams./ We all thought we’d change the world with our great work and deeds./Or maybe we just thought the world would change to fit our needs./The class of ’57 had its dreams.” – “Class of ’57” by the Statler Brothers My mom, a Chelsea High School alum like me, has been gone for more than a decade now, so I hope it’s all right to reveal a secret ritual we participated in for years. Before every one of the annual Chelsea Alumni Association Banquets we attended, I would visit her house and she would fix us both a substantial vodka and 7UP with a lime wedge. Thus fortified for the event, we would head off to the school cafeteria to mingle once again with scores of our fellow CHS graduates, many of whom, I suspect, had indulged in a similar bit of glass-lifting. Is there anything that pulls you in as many emotional directions as a high school reunion? It’s not just the mixed feelings always engendered by nostalgia, that homesick-like longing for the past that’s not only both sweet

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

and sad, but also wistful and ultimately, heartbreakingly futile. While a reunion celebrates the threads that will always bind us to our old classmates, it can also be a relentless reminder of just how old those classmates are getting, a process that directly involves us. The realization of time’s passing seems especially stark when someone shows up whom you haven’t seen for years, and their wrinkles and sags and age blemishes provide an unwelcome reflection of yourself. If nothing else, a reunion shows you just exactly what years of gravity can do to human features, including, of course, your own. In the early ’90s, while covering country music for the Tulsa World, I got into a backstage discussion with Duncan Cameron, guitarist for the group Sawyer Brown. He’d recently gone to one of his class reunions for the first time in a long time, and, like a lot of people who aren’t regular attendees, he’d found it to be kind of weird. He thought that feeling had to do with the fact that he was in the public eye and needed to keep up appearances, so he looked different from his old running buddies, who’d let themselves age naturally. “You go in there with the good hair and everything,” I recall him saying. “And you

just maybe look a lot younger than most people your age.” Cameron had plenty of reason to make that observation. But don’t we all feel that way, if only in our secret heart of hearts? I don’t know of anyone who wouldn’t admit to having, on at least one occasion, come home from a school reunion, stopped in front of a mirror, and thought, “Well, really, I don’t look that bad.” Maybe all of this is on my mind because it’s the school-reunion season. Or perhaps it’s because last year at this time my own CHS class celebrated its 50th anniversary, leaving my classmates and me little room to pretend we were still the kids who dragged Main Street on Saturday nights, sneaked off to the notorious Nowata Stomps (weekend rock ’n’ roll dances whose parking lots were monitored by dour American Legionnaires keeping an eye out for teenage monkey business) and, as the Statler Brothers’ Don and Harold Reid deftly put it in their lyrics, thought “we’d change the world with our great work and deeds.” Now, we were the geezers at the big center table, so ancient that we were getting complimentary tickets to the event. The youngsters around us at their own tables regarded us curiously and


found it inconceivable they’d ever be that old. Believe me, I understood. My mother, Ruth Seely Wooley, was a member of the Dust Bowl-era class of 1934, and I remember taking her to her own 50th reunion pre-party and thinking how wizened her classmates looked. I also remember something she told me a few years later, after I’d been asked to give the eulogy for Randy, one of my good high school pals, who’d succumbed to cancer. “Now,” she said knowingly, “you’re at the age where your classmates start to die.” She was right, of course. But there seemed to be plenty of life left in those who assembled in the Chelsea High School cafeteria for our 50th. The actual number of students in our class has long been a point of contention, but it was somewhere in the upper 40s, and we had more than half that number around the big table. Spirits were high, as minor-keyed complex feelings about connection, and aging, and camaraderie moved about us like tiny clouds, or little spirals of smoke, while we shared memories that reminded us how much we were all part of an extended family. I realize that sounds fatuous. But it’s true. There were people at that table I might see only once a year, or even less, but they are people I would trust with my very life. They’re folks I could call on in an emergency.

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And the reverse is true as well: They could call on me. In talking to graduates whose senior-class sizes were in the hundreds, I’ve found that many of them don’t hold these same sorts of feelings. Invariably, they still have a strong connection to people who were part of their high school group, which is kind of the same as being in a small school. At Chelsea, there were so few of us that we didn’t have the luxury of cliques; we just all kind of hung out with one another. Large or small, it seems to me, a high school graduating class is like a snowflake. No two are alike, and all are made up of tiny components, sticking together into a single pattern. The snowflake gets its time of swirling through the sky, and then it hits the ground and melts and becomes water, flowing with all the other snowflakes to the sea, no longer one-of-a-kind, no longer something precious and unique unto itself. Still, every year in Chelsea, Oklahoma, and untold thousands of places all over the country, people pull themselves out of their lives in the greater community and travel someplace, often far away, to meet with friends of years past, all joining together in an effort to reconstitute the snowflake that was their high school graduating class. Once

pure and white, that snowflake grays and shows more imperfections with time, reflecting the years that its tiny parts have been awash in humanity’s sea. Again, the Statler Brothers: “Johnny’s big in cattle. Ray is deep in debt./Where Mavis finally wound up is anybody’s guess./Linda married Sonny. Brenda married me./And the class of all of us is just part of history.” As the annual date for the Chelsea High reunion rolls around again, and we once-young grown-ups talk and laugh and tell one another the same stories we told the year before, all of us of course know our little class is, indeed, “just part of history,” and an infinitesimally minor part at that. Yet, there’s something truly sweet and lasting in the way we’re drawn almost magnetically together, year after year after year. In a funny way, I think, going to a high school reunion is a little like attending a church service: When we make the effort to get up and go, we’re rewarded by the reassurance that there’s something out there, something hard to define and maybe just beyond our grasp, but beautiful and enduring – a thing, ultimately, that will always be bigger than ourselves. JOHN WOOLEY

4/25/17 8:56 AM

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Cool Treats Ice cream is the perfect way to stay cool as the weather heats up.

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PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN; ICE CREAM COURTESY BRAUM’S; BOWL AND SPOON COURTESY WILLIAMS-SONOMA

hildhood nostalgia deems ice cream the dessert of the summer. From the classic ice cream sandwiches to colorful popsicles made to look (somewhat) like your favorite super hero or TV character, this

sticky sweet dessert option can bring a smile to anyone’s face on a sweltering Oklahoma day. Although picking up a tub or cone of your favorite flavor at the grocery store is a quick, easy and delicious option, learning how to make the treat yourself could be an entertaining and educational summer project for you and your young ones. The recipe won’t break the bank either – all you need are some simple ingredients like heavy cream, whole milk, sea salt, eggs, sugar and your choice of personal preference flavorings. (Some, for example, swear by vanilla extract or brown sugar; the choice is yours.) After the ice cream is made, add sprinkles, chocolate chips or a flavored syrup. For those who want a healthier topping, try seasonal berries or nuts for some crunch. Regardless, ice cream in any form is always a home run for children and adults alike.

JUNE 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

LEFT: THIS 1945 VINTAGE HOME NEAR UTICA SQUARE RECEIVED A MAJOR RENOVATION INSIDE AND OUT. THE MULTI-LEVEL HOME WAS PAINTED WHITE, ANNOUNCING THE PREDOMINANTLY NEUTRAL PALETTE OF THE INTERIOR. TWO UPHOLSTERED CHAIRS FEATURING METAL ACCENT BANDS ARE COMFORTABLY PLACED NEAR THE FIREPLACE AND THE LARGE LIVING ROOM SOFA. A GLASS-TOPPED COFFEE TABLE IS A SPECIAL FEATURE IN THIS SETTING.

INTERIORS

A Dramatic Change

An old Midtown home becomes new for a Tulsa couple. By M. J. Van Deventer • Photos by Alyssa Rosenheck

A

Tulsa couple was well on their way to building a new home. The design plan for the residence was established. They were working well with their interior designer, Mel Bean, owner of Austin Bean Design Studio. Then, by chance, they discovered an older home near Utica Square that spoke to them, much louder than a whisper. Its multilevel, rambling style had an appealing charm. It did need updating, but the couple decided this home could be as impressive and comfortable as the one on the blueprints that they had approved. The Midtown location and the possibilities the home offered for renovation won over the original new home plans. “The exterior did need updating,” Mel says. “It was dark and disjointed. We softened the exterior by painting the brick and wood white and enhancing the landscaping, enlarging the walk to the front door, adding a curve to the threshold and a small seating area near the entrance.” While the interior of the home also needed a fresh look, the couple loved the neighborhood and decided this home could achieve all they wanted in a new “old” residence. The entry makes an impressive statement. The couple have professional interests in geology, and the entry sets the stage with a welcoming console featuring mementos of geological history. The couple’s interest in earth science is complemented with a variety of materials used in the furnishings and accessories. Among the materials are chrome, glass, metal, steel, stone, subway tile,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

LEFT-RIGHT: THE FIREPLACE IN THE FAMILY ROOM, ADJACENT TO THE KITCHEN, WAS RENOVATED. NEW FURNISHINGS REFLECT THE COMFORTABLE FEELING THE HOMEOWNERS WANTED FOR THIS SPECIAL PLACE IN THEIR HOME. AN UNUSUAL MODERN PAINTING FEATURES COPPER ACCENTS AND REFLECTS THE COUPLE’S LOVE FOR VARIOUS SHADES OF BLUE AND THEIR ADMIRATION FOR METALS. FIREBALLS WERE USED IN PLACE OF LOGS FOR THE LIVING ROOM FIREPLACE, GIVING IT A MODERN TOUCH. A BLACK STEEL COFFEE TABLE IN THE FORMAL LIVING ROOM IS ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF THE COUPLE’S INTEREST IN USING A VARIETY OF METALS AND TEXTURES IN THE INTERIOR DESIGN OF THEIR HOME.


JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

CLOCKWISE: MEL BEAN USED A GLAMOROUS VANITY WALLPAPER IN THE DOWNSTAIRS POWDER ROOM.

THE ALL WHITE DINING ROOM FEATURES AN ELEGANT CONTEMPORARY CHANDELIER, FASHIONED OF SELENITE. THE RUG ADDS A COLOR NOTE IN THE KITCHEN. CALCUTTA GOLD MARBLE IS USED ON THE COUNTERTOPS. WHITE SUBWAY TILE IS THE BACKSPLASH. THE NOD TO MIXED TEXTURES CONTINUES IN THE MASTER BEDROOM SUITE. THE HEADBOARD IS FASHIONED OF STRAW-HUED RAFFIA; THE BEDSIDE TABLES ARE METAL.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

copper, selenite and Calcutta gold marble. Wood floors, stained a medium dark brown, anchor each room to add a pleasing contrast to the pristine white theme. Guests to the home could have an interesting treasure hunt for the variety of materials and textures. A soft touch was added by featuring a mixture of fabrics, including velvet, rugs fashioned of a wool and silk blend, soft leathers and straw-hued raffia for a master bedroom headboard. A few structural changes were necessary, Mel notes. An awkward column was removed to provide more space to create a larger kitchen and family room for infomral meals and entertaining.“This is a very approachable, casual room designed for easy living,” Mel says The kitchen got a facelift. New cabinet doors give the existing cabinets a contemporary updated look, enhancing the all-white theme. A new Wolf range and a custom designed hood look impressive. No longer a drab setting, the room is a great area for informal dining. The perfect splash of color is an antique patterned rug accenting the large commercial range. The dining room overlooks the spacious front lawn and is an elegant setting for entertaining. The centerpiece is a dramatic selenite chandelier that, Mel says, “glows beautifully in the room.” The table for eight is flanked with white upholstered chairs. The formal living room exudes a serene look. The custom fireplace is a major focal point, dominating one end of the room. Its dark bronze surface is accented with gold tones. A gray rug in a wool and silk blend is designed in a geometric pattern, and a chrome-and-glass coffee table enhances the seating area. Two lounge chairs, covered in navy velvet, invite seating near the fireplace. While the room makes a beautiful first impression, Mel says it is “not too formal to be comfortable.” The design of the room and the placement of the furnishings invite conversation with guests. Many of the rooms in the home overlook the garden areas, with nature adding its own color palette to the interior design. Throughout this spacious home, the interior color palette is restrained and based on crisp white walls and some white upholstery accented with shades of blue and gray, adding the “pops of color” that Mel likes to use in interiors. The home took seven months to complete, from the purchase of the home to moving day. Mel desribes it as “a wonderful project.” The clients were organized, delightful and trusting of the design firm to bring their dreams to fruition. “The before and after photographs make this look like a brand new house,” Mel says.


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Life & Style

IN THE KNOW

Gallery Opens to Public Tulsa’s Royce Myers Art Ltd. no longer limits viewing of its displays to appointments only.

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has affected the ways in which people buy art. Myers stresses that paintings need to be seen in person, and gallery goers can closely examine the quality of a piece. He reminds that art can be manipulated to look better in online photographs. Choosing to visit a local gallery also provides a more personal experience to help clients find art that perfectly complements their home. “People want original art. They want to shop local,” he says. “I don’t think you can get that experience and level of customer service online.”

The gallery is family owned and operated by Myers, his wife, Kay, and his son and daughter; Myers and his son are both artists. Philanthropy is also a family tradition. Royce and Kay are involved in the 2017 Designer’s Showcase for Foundation for Tulsa Schools, and Kay Myers volunteers weekly at Tulsa Girls Art School. The Royce Myers Gallery, 1706 S. Boston Ave., is open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. BRANDI GENTRY

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

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oyce Myers has been well known among professional art trade dealers, interior designers and architects for 25 years, but recently opened its doors to the public. Before holding public business hours, the Tulsa gallery was only available by appointment to professional art trade dealers, interior designers and architects. While Myers says he plans to continue working closely with those clients, he is looking forward to the opportunity to brinng art to more people’s lives. The gallery, in the same building that was once the beloved Nine of Cups restaurant and concert spot, is filled with hundreds of paintings on display in the gallery and in inventory. Clients receive help choosing art that fits their needs and other associated services to help make the process of buying art easier. “We’ve placed numerous pieces in finer, private homes,” Myers says. “We are a onestop shop, a full-service art gallery. We offer consultation, framing, delivery and installation to our clients.” The gallery has also completed installations for major corporations, law firms, hospitals and colleges, including The University of Tulsa. Artists featured in the gallery include Blakely Bering, Joe Andoe, Cicero Silva, Smith Carney, Susan Hanson, Anna Rutherford, Brent Foreman, Myers himself, and his son, Spencer, and local artist Derek Penix, who won 2016’s National Oil Painters’ Guild Award Best of Show. “We have a very large inventory,” says Myers. “We work with our clients to find art that they love within their budget.” Myers says he believes art is for everyone, and he looks forward to working with people to help them find art that is perfect for them. “This is a new invitation. Times have changed,” says Myers, noting that the internet


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Life & Style F YI

sional organizer and owner of BeeNeat in Edmond, says it’s important to consider everyone’s preferences and have realistic expectations. “Parents need to know their kids, their families and their personalities and give their children the chance Hitting the road in an RV or downsizing provides to choose what they would like,” Marple says. “Somethe freedom to purge the possessions. thing that may not be important to the parent may be important etirement can to the kids. For instance, one thing welcome a new my grandpa would have probably lifestyle with more OF A never thought about was his hankie. time for traveling 3 - PA R T S E R I E S He always carried hankies around and hobbies. Older and to this day I keep one in my adults might downsize their homes, Bible. But I didn’t keep 20; I only move into retirement communities or hit the open road in a travel trailer kept one.” or RV. To prepare for these changes, individuals must cut the clutter in their lives by dispersing, donating or “There is a freeselling their stuff. dom and weight “I have found that seniors who lifted from ‘worldly have reached this stage have a much things,’ and they easier time of letting go of their possessions and passing them down are free to enjoy to their family,” says Anne Spero, a the remainder of certified professional organizer and their lives.” owner of Organized Living in Tulsa. “Couples who once maintained very large homes have little problem livMarple says people are often dising in motor homes or senior living appointed that their children don’t apartments. There is a freedom and want items they consider to be valuweight lifted from ‘worldly things,’ able, such as fine china or silver. and they are free to enjoy the re“I work with clients all the time mainder of their lives.” that say, ‘My kids don’t want this,’ However, freeing yourself from and no one wants to take the time belongings doesn’t mean forcing to polish it,” she says. “While these them on your children or family things were valuable 20 years ago, members. Becky Marple, a profes-

The CluerFree Retiree

3rd

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

they just aren’t anymore. They are really hard to sell, and you don’t get much out of it. It’s sad, but it’s the way it is.” Marple emphasizes that starting to clear the clutter early can relieve stress for the retirees and their families. “Always with love and extreme gentleness, I talk to clients about how we never want to be a burden when we’re gone,” she says. “But, by not going through your things and purging, it could end up feeling like that for your family. “Go through things with your family long before you are actually moving. Start when you’re even thinking about it. Start pulling things out of the cabinet and delegating where it’s going to go.” After this process, it’s often helpful to involve professionals, Spero says. “Once the children’s possessions have been distributed, and the family has been given preference, an estate sale is a good option to part with the remainder of property they won’t need for retirement,” she says. “Hiring a certified professional organizer is found to be beneficial in assisting the elderly in downsizing and many professionals specialize in this area. “Having an outside-the-family, objective viewpoint, someone to keep them focused and keep the momentum going, is what they need to get through the downsizing in a timely manner.” REBECCA FAST


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FUN FACTS

Life & Style

THE PRICE TOWER WAS DESIGNED BY FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT.

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Downtown Bartlesville has rejuvenated itself with restaurants, retail and the arts.

M

any thought Bartlesville would take a fatal body blow when Phillips Petroleum merged with Conoco and moved its headquarters to Houston in 2002. After all, the Phillips family’s history is intertwined with Bartlesville’s. The Frank Phillips House (now a historical site) in town and his retreat 12 miles southwest (the Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Preserve) are perpetual must-see destinations for this Washington County seat. Phillips 66 employs over 1,000 people in Bartlesville (down from 6,000 at one time), but Bartians have shown a resolve that has led to an astonishing revitalization of its downtown. “Yes, we’re still called Bartians,” says Sherri Wilt, president of the Bartlesville Chamber of Commerce. “What else would we be called? But it’s said endearingly.” Here’s a sample evening of what can happen in downtown B-ville: craft brews and prairie-sized chicken-fried steak at the Painted Horse on (where else?) Frank Phillips Boulevard, then a play down the street and around the corner at Theater Bartlesville, an acclaimed community troupe, with nightcaps a few blocks south on the 15th floor of the Price Tower at the Copper Restaurant and Bar. Oh, and about that Price Tower. With

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

19 floors, it’s the only skyscraper designed by world-renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright that was actually constructed. Completed in 1956 for the H.C. Price Co., the tower is what Wright called “the tree that escaped the crowded forest” because he originally had the design in mind as a component for St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery in New York. Near the top of the Price Tower is The Inn, 19 glass-wrapped loft hotel rooms designed to match Wright’s signature work. In addition to the Price Tower Arts Center and Theater Bartlesville, Dewey Avenue is the address for the home office of the annual OK Mozart International Music Festival (June 8-16 this year). “Dewey is called The Arts Street by many of us,” says Joanie Elmore, managing director at Theater Bartlesville, which moved into its present space in 2002. “We want to get some street signs named that show that.” Elmore has seen firsthand the dynamic growth that has transformed an area that could have easily gone the dreary way of many small-city centers. “The addition of the retail stores and restaurants have changed the complexion of downtown,” she says. “There are also many young professionals and they’re very involved now. They’re bringing life back. They don’t run to Tulsa every weekend.” BRIAN WILSON

P R I C E TO W E R

FEET

A B O V E F LO O D S TA G E O F T H E C A N E Y R I V E R

CIT Y WA S S P L I T I N T W O

I N O C TO B E R 1 9 8 6 , W H E N T H E

P L AY T I M E TH

70

OF THE

ANNIVERSARY

K I D D I E PA R K , D E S I G N E D

E S P E C I A L LY F O R C H I L D R E N PORTMANTEAU

WOOLAROC

FRANK PHILLIPS’S G U E S T R A N C H , C O M B I N I N G PA R T S THE NAME OF

OF WOODS, L AKES AND ROCKS


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Life & Style H E A LT H

Summer Sun Safety Protect yourself with these precautions to lower the risk of developing skin cancer.

T

oo much exposure to the sun can cal antioxidants and dietary supplements taken in lead to premature aging, skin conjunction with sunscreen use. damage and skin cancer. It’s Dr. Rola Eid, medical director of plastic and estimated that nearly one in five reconstructive surgery at Cancer Treatment Americans develops skin cancer. Centers of America in Tulsa, emphasizes the So before hitting the beach, mowing the yard importance of children following sun safety or even taking a drive, protect your body’s tips as well. largest organ, your skin. “When we calculate our total sun or ultraDr. Jeff Alexander, owner, dermatologist violet exposure during our lifetimes, nearly 25 and medical director of the Skin Care Institute percent of that exposure occurred during ages medical spa in Tulsa, recommends applying 1 to 18,” Eid says. “Five or more sunburns sunscreen daily to sun-exposed areas, espeduring our youth nearly doubles our lifetime cially before outdoor activities, and wearing risk of melanoma. Previous generations of protective clothing. parents weren’t aware of these increased skin “Remember that sun damage is cumulative cancer risks, but parents today who protect and it is helpful to block their children from sun damage even the small doses you can know they’re doing right in “Five or more get through car windows helping prevent skin cancer.” sunburns during and walking to and from The most common types of your car,” Alexander says. our youth nearly skin cancer are basal cell, squa“Daily moisturizers with mous cell and melanoma. doubles our sunscreen, especially tinted “Melanoma is serious lifetime risk of because it’s the deadlier type ones, and makeups with melanoma.” sunscreen are advised – and of skin cancer that can spread don’t forget to sunscreen to other parts of the body if not ears, behind ears, chest and hands.” caught early,” Eid says. “The good news is He says sunscreen should have a broad spec- that melanoma is quite uncommon and survivtrum, blocking ultraviolet A and B rays with able when both discovered and treated early.” an SPF of 30 or higher, and be water resistant, Alexander suggests that a person check his meaning coverage will last 40-80 minutes skin at least twice a year. while a person sweats or swims. “New lesions, changing lesions, and any mole “Sunscreen should be reapplied depending which does not resemble others on your body upon the time recommended on the sunscreen should be examined by a dermatologist,” he says. label and a thick layer of sunscreen is actually “Lastly, tanning beds cause early aging and skin better than a thin layer,” he says. cancer. They should be avoided, especially by Other ways to safeguard your skin include children.” REBECCA FAST clothes designed to block ultraviolet rays, topi-

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

ABCDEs OF MELANOMA

Asymmetry: One half unlike the other half Border: An irregular, scalloped or poorly defined border

Color: Varied from one area to another;

shades of tan, brown or black, or sometimes white, red or blue

Diameter: Melanomas usually greater than

6mm (the size of a pencil eraser) when diagnosed, but can be smaller

Evolving: A mole or skin lesion looking

different from the rest or changing in size, shape or color

Source: American Academy of Dermatology


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Life & Style

ST YLE

Sandy Style Don’t forget your summer essentials on the way to the beach.

BLEU ROD BEATTIE CORAL COVERUP, $75, DILLARD’S

GIANNI BINI SOLID TASSEL BIKINI TOP, $61; GIANNI BINI SOLID TASSEL BIKINI BOTTOM, $51; SUN N’ SAND BEACH HAT, $38, DILLARD’S. TORY BURCH CLASSIC LEATHER SANDALS, $195; ALEXIS BITTAR LEATHER WRAP CHOKER, $175; ALEXIS BITTAR STUDDED WHITE BANGLE, $185; ALEXIS BITTAR STUDDED BLACK HINGE BRACELET, $145, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ETNIA BARCELONA ICARIA WHITE-PEARL SUNGLASSES, $265, HICKS BRUNSON.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

PETER MILLAR MULTICOLORED SWIM TRUNKS, $85; PETER MILLAR SUEDE CASUAL SHOES, $300, TRAVERS MAHAN. REAL TOYO FEDORA, $128, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ETNIA BARCELONA WAYFARERSTYLE MATTE SUNGLASSES, HICKS BRUNSON. MULTICOLORED INNER TUBE, $26.95, CORAL SWIMMING POOL SUPPLY.

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FACE A FACE TORTOISE SUNGLASSES WITH LIME ACCENTS, $470, HICKS BRUNSON

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Life & Style

EILEEN FISHER STRIPED LINEN-BLEND SCARF, $78, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF LIGHT DENIM PATCHES TOTE, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALEXIS BITTAR ELEMENTS PEARL AND SEA GLASS NECKLACE, $295; ALEXIS BITTAR OPALESCENT CRYSTAL AND TURQUOISE DROP EARRINGS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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ON CODY: MICHAEL’S PINEAPPLE SWIMSUIT, $98; PETER MILLAR SUEDE CASUAL SHOES, $300, TRAVERS MAHAN. MINI SWAN POOL TOY, $12.95, CORAL SWIMMING POOL SUPPLY. ON BAILEY: JESSICA SIMPSON HIGH NECK CROCHET BIKINI TOP, $54; JESSICA SIMPSON CROCHET BIKINI BOTTOM, $42; SUN N’ SAND BEACH HAT, $38, DILLARD’S. SALVATORE FERRAGAMO JEWLED RUBBER SLIDES, $475; STEPHANIE KANTIS SIZER BANGLE BRACELET, $195; STEPHANIE KANTIS NUGGET BANGLE BRACELET, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

GIANNI BINI FLORAL OFF-THE-SHOULDER FLUTTER BIKINI TOP, $59; GIANNI BINI FLORAL BIKINI BOTTOMS, $49, DILLARD’S. REBECCA MINKOFF FRAYED DENIM SLIDES, $130; REAL TOYO FEDORA, $128; MAJORICA WHITE PEARL AND LEATHER CHOKER, $75, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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2017

TOP S R O T C DO Even if you’re just getting a routine checkup, dealing with health issues can be scary. Oklahoma is home to thousands of physicians who focus on a wide variety of specialties, and decisions on your health or the health of your loved ones are some of the most important choices you may make. Oklahoma Magazine is here to help with these decisions by being the state’s exclusive home to Top Doctors in 2017, a list of medical professionals who are recognized as highly trained, skilled, compassionate and dedicated to their patients’ welfare. Oklahoma Magazine would like to congratulate the doctors chosen for this honor. The following health care professionals were chosen by their peers through an extensive survey process conducted by Castle Connolly, and we encourage our readers to use this list to assist in making informed health care decisions.

JUNE 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

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+

TOP DOCTOR

Adolescent Medicine

AMY B. MIDDLEMAN Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Physicians Building, Oklahoma City 405-2716208 Sp: Eating Disorders, Adolescent Behavior-High Risk, Young Women’s Health, Depression

Allergy and Immunology

WARREN V. FILLEY Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic, Oklahoma City 405235-0040 Sp: Asthma, Allergy, Rhinitis, Food Allergy JANE T. PURSER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Allergy Clinic of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-307-1613 Sp: Asthma, Allergy, Food Allergy

Cardiac Electrophysiology KAREN J. BECKMAN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-7001 Sp: Arrhythmias

SEAN M. HALLERAN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-948-4040 Sp: Arrhythmias, Cardiac Catheterization, Pacemakers/Defibrillators, Atrial Fibrillation WARREN M. JACKMAN OU Medical Center • OU Heart Rythm Inst, Oklahoma City 405-271-9696 Sp: Catheter Ablation, Atrial Fibrillation, WPW Syndrome

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Cardiovascular Disease

Douglas Drevets, M.D. INFECTIOUS DISEASES OU MEDICAL CENTER

Dr. Douglas Drevets, professor and chief of infectious diseases at OU Medical Center, has a busy schedule. Besides seeing patients, he is also working on several research projects. These projects include studying brain infection and inflammation caused by Listeria monocytogenes, a food-borne bacterium, a study in south India where he is part of a team looking for new ways to diagnose tapeworm infection in the brain and a project centered in the Cherokee Nation seeking to eliminate Hepatitis C. He sees a wide variety of of inpatients at OU Medical Center and Veterans Hospital, where he works closely with other physicians, providing assistance with any infectious disease cases. In contrast, his outpatient time is mostly spent with patients with HIV/AIDS. The outpatient team is largely funded through the federal government and also partners with the Oklahoma State Health Department and local AIDS service organizations. Drevets says it has been very rewarding to see the improvement in care for HIV/AIDS patients. He adds he hopes to see the same improvement in treatment of patients with Hepatitis C. Drevets is quick to point out that his accomplishments could not have been achieved without the strong clinical and research teams he works with daily. “I’m part of really good teams, and they make me better,” he says. “We strive to make each other better.” – Justin Martino

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

SYED A. ABBAS Oklahoma Heart Hospital • Oklahoma Heart Hospital Physicians, Oklahoma City 405608-3800 Sp: Interventional Cardiology MUHAMMAD ANWAR Norman Regional Hospital • HealthPlex Hospital • Heart Clinic Central Oklahoma, Norman 405-321-0199 Sp: Preventive Cardiology, Cholesterol/ Lipid Disorders, Hypertension

CHARLES F. BETHEA JR INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Heart Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-947-3341 PAMELA CRAVEN Oklahoma Heart Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-608-3800 Sp: Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Disease in Women, Echocardiography, Congestive Heart Failure JEFFREY A. CROOK Norman Regional Hospital • HealthPlex Hospital • Norman Heart & Vascular Assocs, Norman 405-515-2222 DOUGLAS A. HORSTMANSHOF INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Advanced Cardiac Care, Oklahoma City 405713-9900 Sp: Heart Failure, Transplant Medicine-Heart, Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

ROBYN LYN COWPERTHWAITE Integrated Psychiatry, Edmond 405-726-9735 Sp: ADD/ADHD, Anxiety and Depression, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Substance Abuse

Child Neurology

DAVID J. SIEGLER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Child Neurology of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-493-3300 Sp: Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders, Headache, Neuromuscular Disorders AMY Z. STAUFFER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis • Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-502-5960

Colon and Rectal Surgery

RICHARD KACERE St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • St. John Heart Institute, Tulsa 918-748-7650 Sp: Cardiovascular Imaging, Preventive Cardiology, Congenital Heart Disease-Adult, Nuclear Cardiology

GARY D. DUNN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-1400 Sp: Colon and Rectal Cancer, Anorectal Disorders

ALAN M. KANESHIGE Hillcrest Medical Center • Hillcrest Hospital South • Oklahoma Heart Institute, Tulsa 918-592-0999 Sp: Congestive Heart Failure, Echocardiography, Cardiac Imaging

SCOTT A. FENGLER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-794-4788 Sp: Anorectal Disorders, Colon & Rectal Cancer & Surgery, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Laparoscopic Surgery

DARSHAK KARIA INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • 3300 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City 405-949-3349

STUART D. HOFF St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Colon & Rectal Clinic of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-748-7580 Sp: Colon and Rectal Cancer and Surgery, Anal Cancer, Anorectal Disorders, Laparoscopic Surgery

THO DINH LE Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-494-8500 DWIGHT W. REYNOLDS OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-7001 Sp: Pacemakers/Defibrillators, Arrhythmias MUHAMMAD SALIM Norman Regional Hospital • HealthPlex Hospital • Norman Heart & Vascular Assocs, Norman 405-515-2260 Sp: Interventional Cardiology, Nuclear Cardiology

CARMEN RUIZ St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • OU Physicians-Surgical Specialists, Tulsa 918-634-7500 Sp: Anorectal Disorders, Colon and Rectal Cancer and Surgery, Colonoscopy, Laparoscopic Surgery

Dermatology

CRAIG L. ABBOTT Abbot Skin Cancer Treatment, Oklahoma City 405-632-5565 Sp: Skin Cancer JEFF ALEXANDER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, Tulsa 918-4948333 Sp: Skin Cancer, Facial Rejuvenation, Cosmetic Dermatology

Alzheimer’s Signs

Dealing with Alzheimer’s disease can be frightening, and sometimes it is difficult to tell what may be a sign of the onset of Alzheimer’s disease or a typical age-related change. The Alzheimer’s Association gives 10 early signs and symptoms for Alzheimer’s, including memory loss that disrupts daily life, difficulty completing familiar tasks, and new problems with words when speaking or writing. Anyone experiencing early warning signs of Alzheimer’s should immediately see a doctor, the association states. Early detection allows patients to get the maximum benefit from available treatments. For more information, visit alz.org.


HOW DO YOU DEFINE

BEST? There are plenty of ways to rank health care – the best physicians, the best outcomes, the latest technology or the ability to care for the rarest and most complex cases. Whichever way you look at it, INTEGRIS is at the top. We think what really makes a difference is something altogether more subtle. From our volunteers and nurses to our physicians and administrators, we live here. We’re your neighbors. We’re part of this community, and every single day we make decisions with our community’s best interests at heart. With that simple mission, awards and recognitions come naturally, like the U.S. News and World Report ranking of INTEGRIS Baptist as the #1 hospital and our collaboration with the world-renowned Mayo Clinic. So it’s no surprise to find many of our physicians named to Oklahoma Magazine’s Top Docs list as well. It’s yet another way we remain among the best.

That’s what it means to be INTEGRIS.

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TOP DOCTOR

+

Eye on Your Health

While regular eye appointments are important, eye conditions can also give information about other problems. Some eye conditions that could indicate other problems are: BLURRY VISION: It’s easy to pass off blurry vision as just needing a new pair of glasses, but blurred vision can also be a sign of diabetes. CORNEA RINGS: If you’re under 40, a gray-white line of fat deposit around your cornea might be a sign of dangerously high cholesterol. YELLOW EYES: If the whites of your eyes turn yellow, this it’s usually a sign of jaundice, caused by liver problems. PAMELA S. ALLEN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians Dermatology, Oklahoma City 405-271-6110 Sp: Cosmetic Dermatology

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

LYNN A. ANDERSON St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Midtown Dermatology, Tulsa 918-728-3100 Sp: Cosmetic Dermatology, Acne and Rosacea

Joan Walker, M.D. STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER

MARK D. LEHMAN Tulsa Dermatology Clinic, Tulsa 918-749-2261 Sp: Laser Surgery

Dr. Joan Walker, committed to preventing and eradicating cancer, is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology, gynecologic oncology, and palliative care medicine. She also holds the Louise and Clay Bennett Chair in Cancer and is a George Lynn Cross Research Professor, a prestigious faculty award, and has published more than 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals, given nearly 300 presentations and contributed material to 16 different medical textbooks for chapters on gynecologic oncology. As part of her work, Walker coordinates research and enrolls gynecologic cancer patients in clinical trials to learn more about what causes these cancers. “The treatment of cancer and all of our clinical trials is very rewarding,” she says. “But, I’m realizing there’s a tremendous amount of work that needs to be done in the prevention of cancer. I’ve always said I want to put myself out of business.” Stephenson is in the process of becoming a designated cancer center by the National Cancer Institute. “We are very enthusiastic that we will become an M.D. Anderson-like organization by next year,” Walker says. “Along with a grant comes a lot of responsibility because the funding will also be for the improvement of our community. The application includes population health, cancer risk reduction, screenings as well as taking care of people who develop cancer.” – Rebecca Fast 48

CHRISTINA G. KENDRICK St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Tulsa Dermatology Clinic, Tulsa 918-749-2261 TRACY DEE KUYKENDALL Kuykendall Dermatology, Tulsa 918-994-4400 Sp: Medical Dermatology, Cosmetic Dermatology, Laser Hair Removal, Laser Surgery

GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY

RAYMOND L. CORNELISON Dermatology Associates of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-608-4494 Sp: Skin Infections, Skin Cancer, Hair and Nail Disorders, Cosmetic Dermatology

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

KELLI ANN LOVELACE St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Tulsa Dermatology Clinic, Tulsa 918-7492261 Sp: Botox Therapy GEORGE WASHINGTON MONKS St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Tulsa Dermatology Clinic, Tulsa 918-7492261 Sp: Skin Cancer, Psoriasis, Botox Therapy DONALD RICHARD SEIDEL Tulsa Dermatology Clinic, Tulsa 918-749-2261 Sp: Medical Dermatology, Geriatric Dermatology THOMAS STASKO OU Medical Center • OU Physicians Dermatology Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-271-6110 Sp: Mohs Surgery, Skin Cancer, Dermatologic Surgery ASHWINI KAMATH VAIDYA St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Tulsa Dermatology Clinic, Tulsa 918-749-2261

DevelopmentalBehavioral Pediatrics

LAURA J. MCGUINN Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • Child Study Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-5700 Sp: Developmental and Behavioral Disorders, ADD/ADHD

MARK L. WOLRAICH Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • Child Study Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-5700 Sp: Developmental and Behavioral Disorders, ADD/ADHD

Diagnostic Radiology

DOUGLAS P. BEALL Oklahoma Spine Hospital • Clinical Radiology of Oklahoma, Edmond 405-6012325 Sp: Musculoskeletal Imaging, Interventional Radiology, Sports Medicine Radiology ELIZABETH JETT OU Medical Center • OU Breast Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-4514 Sp: Breast Imaging, Mammography, Women’s Health KELLY N. MCDONOUGH OU Medical Center -Edmond • OU Breast Imaging of Oklahoma, Edmond 405-844-2601 Sp: Breast Imaging, Breast Cancer

MADONA AZAR OU Medical Center • Harold Hamm Diabetes Center, Oklahoma City 405-2711000 Sp: Diabetes, Endocrine Disorders in Pregnancy, Thyroid Disorders, Bone Disorders-Metabolic MARY Z. BAKER VA Medical Center - Oklahoma City • OU Medical Center • OU Physicians-Endocrinology, Oklahoma City 405-271-1000 Sp: Diabetes, Osteoporosis, Pituitary Disorders, Thyroid Disorders RALPH J. DUDA JR Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Heart Institute, Endocrinology, Tulsa 918-592-0999 Sp: Hypertension, Thyroid Disorders, Cholesterol/Lipid Disorders CHRISTIAN S. HANSON Hillcrest Hospital South • Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Heart Institute, Endocrinology, Tulsa 918-592-0999 Sp: Diabetes, Cholesterol/Lipid Disorders, Hypertension

DEBRA S. MITCHELL OU Medical Center -Edmond • OU Breast Imaging of Oklahoma, Edmond 405-844-2601 Sp: Breast Imaging, Mammography

DAVID W. HARRIS Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-497-3140 Sp: Diabetes

FARIDALI G. RAMJI Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • Children’s Hospital OU Radiological Sciences, Oklahoma City 405-2715125 Sp: Pediatric Radiology, Cancer Imaging, Nuclear Radiology

RYAN M. BIGGERS OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Mid-Del Family Medicine, Midwest City 405-736-6811 Sp: Sports Medicine, Preventive Medicine, Preventive Cardiology

REBECCA G. STOUGH Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Women’s Center, Oklahoma City 405-752-3500 Sp: MRI-Breast, Breast Cancer, Breast Imaging

BYRON L. CARPENTER Boulevard Family Clinic, Edmond 405-562-1870

TIMOTHY L. TYTLE Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Radiology Consultants, Oklahoma City 405-752-3324 Sp: Interventional Radiology

Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

D. ERIK ASPENSON Hillcrest Hospital South • Hillcrest Medical Center • OK Heart Institute, Tulsa 918-592-0999 Sp: Diabetes, Cholesterol/Lipid Disorders, Hypertension, Thyroid Disorders

Family Medicine

RACHEL M. FRANKLIN OU Medical Center • OU PhysiciansFamily Medicine, Oklahoma City 405-271-4311 Sp: Women’s Health, Preventive Medicine W DEAN HINZ Moore Family Physicians, Norman 405-912-3120 CHITRALEKHA KATHURIA St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • St John Clinic South, Tulsa 918-254-6315 Sp: Adolescent Medicine, Women’s Health F. DAVID KONDOS Hillcrest Medical Center • 8136 S Memorial Drive, Tulsa 918-461-2441


Institute, Tulsa 918-505-3200 Sp: Ovarian Cancer, Uterine Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Pelvic Surgery-Complex

CYNTHIA L. TAYLOR Norman Regional Hospital • Variety Care, Norman 405-632-6688 Sp: Preventive Medicine, Allergy, Diabetes

ROBERT S. MANNEL OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-2718707 Sp: Laparoscopic Surgery, Gynecologic Cancers, Clinical Trials

Gastroenterology

JAVID FAZILI OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-8478 Sp: Liver Disease, Transplant Medicine-Liver, Hepatitis

DARON G. STREET Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Tulsa 918-505-3200 Sp: Cervical Cancer

RALPH T. GUILD III OU Medical Center • VA Medical Center Oklahoma City • OU Medical Ctr, OU Physicians Building, Oklahoma City 405-271-3445 Sp: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), Peptic Ulcer Disease, Nutrition

JOAN L. WALKER OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-8707 Sp: Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Uterine Cancer, Gynecologic Cancers

GARY L. HILLS Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Adult Gastroenterology Associates, Tulsa 918-7494887 Sp: Liver & Biliary Disease MARKHAM NIGHTENGALE Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Adult Gastroenterology Associates, Tulsa 918-481-4700 Sp: Liver Disease HARVEY A. TATUM Hillcrest Medical Center • Utica Park Clinic, Tulsa 918-582-6544 Sp: Crohn’s Disease, Hepatitis C, Liver Disease WILLIAM M. TIERNEY OU Medical Center • VA Medical Center - Oklahoma City • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-8478 Sp: Endoscopic Ultrasound, Colon Cancer, Pancreatic Disease, Gastrointestinal Cancer

Geriatric Medicine

INSUNG KIM Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa Warren Clinic, Geriatrics, Tulsa 918-497-3650 Sp: Alzheimer’s Disease, Osteoporosis PETER A. WINN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians-Family Medicine Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-3537 Sp: Palliative Care, Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia

Gynecologic Oncology

MICHAEL A. GOLD St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists & Research

DAVID G. MCINTOSH Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Gynecology/Oncology, Tulsa 918-502-2260

Hand Surgery

THOMAS W. EWING Norman Regional Hospital • Oklahoma Orthopaedic Institute, Norman 405447-4999 Sp: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery THOMAS P. LEHMAN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-2663 Sp: Trauma STEPHEN W. MIHALSKY OU Medical Center-Edmond • Mercy Hospital-Oklahoma City, Edmond 405-348-5060 Sp: Trauma, Microsurgery, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Arthritis GHAZI M. RAYAN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • OU Medical Center • 3366 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City 405945-4888 Sp: Microsurgery, Congenital Limb Deformities, Arthritis

Hematology

VIKKI ANN CANFIELD Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic Oncology & Hematology, Oklahoma City 405-751-4343 ALEXANDRA P. IKEGUCHI OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-8299 Sp: Melanoma, Hematologic Malignancies, Breast Cancer, Sarcoma

Hospice and Palliative Medicine

TIMOTHY W. HOLDER Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southwestern Regional Medical Center • Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa 918-286-5000 Sp: Cancer Survivorship, Cancer Palliative Care

Infectious Disease DOUGLAS A. DREVETS OU Medical Center • OU PhysiciansInfectious Disease, Oklahoma City 405-271-6434 Sp: Infections-CNS, HIV/AIDS

DAVID N. SCHECK Hillcrest Medical Center • Infectious Disease Specialists Tulsa, Tulsa 918-5826343 Sp: AIDS/HIV

Internal Medicine

L RENE BALLARD Norman Clinic, Norman 405-329-0121 Sp: Hypertension, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Women’s Health BRENT D. DENNIS Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-491-5990 LISA FARHOOD Deaconess Hospital-Oklahoma • Medical Specialists, Oklahoma City 405-604-4321 MICHAEL GEBETSBERGER Hillcrest Hospital South • Utica Park Clinic, Tulsa 918-392-5470 Sp: Alzheimer’s Disease, Geriatric Medicine ANDREW GORDON St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Bernsen Medical Plaza, Tulsa 918-748-7640 ALLEN J. HAMAKER Deaconess Hospital - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • MDVIP, Oklahoma City 405795-5907 MARTINA J. JELLEY OU Medical Center • St. John Medical CenterTulsa • OU Physicians, Internal Medicine, Tulsa 918-619-4400 Sp: Preventive Medicine, Women’s Health, Hypertension, Diabetes JOHN M. KRODEL Norman Regional Hospital • Norman Clinic, Norman 405-329-0121 Sp: Preventive Medicine, Heart Disease, Diabetes, Chronic Illness

Heart Health

A racing heartbeat or a fluttering in your chest may be a sign of a heart arrhythmia, which is caused when the electrical impulses that coordinate your heartbeats don’t work properly. Heart arrhythmias may be harmless, but others may cause bothersome and even life-threatening symptoms, according to the Mayo Clinic. Symptoms such as shortness of breath, weakness, dizziness, chest pain or fainting require urgent medical care if you feel them at a time you normally wouldn’t expect. Conditions such as congenital heart disease, high blood pressure and obstructive sleep apnea may increase your risk of developing an arrhythmia.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

CHANDAN D. LAD Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Family Medicine, Tulsa 918-728-6800

Timothy Holder, M.D.

H O S P I C E A N D PA L L I AT I V E C A R E C A N C E R T R E AT M E N T C E N T E R S O F A M E R I C A

A family medicine physician for nearly 30 years, Timothy Holder focuses on improving the lives of cancer patients. “In medical school, I realized I enjoyed multiple fields of medicine,” he says. “By choosing family medicine, I have been able to practice a wide spectrum of medicine, delivering care to my patients, from neonates to [those] nursing home-aged. Since 2013, I have specialized in palliative medicine, providing symptom control and management for patients with a cancer diagnosis, in addition to providing general medical care.” With a desire to help those in need, Holder has taken several overseas medical mission trips and helped establish the Good Shepherd Clinic in Muskogee, a free medical clinic for those without insurance. He is also involved in the accreditation of continuing education for physicians. He serves as chair of the Accreditation Review Committee for both the Oklahoma State Medical Association and the national Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education. In addition, Holder has served as chairman of the national Education and Training Strategic Coordinating Council for the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, along with serving many years as medical director for hospices in Texas and Oklahoma. – Rebecca Fast JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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THOMAS H. MERRILL Norman Clinic, Norman 405-329-0121 Sp: Geriatric Medicine, Cholesterol/ Lipid Disorders, Diabetes, Preventive Medicine

WAYNE N. LEIMBACH JR Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Heart Institute, Tulsa 918-592-0999 Sp: Cardiac Catheterization, Angioplasty and Stent Placement

ALI H. MOUSSA Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Tulsa 918-505-3200 Sp: Leukemia and Lymphoma

PAUL L. PLUSQUELLEC Norman Regional Hospital • Norman Clinic, Norman 405-329-0121 Sp: Geriatric Medicine

Maternal and Fetal Medicine

CRAIG LEE REITZ Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic Oncology & Hematology, Oklahoma City 405-751-4343 Sp: Lung Cancer, Lymphoma, Breast Cancer

GARY D. RATLIFF Norman Regional Hospital, Norman 405515-0380 GEORGE TARDIBONO OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, General Internal Medicine, Oklahoma City 405-271-3445 Sp: Weight Management, Nutrition and Obesity

MICHAEL A. WEISZ OU Medical Center • St. John Medical CenterTulsa • OU Physicians-Internal Medicine, Tulsa 918-619-4175 Sp: Headache

Medical Oncology

Interventional Cardiology

ABBY R. BOVA Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic Oncology & Hematology, Oklahoma City 405-751-4343

CHARLES TAYLOR St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Oklahoma State University Medical Center • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Tulsa 918-505-3200 Sp: Leukemia and Lymphoma, Solid Tumors, Hematologic Malignancies

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

RALPH DOUGLAS ENSLEY Saint Francis Heart Hospital • Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Cardiology, Tulsa 918-4948500 Sp: Cardiac Catheterization, Endovascular Stent Grafts, Patent Foramen Ovale

F A M I LY M E D I C I N E

JOHN R. STANLEY III Mercy Hospital-Oklahoma City • INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center-Oklahoma • The Perinatal Center of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-748-4726 Sp: Pregnancy-High Risk

GEORGE B. SELBY OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-8299 Sp: Stem Cell Transplant, Bone Marrow Transplant, Hematologic Malignancies SAGUN SHRESTHA Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southwestern Regional Medical Center • Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa 800-788-8485 Sp: Nutrition and Cancer Prevention/ Control

STEPHEN RALPH TRAVIS OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-3445

Chitralekha Kathuria, M.D.

CHARLES P. MIRABILE JR INTEGRIS Baptist Regional Health Center • Mercy Hospital-Oklahoma City • The Perinatal Center of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405748-4726 Sp: Pregnancy-High Risk

JOHN R. HARVEY Oklahoma Heart Hospital • Oklahoma Heart Hospital, Oklahoma City 405608-3800 Sp: Angioplasty and Stent Placement, Coronary Artery Disease NAJI E. KARAM St. Anthony Hospital - Oklahoma City • INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • 608 NW 9th St, Ste 6100, Oklahoma City 405-272-8477 Sp: Echocardiography, Ultrasound AGHA K. KHAN Oklahoma Heart Hospital-South Campus • Oklahoma Heart Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-608-3800 Sp: Angioplasty, Nuclear Cardiology FAISAL LATIF OU Medical Center • OU Physicians Building, Oklahoma City 405-271-7001 Sp: Angiography & Stent Placement

JESS FRANKLIN ARMOR Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic Oncology & Hematology, Oklahoma City 405-751-4343

SUZANNE COLE Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic Oncology & Hematology, Oklahoma City 405-751-4343 SHERRI S. DURICA Mercy Hospital-Oklahoma City • Norman Regional Hospital • Mercy Clinic Oncology and Hematology, Norman 405-321-4644 Sp: Hematologic Malignancies, Clinical Trials BRIAN V. GEISTER INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Cancer Institute ProCure Campus, Oklahoma City 405-7736400 Sp: Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Lymphoma MICHAEL JOSEPH KEEFER Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic Oncology & Hematology, Oklahoma City 405-751-4343 CARLA D. KURKJIAN Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic Oncology & Hematology, Oklahoma City 405-751-4343 Sp: Breast Cancer

ALEDA TOMA INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center-Oklahoma • Deaconess Hospital-Oklahoma • Cancer Specialists of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-942-9200 Sp: Breast Cancer

NeonatalPerinatal Medicine

MARILYN B. ESCOBEDO Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-2715215 Sp: Prematurity/Low Birth Weight Infants, Neonatal Respiratory Care

Nephrology

MARY ANN CAMERON Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Nephrology Specialists of Oklahoma, Tulsa 918-712-5000 BENJAMIN D. COWLEY JR OU Medical Center • OU PhysiciansNephrology, Oklahoma City 405-271-6842 Sp: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Transplant Medicine-Kidney

S T. J O H N C L I N I C

Dr. Chitralekha Kathuria, who practices the full spectrum of family medicine with a special focus on women’s health, is passionate about personalized health care and its impact on the community. “As a family physician, I have the ability to influence the health of individuals, families and the entire community,” she says. “At the same time, I find it challenging and rewarding to care for an individual as a whole person besides providing preventive health care, diagnosing and treating both acute and chronic conditions and supporting people as they reach their personal health goals.” St. John Clinic is involved in the Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative, a national effort to strengthen primary care and improve patient satisfaction. “The development of patient-focused initiatives and advancements in telemedicine are making significant changes in the delivery of health care,” Kathuria says. “We are also spending more time addressing the determinants of health. These improvements help patients be more involved in their own care and … this type of team approach fosters more positive outcomes. “In family practice, we make a positive difference in the lives of patients every day. [Since I am] a strong advocate of preventive care, preventing disease before it happens gives me my greatest sense of accomplishment.” – Rebecca Fast

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The Hormone Hub

The thyroid gland influences almost all the metabolic processes in your body. Problems with your thyroid may range from minor to serious, but it’s important to have any signs checked out. According to WebMD, the most common thyroid problems involve the overproduction of hormones, leading to hyperthyroidism, or underproduction of hormones, leading to hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism can lead to a myxedema coma if left untreated for a long period. Other problems include an enlarged gland, or goiter, that requires no treatment, or life-threatening cancer, which is rare and occurs in about 5 percent of thyroid nodules, WebMD states.


Orthopaedic Excellence, Compassionate Care. The Orthopaedic Center offers orthopaedic care for all ages and injuries. Strains, sprains, fractures, arthritic, and neuromuscular conditions are our expertise, and our well-known surgeons and physicians will work to restore your mobility so you can get back to doing what you love. We are proud to congratulate Yogesh Mittal, MD for being chosen Top Doctor by Castle Connelly.

Fellowship Trained in Adult Hip & Knee Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Surgery

Midtown Tulsa

South Tulsa

Hillcrest Medical Center Campus

Hillcrest South Medical Plaza

1809 E. 13th St., Floors 1, 2, 3 Tulsa, OK 74104

8803 S.101st E. Ave., Suite 100 Tulsa, OK 74133

Center for Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Excellence (CORE) 3029 W. Main St. Jenks, OK 74037 (918) 367-2215

P (918) 301-3137, option #3 • F (918) 582-6060 • www.toctulsa.com 22648 The Orthopedic Center.indd 1

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JOSE EL-AMM INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center-Oklahoma • Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute, Oklahoma City 405-949-3349 Sp: Transplant Medicine-Kidney LUKAS HARAGSIM OU Medical Center • VA Medical Center - Oklahoma City • OU Physicians-Nephrology, Oklahoma City 405-271-6842 Sp: Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease PRANAY KATHURIA Hillcrest Medical Center • St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • OU Physicians-Internal Medicine, Tulsa 918-619-4888 Sp: Kidney Disease-Chronic, Hypertension, Glomerulonephritis, Transplant Medicine-Kidney SUDHIR K. KHANNA INTEGRIS Baptist Regional Health Center • Kidney Specialists of Central Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-942-5442 SATISH KUMAR OU Medical Center • VA Medical Center Oklahoma City • 825 NE 10th St, Ste 4300, Oklahoma City 405-271-8478 Sp: Kidney Disease-Chronic, Hypertension, Kidney Failure

Neurological Surgery

SHON W. COOK Community Hospital-Oklahoma City • INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center-Oklahoma • Keyhole Brain and Spine, Oklahoma City 405-310-6977 Sp: Neurovascular Surgery, Brain Tumors, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Spinal Surgery

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

EMILY FRIEDMAN Northwest Surgical Hospital • Community Hospital-Oklahoma City, Oklahoma City 405-945-4900 Sp: Spinal Cord Injury, Spinal Surgery

Christopher Lentz, M.D. SURGERY

I N T E G R I S PA U L S I LV E R S T E I N B U R N C E N T E R

Dr. Christopher Lentz is not tempted to punt a medical career in the military for a civilian practice. He has a boot and shoe in each world. The Air Force brigadier general and medical director of the Silverstein Burn Center sees his dual roles not as overlaps or competitors, but complements. “Military health is great, but it’s a closed system,” Lentz says, “so I can bring new information to the military from the private sector. Meanwhile [for INTEGRIS], I’m trained to treat burn casualities in war, and that helps the burn center.” Commissioned in 1983, Lentz works 8-12 weeks a year for the Pentagon’s assistant surgeon general for health-care operations. When Silverstein recruited Lentz from the University of New Mexico’s Department of Surgery in 2013 to build a world-class burn center, the two agreed that Lentz’s military work would continue. After all, both were trained by renowned Army burn surgeon H.D. Peterson. “INTEGRIS didn’t have a pediatric burn program, and I was given the opportunity to start that,” Lentz says. “Before then, pediatric burn patients in Oklahoma had to go out of state, either to Dallas or Little Rock, to get treatment. Now they can come here and that’s been rewarding.” - Brian Wilson

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TIMOTHY B. MAPSTONE Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Medical Center • University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Oklahoma City 405271-4912 Sp: Brain Tumors, Pediatric

Neurosurgery, Chiari’s Deformity, Epilepsy-Adult and Pediatric CAPLE SPENCE Specialty Hospital of Midwest City, Midwest City 405-455-3393 Sp: Brain Tumors, Cerebrovascular Disease

JOSEPH ROY JOHNSON Oklahoma State University Medical Center • Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • OSU Physicians, Tulsa 918-586-4500 Sp: Laparoscopic Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Gynecology Only

Neurology

EDUARDO A. DE SOUSA OU Medical Center • OU Physicians-Neurology, Oklahoma City 405-271-3635 Sp: Electrodiagnosis, Neuromuscular Disorders, Diabetic Neuropathy

DAPHNE L. LASHBROOK Norman Regional Hospital • HealthPlex Hospital • Women’s Healthcare of Norman, Norman 405-360-1264 Sp: Hormonal Disorders, Robotic Hysterectomy

DAVID LEE GORDON OU Medical Center • OU PhysiciansNeurology, Oklahoma City 405-271-3635 Sp: Headache/Migraine, Cerebrovascular Disease

ARTHUR COLE NILSON Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Saint Francis Hospital South • Tulsa Women’s Health Care, Tulsa 918-299-5151 Sp: Laparoscopic Surgery

RODNEY L. MYERS Hillcrest Medical Center • Utica Park Clinic, Tulsa 918-560-3823 Sp: Parkinson’s Disease, Neuro-Rehabilitation

MUKESH T. PAREKH Deaconess Hospital-Oklahoma • Mercy Hospital-Oklahoma City • Northwest Obstetrics & Gynecology, Oklahoma City 405-943-6288 Sp: PregnancyHigh Risk, Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair, Robotic Surgery

Obstetrics and Gynecology

JOHN MARTIN BEAL St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Tulsa OB-GYN Associates, Tulsa 918-747-9641 GRANT R. COX St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • OB-GYN Specialists of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-712-8700 Sp: Infertility, Gynecologic Surgery, Miscarriage-Recurrent JULIE HANSEN INTEGRIS Health Edmond • INTEGRIS Women’s Health, Edmond 405-657-3952 Sp: Uterine Fibroids, Diabetes in Pregnancy, Laparoscopic Surgery MARK HARMAN Hillcrest Medical Center • OU Medical Center • OU, Women’s Health, Oklahoma City 918-619-4200 Sp: Pregnancy-High Risk KATHLEEN HEFFRON Hillcrest Medical Center • St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • The Women’s Health Group, Tulsa 918-293-6200 Sp: Gynecology Only

Be Active

Ophthalmology

RAY M. BALYEAT St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • The Eye Institute, Tulsa 918-749-2220 Sp: Retina/ Vitreous Surgery, Retinal Disorders, Retinal Detachment REAGAN BRADFORD JR. OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405271-1092 Sp: Retina/Vitreous Surgery, Retial Disorders CYNTHIA BRADFORD OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2711090 Sp: Cataract Surgery, Refractive Surgery, Glaucoma TODD A. BROCKMAN St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • The Eye Institute, Tulsa 918-742-5513 Sp: Cataract Surgery GARY T. DENSLOW Hillcrest Medical Center • Pediatric Eye Associates & Family Eye Care,

The American Heart Association recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or at least 75 minutes of rigorous exercise per week, or some combination. The goal is overall cardiovascular health. To lower cholesterol levels or reduce blood pressure, the association recommends 40 minutes of aerobic exercise three to four times a week. Upping the cardio a bit lowers the risk for heart attack and stroke. Losing weight usually occurs with higher cardio activity; however, some studies have shown this may not always be the case. You need to find the right balance between aerobic exercise, weight training and calisthenics.


Pain Management of Tulsa Congratulates Dr. Scott Anthony and Dr. Traci L. White on being named Top Doctors for 2017! Scott Anthony, DO Traci L White, MD

Brian T Torgerson, MD Adam J Wallace, MD

6802 S. Olympia Avenue Suite 100 Tulsa, OK 74132 918.447.9300

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Congratulations and thank you. Saint Francis Health System congratulates the Warren Clinic physicians and Saint Francis affiliated physicians who were named among Oklahoma Magazine’s Top Doctors for 2017. We thank them for their dedication to patient care, commitment to excellence and for improving the lives of those in our community.

Saint Francis Health System | 918-494-2200 | saintfrancis.com

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Sleep Positions

Your sleep position may have more of an impact on your overall health than you realize. Many people may experience relief from heartburn symptoms by sleeping on their left sides – in that position, part of the stomach rests lower than your esophagus, which means stomach acids have more trouble migrating up, according to Berkeley Wellness. Sleeping on your back can also worsen sleep-related breathing disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, and lying on your stomach to sleep can lead to neck and back pain because of stress on the neck and cervical vertebrae. Tulsa 918-949-9898 Sp: Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus

PHOTO COURTESY WARREN CLINIC

BRADLEY FARRIS OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-1091 Sp: Neuro-Ophthalmology

Frank E. Schmidt Jr., M.D. CARDIOTHORACIC AND VA S C U L A R S U R G E O N WA R R E N C L I N I C

As a cardiothoracic and vascular surgeon operating on patients’ chests, heart and lungs, Dr. Frank E. Schmidt Jr. feels great accomplishment in his ability to alter his patients’ lives for the better. “As in any part of medicine, you have the opportunity to care for people,” he says. “However, I find cardiovascular and thoracic surgery to have an especially deep impact in helping people. Cardiovascular and thoracic surgery is one of the most rigorous and demanding fields of medicine, but it can immediately and profoundly improve patient lives.” Schmidt also believes people don’t understand the staggering amount of work that goes into his day job, both pre- and post-op.. “People are surprised to know what and how what we do what we do, and how comprehensive our care immediately before and after surgery is,” he says. “I find myself explaining my job a lot, not only to patients but also to new acquaintances.” The continued evolution of technology and science has helped make Schmidt’s life, and the life of his patients, far easier. “All medicine, particularly cardiovascular surgery, has been affected by the advancements in technology,” he says. “We have seen many positive changes and look forward to many more.” – Mary Willa Allen

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STEPHEN R. FRANSEN OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-1092 Sp: Retinal Disorders, Macular Degeneration, Diabetic Eye Disease/Retinopathy LAYNE E. GOETZINGER OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2711090 Sp: Cataract Surgery MARC A. GOLDBERG St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • The Eye Institute, Tulsa 918-584-4433 Sp: Corneal Disease and Transplant, Cataract Surgery, Ocular Inflammatory Disease, Glaucoma JEAN R. HAUSHEER OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2716060 Sp: LASIK-Refractive Surgery DAVID W. JACKSON OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-1090 Sp: Cataract Surgery, LASIK-Refractive Surgery, Refractive Surgery MAHMOUD KHAIMI OU Medical Center -Edmond • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-1093 Sp: Glaucoma REBECCA K. MORGAN OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2711793 Sp: Low Vision ANIL D. PATEL OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-1091 Sp: Neuro-Ophthalmology JAMES M. RICHARD INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • Children’s Eye Care, Oklahoma City 405-751-2020 Sp: Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus-Adult & Pediatric, Eye Muscle Disorders STEVEN R. SARKISIAN JR. OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2711093 Sp: Glaucoma

R. MICHAEL SIATKOWSKI OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2711094 Sp: Pediatric Ophthalmology, Neuro-Ophthalmology, Retinopathy of Prematurity, Strabismus RHEA L. SIATKOWSKI OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2711095 Sp: Cornea Transplant, Trauma GREGORY L. SKUTA OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2717806 Sp: Glaucoma DEENA A. SYLVESTER Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Sylvester Eye Care, Oklahoma City 405607-8948 Sp: Cataract Surgery, Eyelid Surgery, Botox Therapy ANN WARN OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-6060 Sp: LASIK-Refractive Surgery DEANA S. WATTS OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-1090 Sp: Cataract Surgery MARK J. WEISS The Eye Institute, Tulsa 918-742-2428 Sp: Glaucoma TAMMY L. YANOVITCH OU Medical Center • Dean A McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-2711094 Sp: Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus, Amblyopia, GlaucomaPediatric

Orthopedic Surgery

JAMES L. BOND Bone & Joint Hospital • Oklahoma Sports & Orthopedics Institute, Norman 405360-6764 Sp: Hip and Knee Surgery, Shoulder Surgery, Sports Medicine BRADFORD BOONE Oklahoma Surgical Hospital • Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Eastern Oklahoma Orthopedic Center, Tulsa 918494-9300 Sp: Sports Medicine, Elbow Surgery, Knee Surgery, Shoulder Surgery ARTHUR CONLEY Community Hospital - Oklahoma City • Essential Integrative Health, Midwest City 405-703-7300 Sp: Spinal Surgery,

Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery, Osteoarthritis SCOTT M. DE LA GARZA Bone & Joint Hospital • Oklahoma Sports & Orthopedics Institute, Oklahoma City 405-552-5764 Sp: Spinal Surgery CHARLES H. FUNDERBURK JR. McBride Clinic Orthopedic Hospital • McBride Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-230-9270 Sp: Hand Surgery BRYAN J. HAWKINS Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Hillcrest Hospital South • Central States Orthopedics, Tulsa 918-481-2767 Sp: Foot and Ankle Surgery, Arthroscopic Surgery, Sports Medicine RANDALL L. HENDRICKS Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Oklahoma Surgical Hospital • Central States Orthopedics, Tulsa 918-4812767 Sp: Spinal Surgery, Arthroscopic Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery WILLIAM A. HERNDON Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Childrens Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-2669 Sp: Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery YOGESH MITTAL Hillcrest Medical Center • The Orthopaedic Center, Tulsa 918-301-3139 Sp: Hip and Knee Replacement, Robotic Surgery, Arthroscopic Surgery-Knee, Arthroscopic Surgery-Hip TIMOTHY A. PUCKETT OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Orthopedic Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-271-2663 Sp: Spinal Surgery DAVID C. TEAGUE OU Medical Center • OU Physicians BldgOrthopedic Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-271-2663 Sp: Trauma, Fractures-Complex, Pelvic & Acetabular Fractures THOMAS K. TKACH Bone & Joint Hospital • McBride Orthopedic Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-2309342 Sp: Joint Reconstruction CARLAN K. YATES McBride Clinic Orthopedic Hospital • McBride Clinic, Edmond 405-230-9270 Sp: Sports Medicine, Arthroscopic Surgery, Shoulder and Knee Surgery, Elbow Surgery


Hospitals are often associated with cutting edge technology, yet the successful impact of a great medical outcome requires committed, caring and diligent surgeons who use new technology in a proven evidence based manner. We are excited to congratulate Yogesh Mittal, MD for being chosen Top Orthopaedic Doctor by Castle Connelly. He is an essential part of our incredible team of physicians and staff. CORE is a unique hospital providing superior service and the most effective minimally invasive orthopaedic surgery for all bone and joint injuries and conditions. We offer the latest in technology, a 24 hour emergency department, and private rooms in an inviting atmosphere focused on our patients and their caregivers.

3029 W. Main St., Jenks, OK 74037 (Highway 75 & 96th St) // (918) 367-2215 22647 CORE Hospital.indd 1

5/8/17 4:36 PM

Congratulations to The Eye Institute for being the most awarded Ophthalmology group in Northeastern OK by Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors!

Ray M. Balyeat, MD Todd A. Brockman, MD Kali B. Cole, MD Shannon G. Cox, MD Marc A. Goldberg, MD Walter J. Peters, MD J. Matthew Roberts, DO Jamal D. Siddiqui, MD Mark J. Weiss, MD

Kyle Bennett, OD Vanessa Bennett, OD Alison Hansen, OD Karen Mohar, OD Kris Wyatt, PA-C

General Ophthalmology, Advanced Cataract Surgery, Cornea & External Diseases, Glaucoma, Oculoplastic, Orbital & Reconstructive Surgery, Pediatric Ophthalmology & Adult Strabismus, Retina & Vitreous Treatment & Surgery 22635 The Eye Institute 2.indd 1

Northeast Oklahoma’s Most Comprehensive Eye Care Center 918-747-3937 www.eyeinst.com 5/12/17 10:07 AM

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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TOP DOCTOR

Otolaryngology

KEITH F. CLARK St. Anthony Hospital-Oklahoma City • Oklahoma City Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-272-6027 Sp: Airway Reconstruction, Voice Disorders, Vocal Cord Disorders-Botox Therapy, Endoscopic Sinus Surgery EDWARD DIGGES INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • OK Ear Clinic Hearing & Balance Center, Oklahoma City 405607-8222 P. DAVID HUNTER St. Anthony Hospital - Oklahoma City • Oklahoma City ENT Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-272-6027 Sp: Facial Plastic Surgery, Trauma-Face, Head & Neck Reconstruction, Craniofacial Surgery CHRISTOPHER A. PASKOWSKI Norman Regional Hospital • OK Otolaryngology Assocs, Norman 405-364-2666 Sp: Pediatric and Adult Otolaryngology, Nasal and Sinus Disorders, Hearing and Balance Disorders, Endoscopic Sinus Surgery JOSE SANCLEMENT OU Medical Center • OU Physicians Building, Oklahoma City 405-271-7559 Sp: Microvascular Surgery

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

IVAN WAYNE Oklahoma Otolaryngology Associates, Oklahoma City 405-748-5950 Sp: Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Rhinoplasty, Pediatric and Adult Otolaryngology

Yogesh Mittal, M.D. ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY T H E O R T H O PA E D I C C E N T E R / C O R E

There are many things Dr. Yogesh Mittal enjoys about orthopedic surgery, but one of the most fulfilling aspects of his job is the ability to get immediate results when helping people. “One of the most rewarding aspects is when patients have limited mobility or a lot of pain, they come to the office and you fix them,” he says. “You change their lives; they’re happy, they’re back to work. I love it when my patients hug me because they’re so happy that we’ve actually made a substantial difference in their lives.” Mittal was drawn to orthopedic surgery because he enjoys working with his hands and using his hand-eye coordination. He has been practicing at The Orthopaedic Center since finishing his fellowship training at OrthoCarolina in Charlotte, North Carolina. Since then, he says he’s proud of the practice he has been able to build based on hard work and putting patients first. “I think that’s what I’m most proud of – that patients want to come to me because they know that I’m there for them and I’m going to do my very best for them every time.” Mittal keeps up with the latest technological advancements in surgery, noting that since he has started practicing, the improvements have been major. “Orthopedics is amazing because I think we’ve just scratched the surface,” he says. - Justin Martino

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Pediatric Cardiology

EDWARD D. OVERHOLT Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • OU Children’s Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-4411 Sp: Arrhythmias, Interventional Cardiology, Congenital Heart Disease

Pediatric Endocrinology

LAURA J. CHALMERS Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Harold Hamm Diabetes Center, Tulsa 918-619-4803 Sp: Sexual Differentiation Disorders, Growth/Development Disorders, Obesity, Weight Management

Pediatric Gastroenterology

JUDITH O’CONNOR Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Hospital, Gastroenterology, Oklahoma City 405-271-6549 Sp: Liver Disease, Transplant Medicine-Liver

Pediatric HematologyOncology

RENE Y. MCNALL-KNAPP Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-4412 Sp: Brain Tumors, Neuro-Oncology

DAVID W. WHITE SR Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital • Eastern Oklahoma Ear, Nose and Throat, Tulsa 918-492-3636 Sp: Otology, Neuro-Otology, Hearing and Balance Disorders

WILLIAM H. MEYER Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-4412 Sp: Sarcoma, Pediatric Cancers

Pain Medicine

TERENCE LEONARD CAREY St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • T.L.Carey M.D. and Associates, Tulsa 918-481-8100 Sp: Asthma & Allergy

C. SCOTT ANTHONY Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital • Pain Management of Tulsa, Tulsa 918447-9300 Sp: Pain-Interventional Techniques, Spinal Cord Stimulation, Pain-Musculoskeletal-Spine and Neck, Pain-Spine RITA M. HANCOCK Oklahoma Center for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine, Oklahoma City 405759-2663 Sp: Pain Management, Pain-Musculoskeletal DARRYL D. ROBINSON Community Hospital - Oklahoma City • Oklahoma Sports Science & Orthopaedics, Oklahoma City 405-703-4950 Sp: Pain Management, Pain-Spine, Musculoskeletal Disorders, Electrodiagnosis ATUL A. WALIA INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Pain Management, Oklahoma City 405-945-4359 Sp: Pain-Chronic, Pain-Back, Head & Neck, Headache, Pain-Interventional Techniques TRACI L. WHITE Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital • Pain Management of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-447-9300 Sp: Pain-Interventional Techniques, Pain-Musculoskeletal-Spine and Neck, Pain-Spine, Spinal Cord Stimulation

Pathology

KAR-MING A. FUNG OU Medical Center • VA Medical CenterOklahoma City • OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-5653 Sp: Neuro-Pathology

Pediatric Pulmonology

JOSEPH N. WALTER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis • Warren Clinic-Pediatric Pulmonology, Tulsa 918-502-2000

Pediatric Surgery

EDWARD G. FORD Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis • Warren Clinic, Pediatric Surgery, Tulsa 918-494-9450 Sp: Critical Care

DOUGLAS W. STEWART OU Medical Center • OU PhysiciansPediatrics, Tulsa 918-619-4400 JILL S. WARREN OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-6827 Sp: Preventive Medicine, Vaccines DON L. WILBER Midwest Regional Medical Center • Oklahoma City Clinic, Midwest City 405-869-7700 VICTOR T. WILSON HealthPlex Hospital • Caring Pediatrics, Norman 405-360-7337 Sp: ADD/ADHD, Asthma, Allergy

Plastic Surgery

PAUL R. CALLEGARI Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Hillcrest Hospital South, Tulsa 918-494-8200 Sp: Body Contouring after Weight Loss, Cosmetic Surgery-Face and Breast, Hand Surgery, Reconstructive Plastic Surgery CHRISTIAN EL AMM OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Plastic Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-271-4864 Sp: Craniofacial Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery JUSTIN MICHAEL JONES INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center Oklahoma • Jones Plastic Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-848-3459 Sp: Cosmetic Surgery-Body, Cosmetic Surgery-Breast, Liposuction and Body Contouring, Dermatologic Injectables and Fillers ARCHIBALD S. MILLER III Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southwestern Regional Medical Center • Tulsa Plastic Surgery, Tulsa 918-492-2282 Sp: Breast Reconstruction and Augmentation, Cosmetic Surgery-Face and Body, Facial Rejuvenation KAMAL T. SAWAN OU Medical Center • Sawan Surgical Aesthetics, Edmond 405-285-7660 PAUL SILVERSTEIN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • 3705 NW 63rd St, Ste 204, Oklahoma City 405-842-9732 Sp: Cosmetic Surgery-Breast, Cosmetic SurgeryFace & Body, Reconstructive Plastic Surgery

Psychiatry

Pediatric Urology

PHEBE M. TUCKER OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Psychiatry, Oklahoma City 405-271-5251 Sp: Anxiety and Mood Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Pediatrics

JILL K. WARNOCK OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Psychiatry, Tulsa 918-619-4400 Sp: Anxiety and Mood Disorders, Sexual Dysfunction, Stress Management, Geriatric Psychiatry

OREN F. MILLER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis • Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma, Tulsa 918-749-8765 Sp: Voiding Dysfunction

JAMES E. FIELDS Norman Regional Hospital • Premiere Pediatrics, Norman 405-364-6432 Sp: Preventive Medicine EILEEN M. FOX Norman Regional Hospital • Premiere Pediatrics, Norman 405-364-6432 Sp: Developmental Disorders RICHARD A. GORDON Hillcrest Medical Center • Utica Park Clinic, Pediatrics, Tulsa 918-560-3832 NANCY R. INHOFE OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Department of Pediatrics, Tulsa 918-619-4400 Sp: Asthma DONNA JACKSON Norman Regional Hospital • Norman Pediatric Associates, Norman 405-321-5114 THOMAS L. KUHLS Norman Regional Hospital • Norman Pediatric Associates, Norman 405-321-5114

Pulmonary Disease

FRED GARFINKEL OU Medical Center • OU Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Clinic, Tulsa 918619-8700 Sp: Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD), Asthma DAVID C. LEVIN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians Bldg, Oklahoma City 405-271-7001 Sp: Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD), Smoking Cessation, Pulmonary Rehabilitation DANIEL A. NADER Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southwestern Regional Medical Center • Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa 800-788-8485 Sp: Lung Cancer, Interventional Pulmonology


Active

SEPTEMBER 2017

LIVING

Don’t miss the 21st annual salute to

active living. Reserve your space now for this popular section.

Dr. Douglas P. Beall

918.744.6205 advertising@okmag.com Active Seniors 1/8.indd 1

5/19/17 2:12 PM

Lynn A. Anderson, MD Lori Rule, PA-C Lindsay Dilbeck, PA-C 918.728.3100

1725 E 19th Street Suite 702 Tulsa, OK 74104

22137 Midtown Dermatology.indd 1

Dr. Douglas P. Beall attended medical school at Georgetown University. Following his residency at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, he was chief of interventional services at Sheppard Air Force Base. After a fellowship in musculoskeletal radiology at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, he returned to the U.S. Air Force, where he was division chief of the musculoskeletal section. In addition to teaching and research, Dr. Beall is a diplomate of the American Academy of Pain. He has published more than 200 articles, three textbooks and 11 textbook chapters, and has given more than 300 invited lectures and scientific presentations. 1800 Renaissance Blvd. Suite 110 Edmond, OK 73013 405.601.2325

DrDouglasBeall.com

5/8/17 22658 2:09 PM Dr. Douglas Beall.indd 1

5/10/17 5:08 PM

Congratulations To Norman’s Top Doctors Congratulations to our local physicians who were honored as 2017 Top Doctors. Do you need a doctor? Find a physician or specialist today by calling 405.307.3177. Norman Regional Health System can match you with a physician dedicated to patientcentered care. From cardiology to gynecology/obstetrics and from surgery to primary care, Norman Regional’s team of experts can manage your healthcare needs. Call 405.307.3177 today or visit us online at NormanRegional.com

22670 Norman Regional.indd 1

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Loving the Fish

Omega-3 fatty acids, which humans cannot make, reduce the chances of cardiovascular disease by decreasing triglycerides, slowing artery-clogging plaque and slightly lowering blood pressure. Fresh fish such as salmon, mackerel, lake trout, sardines and albacore tuna are high in Omega-3s. The American Heart Association suggests eating these fish at least twice a week. An ongoing debate is whether fish-oil supplements promote heart health. (These pills can ease joint pain in some patients.) Cardiovascular benefits may all come down to whether the oil in the pills has oxidized or spoiled. The better choice, for right now, seems to be fresh fish. Radiation Oncology

OZER ALGAN OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-5641 Sp: Brain Tumors, Genitourinary Cancer, Breast Cancer, Sarcoma JAMES P. FLYNN Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southwestern Regional Medical Center • Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa 918-286-5000 Sp: Brachytherapy, Prostate Cancer JOSHUA D. GARREN Hillcrest Medical Center • Radiation Oncology Consultants, Tulsa 918-5798200 Sp: Brain Tumors, Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy TERENCE S. HERMAN OU Medical Center • University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-5641 Sp: Breast Cancer, Sarcoma, Brain Tumors M. CONNIE NGUYEN Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Tulsa 918-505-3200 Sp: Stereotactic Radiosurgery KIRAN PRABHU INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Cancer Institute, Oklahoma City 405-552-0490 Sp: Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) J. SPENCER THOMPSON OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405271-5641 Sp: Gynecologic Cancers, Pediatric Cancers, Palliative Care

Reproductive Endocrinology

LATASHA B. CRAIG OU Medical Center • OU Physicians-Reproductive Medicine, Oklahoma City 405271-1616 Sp: Pregnancy Loss-Recurrent, Ovarian Failure, Menstrual Disorders, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome KARL R. HANSEN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians-Reproductive Medicine, Oklahoma City 405271-1616 Sp: Infertility-IVF, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Endometriosis ROBERT A. WILD OU Medical Center • 825 NE 10 St, Ste 3300, Oklahoma City 405-271-9494 Sp: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Rheumatology

MANUEL J. CALVIN Saint Fran-

58

cis Hospital-Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Rheumatology, Tulsa 918-495-2685 Sp: Autoimmune Disease, Arthritis ELIZA CHAKRAVARTY OU Medical Center • Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City 405-271-7805 Sp: Lupus/SLE in Pregnancy, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Scleroderma, Connective Tissue Disorders

Hospital-Oklahoma City, Oklahoma City 405-271-7867 Sp: Breast Cancer and Surgery, Sarcoma-Soft Tissue, Appendix Cancer, Cancers-Rare and Unusual JOHN R. FRAME Oklahoma Surgical Hospital • Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Breast Health Specialists of Oklahoma, Tulsa 918-392-7950 Sp: Breast Cancer and Surgery

TIMOTHY L. HUETTNER Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Rheumatology Associates, Tulsa 918-491-9007 Sp: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, Lupus/SLE

ALAN B. HOLLINGSWORTH Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • 4300 McAuley Blvd, Oklahoma City 405-936-5455 Sp: Breast Cancer Genetics, Breast Cancer Risk Assessment

MICHAEL A. MALLOY Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-495-2685 Sp: Autoimmune Disease

CHRISTOPHER W. LENTZ INTEGRIS Baptist Regional Health Center • INTEGRIS Paul Silverstein Burn Center, Oklahoma City 405-552-2857 Sp: Burn Care, Reconstructive Surgery, Critical Care, Wound Healing/Care

IRA N. TARGOFF OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Rheumatology, Oklahoma City 405-271-8478 Sp: Polymyositis, Dermatomyositis, Arthritis AIKATERINI (KATHERINE) THANOU OU Medical Center • Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City 405271-7805 Sp: Autoimmune Disease, Lupus/SLE

Sleep Medicine

RICHARD M. BREGMAN Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Saint Francis Sleep Disorders Center, Tulsa 918-502-5600 Sp: Sleep Disorders/ Apnea

Sports Medicine

LAMONT E. CAVANAGH Hillcrest Medical Center • OU Medical Center • Sports Medicine & Family Medicine, Tulsa 918-619-4600 Sp: Primary Care Sports Medicine CHARLES B. PASQUE OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-2663 Sp: Arthroscopic Surgery, Shoulder and Knee Surgery, Hip Surgery, Elbow Surgery

Surgery

BRIAN BOGGS Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic, Breast Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-749-7023 Sp: Breast Surgery JOSEPH CARLO BUENDIA Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic General Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-749-4231 Sp: Abdominal Wall Reconstruction WILLIAM C. DOOLEY OU Medical Center • St. Anthony

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

JAMES R. MCCURDY Norman Regional Hospital • Oklahoma Surgical Associates, Norman 405-329-4102 Sp: Vascular Surgery KERTRISA MCWHITE Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic Breast Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-749-7023 Sp: Breast Surgery, Breast Cancer RUSSELL G. POSTIER OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-7867 Sp: Gastrointestinal Surgery, Biliary Surgery, Pancreatic Surgery DENISE L. RABLE Lakeside Women’s Hospital-Oklahoma City • INTEGRIS Medical Group, Oklahoma City 405-552-0400 Sp: Breast Cancer and Surgery, Breast Disease LANETTE F. SMITH St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Hillcrest Medical Center • Breast Surgery of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-585-5658 Sp: Breast Surgery SARA SUTHERS Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic, Breast Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-749-7023 Sp: Breast Surgery BEVERLY TALBERT OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Breast Oncology, Oklahoma City 405271-7226 Sp: Breast Cancer and Surgery

Thoracic and Cardiac Surgery

R. MARK BODENHAMER Oklahoma Heart Hospital • Oklahoma Cardiovascular Associates, Oklahoma City 405-608-3800

HAROLD MACDONALD BURKHART Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • Children’s Hospital OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-5789 Sp: Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery JOHN CHAFFIN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center-Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-951-4345 Sp: Transplant-Heart, Transplant-Lung, Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) IOANNIS MICHAEL KARAMICHALIS Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis • Saint Francis Heart Hospital • Warren Clinic-Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Tulsa 918-494-1710 Sp: Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery SCOTT K. LUCAS St. Anthony Hospital-Oklahoma City • Deaconess Hospital-Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-310-3028 Sp: Minimally Invasive Heart Valve Surgery, Coronary Artery Surgery, Heart Valve SurgeryMitral, Aneurysm

Urology

ROBERT BRUCE Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Urologic Specialists, Tulsa 918-749-8765 Sp: Minimally Invasive Surgery, Prostate Benign Disease, Kidney Stones MICHAEL S. COOKSON OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-4088 Sp: Urologic Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Testicular Cancer DANIEL J. CULKIN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Urology, Oklahoma City 405-271-8156 Sp: Urologic Cancer, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Incontinence-Urinary, Reconstructive Surgery SCOTT E. LITWILLER Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Urologic Specialists, Tulsa 918-749-8765 Sp: Urogynecology, Pelvic Reconstruction, Incontinence

Vascular and Interventional Radiology

VANCE MCCOLLOM Mercy Hospital-Oklahoma City • Mercy Hospital, Interventional Radiology, Oklahoma City 405-936-5775 THOMAS E. WILEY III Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Radiology Consultants of Tulsa, Tulsa 918743-8838 Sp: Peripheral Vascular Disease, Thrombolytic Therapy, Angioplasty and Stent Placement

Vascular Surgery

JOHN BLEBEA OU Medical Center • St. John Medical CenterTulsa • OU Physicians, Tulsa 918634-7500 Sp: Endovascular Surgery, Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation

MICHAEL O. RIGGS Mercy Hospital-Oklahoma City • Oklahoma Spine Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-608-8828

GOYA V. RAIKAR Oklahoma Heart Hospital-South Campus • Crossway Medical Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-418-5400 Sp: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Surgery-Mitral, Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery, Thoracic Cancers JOHN D. RANDOLPH Oklahoma Heart Hospital • Mercy HospitalOklahoma City • Oklahoma Cardiovascular Associates, Oklahoma City 405-608-3800 Sp: Cardiovascular Surgery, Heart Valve Surgery, Coronary Artery Surgery FRANK E. SCHMIDT JR Saint Francis Hospital-Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Tulsa 918-502-3200

Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. is a healthcare research and information company founded in 1991 by a former medical college board chairman and president to help guide consumers to America’s top doctors and top hospitals. Castle Connolly’s established nomination survey, research, screening and selection process, under the direction of an MD, involves many hundreds of thousands of physicians as well as academic medical centers, specialty hospitals and regional and community hospitals all across the nation. Castle Connolly’s physician-led team of researchers follows a rigorous screening process to select top doctors on both the national and regional levels. Its online nominations process – located at www. castleconnolly.com/nominations - is open to all licensed physicians in America who are able to nominate physicians in any medical specialty and in any part of the country, as well as indicate whether the nominated physicians is, in their opinion, among the best in their region in their medical specialty or among the best in the nation in their medical specialty. Careful screening of doctors’ educational and professional experience is essential before final selection is made among those physicians most highly regarded by their peers. The result - we identify the top doctors in America and provide you, the consumer, with detailed information about their education, training and special expertise in our paperback guides, national and regional magazine “Top Doctors” features and online directories. Doctors do not and cannot pay to be selected and profiled as Castle Connolly Top Doctors Physicians selected for inclusion in this magazine’s “Top Doctors” feature may also appear as online at www.castleconnolly.com, or in in conjunction with other Castle Connolly Top Doctors databases online and/or in print.


“THE DEMANDS OF MODERN LIFE MAKE IT EASY TO IGNORE THE NATURAL WONDERS ALL AROUND US. AS WE DROVE INTO CHOCTAW COUNTRY AND ABSORBED THE AWESOME BEAUTY OF THE MOUNTAINS AND RIVERS, I KNEW THIS TRIP WAS LONG OVERDUE.”

NEXT TIME, YOU TELL THE STORY.

You needn’t travel far to experience nature in all its majesty; Choctaw Country is right around the corner. Raft the white waters of Mountain Fork River, explore the hideouts of Robbers Cave, ride horseback through the Ouachita National Forest. Hang-glide or scuba-dive, hike or bike—it’s your choice, and Choctaw Country has it all. PLAN YOUR SUMMER ESCAPE AT CHOCTAWCOUNTRY.COM

Talimena Scenic Byway; Southeastern Oklahoma


Head for an

Adventure

With so many options, there’s no reason not to travel this summer.

The summ er is arriv ing, and it and explo ’s time to re. No ma get out tt e r w hat your in there are m any option terests are s for you in , region. Wh the surrou ether you’r n ding e an art lo of the outd ver or an a oors, our t v id fan ravel featu for you. re has som ething From the art collect ions and n Santa Fe, N atural bea ew Mexico uty of , to the the shopping in rmal sprin Hot Spring gs and s, Arkansa find somew s, you’re su here worth re to visiting th is summer.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017


OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA HAS MANY DESTINATIONS AVAILABLE FOR DAY TRIPS OR OVERNIGHT VISITS, PROVIDING OPTIONS JUST A SHORT DRIVE AWAY.

TULSA PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA TOURISM

2 HOURS 22 MIN

OKC

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA TOURISM

ILLINOIS RIVER NEAR TAHLEQUAH

CANOE, KAYAK, RAFT OR WHATEVER LITERALLY FLOATS YOUR BOAT IS THE MODE OF TRANSPORTATION TO TAKE ON THE GENTLY FLOWING ILLINOIS RIVER. OUTFITTERS AND CAMPSITES ABOUND ALONG STATE HIGHWAY 10.

SULPHUR With only 5,000 people, Sulphur packs a

punch for visitors, and you could argue that Oklahoma’s only national park, the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, and the surrounding Arbuckle Mountains provide the keys. Known as Platt National Park from 1906 to 1976, the recreation area’s centerpiece is the Travertine Nature Center. After hiking and exploring the recreation area, you can find perfect swimming at Little Niagara Falls, where spring-fed water averages 65 degrees, even in sultry July and August. If you don’t want to stay at one of the six campgrounds in the recreation area, an ideal place is the

PHOTO COURTESY THE CHICKASAW NATION

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA TOURISM

THE ARBUCKLE MOUNTAINS’ HONEY CREEK DROPS 77 FEET TO FORM TURNER FALLS, WHERE SWIMMING IN A NATURAL POOL IS POPULAR. THE PARK HAS TRAILS, TENT CAMPING, RV SLOTS AND CABINS.

PHOTO BY BAILEY ANDEREGG

TURNER FALLS, DAVIS

Artesian Hotel, Casino and Spa. The original Artesian, built in 1906, burned down in 1962, but the Chickasaw tribe rebuilt it and opened the sparkling resort in 2013. Nearby, the Chickasaw Cultural Center has historical exhibits, art galleries, gardens, and traditional houses, villages, dances and demonstrations. “Built on the ideas, imagination and creativity of Chickasaws, this center incorporates nature, history, heritage and life ways to tell the ongoing story of the Chickasaw people,” tribal Gov. Bill Anoatubby says. “We … celebrate the vision, resilience and spirit of the men, women and children of the Chickasaw Nation.” - Brian Wilson

ALABASTER CAVERNS NEAR FREEDOM PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA TOURISM

BONUS DESTINATIONS

1 HOURS 25 MIN

It may be 100 degrees with high humidity, but freedom from that furnace lies south of town, where it’s 60 degrees inside the three-quarter-mile namesake of Alabaster Caverns State Park. Alabaster, a rare form of gypsum, makes this the world’s largest gypsum cave open to everyone. Black alabaster exists in only three veins globally (Italy and China have the others). Watch parties occur Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays during July as a million Mexican free-tailed bats fly into the night sky.

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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MISSOURI

ART MUSEUMS, MUSIC SHOWS AND MARK TWAIN’S BOYHOOD HOME ARE ALL AVAILABLE IN THE SHOW ME STATE.

TULSA 3 HOURS 53 MIN

OKC

PHOTO COURTESY SILVER DOLLAR CITY

BRANSON

CITY MUSEUM IN ST. LOUIS NOT ONLY SUFFICES FOR YOUR VISUALLY ARTISTIC SIDE, IT ALSO PROVIDES YOU WITH SOME KINESTHETIC THRILLS ON ITS ROOFTOP AMUSEMENT PARK RIDES.

KANSAS CITY District after district along Kansas City’s fabulous Main Street features a distinct range of architecture. From the vintage shops of Westport and the art galleries in Crossroads to the boutiques and bars of the Power and Light District, there is something for everyone. Chic shopping in Country Club Plaza, impressive museums and historic steakhouses are part of KC’s tourism. Along with the cultural highlights, you should tour the zoo, which features Asian and African animal sections. A re-creation of an authentic Ma-

HANNIBAL

“Explore. Dream. Discover.” Mark Twain’s famous words apply to his Boyhood Home and Museum near the banks of the Mississippi River. Dress up in period costumes to enact the lives and characters of Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer and Becky Thatcher. The mid-1800s antiques and furniture enhance the authenticity. Ride the Mark Twain Riverboat past Jackson’s Island, home to many bird species and river animals. The Mark Twain Cave delights lovers of science, history and literature.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

sai village of Africa provides thrills after taking a tram ride over the monkeys and a boat ride to the giraffes. Visit the acclaimed National World War I Museum and Memorial, which has fascinating exhibits and a vantage point offering a panoramic view of the city’s skyline and gorgeous Union Station. Brewery and barbecue bus tours and KC Fun Tours on trolleys can transport you around the city along with segways and horse drawn carriage rides on the Plaza. - Gina Michalopulos Kingsley

PHOTOS COURTESY MARK TWAIN BOYHOOD HOME AND MUSEUM

CITY MUSUEM IN ST. LOUIS

PHOTOS COURTESY VISIT KC

BRANSON HAS SUCH A RANGE OF ATTRACTIONS FROM SHOWS, SHOWBOAT BRANSON BELLE AND THE CHARMING SILVER DOLLAR CITY. AMUSEMENT PARK RIDES, CAVES AND MIDWESTERN FOOD WILL PROVIDE SEVERAL DAYS OF FUN. PHOTO BY MCELROY FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY

BONUS DESTINATIONS

4 HOURS 53 MIN


ARKANSAS

ARKANSAS IS KNOWN FOR ITS NATURAL BEAUTY AND OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES BUT ALSO OFFERS SHOPPING AND ART MUSEUMS.

TULSA 2 HOURS 5 MIN

OKC

MOUNT MAGAZINE

AT 2,753 FEET, ARKANSAS’S TALLEST MOUNTAIN AND MOUNT MAGAZINE STATE PARK PROVIDE SWEEPING VISTAS, HIKING, HORSEBACK RIDING AND BACKPACKING. THE RUSTIC, UPSCALE LODGE AT MOUNT MAGAZINE IS PERFECT FOR GETAWAYS.

BUFFALO RIVER

PHOTOS COURTESY ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND TOURISM

THE NATIONAL PARKS SERVICE DESIGNATED THIS SCENIC WATERWAY IN NORTHERN ARKANSAS AS THE FIRST NATIONAL RIVER. THE WHITEWATER CHALLENGES EXPERIENCED KAYAKERS AND RAFTERS., AND HEMMED-IN-HOLLOW FALLS IS A 209-FOOT HIGHLIGHT.

PHOTOS COURTESY VISIT BENTONVILLE

BONUS DESTINATIONS

3 HOURS 32 MIN

BENTONVILLE This city’s population (41,614) has doubled since 2000 with the growth of Wal-Mart, whose headquarters are in Bentonville. It’s not a coincidence that two major draws– new and old – have ties to the Walton family. Crystal Bridges Museum, opened in 2011, is free and was founded by art collector Alice Walton, heiress of Sam Walton. The building, designed by Moshe Safdie, is itself a work of art; its soaring wood-glass-and-concrete wings, are tucked into the ravines of Town Branch Creek and surrounding forest. Just as rewarding are 3.5 miles of outdoor trails with sculptures and artistic themes amid natural beauty.

One of the trails connects to the city’s hike-and-bike system and you can walk downtown to the City Square. On the western perimeter is the original Walton fiveand-dime, now the Wal-Mart Museum. The forerunner of Wal-Mart opened in 1950 and the museum re-creates the environs, especially the old-fashioned Spark Cafe soda fountain. On the Square, special events occur every weekend, from farmers markets and First Fridays to music and food festivals. For the adventurous are two caverns worth seeing: War Eagle is outside Rogers, 20 minutes away; Cosmic is an hour away in Berryville. - Brian Wilson

HOT SPRINGS

Bill Clinton immortalized his Arkansas birthplace with his speech “A Place Called Hope,” but Hot Springs had a greater impact because he spent his formative years here. You can tour his hangouts and favorite burger joints. But most visitors come to this National Park city for thermal springs, mineral water, spas and funky retail along Central Avenue. You can even fill containers at public fountains billowing pure Ozark water. A dinner cruise on nearby Lake Hamilton is a fun date.

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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6 HOURS 41 MIN

OKC

PHOTO COURTESY NASA

PHOTO COURTESY LADY BIRD JOHNSON WILDFLOWER CENTER

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON

NASA’S HUB FOR U.S. HUMAN SPACEFLIGHT IS A BUCKET-LIST DESTINATION FOR ANYONE FASCINATED WITH THE SOLAR SYSTEM. SPACE CENTER HOUSTON PROVIDES A POPULAR TRAM TOUR OF THE JOHNSON SPACE CENTER.

PHOTO COURTESY VISIT SHERMAN

BONUS DESTINATIONS

5 HOURS 39 MIN

HOT SUMMER NIGHTS, SHERMAN COUNTRY MUSICIANS KEVIN FOWLER (JUNE 22) AND WADE BOWEN (JULY 13), ALONG WITH THE ROCK BAND BLUE OYSTER CULT (JULY 20), HIGHLIGHT SHERMAN’S SERIES OF FREE OUTDOOR CONCERTS THIS SUMMER.

AUSTIN This Live Music Capital of the World is a corporate, high-tech metropolis, but signature areas remind many of Austin’s quaint, beautiful weirdness. Zilker Park, with Barton Springs, is a landmark. The former is home of the three-day Austin City Limits music festival and has hundreds of acres of open areas for picnicking, kite flying and general loafing. The latter is a swimming area with crystalline, 68-degree water. Just a walk away on Barton Springs Road is the original Chuy’s restaurant with its signature margaritas. Former First Lady Lady Bird Johnson was a naturalist whose name marks two outdoor paradises. Lady Bird

PHOTO COURTESY GEOFF DUNCAN OF AUSTIN CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

TULSA

PHOTO BY ANDY FORDE

PHOTO COURTESY LADY BIRD JOHNSON WILDFLOWER CENTER

TEXAS

TEXAS IS HOME TO SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVALS, LUXURIOUS ACCOMMODATIONS, WATERPARKS AND OUTDOOR FUN.

Lake, formerly Town Lake, is a dammed up portion of the Colorado River. Thousands of people run and hike daily on the trails around the lake, while hundreds more paddle or row themselves in it. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is a research-educational facility devoted to sustainable practices and conservation. More than 700 species of wildflowers native to Central Texas make it a botanical delight. Visitors routinely see owls, hares, cardinals, jays, buntings and finches. If you’re lucky, you might witness a roadrunner slam a snake to the ground for a quick meal or a lynx hunting rodentia. - Brian Wilson

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

PHOTO COURTESY HILTON ANATOLE

HILTON ANATOLE, DALLAS

Big D can be an oven in the summer, but one doesn’t need to leave this toney resort to cool off. JadeWaters has 14 kid-centered activities, a lazy river, two 180-foot water slides, a swim-up bar, luxury cabanas, poolside picnics and poolside spa treatments. The Anatole also has an 80,000-squarefoot fitness center, tennis courts, a running track and lap pools. For those who are less physically active, there is a small art museum, a luxury spa oasis and sundry boutiques.


NEW MEXICO

WITH MULTIPLE CHOICES FOR RELAXATION, SHOPPING AND DINING, NEW MEXICO IS A FAVORITE DESTINATION FOR MANY OKLAHOMANS.

TULSA 9 HOURS 11 MIN

OKC

RED RIVER

THIS AREA IS PART OF THE ENCHANTED CIRCLE. HORSEBACK RIDING, HIKING, FISHING, HUNTING AND CAMPING ARE PART OF THE MAGICAL WILDERNESS EXPERIENCE.

SANTA FE This stunning, unique city inspired a trendy design aesthetic decades ago. The Plaza is a must-see for the Palace of the Governors (the oldest continually used public building in the United States), boutiques and cafes. Artisans display their handmade jewelry in the square to balance chic art galleries. Within walking distance of the Plaza are the beautiful Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi, the San Miguel Mission and the Loretto Chapel (with its miraculous staircase). The narrow Canyon Road, known for its Pueb-

PHOTO BY CHRIS CORRIE

PHOTO BY DANIEL NADELBACH

PHOTO COURTESY NEW MEXICO TOURISM DEPARTMENT PHOTO COURTESY RED RIVER VISITOR’S CENTER

HIKE THE SWITCHBACKS, CLIMB BIG BOULDERS OR JUST WALK OR DRIVE ACROSS THE GORGE TO ENJOY THE IMPRESSIVE VISTA 565 FEET ABOVE THE RIVER. THE BRIDGE IS THE SEVENTH-HIGHEST IN THE UNITED STATES. BIGHORN SHEEP ARE COMMONLY SEEN.

PHOTO BY DOUGLAS MERRIAM

RIO GRANDE GORGE

PHOTOS COURTESY ALBUQUERQUE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

BONUS DESTINATIONS

7 HOURS 45 MIN

lo Revivial style, also has world-class galleries. The El Farol restaurant serves delicious meals and features a flamenco dance show. La Fonda on the Plaza is a perfect hotel if you like being in the center of it all. For those craving a spa experience, stay at La Posada de Santa Fe Resort and Spa for luxurious pampering. Dine at The Shed for fresh Mexican food and margaritas. Santa Fe is a true “rest and relaxation” getaway because you can indulge in art galleries, fine food, a desert climate and inspiring landscapes. - Gina Michalopulos Kingsley

ALBUQUERQUE ZOO

Impressive exhibits include those entitled Africa, Asia, Australian Outback and Tropical Trail. Bird annexes and tiger habits are being updated in this 64-acre zoo. Tasmanian devils, lorikeets and alpacas are featured in the educational activities as well as crocodile, sea lion and giraffe feedings. Take a break in the zoo shop or one of the many cafes to relax and recharge.

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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COLORADO

WHILE COLORADO MAY BE KNOWN AS A HOME FOR SKIING, THERE ARE MANY FUN OPTIONS FOR SUMMER TRAVEL AS WELL.

TULSA 9 HOURS 32 MIN

OKC PHOTOS COURTESY VISIT DENVER

PHOTO BY DENISE CHAMBERS/MILES

CRESTED BUTTE

PHOTO BY EVAN SEMON

ONCE YOU DISCOVER THIS OLD MINING TOWN-TURNED-WINTER AND SUMMER PARADISE, YOU TRY TO FIGURE HOW YOU CAN STAY LONGER FOR THE DIVERSE RESTAURANTS, RESTORED VICTORIAN HOMES, CULTURAL OFFERINGS AND NATIONAL FOREST.

PHOTO COURTESY VISIT ESTES PARK

BONUS DESTINATIONS

9 HOURS 21 MIN

ESTES PARK

IT’S A WAY STATION INTO ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK, YES, BUT ALSO MUCH MORE WITH CHARMING SHOPS, INTRIGUING RESTAURANTS, QUAINT B&BS, THE STANLEY HOTEL, WESTERN-STYLE FUN, LIVE MUSIC, MUSEUMS AND AN AERIAL TRAMWAY.

DENVER This city of opposites is aggressively young, yet steeped in Old West heritage … filled with terrific hotels but dedicated to the great outdoors … an energetic metropolis with ethnically embedded neighborhoods. Prepare to fall head over heels in Cheesman Park, a must-see, wedding-worthy oasis of shade, grass, walkways and a jaw-dropping, 150-mile-wide vista of the Rockies, all the way from Pikes Peak to Mount Evans. It’s at 1599 E. Eighth Ave. Lower downtown Denver (LoDo) is where it’s at: cool bars, great restaurants, appealing shopping, stay-out-late nightspots and fascinating galleries. Check out the glasswalled Museum of Contemporary Art and its rooftop

garden. And Coors Field, home of the Colorado Rockies MLB team, is right next door. Feeding into LoDo northwest from the Capitol is 16th Street Mall, a masterpiece of convenience, charm and vehicle-free ecology. You can get there via free shuttles running continuously up and down past unusual shops, taverns, ethnic eateries and the legendary Brown Palace Hotel. Capitol Hil is full of opulent Victorian and Tudor mansions as well as the home of Titanic survivor Molly Brown and the Denver Botanic Gardens (with orchids, the Monet Pool, rare and endangered plants, and 45 formal gardens). - Chuck Mai, AAA Oklahoma

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

PHOTO BY JEREMY SWANSON

ASPEN

Winter sports dominate Aspen, but summer is a close second. The best hiking trails follow clear, flowing streams where refreshing, natural sounds and smells of the Rockies permeate the psyche. Walking the town is great fun with eclectic shops, one-of-a-kind taverns and restaurants, and views of the mountains. Wander over to the Wheeler/ Stallard Museum in an 1888 Queen Anne Revivalstyle house. Also in the summer, take in concerts at the Aspen Music Festival.


KANSAS

TRAVEL OPTIONS ABOUND IN OKLAHOMA’S NORTHERN NEIGHBOR FOR HISTORY BUFFS AND NATURE LOVERS.

TULSA 2 HOURS 31 MIN

OKC

FORT LARNED NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE PHOTOS COURTESY VISIT WICHITA

THIS WELL-PRESERVED HOME OF THE GUARDIANS OF THE SANTA FE TRAIL, ESTABLISHED IN 1859, WAS PART OF THE CONTROVERSIAL INDIAN WARS. NEARBY RUTS REMAIN FROM WAGONS USING THE TRADE ROUTE.

MONUMENT ROCKS

ALSO CALLED THE CHALK PYRAMIDS, THESE OUTCROPPINGS POP SEEMINGLY OUT OF NOWHERE WITH ARCHES AND BUTTES 70 FEET TALL. THEY WERE FORMED 80 MILLION YEARS AGO FROM AN ANCIENT SEABED.

WICHITA Kansas’s largest city, in the southcentral part of the state, is often overlooked by those drawn to the Topeka-Lawrence-Kansas City corridor. However, three gems can make for a pleasurable long weekend. Botanica, with its 30 gardens, is celebrating its 30-year anniversary. The 2,880-square-foot butterfly house allows visitors to see the insects interact with hundreds of plants. Throughout 17.6 acres are ideal spots for weddings, always popular at Botanica. The Chinese Garden of Friendship captures traditional architecture, art and culture reflective of the Ming Dynasty. At the confluence of the Little Arkansas and Big

rivers downtown stands the Keeper of the Plains, a 44-foot-tall steel sculpture symbolizing how Native Americans hold the ground between the two waterways as sacred. The five-ton statue sits atop a 30-foot pedestal. The Keeper of the Plains Plaza is also home to the Mid-America All-Indian Center. Next to the Arkansas River in central Wichita is the Old Cowtown Museum, one of the oldest open-air facilities of its kind in the Midwest. Fiftyfour historic and re-created buildings embody the city’s significant role along the Chisholm Trail. More than 10,000 artifacts, from textiles and furnishings to tools and furniture, exemplify life in the latter part of the 19th century. - Brian Wilson

TOPEKA

PHOTO COURTESY KANSAS TOURISM

PHOTOS COURTESY KANSAS TOURISM

BONUS DESTINATIONS

2 HOURS 20 MIN

The state capital delights history buffs, who don’t have to limit stops to the capitol. But if that’s the start, see “Tragic Prelude,” John Steuart Curry’s famous mural of radical abolitionist John Brown. Elsewhere, the original capitol was Constitution Hall (1863-1869). The Ritchie House, one of Topeka’s oldest homes, was an Underground Railroad stop. Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, the landmark Supreme Court case ending school segregation, has a National Historic Site with an interactive museum.

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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LIVE WORK PL AY

The City’s

POAF TRHRTEE3

Playground

PHOTO BY MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

Downtown Tulsa and OKC provide multiple entertainment options. COX CONVENTION CENTER

PAC

BOK CENTER

BRADY DISTRICT

BLUE DOME DISTRICT

ONEOK FIELD

GREENWOOD DISTRICT

NEARLY

$1

BILLION

IN PRIVATE INVESTMENT HAS OCCURRED DOWNTOWN SINCE THE CONSTRUCTION OF TULSA’S

BOK CENTER.

At the heart of the re-

naissance in Tulsa’s and Oklahoma City’s downtowns is the growth of entertainment options. Art galleries, restaurants, concert venues and sports arenas draw people downtown and make it a more attractive option to live and work. Downtown nightlife keeps residents

coming downtown, attracts visitors and provides an economic boost to the city as a whole. Cities are also nurturing their downtowns to make them more friendly for pedestrians, which encourages people to walk around downtown and explore all the entertainment options available. No matter what your interest is, you’re sure to find something that suits you downtown. JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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LIVE WORK PL AY

DOWNTOWN DINING

EATS AND DRINKS

A boom in restaurants and bars across the downtowns of Oklahoma City and Tulsa has attracted clientele beyond the traditional daytime office crowd. Revitalization explains this trend. In OKC, credit the MAPS (Metropolitan Area Projects) program for enhancing a sense of place and adding destination-worthy entertainment, such as the Bricktown Canal, Bricktown Ballpark, Chesapeake Energy Arena, the Boathouse, whitewater rafting and the Myriad Gardens renovation, says Tammy Fate, manager of retail development and recruitment for the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber. “All of these things combine to create an environment that can sustain a diverse array of bars and restaurants,” she says. As the quality of downtown life grows, so has the customer base. Even if residents don’t live downtown, they spend more time there. Increasing activities and family-friendly events in downtown Tulsa have spurred new restaurants and nightlife, says Kyle Johnston, marketing and promotions manager of the Tulsa Downtown Coordinating Council. Within a 1.4-mile radius of the Inner Dispersal Loop are a host of nationally renowned venues like the BOK Center, ONEOK Field, Cain’s Ballroom, the Brady Theater and Guthrie Green. “Capitalizing on families and outings is the addition of new restaurants and bars,” Johnston says. “It really has helped create a one-stop area where people can visit downtown for a ball game or concert, and grab dinner before and drinks or dessert afterwards.” OKC expects a new one-stop shop called The Commissary, the city’s first food hall, planning to open across from Bleu Garten, the popular food truck park in Midtown. Recent arrivals like Dekora!, Barrios, Revolucion Taqueria, All About Cha, Cultivar Mexican Kitchen and Yuzo Sushi Tapas prove that established downtown centers of nightlife in Bricktown and Midtown still grow. Meanwhile, in Oklahoma Tower, Bruce Rinehart of Rococo just opened a neighborly place called The Manhattan. “When local restaurateurs familiar with the market decide to invest in an area, that is a sign of growth,” Fate says. “For the Central Business District, it is also evidence that

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

more people are viewing that area as a destination, not just a place to spend 40 hours a week while they are at work.” Fate cites the affordable cost of living paired with amenities and quality of life components, such as music, arts and continued investment in the core, making downtown an attractive place for entrepreneurs. Demand in Tulsa has also expanded beyond office hours as new businesses cater to more than just daytime workers. “The attraction of an urban core is driving all Tulsans to downtown,” Johnston says. New within the past six months are two ramen bars (Roppongi and JINYA), a soul food spinoff of a Tulsa treasure (Wanda J’s Next Generation), and a Hurts Donut that draws a line around the clock. On the edgier end of the spectrum, the Unicorn Club Tulsa and She Theatre and Lounge have pulled back the curtain on niche nightlife. “I think restaurateurs and business owners are more likely to take a risk with a downtown project,” says Johnston, noting that symbiotic promotional relationships help them thrive. “More than anything, I think it proves that there is room for new ideas, for a creative spin on businesses. - Jeffrey Tanenhaus

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

VENUE REVENUE

THE ARENA DRAW Big entertainment venues deliver a big eco-

nomic impact to their host communities. “The saying, ‘If you build it, they will come’ needs to be followed up with, ‘If you bring it, they will continue to come,’” says Jeff Nickler, BOK Center general manager. The arena books a wide variety of events while developing new sports business with the Tulsa Sports Commission, most recently with bids with the NCAA, Big 12 Conference and Bassmaster. During March Madness in Tulsa, NCAA basketball generated more than $10 million in direct and indirect economic impact and resulted in nearly 7,000 overnight stays in hotels, says Nickler, noting that attendance also increased from 2011, when tournament games were last in town. Tulsa has landed first- and second-round games in 2019. “Downtown Tulsa was electric during the tournament this year,” Nickler says. “It was gratifying to see the thousands of hoops fans from across the country wearing their school colors packing our sidewalks, entertainment districts and hotels. You could feel the energy

on the streets, and Tulsa truly felt like the center of the March Madness universe.” Thanks to the BOK Center, Tulsa ranks among the nation’s top concert destinations and welcomes around 800,000 visitors per year to the facility. “Since the arena opened in 2008, nearly $1 billion in private investment has occurred downtown as investors embraced the opportunity to create more restaurants, hotels and retail inside a rejuvenated [Inner Dispersal Loop],” Nickler says. Oklahoma City, too, reaps financial rewards from its largest entertainment spaces. Direct spending attributable to four major venues downtown totals about $170 million for the latest complete year, says Michael Carrier, president of the Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau. These include Chesapeake Energy Arena, Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark, the Civic Center and entertainment events in the Cox Center. Carrier conservatively estimates that 30 percent of total retail revenue in downtown OKC is from these four venues. - Jeffrey Tanenhaus


PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY

WALK THIS WAY There was a time when just the thought of

DESTINATION MARKERS IN OKC LIST FACTS ABOUT NEARBY LOCATIONS AROUND THE EDGE.

THE MAP CAST ON THE DESTINATION MARKER INCLUDES A SILVER PIN SHOWING ITS LOCATION TO HELP PEDESTRIANS.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Read more about OKC’s destination markers @ OKmag.com

TULSA

75 39

very walkable

DOWNTOWN car-dependent

METRO AREA

Walk Scores

Walkscore.com promotes walkable neighborhoods by providing scores for cities, districts and buildings based on how many amenities are located within walkable distance. Scores range between 0 and 100. How’s here Oklahoma’s metro areas stack up:

OKC

72 32

very walkable

DOWNTOWN car-dependent

METRO AREA

driving in downtown Tulsa or Oklahoma City was enough to make someone’s blood pressure rise. The lack of parking, insane traffic and confusing thoroughfares led many to write off going downtown in either metropolis unless absolutely necessary, but city planners are changing all that. Initiatives are underway to renovate both downtowns into thriving, pedestrian-friendly districts where residents flock to walk, shop and play in the urban heart of the city. John Tankard, associate planner with the City of Oklahoma City Planning Department, says walkability improves quality of life in at least four major areas: health, safety, environmental impact and economics. The last may come as a surprise to some, but Tankard points out that some of OKC’s most successful business districts are also its most walkable. “When more people are walking (or cycling) in an area, it increases people’s feelings of safety and encourages them to join in the action, increasing sales in business districts,” Tankard says. “Just look at the areas of town where people feel comfortable walking: Bricktown, Midtown, Automobile Alley. All are the best places to walk in the city, and are thriving business districts.” Project 180 has enabled OKC to act on many recommendations made in a 2009 report, including converting one-way streets to two-way roads and providing more shade with the planting of numerous trees. If passed, an upcoming bond issue will implement further walkability initiatives. Tulsa recently completed its own study on downtown walkability. Like their compatriots in OKC, planners found that converting one-way streets to two-way, adding on-street parking and creating a bike-friendly environment were solid investments in Downtown Tulsa. “It’s much more than just getting feet on the ground or implementing sidewalks,” says Kyle Johnston, marketing and promotions manager for the City of Tulsa Downtown Coordinating Council. “Walkability is as much traffic-oriented as it is pedestrian. And above all, it’s about economic growth and attracting people to live, shop, eat and work in the downtown area. Bike lanes will allow downtown residents to commute faster and cheaper. “Getting rid of one-lane streets will remove the stigma some people have about driving downtown. And focusing on developing our downtown the right way will ensure that businesses continue to want to stay in our downtown.” - Tara Malone JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Wedding Guide

Prepping for YOUR Perfect Day GH IN ON HOW TO WEDDING EXPERTS WEI RIOD TENSION-FREE. KEEP THE PL ANNING PE Photos by Chris Humphrey Photographer

BOUQUET BY TONI’S FLOWERS AND GIFTS

T

he word “stress” often goes hand-in-hand with the process of wedding planning, and this pressure can truly dampen the mood of what should be a blissful time in life. With caterers to account for, flower arrangements to pick and wedding cakes to test, a lot of the fun can be lost in the chaos. But there’s an antidote to the madness: a bit of organization goes a long way to make the journey just as fun as the destination. Some of Oklahoma’s wedding experts offer advice on creating a stress-free planning period.

Finding the Space

Whether it’s a traditional church, dazzling beach, swanky downtown loft or cozy home, the venue of the wedding sets the tone for the whole affair and should be reflective of the union between the couple. Questions abound on all the idiosyncratic requirements you and your partner need. Dance floor? Catering? Bar service? Indoor and outdoor options? Make a checklist of your requirements – and check them all off – before booking a venue. Julie Kwok of White House Mansion in Tulsa says the space should be the first thing JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Wedding Guide

on your mind when planning the big day. “Picking the venue should be among your first priorities when planning,” she says. “While florists, DJs and caterers can serve multiple weddings a day, a venue can accommodate one or a limited number of weddings a day.” Kwok also mentions that some venues have restrictions on the number of vendors brought in, so booking the location first would eliminate the issue and save you time and money. “Venues that have an open-door policy will allow their customers to choose vendors that best fit their needs,” she says. “For venues that have vendor restrictions, the pricing of those vendors should be taken into consideration when deciding on that venue.” Debbie Hunter of OK40 Ranch in Mounds also warns that procrastinating on a venue booking could cost you. “Select a venue early,” she says. “Most venues book a year in advance.” This especially applies if you’re dead-set on a certain date or are getting married in peak wedding season – May, June, October and December. Hunter emphasizes the size of your wedding – in terms of guest and the wedding party – should also be nailed down before booking. Without a solid guest list, “the venue could be too small or large for your wedding,” she says. “Too many brides over- or underestimate that number. It could also determine if there will be enough food, beverage and seating for your guests.” And if you’re on the fence about a certain location, it’s not a bad idea to find out how other couples felt about their experiences there. “Do take customer reviews into consideration,” Kwok says. “However, the couples have to determine whether certain compliments or complaints are legitimate.”

Foodie Heaven

With so many culinary creations to consider, picking the food at your wedding should start with one question: what do you and your partner like to eat? After that, everything else will fall into place – or off the bone. You should also decide early if you’d like a sit-down plated dinner, a buffet, or just a smorgasbord of small bites for guests to nosh. Maggie Howell of Aunt Pittypat’s Catering in Oklahoma City believes the “feel of the event – casual vs. formal or somewhere in between” will greatly impact the menu. Plus no-brainers like specific likes and dislikes, budget and style should all fit into the equation. Unlike other components of the wedding, however, the time of day should greatly impact the food you choose.

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“Don’t order light hors d’oeuvres for a 7 p.m. event,” Howell says. “There is also no need for heavy food at a 2 p.m. reception.” This becomes exceptionally important if your wedding has an open bar, says Libby Billings, owner of Elote and the Vault in Tulsa. “It’s important for guests to be able to get full if the wedding is during a meal time and if there is alcohol being served,” she says. After all, little food plus lots of alcohol can turn a tipsy crowd to a drunk one – quickly. For the budget-conscious, Howell mentions that a caterer can often double as a planner, so check with him or her before you bankroll another team member. “See what services your caterer offers. Often a full-service, upscale caterer will provide services like diagrams, coordinating rentals and assisting with decor choices at no additional charge,” she says. Regardless of the time of day, theme or style, the bottom line is that equal effort needs to go into the catering as every other aspect of the wedding. “Don’t spend your entire budget on your dress and decor and then serve your guests a veggie tray from the grocery store,” Billings says. “The best weddings I’ve attended and catered all have something in common: guests leave full and tipsy, and they danced a lot.”

The Glorious Gown

For a bride, one of the most important components of the wedding – besides marrying the love of her life – is what she will wear. Countless pictures will capture the ensemble, but more importantly, the wedding day should be the occasion when a woman feels most beautiful. Before jumping headfirst into your search, you should factor in budgets, body types, wedding theme, season, personality and accessories. But if that all seems a bit much, remember that the internet and print publications can be your greatest ally on your quest for the perfect dress. “Bridal magazines and Pinterest are a great source of inspiration,” says Emily Wallack, public relations associate at David’s Bridal. “As you collect images, look for commonalities amongst styles. Chances are, you’ll start to see the same silhouettes and fabrics, pointing you in the right direction. Bringing pictures with you to your appointment will help you and your stylist sift through hundreds of white dresses to find the one.” Tara Settembre, public relations associate at Alfred Angelo, also offers some tips for the search that will help you get a better idea of how the dress will really look on the


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Wedding Guide big day. “Bring shoes that are the approximate height that you would like to wear for your wedding,” she says. “Some brides also like to bring a robe to wear between try-ons.” For a woman on the go, ordering a dress online may seem like an easier option than schlepping through a mountain of dresses in person, but Wallack warns brides-to-be to pay attention to sizing. “Bridal sizing typically isn’t the same as the clothes you wear every day. The last thing you want to do is buy a gown that is too tight and be uncomfortable the day of, just because it is ‘your size,’” she says. “Work with your stylist to choose the right size and correct undergarments to ensure you look just as good as you feel.” Wallack also says to keep your crew intimate when it comes time to try on gowns; too many cooks in the kitchen can lead to trouble. “Don’t bring the whole squad, as too many opinions start to cloud your own,” she says. If a dress search still remains daunting, remember that the way you feel in the gown should be the paramount concern. “If [the bride] feels happy and beautiful, that’s all that matters,” Settembre says. “After all, it’s one of the most important days of her life.”

Floral Fantasies

Flowers create a powerful ambiance for your nuptials, and choosing the blooms to welcome you into the venue can be a challenge. Toni Garner of Toni’s Flowers and Gifts in Tulsa and Melissa Brumfield of A New Leaf in Oklahoma City weigh in on the dos and don’ts of your floral – and florist – search. When it comes to finding that perfect purveyor of floral fantasies, both Garner and Brumfield suggest meeting with several and waiting for a florist that vibes well with you. “Go meet with a designer and see if you feel a connection,” Brumfield says. “Maybe that sounds strange; we don’t always look for a click in all business interactions, but this is a creative based endeavor, and it’s important you feel your florist understands you.” After the florist is chosen, it’s then time to focus on the details. “First off, the couple should know all the players in the wedding – all the people that would need flowers,” Garner says. This means bridesmaid bouquets, corsages and boutonnieres. Brumfield cautions that these small yet important flowers need to be considered from the get-go. “Personal flowers add up very quickly, and if you don’t come prepared to include those items in an initial quote, you’re tacking them on later when you have already used up your budget on

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Wedding Guide other areas,” she says. Once you’ve determined all the product you’ll need, the season of the wedding is critical in choosing your blooms, especially if you’re set on a certain flower. “Keep in mind the time of year and which flowers are available,” Garner says. “Look-alike flowers can be easily substituted. And if money is no object, you don’t have to worry about seasonality. But if you’re budget-conscious, then always keep that in mind.” Brumfield agrees that floral substitutions are often made, but she encourages couples to think less about the specific flower and more about the atmosphere they want to cultivate. “It’s easy to get caught up in specific flowers, but think of when you walk into that ceremony or the reception,” she says. “The story of your wedding is enhanced by how the room feels when guests enter, not by how many garden roses are in each bouquet.”

Take the Cake

Tiered or flat? Red velvet or chocolate? Butter cream or caramel filling? The options abound for wedding cakes in 2017 – and while they may seem overwhelming, finding the right dessert may be the most delightful aspect of planning your ceremony. Janet Rosebeary of Rosebeary’s Designs in Baking in Oklahoma City and Shannon Harris of Ann’s Bakery in Tulsa share some tips to keep the process entertaining and tasty. “What helps tremendously is an idea of what [the couple has] in mind. Whether it be the wedding dress, the table decorations or color,” Rosebeary says. “Sharing as much information as possible [is helpful.] How you picture the feel of the reception is key so the cake can go with it.” Cost is key, too, and Rosebeary encourages couples to be up front about how much they are willing to spend on the important dessert. “Another point is having a budget – don’t be afraid to share it,” she says. “The baker wants to create the perfect cake for you and would like to help keep it in the budget if they can.” Harris agrees that open communication is major, but also has some practical words of wisdom. “Choose a baker with a standing reputation that is licensed by the state and local health departments,” she says. “Do be creative; it’s your day. Don’t wait till the last minute; give the baker at least three months when booking.” This advance notice is even more important during peak wedding times. Rosebeary also says that couples should try to manage their expectations in terms of the long-awaited dessert. “Don’t expect your cake to be like mom’s or grandma’s,” she says. “No one can compete with them!” MARY WILLA ALLEN

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Senior Living

Choosing a Senior Home Besides moving in with family, choices include retirement communities, assisted living and nursing homes.

F

ather Time is inevitable. He comes for our youth and replaces it daily with gray hairs and a wrinkle or two. As these golden years creep up, they bring a host of new challenges and decisions. Sure, the days of school functions and family vacations, the daily grind of work and the rhetoric of chaotic days may be behind those entering their golden years, but life continues. One of the biggest questions, then, is where to live if moving away from the family house is desired or necessary. Following are some options.

RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES

These are for healthy seniors who remain self-sufďŹ cient and are not in need of care from others. Seniors in retirement communities are able to come and go as they please and choose the services they would like. They want to maintain independent residences and lifestyles but use the many

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amenities and activities that such a community provides, according to seniorhomes.com. Most of these are in the warmer climates and provide access to activities of interest, such as golf, swimming, aerobics and walking trails. In addition, they offer group activities, such as bingo, cards and crafts. The central theme of these communities is to promote unity among like-minded individuals and the importance of staying active. The cost for senior community living in Oklahoma averages $1,865 per month but can go as high as $2,580, according to seniorhomes. com.

ASSISTED-LIVING FACILITIES

These facilities have some nursing care and help for seniors


Choosing a senior living facility is an important decision. Here are some key questions to ask as you look at your options:

with some difficulties getting around. There are several reasons and scenarios that could lead to this option. If a senior has intact mental faculties but suffers from physical ailments that make mobility somewhat difficult but not impossible, then assisted living might be a good choice. These facilities are for seniors who can function independently but may require daily help with dressing, eating, mobility, hygiene, bathing, toileting, using the telephone and shopping. This is also a good option for those affected by the normal deficiencies that accompany age, such as difficulty remembering, seeing and hearing, but not suffering from dementia. These facilities provide 24-hour supervision and security, daily meals, basic housekeeping, laundry, health and exercise programs, social programs, transportation and access to medical services while allowing seniors the freedom to lead relatively normal lives with the reassurance that help is never far away. According to seniorhomes.com, the average cost of assisted living in Oklahoma is $3,345 per month.

NURSING HOMES

This option provides around-the-clock nursing care. While some may not like this choice, it may be the only one available when a senior is incapable of self-care and it is impossible for

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

How many living units are in the residence? Are different sizes and types of units available? Do any units have kitchens or kitchenettes? Are all the rooms private? Are bathrooms private? Does the residence offer special care units such as those serving people with Alzheimer’s disease? Is there a written care plan for each resident? What role does the resident have in developing the care plan? Are additional services available on the same campus if a resident’s needs change? Is the facility Medicaid certified? Has the facility’s license ever been revoked? Does the facility conduct background checks on all of the staff ? How many licensed nurses are on duty at each shift? What is the patient to staff ratio? Nurse to patient? Aide to patient? Does the nursing home have an active family council?

Source: AARP

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE More questions and printable list @ OKmag.com someone else to take on the responsibility of 24-hour attention in a family home. These facilities provide constant care for seniors physically and/or mentally unable to function independently. This is often a challenging decision for family members to make as it takes away the senior’s freedom. It is recommended to do one’s homework on each facility and find out if the home has had complaints filed against it with the Oklahoma State Department of Health. Email the agency at ltccomplaints@health.ok.gov. In addition to what is routinely offered at assisted-living facilities, nursing homes, according to the Nursing Home Abuse Center, should provide complete, nutritional meals that match individual dietary requirements

for each resident. Nursing supervision should be 24 hours with an on-site staff of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, licensed vocational nurses and nurses’ aides. Regular medical evaluation should be carried out by a physician who will consult with the on-site staff about each resident. Social activities may take many forms, but they should be sufficient to stimulate the resident intellectually and emotionally. According to seniorhomes.com, the average rate of a nursing home in Oklahoma is $4,441 per month. C.L. HARMON

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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PERSONAL TRAINER My shins hurt when I run. How can I make this pain stop? Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), also known as shin splints, refers to pain at the middle of the shin on the inner (medial) part of the lower leg (tibia). The cause can range from hard training JOHN JACKSON surfaces, foot shape, or too much repetitive walking, running, or jumping. I suggest seeing a podiatrist (foot Doctor) who can assess your specific issue before resuming activity. If this chronic condition is ignored, it can become debilitating and may lead to permanent damage requiring surgery.

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HOSPICE CARE

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

My father passed away last year. My mother was his caregiver and dedicated most of her time caring for him. She is retired and I know she is lonely and bored. Any ideas?

How can I make sure my finances are ready for summer fun?

This is something I hear quite a bit, and it is very common. I believe one of the best ways to get “back into life” AVA HANCOCK is to volunteer, and there are many great organizations in our region that could use her talents and time. At Grace Hospice, we have many volunteers who work with us because they needed an outlet to share their talents and wanted to meet other people who can empathize with their loss. Our volunteers play a very key role in our success, and we would love to have your mother join us. We have volunteers who meet weekly at Grace Hospice and work on a variety of projects such as creating crafts or handy man work. Our “Visiting Volunteers” see patients in Tulsa and surrounding communities between two and six times a month for about an hour each time and set their own schedules. Volunteers can also help with our events. All volunteers must attend training and pass a background check. For more information, please contact us at 918-744-7223 or visit www.gracehospice.com

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

While childhood dreams of hiking the Appalachian Trail or watching your favorite team play the championship may be costly, they can be within financial reach if you have a plan. Calculate the total cost of the experience. Most opportunities have upgrades DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC® or additional options. Think about what the ideal experience looks like for you and factor in those costs. Making Saving a Priority. Start by looking at recent spending and identifying ways to allocate money to fund your dream. Create a savings goal, which may help you reign in impulse purchases. Don’t spend your emergency savings. This money should be used to meet a sudden unexpected expense. Using it to fund your scuba vacation creates a possible risk to your long-term financial security. Don’t forget to keep funding other financial priorities. Make sure you continue to fund goals such as your retirement and your child’s college tuition. Consider meeting with a financial professional who can work with you to develop a strategy for your unique situation.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

LEGAL SERVICES

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST When spending time in the sun, I’m either sweating off my makeup or can’t wear any because I need to use sunscreen for protection. Is there a way to enjoy the sun, protect my skin and stay looking my best?

What is a “pretermitted heir”? 84 Okla. Stat. tit. 84 §132 provides in part “When any testator omits to provide in his will for any of his children, or for the issue of any deceased child unless it appears that such omission was intentional, such child, or the issue of such child, must have the same share in the estate BRAD BEASLEY of the testator, as if he had died intestate…”. If a decedent has a will but does not leave anything for each child, or the issue of such child if the child pre-deceases the decedent, and also does not specifically set forth an intent to exclude such child from the estate, Oklahoma law makes the assumption that such child was unintentionally left out and such child, as a pretermitted heir, is entitled to his or her share of an estate as though the decedent died without a will.

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Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Grilling With the Seven Fires The open flames of a specialized oven create the unexpected primal atmosphere of Amelia’s.

W AMELIA’S WOOD GRILLED SCOTTISH KING SALMON IS SERVED WITH PANZENELLA SALAD.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

ith Ringling Bros. gone, deathdefying acts, primal drama and children with wide eyes asparkle seem dated. But that excitement can be recaptured in an unlikely place – with excellent food. Just open a tall glass door to Amelia’s Wood Fired Cuisine in Tulsa’s Brady district. You see tasteful red leather banquettes, crisp white tablecloths and brick-and-wood paneled walls soaring to a high ceiling. “Much too tame and civilized,” you think when a director’s muse – waifish, impossibly elegant and ethereally graced – welcomes you. But here she’s the director (and eponymous owner), Amelia Eesley. She would be happy to seat you where suave waiters stand at the ready, but ask for the chef’s counter instead.

She leads you past big bronze urns, potted plants and a long bar where patrons drink or dine on the wide counter, back, past more tables – except the dining room now includes the kitchen, and those tables abut counters with cooks prepping vegetables and sauces. But you don’t notice all that because you focus on a huge wall of yellow brick, steel racks, blazing coals and raging fire. It’s like the gates of Hell. This so-called Argentine grill is made by a small Michigan company started by a former Time correspondent in Buenos Aires who, returning stateside, found that the flavor of grilled Argentine meats was nowhere to be found. In the past few years, the Argentine grill has been discovered. Some top chefs – Jose Andres, Tom Colicchio – use them because of the challenge and excitement. You don’t set a control for 350 degrees and

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Taste

a timer for five minutes. You use instinct and feel, talents honed by practice. “We use white oak from Keystone,” says master chef Kevin Snell, who, like Eesley, is a Stonehorse Grill alum. “Every piece of wood is different. The grill has hot spots, cold spots; you have to know them all.” Snell points to the huge metal wheels and chains, which “let us raise and lower the grill toward the fire or the coals, giving us perfect control. The possibilites are endless.” The Argentine is versatile: an open grill; a chapa (a flat griddle) for searing or making a caramelized crust; a fiery oven for bread and pizza; and a smoker for house-made sausages and hams. “We bought a half pig from 413 Farms in Adair. We cooked each section a different way,” Snell says. “I love those farms. They let the pigs roam free. I took the entire staff there to see where our pigs and chickens come from.” The flames leap and you notice the intense heat. Step back to the chef’s counter. Have a look at the menu. Francis Mallmann’s bestseller about the Argentine grill, Seven Fires, details its different ways of cooking. Six of

those seven are on the menu. (Snell hasn’t used Infiernillo, cooking between two fires, but he will.) The first of Mallmann’s seven fires is Parilla, a cast-iron grate; from it comes a pork chop with blackberry hibiscus sauce with homemade andouille sausage. Smoke and fire flavor this dish. Chapa is for the rainbow trout. Horno de barro is the wood-fired oven for the crusty sourdough bread. Rescoldo is for vegetables cooked while buried under hot ashes and served with roasted brie. In Asador, Snell cooks whole animals, like the pig. Caldero is a large castiron Dutch oven for a delicious pork belly and beans casserole. All these fires, Eesley says, “add incredible flavor. Cooking by fire is primal.” That’s the drama. It’s dangerous, a bit chancy, like a lion tamer. Chefs work by instinct with balletic grace. Each perfectly seared steak is a victory. “We serve not just dinner but entertainment as well,” says Eesley, who spent four years in New York at drama school. Snell adds, “When people see us work, they gain respect for what we do.” BRIAN SCHWARTZ

PIZZA AT AMELIA’S IS COOKED IN A WOODFIRED OVEN. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

LO C A L F L AV O R

Keeping it Classen Oklahoma City north-side institution proves true classics never go out of style.

D THE CHICKEN FRIED STEAK IS A CLASSIC AT CLASSEN GRILL. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

ecades before Classen Curve became home to purveyors of artisanal yoga pants and trendy eateries, the nearby Classen Grill served up one of the best breakfasts in OKC. This north-side institution has long distinguished itself with good service, a cozy environment and new spins on old classics. Favorites include the biscuit debris – homemade biscuits covered in sausage and ham gravy, then smothered with cheese for good measure – and the Memphis French toast stuffed with bananas, peanut butter and honey in a crispy cinnamon batter fit for the King. The machine that produces fresh-squeezed orange juice looks like something the dad from Gremlins invented, but the end-product can’t be beat, especially when combined with a generous dollop of champagne during brunch. And speaking of brunch, your mission should you choose to accept it, is the Chinook: homemade salmon patties with poached eggs, hollandaise and cheese grits. Choosing your culinary adventure at Classen Grill is difficult, but, whatever you decide on, do not pass on the Classen Grill potatoes, hefty spheres of garlicky mashed potatoes deep fried inside a golden crust. Honestly, do yourself a favor and just order one of everything. TARA MALONE

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Taste

CHEF CANDACE CONLEY OFFERS RECREATIONAL COOKING CLASSES WITH AN EMPHASIS ON FUN. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

FRICO WITH POTATOES AND ONION Serves 6–8

1 medium baking potato (approximately ½ lb) 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1 small onion, finely chopped ½ cup green onions (about 4), thinly sliced ¼ teaspoon kosher salt Ground black pepper 8 oz Montasio cheese, shredded (fresh Asiago and/or Parmigiano Reggiano can be substituted)

Cook the potato in boiling water until it is easily pierced all the way through with a sharp knife. Drain and cool the potato, remove the skin and shred it.

C H E F C H AT

Add olive oil to a medium, non-stick saute

Living up to the Name

C

Candace Conley, owner of That Girl Can Cook!, lands on the Food Network because she really can.

hef Candace Conley doesn’t just teach culinary skills in northeast Oklahoma’s only stand-alone cooking instruction studio. She also understands the profound meanings of food in our lives – thanks to a doctorate in psychology – and how food unites people and pervades our memories and experiences. This expertise and insight have brought her to the national attention of the Food Network. As owner of The Girl Can Cook!, Conley offers no-fuss, non-intimidating recreational cooking classes with an emphasis on fun at her newly renovated studio and catering kitchen in Broken Arrow. Classes are designed for all skill levels with offerings such as “Cooking Without a Parachute” and “Stupid, Easy and Delicious.” All are welcome to learn skills, from basic knife techniques to show-stopping meals. “People just seem to respond to what we do; it’s that no one else does it like we do,” Conley says. “We’re the only stand-alone cooking studio where we concentrate on teaching people how to broaden their cooking repertoires. They learn to enjoy what they do in the kitchen, so they want to cook more at home. My mission is to get people cooking for themselves more, to actually enjoy cooking at home.” A Tulsa native and Holland Hall alumna,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

Conley comes from a long line of talented home cooks and has developed a self-taught culinary style. She has mastered many techniques and cuisine genres but particularly enjoys Italian. “I spent part of a summer in 2015 cooking in Italy in restaurants and vineyards,” she says. “I had studied a lot on my own, but that brings it together when you cook with the natives.” The Food Network noticed Conley’s unique skills, and she participated in Cooks vs. Cons, a home cook versus professional chef show that originally aired in April and continues in re-runs. The 17-hour shoot showcased Conley’s prowess and she is negotiating to participate in other Food Network programming. Food is universal and “brings people together,” Conley says. “What happens in our kitchens is people come to classes as strangers and leave as friends. It’s powerful on many levels to learn to cook together for two hours and then sit together at a communal table. “It doesn’t matter how skilled you are when you come in. If you want lots of help, we’re there. If you want to do more of your own thing, that’s cool, too.” Conley’s industry recognitions include People’s Choice awards and other accolades. She is a familiar figure on the philanthropic scene by providing demonstrations and luscious edible spreads at many nonprofit events. TRACY LEGRAND

pan over medium heat. Add onions. Cook until translucent and softened slightly, then add potato shreds. Combine well and season with the salt and pepper. Cook for about 5 minutes, tossing frequently, until lightly crisped and golden.

Pile the shredded cheese on top of the

potato mixture. Flip with a spatula until the cheese shreds are combined and starting to melt. Smooth into a pancake-like disk, filling the pan bottom.

Lower the heat and let the frico cook un-

disturbed until the bottom is heavily brown and nicely crusted (about 5-10 minutes). Shake the pan to loosen the disk, put a large plate on top and invert, dropping the frico onto the plate, then slide it back in the pan, top side down. Cook until the second side is crisp and brown, about 5-10 minutes more.

Slide the frico onto a plate and blot up excess oil with a paper towel. Slice into wedges and serve immediately.

ONLINE Video @ OKmag.com


R A N D O M F L AV O R S

A GERMAN GEM

DINE IN STYLE

For those in need of a killer atmosphere to pair with killer food, visit The R&J Lounge and Supper Club. The menu is expansive, but a few delectable items include shrimp and grits, trout amandine and grilled pimento BLT. Crafted cocktails and brews flow freely and the brunch menu is a can’t-miss. 320 NW 10th St., OKC; rjsupperclub.com.

PHOTOS COURTESY FASSLER HALL

SUSHI EUPHORIA PHOTO BY JEREMY CHARLES COURTESY YOKOZUNA

PHOTO COURTESY THE R&J LOUNGE AND SUPPER CLUB

Fassler Hall boasts a menu full of German delights like bratwurst and chicken schnitzel, but the restaurant is more than a one-hit wonder – it also provides a popular brunch menu with tasty items like chorizo breakfast tacos, spicy chicken biscuits and Belgian waffles. Splendid happy hour deals, a plethora of German beers and live entertainment round out a popular hot spot in Oklahoma. 304 S. Elgin Ave., Tulsa; 421 NW 10th St., Oklahoma City; fasslerhall.com

Sushi enthusiasts, look no further than the trendy and tasty Yokozuna to fulfill your culinary needs. With an expansive sushi bar plus popular dishes like pad thai, fried rice, pork belly tacos and grilled salmon, your taste buds will sing. And if you’re on the fence, Yoko’s outstanding happy hour deals will surely seal the deal. 13230 Pawnee Drive, OKC; 309 E. Second St., Tulsa; 9146 S. Yale, Tulsa; yokozunasushi.com

PHOTO COURTESY CLANTON’S CAFE

FIERI-APPROVED CUISINE

Clanton’s Cafe is the oldest continually family owned restaurant on all of Route 66 in Oklahoma. Serving hearty Southern American meals has been a Clanton family tradition since 1927. Clanton’s has been featured on the Food Network’s Diners, Drive-ins and Dives, and host Guy Fieri claims that Clanton’s chicken fried steak is “the best.” Make sure to check out the calf fries and from-scratch homemade pies, too. 319 E. Illinois Ave., Vinita; www.clantonscafe.com JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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CHIEF METEOROLOGIST

MIKE COLLIER

WORKING FOR YOU EVERY WEEKNIGHT

5:00 / 6:00 / 10:00


Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Tulsa Gets Tough The annual cycling competition rolls through the city in June.

PHOTO COURTESY PROPELLER COMMUNICATIONS

C

ycling culture has slowly weaved its way into the fabric of the state, and the introduction of Saint Francis Tulsa Tough in 2006 created what is now a celebrated Oklahoma sporting tradition. “Saint Francis Tulsa Tough began as the vision of the Tulsa Wheelmen and the Tulsa Sports Commission, who wanted to build on the grassroots cycling culture in Tulsa and create a first-class racing and riding event for the city,” says Malcolm McCollam, executive director at Tulsa Tough, Inc. “Along with a small team of partners, they began small and have now grown to hosting nearly 2,000 Gran Fondo riders and 3,000 criterium racers over three days.” The event is about more than cycling, however, as this spectator sport brings in tourists from across the globe and shines a positive light on an ever-developing city. “The event showcases some of Tulsa’s most

exciting areas, including the Blue Dome District, the Brady Arts District and River Parks,” McCollam says. “Tens of thousands of spectators fill the streets of Tulsa each June, and the event draws attention from around the world.” The competition garnered national awareness from the get-go, as the women’s pro races were included in the United States Auto Club’s prestigious National Racing Calendar in 2008, and the event itself was ranked in the top 10 of 30 NRC races. By 2009, Tulsa Tough was ranked in the top four events in the NRC. McCollam says the high rankings resulted in so much national and international awareness that cyclists are now registering from as far away as Australia and New Zealand. For those who are unfamiliar with Tulsa Tough’s goings-on, there are different types of races to participate in or observe. On June 9, criterium races – which consist of several laps around a closed circuit – begin in the evening for

competitive racers. On June 10, Gran Fondo races – which consist of long-distance treks between 38 and 100 miles – welcome cyclists of all ages, shapes and skill levels; crit races are running on this day, too. June 11 offers both types of races again, plus the townie ride, which is a non-competitive 5-miler welcome to any and all. A highlight of the weekend is the River Parks Criterium on June 11, dubbed as “Cry Baby Hill.” This grueling course challenges even the most well-prepared cyclists, but the real fun happens as a spectator. Join the throngs as supporters line the streets – in costume – to tailgate and fraternize. 2017 also marks a special milestone in the cycling community, which Tulsa Tough plans to honor. “This year we celebrate the 200th anniversary of the invention of the bicycle, [which was] dubbed the ‘Freedom Machine’ in the late 1800s by Susan B. Anthony,” says McCollam. For a full schedule of events or to register for a race, visit tulsatough.com. MARY WILLA ALLEN

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTO COURTESY ST. JOHN

Where & When C H A R I TA B L E E V E N T S

St. John Street Party

Come and enjoy Tulsa’s favorite summer fundraiser at the St. John Street Party on June 3. The event offers food tastings from restaurants, food trucks, talented caterers, wine tastings and live music from Tulsa favorites Charlie Redd and the Full Flava Kings. All money spent will go toward the St. John Foundation, which provides financial support for the operation and continued

growth of St. John Health System. Lucky Lamons, the foundation president, looks forward to an event that blends philanthropy and fun into one exceptional evening. “St. John Street Party brings a unique flavor to the opportunity of fundraising, to benefit the health care needs for those we serve through St. John Health System,” he says. “In addition to fundraising for important St. John programs and initiatives, Street Party serves as a valuable ‘friend-raiser’ to inform party guests and the communities about programs and services available through St. John Health System.” The event runs from 7 to 11 p.m. For details, visit stjohnhealthsystem.com.

IN TULSA PERFORMANCES THE CHEROKEE MAIDENS AND SYCAMORE SWING IN CONCERT June 1 PAC Rising from deep

BOK THRIVES The BOK Center is on a hot streak: In the most recent Pollstar Top 200 Arena Venues based on ticket sales, it ranked No. 11 in the United States and No. 35 in the world. In addition, the BOK was the highest ranking arena in North America managed by SMG, which oversees more than 230 facilities. June keeps that momentum rolling with several big-name concerts. June 1 welcomes Roger Waters, one of Pink

Floyd’s founding members. The English singersongwriter embarks on his Us+Them Tour ahead of his new album, out June 2. Journey comes to the stage June 5 to play adored hits like “Don’t Stop Believin’” and “Faithfully.” The band was formed in 1973, but its continued relevance in rock music sets an unusual precedent. Country fans can rejoice: Luke Bryan comes to the BOK on June 10 and Chris Stapleton arrives June 22. Both present a mixture of new and classic hits from their vast discographies. Visit bokcenter.com for tickets.

TRAVIS WALL’S SHAPING SOUND June 9 PAC Through his Emmy

musical roots in America’s Heartland, the Cherokee Maidens and their star-studded band, Sycamore Swing, pay homage to the past. Think Bob Wills meets the country cousins of the Andrews Sisters. tulsapac.com

Award-winning work on So You Think You Can Dance, Travis Wall has established himself as one of America’s favorite choreographers. tulsapac.com

TULSA YOUTH CABARET PRESENTS: SONGS ABOUT TEENAGE LIFE, LOVE AND HOPE June 2 PAC Tulsa Youth Cabaret

Rutland is inspired by a Janis Ian composition recorded by Mel Torme in the early 1980s.

is a musical theater troupe comprising the most talented youth singers in Greater Tulsa. Participation in the group is by invitation only. tulsapac.com

TULSA PROJECT THEATRE PRESENTS: LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS June 2-4, 8-11 PAC Little Shop of Horrors is

a horror-comedy rock musical based on the 1960 cult classic film of the same name. The Faustian tale follows a hapless floral shop worker who raises a strange plant that feeds on human flesh and blood. tulsaprojecttheatre.com

CONCERTS

classical, romantic, comedic and tragic. tulsapac.com

SUMMERSTAGE TULSA PRESENTS: FLYIN’ WEST June 2-3 PAC Flyin’ West takes place

after the Civil War, when many former slaves, anxious to leave the South and the increasing disappointments and dangers of Reconstruction, took advantage of the Homestead Act to build new lives for themselves. summerstagetulsa.org

88 KEYS & ME June 9 PAC Using nothing but a

grand piano, Jeremy Stevens tells the story of how that instrument changed his life. 88 Keys and Me is a raucous romp through his life as he explores all the virtues of the piano —

SILLY HABITS WITH JANET RUTLAND June 10-11 PAC Silly Habits with Janet tulsapac.com

PIQUE THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS: SEEKING SHELTER June 15 PAC Seeking Shelter is an

original show about seemingly invisible people: the homeless. Through storytelling, song and dance, performers shed light on the plight of our homeless population and give voice to our marginalized communities. tulsapac.com

TULSA OPERA PRESENTS: THE SNOW QUEEN June 17 PAC On the heels of

acclaimed European performances in Hamburg, Dresden and Venice and a two-year, sold-out run at the Berlin Comic Opera, Tulsa Opera presents the U.S. premiere of The Snow Queen, a fairytale by Pierangelo Valtinoni delighting adults and children. tulsaopera.com

CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS PRESENTS: MATILDA THE MUSICAL June 20-25 PAC Winner of 50 international awards, including four Tony Awards, Matilda the Musical is the story of an extraordinary girl who, armed with a vivid imagination and a sharp mind, dares to take a stand and change her own destiny.

celebrityattractions.com

CONCERTS ROGER WATERS June 1 BOK CENTER Roger

Waters’s Us + Them is his first outing since The Wall. Previews suggest you will be gobsmacked.

bokcenter.com

TECH N9NE June 1

CAIN’S BALLROOM Tech N9ne has set July 30 as the release of Something Else album. The high-powered collection has “Fire,” “Water” and “Earth” sections with guests from different genres and eras. cainsballroom.com

PHOTO COURTESY BOK CENTER

VINCE NEIL June 1 HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO Hear the legendary

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

sounds of Motley Crue as Vince Neil performs.

hardrockcasinotulsa.com

PATTI LABELLE June 2 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO Classic rhythm and blues, pop standards

and spiritual sonnets have created the unique platform of versatility that Ms. Labelle is known and revered for.

riverspirittulsa.com

COLT FORD June 3 CAIN’S BALLROOM Proceeds from

this concert will benefit the Oklahoma Central Foundation, which offers scholarships to high school seniors and college students.

cainsballroom.com

VINTAGE WILDFLOWERS June 4 PAC Acclaimed for

instrumental prowess, onstage charm and soulful vocals, Vintage Wildflowers has an enthusiastic legion of fans with a vibrant Celtic, folk and bluegrass blend. vintagewildflowers.com

THE STRUMBELLAS June 5 CAIN’S BALLROOM When


JOURNEY June 5 BOK CENTER Through all its phases and eras, twists and turns, Journey has seen its music become more popular as the years go on. The roadie who suggested the band’s name truly had a vision.

bokcenter.com

FLUX PAVILION June 6 CAIN’S BALLROOM Flux

Pavilion is Joshua Steele, a one-man orchestra with the ability to sing and play a variety of instruments. It’s obvious that music comes naturally to Steele. cainsballroom.com

BROWN BAG IT: TULSA ROCK QUARTET June 7 KATHLEEN WESTBY PAVILION Contemporary

performs old classics and new hits. bradytheater.com

LUKE BRYAN June 10 BOK CENTER Award-winning country superstar Luke Bryan is on his Huntin’ Fishin’ And Lovin’ Every Day tour.

bokcenter.com

1964 ... THE TRIBUTE June 10 PAC Since the early 1980s,

1964 … The Tribute has entertained audiences all over the globe with what Rolling Stone magazine has called the “Best Beatles Tribute on Earth.” tulsapac.com

SOMO June 13 CAIN’S BALLROOM Ultimately, it’s

Joseph Somers-Morales’s intimate, infectious, irresistible music that makes everyone remember the name SoMo.

cainsballroom.com

CHRIS STAPLETON June 22 BOK CENTER Troubadour

tunes performed on classical instruments makes for a great night of music. tulsapac.com

SAMMY HAGAR June 7 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO For

almost 40 years, Sammy Hagar has been one of rock music’s most dynamic, prolific artists. riverspirittulsa.com

BUSH June 7 BRADY THEATER Combine Gavin Rossdale, Chris Taynor, Corey Britz and Robin Goodridge and you get a Brit-rock powerhouse.

Chris Stapleton is on his All American Road Show tour with guests Anderson East and Brent Cobb. bokcenter.com

DWIGHT YOAKAM June 22 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO Dwight Yoakam

has sold more than 25 million albums worldwide. He is also a 21-time nominated, multiple Grammy Award winner.

riverspirittulsa.com

AN EVENING WITH JOE JACKSON June 24 BRADY THEATER Enjoy

bradytheater.com

a night of smooth jazz with English performer Joe Jackson. bradytheater.com

MIIKE SNOW June 9 CAIN’S BALLROOM Miike

STONEY LARUE June 24 CAIN’S BALLROOM Us Time

Snow is in a playful mood. The three-man group’s second album, Happy To You, is orchestral and electronic with a mysterious Jackalope symbol.

is a collection of songs from native Texan Stoney Larue, reflecting personal dreams.

NORAH JONES June 9 BRADY THEATER After

Adkins’s baritone has powered countless hits and sold over 10 million albums, cumulatively.

cainsballroom.com

selling more than 50 million albums worldwide, Norah Jones

cainsballroom.com

TRACE ATKINS June 29 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO Trace riverspirittulsa.com

ART FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL June 2 BRADY ARTS DISTRICT This

year-round, monthly event features all of the galleries, studios and museums as well as the part-time galleries in various shops opening their doors. The Art Crawl is held on the first Friday of the month from 6 to 9 pm.

thebradyartsdistrict.com

EXAMINING CHANGE: THE NORTH TULSA ART PROJECT June 2-22

LIVING ARTS The North Tulsa Art Project is a collaborative, cross-disciplinary series of events comparing North Tulsa in the early 1990s and now, 25 years later. livingsarts.org NOIRE III June 2-22 LIVING ARTS This features

works by artist Nathan Lee. livingarts.org

ROOTED, REVIVED, REINVENTED: BASKETRY IN AMERICA June 2-July 23

108 CONTEMPORARY This

traveling exhibition, curated by Josephine Stealey, chronicles a history of American basketry from its origins in Native American, immigrant and slave communities to the contemporary fine-art world.

108contemporary.org

TAC@HARDESTY ARTS CENTER June 2-July 23 AHHA TULSA The Tulsa

Artists Coalition showcases its work during this extended exhibition. ahhatulsa.org

PAPEL CHICANO DOS June 4-Sept. 3

PHILBROOK This exhibition

presents the work of 26 artists from the renowned Chicano art collection of Cheech Marin. philbrook.org

ART EXPLORATIONS June 13 GILCREASE Those with early

stage Alzheimer’s disease and their care partners can attend a gallery discussion of art pieces followed by a hands-on art

ART

Portraiture for a New Republic A common problem in American museums is the lack of portraiture containing people of color. It’s even rarer when these works are created by people of color. The Oklahoma City Museum of Art strives to fill that gap with its newest exhibition, Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic. Michael Anderson, director of curatorial affairs at OKCMOA, says one should expect a “career-spanning survey featuring one of the country’s most exciting contemporary artists. Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic begins in the early 2000s with various experiments in portraiture ... and moves through the monumental canvases of African American men and later women which draw on older European sources from the 15th century onward.” Anderson finds one piece in the series particularly compelling. “I really admire his video piece activity for both individual and groups. gilcrease.org

SUMMER ART CAMP June 19-Aug. 11

GILCREASE The museum and the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education offer camp programs for students ages 5 to 12. gilcrease.org

Smile (2001), which presents four smiling AfricanAmerican men at a time, gritting their teeth as they hold their grins for as long as they can physically stand it,” he says. “To me, this work says a great deal about the cultural demands placed on this community of young men to put on artificial and what seem to me to be purposefully non-threatening expressions.” The exhibition runs June 17-Sept. 10. Visit okcmoa.com for more information.

HOPE AND FEAR June 24-Nov. 12

PHILBROOK To commemorate the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into World War I, Philbrook presents wartime propaganda art from the museum’s permanent collection. philbrook.org

SPORTS TULSA DRILLERS BASEBALL June 1-4, 10-17, 22-25 ONEOK FIELD Catch the

team in action for several homestands. Grab a hot dog and a beer and relax as the Drillers chase victory. milb.com

FAIR MEADOWS HORSE RACING June 8-11, 15-18, 21-25 EXPO SQUARE This free,

family friendly event excites all audiences. The track is north of the Fair Meadows Simulcast Facility. exposquare.com

PINTO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP HORSE SHOW June 12-24 EXPO SQUARE The Pinto

Horse Association hosts the world’s largest gathering of this breed at its 52nd annual world championship. pinto.org

COMMUNITY JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM Through June 2

DENNIS R. NEILL EQUALITY CENTER Learn about the role arts and culture can play in healing racial divides in the United States and around the world. jhfcenter.org

WOODCARVING AND FOLK ARTS FESTIVAL June 2-3 CENTRAL PARK COMMUNITY CENTER, BROKEN

ARROW This annual event for more than 30 years features carvers, turners, woodworkers, wood burners and scroll sawyers from across the country. eowa.us GEM FAIRE June 2-4 EXPO SQUARE This is one

of the largest gem, jewelry and bead shows in the United States. gemfaire.com

ROUTE 66 BLOWOUT June 3 DOWNTOWN SAPULPA

BY KEHINDE WILEY COURTESY OKCMOA

a crowd feverishly sings along with the last chorus upon first listen, the song connects. This is what happens when The Strumbellas play “Spirits” live for the first time, the first single from their forthcoming album, Hope. cainsballroom.com

Come to this historic area on Route 66 for the 27th annual car show and festival. route66blowout.com

BOOTS AND BBQ FESTIVAL June 3 CLAREMORE EXPO CENTER This event is a

TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY The Chautauqua

movement is historical tourism at its finest. It’s your chance to time travel to another era and meet some of history’s most illustrious characters.

ahhatulsa.org

TULSA BALLOON FESTIVAL June 14-18 12700 E. 41ST ST. This is

sanctioned Kansas City-style barbecue cookoff with top competitors.

claremorereveille.com

TULSA PRIDE BLOCK PARTY AND PARADE June 3-4 DENNIS R. NEILL EQUALITY CENTER Tulsa Pride, in its 35th year, is the longest running gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender festival in Oklahoma. It incluces the Tulsa Pride Parade, Tulsa Pride Celebration and Picnic in the Park. okeq.org

THE GREAT WEST: COWBOYS AND CATTLE TRAILS June

one of the largest free events in Oklahoma, and aspires to become the second largest ballooning event in the United States. tulsaibf.com

JUNETEENTH June 15-18

DOWNTOWN TULSA Juneteenth is the

oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Celebrations will include music, art and fun. tulsajuneteenth.org

6-10

CHARITABLE EVENTS BROOKSIDE RUMBLE AND ROLL June 1 BROOKSIDE The motorcycle

parade and street party feature the Fabulous Mid Life Crisis Band and benefit Make-A-Wish Oklahoma.

brooksidetheplacetobe.com

RAINBOW 5K GLO RUN June 2 621 E. FOURTH ST., TULSA The Rainbow Run

benefits Tulsa Pride and Oklahomans for Equality, whose mission is to seek equal rights for LGBTQ individuals and families. okeq.org

TOUR DE CURE/STEP OUT: WALK TO STOP DIABETES June 3

HILLCREST HOSPITAL SOUTH This event has routes available for all skill levels.

JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Where & When

Become inspired by those joining you as you make an impact for the American Diabetes Association.

C U LT U R E

RED EARTH RETURNS

diabetes.org

TOP OF THE TOWN June 8 DECO DISTRICT Top of the

Oklahoma is home to 39 sovereign tribal nations, and the Red Earth Festival strives to honor each of their unique histories and cultures during its June 9-11 event. The celebration brings parades, performances, food, music, art, tournaments and a plethora of other activities to downtown Oklahoma City. The festival has run for 31 years, but the variety of entertainment options never stales. Festivities begin with a parade, which serves as a colorful taste of what’s to come. “The parade draws hundreds of entries including tribal leaders, princesses, floats, bands, military organizations and motorcycle clubs,” says Eric Oesch, deputy director at Red Earth, Inc. The weekend includes an “Ask the Expert” panel that provides guests an opportunity to bring their Native American art and historic pieces for free evaluation. A powwow draws hundreds of dancers, singers and participants to fill a dance arena at Cox Convention Center. New this year is a Native American Handgame Tournament. This festival is by no means only for those with Native American heritage; Oesch notes that people from all backgrounds visit and enjoy the festivities. “Every year the Red Earth Festival attracts guests from throughout the world,” he says. “While walking through the artist display booths, it’s not uncommon to hear people speaking German or a variety of other languages as Red Earth is a destination event for many European travelers looking to experience the native cultures that make Oklahoma and the United States unique.” Visit redearth.org for an event schedule.

Town highlights a variety of downtown buildings, with views from many top floors and rooftops, all to benefit Child Care Resource Center. ccrctulsa.org

BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT June 12 TULSA COUNTRY CLUB Golfers, sponsors and

youth enjoy the greens to support the six Tulsa Salvation Army clubs.

salarmytulsa.org

HOLLAND HALL GOLF TOURNAMENT June 13 PATRIOT GOLF CLUB Join Holland Hall in its annual

benefit for the school’s students and programs.

THE CRITERION Don’t miss

hollandhall.org

criterionokc.com

THE NEXT BIG THING June 15

AT THE DRIVE IN June 13 THE CRITERION This

CENTER This event premieres a record-setting, world’s largest object designed for Big Brothers Big Sisters Tulsa. bbbsok.org

criterionokc.com

COX BUSINESS

CENTER POLO CLASSIC June 23-24 MOHAWK PARK The Center

for Individuals with Physical Challenges’ Polo Classic offers food, drinks, silent auction, a kids’ zone and merchandise tents. tulsacenter.org

REBUILD THE BLOCK June 24

CITYWIDE Join Rebuilding Together Tulsa for a neighborhood beautification and cleanup effort.

oklahomashakespeare.com

OKC BROADWAY PRESENTS: JULIANNE AND DEREK HOUGH: MOVE BEYOND TOUR June 4 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Following sold-out successes of its 2014 inaugural run and a fan-demanded sophomore run in 2015, Move Live on Tour, featuring powerhouse duo Julianne and Derek Hough, is back with an all-new experience.

okcbroadway.com

PAW PATROL LIVE: RACE TO THE RESCUE June 10-11 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Before the Great Race between Adventure Bay’s Mayor Goodway and Foggy Bottom’s Mayor Humdinger, Goodway is nowhere to be found. Paw Patrol to the rescue. okcciviccenter.com

ONE-MAN STAR WARS

TRILOGY June 14-18 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL In honor of this year’s

40th anniversary of the original Star Wars, CityRep, an award-winning professional troupe, has an audience and family favorite from a long time ago.... cityrep.com

PHOTO COURTESY RED EARTH

your favorite Pink Floyd songs performed by this British tribute band. criterionokc.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

MIKY CHANCE June 5 DIAMOND BALLROOM This German duo embarks on its Blossom Tour.

DWIGHT YOAKAM June 22 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Dwight Yoakam

has sold more than 25 million albums worldwide. He is also a 21-time nominated, multiple Grammy Award winner. choctawcasinos.com

SMASH MOUTH June 24 FRONTIER CITY THEME PARK This year, venerable

multi-platinum and Grammy-nominated band Smash Mouth celebrates the 20th anniversary of its debut album. frontiercity.com

festival is a free gift to the Norman community. jazzinjune.org

SOUNDBITES June 27 KERR PARK, DOWNTOWN SoundBites

IRON MAIDEN June 19 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Iron Maiden’s

successful The Book Of Souls World Tour returns to North America.

chesapeakearena.com

is an acoustic concert series happening. Enjoy a food truck (or bring your own lunch), yard games and an acoustic set from a local musician. downtownokc.com

ART

A New Republic presents an overview of the artist’s career. The exhibition highlights the range of Wiley’s production, starting with examples of early paintings executed around the time of his 2001 residency

at the Studio Museum in Harlem. okcmoa.com

THE COMPLETE WPA COLLECTION Through July 2 OKC MOA The collection

features extensive landscapes and depictions of U.S. labor, infrastructure and industrial development. okcmoa.com

SPORTS

travelok.com

UPSTAGE THEATRE PRESENTS: GREASE

ENDEAVOR GAMES June 8-11 UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA, EDMOND Athletes with

MITCH PARK AMPHITHEATER Enjoy the

uco.edu/wellness

upstagetheatreok.com

ALL-AMERICAN KIDS’ FISHING DERBY June 10 ARCADIA LAKE Kids age

July-themed festival combines on-the-water fun with food trucks, RiverSports Adventures, whitewater rafting and racing throughout the day.

June 15-17

story of summer lovers Sandy and Danny.

GABRIEL IGLESIAS June 23 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Born in Chula

Vista, California, Gabriel Iglesias is the youngest of six children raised by a single mother in Long Beach. During his childhood, he developed a strong sense of humor to deal with the obstacles he faced. riverwind.com

LYRIC THEATRE PRESENTS: MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET June 27-July 1 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL This Tony Awardwinning musical is inspired by the night when Sam Phillips brought together icons Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley.

lyrictheatreokc.com

CONCERTS BRIT FLOYD June 4 THE CRITERION Enjoy all

JAZZ IN JUNE June 15-17 BROOKHAVEN VILLAGE/ ANDREWS PARK, NORMAN This hip jazz

KEHINDE WILEY: A NEW REPUBLIC June 17-Sept. 10 OKC MOA Kehinde Wiley:

PERFORMANCES

William Shakespeare, sweet tempered daddy’s girl, Bianca, can have her pick of suitors, but not until her sister, acid-tongued Kate, can be married off. Rising to the challenge is new man in town, Petruchio, but can he match Kate jab for jab?

Texas-based band has been rockin’ since 1993 and is ready to bring down the house.

rebuildingtogethertulsa.org

IN OKC OKLAHOMA SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK PRESENTS: THE TAMING OF THE SHREW June 1-24 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS In this comedy by

this Danish heavy metal band.

decades worth of iconic indie hits comprise the band Modest Mouse. diamondballroom.net

THEORY OF A DEADMAN June 10 FRONTIER CITY THEME PARK Enjoy one of

diamondballroom.net

Oklahoma’s best theme parks and see Theory of Deadman in its concert on the lawn.

MODEST MOUSE June 8 DIAMOND BALLROOM Two

VOLBEAT June 10

frontiercity.com

physical disabilities compete in a variety of sports.

STARS AND STRIPES RIVER FESTIVAL June 24 BOATHOUSE DISTRICT, OKC This Fourth of

five through 15 are welcome to compete to see who can catch the largest fish.

riversportokc.org

EQUALITY RUN June 17 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS This run features

Marina, through the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife, has tagged 25 large mouth bass, one of which will lead to a $1 million prize.

edmondok.com

1-mile, 5K and 10K options along the Oklahoma River.

REEL-A-MILLION June 24 LAKE THUNDERBIRD STATE PARK Calypso Cove

calypsocovemarina.com

COMMUNITY H&8TH NIGHT MARKET June 2 HUDSON AVENUE, DOWNTOWN This annual cycling event is part of the community-friendly Pro Am Classic. h8thokc.com

SPIRIT OF OKLAHOMA STORYTELLING FESTIVAL June 2-3 EASTLAKE CUMBERLAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH At the 11th annual

festival and celebration of storytelling, everyone is encouraged to enjoy the personal experience of wonder.

territorytellers.com

WINES OF THE WEST June 3 STOCKYARDS CITY Sample

some of Oklahoma’s finest wines and get your “wine passport” stamped for a chance to win prizes. stockyardscity.org

PEACE, LOVE AND GOODWILL FESTIVAL June 4

MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Hear live music

from many of Oklahoma’s best artists and bands. Tempt your taste buds at the lineup of more than 30 food trucks, or shop at local vendors.

peacelovegoodwill.org

DEADCENTER FILM FESTIVAL June 8-11 DOWNTOWN The

deadCENTER film festival showcases more than 1,000 indie films from around the world. deadcenterfilm.org

BRIGHTMUSIC SPRING CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL June 8-13

127 NW SEVENTH ST. Enjoy

modern and classical chamber music from American composers. brightmusic.org


jazz festival to celebrate the area’s jazz heritage, culture and history. okcjazzfest.com

furry friends to win awards like Best in Show and the National Puppy Title. iabca.com

LIBERTYFEST June 24-July 4 CITYWIDE, EDMOND LibertyFest has 10

OKLAHOMA CITY BURLESQUE FESTIVAL

libertyfest.org

June 16-17

LYRIC THEATRE Oklahoma’s largest burlesque event features a variety in entertainment from around the world. okcburlesquefest.com OKC JAZZ FEST June 22-25 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL/BICENTENNIAL PARK Jazz and Deep Deuce

have played important roles in Oklahoma since the 1940s. If for no other reason, there should always be an Oklahoma City

events to excite, entertain and dazzle audiences.

KITEFEST June 24-25 1501 W. COVELL ROAD, EDMOND This festival

includes many events for experienced flyers and novices. Paint the sky with hundreds of kites, flown by anyone who wants to “go fly a kite.”

libertyfest.org/kitefest

PLAZA BEER FESTIVAL June 28

PLAZA DISTRICT Try tons of tasty craft brews.

plazadistrict.org

CHARITABLE EVENTS MAYORS’ GOLF TOURNAMENT June 5 OKLAHOMA CITY GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB This annual

tournament raises funds for other OKC Beautiful events, which beautify the community and instill those passions in the city’s youth. okcbeautiful.com

CAMPAIGN CELEBRATION June 15

CIVIC CENTER HALL OF MIRRORS It’s time to

party with Allied Arts at their Campaign Celebration. alliedartsokc.com

PURPLE SASH GALA June 17 THE CRITERION The evening features dinner, live and silent auctions and a New York-style fashion show to benefit the YWCA in OKC. ywcaokc.com

AROUND THE STATE

COMMUNIT Y

All Genres Welcome The revered OK Mozart Festival has hosted some of the country’s greatest classical musicians, but this year the event will branch out to accommodate music enthusiasts in an array of genres. “In response to a changing audience during the years, the primarily classical festival has strayed a little from its roots to include crossover and discovery concerts that allowed for a little more diversity,” says Susan Albert, director of marketing and public relations at OK Mozart. “This year’s concert lineup is the most diverse, with new genres such as country and pop.” Among the varied artists in the lineup are the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra, the Miro Quartet and Trio Solari for classical fans. Wilson Phillips and Michael Martin Murphey bring pop and country to the table. Chris Mann, star of the touring Phantom of the Opera, will sing Broadway favorites with help from the Bartlesville Symphony Orchestra.

PHOTO BY MARK BLUMER COURTESY OK MOZART

INTERNATIONAL DOG SHOW June 10-11 OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR PARK Cheer on your favorite

The Burchfield Brothers bring inspirational music to the mix, and the Modern Oklahoma Jazz Orchestra offers up some tunes as well. For kids, an outdoor concert featuring Disney favorites played by Tulsa Symphony is a can’t-miss. The festival also offers up two world premieres. “Tulsa Symphony Orchestra commissioned Jerod Tate’s ‘Muscogee Hymn Suite’ and Brightmusic’s Trio Solari commissioned ‘Homage to Haydn’ by Joseph F. Tyldesley,” Albert says. The event runs June 6-18 in varying locations. Visit okmozart.com for a complete listing.

PERFORMANCES

Sam Spade. Sammy faces his biggest challenge with the sudden fall and disappearance of the jolly Humpty-Dumpty, who apparently has had no enemies.

brings live theater to the area by providing a varied program of plays, musicals, assorted dinner theaters and melodrama’s over the course of each year.

miamilittletheatre.com

MIAMI LITTLE THEARE PRESENTS: MYSTERIOUS CASE OF THE FALLEN EGG June 15-17 COLEMAN THEATRE, MIAMI Sammy Scoop is

Shakespeare’s most gruesome works in a pavilion under the stars. gaslighttheatre.org

duncanlittletheatre.com

a private investigator in the tradition of his grandfather, Samuel Shovel, and his father,

SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK PRESENTS: TITUS ANDRONICUS June 23-25 GOVERNMENT SPRINGS PARK, ENID See one of

JERRY SEINFELD June 24 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Don’t

miss the chance to see this long-time American comedian. winstarworldcasino.com

CONCERTS SAMMY HAGAR AND THE CIRCLE June 2 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Don’t miss

your chance to see Sammy Hagar and The Circle. winstarworldcasino.com

NIGHT RANGER June 2 GRAND CASINO HOTEL AND RESORT, SHAWNEE Pick up tickets to catch a live set by Night Ranger.

grandresortok.com

TALLGRASS MUSIC FESTIVAL June 2-3 SKIATOOK See quality

bands amid spacious, beautiful campgrounds. There’s covered

seating for guests.

tallgrassmusicfestival.com

PATTI LABELLE June 3 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE The Queen

of Rock and Soul inspires with her performances. winstarworldcasino.com

AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSIC FESTIVAL June 8-10 GROVE CIVIC CENTER Two

areas allow separation of competitions and entertainment from warm-up and jamming, with even more happening at Snider’s Camp on Grand Lake.

grandlakefestivals.com

PHOTO BY KATHRYN PEASTER COURTESY WOOLAROC

DUNCAN LITTLE THEATRE PRESENTS: 35 YEARS OF MEMORIES June 9-11 DUNCAN LITTLE THEATRE The troupe

K I D S / FA M I LY

AWoolaroc TIME FOR PLAY Museum and Wildlife Preserve offers

events for people from all walks of life be they trail rides or animal barn visits but Kidsfest gives its target demographic away in the name: This one’s for children. “For almost 30 years, Woolaroc has hosted Kidsfest, and it has quickly grown into a tradition for families in the area,” says Kaci Fouts, director of strategic planning at the museum. The

event keeps children entertained and mentally stimulated with its array of activities. “Kids of all ages can enjoy inflatable toys, games, adventures, crafts, pony rides, train rides and traveling magicians,” Fouts says. “We will also host a number of craft booths on the grounds as well.” The festival runs June 24-25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Children 11 and under, plus members of Woolaroc, get in free. Visit woolaroc.org for more information. JUNE 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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DURANT Listen to popular country tunes, old and new, with Jamey Johnson.

Muskogee Music Festival, G Fest, features dozens of acts, including the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the Red Dirt Rangers and Creedence Clearwater Revisited. gfestmuskogee.com

choctawcasinos.com

JAMEY JOHNSON June 17 CHOCTAW CASINO RESORT,

choctawcasinos.com

AARON LEWIS June 24 CHOCTAW CASINO RESORT, DURANT See Aaron Lewis live on tour for his newest album, Sinner.

SPORTS SOUTHWEST DISTRICT 4-H HORSE SHOW June 1-3 STEPHENS COUNTY EXPO CENTER, DUNCAN This

GOLDEN EAGLE POKER RUN June 10 EUFAULA COVE MARINA Over $40,000 in

show features all disciplines, including pleasure, class and trail. stephenscountyok.com

cash prizes are up for grabs at Lake Eufaula’s original poker run. visitlakeeufaula.com

ROUTE 66 TRIATHLON June 3-4 EL RENO An Olympic-style

BIG BASS BASH June 10-11 GRAND LAKE Test your

triathlon will be the featured race as it is home to Oklahoma State Triathlon Championship. triokc.org

fishing skills at the Big Bass Bash. The biggest bass wins $70,000.

WHAT ABOUT BOB CHUCKWAGON RACES June 8-11 3610 HAYES ROAD, WILBURTON An event like

OKLAHOMA D-DAY PAINTBALL EVENT

none other in Oklahoma has a concert and chuckwagon races. travelok.com

O’REILLY AUTO PARTS OUTLAW NATIONALS June 9-10

OTTAWA COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS It’s going to

be a record year; 13 monster trucks are booked and ready for battle. mapmotorsports.com

midwestfishtournaments.com

June 12-17

THE BUNKER, WYANDOTTE Thousands

of participants from around the world will participate in beach landings and army transports with real military tanks. ddaypark.com

OKIE NOODLING TOURNAMENT June 16-17 WACKER PARK, PAULS VALLEY The world’s largest

noodling contest is an annual event for handfishing enthusiasts. okienoodling.com

COMMUNITY SUMMERFEST June 1-3 WAGONER Celebrate

with food, fun and celebration at this annual event. thecityofwagoner.org

MAGNOLIA FESTIVAL OF OKLAHOMA June 1-3 CHOCTAW EVENT CENTER, DURANT This festival has run annually since 1997 and promises plenty of family fun. magnoliafestival.com

ROUTE 66 DAYS June 1-4 ACKLEY PARK AND RETAIL DISTRICT, ELK CITY More

than 40 merchants offer sales prices at this family-friendly outdoor event. visitelkcity.com

REAL OKIE CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL June 2 HONOR HEIGHTS PARK, MUSKOGEE Enjoy cold brews made by Oklahoma companies.

friendsofhonorheightspark.org

EL RENO SMALL TOWN WEEKEND June 2-4 EL RENO Enjoy a swap meet, car shows, drag races and kids’ hot wheel races at this family event. ercruisers.com

SUNFEST June 2-4 SOONER PARK, BARTLESVILLE Sunfest has

first-class music, art, food and activities. bartlesvillesunfest.org

CHISHOLM TRAIL AND CRAWFISH FESTIVAL June 3

KIRKPATRICK FAMILY FARM, YUKON This event

celebrates Cajun culture with food, history and music. cityofyukonok.gov

CHIHULY: IN THE GALLERY June 3-Aug. 14 CRYSTAL BRIDGES, BENTONVILLE, ARK. Dale

Chihuly, an American sculptor, is globally renowned for his ambitious site-specific installations in public spaces. crystalbridges.org

PONCA CITY HERB FESTIVAL June 3 CANN MEMORIAL BOTANICAL GARDENS This

festival won the Oklahoma Department of Tourism’s Outstanding Event prize. poncacityherbfestival.net

FOR EVEN MORE

EXCITING EVENTS

IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND

THE STATE, HEAD TO

OKMAG.COM.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017

PHOTO BY NIKO TAVERNISE

Where & When

G FEST June 15-17 HATBOX FIELD, MUSKOGEE The second

FILM AND CINEMA

Bombshells, Hitmen and Heists As summer begins, options abound for movie lovers in Oklahoma.

Around Town

You can be forgiven for not knowing the name Frank Tashlin. Despite being one of the great directors of film comedies and possessing a style all his own, he never achieved the name recognition of other comic directors like Preston Sturges. Correct your oversight by getting out to Bachelors and Bombshells: Six Films by Frank Tashlin, running at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art on June 15, 17 and 18. Tashlin’s manic style draws inspiration from the world of cartoons (he began his career as an animator, where he worked on several Looney Tunes shorts), and he channels that irrepressible energy into biting satires of the vacuity of the entertainment business. The absolute essential here is Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?, a merciless skewering of Hollywood and Madison Avenue, playing in a new restoration. But all the films are worth catching, especially since two of the films, Bachelor Flat and the underrated Artists and Models, are being screened from 35mm prints. Tashlin’s flair for bright colors will pop all the more on original film stock.

At Home

It’s become a running joke among my friends how much I love John Wick, the gloriously excessive Keanu Reeves action film from 2014. It’s a nonstop shot of adrenaline, and slyly goofy to boot. This year’s sequel, John Wick: Chapter 2, goes bigger and broader, and though it loses some of the original’s satisfying leanness in the process, it is still absolutely worth owning when it comes out on video June 13.

After unretiring from the world of underground hitmen to avenge the murder of his dog in the first film, round two sees John Wick facing off against a kingpin to whom he owes a favor. When things go awry, Wick must gather the strength to face off against practically the entire shadow world of assassins he keeps trying to leave behind. Filled with bravura action sequences, John Wick: Chapter 2 will leave you wowed. It’s not for the faint of heart, though it earns every iota of its R rating with its harsh, unromanticized violence.

In Theaters

As in many years, this June’s blockbuster season appears filled with unpromising sequels and tepid reboots. Who among us was genuinely clamoring for a third entry in Pixar’s least well regarded series, Cars? Or the umpteenth film in Michael Bay’s never ending hymn to product placement, Transformers: The Last Knight (we should only be so lucky!)? Or a reboot of a reboot (The Mummy), with an aging Tom Cruise in the lead? But like a beacon of hope, there’s one bright spot at the end of the month: Edgar Wright’s Baby Driver. Best known for his trilogy of action-comedy films with Simon Pegg and Nick Frost (Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, The World’s End), Wright brings kinetic camera work and a deep well of pop culture lore to his films. Baby Driver follows a getaway car driver (Ansel Elgort) as he navigates the world of crime, and it’s sure to be one of the most fun films of the summer. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS


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C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

Pat Pos

P

really pushed us in that direction was the awareness that 85 percent of the brain’s volume develops by the age of 3. The research is just overwhelming that what happens positively or negatively those first few years has a tremendous impact on outcomes later in life.

at Potts has a long history with nonprofit organizations. Besides cofounding the Potts Family Foundation in Oklahoma City with her husband, Ray, she also founded the Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits, serving as president and CEO for more than 20 years. In addition, she was a founder of the Oklahoma Women’s Coalition and has served on many other boards in her attempt to help the community. While one of the earliest goals of the Potts Family Foundation was to help provide the support nonprofits need, the foundation has also focused on early childhood development and started the 25 by 25 program with the goal of raising Oklahoma’s ranking of early childhood well-being into the top 25 states in the country by 2025. We recently talked to Potts and got her thoughts on …

… the growth in the Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits.

… starting the Potts Family Foundation.

In Oklahoma, around 30 percent of our people vote. It is really among the lowest in voter engagement among all the states. I think that’s one thing people can do to be involved and make a difference. They can do more to make themselves knowledgeable about the issues and get in touch with their legislators and let them know that they care and what they’re concerned about. Democracy really depends on hearing from all walks of life.

I think part of starting the foundation had to do with this whole concept of paying it forward. We’ve been fortunate and really wanted to share to help others. We also wanted to share that with our kids and ultimately our grandkids, and so when we started the foundation, we set it up with that in mind. The majority of our board is community leaders, and that has really raised our game tremendously because we brought in so many outstanding leaders in our state. They have helped us expand our direction and our effectiveness.

When [the Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits] started, it had three employees and … less than $100,000 total budget. Now it has grown to where it is recognized all over the state as the premier expert in nonprofit management. They reach out to urban as well as rural nonprofits. Their membership now is well over 1,000, and I am also really proud of the fact that the Center for Nonprofits has, over the years since they’ve been offering the standards courses that certify that organizations have the policies and practices in place that should help assure their excellence, had 862 organizations statewide go through that. So the quality of the nonprofit sector has definitely been raised by the work that they’ve done.

… how any adult can help the community.

… the 25 by 25 program.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

As we had grant requests come in, we noted that we were spreading ourselves too thin and not focusing on the root cause of a lot of the problems we were trying to address. As we learned more, we came to the conclusion that we needed to focus on early childhood, and so our staff has been very involved in that over several years. I think one of the things that

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2017


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