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BBQ

GET FIRED UP FOR OKLAHOMA'S BARBECUE CULTURE

Summer Travel

FIND SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE IN OUR GUIDE


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Features June

42 The Heartland of BBQ

2016 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XX, No. 6

Oklahoma is known as home to some of the best barbecue in the country for good reason. We talk to local barbecue pit masters to give you some tips for your own barbecue and find out what makes Oklahoma barbecue so great.

48 Oklahoma Socialites Whether you’re into cooking or comedy, Oklahoma is full of talented people – and many of them are accessible through your computer or phone by social media. Oklahoma Magazine talks to some of the social media stars in the state to help you decide who to follow.

56 What to do This Summer

Art lover, history buff or nature lover, Oklahoma Magazine has ideas for your next summer road trip. From art museums to kayaking, Oklahoma and the surounding area has something for everyone.

65 2016 Top Doctors

42

An Oklahoma Magazine exclusive! We are proud to present the state’s Top Doctors for 2016, chosen by their peers in an extensive survey process.

The Heartland of BBQ

Special Sections

Oklahoma Magazine dives into one of the most popular and famous foods in the state.

June 2016

JUNE 2016

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read

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Socialites FOLLOW THE STATE’S TOP SOCIAL MEDIA STARS

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Wedding Guide Seniors

THE HEARTLAND OF

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GET FIRED UP FOR OKLAHOMA'S BARBECUE CULTURE

Summer Travel

FIND SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE IN OUR GUIDE june cover 2016.indd 9

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MORE PHOTOS: ON THE COVER: OKLAHOMAN TREY KENNEDY IS KNOWN FOR HIS VINE VIDEOS ON A VARIETY OF TOPICS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.


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Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

11

11 The State

The month of June has come to be the Sooner State’s most popular cycling month. Oklahoma Magazine focuses on three popular twowheeled events that encourage both fun and fitness.

16 18 20 22

Culture OK Then The Insider Oklahoma Business

25 Life & Style 26 28

32 34

38 40

Guide Living Space

Explore a Tulsa designer’s 4,500-square-foot dream home that features a functional combination of old world traditional and contemporary architectural details, furnishings and accessories.

34

Destination Fashion

Oklahoma Magazine welcomes summer with a focus on the latest in swim apparel and accessories. Check out some of the hottest looks for 2016.

Health Scene

91 Taste

Now in their 10th season, the Living Kitchen, located off Route 66 in Depew, is hosting another successful season of treating guests to a gourmet, certified-organic eight-course dinner – and showing off their goats.

92 94

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Local Flavor Focus on Food

97 Entertainment

The Oklahoma City Museum of Art opens its exhibit showcasing the works for Henri Matisse, the G Fest holds its inaugural festival in Muskogee this month. No matter what your interests are, there’s something for you in Oklahoma.

98 In Tulsa/ In OKC 102 Cinema

104 Closing Thoughts

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Connect to physicians and services 24/7. With more than 1,000 providers and 80 locations, Saint Francis Health System provides the community’s largest and most comprehensive network of healthcare services for adults and children. Whether you are looking for primary care or a physician specialist, imaging services or urgent care, Saint Francis Health Link is available 24/7 to help connect you with the care you need.

Healthcare for life. saintfrancis.com


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

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Your Day Made Perfect Let Oklahoma Magazine help you plan your special day! The Oklahoma Wedding Show will return Saturday, January 14.

The Oklahoma Wedding Show and issue are returning January 2017. Booth spaces are now available.

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Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2016 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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CLOSING THOUGHTS VIDEO INTERVIEW

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Tava Maloy Sofsky is a filmmaker who worked for over 20 years in Los Angeles in the entertainment industry and has since moved back to Oklahoma to act as director for the Oklahoma Film + Music Office in Oklahoma City. As director, Sofsky manages all aspects of the music and film presence in Oklahoma, bringing in talent from all over the world to produce entertainment using Oklahoma production crews, musicians and actors. Oklahoma Magazine connects with Sofsky on the set of the taping of the upcoming season of American Ninja Warrior to discuss her involvement in the organization, the programs her office is offering for local talent and the future of film, television and music projects coming to the state. “There is a resurgence happening in the state with artists and crew members moving home to expand their careers to new film and music production companies born every month,” Sofsky says. To see a web-exclusive video interview with Sofsky and find out all the fun things the Oklahoma Film + Music Office has planned in 2016, visit okmag.com.

Oklahoma

OK

DON’T FORGET THE SUNSCREEN PHOTO SHOOT

Go behind-the-scenes of our annual swimwear photo shoot with web-exclusive video footage from our recent in-studio photo session. See the latest styles in bathing suits and accessories in our expanded galleries, including outfits not seen in the print edition. Head to okmag.com to get yourself pumped up for swimsuit season.

Socialites In this issue of Oklahoma Magazine, we expand our coverage on social media with our feature story, “Oklahoma Socialites.” We spotlight over 20 online content creators who have earned a significant following on social media with their regular posts, tweets, Vines and pins in all genres. We tell you which comedians, storytellers, photographers and artists you should be following, all of whom have a direct connection to Oklahoma. With okmag.com’s expanded coverage, get direct links to all our socialites’ profiles, see embedded YouTube and Vine videos that play right off the page and scroll through Instagram feeds. For a deeper look at why these Oklahoma content creators’ numbers have risen above the ranks, read the online version of this month’s feature “Oklahoma Socialites” at okmag.com.

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S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

LET TER FROM EDITOR As the weather warms up and the days grow longer, many Oklahomans start thinking of their favorite summer activities: swimming, boating, golfing and all the other things Oklahoma has to offer that are better in warm weather. And nothing says summer better than barbecue. Oklahoma is famous for its barbecue. We’re right between cow country and pig country, as Burn Co. Barbeque pit master Nick Corcoran puts it, and the mix of styles, combined with hard work, has led to one of the leading barbecue cultures in the country. While there are many barbecue restaurants all over the state to choose from, those who choose to try to make their own can find plenty of helpful people willing to give them some tips. We talked to a few barbecue cooks in the state and got a glimpse into the barbecue world this issue – from sauces to wood types and from the spirit of sharing that permeates the culture to the competitive barbecue festivals held every summer. Also in this issue, we’ve included a list of the top doctors in the state. The list is decided by physicians and can help take some of the stress out of choosing a doctor. I hope you enjoy the features and, as always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com Justin Martino Managing Editor


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Now A Network Provider For


State

MALCOLM MCCOLLAM OF TULSA SERVES AS THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TULSA TOUGH INC. AND IS ALSO A COMPETITIVE RACER.

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

PHOTO BY ADAM MURPHY

On the Road Again

R

The state gears-up for both leisurely and competitive fun and fitness as cyclists hit the open road on two wheels.

oad cycling has taken hold of Oklahoma – and what better way to experience everything that our great state has to offer than from the saddle of a bike? Although we definitely want to extend kudos to the hardcore, year-round cyclists, it appears that the month of June

Saint Francis Tulsa Tough

The much-anticipated Saint Francis Tulsa Tough will take over downtown Tulsa June 10-12. The three-day weekend cycling festival includes criterium races for both amateurs and pros, noncompetitive Gran Fondo rides and a family-friendly Townie Ride. Tulsa Tough strives to

has come to be the Sooner State’s most popular cycling month – primarily for the somewhat mild temps and predictable weather conditions. Regardless of skill level, body type or age, there are a variety of scheduled events providing two-wheeled fun and fitness for all. It’s prime time for cycling in this neck of the woods – so saddle up!

deliver the full riding experience to everyone – from training wheels to racing rims. Tulsa Tough began in 2006. “At that time I had been involved in the running and cycling community as both a participant and organizer of local events,” says Malcolm McCollam, executive director of Tulsa Tough. “Because of that prior experi-

ence, I was one of the people who became involved in creating this new concept.” Each year, Tulsa Tough has grown in size and popularity and is now known across the state, across the nation and beyond as a prime racing opportunity for competitive cyclists and professional teams. Twenty-year-old Skyler Mackey JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

of Tulsa is currently on the road to a future as an elite, professional cyclist. “My father was the one who got me into cycling seven years ago,” Skyler says. “After racing mountain bikes for a few years, another one of Tulsa’s elite cyclists, Bryan DuVall, told me to go out and watch Tulsa Tough. After watching the races, I knew that I had to race road – and Tulsa Tough. This started me on the path to where I am today.” “I have not raced all that long – going on six years, and it started with the mountain bike,” says Skyler’s father, Brian Mackey, adding that it was Skyler’s fault that he got into racing in the first place. “I was not about to sit and do nothing at the races while he raced!” “I must say that, at first, I couldn’t have cared less about Tulsa Tough. I was a mountain biker that really did not like the idea of a road bike,” says Brian, who is now a Category 3 Masters racer. “If my son, Skyler, never got me to go and watch with him, I can say that I would have missed out on some of the best times I have had racing my bike – I race all three days now.” Proud father Brian has this to say about son Skyler: “Work ethic – this kid has had it since he threw his leg over the bike. No matter the conditions outside or the roadblocks put in front of him, he is sticking to his plan. He has had to make sacrifices to get where he is now. Seeing him surpass me on the bike has been a true treasure.” Skyler says that professional cycling takes sacrifice and major dedication. His goal is to race Paris-Roubaix, a professional road race in northern France, and to be able to make a living racing his bike. In addition to the races, Tulsa Tough offers the popular Gran Fondo – two challenging days of noncompetitive, fully supported, tour-style rides with three distances to choose from, 35 to 100 miles in length. All routes explore Tulsa and the surrounding rural areas, finishing each day at the heart of downtown just in time for the criterium races. Sharon Johndrow is a four-year veteran of Tulsa Tough and a member of the Saint Francis Tulsa Tough Divas, a noncompetitive, women’s cycling team. “Three years ago, Divas was started to coincide with Tulsa Tough as a way to draw attention to women’s cycling,” Johndrow says. “It is a program where the common goal is cycling, but more so for women to support each other in other ways too.” The Divas will participate in the Gran Fondos on Saturday and Sunday. “I will participate in the Medio, which is approximately 66 miles,” Johndrow says. “In 2015, we had nearly 3,000 total participants from 41 states and 14 countries. We hope to continue growing those numbers,” 12

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

THIS PAGE: PHOTOS COURTESY TULSA TOUGH INC. RIGHT: PHOTO COURTESY TENACITY.


McCollam says. “2015 was a pivotal year for us as we produced a second event, the Cyntergy Hurtland, and took steps to expand our activities beyond event production to youth programming, promotion of a public bike sharing network and development of a concept for a world class cycling facility in Tulsa.” Not only does Saint Francis Tulsa Tough guarantee a weekend of fun for both riders and spectators, it has a significant impact on the city’s economy. According to McCollam, “The last study we conducted was in 2013 and, at that time, the economic impact was conservatively estimated at $1.5 million.” Saint Francis Tulsa Tough is produced by Tulsa Tough Inc., a non-profit 501(c)(3) with the support of local corporations and foundations. Guidance for the event comes from an executive committee made up of area cyclists and business people. “Our mission is to elevate the profile of Tulsa and promote active lifestyles,” explains McCollam. “The event benefits all of Tulsa and its citizens by promoting a positive image of the community to those outside Oklahoma.” For more information, visit tulsatough.com. LAURIE GOODALE

TenaCity

The Oklahoma TenaCity is an all-ages, family fun cycling festival scheduled for June 3-5. The three-day event features the Oklahoma City Pro-Am Classic, the H&8th Night Market, a Fondo city tour and the “Y Without Walls,” a collaborative effort between the YMCA of Greater Oklahoma City and the Oklahoma City Community Foundation. “2016 marks the fifth anniversary of the

Oklahoma City Pro-Am Classic,” says Chad Hodges, team manager for DNA Racing Cycling Team. “The OKC Pro-Am is a criterium-style bicycle race that includes closed-off short courses where the participants do multiple laps at speeds averaging 25 to 30 miles per hour, making it a very spectator-friendly event.” The race will take place in Midtown on June 3, Film Row on June 4 and at Automobile Alley on June 5. Criterium cyclists have the opportunity to win over $45,000 in cash. “To celebrate our fifth anniversary, the OKC Pro-Am has earned a spot on the USA Cycling Pro Road Tour, the national calendar, which will draw professional cyclists from around the nation,” Hodges says. “It’s a true opportunity for Oklahoma to cheer on the top cyclists in the U.S.” The H&8th Night Market street festival will return as an annual event from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. on June 3 between NW 8th Street and NW 10th Street along Hudson Avenue and on NW 9th Street between Hudson and Walker avenues in Oklahoma City’s Midtown District. Along the market route, approximately 30,000 spectators will have a front row seat to the cycling action, Hodges says. For amateur cyclists who want to participate without competing in the races, the OKC Pro-Am Fondo offers three route options for riders of all ages and ability levels. “We are presenting a 12-mile district tour, a 30-mile mid-distance ride and a 58-mile trek touring the countryside as well as OKC neighborhoods,” Hodges says. All three tours begin at 8 a.m. June 4 and start and finish at the center of Film Row, Saturday’s racing venue. “These gran fondo-type rides are suitable for cyclists of all abilities and perfect for the whole family to ride together,” Hodges says. “Y Without Walls,” a mobile YMCA, will offer family activities, prize giveaways and safety lessons June 5 at the corner of NW 10th Street and Broadway Avenue. “If someone would prefer not to ride but still wants to be involved in the event, we’d love to have their support, and an event like this doesn’t happen without a strong volunteer staff,” says Hodges. Most volunteers work as corner marshals or crossing guards to help keep racers and spectators safe, Hodges says. There is also the opportunity to offer host housing to out-of-state athletes who will be in Oklahoma City for the weekend. People looking to volunteer or offer host housing can sign up at okcpac.com “Professional cycling teams often look to host housing to ease the fi-

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

nancial burden of continuous travel throughout the season,” Hodges says. “This is a great opportunity to get to know the athletes, get more familiar with the sport and really see what type of team and athlete preparation goes into a weekend of racing at the professional level.” For more information, visit oktenacity.com. SHARON MCBRIDE

“It was beyond my comprehension that I might be able to ride a bike that far,” says now-veteran rider Keith Reed of Perkins. This is a common statement made by riders who have accomplished the week-long, cross-state bicycle tour known as Oklahoma Freewheel, which is celebrating its 38th year this month, June 19-25 – rain, shine or wind. Reed has since completed five Freewheels – this year will mark his sixth. Founded in 1979, Freewheel has grown from a few hundred riders to as many as 1,000 riders who now enjoy a fully supported trek from the Red River to the Kansas state line. Trevor Steward of Stillwater was first introduced to Oklahoma Freewheel in 2013 when some of his friends participated in the tour. In November 2014, he was hired as the executive director of Freewheel Inc. and is now involved with every aspect of the tour. “The position of executive director is the only paid position we have, so I get to do almost everything. This includes talking each town into hosting the tour, getting riders signed up, promoting our tour at events across Oklahoma and the bordering states and managing our website and other media,” he says. “For over 30 years, Freewheel has been Oklahoma’s only cross-state cycling touring event,” proudly states Steward. “We are very excited that our 2016 tour is highlighting the Five Civilized Tribes of Oklahoma.” Host communities will include Madill, Coalgate, Wewoka, Okmulgee, Sand Springs, Claremore, Bartlesville and Caney, Kansas. The route changes each year. Distances traveled each day vary from 50 to 75 miles, with a few 100-mile (century) options thrown in for the hardcore cyclists. Riders camp in the rural host towns, and their gear is transported via semi truck while they ride to the next site. “My assistant, Ross Snider, is responsible for lining out the route. I honestly think he has ridden every road in the state, so he is very good at routing the tour,” Steward says. “We are expecting around 550 participants from all over the country. Last year, we had participants from 23 states and four countries, and I would expect the same this year.” Cyclists travel on public roads and highways, so the safety of the riders is of utmost importance. As any other vehicle operator, they are required to observe all state and local traffic laws. Two Oklahoma highway patrolmen ac

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

company the riders each day. Tom and Sylvia Brown, owners of Tom’s Bicycles in Tulsa, are two of the ride’s familiar faces and avid supporters. “I attended the very first Freewheel as a rider, and I have only missed three over the years,” Tom says. “As a bike shop, I have helped on the road since the mid-eighties.” Both Tom and Sylvia spend the week prior to the ride packing tires, tubes, bicycle parts, riding gear and other little things that the riders might need. “Tom takes care of all the tools and repair parts, and I take care of the non-repair merchandise – things people forgot to pack or that they have lost or broken,” Sylvia says. “I pack everything in gallon-size baggies so that the merchandise stays clean and dry. We have experienced several Freewheel evenings where storms pop up, so we have learned from our mistakes as far as merchandising.” Both wake up with the sunrise to assist riders with last minute details to get started on the day’s route. “I get on the road as soon as possible, looking for trouble, which I usually find quickly,” Tom says with a laugh. “Sometimes I’m a mechanic, sometimes I’m a cheerleader. The bike shops – usually there are three – follow the riders all day long, and then we set up in camp and work until dark.” Cyclists near Tulsa, Oklahoma City or Bartlesville can participate in organized training rides to prepare for the event, generally starting at five miles and gradually increasing to 60 miles or more. These rides begin each year in early March. “Other than riding all you can, I think it’s really important to ride a significant mileage about three days in a row,” recommends Reed. “And this may sound silly, but practice sleeping outside on a hot night and getting up early to ride. I’ve seen people that are very strong riders struggle because they don’t get enough sleep.” “Oklahoma is such a beautiful state, and the best way to experience it is by bicycle,” says Steward. “We have just about every type of rider – the slow and fast, the skinny and overweight, the young and old, and the new and veteran riders. As long as you and your bike can make it around 60 miles each day, you can ride Oklahoma Freewheel.” “I don’t have a competitive bone in my body, so I really enjoy the laid back atmosphere Freewheel provides,” Reed says. “Sometimes I ride fast (ish), and sometimes I take it easy, but I couldn’t care less who gets there first!” In closing Reed humorously states, “It’s cool to see old friends get together for this every year. I like to say ‘Freewheel is like a giant, rolling family reunion with one exception – everyone gets along!’” Visit www.okfreewheel.com for more info. LAURIE GOODALE

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA FREEWHEEL

Oklahoma Freewheel


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The State

REBECCA MARKS JIMERSON IS A KEY PLAYER IN THE COORDINATION OF TULSA’S JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION. PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

CULTURE

Heritage & Harmony Juneteenth brings people together to celebrate freedom and unity.

T

he Brady District springs to life each June with the sights, sounds and soul of the Juneteenth celebration. This year will likely be no exception with the packed weekend of events focusing on the theme “Heritage through Music and Art.” “This year’s theme derived from an unprecedented alliance of multiple community organizations working together to commemorate Juneteenth,” says event spokesperson Rebecca Marks Jimerson. “For the past two years, I have coordinated the event for the Martin Luther King Commemoration Society at Guthrie Green. Pleas Thompson, the president of MLK, had a vision to unify the event, and this year it is a reality.” Juneteenth, or Freedom Day, dates back to 1865 and celebrates the emancipation of African-American slaves in the Confederate South. The word comes from the combination of June and nineteenth, the day the news of their freedom finally reached the slaves in Texas. The announcement was made in Galveston, Texas by Union General Gordon Granger, who had traveled with

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

federal troops to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation – two years after it went into effect. The annual event is the oldest holiday commemorating the end of slavery in America. Today, Juneteenth is a celebration of human rights and an opportunity for everyone to reflect, rejoice and remember. “We commemorate the celebration of Juneteenth and the healing of the wounds endured by the 1921 race riot in our city,” Jimerson says. “The message must resonate for the call for equality of rights for all human beings. The past two years, the Tulsa community has embraced the celebration of Juneteenth immensely. Thousands have attended at the Guthrie Green. We have witnessed diverse community audiences and stage participation.” The 2016 event runs from Thursday, June 16 through Sunday, June 19. It kicks off at the Guthrie Green with a showing of The Real Juneteenth, a documentary about the history and perception of the holiday. The following night there will be a jazz and blues tribute concert for Wayman Tisdale. Tisdale grew up in Tulsa and was recruited to play basketball at the Univer-

sity of Oklahoma, where he was named All American three years in a row. He went on to have a successful music career as a jazz bass guitarist. Mike Fields, Jeremy Thomas, Eldridge Jackson and Julian Vaughn will all perform in memory of Tisdale, who passed away in 2009. On Saturday, Living Arts of Tulsa will present GAGE & NOIRE II, a showcase of spoken word, fashion, music and visual art that incorporates the history of the holiday and its enduring message of freedom and unity. Later that night, there will be a concert featuring Wise Men and Koolie High, Brandy and Soul Element, Val & Wall Street, and the All Star Band. The four-day celebration also includes an exhibit at the Woody Guthrie Center and tours at the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park. The event concludes on Sunday with a gospel brunch. “The summer’s events demonstrate a coming together of a diverse group of organizations lifting up the call through music and art for human rights equality intended for all God’s people,” says Jimerson. BETH WEESE


CULTURE

Celebrating Tribal Diversity Red Earth Festival’s organizers expect 30,000 visitors this year.

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atch. Eat. Dance. Shop. Learn. One of Native America’s biggest festivals returns to Oklahoma City July 10-12 for its 30th anniversary. This year’s Red Earth Festival, celebrating Native American art and dance, may be the biggest yet. The Cox Convention Center will be home to the three-day celebration. “The Red Earth Festival highlights the cultures that make Oklahoma says Eric Oesch, “I show in Santa Fe and New unique,” deputy director of Red York. The Red Earth festival Earth Inc., the festival’s easily competes with those primary sponsor. “There types of shows in sales and are 39 federally recognized tribes with headattendance.” quarters within our state’s borders. That’s more than any other state in the nation.” Around 26,000 people attended last year’s festival. This year, Oesch expects 30,000. More than 1,200 American Indian artists, dancers and singers from around the nation will converge on this year’s show, making Oklahoma City American Indian headquarters for three days. “Each tribal nation works diligently to keep PHOTOS COURTESY their languages and historical customs alive and RED EARTH FESTIVAL vibrant,” Oesch says. “Native cultures aren’t

just in the history books. They are living and vibrant cultures of today.” The Red Earth Festival was named by USA Today as one of the top 10 of its kind in the nation. It has won numerous awards and draws guests from around the world. “I show in Santa Fe and New York,” Choctaw painter Dylan Cavin says. “The Red Earth festival easily competes with those types of shows in sales and attendance.” Guests will be able to view the work of some of the country’s most celebrated American Indian artists. They’ll be selling contemporary and traditional examples of beadwork, basketry, jewelry, pottery, sculpture and paintings. “Oklahoma’s Native American art is very diverse,” Oesch says. “When people think of New Mexico or Arizona Native art, they immediately think of beautiful jewelry and black pottery. Oklahoma’s Native art is more diverse because our Native tribes come from all parts of the country.” While a number of the country’s top Native American artists will be showing at the festival, it’s far more than just an art show. Red Earth’s dance competition is a breathtaking kaleidoscope of colors featuring hundreds of Native American dancers in their distinctive tribal dress. The competition is one of the most prestigious in the nation. Red Earth opens with a spectacular parade on the morning of Friday, June 10. The streets of downtown Oklahoma City will brim with Native American pride, featuring tribal members from around the country, many in their tribes’ distinctive regalia. A sunrise breakfast on Saturday gives visitors the opportunity to quiz a panel of Native American jewelry makers about the craft and how to find good examples of it. It’s a new addition to the festival that has both jewelry makers and collectors excited. Lots of Oklahomans have Native American art on hand that they’ve picked up but don’t know much about. On Sunday afternoon, visitors will be treated to an “Ask the Experts” panel modeled after the popular Antiques Roadshow. While the experts won’t be appraising items, visitors will be able to learn if the items are authentic, where they come from and their significance. Guests can bring up to three items, and the event is free with admission. “Many of the tribes in Oklahoma were relocated from different parts of the country. What we do at the festival is celebrate that diversity,” Oesch says. “When you come to the festival, where we have so many Oklahoman artists, their artwork reflects their tribal heritage. The diversity at the festival is totally unique.” PAUL FAIRCHILD

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

OK THEN

Remembering Pawnee Bill

The Pawnee Bill Ranch is a beautiful example of a time long past.

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PHOTO COURTESY PAWNEE BILL RANCH

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uring a visit to the Pawnee Bill Ranch in Pawnee, a climb to the top of the rock observation tower provides an expansive view of the present-day ranch as well as the hundreds of acres of Blue Hawk Peak, the former showplace home of Gordon William “Pawnee Bill” Lillie. Gordon Lillie, who gained the nickname “Pawnee Bill” while living and working with the Pawnee Indians, started his famous Wild West Show in 1888. Lillie was also a successful businessman, rancher, banker and entertainer. He lived with his wife, May, in a 14-room mansion on the hillside. “Looking back, we can safely say that Wild West shows created the public’s perception of the American West,” says Erin Brown, historical collections specialist at the Pawnee Bill Ranch. “It’s a stereotype that was perpetuated in movies, literature and television. It started with the Wild West shows.” Pawnee Bill Ranch, west of Tulsa and south of Ponca City, welcomes guests year round. It is a site of the Oklahoma Historical Society and offers a museum detailing the life of Pawnee Bill, May Lillie and the history of Wild West shows. There is an original turn-of-the-century cabin complete with dirt floors, a blacksmith shop and a large barn housing wagons and farm implements. Visitors can tour each and

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

get a glimpse into the past – what it must have been like more than 100 years ago in Oklahoma. The grounds also include covered picnic areas complete with a children’s fishing pond. The ranch keeps the spirit of Pawnee Bill’s Wild West Show alive through a re-creation every June. “We consider the show to be representative of the best of Pawnee Bill, including acts and original language taken from primary source material,” says Brown. The show provides “family-friendly entertainment at its wildest.” Crowds are told to expect trick riders, trick shooters and trick ropers. It’s not in the name, but there’s surely a trick to the square dance on horseback as well. And guests shouldn’t be alarmed by a stagecoach robbery or two. It comes with the territory. The historic mansion has been fully furnished with his personal belongings. Beautiful silk wall tapestries, crystal ware and gold inlaid tile speak of a couple who liked to live well and had the means to do so. The Lillies also enjoyed entertaining company and had many guests – including some recognizable names. But the humans who lived on the ranch aren’t the only ones represented. Gordon Lillie was an advocate for the American bison and established a herd on his ranch in the early part of the 20th century. A present-day herd of bison calls the ranch home as well. Guests can drive through their pasture for an up-close look and, if they’re lucky, get a look at the new calves born this season. From the vantage point on the observation tower, it is clear that the Pawnee Bill Ranch is a beautiful example of a time long past. Erin Brown describes why places like this are important to preserve. “Historic sites have the ability to connect people across time and space,” she says. “They make history accessible to a broader public. They make history come alive.” BONNIE RUCKER


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The State THE INSIDER

Charley Gardner’s Angels The local musician will be accompanying three of his favorite female vocalists in a show this month.

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CHARLEY’S ANGELS: SANDY GARDNER, CINDY CAIN, CHUCK GARDNER AND JANET RUTLAND PHOTO COURTESY CHUCK GARDNER

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ere are a couple of things you should know about Chuck Gardner’s Charley’s Angels show, set for Sunday, June 5 at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame’s Jazz Depot in Tulsa. First, the only person who consistently referred to pianist, arranger and composer Gardner as “Charley” was his old Uncle Lyle from Minneapolis. Second, Gardner has dubbed the concert “Charley’s Angels” instead of “Charlie’s Angels” because he doesn’t want anyone to think it’s a direct representation of the well-remembered late ’70s-early ’80s TV show that made actresses Kate Jackson, Jaclyn Smith and, especially, Farrah Fawcett household names. “However,” he says, “the inference is there. In fact, Janet told me she wanted to be Farrah Fawcett, but I said, ‘No, Tony’s already applied for that.’” “Janet” is Janet Rutland, one of the three angels working with Gardner on his show. The other two are Cindy Cain and Sandy Gardner, Chuck’s wife of 38 years, who’ll also play bass. “Tony” is veteran Tulsa drummer Anthony Yohe, a longtime musical cohort of the Gardners and one of the least likely people in the known universe to be mistaken for Farrah Fawcett. “I’ve been wanting to do a concert with these three gals for a long time,” Gardner says, “and I thought ‘Charley’s Angels’ would make a good framing device to bring us all together. Each one has her own following, which is one of the reasons I selfishly picked them. They’ll all bring in their different crowds. “As a piano player,” he adds, “I get more of a kick out

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

of accompanying professional singers than I do just playing piano by myself or with a trio. It all comes from when I was in the Air Force, doing the Serenade in Blue Armed Forces Radio shows at Capitol Records in Hollywood. That was during the Vietnam era. I had the great opportunity of working with Rosemary Clooney, Anna Maria Alberghetti, Gisele McKenzie, all sorts of different singers. That’s when I really started enjoying this accompanying business.” He’d gotten his first taste of it about a decade earlier, while stationed at Hickam Field in Hawaii and leading an Air Force group called the Pacificaires. He’d joined the Air Force band program only a few years earlier, in 1957, after working in various musical outfits as a young civilian in his home state of Iowa. Then, in the very early 1960s, an up-and-coming jazz-pop vocalist who’d just recorded her first album for Capitol Records visited the Hawaiian Islands. Her name was Nancy Wilson, and she was scheduled to appear on a Honolulu television show. The station, however, didn’t have a pianist on its staff. “They called us at Hickam, wanting to know if we had a piano player who could come out and back her,” Gardner recalls. “I was sent over, and I remember she was just gorgeous, but I had no idea who she was. “She told me, ‘I have this new arrangement, and I’d like to do it with you.’ I said okay, and we rehearsed it once and then did it on the show, which was just a local Honolulu TV show. The song was called ‘Guess Who I Saw Today,’ and I got to thinking, after I later heard her recording of it, that I might’ve been the first person ever


to play it in public with her.” Nancy Wilson was far from the only recording artist Gardner worked with during his time in the Islands. “There was something called ‘Sail with the Stars’ that Matson Lines had with cruise ships going back and forth from Honolulu,” he says. “They would bring, oh, Vic Damone or Mel Torme over, and when they got to Hawaii they’d do a couple of shows before sailing back and the Pacificaires would back them. I remember Hoagy Carmichael coming over, which was great. I really had some wonderful opportunities there.” The latter part of the decade found Gardner back on the mainland, not only working with and ultimately leading the U.S. Air Force Academy Band, the Falconaires, but also playing other gigs in and around his home base of Colorado Springs, Colorado. That’s where he met one of the three singers who’ll be appearing with him on the Charley’s Angels show. However, their initial meeting at the Academy’s Officers’ Club, did not go well. “I did not have a job that particular night, so the leader of Sandy’s band called me to play with them,” Gardner remembers. “I knew they had a vocalist, and I thought, ‘Oh, brother. Here we go.’ I wasn’t very happy about subbing with some singer I didn’t know.

“She was thinking the same thing, because she didn’t have her regular piano player and didn’t know what to expect from me. So when we met we really didn’t hit it off right away because that stigma was there with both of us.” He laughs. “But then, after about three or four tunes – I guess ‘Girl from Ipanema’ was really the one that did it – we looked at one another and the earth moved. That’s how it all started.” Their professional association quickly became personal, and within a few weeks Chuck and Sandy were engaged. They also continued to play music together, with Sandy learning bass from a member of the Falconaires. “She is so talented,” he says. “She plays piano; she has a better ear than I do. She can pick up a bass and play with any country band by ear with no problem whatsoever. She reads well, too. She’s very well-rounded, and as a musician she’s very underrated – although I realize I’m prejudiced.” Married in 1978, the two worked professional gigs in several more states before landing in Tulsa, Sandy’s hometown, in the early 1990s. Soon, they’d met and started playing with both Anthony Yohe and Cindy Cain. “The thing about Tony isn’t just his drumming, which is great,” notes Gardner. “It’s his dependability. I can always depend on him to be there early, to be dressed properly – all

these little things you have to worry about with musicians.” He laughs again. “Tony’s always there and a perfect musician, as far as I’m concerned.” He has similar praise for Cain, one of the first vocalists he worked with after settling in Tulsa. “Cindy has that sultry blues-type low voice, along with great stage presence,” he says. “It’s a unique voice that’s immediately recognized as ‘Cindy’ and no one else. The way she sings a song goes right to the soul.” And the third member of Charley’s Angels, he adds, “has great musicianship and a wonderfully pleasant voice. We played back in the ’90s at the old Adam’s Mark [Hotel], with the late bassist John Rigney. She has a big following, but I still think she’s underrated, or maybe taken for granted: ‘Well, there’s Janet, she sings.’ Yes, she does, but she really sings.” Charley’s Angels, featuring Chuck Gardner on piano, Anthony Yohe on drums, and Sandy Gardner on bass and vocals, along with vocalists Janet Rutland and Cindy Cain, is set for 5 p.m. June 5 in the Jazz Depot, 111 E. First St. in downtown Tulsa. Tickets are available at JazzHallTickets.com or by calling 918-928-JAZZ. JOHN WOOLEY

OPERATION

ORANGE High school students from across the state will experience a day in the life of a medical student at Operation Orange, Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine’s annual summer camps. The camps, hosted at partner instititutions across the state in June, introduce students to careers as physicians and spark an interest in medicine. Students participate in hands-on demonstrations, including studying the anatomy of a heart, lungs and brain and performing intubations using a simulator. Operation Orange is sponsored in part by the Cherokee Nation and Stillwater Medical Center. For more information about Operation Orange, visit www.healthsciences.okstate.edu/operationorange.

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The State

OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Dynamic Duos

Running a business with a spouse or loved one comes with pros – and a few cons.

B TRAVERS AND LAURIE MAHAN ARE THE DYNAMIC DUO BEHIND TRAVERS MAHAN, A RETAIL MEN’S APPAREL BUSINESS IN TULSA.

PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

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atman and Robin. Clark Kent and Lois Lane. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Laverne and Shirley. Sometimes working with a partner is simply the way to go. Of the dynamic duos making it work in the world of Oklahoma businesses, Sheryl Chinowth and Lee Cohen are definitely in the running. The married pair started Chinowth & Cohen Realtors in 2004 and oversee eight offices in the Tulsa area with over 430 agents. Cohen works in the commercial division, while Chinowth focuses on residential. “We’re qualified in both

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

areas, but our business passions are separated by types of real estate,” Chinowth says. What doesn’t separate this realtor pair is their mutual trust. Running a business with others is a balancing act, which can be made even more difficult when a loved one or spouse is the partner. But, according to Chinowth, “As with all businesses, you must work with someone you can trust. Forming a business partnership with anyone is a type of marriage. As with a marriage or growing a business, a solid foundation of trust makes the partnership even stronger.”

Trust is an essential element for working couples, according to Suzie Symcox, executive vice-president and chief administrative officer at First Fidelity Bank in Oklahoma City. Symcox, who works with her husband Lee, the president and CEO, says, “In our situation, we work as a team. We have split responsibilities. While we have those specific areas of responsibility, it is always a great advantage to be able to bounce ideas off someone that you can trust and that knows the situation.” Respect is another key to working together in a business, according to Travers and Laurie Mahan, the married duo behind Travers Mahan, an apparel retail business based in Tulsa and in Dallas. “We don’t always see things the same way, and some decisions highlight our differences,” says Travers Mahan. “But we respect each other’s opinions because we both have a lifetime of knowledge of the fashion industry.” Like Chinowth and Cohen, the Mahans divide their work duties according to ability and interest. “Travers handles the day-to-day decisions in sales and operations while I focus on the marketing, public relations and product development,” Laurie Mahan says. Even the best working duos encounter difficulties. Both of the Mahans emphasized having the business and personal relationships work smoothly. If anything is upset in the personal area, says Travers Mahan, “the business can suffer.” According to Suzie Symcox, in working with a spouse, “The only disadvantage that I can think of is that it is 24/7.” All three couples note the fact that dividing up responsibilities according to personal skill is essential to their success. “We have in essence split the bank and tried to take advantage of our individual strengths,” Lee Symcox says. “I am much more of a numbers person, and Suzie has more of a creative mind. While we have the primary responsibilities, it is a very collaborative situation. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are almost 4 million family-owned businesses in the U.S., and 1.4 million of those are run by a husband and wife team. Dynamic duos are, indeed, paving new, successful roads in the work world. SHAUN PERKINS


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THE McKNIGHT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY will be a world-class epicenter for the arts, attracting celebrated national and international programs featuring notable performing arts productions and artists. The center will allow the university and the center’s supporters to express — and be recognized for — their passion for the arts on a global stage. Construction for the project is underway. Oklahoma State University thanks Billie and Ross McKnight for their transformational gift.


Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

PHOTO BY MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY | SETTING BY RICHARD NEEL INTERIORS

Take your style outdoors

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The soft glow of candles sets the mood for summer relaxation.

ummer days in Oklahoma may be hot, but when the sun sets and the night cools down, take advantage of the mild temps and move your style and your entertaining outside. Whether you are enjoying a simple glass of wine alone or a sit-down dinner with friends and family, outdoor lamps and lanterns, landscape lighting, vintage string lights or even the simple glow from a candle flame – natural or LED – can create a relaxing evening ambience that is hard to beat. This summer, refresh your outdoor living space with bright ideas and up-to-date looks for the deck, patio and garden. Enjoy!

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

GUIDE

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Life & Style

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016


L I V I N G S PA C E

Building A Dream House

Tulsa designer considers furnishings in her home’s floor plan. By M.J. Van Deventer • Photos by Darshan Phillips

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LEFT: THE HOME IS CHARACTERIZED BY THE SIMPLICITY OF DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURAL THEMES, NEUTRAL COLORS, AND A MIX OF ANTIQUE WOODS AND CONTEMPORARY CHROME AND GLASS. RIGHT: THE 4,500-SQUARE-FOOT HOME FEATURES A SPACIOUS ENTRY FOYER.

terized by the simplicity of design, arah which includes repetitive architecMcPhail tural themes, a neutral color palwas enviette and a pleasing mix of antique sioning her dream home woods, sparked by contemporary chrome and glass. long before she and her husband found “Consider how you want their ideal location to build in to live inside your home. Tulsa. Make sure your furnishings “I always will fit your floor plan.” knew I wanted to design my dream “I researched a lot of design elehome, even while I was majoring in interior design at ments through the years. I wanted the University of Oklahoma,” a home that had clean lines, would be transitional and very functional. Sarah says. “Our first ‘starter Durability was also important with home’ was an exercise in children at home,” Sarah notes. restraint. I knew then I would Sarah wanted her family’s home have to design our home to be to be a showcase for found objects, satisfied. The south Tulsa area we ranging from art and sculpture to found is family-friendly. I wanted family treasures. Various settings to build a home that could grow in the home serve as a stage for the with our family.” collection of design accessories The two-story home is characJUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

TOP: THE WHITEAND-BLACK KITCHEN FEATURES A BLACK WALNUT CENTER ISLAND – A FAVORITE GATHERING PLACE. LEFT: AN ARCHED WINDOW ADDS ARCHITECTURAL DRAMA TO THE OPEN LIVING ROOM. RIGHT: THE HOME’S DINING AREA FEATURES A TRADITIONAL DINING TABLE AND WHITE LEATHER CHAIRS.

Sarah has acquired during her career. She particularly enjoys the juxtaposition of old world traditional and contemporary architectural details, furnishings and accessories. The spacious entry foyer in the 4,500-squarefoot home reveals her artistry with mixing design periods. A contemporary landscape painting, “Golden Moments” by Jamie Kirkland, complements an heirloom cuckoo wall clock carved from Germany’s Black Forest wood. It belonged to her paternal grandmother and is priceless to Sarah. A contemporary Z-shaped chair adds a modern touch, as does a metal coat rack by designer Tom Dickson. “It’s an architectural feature when not serving as a coat rack,” Sarah says. An arched opening leads from the entry hall into the open living room, kitchen and dining area, providing a feeling of cozy ambience. An arched window adds architectural drama to this room. The neutral color scheme includes

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

an off-white sectional sofa, accented by two chestnut colored saddle leather chairs with wing frames and down-filled cushions. An adjacent den includes an office and children’s playroom. Sarah’s love for mixing architectural periods is classic in the small dining area. A traditional round dining table is teamed with white leather chairs, laced up the back. Nearby, a dark wood cabinet made from an East Indian door frame houses family heirlooms. “The cabinet was one of the first antique pieces we purchased for our home,” Sarah says. The white-and-black kitchen is a portrait of sleek efficiency. A black walnut center island is a favorite gathering place, especially for the children. The Ikea chrome and black plastic bar stools are “a durable necessity for children,” Sarah adds. Other notable features are a tiny chrome light bar created by the Ingo Maurer Company, which hangs above the

kitchen’s center island. An African bull mask presides over the kitchen’s work area. Sarah found the unusual mask at SR Hughes, where she is on the design staff. Sarah loves the warmth of the white oak floors featured throughout the home. They are complemented by white walls, achieving the crisp, pristine look Sarah hoped to achieve with her design. “I’m really happy with this house,” Sarah says. “It’s very functional. The fabrics are durable. The rugs hide any mess. There’s nothing the children can’t touch. Everything works well. I considered the furnishings in the floor plan. I built the home from the inside out. The twin sofas dictated the size of the living room.” As a designer, Sarah tells others planning their dream home: “Consider how you want to live inside your home. Make sure your furnishings will fit your floor plan.”


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Life & Style D E S T I N AT I O N

Adventures in Southwest Canada

With a mixture of Victorian charm and highexcitement outdoor experiences, Vancouver and Victoria hold something for almost everyone.

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trip to Vancouver and Victoria, British Columbia is filled with beauty and adventure. This area of Canada is characteristically Victorian with its details and charm. A convenient and pleasant way to tour these areas is by rental car from Vancouver to Victoria Island via ferry so that you have transportation access to activities. You can also fly into Vancouver International Airport or take a car, RV, bus, ferry or train. Make sure you have passports and proper identification to enter Canada.

Vancouver Lodging

Shangri-La Hotel, Hotel Blu and Delta Vancouver are downtown hotel options with a range of nightly rates.

Activities and Restaurants

First day in Vancouver, rent a bike for sightseeing and have dinner at Kobe Japanese Steak and Seafood House in downtown Vancouver. Another day, take a free shuttle to Grouse Mountain (only a twenty-minute drive from downtown) for an unforgettable gondola ride to Breakfast with the Bears, in which you’ll participate in the bears’ morning feeding with wildlife rangers. Harbour Air Floatplanes provides a twenty-minute tour over the city, landing in Horseshoe Bay. Stay and enjoy the charming village center of Horseshoe Bay for its wonderful restaurants and shops.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

A second day’s itinerary for the sporty tourist would include Ecomarine Paddlesports Center for scenic kayaking in the English Bay. The sight of kayaks in the bay is a personal favorite example of this area’s beauty. The wine enthusiast will appreciate a trek to Metro Vancouver Wine Country showcasing the famous ice wine (eiswein) at the Lulu Island Winery, 25 minutes south of Vancouver in the historic fishing town of Richmond. Capilano Suspension Bridge, Vancouver Aquarium and Science World are thrilling ways to experience Vancouver’s natural treasures. Visit tourismvancouver. com for more information.


Attractions

CHASE CLASEN/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The ivy-covered Fairmont Empress Hotel is the focal point of the busy harbor. Built in Edwardian architectural style, this historic hotel is known for its tradition of secret-blend tea and scones in the grandiose Tea Lobby. The Royal British Columbia Museum and the Parliament Building contain art galleries dedicated to the region’s indigenous people. Butchart Gardens, open year round, is one of the world’s renowned gardens and a must see on your itinerary. Culture and history can be found at Craigdarroch Castle Historic House Museum, an impressive Victorian castle built by a wealthy coal baron.

Victoria

Transportation and Lodging

Activities

Personal favorites are the zip line adventure at AdrenaLine in Sooke National Rainfor-

GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

DOUG SCHNURR / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

The ferry ride to Victoria Island is jaw-dropping. You will pass by islets, boats and even helicopters bringing people and materials into this remote wonderland. Pacific Grand Hotel, with a large pool and gym, is located next to the Parliament Museum and main plaza and provides access to all of the area’s excitement. Victoria Marriott is another hotel option on the Inner Harbour. The view of the lighted marina can be seen from the hotels around the inlet. Shops, cafes, international restaurants, galleries, street performers, pedicabs and horse-drawn carriages adorn the plaza. Enjoy a meal at the Sticky Wicket Pub. Inner Harbour is the centerpiece of this picturesque town, and the Victorianera architecture gives British Columbia’s capital city a very British reputation. A threeday stay is recommended for sightseeing in Victoria. If you opt to not take a rental car, guided tours of Victoria are available via car, boat, horse drawn carriages, double decker buses and scenic floatplanes. CVStours.com has more information.

est and whale watching through Prince of Whales high-speed outdoor adventures. A thrilling Zodiac boat ride will take you to watch the whales swim and jump. On the ride back to the harbor, you will see seaplanes, cruise ships, sailboats and kayaks. A personal caution for tourists is to balance your day with museums and one adventure excursion. The high energy of both zip lining and whale watching in one day is overwhelming, so plan accordingly. The uniqueness of Victoria is its bustling harbor plaza with its artistic vibe and stunning scenery of the vessels in the bay. The pulse of the music and lights and a very pedestrian-friendly layout is the magnetic charm which attracts tourists to food stands, coffee shops, Irish pubs and pedicab rides. In even a short stay, you can experience the sights and sounds of Victoria ranging from amazing florals, costumed poets, steel drum bands and the spray of water on boat rides. Charm galore!

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

FA S H I O N

Don’t Forget the Sunscreen

Check out some of this summer’s hottest looks in swim apparel and accessories. Oklahoma sun-worshippers will be getting their “cool” on with the latest in flirty suits, shades and other stylish beachwear. CHANEL BLACK CAT-EYE SUNGLASSES, $449, VISIONS. ANNA & AVA GOLD BANGLE BRACELET, $30, MICHAEL KORS STAINLESS STEEL AND BRASS LARGE HOOP EARRINGS, $65, GB COLORBLOCK BRALETTE TOP, $34, GB TAB SIDE BOTTOM, $36, DILLARD’S. TORY BURCH ELLA PACKABLE NYLON AND LEATHER TOTE, $225, TORY BURCH MARION QUILTED LEATHER T-STRAP SANDAL, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JOIE SABLE DOUBLE-STRAP LEATHER SANDAL, $150, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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STAR MELA LEXA EMBROIDERED JUTE TOTE, $200, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016


SPLENDID CHAMBRAY SHORT JUMPSUIT, $168, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. MAUI JIM TORTOISE SUNGLASSES, $279, VISIONS. MADA FELLA T-SHIRT, $48.50, MADDA FELLA SWIMSUIT, $75, SOUTHERN TIDE FLIPJACKS, $69.50, TRAVERS MAHAN.

J BRAND LIAT TANK TOP, $158, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MICHAEL KORS RAFFIA TOTE, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TORY BURCH POSITANO LACE-UP ESPADRILLE PLATFORM SANDAL, $350, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JOIE RAGNI LINEN PANTS, $198, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TART SHAELYNN LACE SHORT JUMPSUIT, $163, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MAUI JIM SILVER AVIATOR SUNGLASSES, $299, VISIONS. TOMMY BAHAMA BUTTON-DOWN SHIRT, $98, TOMMY BAHAMA SWIMSUIT, $58, SOUTHERN TIDE FLIPJACKS, $69.50, TRAVERS MAHAN. CHANEL ROUND FADE SUNGLASSES, $349, VISIONS. ANNA & AVA BLACK RIBBON STRAW HAT, $30, KENNETH COLE BEADED EARRINGS, $38, COCO REEF ST. LUCIA AURA RUFFLE BRA, $71, COCO REEF SMOOTH CURVES ADJUSTABLE SIDETIE BOTTOM, $43, DILLARD’S. STAR MELA CICI EMBROIDERED COTTON CHARM CROSSBODY BAG, $70, TORY BURCH MARION QUILTED LEATHER T-STRAP SANDAL, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

MAUI JIM AVIATOR SUNGLASSES, $299, VISIONS. SOUTHERN TIDE SEERSUCKER HAT, $30, MICHAEL’S T-SHIRT, $50, MICHAEL’S SWIMSUIT, $98, SOUTHERN TIDE FLIPJACKS, $69.50, TRAVERS MAHAN.

BCBGMAXAZRIA LAINIE CROSSBACK TOP, $78, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JOE’S HIGH-RISE DENIM SHORT, $145, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ROBERT CLEGERIE WOVEN BLACK/CREAM WEDGE, $550, ABERSONS.

JADETRIBE SMALL TASSEL POM POM BEACH BASKET, $138, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

CHANEL BLUE FRAME SUNGLASSES, $389, VISIONS. MICHAEL KORS STAINLESS STEEL AND BRASS LARGE HOOP EARRINGS, $65, GB LACE MOLDED HALTER TOP, $36, GB LACE HIPSTER BOTTOM, $38, DILLARD’S. MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION GABRIEL STRAW AND LEATHER BOX BAG, $258, TORY BURCH PRINTED RUBBER FLIP FLOP, $50, FRANCO FERRARI RIETI FLORAL SCARF, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


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3/17/16 11:23 AM


Life & Style

HEALTH

The Risks of Summer Fun

Enjoying the great outdoors is not without its obstacles. Take precautions for you and your family to stay safe and healthy.

T

he long days of summer typically bring extended time outdoors – enjoying a hike, camping or backyard gardening. But communing with Mother Nature can have its costs. Bug bites and skin rashes can range from a minor irritation to a need for medical intervention. Dodging a bee or a wasp is a seasonal dance that’s humorous to watch, but it’s not so funny if you get stung. While a honey bee can only sting once because it leaves its stinger behind, wasps can sting repeatedly. After coming into contact with these insects, it is important to be able to recognize whether you or someone you are with is experiencing a severe allergic reaction. “Bug bites and stings, although painful, are typically not severe. But they can be,” says Dr. S. Christopher Shadid, a family medicine physician with INTEGRIS Health in Oklahoma City. “Some people have severe allergic reactions to these. Concerning signs and symptoms may be: rash, shortness of breath, cough, a feeling of your throat closing up. If you have any of these, seek medical attention immediately. People who know they have these typical reactions should carry a medicine with them called an EpiPen. This can be injected after the initial bite or sting prior to emergent medical treatment.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

Commonly referred to as an insect, ticks are actually parasitic arachnids – meaning they feed off the blood of a host. And if that’s not enough to make your skin crawl, tick bites can be hazardous to your health as certain infected species carry diseases to humans, such as Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. While Dr. Shadid notes that Lyme disease can be a very severe illness, he most often treats patients for Rocky Mountain spotted fever. “There has not been a documented case of Lyme disease in the state of Oklahoma in many years. This is only seen in the New England states of the United States,” Dr. Shadid says. “For us here in Oklahoma, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the bigger tick-born concern. I diagnose this at least a few times every


SKIN CARE

SKIN CANCER AWARENESS

year. This presents typically with fever, rash and generally not feeling well. Lucky for us, both of these illnesses are treated the same.” Dr. Shadid shares that doxycycline is the most commonly used antibiotic for treatment, but it is not suitable for children under the age of eight. For younger children, there are other antibiotics that can be prescribed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tick species (if infected) that can potentially transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever include the American dog tick, Rocky Mountain wood tick and the brown dog tick. Lyme disease is transmitted to humans through infected blacklegged ticks. “It is very important to seek medical advice if having issues after being bitten by a tick,” adds Dr. Shadid. “Both Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Lyme disease can have long-term sequelae if not treated appropriately.” Most everyone has heard the old adage “leaves of three, let it be” in reference to poison ivy and poison oak. These poisonous plants are most commonly identified by having three leaves and can be found as a small shrub or a climbing vine. Poison ivy leaves are pointed and will be different colors based upon the season – red in the spring, green in the summer and then yellow, orange or red in the fall. Poison oak leaves are recognized for being shaped like an oak tree leaf. Both plants release an oil called urushiol, which upon contact can cause red, swollen skin, blisters and severe itching to those who are allergic. “Poison ivy and poison oak can be very difficult to treat,” Dr. Shadid says. “Often you can get by with over-the-counter steroid creams such as hydrocortisone, but typically these reactions can be so severe that you need oral steroids. In fact, just a general short course of oral steroids usually doesn’t do the trick either. The appropriate way to treat these reactions is with a longer course – two weeks of a tapered steroid. If this is not done appropriately, the reaction will classically come back with a vengeance.” After being exposed to poison oak or poison ivy, be sure to wash with warm, soapy water to help reduce the risk of spreading the oil. The oil can also stick to garden tools, pets and clothing, so it’s important to take precautions to help prevent recurrence. Wearing long sleeves and pants as well as gloves can help you avoid contact with these plants when you are in areas where they may be prevalent. It’s also important to note that you should not burn poison oak or poison ivy. Inhaling the smoke from burning poison oak or poison ivy can cause severe allergic respiratory problems. REBECCA FAST

Early diagnosis is crucial for best prognosis.

As the days grow longer, the sunlight gets stronger. Summer is the time when people spend more time in the sun, but it is also the time people are more at risk for developing skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the world, says the American Academy of Dermatology. Skin cancer is a broad term that refers to any type of cancer that begins in the cells of the skin. These cancers usually develop in the top layer of skin, also known as the epidermis. The most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. In addition, there are several types of skin cancers that occur much less frequently, including kaposi sarcoma, merkel cell carcinoma, cutaneous (skin) lymphoma, skin adnexal tumors and various other types of sarcomas, says the AAD. The AAD estimates that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. There are some precautions that people should take, especially if they know they will be in the sun, says Dr. Adrienne Lam, fellow with the American Academy of Dermatology, with Lam Dermatology in Oklahoma City. “There are many factors that we know of that contribute to skin cancer development: family genetics, cancer syndromes, sun exposure, smoking and certain viral infections,” Lam says. “Of these contributors, the biggest impact that patients can make is to reduce sun exposure. “Sunscreen, sun-protective clothing and sun avoidance can help reduce the effects of harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation,” says Lam. “These measures are best when done consistently and starting at an early age.” Most experts agree that the midday sun is the most dangerous for UV exposure. “It is a good idea to avoid the sun between the hours of 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,” Lam says. It is also important not to panic if you develop a new sore or lesion, she says. “Most benign skin lesions such as acne or bug bites heal easily within two to three weeks,” Lam says. “If any lesion persists, grows, bleeds easily or ulcerates, the patient should see a dermatologist for evaluation.” “When evaluating a spot, most dermatologists use the ABCDE rule,” says Meagan Tyler, physician assistant - certified with Skin Renewal in Tulsa. “A equals asymmetry: a mole that does not look the same on both sides, B equals border: a mole that has a wavy or blurry edge, C equals color: a mole that becomes darker, lighter or takes on a grey, blue or white color, D equals diameter: a mole larger than 6mm, the size of a pencil eraser, E equals evolution: a mole that is changing in any way.” SHARON MCBRIDE

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

SCENE

LISA BREASHEARS, BETTY ROHDE, BRENDA SANDERS, GARDEN PARTY, LITTLE LIGHTHOUSE.

MARCY REED, LISA SWAB, TIFFANY STEINKE, CANDACE MCCORMICK, STACY WOOD, CELEBRATE CASCIA, CASCIA HALL.

RANIA NAREDDINE, SUZANNE WARREN, LAUREN AVERY, CARISSA COOPER, GEM GALA, JUNIOR LEAGUE OF TULSA.

ANDY KINSLOW, RUSS KIRKPATRICK, EN ROUTE, ARTS ALLIANCE TULSA.

LIZ HALLER, CANDICE EVANS, CHEENA PAZZO, GO RED FOR WOMEN, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION. CHERA KIMIKO, TOM NEFF, VIDA SCHUMAN, GO RED FOR WOMEN, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION.

MARJORIE WETWISKA, WES WALKER, BRENNA SEE, CLEATS AND COCKTAILS, WES WALKER FOUNDATION. KRISTIN DICKERSON, GREGG CONWAY, RUN FOR THE ROSES, TULSA BOYS’ HOME.

SETH AND ERIN VONTUNGELN, COURTNEY AND RICKEY DUNIGAN, ARTINI, ALLIED ARTS OKLAHOMA CITY.

KATIE PLOHOCKY, BECKY DIXON, LEIGH GOODSON, JILL DONOVAN, NEWSMAKERS LUNCHEON, TULSA CHAPTER OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR WOMEN IN COMMUNICATIONS.

MARY ANN AND KEN FERGESON, MARNIE TAYLOR, ONE AWARDS, OKLAHOMA CENTER FOR NONPROFITS.

LISA SWORDS, ZACH AND SYDNEY WALKER, SHERIDAN SWORDS, CAMP KELLEY AUCTION, BISHOP KELLEY.

JASON GLASS, BRIAN HUGHES, MEG AND ELLIOT NELSON, EMPTY BOWLS, COMMUNITY FOOD BANK OF EASTERN OKLAHOMA.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016


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THe

HEaRT oF

BURN CO. BARBEQUE SELLS BARBECUE AND HAS A MEAT MARKET FOR PEOPLE WANTING TO COOK THEIR OWN. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016


By Justin Martino

TlANd

BbQ

With a long list of some of the BEST BARBECUE restaurants in the country and more world barbecue champions per capita than any other state in the U.S., Oklahoma has a reputation of being a barbecue capital. But what is it that makes barbecue in Oklahoma so SPECIAL? The answer to that question could be a number of things. “We’re right in the heartland,” says Nick Corcoran, pit master at Burn Co. Barbeque in Tulsa. “We’re right between pig country and cow country, so we get the best of both worlds. We’re also right between Kansas and Texas, two known barbecue meccas as well, so we get a melding of those two pots.” Location certainly has a hand in play, but there are other factors as well. Oklahoma has access to some of the best wood used for barbecuing, a willingness to share knowledge to make everyone better and versatility. “I think what makes Oklahoma barbecue so good is we adapt,” says Joe Davidson, owner of Oklahoma Joe’s Smokers and Oklahoma Joe’s Bar-B-Q. “Oklahoma barbecuers adapt and are constantly learning. We’re harder workers than other people are – if you want to be the best in the world, you have to work really hard at it.” Whether you’re new to barbecue, a seasoned hand or just a fan of the food, you’re in the right place: The heartland of barbecue. JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

43


A SPIRIT OF SHARING

TOP: ELMER'S BBQ IN TULSA IS KNOWN FOR AN OLD SCHOOL STYLE OF BARBECUE. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

BOTTOM LEFT: IRON STAR URBAN BARBEQUE IN OKLAHOMA CITY COMBINES BARBECUE WITH FINE DINING. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

BOTTOM RIGHT: KEITH JIMERSON, OWNER OF ELMER'S BBQ, IN THE KITCHEN. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

Most people might not expect a famous chef to give out his or her best recipes, but the Oklahoma barbecue community has no problem doing just that. “That’s the spirit of Oklahoma barbecue – sharing things and learning from others,” says Joe Davidson, owner of Oklahoma Joe’s Bar-B-Q. “If someone has some level of success, they’ll share it. They don’t hoard it to themselves; they want everybody to have success. That’s the philosophy of Oklahoma barbecue that’s really unique.” Oklahomans can get barbecue advice from a variety of sources – many restaurants not only sell barbecue, but talk to customers about how they cook the food they sell. Burn Co. Barbeque even has a meat market so people can come in for their favorite barbecue or try to barbecue it themselves. Being open isn’t something reserved just for customers, though. Nick Corcoran, pitmaster at Burn Co. Barbeque, says the barbecue community in Oklahoma shares tricks and tips even with competing restaurants – comparing the openness in Oklahoma barbecue with that used by a manufacturer of electric cars. “If everybody knows everything, then we all get better,” Corcoran says. “Like Elon Musk did with Tesla – he took the patents off everything. You end up with this culture that grows around it, and to use [Burn Co. coowner Adam Myers’] words: If somebody’s talking about barbecue, our name is going to come up eventually. That’s better for us. It’s better to cultivate that fire than to snuff it.” Barbecue restaurants are unusual because there often is an element of teaching the customers how the food is cooked, Corcoran says. And while many industries might avoid that type of openness, barbecue is usually an open book for Oklahoma restaurants. “It’s my favorite part of the job,” Corcoran says. “I’ve worked in other kitchens, I’ve worked in a lot of different parts of restaurants, and my favorite part about waiting tables was always talking to people and getting to know people. This is like that to the nth degree, because people want to come here and learn from you. I think that’s awesome that I’m able to teach people.”


BRINGING THE SIDES TO CENTER

The focus of barbecue may be on the main course, but neglecting the side dishes can lead to a mediocre experience. “We believe the side items should be just as good as the barbecue,” says Keith Jimerson, owner of Elmer’s BBQ in Tulsa. “The side items are a part of the barbecue experience, and you have to put just as much care into them as anything else.” A few of the popular side items for

3

BARBECUE TIPS

1

Start with a good cut of meat.

As the saying goes, you get out what you put in. If you’re looking for good barbecue, it all starts with the quality of meat you put on the grill. If you’re not comfortable picking the best cut of meat, visit with your local butcher.

2

Think of your flavor profile.

A lot of different factors go into the final flavor of the barbecue. The rub used to season the meat before cooking, the sauce you use, and even the wood in the fire is important to the taste.

3

Watch the time and temperature.

The temperature of the fire and the time your food cooks differ by the type of meat you’re barbecuing. Tender meats are more likely to be cooked hot and fast to sear the outside while staying tender inside. For tougher meats like briskets, most people prefer using low heat over a longer period of time.

barbecue are baked beans, potato salad, coleslaw and green beans – Jimerson says green beans are popular because many people like to have green vegetables with their meals. The restaurant also experiments with new sides, such as macaroni and cheese. Side dishes don’t have to be completely separate from the main dish. Trimmed slices of meat you might not serve on a plate can be used in the side dishes. “We put brisket in the beans, and our green beans have chunks of rib meat in them,” Jimerson says. “It flavors it and gives it a different dimension. That way we don’t waste our hard work. Meat is expensive, and we don’t want to throw it into the trash if we can work it into something else.” So next time you plan on barbecuing, don’t forget to plan and spend some time on the side items.

TULSA ATTORNEY BRAD BEASLEY COMPETES IN 25 TO 30 BARBECUE COMPETITIONS EACH YEAR. PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

TOUGH COMPETITION

With all the great barbecue in Oklahoma, it’s not a surprise that competitive barbecuing has taken off in the state, providing fierce, but friendly, contests. Tulsa attorney Brad Beasley has been participating in barbecue competitions for around five years now. What started out as a casual hobby grew, and he now competes in 25 to 30 contests a year – almost every weekend between March and October. His barbecue team, Big Butts Need Rubbin Too, is currently ranked 38th in the Kansas City Barbecue Society’s 2016 Team of the Year standings. The Kansas City Barbecue Society is the largest barbecue organization in the world, consisting of more than 20,000 members and hosting barbecue contests around the world. Beasley says KCBS hosts around 550 contests in the U.S. annually, and around another 50 or so in countries around the world. The rules for each competition are the same, and the results are combined to create the rankings for top teams. Around 12 to 15 Oklahoma barbecue teams will appear in the top 100 teams each year, Beasley says, adding that currently eight teams are included in the top 40 teams. Despite the high level of competitiveness, Beasley says the comradery among the competition is one of the reasons he enjoys the contests. “The barbecue community is a very friendly community,” he says. “Competitive barbecue is the only activity I’ve ever had anything to do with where you’re truly happy when your competitors are doing well. I think probably the most rewarding aspects of it are the friends and the comradery you have – it’s a great group of people you look forward to seeing each week.” The competition still matters, though, and Beasley says participating makes people much better barbecue cooks. Most people competing use a combination of rubs – Beasley uses one barbecue rub he makes himself, but, for example, uses four different rubs on his chicken. For one of his sauces, he combines seven different sauces. The attention to detail in cooking can also result in a better finished product. Barbecue restaurants cook on a mass scale, while competition barbecue cooks are cooking for six judges. “The preparation time that goes into it is unbelievable,” Beasley says. “Just for chicken, we’re probably spending six, seven or eight hours from preparation to cooking just to turn in six pieces of chicken. So you pay a lot of attention to detail.”

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


NICK CORCORAN, PIT MASTER AT BURN CO. BARBEQUE. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

BIXBY BBQ 'N BLUES COMPETITION PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

"OKLAHOMA" JOE DAVIDSON

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

RIBS AT OKLAHOMA JOE'S BAR-B-QUE

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

BARBECUE AT IRON STAR BARBEQUE PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS


TRY SOMETHING NEW

The spice rub and barbecue sauce used on meat are big factors in how the finished meat tastes. While there are many commercial rubs and sauces available, those rubs and sauces can be adapted to create a different taste. Keith Jimerson, owner of Elmer’s BBQ in Tulsa, says his restaurant creates its own barbecue sauce, which he sells on site, but is always willing to customize sauces to suit someone’s taste. “We have a sauce for diabetics that’s sugar free,” Jimerson said. “We have some that are super hot that we throw some ghost pepper in. We have people here – they just want the hotter the better. We’ve created some sauces that actually, believe it or not, people use as a salad dressing.” Paul Schatte, co-owner of Head Country Bar-B-Q, says he encourages people to add new things to the rubs and sauces sold by the company. “I encourage people to experiment and practice, see what they like,” he says. “They may want to put apple juice in it to give it more of a sheen, or they may want to add a bourbon note. I have a customer who adds pineapple chunks.” Experimentation isn’t just reserved for sauces, though. Iron Star Urban Barbeque in Oklahoma City started with the concept of combining barbecue with fine dining. The idea was new in Oklahoma – while there may be plenty of barbecue restaurants in the state, a barbecue restaurant with specialty drinks, linen

napkins and a full dining experience was unusual in the area. Kimberly King, general manager of Iron Star Urban Barbeque, says some people said the food wasn’t what they were used to when the restaurant first opened, but over time the restaurant’s distinctive style was embraced by the customers. “We had to get everyone used to the

IRON STAR BARBEQUE AIMS TO PROVIDE A DIFFERENT BARBECUE EXPERIENCE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

BBQ OR GRILLING?

Not all outdoor cooking is the same – while grilling and barbecuing may share some similar components, the two styles are very different. Grilling uses a direct fire and high heat to cook the meat. Temperatures for grilling start at 325 degrees and can exceed 500 degrees. Barbecuing uses indirect heat and lower temperatures, relying on constant heat over time to cook the meat while the smoke from the wood used in the fire adds additional flavor.

FUELING THE FLAVOR

Rubs and sauce may be the obvious way to give your barbecue some flavor, but it would be a mistake to ignore the wood used in the fire of your barbecue. The smoke from the fire flavors the meat, and different types of wood can make a major difference In the taste. “People don’t think of wood as a seasoning, but in barbecue it’s the most important seasoning you’re using,” says Joe Davidson of Oklahoma Joe’s Bar-B-Q. While the choices for wood type may not be limitless, they can be overwhelming at first. Many people in Oklahoma choose to use pecan wood, which grows in the state. Other

way we were going to do barbecue,” King says. “Eventually it calmed down, and now people love it because it’s different. Because it’s not the same thing you can get everywhere else.”

popular choices include mesquite, hickory, oak and apple wood – Davidson says his rule of thumb is any wood that bears a fruit or a nut is suitable for cooking. Avoid softwoods such as pine or spruce, which contain too much sap and can ruin the taste and even make people sick. Woods such as alder, apple, cherry and maple are more mild woods, best for foods with a lighter flavor that may not be heavily seasoned or sauced, while woods like hickory, mesquite, pecan and oak may work better for foods with a stronger flavor. Some woods also burn with a thicker

smoke or make a better bed of coals, which is important to Elmer’s BBQ owner Keith Jimerson. He serves what he describes as “old school barbecue with an authentic flavor," and while his choice of wood may vary depending on factors such as the season or the meat being cooked, he likes using hickory and oak. “Hickory and oak will make the best bed of coals,” Jimerson said. “Whenever you’re barbecuing the meat, you have to look at the bed of coals. The right hardwoods will last a lot longer than softer wood. They also make the meat very flavorful and the smoke is very aromatic.”

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Oklahoma

Socia Michael Kory

262k “michaelkoryfitness”

253k “michaelkoryofficial”

PHOTO BY PAIGE WIDENER

15k @michaelkory

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51k @michaelkory michaelkory.tumblr.com

Fitness expert Michael Kory has built a large following on YouTube with his one-on-one motivational videos on fitness, nutrition and lifestyle delivered in a vlog format a few times a week. His videos are insightful and inspirational, offering advice on how to achieve the best results for any fitness regimen. Kory is passionate and determined to achieve his own personal goals and spread a message of encouragement and support to his viewers. When asked about the impact he has made on his online community, Kory says, “In terms of changing someones life, I think that is a really major thing. Meeting people at expos face-to-face and hearing everyone’s stories is really motivational for me and makes me feel good. It’s a rewarding feeling.” Kory recently released a digital cookbook filled with healthy and nutritious recipes for every meal. The e-book is available for purchase at michaelkory.com.


alites

Life & Family Reed Timmer

132k “tornadovideosdotnet”

By James Avery

170k @reedtimmertvn

925k “reedtimmertvn” 79k @reedtimmer

Meteorologist and extreme storm chaser Reed Timmer is responsible for some of the most amazing videos of Mother Nature at her angriest. His latest upload, a high-octane game of chicken with a large tornado touching ground north of Wray, Colorado, has been spreading like wildfire all over the internet. As of this writing the video has received national attention with over 3.7 million views on Facebook. His custom-built storm chasing vehicles, deemed the SRV Dominators, allow Timmer and his team to livestream intimate footage of devastating weather from a perspective that most would prefer to never experience firsthand. For an up close and personal look at some of the Midwest’s most devastating storms, tornados and blizzards, follow Timmer’s jaw-dropping content on Facebook, Twitter and Youtube.

Oklahoma has always had talented people, and the open world of social media has allowed many of them to gain the recognition they deserve for their abilities. If you’re on YouTube, Twitter, Facebook or any other social media, it’s hard to miss these talented Oklahomans making a name for themselves both in their home state and across the world. From comedy to cooking, these are the top Oklahoma Socialites to add to your feed.

kingdaddy 13.8k @kingdaddy

5k @kingdaddy

PHOTO COURTESY JASON KINGHAM.

The kids are the stars of the show on kingdaddy’s hilarious Vine account. Everyday parenting scenarios that any mom or dad can relate to are seen through the eyes of kingdaddy, father of two children who are featured in most of kingdaddy’s six-second clips. With a mixture of humor, social commentary, and a touch of cynicism, these brief slice-of-life uploads demonstrate how funny life as a parent really can be. In 2011, Jason Kingham (kingdaddy) was in the national spotlight after being featured on a segment of Jimmy Kimmel Live!, where he made a splash, literally, that gained him thousands of followers on Twitter. When Vine became available, he quickly took advantage of the format. “‘Adulting’ can be tough, so creating content that makes some people smile is a great motivator. If nothing else, I’m making some amazing memories with my kids,” Kingham says.

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Recipes & Cooking Sasha Martin

6,904 “globaltableadventure” 1,980 @globaltable

4.6k “globaltable” 1,804 @globaltable

3.6M “thepioneerwoman”

640k “thepioneerwoman”

PHOTO COURTESY SASHA MARTIN.

1,115 “globaltable”

Blogger and author of Life From Scratch, Sasha Martin began a “global table adventure” with her daughter and husband a few years back, preparing one meal per week from 195 different countries. Preparing, tasting and critiquing each meal from scratch while recording the entire process on video, Martin has created a wealth of informative, bite-sized content on a regular basis. These videos have been collecting on her website globaltableadventure.com and have been viewed by thousands of foodies since their online publication. Continue following Martin’s adventure on Pinterest, where she frequently posts photos of her delicious hand-prepared meals that will make your mouth water.

Ree Drummond

1M @thepioneerwoman 634k @thepioneerwoman

Ree Drummond, host of the television show The Pioneer Woman, is a favorite not just in Oklahoma but nationwide. Her down-toearth cooking program doesn’t stop with just the preparation of fabulous meals but also includes the steps leading up to her time in the kitchen. Drummond’s family members and the community as a whole are included as key ingredients to her television program and inspire breathtaking entrees. Online, Drummond uses platforms like Instagram and Pinterest to allow her followers to participate in the cooking process and see food preparation with both still photography and video. If you have a passion for down-home cooking, Drummond provides a colorful feed of tasty meals that shine not just on television but on mobile devices through social media.

Style & Fashion Guy Tang 1.4m @guy_tang

1m “guytanghair”

825k “guytanghairartist” 37k @guy_tang

55k “guytang”

guytang.tumblr.com

HAIR, COLOR AND PHOTO BY GUY TANG.

Celebrity hairstylist Guy Tang doesn’t just cut hair, he makes incredible masterpieces using color and contrast to create a work of art that transforms each client’s hair into something truly out of this world. One of his most famous color treatments, called “Unicorn hair,” is a vivid rainbow explosion of layered color that is a treat for the eyes. One look at his work and it is impossible to

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deny that Tang really is a master at his craft. Thankfully, he records his process regularly on YouTube, where he offers hair color and style demonstrations in a fun, energetic presentation that is both entertaining to watch and very informative. It is difficult to not smile at Tang’s giddiness in his videos as he breaks down his process step by step, showing exactly how to achieve beautiful hairstyles worn by some of Hollywood’s most glamorous models and celebrities. Any stylists looking to expand their arsenal should hit the subscribe button.

Abby Rose Henry 47k @abbbbyroses

Abby Rose is a skilled photographer and florist, and when viewing her Instagram profile one thing is clear: Rose has a unique sense of style that permeates all of her online work. The content she puts out is often warm and comforting, whether it is seen in her delightful floral arrangements or her magnificent wedding photography. Love and intimacy are both themes that flows throughout her social media content. Rose was recently featured on the Instagram blog With the Locals, where she was selected out of thousands of Instagram users to take over the account and share some of Tulsa’s best spots to people all around the world. Rose’s impeccable taste and her eye for composition, along with her modern beatnik fashion sense, will inspire you on both Instagram and Pinterest.


907k @rick_bayless

50k @rick_bayless

276k “chefrickbayless” 16k “rickbayless”

World-renowned chef Rick Bayless has pleased television viewers for years with his PBS program Mexico: One Plate at a Time, and he continues his tradition of cooking jaw-dropping Mexico-inspired delicacies online. Tacos, salsa and queso are just some of the stars of the show, and on YouTube and Twitter, Bayless spreads his love of Hispanic dishes to those who are looking for inspiration for their next south-of-the-border meals. For detailed instructions on how to shop, prepare and present incredible Mexico-inspired dishes, follow Bayless online and tune in to PBS and never look back.

Jim Ross 1.46m @jrsbbq

187k “jimrossbbq”

WWE Hall of Famer Jim Ross has been in the national spotlight for decades acting as announcer for some of the world’s most memorable professional wrestling matches. Although Ross is primarily known

for his long career with the WWE, he has also developed a following because of his amazing barbecue. Founder of J.R.’s Bar-B-Q, Ross provides customers with jerky, sauces and seasoning to take your next grill-out to another level. On social media and his blog OklaMania.com, Ross keeps his followers informed about recent events with the WWE and new recipes for the perfect Oklahoma barbecue. For more weekly content from Jim Ross, listen to his podcast, The Ross Report, where he covers all things wrestling, pop culture, Oklahoma and barbecue.

PHOTO COURTESY JIM ROSS.

Rick Bayless

BIG TRUCK TACOS

Brett McKay artofmanliness.com 971k “artofmanliness”

146k @artofmanliness

505k “artofmanliness”

87k @artofmanliness

artofmanliness.tumblr.com

Meals On The Go

Food trucks in Oklahoma have been gaining in popularity over the last few years for their often unique spin on classic dishes and their quick fix for the unexpected hunger pains. Most food trucks rely on social media to keep hungry patrons up-to-date on where and when their mobile kitchens are open for business. If you are in the mood for some fresh grub served on four wheels, here’s a few trucks to chase in Tulsa and Oklahoma City.

Lone Wolf Banh Mi

Big Truck Tacos

Known for their banh mi, kimchi fries and fried rice bowls. Usually spotted at The Fur Shop in Tulsa.

In Oklahoma City, this truck is popular for a number of Mexican dishes, including chips and queso or salsa, tacos and burritos.

@lonewolfbanhmi

PHOTO COURTESY ADAM MURPHY.

Brett McKay is the founder of The Art of Manliness, “a blog dedicated to uncovering the lost art of being a man.” This blog offers readers with a wealth of resources on how to be the best men they can be. Topics include such categories including manly skills, relationships and family, and dress and grooming. McKay also hosts a weekly companion podcast that covers many of the topics found on artofmanliness.com and also includes commentary, news and audio interviews with the manliest of men. On Facebook, the blog brings its updated content directly to your news feed, and offers additional related stories found on other popular men’s lifestyle websites.

Mr. Nice Guys @mrniceguystulsa

In Tulsa, Mr. Nice Guys is famous for their mac and cheese, jerk chicken and spicy pork.

@bigtrucktacos

Andolini’s Pizza Truck @andotrucktulsa

When it comes to pizza trucks in Tulsa, you can’t beat Andolini’s pizza by the slice. JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Arts & Culture

Jonathan Burkhart 51k @burkhartsokc

As a passionate photographer based in Oklahoma City, Jonathan Burkhart uses his camera to capture images of visually entrancing people and places in and around the Sooner State. His ability to maintain a distinct mood with each of his photos is a talent that Burkhart is able to repeat page after page on Instagram. Burkhart uses light as a paintbrush, highlighting the shape and form of his subjects, using it as a tool just as important as the camera itself. When asked about some of his recent shots, Burkhart says, “A lot of it really is just experimenting, because I want to try and shoot new things that I’ve never done before. I always try to push myself everyday, and try to do something weirder or something that I’ve never thought about.” Burkhart primarily uses Instagram to deliver his new work to followers and generally posts multiple great shots each week.

lepas.tumblr.com

Pascalle Lepas gained a significant online following with her web comic ZAP, which follows the adventures of a starship captain and his crew. ZAP’s story was continuously updated on a regular basis, eventually coming to a close after 11 years of publication online. Her current series, Wilde Life, a supernatural adventure story that takes place in a small town in Oklahoma, has gained thousands of fans with its quirky writing and clever mixture of humor, Native American folklore and horror. Lepas has a large presence on the popular artist’s community DeviantArt, where she interacts with her fans through insightful conversation and regular updates on her current series and other projects.

ARTWORK COURTESY PASCALLE LEPAS.

34k @lepas

PHOTOS COURTESY JONATHAN BURKHART.

Pascalle Lepas

on current magazine issues and upcoming stories but also on the lives of the magazine’s vendors, often celebrating their personal achievements and milestones. It is clear that at Curbside Chronicle, the individual lives of the vendors and others in the homeless community are as important as the magazine itself.

Curbside Chronicle 1,111 @curbsideokc

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PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

5,222 “curbsideokc”

This street paper provides the homeless community of Oklahoma City with a platform to tell stories and exercise creativity while attempting to eliminate panhandling by offering a profitable alternative through streetside magazine sales and distribution. The Curbside Chronicle’s powerful mission has changed the lives of numerous citizens in Oklahoma City by offering steady employment and structure to those who are at-risk or currently living with homelessness. Many of the stories are written by the homeless community themselves, covering topics that affect everyone such as mental health and domestic violence. On social media, Curbside Chronicle keeps readers updated not just


From a Basement in Tulsa

Y FROM A BASEM

. ENT IN TULSA

1,233 “fromabasementintulsa”

The Napkin Dad (Marty Coleman) 4,269 @thenapkindad

2,718 @thenapkindad

1,101 “napkindad”

napkindad.tumblr.com

The Napkin

Absorbent Art for Head and Heart About

Ask

The Napkin

Likes

Archive

Referred to as “Napkin Dad” on his blog and on social media, Marty Coleman has built a loyal following of fans online by livestreaming his creative process on Periscope, turning the act of creating visual art into an interactive community endeavor. Coleman gained national attention in 2008 after uploading a Barack Obama napkin drawing to Flickr, where it was quickly picked up by Time Magazine and published in the “Person of the Year” issue. Originally creating the artwork on a daily basis for his young daughters to include in their sack lunches, Coleman now inspires thousands of fans with his artwork, blog posts, livestreams and other online projects. When discussing his streaming video community, Coleman says, “It has opened me up to new ideas about what I can create, how big I can go. It’s an idea generator. I want to produce something really interesting and fun to watch, so it has been very energizing for me on social media.”

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY MARTY COLEMAN

PHOTO COURTES

1,597 @fabitpodcast

From a Basement in Tulsa is a weekly podcast talk show featuring key figures in the Tulsa arts and music community. Hosted by Jason Ferguson, each episode features insightful conversation with Oklahoma musicians, comedians and filmmakers, including Sterlin Harjo, Fiawna Forté and The Tulsa Pin Up Mafia. If you are a regular in the Tulsa music scene, chances are Ferguson has already interviewed your favorite local band on the show. When asked about the beginnings of the podcast, Ferguson says, “I was playing music for quite a while before the podcast. I was in love with podcasts and with the idea of podcasting, and so I just started inviting friends into my basement and recording our conversations and uploading them to the internet.” Get updates on upcoming shows by following Ferguson on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Comedy & Satire Ray William Johnson 10.6m “raywilliamjohnson”

City of Tulsa Parking Enforcement

(Parody):

4.5m “raywilliamjohnson”

joshfadem.tumblr.com

1,570 @tulsa_parking

463k @raywilliamjohnson ray-william-johnson-official.tumblr.com

Nothing can ruin a great sunny day like approaching your vehicle from a distance and seeing that little flappy piece of paper tucked under your windshield wiper. Nobody likes parking citations, especially the City of Tulsa Parking Enforcement satire twitter account. This parody account takes out the frustration of getting a ticket by turning the circus mirror on city parking enforcement. For a laugh, the account regularly issues fake parking violations via Twitter to various city community leaders for a range of ridiculous reasons, often not even parking related. Although the humor can be considered crude to some occasionally, everyone who follows this twitter account can relate to the feeling of having to pay a $30 ticket for being a minute late paying the meter. Sometimes that can result in some pretty colorful language.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Considered one of the most-watched content creators on YouTube, Ray William Johnson gained his 10 million followers with his expertly written bite-sized comedy videos offering pop culture commentary. Poking fun at topics such as relationships, family, world history and video games, Johnson and his team of hosts create gut-busting daily content that features talking-head style lists and social commentary.

Trey Kennedy

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OTOGRAPHER.

20k @treynkennedy

For any comedy writer and content creator, there is one social media platform that offers a difficult challenge: make the viewer laugh in under six seconds. Trey Kennedy, Oklahoma’s top Vine user, takes this challenge head on by posting hilarious daily vines that are sure to get a chuckle out of the viewer. With each upload appearing completely spontaneous, these selfie-style comedy nuggets deliver rapid-fire jokes that are equally as impressive as they are hilarious. Offering commentary on topics including celebrity life, social norms and embarrassing family members, Kennedy proves he can make a joke about anything and everything in life. In response, we at Oklahoma Magazine challenge you to watch any one of Kennedy’s recent vines without cracking a smile.

HUMPHREY PH

98k “treynkennedy”

62k @treynkennedy

PHOTO BY CHRIS

2.6m “treykennedy”

12.7k @joshfadem

3,3k @joshfadem

4k “tulsaparking”

1.6m @raywj

Josh Fadem

Josh Fadem has been writing and performing comedy for over a decade. In addition to being a known quantity in the LA stand up comedy scene, Fadem’s talents also extend to the role of director and actor. After appearing on a number of episodes of the Breaking Bad prequel TV series Better Call Saul, Fadem was recently cast in the upcoming Netflix series Twin Peaks. On Twitter, he continues exercising his comedy muscle by posting 140 character jokes with his signature smart and cynical delivery. When asked about Facebook in a recent interview, Fadem said, “I’m trying to get off Facebook. I hate that place. I hate the stuff on my feed, everyone fighting about politics. I don’t want to hear about that. Everyone posting about their dead relative or animal. It’s sad. It’s a bummer. And you get hooked on it. You say, ‘There’s got to be something else underneath here.’ Isn’t it awful? Get me off of there. I got to get out of there, but I’m stuck.”


The 1491s 35k “the1491s”

THE VOTES ARE IN!!

58k “1491s”

6k @1491s

The 1491s received national attention after being featured in a controversial segment on Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show involving the NFL Redskins name and logo. However, this sketch comedy group has been creating content on YouTube for a number of years, producing cynical comedy skits inspired by modern day Native American life. Their YouTube channel offers side-splitting commentary on a range of topics including sovereignty, Native American gift shops and the Twilight series. “It’s all improv. We’re still making it up as we go along,” says Ryan RedCorn, one-fifth of the team known as the 1491s. With over 6 million views on their YouTube channel, subscribers enjoy hours of improvisational indigenous satire.

LAHOMA K O

the

of

BEST the BEST

PHOTO COURTESY THE 1491S.

2016

MA

GAZINE

LOOK FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST OF OKLAHOMA. COMING IN JULY.

OKLAHOMA Don’t miss this exciting issue. Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

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JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM 3/17/16 55 12:34 PM


Get your Oklahoma vacation on.

It’s summertime in Oklahoma and, undoubtedly, vacation plans are being made. But before you make extensive plans to tour the world, take a look at what your home state and the surrounding area have to offer. Oklahoma is a state rich in history and culture and home to some of the top museums in the country, many of which are hosting special summer exhibits of interest. For the thrill seeker, check out a multitude of amusement parks and popular watersports. Explore our state’s natural beauty and discover an abundance of everything from animal refuges to caves. Oklahoma features more shoreline than anywhere else in the U.S., a diverse terrain – from prairies to mountains and even a desert – and mild temperatures enabling year-round adventure and fun. The following pages contain only a partial listing of everything Oklahoma. Already seen these sites? Then dare to make the short jaunt across state lines to see what our neighboring states have to offer. Be it a week of fun and activity with the kids or a weekend getaway from the kids, when it comes to vacationing this summer, our great state has plenty to choose from for an enjoyable afternoon, weekend or more of thrill-filled activity, educational opportunities or just some much needed relaxation.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER

HISTORY

?

What to do this summer Time Traveling

THE OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER, OKLAHOMA CITY

Plan a trip back in time to discover the history and culture that is Oklahoma.

Oklahoma is a state rich in history and culture. The following is just a partial listing of sites and centers that will not only provide you with an enjoyable afternoon of activity, but will also have you brushing up on some state (and regional) historical trivia. The Oklahoma History Center in Oklahoma City, which spans 18 acres and 215,000 square feet, explores the state’s past in areas like geology, transportation, commerce, culture, aviation and heritage. The center is located near the Oklahoma State Capitol and has four semi-permanent galleries, special events hall and outdoor exhibits. The Tulsa Historical Society & Museum provides a look into Tulsa’s past with eight rotating exhibit galleries focusing on local history. Over the summer, the museum is running multiple exhibits, including Designing Tulsa: Oil Capital Architects, running until August, and A Ship Named Tulsa: Three Stories of Namesake Vessels, running through March 2017. Ongoing exhibits at the museum include a virtual exhibit on the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot, Tulsa’s Art Deco & Public Art and Timeline of Tulsa History: A Brief Journey through Tulsa’s Past. The museum also hosts downtown walking tours on the last Friday of every month, and reservations are required. The Greenwood Cultural Center in Tulsa preserves the history of an area called “Black Wall Street” by Booker T. Washington and is located in the Greenwood District, one of the most historically significant parts of Tulsa. The center has a collection of historical exhibits and photos from before, during and after the 1921 Tulsa race riot and offers guided tours from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Monday through Friday. In Muskogee, the Five Civilized Tribes Museum is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year by focusing on the art and culture of each tribe, drawing work from the museum’s archives. Located in a sandstone building dating back to the 1870s, the museum is a storehouse of Native American cultural history, containing an archive larger than can ever be displayed, according to Executive Director Sean Barney. One of Oklahoma’s most famous native sons is celebrated at the


TOP: TITANIC MUSEUM, BRANSON, MISSOURI. RIGHT: NATIONAL WORLD WAR I MUSEUM, KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI. BELOW: FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES MUSEUM, MUSKOGEE.

PHOTO COURTESY FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES MUSEUM

TANI URTESY TI

C MUSEU

TION M ATTRAC

There are numerous other historical sites in the areas surrounding Oklahoma. Kansas City is home to the National World War I Museum, which explores the history of the war through original objects, documents, video and recreated trenches and interactive tables. The museum also hosts limited-run exhibits that tell newly curated stories of World War I. Fans of Mark Twain should visit the Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum in Hannibal, Missouri, hosting collections and permanent exhibitions related to the author. The museum holds many of Twain’s personal artifacts, as well as an extensive collection of printed materials. Branson, Missouri is home of the Titanic Museum Attraction, a two-story museum that holds 400 artifacts in 20 galleries.

PHOTO CO

Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore. The museum has 12 galleries with photographs and manuscripts documenting Rogers’ life as a trick roper, Vaudeville performer, movie star, radio commentator, newspaper columnist and author. The site, originally acquired by Rogers to build a retirement home, also contains his tomb, which is chiseled with his famous quotation: “I never met a man I didn’t like.” Oklahoma and the surrounding area is also home to multiple historic battlefields. The Honey Springs Battlefield Historic Site, located east of U.S. Highway 69 between Oktaha and Rentiesville, was home to the largest of more than 107 documented hostile encounters in Indian Territory during the Civil War. Other Civil War battle sites in the area include Cabin Creek Battlefield, located near Big Cabin, and Pea Ridge National Military Park, a 4,300 acre battlefield near Garfield, Arkansas. Pea Ridge was one of the most pivotal Civil War battles and is the most intact Civil War battlefield in the U.S. Texas has also been the home of numerous battles, including the famous Alamo Mission in San Antonio. The site is home to multiple exhibits, including one donated by musician Phil Collins, and offers tours of the legendary area. Also in Texas is the San Jacinto Museum of History, located near Houston at the site of the decisive battle of the Texas Revolution. The museum is home to the San Jacinto Monument, a 567-foothigh tower commemorating the Battle of San Jacinto. The tower is the world’s tallest masonry column.

BELOW LEFT: WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM, CLAREMORE. BELOW CENTER: THE ALAMO MISSION, SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS.

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Looking for something to keep the children entertained while you travel? Oklahoma and its surrounding states have plenty of options that are both fun and educational. In Tulsa, the Tulsa Children’s Museum Discovery Lab combines fun and education with multidisciplinary experiences and exhibits. The museum, located just northwest of downtown Tulsa, allows visitors to use a variety of hands-on exhibits to not only learn, but spark creativity and innovation. Science Museum Oklahoma, in Oklahoma City, also provides a variety of exhibits to promote science education while remaining fun for children. Attractions include the Science Floor, which shows how science affects your everyday life; CurioCity, a 20,000-square-foot village with eight distinct areas that allows visitors to explore scientific concepts using interactive devices and unusual settings; and Destination Space, where visitors learn more about space exploration. Space and flight also take top billing at the Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium, a nearly 18-acre campus on the north side of the Tulsa International Airport. The museum has historical exhibits, a computer flight simulator lab and full-dome planetarium shows.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

PHOTO COURTESY ANDERSON-ABRUZZO INTERNATIONAL BALLOON MUSEUM

The summer months are prime time to take the entire family on an educational or thrill-filled road-trip.

The Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden and the Tulsa Zoo are also both popular destinations for families over the summer months. The Oklahoma City Zoo has a broad selection of animals, including red pandas, as well as a 130-acre botanical garden with animals roaming through the landscapes. The Tulsa Zoo holds more than 425 species of animals, including a Life in the Water exhibit featuring American alligators, seahorses, anaconda and lionfish. Oklahomans looking for family entertainment outside of the metro areas have several options as well. Leonardo’s Children’s Museum in Enid is an outdoor science playground with a three-story wooden castle featuring ridges, slides, swings, mazes and a dinosaur dig designed to inspire the imagination of both the young and young at heart. In Stillwater, the Oklahoma WONDERtorium is designed primarily for children ages 12 and younger and has exhibits exploring science, math, creativity, history, culture and problem solving. Surrounding states contain even more opportunities for children to learn while having fun. The Texas Discovery Gardens in Dallas give children and adults both a chance to discover and learn how to sustain the natural world and offers special

PHOTO COURTESY TEXAS DISCOVERY GARDENS

PHOTO COURTESY SCIENCE MUSEUM OKLAHOMA

FAMILY FAMILYTRAVEL TRAVEL

r e m m u S g n i k a M emories M

Go outside

ANDERSON-ABRUZZO ALBUQUERQUE INTERNATIONAL BALLOON SEUM, ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICMU O.

events like daily butterfly releases and Crafty Mondays with nature-themed crafts. The Children’s Museum of Denver offers multiple exhibits, including Big Backyard, an area where children can play as a bird, bunny or ant living its natural habitat – complete with costumes. The museum also contains areas where children can play, experiment with water and build their own creations with recycled materials. In New


Mexico, the Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum gives families a chance to learn about the history, science and art of all types of ballooning and lighter-than-air flight. While trips that focus on educational exploration are important, sometimes it’s important to just have fun – and there are plenty of opportunities in Oklahoma for that as well. In Oklahoma City, Frontier City has the usual selection of roller coasters, bumper cars and water rides along with Gunslinger, a Wild West-themed ride that is new for 2016. The park also hosts a variety of concerts and shows through the summer. Water adventure park Whitewater Bay features a variety of activities, including a new area, Barefootin’ Bay, which has more than 35 interactive features, mini slides and water sprayers. Even more amusement park options are

TULSA AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM, TULSA. PHOTO COURTESY TULSA AIR AND SPACE MUSEUM & PLANETARIUM

SCIENCE MUSEUM OKLAHOMA, OKLAHOMA CITY.

TEXAS DISCOVERY GARDENS, DALLAS, TEXAS.

available for those traveling out of state, including four Six Flags locations in the surrounding states: Six Flags Over Texas and Six Flags Hurricane Harbor, both in Arlington, Six Flags Fiesta Texas in San Antonio, and Six Flags St. Louis. Kansas City is home to both Worlds of Fun and Oceans of Fun, and Silver Dollar City in Branson, Missouri is home to many different family attractions. The park has rides, shows and a water park and claims to have the “world’s most daring” wooden roller coaster, which features three upside-down twists. Schlitterbahn Waterparks & Resorts also has several locations in the areas surrounding Oklahoma. The resort has locations in New Braunfels, Galveston Island, South Padre Island and Corpus Christi in Texas and in Kansas City, Kansas. If you’re not able to travel this summer, the park and resort stays

ATERPARK SCHLITTERBAHN W

& RESORTS.

PHOTO COURTESY SCHLITTERBAHN WATERPARKS & RESORTS

PHOTO COURTESY FRONTIER CITY

FRONTIER CITY, OKLAHOMA CITY.

open year-round with attractions designed for colder weather. Whether you choose an educational odyssey or a thrill-seeking trek, there are plenty of options for Oklahoma travelers this summer. JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTO COURTESY WICHITA ART MUSEUM

ART

Artful Excursions

From some of the top museums in the country to local districts and galleries, when it comes to art adventures this summer the state has plenty to choose from. installment of Guerrilla Art Park, an outdoor sculpture exhibit located on the site of its future arts campus on NW 11th Street and Broadway Avenue, from June until September. In Tulsa, Gilcrease Museum has several exhibitions planned for the summer months. West Mexico: Ritual and Identity, which runs from June 26 until Nov. 6, will feature a selection of ceramic figures and vessels from the Gilcrease collection, as well as pieces from public and private collections, and Frida Kahlo: Through the Lens of Nickolas Muray, which runs from July 10 through Sept. 11, will provide a look at Frida Kahlo, Mexico’s most

PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART, TULSA. RIGHT: DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART, DALLAS, TEXAS.

TTERSTOCK.COM

VAL LAWLESS / SHU

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PHOTO COURTESY DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART,

Oklahoma and its surrounding states have a wide variety of art museums and districts, with many hosting special exhibits over the summer that deserve special attention when planning your museum and art district travels. The Oklahoma City Museum of Art is hosting Matisse in His Time: Masterworks of Mondernism from the Centre Pompidou, Paris from June 18 until Sept. 18. The museum is the exclusive North American venue for the show, which showcases nearly 50 of Matisse’s paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints. The exhibition will run alongside others scheduled for the summer, including Our City, Our Collection: Building the Museum’s Lasting Legacy and Dale Chihuly: Magic & Light, along with the museum’s permanent collection. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, also in Oklahoma City, offers innovative art exhibits year-round with free admission. The museum will be displaying works from artists in its first

well-known female artist, through photographs by Nickolas Muray. With two locations in Tulsa, Philbrook Museum of Art will be hosting exhibitions for any art lover. The museum’s downtown location is showing Cady Wells: Ruminations until October 2, and First Person, a collection by Lakota artists Stephen Standing Bear and Amos Bad Heart Bull, from June 11 until Nov. 20. The museum’s main location on Peoria Avenue will be exhibiting A Place in the Sun, a collection of paintings by Walter Ufer and E. Martin Hennings, until Aug. 28 and A Bestiary, a collection of lithographs by Eisabeth Frink and Rudy Pozzatti, from July 3 until Oct. 23. The Price Tower Arts Center in Bartlesville, located in the historic building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, is hosting Peanuts … Naturally, a lighthearted exhibit of Charles Schulz’s work through comic strips, videos and objects, from June 4 until Oct. 9. Multiple options exist for art explorers in the surrounding states as well, including the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. The museum, which takes its name from a natural spring and the bridge construction used for the building, hosts a permanent collection spanning five centuries of American art, ranging from the colonial era to modern day. Other possible destinations include the Dallas


PHOTO COURTESY GILCREASE MUSEUM

GILCREASE MUSEUM, TULSA.

and Oklahoma City, though. The Ada Arts District, located around the east end of Main Street in Ada, is home to artist studios, galleries, sculpture gardens and local businesses, and Artists Alley in Mangum gives visitors a chance to see several award-winning artists, dine in a local restaurant or shop for antiques. From some of the top museums in the country to local districts that invite you to spend the day viewing art, dining and shopping, this area of the country has plenty to choose from for any Oklahomans looking for art adventures this summer.

PASEO ARTS DISTRICT, TS OKLAHOMA CITY; BRADY AR DISTRICT, TULSA.

TESY PASEO AR

TS DISTRICT

Museum of Art, located in the Arts District of downtown Dallas, the Wichita Art Museum, located on the Arkansas River in Kansas, the Denver Art Museum in Colorado, the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City and the New Mexico Museum of Art and Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, both in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Not all art is in museums, though, and there are many arts districts in the area that give people a chance to view and purchase art as well as visit other local businesses. In Tulsa, the Brady Arts District is home to art galleries, restaurants, bars and music venues. The district hosts events like the First Friday Art Crawl, held on the first Friday of every month. The area is located in downtown Tulsa and encourages visitors to “arrive early and stay late.” In Oklahoma City, the Paseo Arts District, the oldest arts district community in Oklahoma, also has First Friday Gallery Art Walks and is home to numerous local galleries, restaurants and retail businesses. Art districts in Oklahoma aren’t limited to Tulsa PHOTO COUR

IMAGE COURTESY OF JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY, NY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES PRINZ

PHOTO COURTESY

SEUM PRICE TOWER MU

LEFT: WICHITA ART MUSEUM, WICHITA, KANSAS. RIGHT: PRICE TOWER ARTS CENTER, BARTLESVILLE. BELOW: CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, BENTONVILLE, ARKANSAS.

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTO COURTESY LITTLE SAHARA STATE PARK

LITTLE SAHARA STATE PARK, WAYNOKA.

When it comes to nature, Oklahoma is all about exploration and preservation.

views, swimming beaches, fishing, boating and other water sport action – even scuba diving. At the end of the day, pitch a tent and enjoy the best of waterfront camping! Pick your form of flotation – an inflatable raft, kayak or traditional canoe and spend a day on the scenic Illinois River just outside of Tahlequah. The Illinois offers a gentle current through the Cookson Hills of northeastern Oklahoma with numerous outfitters available to assist you with your trip – six to 70 miles. Animal lovers can take a walk on the wild side at Lost Creek Safari, a small exotic animal park in Stillwater. In addition to various breeds of exotic deer, visitors will see African crested porcupines, red kangaroo, Grant’s zebra, ring-tailed lemurs, spider monkeys and capuchins and various types of birds, including the three largest breeds in the world – a rhea, emu and ostrich. You

might even get a kiss from the resident camel, Gilbert! The Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge in Jet is one of nine National Wildlife Refuges in the state, and serves as an excellent destination for bird and wildlife watchers as well as gem seekers! The winter months are a great time for eagle viewing. Visit the refuge between the months of April and October and dig for unique selenite crystals to take home as a souvenir!

PHOTO COURTESY BLANCHARD SPRINGS CAVERNS .

With its diverse terrain – from prairies to mountains, to caves and even a desert, more shoreline than anywhere else in the U.S., and mild temperatures, enabling year-round adventure and fun. This great state has it all for the outdoor enthusiast! After a day of activity, enjoy camping under the stars in a sleeping bag, tent or, okay – a fully furnished RV. S’mores, anyone? Yes, we said desert! You will find over 1,600 acres of it at Little Sahara State Park located south of Waynoka in northwest Oklahoma. This desert in the heartland features sand dunes ranging in height from 25 to 75 feet. Thrill-seeking off-roaders come from miles around for the main attraction: dune buggy, dirt bike and ATV riding. The park offers RV and tent sites. Just remember – if you are looking for peace and quiet, this is not for you, as the off-roading continues both day and night. Live like an outlaw at Robbers Cave State Park – the former hideout of Jesse James and Belle Starr. This park is located near Wilburton in the scenic Sans Bois Mountains of southeast Oklahoma, and is a favorite go to for rappellers, equestrians and hikers. The park offers miles of hiking and equestrian trails, rugged cliffs for climbing and an ATV riding area. The Park offers fully equipped cabins, RV sites and primitive camping. Equestrian campsites are available, so bring the family horse! Live the lake life at one of the state’s “big three.” Our stunning state is covered with more than a million surface acres of water! Lake Tenkiller in Cookson, Grand Lake in Grove and Lake Eufaula are all sure bets for lake fun. Enjoy scenic

PHOTO COURTESY LOST CREEK SAFARI

NATURE

e e r T e h t r Fo ng Nature i g g u H Lovers

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LEFT: BLANCHARD SPRINGS CAVERNS, MOUNTAIN VIEW, ARKANSAS. RIGHT: LOST CREEK SAFARI, STILLWATER.


CARLSBAD CAVERNS NATIONAL PARK, CARLSBAD, NEW MEXICO.

were created by single drops of water over millions of years. Above ground, take the “Canopy Challenge” or maneuver your way through the 5,000-square-foot “AMAZEn’ Ranch Roundup.” Another adventure stop for “cavers” is Arkansas’ Blanchard Springs Caverns. Located in the Ozark National Forest, Blanchard Springs is touted as one of the most spectacular caves found anywhere in the world. Beautifully lighted rooms highlight impressive stalactites, stalagmites and flowstones. The cave also features an undeveloped section, allowing visitors the opportunity to climb over rocks, crawl through tight spaces and slide on clay mudslides. Visit New Mexico and venture beneath the rocky slopes of the Guadalupe Mountain range to discover an underground treasure – Carlsbad Caverns National Park. With more than 117 known caves, the park is home to some of the largest and most visited caves in the country. Over 300,000 visitors travel to Carlsbad Caverns each year to witness the stunning rock formations.

DID YOU KNOW THAT THE OSTRICH IS ONE OF THE THREE LARGEST BIRDS IN THE WORLD?

BRIDGE CAVERNS

LEFT: OKLAHOMA AQUARIUM, JENKS. RIGHT: NATURAL BRIDGE CAVERNS, NATURAL BRIDGE, TEXAS. PHOTO COURTESY NATURAL

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA AQUAR

IUM

Enjoy a two-mile drive through the 3,700 acre Woolaroc Wildlife Preserve in Bartlesville. This working ranch is home to more than 30 varieties of native and exotic animals and birds. Frank Phillips, founder of Phillips Petroleum Company, created the preserve in 1925. Great care has been taken to provide the optimum environment for the animals, which roam freely. The preserve is best known for its buffalo herd that dates back to 1926. Discover aquatic creatures of all kinds in more than 100 exhibits at the Oklahoma Aquarium in Jenks. See saltwater seahorses, jellyfish and eels and explore the amazing array of wildlife that call the state’s freshwater rivers and lakes home. Pet stingrays, feed turtles and walk through a transparent, underwater tunnel to safely visit some of the biggest bull sharks in captivity! For out-of-state outdoor adventures, visit Palo Duro Canyon State Park. Located in the Texas Panhandle, the park features the second largest canyon in the country, nicknamed “The Grand Canyon of Texas.” With more than 30 miles of hiking, biking and equestrian trails, adventurers can explore the canyon by foot, mountain bike, horse or car. A variety of campsites and cabins are available for those who choose to make a weekend of it! In Texas, the Dallas World Aquarium is worth the day-trip. What was previously an old warehouse in the West End Historic District of downtown Dallas is now a rainforest home to a variety of exotic birds, sloths, crocodiles, giant river otters, Antillean manatees and monkeys. The aquarium also features interesting marine life and penguins in the South Africa exhibit! Also located in Texas is Natural Bridge Caverns in New Braunfels. Bring out your inner spelunker and participate in the “Discovery “ or “Hidden Passages” tour and learn about the massive cave formations that

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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2016

TOP DOCTORS Oklahoma is home to thousands of physicians whose practices range from primary and family care to specialties like obstetrics and gynecology, cardiology and oncology – just to mention a few. Navigating through an unfamiliar world of medical terms, tests and procedures can certainly be scary, especially when you are making decisions regarding your health or the health of your family members. The peace of mind that comes from knowing that you have made the right physician choice can make this healthcare journey through the unknown much more comfortable. The next few pages contain a list of physicians who have been deemed among the best in their medical specialties and are affiliated with some of the state’s most reputable medical facilities. They are recognized as highly trained, skilled, compassionate, and dedicated to providing excellent healthcare to their patients. Oklahoma Magazine congratulates and is proud to present the state’s Top Doctors for 2016, chosen by their peers in an extensive survey process. We encourage our readers to use this list to assist in making informed healthcare decisions.

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TOP DOCTORS

Dr. Charles F. Bethea CARDIOLOGY

INTEGRIS CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSICIANS

Sleep Matters

sion, and the development of coronary bypass and coronary stents. He also emphasizes the impact of new information technology. “Electronic Health Records (EHR) combined with informatics allows physicians to aggregate data and understand clinical results within their own practice as a whole rather than case by case,” Dr. Bethea says. “EHR will result in being able to provide highly personalized care by using pooled information across the United States. In the future, when nationally connected health records are all integrated

Getting a good night’s sleep is one of the keys to a healthy lifestyle. Sure, sleep makes you feel better, but researchers have found that it also benefits your overall health, specifically, the health of your heart, weight and even mind. It’s true. In addition to sleep deprivation affecting the immune system and its ability to fight off illnesses like the common cold and flu, long-term insufficient sleep patterns (less than seven hours per night) increase your odds of diabetes, depression, cardiovascular disease, stroke, arthritis, premature aging – even weight gain (sleep and metabolism are controlled by the same part of the brain). Your mind stays at work while you are sleeping, strengthening memories and practicing skills learned while awake. In addition to boosting your creativity and focus, getting plenty of sleep also helps to reduce stress and avoid accidents.

Adolescent Medicine

AMY B. MIDDLEMAN Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Physicians Building, Oklahoma City 405-271-6208 Sp: Eating Disorders, Adolescent BehaviorHigh Risk, Young Women’s Health, Depression

Allergy & Immunology

WARREN V. FILLEY Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic, Oklahoma City 405235-0040 Sp: Asthma, Allergy, Rhinitis, Food Allergy JANE T. PURSER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, St. John Medical Center - Tulsa • Allergy Clinic of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-307-1613 Sp: Asthma & Allergy, Food Allergy

Cardiac Electrophysiology KAREN J. BECKMAN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-2717001 Sp: Arrhythmias

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

PHOTO COURTESY CTCA.

For 45 years, Dr. Charles F. Bethea has been treating matters of the heart. A distinguished cardiologist, Dr. Bethea serves as the chief medical officer for INTEGRIS Cardiovascular Physicians at INTEGRIS Heart Hospital in Oklahoma City. Committed to advancing his field of medicine, he has devoted a significant amount of his practice to research, quality measurement and administration. His many accomplishments include introducing echocardiography to hospitals in Oklahoma City, developing the first in-hospital cardiac rehabilitation program and helping develop the INTEGRIS PACER Fitness Center, which became the first hospital-based fitness center in the United States. Among the various studies he has participated in, he has field-tested small EKG devices able to transmit EKGs to diagnose heart attacks in rural Oklahoma and is working on a study of iPhone EKGs. Dr. Bethea notes that “heart attack deaths have declined dramatically in the last 50 years from 810 per 100,000 to 200 per 100,000” but “heart disease may soon be replaced by cancer as the most common cause of death.” He shares that some of the greatest advancements in his field include the development of cholesterol drugs or ‘statins’ to lower cholesterol and blood pressure drugs called ACE-ARB’s to stop severe hyperten-

and combined, EHRs can be combined with genetic information, there will be a great reduction in medication side effects and increased effectiveness of treatment.” – Rebecca Fast

SEAN M. HALLERAN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Ctr, Oklahoma City 405-948-4040 Sp: Arrhythmias, Cardiac Catheterization, Pacemakers/Defibrillators, Atrial Fibrillation

Cardiovascular Disease

CHARLES BETHEA INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Heart Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-947-3341 PAMELA CRAVEN Oklahoma Heart Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-608-3200 Sp: Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Disease in Women, Echocardiography, Congestive Heart Failure JEFFREY A. CROOK Norman Regional Hospital, HealthPlex Hospital, Norman • Heart & Vascular Assocs, Norman 405-515-2222 DOUGLAS A. HORSTMANSHOF INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Advanced Cardiac Care, Oklahoma City 405-713-9900

Sp: Heart Failure, Transplant Medicine-Heart, Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) RICHARD KACERE St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • St John Heart Inst, Tulsa 918748-7650 Sp: Cardiovascular Imaging, Preventive Cardiology, Congenital Heart Disease-Adult, Nuclear Cardiology ALAN, M., KANESHIGE Hillcrest Medical Center, Hillcrest Hospital South, Oklahoma Heart Inst, Tulsa 918-592-0999 Sp: Congestive Heart Failure, Echocardiography, Cardiac Imaging DWIGHT W. REYNOLDS OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-2717001 Sp: Pacemakers/Defibrillators, Arrhythmias MUHAMMAD SALIM Norman Regional Hospital, HealthPlex Hospital • Norman Heart & Vascular Assocs, Norman 405-515-2260 Sp: Interventional Cardiology, Nuclear Cardiology


ROBYN LYN COWPERTHWAITE Integrated Psychiatry, Edmond 405-726-9735 Sp: ADD/ ADHD, Anxiety & Depression, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Substance Abuse

Child Neurology

DAVID J. SIEGLER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, St. John Medical Center - Tulsa • Child Neurology of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-493-3300 Sp: Epilepsy/ Seizure Disorders, Headache, Neuromuscular Disorders AMY Z. STAUFFER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-502-5960

Colon & Rectal Surgery

GARY D. DUNN OU Medical Center OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-2711400 Sp: Colon & Rectal Cancer, Anorectal Disorders SCOTT A. FENGLER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic-Colon & Rectal Surgery, Tulsa 918-794-4788 Sp: Anorectal Disorders, Colon & Rectal Cancer & Surgery, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Laparoscopic Surgery CARMEN RUIZ St. John Medical Center Tulsa • OU Physicians - Surgical Specialists, Tulsa 918-634-7500 Sp: Anorectal Disorders, Colon & Rectal Cancer & Surgery, Colonoscopy, Laparoscopic Surgery

Dermatology

LYNN A. ANDERSON Midtown Dermatology, Tulsa 918728-3100 Sp: Cosmetic Dermatology, Acne & Rosacea RAYMOND L. CORNELISON Dermatology Associates of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405608-4494 Sp: Skin Infections,

Cancer Fighting Foods

Skin Cancer, Hair & Nail Disorders, Cosmetic Dermatology TRACY DEE KUYKENDALL Kuykendall Dermatology, Tulsa 918-994-4400 Sp: Medical Dermatology, Cosmetic Dermatology, Laser Hair Removal, Laser Surgery

Paying attention to what you eat is one of the best things you can do to reduce your cancer risk. Focus on eating healthy foods filled with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that work together to lower the risk of numerous cancers: lung, mouth, esophagus, stomach and colon. A good rule is to follow a Mediterranean diet – a healthy, plant-based diet full of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, olive oil (instead of butter), legumes, cheese and yogurt. Fish is the healthiest option for meat – limit the consumption of red meat to only a few times a month. Also, try using various herbs instead of salt. According to the American Cancer Association the consumption of foods like sugar, alcohol and red meat can actually increase your risk for cancer, with one out of every three cancers in the U.S. being linked to excess weight, poor nutrition or lack of physical activity.

DONALD RICHARD SEIDEL Tulsa Dermatology Clinic, Tulsa 918-749-2261 Sp: Medical Dermatology, Geriatric Dermatology THOMAS STASKO OU Medical Center • OU Physicians Dermatology Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-271-6110 Sp: Mohs Surgery, Skin Cancer, Dermatologic Surgery

Diagnostic Radiology

DOUGLAS P. BEALL Oklahoma Spine Hospital • Clinical Radiology of Oklahoma, Edmond 405-601-2325 Sp: Musculoskeletal Imaging, Interventional Radiology, Sports Medicine Radiology ELIZABETH JETT OU Medical Center • OU Breast Institute, Oklahoma City 405271-4514 Sp: Breast Imaging, Mammography, Women’s Health KELLY N. MCDONOUGH OU Medical Center - Edmond • OU Breast Imaging of Oklahoma, Edmond 405-844-2601 Sp: Breast Imaging, Breast Cancer DEBRA S. MITCHELL OU Medical Center - Edmond • OU Breast Imaging of Oklahoma, Edmond 405-844-2601 Sp: Breast Imaging, Mammography REBECCA G. STOUGH Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City Breast MRI of OK • Oklahoma City 405-749-7077 Sp: MRIBreast, Breast Cancer, Breast Imaging TIMOTHY L. TYTLE Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Radiology Consultants, Oklahoma City 405-752-3324 Sp: Interventional Radiology

Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

D. ERIK ASPENSON Hillcrest Hospital South, Hillcrest Medical Center • OK Heart Inst, Tulsa 918-592-0999 Sp: Diabetes, Cholesterol/ Lipid Disorders, Hypertension, Thyroid Disorders RALPH J. DUDA, JR Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Heart Institute, Tulsa 918-592-0999 Sp: Hypertension, Thyroid Disorders, Cholesterol/Lipid Disorders FATEH ELKHATIB Integris Southwest Medical Center • INTEGRIS Southwest Medical Ctr, Oklahoma City 405-644-6232 Sp: Thyroid Disorders, Parathyroid Disorders, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Pituitary Disorders

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

Dr. Richard Bregman

PULMONARY MEDICINE

SLEEP DISORDERS CENTER AT SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL

Dr. Richard Bregman serves as the medical director for the Sleep Disorders Center at Saint Francis Hospital in Tulsa. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine and sleep medicine. “I chose pulmonary medicine because I have the opportunity to treat both acutely ill inpatients and provide longitudinal outpatient care,” says Dr. Bregman. “I developed my interest in sleep medicine during my pulmonary medicine fellowship as the symptoms and pathophysiology of both sleep apnea syndrome and pulmonary dysfunction are interconnected.” In 1981, Dr. Bregman established Tulsa’s first sleep disorder center, which in turn became the first nationally accredited sleep

disorder center in the city. He also founded Pulmonary Medicine Associates, which became the largest practice exclusively dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with pulmonary and related diseases – and the first pulmonary practice to provide direct patient care in Northeast Oklahoma. Since beginning his career, he has seen much progress in the fields of critical care medicine and sleep medicine. “In critical care medicine there have been so many advancements in terms of care for the critically ill patient that have improved survival rates,” Dr. Bregman says. “Also, there have been advancements in terms of diagnosis and treatment of a host of pulmonary diseases from bronchogenic carcinoma

to reactive airways disease that have both improved survival rate and improved quality of life.” He adds that some of the most clinically significant advancements in sleep medicine has been the treatment of sleep apnea syndrome – specifically improved technology for more successful therapy. For individuals experiencing problems, he encourages them to seek help. “People should pay attention to the symptoms of sleep disorders and realize that treatment can make a major difference in terms of quality of life in the short term and potentially prevent long-term consequences of an untreated condition,” says Dr. Bregman. – Rebecca Fast JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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TOP DOCTORS

Dr. Robert S. Mannel

GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER

Vitamin Power

According to recent studies, vitamin D is important for more than strong, healthy bones (vitamin D enables your body to absorb calcium). The truth is that nearly every tissue and cell type in the body benefits from vitamin D. Low levels of vitamin D might be opening the door to multiple disorders that include heart disease, diabetes, cancer and even Alzheimer’s. Even though we make some vitamin D in our bodies, most of us will require additional amounts that we can derive from our diet, a supplement or the sun (10 minutes of mid-day sun is plenty). The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends that you obtain vitamin D from all three of these sources in order to ensure adequate levels. Foods that contain vitamin D include: salmon, sardines, egg yolk, shrimp, fortified milk, cereal, yogurt and orange juice. Talk to your doctor for guidance on how to ensure you are getting the right amount.

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During medical residency, Dr. Robert S. Mannel was introduced to the gynecologic oncology field and “felt a professional calling to work with these brave women,” he says. Since then, he has worked to not only advance his specialty but assist the medical community in finding new ways to fight cancer. Today, Dr. Mannel is the Rainbolt Family Endowed Chair in Cancer, the director of the Stephenson Cancer Center and a distinguished professor within the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. He shares that in Oklahoma one in two men and one in three women will develop cancer at some point in his or her life, and 35 percent of patients diagnosed with cancer succumbed to their disease in 2015. “Gynecologic cancers play a major role in these numbers, with endometrial cancer being the fourth most common cancer CHRISTIAN S. HANSON Hillcrest Hospital South, Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Heart Inst, Tulsa 918-5920999 Sp: Diabetes, Cholesterol/ Lipid Disorders, Hypertension DAVID W. HARRIS Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-4973140 Sp: Diabetes

Family Medicine

RACHEL M. FRANKLIN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians-Family Medicine, Oklahoma City 405-271-4311 Sp: Women’s Health, Preventive Medicine W. DEAN HINZ Moore Family Physicians, Norman 405-912-3120 CHANDAN D. LAD Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa Warren Clinic, Family Medicine, Tulsa 918-728-6800

Gastroenterology

JAVID FAZILI OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405271-8478 Sp: Liver Disease, Transplant Medicine-Liver, Hepatitis

MARKHAM NIGHTENGALE Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Adult Gastroenterology Assocs, Tulsa 918-481-4700 Sp: Liver Disease

in women and ovarian cancer being one of the most lethal,” says Dr. Mannel. “Overall, gynecologic cancers account for over 35,000 deaths annually in women and trail only lung, breast and colorectal cancer in mortality. The only way to change these staggering statistics are to invest in research – both laboratory and clinical trials – so we can improve cancer patients’ chances.” Dr. Mannel has published more than 100 peer review articles on gynecologic cancer and obtained more than $10 million in grant funding for research with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) to advance the science of how to care for patients with cancer. He is also the chair of the gynecologic cancer committee for the NCI/NCTN system, which oversees cooperative group clinical trial research nationally and is a member of the NCI Gynecologic Cancer Steering Committee which sets research direction for gynecologic cancers. – Rebecca Fast

HARVEY A. TATUM Hillcrest Medical Center • Utica Park Clinic, Tulsa 918-582-6544 Sp: Crohn’s Disease, Hepatitis C, Liver Disease

Geriatric Medicine

INSUNG KIM Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic, Tulsa 918-4973650 Sp: Alzheimer’s Disease, Osteoporosis LAURENCE Z. RUBENSTEIN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians-Senior Health Ctr, Oklahoma City 405-271-3050 Sp: Falls in the Elderly PETER A. WINN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians-Family Medicine Ctr, Oklahoma City 405-271-3537 Sp: Palliative Care, Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia

Gynecologic Oncology

MICHAEL A. GOLD St. John Medical Center - Tulsa Oklahoma Cancer Specialists and Research Institute, Tulsa 918-505-3200 Sp: Ovarian Cancer, Uterine Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Pelvic Surgery-Complex

ROBERT S. MANNEL OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Ctr, Oklahoma City 405-271-8707 Sp: Laparoscopic Surgery, Gynecologic Cancers, Clinical Trials DARON G. STREET Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists and Research Institute, Tulsa 918505-3200 Sp: Cervical Cancer JOAN L. WALKER OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-8707 Sp: Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Uterine Cancer, Gynecologic Cancers

Hand Surgery

THOMAS W. EWING Norman Regional Hospital • Oklahoma Orthopaedic Inst, Norman 405-447-4999 Sp: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Hand & Upper Extremity Surgery THOMAS P. LEHMAN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-2712663 Sp: Trauma STEPHEN W. MIHALSKY OU Medical Center - Edmond, Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City 405-348-5060 Sp: Trauma, Microsurgery, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Arthritis


October 2016

Congratulations to Dr. Randall Hendricks and Dr. Bryan Hawkins for being recognized as Oklahoma Magazine’s Top Doctors for 2016.

K I TC H E N S A N D BAT H S

Oklahoma Magazine goes inside some of the most lavish kitchens and baths and takes a look at the latest in trends, technology and design that make these two rooms both functional and luxurious.

Advertising opportunities available.

R. Clio Robertson, MD David R. Hicks, MD James D. Cash, MD David E. Nonweiler, MD Randall L. Hendricks, MD David K. Wong, MD Bryan J. Hawkins, MD Thomas G. Craven, MD Jeffrey R. Morris, DO Ronald S. LaButti, DO

OKLAHOMA

Jeff A. Fox, MD Blake E. Shockley, MD Brent C. Nossaman, DO Kathleen M. Sisler, MD Troy A. Glaser, DO Bradley J. Lawson, MD Debbie A. Gladd, DO Casey L. Smith, MD Wendy B. Emerson, MD Chad E. Crawley, DO

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

www.csosortho.com 918.481.2767

advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205

Randall L. Hendricks, MD

Bryan J. Hawkins, MD

22133 Central State Orthopedics.indd 1 Kitchen & Bath.indd 1

5/4/16 1:14 PM

5/14/16 3:55 PM

C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S Saint Francis Health System congratulates those Warren Clinic physicians who were named among Oklahoma Magazine’s Top Doctors for 2016. We thank them for their dedication to patient care, commitment to excellence and for improving the lives of those in our community. 2016 TOP DOCTORS | Richard Bregman, M.D. | R. Douglas Ensley, M.D. David Harris, M.D. | Ioannis Karamichalis, M.D. | Insung Kim, M.D.

| Scott Fengler, M.D. | Edward Gregg Ford, M.D. | Chandan Lad, M.D. | Joseph Walter, M.D.

Saint Francis Health System | 918-494-2200 | saintfrancis.com

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TOP DOCTORS GHAZI M. RAYAN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma, OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-945-4888 Sp: Microsurgery, Congenital Limb Deformities, Arthritis

Infectious Disease

DOUGLAS A. DREVETS OU Medical Center • OU Physicians - Infectious Disease, Oklahoma City 405-271-6434 Sp: Infections-CNS DAVID N. SCHECK Hillcrest Medical Center • Infectious Disease Specialists of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-582-6343 Sp: AIDS/HIV

Internal Medicine

LISA FARHOOD Deaconess Hospital - Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-604-4321

MICHAEL GEBETSBERGER Hillcrest Hospital South • Utica Park Clinic, Tulsa 918-3925470 Sp: Alzheimer’s Disease, Geriatric Medicine

JOHN M. KRODEL Norman Regional Hospital • Norman Clinic, Norman 405329-0121 Sp: Preventive Medicine, Heart Disease, Diabetes, Chronic Illness STEPHEN RALPH TRAVIS OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-3445

Interventional Cardiology

R. DOUGLAS ENSLEY Saint Francis Heart Hospital, Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Warren Clinic-Cardiology, Tulsa 918-494-8500 Sp: Cardiac Catheterization, Endovascular Stent Grafts, Patent Foramen Ovale

JOHN R. HARVEY Oklahoma Heart Hospital • Oklahoma Heart Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-608-3800 Sp: Angioplasty & Stent Placement, Coronary Artery Disease NAJI E. KARAM St. Anthony Hospital - Oklahoma City, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-272-8477 Sp: Echocardiography, Ultrasound AGHA K. KHAN Oklahoma Heart Hospital-South Campus, Oklahoma Heart Hospital, Oklahoma City 405-6083800 Sp: Angioplasty, Nuclear Cardiology

Maternal & Fetal Medicine

CHARLES P. MIRABILE, JR, INTEGRIS Baptist Regional Health Center, Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • The Perinatal Center of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-748-4726 Sp: Pregnancy - High Risk JOHN R. STANLEY III Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • The Perinatal Center of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-748-4726 Sp: Pregnancy - High Risk

Medical Oncology

SHERRI S. DURICA Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City, Norman Regional Hospital • Mercy Oncology, Norman 405-321-4644 Sp: Hematologic Malignancies, Clinical Trials ALI H. MOUSSA Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists and Research Institute, Tulsa 918505-3200 Sp: Leukemia & Lymphoma GEORGE B. SELBY OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma

City 405-271-8299 Sp: Stem Cell Transplant, Bone Marrow Transplant, Hematologic Malignancies SAGUN SHRESTHA CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center • Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa 800-788-8485 Sp: Nutrition & Cancer Prevention/Control CHARLES TAYLOR St. John Medical Center - Tulsa • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists and Research Institute, Tulsa 918-505-3200 Sp: Leukemia & Lymphoma, Solid Tumors, Hematologic Malignancies

WAYNE N. LEIMBACH, JR Hillcrest Medical Center • Oklahoma Heart Inst, Tulsa 918-5920999 Sp: Cardiac Catheterization, Angioplasty & Stent Placement

In addition to pain control, weight management, promoting sleep and controlling diseases such as type two diabetes and cardiovascular disease, exercise has now been linked to decreased stress and greater happiness. Even something as simple as going for a short walk has been associated with improving your mood. How? Researchers have determined that regular exercise causes our body to produce stimulating, feelgood endorphins, which assist in raising our self-esteem and alleviating depression. Stress and anxiety can also interfere with the effectiveness of the immune system. Take a walk and take the first step to spending your day happy, relaxed and healthier.

Dr. Sagun Shrestha MEDICAL ONCOLOGY

CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS OF AMERICA AT SOUTHWESTERN REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

Dr. Sagun Shrestha serves as the medical oncology director of pharmacy and therapeutics and the program director for the medical oncology fellowship at Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southwestern Regional Medical Center in Tulsa. She shares that cancer can be treated like a chronic disease and not a terminal illness. “With decades of research and advancements in the field of oncology, there is a range of new options from targeted drugs, immunotherapy and mapping of the cancer genome, which has helped us to improve so many patients’ quality of life during their cancer care,” Dr. Shrestha

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says. “Adding palliative care with active cancer treatment early on has helped many of our patients at Cancer Treatment Centers of America experience better outcomes and an improved quality of life.” She adds that in the last decade, more than 60 anticancer drugs have been approved by the FDA. “In the last few years, researchers have been successful in understanding tumor biology, how genes are treated and a whole range of new, molecularly targeted drugs that have changed the way we treat cancer,” Dr. Shrestha says. “The successful discovery of antibody immuno-

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Don’t Worry, Be Happy!

therapies to treat cancer – especially melanoma and lung cancer – is remarkable. Also in the last decade, the first cancer prevention vaccine has been approved: Gardasil for cervical cancer. With all of these new advancements in the field of oncology, it makes the outlook of cancer very encouraging – not just for the patients, but for treating oncologists like me.” Dr. Shrestha also notes the importance of screening guidelines for cancer. Tests such as mammograms and colonoscopies help in diagnosing and treating cancer in the early stages, which potentially offers a better outcome than being diagnosed in later stages. – Rebecca Fast


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TOP DOCTORS

Dr. Carmen Ruiz

C O L O R E C TA L S U R G E R Y Dr. Carmen Ruiz is an assistant professor and colorectal surgeon with OU Physicians and the OU-TU School of Community Medicine in Tulsa. After graduating from Harvard Medical School, she completed a general surgery residency at Boston Medical Center where she continued her interest in colorectal diseases. “I found colorectal surgery patients most interesting to read about, operate on, manage postoperatively and follow after hospital discharge,” Dr. Ruiz says. “After my five-year general surgery residency, I naturally chose to specialize in colorectal surgery and completed a colorectal surgery fellowship at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.” She believes her greatest accomplishment is helping to save lives. “Colonoscopy provides the technology to prevent colorectal cancer or to find it before it spreads beyond reasonable hope of cure,” she says. “Colorectal cancer is typically silent before its advanced stages. Colonoscopy permits discovery and removal of tumors before they become cancerous. Colonoscopy even allows for cure of very early colorectal cancer without requiring surgery. More advanced cancers do require surgery. As a colorectal surgeon, I perform the colonoscopies and the surgeries. It is intrinsically rewarding for me to be involved in this life-saving effort.” She also notes that significant improvements have been made in treating advanced colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Previously, there was only one chemotherapy formula available. “There are now various chemotherapy options for advanced colorectal cancer,” says Dr. Ruiz. “Tumors can now be genetically analyzed for selecting the most effective chemotherapy.” What she most wants people to know is that colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. “With the availability of colonoscopy, this should not be the case,” Dr. Ruiz says. “Timely colonoscopy is of crucial importance.” – Rebecca Fast ALEDA TOMA INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma, Deaconess Hospital - Oklahoma • Cancer Specialists of OK, Oklahoma City 405-9429200 Sp: Breast Cancer

City 405-949-3349 Sp: Transplant Medicine-Kidney

NeonatalPerinatal Medicine

LUKAS HARAGSIM OU Medical Center, VA Medical Center - Oklahoma City • OU Physicians - Nephrology, Oklahoma City 405-271-6842 Sp: Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

Nephrology

PRANAY KATHURIA Hillcrest Medical Center, St. John Medical Center - Tulsa • OU Physicians - Internal Medicine, Tulsa 918-619-4888 Sp: Kidney Disease - Chronic, Hypertension, Glomerulonephritis, Transplant Medicine - Kidney

MARILYN B. ESCOBEDO Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405271-5215 Sp: Prematurity/Low Birth Weight Infants, Neonatal Respiratory Care

MARY ANN CAMERON Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Nephrology Specialists of OK, Tulsa 918-712-5000 BENJAMIN D. COWLEY JR. OU Medical Center • OU Physicians - Nephrology, Oklahoma City 405-271-6842 Sp: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Transplant Medicine-Kidney

Neurological Surgery

SHON W. COOK Community Hospital - Oklahoma City, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma 405-3106977 Sp: Neurovascular Surgery, Brain Tumors, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Spinal Surgery

JOSE EL-AMM INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Inst, Oklahoma

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Take Charge of Your Health

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

OU PHYSICIANS O U -T U S C H O O L O F C O M M U N I T Y M E D I C I N E

The truth is that each of us are ultimately responsible and in charge of our own health. And there’s a big swing toward being proactive with it instead of reactive. Remember, being a proactive patient involves more than simply making an appointment with your doctor – although that’s a good start! The single most important way that you can remain healthy is to be an active member of your health care team every day. Your lifestyle is the most controllable factor that influences your health. Here’s a guide to being proactive: • Invest in programs to change unhealthy behavior such as smoking. • Eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly. • Stay current on physicals, bloodwork and other routine procedures (such as colonoscopies) as recommended by your physician. • Never be afraid to get a second opinion. A proactive patient is also an informed one. The more you know about your condition and the options for treatment, the better care you will receive. Be cautious in your research, though, and don’t believe everything you read on the internet!


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TOP DOCTORS EMILY FRIEDMAN Northwest Surgical Hospital, Community Hospital - Oklahoma City 405-945-4900 Sp: Spinal Cord Injury, Spinal Surgery

MARC A. GOLDBERG St. John Medical Center - Tulsa The Eye Institute, Tulsa 918584-4433 Sp: Corneal Disease & Transplant, Cataract Surgery

TIMOTHY B. MAPSTONE Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, OU Medical Center • Univ OK Hlth Sci Ctr, Dept Neurosurgery, Oklahoma City 405-271-4912 Sp: Brain Tumors, Pediatric Neurosurgery, Chiari’s Deformity, Epilepsy

P. LLOYD HILDEBRAND OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Inst, Oklahoma City 405-271-1096 Sp: Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery, Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery, Eyelid Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery, Orbital Surgery

Neurology

REBECCA K. MORGAN OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Inst, Oklahoma City 405271-1793 Sp: Low Vision

KERSI J. BHARUCHA OU Medical Center • OU Physicians - Neurology, Oklahoma City 405-271-3635 Sp: Parkinson’s Disease, Movement Disorders, Huntington’s Disease, Botox Therapy EDUARDO A. DE SOUSA OU Medical Center • OU Physicians - Neurology, Oklahoma City 405-271-3635 Sp: Electrodiagnosis, Neuromuscular Disorders, Diabetic Neuropathy DAVID LEE GORDON OU Medical Center • OU Physicians - Neurology, Oklahoma City 405-271-3635 Sp: Headache/Migraine, Cerebrovascular Disease RODNEY L. MYERS Hillcrest Medical Center • Utica Park Clinic, Tulsa 918-560-3823 Sp: Parkinson’s Disease, NeuroRehabilitation

R. MICHAEL SIATKOWSKI OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City 405-271-1094 Sp: Pediatric Ophthalmology, Neuro-Ophthalmology, Retinopathy of Prematurity, Strabismus GREGORY L. SKUTA OU Medical Center • Dean McGee Eye Inst, Oklahoma City 405271-7806 Sp: Glaucoma

Orthopaedic Surgery

Obstetrics & Gynecology

BRADFORD BOONE Oklahoma Surgical Hospital, Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Eastern OK Orthopedic Ctr, Tulsa 918-494-9300 Sp: Sports Medicine, Elbow Surgery, Knee Surgery, Shoulder Surgery

GRANT R. COX St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • OB-GYN Specialists of Tulsa, Tulsa 918712-8700 Sp: Infertility, Gynecologic Surgery, Miscarriage - Recurrent

CHARLES H. FUNDERBURK JR. MCBRIDE CLINIC ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL • MCBRIDE CLINIC, OKLAHOMA CITY 405-230-9270 Sp: Hand Surgery

JOHN MARTIN BEAL St. John Medical Center - Tulsa • Tulsa OB-GYN Associates, Tulsa 918-747-9641

JOSEPH ROY JOHNSON Oklahoma State University Medical Center, Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • OSU Physicians, Tulsa 918-586-4500 Sp: Laparoscopic Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Gynecology Only MUKESH T. PAREKH Deaconess Hospital - Oklahoma, Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Northwest Obstetrics & Gynecology, Oklahoma City 405-943-6288 Sp: Pregnancy - High Risk, Incontinence, Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair, Robotic Surgery

Ophthalmology

RAY M. BALYEAT St. John Medical Center - Tulsa, Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • The Eye Institute, Tulsa 918749-2220 Sp: Retina/Vitreous Surgery, Retinal Disorders, Retinal Detachment TODD A. BROCKMAN St. John Medical Center - Tulsa • The Eye Institute, Tulsa 918742-5513 Sp: Cataract Surgery GARY T. DENSLOW Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, Hillcrest Medical Center • Pediatric Eye Assocs & Family Eye Cre, Tulsa 918-949-9898 Sp: Pediatric Ophthalmology

JAMES M. RICHARD INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • Children’s Eye Care, Oklahoma City 405-751-2020 Sp: Pediatric Ophthalmology, StrabismusAdult & Pediatric, Eye Muscle Disorders

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BRYAN J. HAWKINS Saint Francis Hospital Tulsa, Hillcrest Hospital South • Central States Orthopedics, Tulsa 918-481-2767 Sp: Foot & Ankle Surgery, Arthroscopic Surgery, Sports Medicine RANDALL L. HENDRICKS Saint Francis Hospital Tulsa, Hillcrest Hospital South • Central States Orthopedics, Tulsa 918-481-2767 Sp: Spinal Surgery, Arthroscopic Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery YOGESH MITTAL Hillcrest Medical Center • The Orthopaedic Center, Tulsa 918301-3139 Sp: Hip & Knee Replacement, Robotic Surgery, Arthroscopic Surgery - Knee, Arthroscopic Surgery - Hip TIMOTHY A. PUCKETT OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-2712663 Sp: Spinal Surgery CARLAN K. YATES McBride Clinic Orthopedic Hospital • McBride Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-230-9270 Sp: Sports Medicine, Arthroscopic Surgery, Shoulder & Knee Surgery, Elbow Surgery

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

Otolaryngology

KEITH F. CLARK St. Anthony Hospital - Oklahoma City • Oklahoma City ENT Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-272-6027 Sp: Airway Reconstruction, Voice Disorders, Vocal Cord Disorders - Botox Therapy, Endoscopic Sinus Surgery P. DAVID HUNTER St. Anthony Hospital - Oklahoma City • Oklahoma City ENT Clinic, Oklahoma City 405-272-6027 Sp: Facial Plastic Surgery, TraumaFace, Head & Neck Reconstruction, Craniofacial Surgery CHRISTOPHER A. PASKOWSKI Norman Regional Hospital • OK Otolaryngology Assocs, Norman 405-364-2666 Sp: Sleep Disorders/Apnea/Snoring, Nasal & Sinus Disorders, Hearing & Balance Disorders, Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

Nailing the Clues Did you know that your fingernails can provide clues to your overall health? For example, your nails’ shape, color, strength, ridges and depressions, thickness and growth rate can all be indications of various health concerns from mild to serious. Connective tissue disorders, low blood oxygen level, anemia, diabetes, hypothyroidism, as well as cardiovascular, liver and kidney disease can actually be tipped off by the condition of your nails. Your nails can be strongly influenced by your nutritional status, medications that you are taking, trauma and the aging process itself. Give your fingernails some love and care by staying hydrated and eating a well-balanced diet. In many cases, changes to your nails are normal, but if you notice any significant changes, consulting your doctor is always the best bet.

IVAN WAYNE OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-5950 Sp: Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Rhinoplasty, Cosmetic Surgery DAVID, W. WHITE SR. Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital • Eastern Oklahoma ENT, Tulsa 918-492-3636 Sp: Otology, Neuro-Otology, Hearing & Balance Disorders

Pain Medicine

C. SCOTT ANTHONY Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital • Pain Management of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-447-9300 Sp: PainInterventional Techniques, Spinal Cord Stimulation, PainMusculoskeletal-Spine & Neck, Pain-Spine RITA M. HANCOCK OK Ctr for Orthopaedics & Sports Med, Oklahoma City 405759-2663 Sp: Pain Management, Pain-Musculoskeletal DARRYL D. ROBINSON Community Hospital - Oklahoma City • Oklahoma Sports Science & Orthopaedics, Oklahoma City 405-703-4950 Sp: Pain Management, Pain-Spine, Musculoskeletal Disorders, Electrodiagnosis TRACI L. WHITE Saint Francis Hospital Tulsa, Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital • Pain Management of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-447-9300 Sp: Pain-Interventional Techniques, Pain-Musculoskeletal-Spine & Neck, Pain-Spine, Spinal Cord Stimulation

Pediatric Cardiology

EDWARD D. OVERHOLT Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • OU Children’s Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-4411 Sp: Arrhythmias, Interventional Cardiology

Pediatric Endocrinology

LAURA J. CHALMERS Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, Hillcrest Medical Center • Harold Hamm Diabetes Center, Tulsa 918-619-4803 Sp: Sexual Differentiation Disorders, Growth/Development Disorders, Obesity, Weight Management

Pediatric Gastroenterology

Pediatric Pulmonology

STEVEN FITTS Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, Tulsa 918-6194323 Sp: Endoscopy, Digestive Disorders

JOSEPH N. WALTER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis • Warren Clinic - Pediatric Pulmonology, Tulsa 918-502-2000

JUDITH O’CONNOR Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Hosp, Gastroenterology, Oklahoma City 405-271-6549 Sp: Liver Disease, Transplant Medicine-Liver

EDWARD GREGG FORD Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis • Warren Clinic - Pediatric Surgery, Tulsa 918-4949450 Sp: Critical Care

Pediatric HematologyOncology

RENE Y. MCNALL-KNAPP Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Physicians, Oklahoma City 405271-4412 Sp: Brain Tumors, Neuro-Oncology WILLIAM H. MEYER Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Physicians, Oklahoma City 405271-4412 Sp: Sarcoma, Pediatric Cancers

Pediatric Nephrology

MARTIN A. TURMAN Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Children’s Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-4409 Sp: Transplant Medicine - Kidney, Dialysis Care, Kidney Disease - Chronic

Pediatric Surgery

Pediatric Urology

BRADLEY KROPP Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center • OU Childrens Physicians - Ped Urology, Oklahoma City 405-271-3800 Sp: Neurogenic Bladder, Bladder Exstrophy, Bladder Reconstruction OREN F. MILLER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis Urologic Specialists of OK, Tulsa 918-749-8765 Sp: Voiding Dysfunction

Pediatrics

JAMES E. FIELDS Norman Regional Hospital • Premiere Pediatrics, Norman 405-364-6432 Sp: Preventive Medicine EILEEN M. FOX Norman Regional Hospital Premiere Pediatrics, Norman 405-364-6432 Sp: Developmental Disorders RICHARD A. GORDON Hillcrest Medical Center • Utica Park Clinic, Tulsa 918-560-3832

THOMAS L. KUHLS Norman Regional Hospital • Norman Pediatric Associates, Norman 405-321-5114 JILL S. WARREN OU Medical Center • OU Childrens Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-6827 Sp: Preventive Medicine, Vaccines VICTOR T. WILSON HealthPlex Hospital • Caring Pediatrics, Norman 405-360-7337 Sp: ADD/ADHD, Asthma, Allergy

Plastic Surgery

PAUL R. CALLEGARI Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, Hillcrest Hospital South, Tulsa 918494-8200 Sp: Body Contouring after Weight Loss, Cosmetic Surgery - Face & Breast, Hand Surgery, Reconstructive Plastic Surgery CHRISTIAN EL AMM OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-4864 Sp: Craniofacial Surgery, Cosmetic Surgery JUSTIN MICHAEL JONES INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • Jones Plastic Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-8483459 Sp: Cosmetic Surgery - Body, Cosmetic Surgery - Breast, Liposuction & Body Contouring, Dermatologic Fillers ARCHIBALD S. MILLER III Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center • Tulsa Plastic Surgery, Tulsa 918-492-2282 Sp: Breast Reconstruction & Augmentation, Cosmetic SurgeryFace & Body, Facial Rejuvenation


October 2016

THE

MEDICAL ISSUE

Oklahoma Magazine takes a look at the latest in technology and the health isses effecting our state. How does Oklahoma Rank?

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September 2016

Active LIVING

CONGRATULATIONS

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For being named one of Oklahoma’s Top Doctors! From the OSU Center for Health Sciences

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Wash Those Hands!

Germs are abundant and can spread very easily by simply touching a person, object or surface and then touching your face. Just as simply, one of the easiest ways to prevent the spread of germs and infections is by learning how to wash your hands correctly and frequently doing so throughout the day. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers the following guidelines: • Place hands under clean, running water. • Add soap and rub hands together until suds form. • Scrub every surface for at least 20 seconds, including both sides, between fingers and under fingernails. • Rinse hands under running water and dry with a clean, dry towel or air dry. When soap and water are not available, alcohol-based hand sanitizers that contain at least 60 percent alcohol can effectively clean hands. Unfortunately, there is no way to completely get rid of germs but proper hand washing can significantly limit the spread of them, keeping you and others healthier! Psychiatry

PHEBE M. TUCKER OU Medical Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-5251 Sp: Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder JILL K. WARNOCK OU Medical Center • OU-Tulsa, Dept Psychiatry, Tulsa 918619-4400 Sp: Anxiety & Mood Disorders, Sexual Dysfunction, Stress Management

Pulmonary Disease

FRED GARFINKEL OU Medical Center • OU Wayman Tisdale Specialty Hlth Clinic, Tulsa 918-619-8700 Sp: Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD), Asthma DANIEL A. NADER CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center • Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa, 800-788-8485 Sp: Lung Cancer, Interventional Pulmonology

Radiation Oncology

JOSHUA D. GARREN Hillcrest Medical Center • Radiation Oncology Consultants, Tulsa 918-579-8200 Sp: Brain Tumors, Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy TERENCE S. HERMAN OU Medical Center • Oklahoma Univ Health Sci Ctr, Oklahoma City 405-271-5641 Sp: Breast Cancer, Sarcoma, Brain Tumors M. CONNIE NGUYEN Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Oklahoma Cancer Specialists and Research Institute, Tulsa 918-505-3200 Sp: Stereotactic Radiosurgery KIRAN PRABHU INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma • INTEGRIS Cancer Institute, Oklahoma City 405552-0490 Sp: Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Image

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Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) J. SPENCER THOMPSON OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Ctr, Oklahoma City 405271-3016 Sp: Gynecologic Cancers, Pediatric Cancers

Reproductive Endocrinology

LATASHA B. CRAIG OU Medical Center • OU Physicians - Reproductive Medicine, Oklahoma City 405-271-1616 Sp: Pregnancy Loss - Recurrent, Ovarian Failure, Menstrual Disorders, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome KARL R. HANSEN OU Medical Center • OU Physicians - Reproductive Med, Oklahoma City 405-271-1616 Sp: Infertility - IVF, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Endometriosis

Rheumatology

TIMOTHY L. HUETTNER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa, St. John Medical Center-Tulsa • Rheumatology Associates, Tulsa 918491-9007 Sp: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, Lupus/SLE JOAN T. MERRILL OU Medical Center • Oklahoma Medical Research Fdn, Oklahoma City 405-271-7805 Sp: Lupus/ SLE, Rheumatoid Arthritis

RUSSELL G. POSTIER OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-1632 Sp: Gastrointestinal Surgery, Biliary Surgery, Pancreatic Surgery DENISE L. RABLE Lakeside Women’s Hospital - Oklahoma City • INTEGRIS Medical Group, Oklahoma City 405-552-0400 Sp: Breast Cancer & Surgery, Breast Disease

IRA N. TARGOFF OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-271-8478 Sp: Polymyositis, Dermatomyositis, Arthritis

LANETTE F. SMITH St. John Medical Center - Tulsa, Hillcrest Medical Center • Breast Surgery of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-585-5658 Sp: Breast Surgery

Sleep Medicine

BEVERLY TALBERT OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Ctr, Breast Oncology, Oklahoma City 405271-7226 Sp: Breast Cancer & Surgery

RICHARD M. BREGMAN Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • St Francis Sleep Disorders Ctr, Tulsa 918-502-5600 Sp: Sleep Disorders/Apnea LAMONT E. CAVANAGH Hillcrest Medical Center, OU Medical Center • Sports Medicine & Family Medicine, Tulsa 918-619-4600 Sp: Primary Care Sports Medicine CHARLES B. PASQUE OU Medical Center • OU Physicians, Oklahoma City 405-2712663 Sp: Arthroscopic Surgery, Shoulder & Knee Surgery, Hip Surgery, Elbow Surgery

Surgery

BRIAN BOGGS Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Clinic, Breast Surgery, Oklahoma City 405-749-7023 Sp: Breast Surgery WILLIAM C. DOOLEY OU Medical Center, St. Anthony Hospital - Oklahoma City 405271-1400 Sp: Breast Cancer & Surgery, Sarcoma-Soft Tissue ALAN B. HOLLINSWORTH Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City 405-936-5455 Sp: Breast Cancer Genetics, Breast Cancer Risk Assessment CHRISTOPHER W. LENTZ INTEGRIS Baptist Regional Health Center • INTEGRIS Paul Silverstein Burn Ctr, Oklahoma City 405-552-2857 Sp: Burn Care, Reconstructive Surgery, Critical Care, Wound Healing/Care JAMES R. MCCURDY Norman Regional Hospital • Oklahoma Surgical Associates, Norman 405-329-4102 Sp: Vascular Surgery

lished online nomination survey process is open to all licensed physicians in America and is promoted through a variety of mail, email, fax and other broad distribution platforms to encourage the highest levels of participation. Nominating physicians, including the medical leadership of hospitals, are asked to identify highly skilled, exceptional doctors. Castle Connolly’s physician-led team of researchers follows a rigorous screening process to select top doctors on both the national and regional levels. Careful screening of doctors’ educational and professional experience is essential before final selection is made among those physicians most highly regarded by their peers.

Thoracic & Cardiac Surgery

MARY-JANE BARTH Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis • Warren Clinic - Ped Cardiac Surgery, Tulsa 918-494-1710 Sp: Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery R. MARK BODENHAMER Oklahoma Heart Hospital Oklahoma • Cardiovascular Assocs, Oklahoma City 405-608-3800 Sp: Cardiovascular Surgery, Thoracic Surgery JOHN CHAFFIN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center - Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-951-4345 Sp: TransplantHeart, Transplant - Lung, Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) JOHN KARAMICHALIS Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, Saint Francis Heart Hospital • Warren Clinic-Ped Cardiac Surgery, Tulsa 918-4941710 Sp: Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery

Surgery, Thoracic Cancers

Urology

MICHAEL S. COOKSON OU Medical Center • Stephenson Cancer Center, Oklahoma City 405-271-4088 Sp: Urologic Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Testicular Cancer DANIEL J. CULKIN OU Medical Center OU Physicians - Urology, Oklahoma City 405-271-6900 Sp: Urologic Cancer, Minimally Invasive Surgery, Incontinence-Female, Reconstructive Surgery SCOTT E. LITWILLER Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Urologic Specialists of OK, Tulsa 918-749-8765 Sp: UroGynecology, Pelvic Reconstruction, Incontinence

Vascular & Interventional Radiology

VANCE MCCOLLOM Mercy Hospital - Oklahoma City • Mercy Hosp, Interventional Radiology , Oklahoma City 405936-5775 THOMAS E. WILEY III Saint Francis Hospital - Tulsa • Radiology Consultants of Tulsa, Tulsa 918-743-8838 Sp: Peripheral Vascular Disease, Thrombolytic Therapy, Angioplasty & Stent Placement

Vascular Surgery

JOHN BLEBEA OU Medical Center, St. John Medical Center - Tulsa 918-6347500 Sp: Endovascular Surgery, Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation

SCOTT K. LUCAS St. Anthony Hospital Oklahoma City, Deaconess Hospital - Oklahoma, Oklahoma City 405-310-3028 Sp: Minimally Invasive Heart Valve Surgery, Endovascular Surgery, Coronary Artery Surgery, Heart Valve Surgery - Mitral GOYA V. RAIKAR Oklahoma Heart Hospital-South Campus, Oklahoma City 405-6083800 Sp: Cardiothoracic Surgery, Heart Valve Surgery - Mitral, Minimally Invasive Cardiac

The result – we identify the top doctors in America and provide you, the consumer, with detailed information about their education, training and special expertise in our paperback guides, national and regional magazine “Top Doctors” features and online directories. Doctors do not and cannot pay to be selected and profiled as Castle Connolly Top Doctors. Physicians selected for inclusion in this magazine’s “Top Doctors” feature may also appear as Regional Top Doctors online at www.castleconnolly.com, or in one of Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors guides, such as America’s Top Doctors® or America’s Top Doctors® for Cancer.


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WEDDING GUIDE

“I Do” – What’s Next? Being prepared can take a lot of stress out of the big day.

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BY TARA MALONE • PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

hether you’ve been planning your dream wedding since childhood or have never contemplated the many variables of a marriage ceremony, a little

planning can go a long way. But where to begin? And how can couples minimize the stress of planning a ceremony and reception without caving under the pressure? Some of Oklahoma’s matrimonial experts weigh in on the essentials to consider. JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Say Yes to the Dress

Let’s face it, a lot of work and energy go into planning a wedding, but for the bride, the biggest question after the question is what to wear. While it’s tempting to jump head first into the dream dress, Lori Conley at David’s Bridal recommends starting with the venue before gown-shopping. “The venue sets the tone of your entire day and also offers perspective on design elements that will work best with your space,” Conley says. “Are you using a grand ballroom for your reception? Wearing a ball gown will allow your style to be as grand as the space itself. Having an outdoor garden wedding? Opt for a style with no train, or even dare to go with a tea-length gown to ensure that your dress doesn’t fight the terrain.” In addition to suiting the venue, a dress needs to flatter its wearer. There are as many types and shapes of gowns as there are brides, and while a classy peplum might seem like a sophisticated statement, the reality might be different once it’s actually on the bride. “I always encourage brides to try on a range of silhouettes when they first start shopping,” Conley says. “A wedding gown is unlike anything you’ve ever purchased before in your life. Getting familiar with a silhouette shape that makes you feel confident and comfortable is so important.” Of course, as with all weddings, there are practical considerations as well. There’s more to the wedding ensemble than just the dress. Accoutrements and last-minute adjustments should be factored into your wedding gown budget. “Your total budget should take into account everything you need for your wedding day look,” Conley says, “including a veil, undergarments, accessories and alterations. I always think a good rule of thumb is to reserve around 20 percent of your budget to cover those costs.”

Use the Buddy System — Hire an Event Planner

While some couples are eager to plan each detail themselves, others may want a professional to help share the burden of planning a large wedding. At the same time, trusting someone to help create one of your most treasured memories can itself result in a lot of pressure. Joe Mathis, event producer and owner of J.A. Mathis Company and Vern’s Props and Flowers, says being clear about needs and expectations can help couples choose the planner for them. “It is important for a couple to understand what they need in a wedding planner,” Mathis says. “Do they need organization? Creative design and direction? Or do they need labor? Some planners specialize in one of the above,

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while others can provide all services or perhaps work as a team to accomplish the tasks at hand. It is important to understand up front what services an event planner will be providing. Make sure you do not have expectations that will go unmet.” Mathis says one of the biggest challenges of planning the event is meeting the needs of all involved, from the bridal party to family and friends. “Helping everyone know expectations, plans and what is important to the couple is crucial in having a great event,” he says. “Communicating this can be a challenge. Additionally, organizing vendors and helping them to know expectations for the day can also

be very challenging. A great planner can help with all of these details.”

Bienvenue to the Venue

Be it a church, a park or a family home, many couples have a good idea of where they want their ceremony to take place. However, there’s also the reception to consider. Do you need a place with a dance floor and bar? Or a simple buffet for a mix-and-mingle? What’s the most important factor in picking a reception venue? Mickey Mantle’s Steakhouse in Oklahoma City’s Bricktown hosts around 15 wedding receptions each year as well as numerous related events such as rehearsals, showers and

engagements or bachelor/bachelorette parties. The venue provides a full host of services, from floral arrangements to professional help. Brooke Wilhite, assistant event manager at the steakhouse, says that while cost and space should be taken into account, one consideration trumps the rest. “I believe it is important that a couple choose a venue that is representative of them as a couple,” she says. So when thinking about the services you’ll need for your friends and family, the activities planned and the cost involved, don’t forget to pick a place that will provide memories of those special reception moments and the unique things that brought you together.

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Marriage Builds up an Appetite

Your wedding may be the most treasured and memorable party of your life, and what’s a bash without great food? Picking a menu should be fun (and tasty), but it can become burdensome when considering the preferences of the wedding party, balancing your taste for exotic fare with the meat-and-potatoes sentiments or numerous dietary needs and intolerances of your guests. When considering the endgame of the meal, what’s most important? “What is the feel of the reception that you envision?” asks Maggie Howell, co-owner of Aunt Pittypat’s Catering and Events in Oklahoma City. “Remember, you don’t have to please everyone. You have to make sure you are having the party you want to have. Do you want everyone dining together at once or would you prefer more of a cocktail-party grazing atmosphere? Formal or whimsical? Really talk with your partner about the flow of the evening that you prefer, as this will answer a lot of questions for your caterer/planner. “Again, what do you love to eat?” she continues. “Include favorites that go along with the feel. Easy, bite-sized, cocktailstyle food or your favorite meal plated for each guest? Avoid heavy, overly starchy foods to ensure everyone is ready to enjoy the entirety of

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the event and not ready for a nap after dinner. Seasonality is also really important. If you must have watermelon, don’t plan a winter wedding!” Howell also points out a lesser-known tip: some caterers, including Aunt Pittypat’s, can double as event planners. “Catering and event planning go hand in hand,” she says. “A seasoned professional caterer should be able to help guide your event in layout, flow and even décor to best meet the needs of your vision.”

All About That Cake

Next to the bride and groom, the centerpiece of any wedding is the cake. From traditional tiered affairs to tables of pies or colorful

macaroons, Merritt’s Bakery, run by family members Bobbie, Larry and Christian Merritt, has been baking for Tulsans’ weddings for 36 years. Bobbie says one of the most important considerations isn’t just the type or flavor of cake, but the amount as well. “I recommend that they [couples] should order enough cake for each guest that they invited, in addition to ordering a groom’s cake for another 30 to 40 percent of the guests,” she says. She also recommends factoring in 10 percent on top, just in case some members of the wedding party want to take some home for continuing celebrations with family. Traditionally, Bobbie says, if a couple orders a tiered cake, the top layer is saved and shared between bride and groom on their first anniversary. She recommends freezing the tier in a large container with a tight-fitting lid. In addition, she says, plan your order three months ahead during peak wedding times (specifically May, June, October and December). According to Bobbie, style is important too. Be sure to consult with your baker about your vision and keep in mind the bridal gown and décor or theme. Feel free to bring drawings of what you imagine your cake should look like. “There is nothing that says ‘wedding’ better than the cake,” she says.


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Flower Power

Classic roses or herbs and wildflowers? Traditional shades or a riot of colors? Flowers can be one of the most telling statements of wedding style, but can also be the most difficult (and fun!) to choose. Melissa Brumfield, floral designer and wedding consultant for New Leaf Florist in Oklahoma City, says to start with the practicalities in mind. “While couples should be aware of what arrangements they need for their wedding day, such as bridal bouquets, boutonnieres or centerpieces, I find it more important to have a budget in mind even if it’s vague at first,” she cautions. Once the numbers of the budget and the order are crunched, Brumfield says consult with your florist about what inspires you and what colors and styles you are drawn to. And always have the practical details handy. “Details are important in our business,” she says. “We don’t want to offend Grandma Fern because she didn’t get her corsage!” When choosing a florist, Brumfield encourages couples to do their homework diligently. “Look online, check out social media,” she says. “Most florists have a website that will show some professional work, and most of us have Instagram, Facebook and Twitter pages that will show off what’s happening on a more day-to-day basis. You can see who we are and what we can do. So window shop online and then schedule appointments with several florists.”

What a Picture is Worth

Picking the right photographer can help couples relive all the laughter, tears and joy of the wedding day for years to come. Since 2011, Alex Dugan and Howie Mapson of Alex and Howie Photography in Oklahoma City have been capturing and preserving the memories of Oklahoma’s happy couples. Dugan says before selecting the right photographer, there is a lot you should investigate. “Make sure that their style is something that you are looking for,” she advises. “Do their photos seem traditional, conceptual or heavily edited? Think about what your wedding needs. For instance, if you are looking at a photographer’s website and you don’t see any photographs at night or during a reception, and you have an evening wedding, this may not be the photographer for you. Using flashes and off-camera lighting is an entirely different skill from daytime photos and using natural light.” Dugan also recommends not just relying on the photographer’s curated portfolio, but looking at examples of the whole event. “Ask to see a full wedding from the wedding photographer, not just their four or five best shots from one – that’s what you’ll be getting after all,” she says. “Capturing good candid shots requires different skills and anticipation than posed photos. You want a photographer that can show they are capable of both.” Chris Humphrey has been photographing weddings in the Tulsa area for 19 years. When selecting a photographer, he advises couples to choose someone who cares as much about the wedding day as the couple does. “It goes so much deeper than the ‘creative shots’ that a photographer will get,” he says. “This day is about the couple, their family and their friends, and as a photographer, I get to preserve that day for everyone. It’s a tremendous honor and an equally tremendous responsibility, so choosing someone who can not only handle a wedding but will take care of you is a must – and make sure you like them. It’s always nice to like the people you surround yourself with on your wedding day. “I envision my couple sitting down with their kids, maybe 10 or 15 years after their wedding, opening their wedding album and reliving that day again, right there,” Humphrey says. “Not just looking at the photos and seeing who was there, but genuinely feeling the emotions of that day all over again – the anticipation, the excitement, the laughter, the tears and the joy of their wedding day. I love that part!”

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Senior Living

SENIORS

Protecting Senior Citizens from Fraud and Financial Scams

Senior citizens are often targeted by scammers, but being aware and informed can reduce the risk of becoming a target. By M.A. Chiappetta

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According to The True Link Report on Elder hen Oklahoman Financial Abuse 2015, each year the elderly Madalyn Smith are defrauded of as much as $36.48 billion. Harmon heard And much of that money is taken through the message on means that are unethical and deceptive but her voice mail, it technically legal. This can make it hard to sounded perfectly normal. “This is Rachel fight fraudsters, and it means seniors need from Card Members Services,” the caller to be especially on their guard against those stated. “There is nothing wrong with your who would steal their money. credit card account, but we would like to Senior citizens are give you the opporan especially tempttunity to reduce your Each year the elderly are ing target for many interest rate. Press reasons – they tend to defrauded of as much as one if you would like the opportu$36.48 billion. And much of have more ready cash, for one thing. They nity.” that money is taken through may be more trusting It seemed like a means that are unethical of strangers, or less good idea. “We get likely to think fast on that call so often that and deceptive but their feet. But even I thought I would technically legal. the most astute of press one and see people can be taken in what they could by these schemes, which often masquerade do,” Harmon explains. “Long story short, as an offer to help someone in need. they wanted my credit card number and my For Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner checking account number. I said, ‘Are you John D. Doak, fighting elder fraud is crucial crazy? This conversation is over.’” to the state’s well-being. Thankfully Harmon, who is in her sixties, “Crooks target seniors because they think recognized the scam for what it was and they’re an easy target,” Doak says. “The avoided trouble. But others aren’t so lucky.


scams have gotten more sophisticated, with crooks using social media and the internet to find out where you live, where you work and who you’re related to. Once they have that information, it’s easier for them to steal your money.” These scams can happen over the phone, by email or in person. Common tricks include fraudsters claiming to be IRS agents, debt collectors, health care representatives, or even a long-lost child or grandchild in trouble. And with the increasing health needs of an aging population, phony anti-aging products, fake prescription drugs and funeral and cemetery scams are becoming more common. Clues that you may be the target of a scammer are varied, but they boil down to a few key elements. Fraudsters often claim to be someone you would normally trust, such as a representative of a bank or credit card company. They typically resort to fear tactics, such as threatening you with jail time or high fines unless immediate action is taken. Their goal is simple – to get you off-balance and force you to act fast, before you have time to think. The best way to avoid being taken in by scammers is to be educated and aware. The Federal Trade Commission’s website recommends several red flags to be on the lookout for. First and foremost, don’t make any assumptions. Just because the caller ID says IRS or the name of your bank, that doesn’t mean it’s accurate. Caller IDs can be faked, and so can email addresses. Trust your gut. If something doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. Also, don’t be rushed into making decisions or taking action. Research charities before you decide to donate. Fraudsters will often claim to be doing charity work, especially after a disaster such as a severe storm or a wildfire. To help fight elder fraud and make the public aware of how to protect themselves from scammers, the Oklahoma Insurance Department is hosting ten free conferences throughout the state. The conferences started in May and will continue through July. “Our seniors should be protected from scammers,” Doak says. “These Senior Fraud Conferences will teach Oklahomans how to spot the red flags and avoid being a victim.” Conference topics include Medicare fraud, insurance and funeral trust fraud, investment fraud, banking fraud and current senior scams. Each seminar is free for seniors and includes breakfast. Insurance professionals can attend a conference for four hours of Continuing Education (CE) credit. The cost for CE credit is $30. Those interested in attending can RSVP by registering online at map.oid. ok.gov or calling 800-763-2828.

TIPS FOR PROTECTING YOURSELF 1. Be aware that you are at risk from not only strangers, but those closest to you. More than 90 percent of all reported elder abuse is committed by the person’s own family members. 2. Stay involved and don’t isolate yourself. Isolation is a large risk factor for elder abuse – limit your risks by staying involved in your community. 3. Never buy or give anything to someone who calls or visits unannounced. While exceptions can be made for situations such as local children selling items door-to-door, a good rule of thumb is to never donate if it requires you to write your credit card information on a form. 4. Shred all receipts with your credit card number. Identity theft is a huge business, and using a paper shredder is one of the best ways to protect yourself. 5. Sign up for the Do Not Call List. Signing up for the National Do Not Call Registry (donotcall. gov) will stop telemarketers from contacting you. 6. Use direct deposit for benefit checks. Using direct deposit for checks ensures they go straight into your bank account and are protected from being stolen from your mailbox. 7. Never give credit card, banking, Social Security, Medicare or other personal information over the phone unless you initiated the call. Misuse of Medicare dollars is one of the largest scams involving seniors, and your Medicare information should be protected the same way as credit card, banking and Social Security information. 8. Be skeptical of all unsolicited offers and do your research. The best way to avoid scams is to be an informed consumer. Call and shop around before making a purchase and carefully read all contracts and purchasing agreements before signing.

-Information from the National Council on Aging

JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS ROOFER

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

Three frequently asked questions regarding felt underlayment: Why should I install shingle underlayment? Roof deck protection – • Underlayment serves as a secondary layer of water protection in case RICKY HANKS of shingle damage. • Shingle protection – Underlayment keeps damaging wood resins away from the shingles. • Deck leveler - Shingle underlayment can help create a flat and even deck surface. • Most building codes recommend or require an underlayment to be installed under shingles. Can shingles be installed over wet underlayment? Do not install shingles over wet underlayment. Moisture trapped inside the underlayment may cause different types of damage to the shingles. What precautions need to be taken? Shingle underlayment should be completely dry and flat to create a smooth surface before installing shingles. Additionally, use a sufficient number of fasteners to hold the underlayment in place until the shingles are installed.

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Individuals can begin claiming Social Security benefits at age 62 to 70. Choosing when to claim Social Security may affect your monthly benefit amount. You usually earn a higher monthly benefit the longer you delay. DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC®

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What can I do to reduce the laxity of my skin? I want to be able to wear tank tops this summer but I am so insecure about my neck and chest. At BA Med Spa we see women everyday facing this same problem, which is why we offer Ultherapy®. MALISSA SPACEK Ultherapy® is considered to be the industry’s’ “gold standard” for treating laxity in the skin of the face, neck and chest. Why? Because Ultherapy® is the only non-invasive procedure to have the FDA-indication to tone, tighten and lift skin. No other procedure can do what Ultherapy® does. To find out if this procedure can help you feel more confident in your clothes this summer, call the BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center to schedule your complimentary consultation.

For married couples, each eligible spouse can choose when they want to begin collecting Social Security. Generally, the higher income earner will receive a higher benefit, and should delay claiming as long as possible.

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BUSINESS COACH I follow your work online and saw that you had two digital course launches this year that each generated over $100,000 in revenue. What are your tips for continual business growth?

Do sleepy drivers pose a deadly risk?

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org

Consider the following:

• Longer life expectancies. Social Security pays benefits no matter how long you live, but personal savings could be strained if you have a longer retirement. • If you receive Social Security while working prior to age 66, your benefit amount might be reduced. • Other assets you have available to fill income gaps before you begin collecting Social Security. • Determine how Social Security benefits fit into your overall retirement income strategy.

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

Yes, they absolutely do. It’s one of the three deadly D’s: drunk-driving, distracted-driving and drowsydriving. Nearly one-third of injury crashes involve a drowsy driver and more than 6,000 fatality crashes RUSS IDEN each year are fatigue related. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates 1 in 25 adult drivers (aged 18 years or older) report to have fallen asleep while behind the wheel. Pay attention to the warning signs: frequent yawning and blinking, a heavy head, drifting in and out of your lane, and missing traffic signs. Don’t hesitate to get to a safe area and change drivers or pull over to rest. It could save your life and the lives of your passengers and other motorists. If you have questions about automobile insurance or other insurance questions, call a AAA agent near you.

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When should you claim your Social Security benefits?

1. Believe in yourself deeply. There is no perfect business, service or product. Magic happens when you believe it’s enough anyway. No one can believe in your work if you don’t. AMANDA FRANCES

2. Get your mind right! Putting your new offer out there will be scary. You will feel like what you created isn’t good enough, but you are not obligated to listen to your negative thoughts. 3. Get your content in front of people. You need eyes on your work. I know and speak to my ideal customer each day online. When I have a paid offer, she already knows me and trusts me. I don’t sell or pitch, I just tell the truth. 4. Never give up. At no point during either launch did it look like I’d reach my goal, but I kept the faith. Giving up can’t be an option.

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PHYSICAL THERAPY Athletes wear colorful tape on their shoulder, thigh or calf. Does it work? What you are describing is kinesiotape. It was developed in the ‘70s and was initially skin tone. Due to successful marketing, this tape was created in different colors and placed on highTIM MINNICK, PT level athletes to sell better. Thus, now you see this tape on young athletes and professionals. Unfortunately, I am personally unaware of any peer-reviewed research that proves kinesiotape improves athletic performance or prevents injury. It may help reduce edema following an injury event due to its professed ability to increase fluid flow in tissue underneath the tape. Additionally, it may provide a little proprioceptive feedback to an athlete during competition. Otherwise, much of the “benefit” is probably placebo in nature. More peer-reviewed research is needed related to this taping technique. Physical Therapists prefer to work on solving the underlying problems that lead to an athlete feeling a need for taping.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. PERSONAL TRAINER I’m happy with my weight; can I change my diet now? Yes, you can now start moving towards your maintenance phase, which will help you stay at your target weight. Start allowing yourself 100 more calories a day until you stop losing weight. For JOHN JACKSON example, if your caloric intake was 1,500 a day while you were in your slim-down phase, you should increase it to 1,600 a day for the next week. As long as your weight stays the same, continue with the same amount of calories. You will also need to stick with at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (jogging, zumba, spin) five days a week. Moreover, if you are fit enough to participate, do 30 minutes of vigorous exercise like basketball, tennis or BOOTCAMP offered at St. John’s Health Plaza. Ballistic exercise should not be done more than three times a week and rarely in back-to-back workouts.

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HOSPICE CARE

LEGAL SERVICES What are the obligations of a driver when approaching an emergency vehicle on the side of a roadway? When approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle (police, fire, medical), Department BRAD BEASLEY of Transportation vehicle, Turnpike Authority vehicle, or wrecker with flashing lights drivers should do the following: If on a four or more lane highway, move to a lane that is not adjacent to the vehicle on the side of the roadway (if you can do so safely) and proceed with caution. If the driver is unable to change lanes safely or is on a two lane road, reduce speed to a safe speed with regard to existing road, weather and traffic conditions, and proceed with caution.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

My mother passed away about a year ago. My father spent the last year of her life caring for her. He is retired and going a little stir crazy. Any ideas? One of the best ways for seniors to meet other people is to volunteer, and there are many great organizations that AVA HANCOCK could use his services. Here at Grace Hospice we have many volunteers who joined us because they needed an outlet to share their talents and wanted a way to meet others. They play a very key role in our success. We would love to have your father join us. There are many areas where he can get involved. Our “Visiting Volunteers” see patients in Tulsa and surrounding communities between two and six times a month for about an hour each time – and they set their own schedules. We also have volunteers who meet weekly at Grace Hospice and work on a variety of projects such as creating crafts and gifts or handy man work. Volunteers can also help with our events. All volunteers must attend training and pass a background check. For more information on volunteering, please contact us at 918-744-7223.

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

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Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

A

The Farmer’s Table Ten harvests in, The Living Kitchen takes diners back to the source.

crowd is gathered outside Linda Ford and Lisa Becklund’s home in Depew – it’s time to feed the goats. Making her way through the group with recycled ginger ale bottles turned into feeding bottles, Ford demonstrates how to feed the baby goats who are eagerly awaiting their dinner. The Living Kitchen is almost exactly halfway between Oklahoma City and Tulsa, right off Route 66 in Depew. The dining experience, which takes place at Ford and Becklund’s home and often sells out within two days of going on sale, includes a farm tour and a gourmet, certified-organic, eightcourse dinner, picked fresh that day and served on the screened-in back porch of Ford and Becklund’s cabin. The dinners often have themes such as “lavender field and forage” or “star-gazing”,

and they combine locally sourced meat with vegetables and plants picked out of the garden and on the land, and fresh dairy from the goats. Guests are invited to bring their own alcoholic beverages, and a suggested pairing for each course is sent out the week before the dinner. Ten years after a humble dinner to raise money to pay for goat feed, The Living Kitchen now hosts dinners almost every Friday and Saturday night during April through October. “They get to see an actual farm and see where the food really comes from,” says Ford, who has a fulltime job off the farm and handles the farm tours and marketing. “I think sometimes farm to table – it has such a varied interpretation restaurant to restaurant, almost like all-natural or something like that where it doesn’t have a very specific meaning.” This disconnect from the farm is part of

why Ford and Becklund love what they’re doing – they see older patrons who grew up on farms and millennials who have never set foot on one come together to appreciate fresh food from the Oklahoma soil. “I think a working farm has been lost in translation, and we’re trying to reestablish that connection,” says Becklund, the chef who creates each dinner’s menu. “It goes beyond a marketing ploy and a catchword – we want to encourage people to look for places that support local farms and show them what it’s like when there isn’t a middle man in farm to table. There really is a farm they get to see.” The optional farm tour, which kicks off the dining experience, takes diners from their goat feeding to see the rest of the farm’s residents – including two fluffy white farm dogs and a small group of llamas that protect the goats from coyotes and predators in the

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BAILEY ELISE MCBRIDE

L O C A L F L AV O R

Tickled Pink Pinkitzel brings sweets with style to Oklahoma City and Tulsa.

Imagine Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory with the classical considerations of pre-revolutionary France and a healthy dose of Pinterestinspired DIY style. Sound confusing? Maybe even alarming? Stop thinking and start eating. Pinkitzel, a sweets-and-toy boutique that has delighted downtown Oklahoma City for years and has opened a store in downtown Tulsa, is way too much fun to question. The name of the eatery comes from the Yiddish word “kitzel,” or “to tickle.” Tickled pink is definitely an accurate reaction to this whimsical sweet space. Pinkitzel is a total assault on the senses for everyone who has ever wanted to roll around in candy like it was money. Old-school gummy, jelly bean and taffy buffets rub elbows with upscale chocolates and buckets of vanilla bean, root beer or orange creamsicle cotton candy. The boutique offers a robust selection of traditional packaged candies as well, plus a few more exotic offerings like Thanksgiving or wasabi gumballs from Seattle novelty company Archie McPhee. Pinkitzel’s famous cupcakes (which, by the way, they can deliver) are almost overshadowed by a bevy of other baked goods. The macaroons, while imported from New York, are fresh and chewy and come in a kaleidoscope of colors and flavors such as Earl Grey, pistachio, espresso and more. And what goes better with sweets than flavored milks, bacon hot chocolate or local coffee? Toys. From whimsical pirate and unicorn finger puppets to vintage-inspired sewing kits and donut socks, kids are probably going to want one of everything. Adults may be drawn to a colorful wall of paper gifts, journals and Tokyo Milk lotions – and the donut socks. Pinkitzel is located at 150 North E.K. Gaylord Blvd. in Oklahoma City, and at 201 S. Denver Ave. in Tulsa. More information on Pinkitzel sweets and services can be found at www.pinkitzel.com. TARA MALONE

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PHOTOS BY MARC RAINS

Taste

fields. The 10-acre farm also has a milking barn and a repurposed school bus, which Ford and Becklund lovingly refer to as the “hena-bago,” as it now serves as a mobile chicken coop. Though Ford and Becklund will tell you it’s the goats that are the stars of the evening (and the goats are very cute), it’s the dinner that really shines and brings diners like Christy Craig of Tulsa back season after season. Sitting at a recent dinner, Craig notes that the people to the left of her were from Tulsa, and to her right were people from Checotah and Oklahoma City – all strangers, brought together by a love of food and a desire to experience and connect with nature and what they were eating. “I love this table and that people are so open,” she says. “Whether it’s this dinner or the two I’ve previously been to, everyone I’ve been at the table with were the same way – I had conversations and got to know people from all over Oklahoma.” Over the three seasons she has visited The Living Kitchen, Craig says although the food has changed on each menu, the experience has been consistent. “In a way, it not evolving has been the most comforting part of this experience,” she says. The chef has been so welcoming and laid-back and consistent, and so it feels homey in a new place, like you’re having a family dinner.” When Becklund moved to Oklahoma from Seattle 12 years ago, she didn’t expect to work in anything close to a restaurant – her goal was to create a self-sustaining farm and be able to sell her crops at local farmers markets. After realizing her garden wasn’t really large enough to sell and sustain the farm, she decided at the end of the season she would host a casual dinner for others in the farmers market community, charge a small fee, and that could buy just enough feed to get the goats through the season. That first dinner 10 years ago was such a success that the dinner soon turned into dinners, and by the time Ford moved out to live on the farm full time, word had spread in the Tulsa and Oklahoma City communities and the demand for more seats at the table had grown substantially. Now in their 10th season and doing dinners almost every weekend, Ford and Becklund can look back on their humble start and appreciate the opportunity they get each week to make a difference in the lives of people across the state who come to eat at their table. “It’s a privilege every dinner we do,” Becklund says. “When I moved here, I thought all of Oklahoma would be horse-and-buggy and I would have a lot to learn from every single being in this great state, and I have, but I also found that I have something to contribute, which is a great privilege.”


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FOCUS ON FOOD

Taste

New Varieties of a Frozen Classic

Ice cream is always a summer favorite, but don’t let yourself be limited by the traditional choices.

W

hen the temperatures rise in Oklahoma, everyone likes a frozen treat. Ice cream is a traditional favorite, but many companies in Oklahoma are providing more choices than ever – but what’s the difference between ice cream and gelato? Frozen yogurt and frozen custard? No matter what you decide on, though, the end result is guaranteed to be delicious.

Ice Cream

While many companies use different techniques to make ice cream, the basic recipe is milk and cream sweetened with something such as cane sugar, beet sugar or sucrose and combined with fruits or other flavors. The mixture of ingredients is stirred and cooled below the freezing point of water. Companies are becoming even more creative with their flavors, working in a mixture of ingredients – while chocolate and vanilla are old standards, ice cream that includes everything everything from caramel to chocolate chip cookie dough has been com

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mon for ice cream makers. Raena Mutz, who owns Roxy’s Ice Cream Social in Oklahoma City with her husband, Shane, says the most popular flavors in the store are cookies and cream and salted caramel. The company typically doesn’t stray from traditional flavors so people know what to expect, Mutz says, but that doesn’t mean the company doesn’t experiment. “We did a few batches of vegan (nondairy) flavors that are now a part of our permanent menu because they were an instant hit,” Mutz says. “German chocolate is our

best-selling vegan flavor.” Mutz says the store does a Philadelphiastyle ice cream, which tends to be more smooth and creamy. And despite all the varieties of desserts available, she expects ice cream stores to continue to be a hit among people looking for a frozen treat. “Ice cream is an ingrained part of American culture,” she says. “George Washington liked ice cream so much he had ice cream equipment installed into the Capitol so he could serve himself and guests.”


Gelato may be the Italian word for ice cream, but anyone who has tried the two varieties knows the differences between the desserts go beyond the language in which the name is spoken. “Gelato is made with milk instead of heavy cream like ice cream,” says Mike Bausch, owner of STG Pizzeria & Gelateria and Gelateria STG in Tulsa. “That makes gelato lower in calories and fat while not being so thick it coats the tongue, preventing the proper, full experience of flavor.” The process used to make gelato is also different, which results in certain flavors really standing out, he says. “In gelato, flavors like pistachio or mint really pop because they aren’t added after the fact to a vanilla ice cream base,” he says. “Rather they are a part of the blending and crafting process. Gelato is churned much slower than ice cream, making it significantly more dense with flavor.” The slower churning process incorporates less air, which leads to the denser texture. Bausch decided to bring gelato to Tulsa because the local gelato didn’t match what he found in Italy when participating in pizza competitions. His restaurant purchased the same machines used in Italy and learned the same process used to make the gelato, replicating the experience down to the spoons. Some of the most popular flavors of gelato at STG are pistachio, fragola (strawberry), sorbet (no milk) and stracciatella, which is similar to chocolate chip.

FREDDY’SUSA.COM

STG

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ATE RIA

Gelato

Frozen Custard

What do you get when you take ice cream and add egg yolk? Thick, delicious frozen custard. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires frozen custard contain at least 1.4 percent egg yolk solid by weight. The egg yolk creates a dessert that is thicker and often creamier than ice cream, and that difference creates a new experience that many people love, says Scott Redler, Chief Operating Officer of Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers, which is based out of Wichita Kansas and has restaurants throughout Oklahoma. “Many of our guests are pleasantly surprised when they taste our frozen custard and find it’s creamier than ice cream,” Redler says. “We use a special churning process that eliminates excess air and ice crystals; it creates a product that’s smooth and rich.” Freddy’s offers chocolate or vanilla frozen custard, but many options are available to change the taste to suit your mood, including using toppings and mix-ins. If just the egg yolk doesn’t create a treat thick enough for you, Redler suggests trying a “concrete,” where all the toppings are blended into the frozen custard and create a treat that’s a bit thicker than a traditional shake. “When it’s freshly made, you can even turn it upside down, hence the name ‘concrete,’” he says.

Frozen Yogurt

Frozen yogurt replaces much of the heavy cream used in ice cream with yogurt, making it lower in calories and fat than many frozen desserts. One of the main draws for many frozen yogurt shops is the large number of available toppings ranging from granola to gummy bears. Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt, an Oklahoma City-based chain of frozen yogurt stores with locations across Oklahoma, also keeps a large number of flavors in each store. “Our indulgent flavors tend to be the most popular with our customers, however, some of our flavors are born from trends and customer suggestions we receive online and in store,” says Orange Leff President Geoff Goodman. “We like to say that we have no R&D department. We listen to our customers and stay on top of food and industry trends.” Orange Leaf makes its frozen yogurt from a dehydrated yogurt base that is prepared daily with fat-free milk. The store also offers options like gluten-free, no-sugar-added and vegan yogurt. JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Lining up the Stars

O

Muskogee’s G Fest is bringing in top acts from Oklahoma and around the country for its inaugural festival.

ed working with the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame to host a music festival on the grounds. The suggestion was a natural fit, and work began on organizing the festival two years ago. Blair says the event wouldn’t have been possible without the City of Muskogee Foundation, which city officials created in 2008 from funds raised by leasing airport. “We set out to be more of an the Muskogee Regional Medical Center to Ca“There are a lot of moving parts, and you eclectic music festival, and pella Healthcare for 40 years. The foundation wait for the stars to line up,” says Jim Blair, executive director of the Oklahoma Music we see this as an opportunity has already used around $38 million supportand promoting programs and facilities in Hall of Fame. because of the venue, which ing Muskogee. The event is being held at Hatbox Field, an is hard to find if you’re in Net proceeds of G Fest will be used to airport built in the 1930s and closed for landfurther the goals of the Oklahoma Music Hall ings in 2000. Part of the area was then used Tulsa or Oklahoma City.” of Fame and to continue to develop the infrafor walking trails, and the City of Muskogee structure of the Hatbox complex for future fesbuilt a water park and a sports complex on tivals. The festival is funded through a joint effort by The Oklahoma the grounds. But the city continued to look for new ways to use the Music Hall of Fame, the City of Muskogee, the City of Muskogee area, and a team brought in from the University of Arkansas suggestn June 16-18, some of the biggest names in country, rock and Americana music will gather in Muskogee for a festival estimated to bring in between $5 million and $8 million to the area in its first year. And it all started with an abandoned

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PHOTO COURTESY G FEST

Blair says the festival will pay tribute to Merle Haggard, originally scheduled to be a headliner before his death on April 6. The California native cowrote and performed “Okie from Muskogee,” one of his biggest hits, and was part of the inaugural class for the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame. “That shook some people up, because he did have such an influence on so many of even today’s young artists,” Blair says. Tickets and more information on G Fest are available at gfestmuskogee.com.

PHOTO COURTESY INTERSCOPE RECORDS

Entertainment

Foundation and Muskogee Tourism. Blair says he expects the festival to continue to grow, noting that Bonnaroo, a music festival held in Manchester, Tennessee, brings around $50 million to the area each year. The festival has sold tickets to people from across the U.S. as well as Canada and the U.K. The lineup and location both help factor into the appeal of G Fest. “We set out to be more of an eclectic music festival, and we see this as an opportunity because of the venue, which is hard to find if you’re in Tulsa or Oklahoma City,” Blair says. The Avett Brothers, Old Crow Medicine Show, Kacey Musgraves and Turnpike Troubadours are headlining G Fest, which has around 85 different musicians and bands in the lineup. The festival showcases many Oklahoma and regional acts, including The Swon Brothers, John Fullbright and Jason Boland and the Stragglers.

IN TULSA

Selena Gomez

June 19 BOK CENTER Multiplatinum singer and actress Selena Gomez will be playing at the BOK Center on June 19 as part of her Revival Tour. The tour supports her latest album, which was released last year. The singer will be receiving support from Joe Jonas’ band DNCE and Bahari on the tour. Gomez has had a long career as an actress before releasing her first album, Kiss & Tell, in 2009 as lead singer of the band Selena Gomez & the Scene. In 2013, she released her first solo album, Stars Dance, which she followed with Revival in 2015.

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IN TULSA

BROWN BAG IT: TULSA ROCK QUARTET June 1 TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER The contemporary classical music of Tulsa Rock Quartet is the final concert of the 2015-16 Brown Bag It series. - tulsapactrust. org TYLER, THE CREATOR June 1 CAIN’S BALLROOM Tyler, the Creator was born Tyler Okonma on March 6, 1991. He burst onto the scene as the founder and front man for the collective Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All, overseeing the release of their first album in 2008. - cainsballroom.com TULSA PRIDE BLOCK PARTY June 4-5 DENNIS R. NEILL EQUALITY CENTER Grab some friends and head to the Tulsa Pride Block Party & Parade to enjoy gay pride festivities in the heart of Tulsa. This free event is the longest-running LGBT festival in Oklahoma and features live music, food, various vendors in a marketplace setting, a children’s zone and much more. Stick around for the Tulsa Pride Parade at 6 p.m. on Saturday, which will feature everything from floats to decorated vehicles. On Sunday, join Tulsa Pride in Centennial Park for a picnic from noon to 5 p.m. Tulsa Pride 2016 is presented by Oklahomans for Equality. - travelok.com GRACE POTTER June 5 CAIN’S BALLROOM Described by Spin as “one of the greatest living voices in rock today” and by SF Weekly as “the whole package,” Grace Potter continues to impress both critics and audiences with her musical achievements and captivating live shows. - cainsballroom.com BRIT FLOYD June 11 BRADY THEATER Following its hugely successful 146 concert date tour around the globe in 2015, Brit Floyd, The World’s Greatest Pink Floyd Show, returns to North America in 2016 to continue its amazing journey through 50 years of Pink Floyd and the vast and incredible catalogue of music they have given us. - britfloyd.com WINGAPALOOZA June 11 BOK CENTER SMG Special Events and BOK Center are excited to announce Wingapalooza, presented by Tulsa Federal Credit Union, as it returns for its third year at the BOK Center. This one-of-a-kind event features several Tulsa-area restaurants showcasing their various wing preparation styles. Restaurants will compete for several awards including People’s Choice. bokcenter.com MAMMA MIA! June 11-12 TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER MAMMA MIA! is the ultimate feel-good show that has audiences coming back again and again to relive the thrill. Now it’s your turn to have the time of your life at this smash-hit musical that combines ABBA’s greatest hits, including “Dancing Queen,” “S.O.S.,” “Super Trouper,” “Take A Chance on Me” and “The Winner Takes It All.” - tulsapac.com IDENTITY & INSPIRATION June 14-29 PHILBROOK The exhibition Identity & Inspiration features nearly 200 objects that reflect the motivations influencing the artists’ creative processes, from the desire to preserve tribal traditions to incorporating new materials and producing work for new audiences. Other influences include the challenge to push


boundaries by generating innovative forms and designs and incorporating movements like Pop Art and even social commentary in their pieces. - philbrook.org LEON RUSSELL June 16 HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO Oklahoma native Leon Russell is a music legend and one of the most accomplished and versatile musicians in the history of rock ’n’ roll. In his distinguished and unique 50-year career, he has played on, arranged, written and/or produced some of the best records in popular music. THE HOBBIT June 18-19 TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Tulsa Youth Opera, Tulsa Opera’s music training program for young singers in third through twelfth grades, presents Dean Burry’s The Hobbit, based on the beloved novel by J.R.R. Tolkien. Burry’s opera, written for and performed by young people, brings to life all the magic of Tolkien’s Middle Earth. The opera premiered to critical acclaim and sold-out houses by Canadian Children’s Opera Chorus in 2004, and Tulsa Opera is very pleased to present this production by special arrangement with the composer and publisher in conjunction with the Tolkien estate. - tulsapac. com JAMES TAYLOR June 24 BOK CENTER Come spend an unforgettable night with America’s iconic singer-songwriter James Taylor and his All-Star Band on June 24 at BOK Center. - bokcenter.com

PHOTOS COURTESY THE OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART

IN OKC

GOGOL BORDELLO June 1 DIAMOND BALLROOM The Gypsy punk band Gogol Bordello’s consistent touring will bring it to Oklahoma City this month. Known for its theatrical stage performance, the band formed in 1999. Frank Turner & the Sleeping Souls is joining Gogol Bordello for this tour. WWE MONDAY NIGHT RAW June 6 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Monday Night RAW, the WWE’s flagship broadcast, is returning to Chesapeake Energy Arena with some of wrestling’s biggest stars, including Roman Reigns, Dean Ambrose, Bray Wyatt and the Wyatt Family, New Day and Alberto Del Rio. MADE IN OKLAHOMA WINE, BEER & FOOD FESTIVAL June 6 SHERATON MIDWEST CITY HOTEL Witness agritourism at its finest as Midwest City offers a state of great tastes at the 2016 Made in Oklahoma Wine, Beer and Food Festival on Saturday, June 4 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Residents and visitors will enjoy a family-friendly event hosted at the Sheraton Midwest City Hotel at the Reed Conference Center. Experience an extensive variety of wine and beer samples from local producers as well as food tastings and culinary delights from several of Oklahoma’s premier restaurants. MAMMA MIA! June 7-10 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL MAMMA MIA! is the ultimate feel-good show that has audiences coming back again and again to relive the thrill. Now it’s your turn to have the time of your life at this smash-hit musical that combines ABBA’s greatest hits, including “Dancing Queen,” “S.O.S.,” “Super Trouper,” “Take A Chance on Me” and “The Winner Takes It All.” - okcciviccenter.com

I N O KC

Matisse in His Time

June 18 through Sept. 18 OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART The Oklahoma City Museum of Art will open Matisse in His Time: Masterworks of Modernism from the Centre Pompidou, Paris on June 18, providing an opportunity to see art from Henri Matisse that has never been exhibited outside of Europe. The OKCMOA is the exclusive venue for the exhibition in North America for the show, which was organized by the Centre Pompidou in collaboration with the OKCMOA. The exhibition will host more than 100 works of art, and around 50 pieces of Matisse’s art will be available for viewing. “We think this will be a national exhibition,” says Michael Anderson, who is serving as curator for the exhibition. “We’ve already had people from as far away as Hawaii buy tickets.” The exhibition provides an opportunity for the museum to show art that has not always been available in the Midwest. Anderson said one of the museum’s goals is to continue to bring major works of art to the area. He notes that while there are many Matisse exhibitions, they normally are hosted in major cultural capitals like New York. The exhibition was made possible by forging relationships with art organizations in Europe, and those relationships will help the museum continue to show similar exhibitions in the future. Anderson notes the Musée d’Orsay, the leading museum for impressionist paintings, located in Paris, is also lending art for the show. Anderson adds that OKCMOA President and CEO E. Michael Whittington has been working to build those relationships, and the museum expects they will pay off with future exhibitions. “We’re just beginning to create these relationships that will allow us to be the venue for other significant exhibitions in this region,” Anderson says. For more information on Matisse in His Time or to purchase tickets, visit okcmoa.com. JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

A R O U N D T H E S TAT E

ANNE-MARIE MCDERMOTT

CATHERINE RUSSELL

DEADCENTER FILM FESTIVAL June 8-12 VARIOUS VENUES deadCenter provides an amazing weekend of film and parties for festival veterans or first-time visitors alike. Last year alone, it had 30,000 attendees and an economic impact of $4.5 million. deadcenterfilm.org RED EARTH FESTIVAL June 10-12 COX CONVENTION CENTER This awardwinning festival features American Indian artists and dancers from throughout North America who celebrate the richness and diversity of their heritage with the world. During the Red Earth Festival, Oklahoma City is the center of Native American art and culture in America. - redearth.org WIDESPREAD PANIC June 19 THE CRITERION Formed in the tradition of the great southern guitar blues bands with an improvisatory ethos, Widespread Panic continue to explore a sound all its own on the band’s 12th album, Street Dogs, their first studio effort since 2010’s Dirty Side Down. ELECTRIC SIX June 21 OPOLIS, NORMAN Electric Six is a six-piece band from Detroit that fuses multiple styles of rock music, including garage, disco and punk rock. The band, which has recorded eleven full-length albums, will bring their distinctive style to Norman. DREAMGIRLS June 28-July 2 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Follow the Supremes-inspired girl group as they make their way from the Apollo Theatre to the top of the pop and R&B charts. Join Lyric for “one night only” with The Dreams as they search for love and find success during the height of the Motown sound in one of the most exciting shows ever created. - okcciviccenter.com

SIMPLY THREE

OK Mozart International Festival June 11-18 BARTLESVILLE Oklahomans attending the OK Mozart International Festival in Bartlesville this month may find a few surprises in the festival’s 32nd season. While the festival still focuses on Mozart, the theme has expanded to fit in other works as well. “We have a broad new theme called called ‘Mozart and His Musical Heirs,’ and that’s how we’re deciding what music to play,” says OK Mozart Executive Director Randy Thompson. “We’re including Mozart on every program, but we’re also juxtaposing his music with music he has influenced. The change has allowed the festival to expand and present a variety of different music. Pianist Anne-Marie McDermott will be performing with the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra for the grand finale concert, which includes music from Europe and the Americas. Other performers include jazz and blues

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vocalist Catherine Russell and Simply Three, a trio that plays everything from Puccini to Michael Jackson. The festival is using many Oklahoma artists in the festival, including the Tulsa Symphony, the Oklahoma Philharmonic and the Signature Symphony, Tulsa Community College’s professional orchestra in residence. “We are really becoming a festival not only for Oklahomans, but by Oklahomans,” Thompson says. “We’ve put a new level of meaning into the OK in OK Mozart.” The festival will draw 15,000 people to Bartlesville and includes 117 separate events, including seven main concert events and 10 chamber music concerts. The rest are events in every area of humanities people can imagine, Thompson says. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit okmozart.com.

PHOTOS COURTESY OK MOZART

AROUND THE STATE

TIM MCGRAW IN CONCERT June 3 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO Tim McGraw has sold more than 40 million records worldwide and dominated the charts with 36 No. 1 singles. He has won three Grammy Awards, 16 Academy of Country Music Awards, 14 Country Music Association Awards, 10 American Music Awards, three People’s Choice Awards and numerous other honors. - winstarworldcasino.com TALLGRASS MUSIC FESTIVAL June 3 & 4 3020 W 133RD ST. N., SKIATOOK The annual Tallgrass Music Festival in Skiatook is a fun-filled family event that features top-notch bluegrass music. Join hundreds of visitors that descend upon the Tallgrass Music Festival, previously known as the Skiatook Bluegrass Festival. Festival goers are encouraged to stay and camp while listening to the lively sounds of traditional bluegrass. This year, Russell More & IIIrd Tyme Out and James King will be headlining the festival. DAUGHTRY June 4 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Daughtry will rock out the stage in the Global Event Center at WinStar World Casino and Resort on Saturday, June 4. The show will start at 8:00 p.m., with doors opening at 6:30 p.m. Tickets for this event are $45 for General, $65 for Premium and $75 for VIP. - winstarworldcasino.com


SO

STEPHEN KING

LD

OU

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PHOTO COURTESY STEPHENKING.COM

June 19 CAIN’S BALLROOM Oklahomans who were hoping to hear bestselling author Stephen King speak at Cain’s Ballroom on June 19 needed to act fast – the approximately 1,000 tickets available for the event sold out in less than an hour. A simulcast being hosted at Circle Cinema has also sold out. King’s speech coincides with the release of his new book, End of Watch. The book marks the end of a trilogy that started with Mr. Mercedes and continued with Finders Keepers. Oklahomans lucky enough to have tickets for the event, where King will speak, read from his work and participate in a question and answer session, will also receive a copy of End of Watch. King is one of the world’s most famous authors. He has published 57 novels and nearly 200 short stories and won multiple awards for his writing

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK

VINCE GILL WITH SPECIAL GUEST LEE ANN WOMACK June 3 CHOCTAW CASINO RESORT, DURANT Country music favorite Vince Gill has sold more than 26 million albums, won 20 Grammys and earned 18 CMA awards, including two Entertainer of the Year trophies. On June 10, he’ll be playing the Choctaw Casino Resort in Durant to support his 18th studio album, Down to my Last Bad Habit. HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS June 10 CHOCTAW CASINO RESORT, DURANT Huey Lewis and The News are truly one of America’s great rock ’n’ roll bands. As they enter their 36th year together, their contagious brand of music has outlasted countless trends and is as fresh today as ever. Formed from two rival Bay Area bands in 1979, they continue to thrill audiences worldwide, selling over 20 million albums in the process and earning them the right to mark their place on the pop history map. hueylewisandthenews.com LORETTA LYNN June 11 SUGAR CREEK CASINO, HINTON Oklahomans will have an opportunity to see legendary Loretta Lynn in concert this month. In 1967, she began picking up various Female Vocalist of the Year trophies. She and Conway Twitty also won a long string of Duet of the Year awards beginning in 1971. In 1972, she became the first woman in history to win the Country Music Association’s Entertainer of the Year trophy. PAT BENATAR June 16 ENID EVENT CENTER, ENID Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo’s We Live for Love Tour will take place at the Enid Event Center Thursday, June 16. Tickets are $35 and $49 and will go on sale at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, April 8. Fans can order tickets by calling 855.TIX.ENID, visiting www. EnidEventCenter.com or the Enid Event Center and Convention Hall Administration offices. enideventcenter.com ALABAMA June 18 ENID EVENT CENTER, ENID While their music continues to stand the test of time, their numbers and stats are beyond compare. They have charted 43 No. 1 singles, including 21 No. 1 singles in a row, a record that will likely never be surpassed in any genre. They have won over 178 CMA Awards, Grammy Awards, ACM Awards and counting. They’ve earned 21 Gold, Platinum and Multi-Platinum albums and were named the RIAA’s Country Group of the Century. They are members of the Country Music Hall of Fame and have a start on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. They are also world-class philanthropists who have raised over $250 million for charity. RICKY SCAGGS June 25 SUGAR CREEK CASINO This 14-time Grammy Award winner continues to do his part to lead the recent roots revival in music. With 12 consecutive Grammy-nominated classics behind him, all from his own Skaggs Family Records label, the diverse and masterful tones made by the gifted Skaggs come from a life dedicated to playing music that is both fed by the soul and felt by the heart. See Scaggs perform hit songs including “Same Old Train,” “Cotton-Eyed Joe” and “Country Boy” live in Hinton. - sugarscreekcasino.net.

Much Ado About Nothing

Multiple Performances MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park (OSP) is launching its 32nd season this month with Much Ado About Nothing at the Myriad Botanical Gardens Water Stage. The regional theater company will also perform British playwright Howard Barker’s Scenes from an Execution; David Ives’ The Liar, adapted from the play by Pierre Cornielle; and will conclude the season with Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Much Ado About Nothing and Romeo and Juliet will both be performed at the Myriad Botanical Gardens, while the other two performances will be staged at OSP’s theater at 2920 Paseo in the Paseo Arts District. Much Ado About Nothing stars Wil Rogers and Renee Krapff and is directed by Lance Marsh. The show opens June 2 and has nine performances before it closes on June 25. For more information or to buy tickets, visit oklahomashakespeare.com. JUNE 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

FILM AND CINEMA

June’s Best Bets in Cinema

Each month Oklahoma Magazine highlights exciting Oklahoma film events and gives some guidance on films coming out on home video and those currently playing in theaters.

IN THEATERS

ABOUT TOWN

June in Oklahoma means one thing for cinephiles: the deadCenter Film Festival, which happens this year in Oklahoma City from June 8-12. In the 30 or so years since the Sundance Film Festival began, festivals have blossomed all over the U.S., thriving as a way to make film going an event and not just an item on the schedule. In some ways it almost seems like the market is oversaturated, and festivals have had to either specialize (like Missouri’s True/False festival, which has become the premier festival for documentary films in the U.S.) or go above and beyond to make themselves stand out in one way or another. deadCenter has opted for the latter route, and part of what makes the festival pop is just how much fun it is. A party atmosphere seems to pervade much of it; there are multiple events that focus on socialization (with plenty of food and drink). Even the screenings themselves have a bouncy energy that speaks to the festival’s relaxed feel. That should not imply, though, that the films come second, and deadCenter has a tasty lineup well worth checking out. There are main event films, like the New Zealand comedy Hunt for the Wilderpeople, but also a solid slate of short films that come packaged in themed groups. These include a whole array of shorts by Oklahoma filmmakers – just one more way deadCenter manages to feel like a distinctly Oklahoman festival.

The setup of Jeremy Saulnier’s taut new indie action film Green Room sells itself: a down-on-its-luck punk band takes a gig at a neo-Nazi compound, but when things go awry they have to battle their way out, pitted against a whole host of angry skinheads led by Patrick Stewart. That should be enough to tell you if the film is for you (and, fair warning, it has quite a bit of gore), but the film extends beyond its genre trappings to explore the ways in which group dynamics can be both beneficial and very harmful. Stewart is a delight (no surprise there), but leads Anton Yelchin and Imogen Poots bring a nice chemistry to the screen as well – not to mention Alia Shawkat’s nice turn as the responsible band member. Saulnier ratchets the tension up slowly until things reach the bursting point and explode in offbeat ways.

AT HOME

By far the standout of June’s DVD releases, Charlie Kaufmann’s latest film Anomalisa provides a different sort of animated film experience (you’ll want to watch when the kids are in bed). A decidedly grown-up film that deals with themes like clinical depression, social conformity and the difficulty of love in the modern age, Anomalisa provides plenty of food for thought. Aside from its thematic richness, the film offers a bounty of visual delights – it’s stop-motion animated, with each figure crafted lovingly for maximum emotive detail. Add in a surprising sound mix and Kaufmann’s usual clever dialog, and you have a mature, delightful film. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016


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CLOSING THOUGHTS

Tava Maloy Sofsky

O

klahoma Film + Music Office Director Tava Maloy Sofsky is getting a chance to use 20 years of experience in the entertainment industry to help her native state. After graduating from The University of Oklahoma, she moved to Los Angeles to begin her film career and was mentored by veteran producer Doug Claybourne and has worked with film industry likers such as Francis Ford Coppola, Steve Spielberg, Oliver Stone and Robin Williams. As director of OF+MO, she works to support and promote Oklahoma’s film and music industries by connecting filmmakers and music professionals to the state’s resources, including the Oklahoma Film Enhancement Rebate Program, diverse locations and professional support. We met with Sofsky to get her thoughts on…

…the benefit of bringing film, television and music production to the state.

…the impact of the film and music industry in Oklahoma.

The film and music industry is playing an important role in the sustainability and growth in our economy. Due to the thousands of jobs for the creative class and VOTECH industries (hair, make-up, catering, electrical, transportation, construction, etc.) and the production service companies and businesses benefiting from these industries, the cultural and economic impact is significant.

…turning Oklahoma into a major site for entertainment production.

Oklahoma is already becoming a major hub for filming and music production. It doesn’t (or shouldn’t) happen overnight, but I’m happy with the steady growth. There 104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2016

is a resurgence happening in the state with artists and crew members moving home to expand their careers to new film and music production companies being born every month. With the certainty and longevity of our rebate program, which keeps our crews and artists hard at work, you will start seeing larger sound stages and production facilities being built and more talent being attracted to our state.

…her favorite part of being OF+MO director.

I’ve always been a connector and encourager, so I love that my job is just that. I get to connect like-minded people to the resources they need, whether it be a filmmaker in Hollywood who is seeking local crew, equipment and talent or a local filmmaker scouting a specific location. Same for our musicians – there are so many opportunities that we connect artists to as well, which is rewarding knowing we are developing the infrastructure of these industries in our great state.

…using film and music to promote Oklahoma.

I truly believe that if we can get filmmakers on a plane, they do (and will) fall in love with our people and places. There is nothing like the experience you have by filming and working in Oklahoma!

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

The State of Oklahoma will benefit from national, if not worldwide, exposure by three television projects utilizing our diverse locations and local resources. American Ninja Warrior 8 alone has caused Oklahoma to garner a great deal of attention from media stories that have reached an audience of almost 200 million people with over 1.2 billion page views. The total dollar value of the media attention is approximately $4.5 million dollars. That’s a huge impact to the state, not to mention the publicity Oklahoma will gain from the other film and television projects filming around our state over the next several months. The impact on Oklahoma has a long shelf life, especially when you consider the digital world of media on top of film tourism benefits.


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