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VOTE NOW FOR 2017 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM JANUARY 2017

20th Anniversary

Oklahoma

Wedding

Catering, dresses, rings and tips for your special day

Oklahomans of the Year Four people who show the spirit of our state

Learn to Love Fitness Find new ways to stay in shape this year

PLUS Oklahoma Outlaws

THE

OKLAHOMA

WEDDING SHOW SATURDAY, JANUARY 14 10 A.M.-4 P.M. EXPO SQUARE CENTRAL PARK HALL


Patient-Centered Patient-Centered Cancer Cancer Care Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home. home.

800 NE 10th Street 800 NECity, 10th OK Street Oklahoma 73104 Oklahoma City, 271-1112 OK 73104 Phone (405)

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top three cancer The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top three cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-1112 Fax (405) 271-5797 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


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Features January

44 Fall in Love With Fitness

2017 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXI, No. 1

The first step in creating a more active lifestyle is finding an activity that keeps you healthy and happy. Oklahoma Magazine spoke to several people around the state who found the right activity to get fit – and felt good doing it.

48 Oklahoma Outlaws

38

The legends of Oklahoma’s most notorious outlaws live on, from the Dalton Gang and Pretty Boy Floyd to Belle Starr and Cherokee Bill.

Oklahomans of the Year

The Thunder’s general manager and passionate philanthropist. An iconic musician. A Native American chief working to regain his tribe’s culture and heritage. A medical researcher striving to find cures for autoimmune diseases. These are Oklahoma Magazine’s Oklahomans of the Year.

WANT SOME MORE?

From your dress and accessories to the ever-important cakes, catering and flowers, Oklahoma Magazine shows you the hottest wedding trends of 2017 in the most comprehensive wedding guide in Oklahoma.

JANUARY 2016

January 2016

67 Oklahoma Wedding

Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES

VOTE NOW FOR 2017 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM

20th Anniversary

Oklahoma

Wedding

ON THE COVER:

ISSUE

Catering, dresses, rings and tips for your special day Oklahomans of the Year Four people who show the spirit of our state

Learn to Love Fitness Find new ways to stay in shape this year

PLUS Oklahoma Outlaws

THE

OKLAHOMA

WEDDING SHOW

SATURDAY, JANUARY 14 10 A.M.-4 P.M. EXPO SQUARE CENTRAL PARK HALL

WHETHER YOU NEED INSPIRATION FOR A WEDDING DRESS OR IDEAS FOR A HONEYMOON DESTINATION, OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE’S WEDDING ISSUE HAS YOU COVERED. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes even more great Oklahoma events.


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Departments 11 The State 14 16

18 20

Makers People

The newest president of the University of Tulsa, Dr. Gerard Clancy, forges ahead to make positive changes at the school.

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

16

Culture Insider

24

23 Life and Style 24 28 29 30 32

36

Interiors

A Midtown Tulsa home undergoes a complete renovation to add California flair.

City Life Health Destinations Style

January is the perfect time for a warm weather escape – get ready for a vacation with plenty of resortinspired fashion choices.

Scene

53 Taste 54 56 57 57

Midtown Oklahoma City’s culinary titan, Ludivine, continues to deliver on its early promise.

Local Flavor Chef Chat In Season Random Flavors

53

59 Where and When 60 64

Cirque du Soleil’s new insect-themed show will stun and enchant guests.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

65 Closing Thoughts

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

59

32


1 3 TH A N N U A L

HEALTH & WELLNESS

E X P O SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 2017

Whatever you have promised yourself to do this year—trim down, tone up, eat healthier, exercise more—now is the time to get started. Join us on Saturday, January 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and sample everything the Health Zone at Saint Francis has to offer. The event is free and open to the public and will include fitness classes, cooking classes, free health screenings and wellness education.

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• Zumba, barre and yoga

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• Basketball and racquetball

• Summer programs for kids and teens

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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™ OKLAHOMA

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Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2017 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

12/13/16 4:17 PM


LET TER FROM THE EDITOR To come up with our Oklahomans of the Year (p. 38), we spend a few months talking to different people around the state. There are many Oklahomans who make a difference in the lives of others, and choosing among them is a difficult task that results in an extensive list with a lot of variety. After Nov. 13, however, things changed. Almost every list of suggestions we received started including the same person. Every email I received, every phone call I made, I heard the same name again and again: “Leon Russell.” As contributing editor John Wooley writes in his article, it’s time. All four of our Oklahomans of the Year exemplify what it means to be a great Oklahoman. Each has his or her own way of helping others, each represents Oklahoma in a way in which we can all be proud. Also in this issue, we talk about how to get your fitness plan on track. Many people will be heading to the gym this month to keep up with their New Year’s resolutions; far fewer will still be going in three months. Be sure to check out our fitness feature (p. 44) to hear from people who learned to love fitness. Finally, January is our annual wedding guide (p. 67), which coincides with The Oklahoma Wedding Show on Jan. 14 at Expo Square’s Central Park Hall. If you or someone you know is getting married this year, this is a can’t-miss feature and show. Be sure to check out both. As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com Sincerely,

FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES EMAIL ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA

OKMAG.COM

OKLAHOMA

2017 OKLAHOMA

Justin Martino Justin Martino Managing Editor

OKMAG.COM Oklahoma

Socialites ALFRE WOODARD 24,061 3,799

FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST.

Vote 8

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

The Oklahoma Wedding Show takes place Saturday, Jan. 14 at the Expo Square Central Park Hall. To accompany the annual event, Oklahoma Magazine celebrates all things weddings with our January Wedding issue. Each year, we utilize beautiful photography combined with highly informed editorial coverage to showcase Oklahoma’s highest regarded bakers, catering companies, jewelers, florists and bridal gown retailers. In this month’s web exclusive video, go on-set with our team of editors, makeup artists, hair stylists, photographers and models as we produce the most comprehensive wedding guide available in Oklahoma.

Acclaimed stage and screen actress Alfre Woodard has been a force in the entertainment industry since she first took the theatre stage in the 1970s. This Bishop Kelley alumna has appeared in many television and film projects, which have garnered multiple Emmy and Academy Awards. Last summer Woodard appeared in the critically acclaimed blockbuster hit Captain America: Civil War. Woodard’s passion for the performing arts is met only with her dedication for defending human rights. Woodard has chosen to use her fame on social media as a political activist, raising awareness about i topics like police violence and race and gender equality.

PHOTO BY MICHELLE UTHOFF-CAMPBELL

DECEMBER 1ST

WEDDING FASHION SHOOT

@alfrewoodard @realalfrewoodard

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

OK


Expectations. Meet Tracy Crow. She’s President at Tomco-Harwel Industries in Tulsa. Tracy’s business is successful and growing because she knows how to assemble a team that understands her drive, one that shares her vision. Meet Louis Medina. He’s Senior Vice President, Commercial Lending at Blue Sky Bank. He knows Tracy’s business very well too. And when she calls, he answers with the financial solutions to help keep THI on the fast track. Right where Tracy wants it. Tracy has sky high expectations when it comes to a business banking partner. Louis wouldn’t have it any other way. Now, how can we go to work for you?

Tracy Crow President Tomco-Harwel Industries and Blue Sky partner

Louis Medina Senior Vice President Commercial Lending Blue Sky Bank

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Jane explored her options with a team of specialists who treat only cancer.

Jane Elterman Lung Cancer Patient

At Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA), treating cancer isn’t one thing we do—it’s the only thing we do. With state-of-the-art technologies and precision cancer treatment, our experts diagnose patients and develop a thorough treatment plan. So patients like Jane get a plan that not only attacks the cancer, but also offers evidence-based therapies to help reduce side effects. If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, or are already undergoing treatment, and are unsure about your options, talk to the experts at CTCA® in Tulsa. Our team can recommend a treatment plan customized to fight your specific cancer and help you get back to living your life.

cancercenter.com/experts • 888.568.1571 ©2016 Rising Tide

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

A Network Provider For


State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Harnessed Wind Energy Oklahoma is a national leader for wind energy production.

O

klahoma has long been known for the wind that comes sweeping down the plains. The power of this wind has become an important part of the state’s energy supply and continues to evolve as it’s better utilized. Giant turbines harness the energy of winds and generate power, which is transmitted to homes, businesses and other public entities. Laura Fleet, the director of public policy for The Wind Coalition, says wind energy has benefited Oklahoma in a number of ways since it was first established in the early 2000s. “It’s clean, cheap and infinite power that utilizes no water,” she says. “Oklahoma’s two largest utilities have estimated wind power that will save their customers over $2 billion over the lifetime of their wind purchase agreements.” She adds that wind energy has had a positive impact on schools throughout the state. “Wind power generates millions of dollars annually through ad valorem taxes for schools, which allow districts to invest in a myriad of capital improvements, salary increases for teachers and technology upgrades,” she says.

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State

County governments also receive revenue from wind energy, enabling them to provide an array of services for their respective residents. In addition, the wind industry gives royalty payments to Oklahomans who lease their land for the placement of wind turbines. “These royalty payments are a steady source of income, which allows many rural Oklahomans to maintain their farm and ranch operations,” Fleet says. The towering wind turbines, some as tall as 212 feet and grouped in what are known as wind farms, can be spotted from miles away and certainly spark curiosity from passers-by. Fleet notes that there are more than 2,000 turbines in 19 of Oklahoma’s 77 counties. Blades reaching lengths of 116 feet catch the wind and spin the turbines, which send electrical currents through transmission lines to substations, where the electricity is dispersed. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, Oklahoma is fourth in the nation with 5,453 megawatts of installed wind power capacity, trailing only Texas, Iowa and California. Approximately 18 percent of all electricity generated here comes from the wind, and Fleet says this percentage will increase as more businesses purchase renewable energy, especially larger corporations. Locations for the turbines are carefully considered. “Wind energy is a science, and wind patterns are studied thoroughly before any development begins construction,” Fleet says. “Wide, open, largely rural spaces, with fewer structures, are prime locations.” She adds that, other than open land, there are a few other limitations to where wind turbines can be placed.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

“Wind energy is a science, and wind patterns are studied thoroughly before any development begins construction.”

“The size of the turbines negates their placement in areas where there are structures,” Fleet says. “There are also setback restrictions requiring turbines to be placed a certain distance away from hospitals, schools and airports. Municipalities can also have setback ordinances.” These limitations have proved to be challenging to the industry since the power that’s generated in open spaces has a quite long way to travel in order to reach more populated areas in the state. This challenge is being addressed with a recently announced transmission line that will carry Oklahoma’s wind power to areas that it previously couldn’t reach, along with a row of other states. The Plains and Eastern Clean Line, a joint project of Clean Line Energy and GE Energy Connections, will stretch 720 miles and is the largest infrastructure project of its kind. The line is expected to provide 4,000 megawatts to more than 1 million homes in Arkansas, Tennessee, and other states in the Mid-South and Southeast. Construction has been approved and will begin in the second half of 2017. Fleet says Oklahoma is looking ahead in the industry and, along with neighboring states, participates in the Southwest Power Pool, a regional transmission organization. It works with states, utilities and regulators to assess the area’s long- and near-term transmission needs. “The benefits to planning ahead and building these farm-to-market wires, so to speak, are immense and help provide a strong electric grid, unlock customer savings and generate many economic benefits for a state like Oklahoma with abundant energy potential,” she says. The coming years have a lot to hold for the wind industry. “Like any emerging technology, the wind industry is constantly evolving,” Fleet says. “The industry is still very young in Oklahoma. In just over a decade, the industry has grown to be a respected and valued member of Oklahoma’s energy portfolio. New technologies are being developed and tested constantly and will only continue to improve the efficiency of wind power, which will provide continued low consumer electricity rates and reliable, clean, infinite energy to thousands of Oklahomans.” ANNE BOYD


The State

MAKERS

Get Your Motor Runnin’

Custom cycle producer in OKC specializes in high-end, timeless creations.

F

with a chuckle. “Russia, Estonia, South Afor Dar Holdsworth, the art of building customized motorcycles rica, Australia … we also have them all over the place in the U.S.” began as a stress-relieving Brass Balls Cycles builds custom motorcyhobby. cles from the ground up, as well as customiza“I had a corporate job, and tions for existing bikes. Depending on the custhis was an outlet for nights and weekends,” tomer’s wishes, prices can range from $26,000 he says. “Eventually, that phased out because to $80,000. Holdsworth says a custom bike this – this is where my passion is.” The passion also translates as talent because typically costs about $40,000 because “we use high end components that last. People can Holdsworth has also won the World Champitake these bikes around the racetrack or across onship for Custom/Production Bike Building the country and have no two years in a problems.” row. “We create bikes that When describing the Just a stone’s looked good 10 years bikes he builds, Holdthrow from sworth carefully conveys downtown Oklaago, and they’ll look these bikes, while homa City, Brass good 10 years from now.” that maintaining a unique Balls Cycles has look, are not takes on trendy fads. produced unique, customized motorcycles for “We create timeless bikes,” he says. “We almost 10 years. These timeless pieces have create bikes that looked good 10 years ago, drawn customers from all over the world, including actor Tim Allen and entertainer Usher. and they’ll look good 10 years from now.” Each cycle is assembled by hand, as op“I can’t even name all the places all over posed to an assembly line. The shop has four the world we have bikes in,” Holdsworth says

lifts, so they can accommodate four bikes at any given time. Currently, all of his lifts are full and it is possible that they could be full for at least a little while; when customers bring in their bikes, depending on the intensity of the customization, they could look at anywhere from two weeks to six months of production. It’s also a first-come, first-served basis. Brass Balls Cycles is owned and operated by Holdsworth and his wife. He enjoys when people call the shop with questions and request to speak with him instead of his wife when she answers the phone and end up discovering his wife is also a motorcycle expert. “She is very knowledgable about this stuff,” he says. “She knows more than probably most of the people that call up here. She can answer almost any question anyone has about these bikes; she knows all about it.” Another area growing in his business, Holdsworth says, is customizing existing motorcycles. Custom wheels, tires, brakes, grips, handlebars, foot pegs and seats are just a few of the parts that customers request for their bikes. When asked if he ever takes his bike cross country, the longing in his voice is palpable: “Oh yeah, of course. No email, no cellphone; it’s great. I should do it again soon.” SAMANTHA ALEXANDER

DAR HOLDSWORTH HAS RUN BRASS BALLS CYCLES FOR NEARLY A DECADE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


The State

GERARD CLANCY BECAME THE UNIVERSITY OF TULSA’S 20TH PRESIDENT IN NOVEMBER. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

PEOPLE

I

A Man With a Plan Dr. Gerard Clancy aims to advance the University of Tulsa, its students and the city.

n 2005, Gerard Clancy, M.D., learned a sobering fact. The life expectancy of a north Tulsan was 14 years fewer than it was for someone in south Tulsa. To reduce the disparity, Clancy led the Lewin Report to improve the health of Tulsans. He raised $20 million and helped to establish the OU Physicians Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Clinic, four additional clinics, educational and preventative programs, and mobile psychiatric teams in north Tulsa. Within 10 years, the life-expectancy gap was reduced to 11 years.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

An agent of change, the new University of Tulsa president (as of November) has spent the past three decades as a leader. “If you can improve the system, you can improve the situation for many, many people,” Clancy says. Before moving to Tulsa 16 years ago, Clancy developed programs at the University of Iowa for homeless people with severe mental illness. Highly effective in improving health and reducing costs, the programs have been replicated across America. Clancy also served as president of the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa, where he

added more than $327 million in facilities, programs and scholarships. He led the establishment of the OU-TU School of Community Medicine, and he served as TU’s vice president of health affairs and dean of its Oxley College of Health Sciences. He envisions graduates working in and transforming the real world. “They’ll know what China is like,” he says. “They’ll know what it’s like with the homeless, what it’s like at Iron Gate [soup kitchen]. TU will thrive at having students in the community doing things, so, by the time they leave, they feel comfortable jumping into the world and doing, using the knowledge they gained. “Universities have taken the approach, ‘We’ll prepare your brain, and then you go do.’ I’d like to move that line to, ‘Yes, we’ll prepare your brain, but also your heart and your skills to do in the real world.’” Clancy wants to retain talent in the city, a priority for this former Chamber of Commerce board chair. “We need smart, young, creative people to stay in Tulsa, and the universities have a major responsibility in making that happen,” he says. He also plans to increase talent retention by furthering the arts and local activities, via the university, to ensure an engaging, enjoyable city where graduates will settle down. Clancy’s goals are lofty, especially considering TU’s severe budget cuts. But by protecting the academic core and diversifying offerings through health, computer and information sciences, Clancy is confident the university will thrive. The university will not raise tuition for a year as Clancy focuses on funding scholarships. “I understand the importance of perseverance. It takes a long time sometimes to do big, complicated things,” says Clancy, acknowledging “the grind of execution. Plans are fun and easy to do. It’s the execution that’s the hard part, and I’m used to that.” Clancy will also continue to improve Tulsans’ health. As a psychiatrist, he is chair of the steering committee for the 10-year Tulsa Regional Mental Health Plan on mental illness and substance abuse. “My wife, Paula, and I aren’t going anywhere. We’ve put down roots,” Clancy says. CAMILLE TORRES


The

CHICKASAW NATION United We Thrive

T H E A RT E S I A N H OT E L SULPHUR, OK

BEDRÉ CAFE SULPHUR, OK

BILL ANOATUBBY, GOVERNOR

EXHIBIT C O K L A H O M A C I T Y, O K

www.CHICKASAW.net


The State

I

Oz en Pointe

Tulsa Ballet premieres its biggest production to date for its 60th anniversary.

n celebration of its 60th year, Tulsa Ballet will premiere Dorothy and the Prince of Oz. Adapted from the 14th book in L. Frank Baum’s series, this $1 million production won’t include a walk along the yellow brick road, but it will showcase a familiar cast of characters. Audiences “will love this production, and they’re going to be enamored and taken in by the story,” choreographer Edwaard Liang says, “but I just want to make sure the audience isn’t disappointed that they aren’t seeing the first book and that they’re not going to hear ‘Somewhere Over the Rainbow.’” Dorothy and the Prince of Oz is a co-production between Tulsa Ballet and BalletMet, from Columbus, Ohio, where Liang is the artistic director. Liang and Marcello Angelini, Tulsa Ballet’s artistic director, have worked on this ballet for nearly three years. It features the work of costume designer Mark Zappone, composer Oliver Peter Graber, and Basil Twist, the MacArthur Genius Award recipient who created the sets and puppets. “It has been at great lengths that we really balance out this production,” Liang says. “I think it has humor, and I think it has amazing sets and costumes. I think it’s a spectacle, especially with the puppetry. I don’t think anybody has ever seen this type of imaginative, inventive puppetry. It’s not like puppetry that you’re going to see in an amusement park. It’s a very dramatic journey, and it’s passionate, and it’s intense, and it touches on all different parts of emotion, from joy of dance to obses

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

sion to control to death.” Even though this isn’t The Wizard of Oz that audiences have grown accustomed to, Liang is optimistic that the production will encourage more people to come to the ballet. “I think that this is such an iconic piece of American history,” he says. “So, I’m hoping that this story will bring new audiences and also be able to inspire the audiences that we have. These are the productions that I think both Marcello and I are extremely passionate about because we need to find more ballets that are great entry points for the community and audiences beyond The Nutcracker.” Liang says he is honored that this ballet is part of the 60th celebration because he and Angelini share a vision for ballet companies. “This is a new world premiere. We’re trying to find inventive ways to tell a story,” Liang says. “[The] first aim is to create great art and with great art and great repertoire and with great ballets you attract world class dancers. When you attract world class dancers to dance this great art, you attract more patrons. You attract more audience. That’s why we’re here. That’s why we do what we do so that people can see and get touched, moved, and inspired by what we do, hopefully. That means that there’s hopefully more funding for the ballet companies, and then we put it back to the great art, so it’s this virtuous cycle.” BETH WEESE

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

C U LT U R E


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The State

INSIDER

Background Man Oklahoma State alum Steve Olim can’t shake the movie bug and now makes it as an extra on sets.

B

STEVE OLIM STANDS ON THE SET OF TV’S LETHAL WEAPON. PHOTO COURTESY STEVE OLIM

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

ack in the late ’60s, my friend Steve Olim and I made a couple of movies, using ourselves and some of our fellow Oklahoma State University students as actors and crew. Done well before the video and digital revolutions, these short, silent pictures were shot on 8mm film; one of them, a comedy that Steve directed called The Hitchhiker, got a special screening at the OSU Student Union right before a Clint Eastwood feature. We had the filmmaking bug then, and we’ve both had a hard time shaking it ever since. Steve had it so bad during his OSU days that one evening he sought out the Los Angeles telephone book in the college library, took down the names and addresses of every movie and TV studio he could find, went back to his dorm room and wrote them all about the possibility of a summer job. A personal letter from a Columbia Pictures executive led to his working two summers handling administrative affairs for that studio’s makeup department. A naturally gregarious guy, Steve became chummy with several big-name actors during his Hollywood time, something I found out firsthand when we took a trip West in 1971, just before I went on active duty with the Naval Reserve. We visited the set of the TV series Bewitched, where star Elizabeth Montgomery greeted him like a returning brother; got VIP seats to a taping of The Dean Martin Show, courtesy of series regular Kay Medford; and had cocktails at the home of Hayden Rorke, Dr. Bellows on I Dream of Jeannie. Steve intended to continue working with Columbia after graduation, but those were the days of the Vietnam draft lottery, and the luck of the draw determined that he’d first have to do some time in the military. By the time he finished his service and headed back to California, he

recalls, the executives who’d hired him had gone elsewhere. “I was out of college, I needed to make money, so I stayed in Oklahoma and became a salesman,” he remembers. “But I think my heart was always in the [film] industry.” Steve got a little closer to it in 1984, when he moved from Tulsa to Southern California. But he was still making his living by selling bank equipment. Eventually, he left that job and started daytrading in the stock market via computer from his home. That’s what he was doing in 2009, when a friend who lived nearby told Steve that he was thinking about pursuing jobs as an extra in movies and television. That rekindled Steve’s old filmmaking fire, and when his buddy headed to Burbank to register with Central Casting – the famous extra-casting company begun in the silent-movie era – Steve went along and signed up himself. “I was in it for six months or a year,” he recalls, “and I did several TV shows and two feature films, Iron Man 2 and Valentine’s Day. It turns out that Valentine’s Day was produced by the son of Alan Rice, the man who gave me my summer job at Columbia-Screen Gems.” The work was fun, he says, and the food was good and plentiful, but the pay was just a shade above minimum wage. So he returned to the stock market for another several years ... until May 2016, when he decided to give moviemaking another try. “I got tired of looking at the [computer] screen, and the business still had a draw for me,” he explains. So he committed to working as an extra – or, as he prefers, a background actor. And this time it took. Since then, he’s worked as a background actor in scores of television episodes, shot all over Southern California. As with his former job, however, he’s got to log plenty of time at the computer. “Once you’ve filled out all the forms and gotten your picture taken, then you’re registered with Central Casting, and you can use your PC or cell phone to go to their site on Twitter and see what they’re posting, minute-by-minute,” he notes. “It might say, ‘Looking for Hispanic males and females between the ages of 18 and


25’ or ‘Looking for Caucasian males, 30s60s, must have a waist no larger than 34.’ They’re very specific. “So they’ll tell you what they’re looking for and usually where the shoot will be, and if you feel like you fit, then you get on the phone and call their number. Sometimes you get a busy signal, so you just keep calling. Sometimes you don’t get through, or you get a recording that says, ‘Sorry, this has all been booked.’ And then you look for the next thing. “Other times, they don’t want you to call. They’ll say, ‘Send a picture of you in your business suit’ or ‘We want to see what you look like dressed as a homeless person.’ So you send a picture to them online with your information. That way, they can pull up the picture they took of you when you enrolled and compare it. If they want you, they’ll contact you and say, ‘Report to such-and-such studio tomorrow, 6 a.m. call time. You’ve got the job.’” Steve’s been getting a lot of those lately, at least in part because of the movie-set professionalism he learned during those long-ago summers at Columbia Pictures. “When you’re hired to do a job as a background actor,” he says, “you may not be paid a wealth of money, but you’re expected

to be on time and be professional and not cause any disruption. Go where the director tells you, when the director tells you, and don’t trip over the cables.” He laughs. “When you walk, don’t act like a robot. Use natural facial expressions. If the scene is supposed to be a shocking one, where aliens invade or a cop runs in with a gun and yells while you’re a patron in a restaurant, act shocked.”

“While you’re a small part of things, you’re actually being a part of the creative process. And no two days are alike.” One of the disruptions forbidden on the sets is taking pictures of or trying to fraternize with what Steve calls the “first-team actors,” the stars and featured players. But sometimes the first-teamers interact with the extras. That was the case during a recent taping of the series Training Day, when star Bill Paxton overheard Steve making a crack

about the plastic sushi he was supposed to be eating during a Japanese restaurant scene. “It was when we broke for lunch,” he remembers. “All of a sudden, I heard this voice say, ‘Just where are you from?’ I turned around, and there’s Bill Paxton. I told him I was from Oklahoma, he said he was from Fort Worth, and we stood there and talked for a few minutes. He told me how much he loved Tulsa. Just a nice, congenial guy.” That kind of conversation may not happen often when you’re a background actor, but, for Steve, lots of good come along with every job. “To me it’s exciting,” he says. “To me it’s fun. You’re actually walking onto a studio lot. You’re getting past the gate. And while you’re a small part of things, you’re actually being a part of the creative process. And no two days are alike. “Once, I was on a set where the production company had rented a strip club. I think it was for Rosewood. I was supposed to be a patron, leaning against the bar watching girls in bikinis dance. That was a pretty good gig. I live in Huntington Beach, and I could go down to the beach and watch girls in bikinis all day – but who’s going to feed me and pay me to do it?” JOHN WOOLEY

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Healthy Home, Happy Life PHOTO BY ALYSSA ROSENHECK

A positive atmosphere complete with healthy, delicious food options contributes to one’s well-being.

M

yriad factors contribute to a healthy lifestyle, from how much exercise one gets to the amount of stress in one’s life. Here, the relaxing ambiance of a Midtown

Tulsa home, refurbished by Austin Bean Design Studio, is embodied by these luscious grapes. And just as the home environment can add to the quality of life, so too can food. Diets rich in fresh fruits and vegetables promote lower blood pressure and higher resistance to illness. JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style INTERIORS

A Taste of Wine Country

A Midtown Tulsa home undergoes a complete renovation to add a California flair. By M. J. Van Deventer • Photos by Alyssa Rosenheck

W

hen the owners of a midtown Tulsa home decided on a full-scale renovation, they sought the advice of Mel Bean and Bailey Austin Bird of the Austin Bean Design Studio. “We toured their home and over wine they told us of their desire to add on to and completely update the exterior of the home, as well as every space within,” Mel says. “They requested an approachable and comfortable, yet modern aesthetic informed by their travels through California wine country.” The couple wanted to update the home’s exterior by transforming its exterior with modern lines to give a sleek, cozy, welcoming first impression. Bailey also re-imagined the layout of the interior by adding several rooms and a garage, and renovating interior spaces. Several additions that were not cohesive had been built onto the house, which added to the challenge, Mel says. “You could tell where each addition began,” she says. “There were also several challenging floor levels.” The new design involves textures and natural materials. Contractor Casey Goodwin concealed all hints of earlier additions and transformed cramped areas into voluminous spaces full of natural light. The approach was shown in the living room, which combines a natural hide rug, linen chairs, custom silk drapes, a cast stone fireplace and other touches of dark metal and aged wood.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


CLOCKWISE: THE BLACK METAL CHANDELIER IN THE SITTING ROOM PROVIDES A DRAMATIC TOUCH. NEW WINDOWS IN THE FAMILY ROOM PROVIDE NATURAL LIGHTING, ACCENTING THE SEATING AREA AND NEW FIREPLACE. A SECONDARY STAIR WAS ADDED TO ACCESS THE NEW UPSTAIRS GAME, EXERCISE AND CRAFT ROOMS AND RENOVATED BEDROOMS. THE CHAIRS IN THE SITTING ROOM HAVE A TEXTURED SURFACE THAT COMPLEMENTS THE COUNTRY COWHIDE RUG. A PALE WOOD TOP WITH A METAL STRAPPED BASE REFLECTING THE STEEL DRUM SHADE OF THE LIGHT FIXTURE AND CHAIRS WITH NAILHEAD TRIM SUGGEST THE WINE COUNTRY THEME. THE NEW DESIGN UTILIZES TOUCHES OF AGED WOOD TO CREATE A WINE COUNTRY FEEL. THE TEAM USED ART PIECES THROUGHOUT THE HOME TO ACCENT THE COLOR PALETTE.

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

“The goal was to remove the word formal from this space while retaining a level of elegance,” Mel says. “The heavily textured linen swivel chairs are the perfect place for conversation over a glass of wine.” The sitting room has an intimate seating group for four with a large chandelier anchoring this space. A baby grand piano adds a classical note. New large windows, custom trim and refinished wood floors aided the renovation. The dining room’s focal point is a large round table and a modern retro chandelier. A bar in the dining room is enhanced with custom walnut cabinetry, a slab backsplash and a quartzite countertrop. The bar also serves the kitchen and family room – rooms that were also reworked to be a welcoming retreat for entertaining and cooking with their two children. “Originally, the kitchen was a small galley with low ceilings, useless columns and a back stairway too narrow to be functional. We reworked the kitchen’s location and size, relocated the secondary stairs and designed a custom railing,” Mel says. The kitchen was extended and redesigned with zones that allow for multiple cooks in the kitchen. New windows provide natural lighting, and a peninsula with a quartzite countertop has a waterfall edge. The backsplash is chiseled stone. “It’s a beautiful space designed to serve all their kitchen needs,” Mel adds. The team added vaulted ceilings to both the kitchen and family room. The family room features a custom-designed dramatic cast stone fireplace extending to the ceiling. End tables made from old wine barrels and a concrete-topped coffee table with a reclaimed wood base rest on a soft rug, providing textural contrast. Other features of the renovation include separate offices for the parents and children, a mud room, game room, exercise space and a crafts studio. “The biggest challenges in designing renovations are the unexpected surprises – like that narrow stairway,” Mel says. “This was a very successful project. Our staff was thrilled with the way the project developed and so were the clients.” Now, the home is a beautiful, functional showplace, redesigned perfectly to meet the family’s needs for casual living and entertaining with a wine country flair. 26

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

CLOCKWISE: THE EXISTING GALLEY KITCHEN WAS EXTENDED AND REDESIGNED WITH ZONES ALLOWING FOR SEVERAL COOKS IN THE KITCHEN. IN THE DINING ROOM, A GUEST’S EYES ARE NATURALLY DRAWN TO AN ORIGINAL OIL PAINTING BY TULSA ARTIST KIM FONDER. CUSTOM SHELVING WAS ADDED TO MANY AREAS IN THE HOME. SEEING THIS PAINTING IN THE DINING ROOM WAS LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT FOR THE CLIENTS AND DESIGNERS. GRAY GRASSCLOTH WALLPAPER AND A SINK MADE OF SILVER TRAVERTINE WITH A WATERFALL EDGE ARE FEATURES OF THE NEW POWDER ROOM, NEAR THE KITCHEN AND POOL.


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Life & Style

CIT Y LIFE

‘Doin’ It Right in Doo-rant’ Durant is home to the Magnolia and Shakespeare festivals, along with the Choctaw headquarters.

O

ne of the quick ways to tell whether one is a native of or transplant to Durant is the pronunciation of its name. DOO-rant, say the locals; der-RANT, say the imports. Regardless of the accent or dipthong, the seat of Bryan County has just about everything for a varied lifestyle: recreation, beauty, culture, history and gaming. “We’re doin’ it right in Doo-rant,” says Janet Reed, executive director of the Durant Chamber of Commerce. Fifteen miles north of the Red River and about 2.5 hours by car from Oklahoma City or Tulsa, Durant also draws extensive crowds from North Texas. Dixon Durant, whose father came to southeastern Oklahoma during the Trail of Tears removal of the Choctaw people, is credited as the founder after he established a general store in 1873. The original pronunciation of his name, der-RAWNT, actually provides a third option if one wants to use the proper French. But how the city’s name is said makes little difference to Reed, who merely wants everyone to come visit. “We have all the necessities, along with our boutique stores downtown, which are unique,” she says. The Magnolia Festival, which will celebrate its 21st year in late May and early June, has gotten so big that it moved to the Choctaw Event Center three years ago. At that venue, everything is under one roof, which has allowed the festival to grow because inclement weather is rendered moot. The Choctaw Nation’s Casino and Resort, with 776 rooms and two gaming areas each over 108,000 square feet, is the city’s largest employer. The Grand Theater is routinely packed; Kid Rock, who will appear there late this month, has already sold out two shows. With its headquarters in Durant, the Choctaw Nation is a major partner in planning events with the city, along with Southeastern Oklahoma State University and the Durant Independent School District, Reed says. “All three entities have representatives on

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

DURANT HAS MULTIPLE HORSE STATUES LINING ITS LIVELY MAIN STREET. PHOTO COURTESY DURANT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

FUN FACTS P O P U L AT I O N

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The original site for

Southeastern State Normal School, now Southeastern Oklahoma State University, was in

Dr. J.L. Schulter’s peach orchard. our board of directors, so they’re part of the process,” she says. SEOSU, home to about 4,000 Savage Storm students, is a NCAA Division II-sized school. Originally Oklahoma’s teaching college, it was founded in 1909 as Southeastern State Normal School. It also hosts the annual Oklahoma Shakespearean Festival, which offers several productions during the summer and theater classes year-round. Other Durant destinations nearby are Lake Texoma, a camping, hiking, fishing and skiing wonderland, and the Three Valley Museum (“One of our best-kept secrets,” Reed says), which is named for the area’s three rivers (the Red, the Blue and the Washita). BRIAN WILSON

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H E A LT H

Mood Food Your diet can both help and hinder your emotional and mental health.

W

e know a healthy diet supports a healthy body, and the same goes for our mental health. When we treat ourselves to an extra piece of cake, we don’t often consider the cognitive effects. However, the food we eat can play an important role in boosting our mood and emotional well-being. According to the Mayo Clinic, several studies have found that people who have a poor quality diet – one that’s high in processed meat, sweets, fried food, refined cereals and high-fat dairy products – were more likely to report symptoms of depression, while those who ate mostly fruits, vegetables and fish were less likely to report being depressed. “Dietary intake can trigger chemical and physiological changes within the brain that later can affect our behavior and emotions,” says Valerie Dandridge, an outpatient dietitian with Saint Francis Hospital. “Eating consistently during the day without skipping meals, including an adequate amount of carbohydratecontaining foods, and a balanced diet containing omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, can affect how we feel.” She points out that eating too much or too little of a macronutrient can adversely affect our mental and physical states. “Too little carbs, for example, can cause us to have a shortage on production of serotonin,” she says. “Eating too much fat in a greasy meal can make us feel a bit sluggish because it takes more work to digest such a meal.” Dandridge says she agrees that food can be another tool in fighting stress and depression. “Diet has been known to help ‘fight the blues’ in regard to tryptophan, adequate carbs, omega 3s and a consistent intake of nutrition throughout the day to keep blood sugars stable, which keeps the amount of fuel to the brain stable,” she says.

While more research is needed, the Mayo Clinic reports that some studies have suggested that omega-3 fatty acids may be beneficial in the treatment of mild to moderate depression and a folate deficiency has been linked to depression. However, experts recommend individuals visit their doctors before seeking new treatment plans. Consider adding more of the following foods to your diet to help improve your mood: Walnuts: Go nuts with walnuts as these are the richest plant-based source of omega-3 fatty acids. Other good sources include flaxseed and enriched eggs. Fish: Add the catch of the day to your menu for a good source of protein that’s not high in saturated fat. Fatty fish packed with omega-3s include mackerel, salmon, trout and tuna. Dark chocolate/cocoa: It’s OK to indulge occasionally in dark chocolate as it may help with the release of serotonin; just be sure you don’t overdo it so as to avoid consuming too much sugar and fat. Avocado: Surprisingly, avocados are classified as a berry and pack a serious punch with nearly 20 vitamins and minerals in a serving. Avocados are also high in fat, but it’s monounsaturated fat, considered the “good” fat that helps lower bad cholesterol. Dark leafy greens: Leafy greens like kale, collards, spinach and romaine lettuce are high in antioxidants, dietary fiber, folate and vitamins such as A, C, E and K. In addition, they are known to help reduce the risk of cancer and heart disease. Green tea: Also high in antioxidants, green tea contains the amino acid L-theanine, which in some studies has shown to enhance mental performance. Turmeric: Known for being the main spice in curry, turmeric offers antiinflammatory properties and can be added to tea and soups or sprinkled atop roasted vegetables. REBECCA FAST

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style D E S T I N AT I O N S

‘I’m Goin’ to ... Kansas City’ Architecture, barbecue and whiskey help to define Paris of the Plains, City of Fountains.

M

etropolitan. Cultural. Diverse. Entertaining. Kansas City has all these qualities. Midwestern yet international, KC provides so much to do that you can’t fit it all into one trip. But making a second excursion is easy since, by car, it’s four hours from Tulsa and five hours from Oklahoma City. Lacking the crazy traffic of most large burghs, Kansas City boasts whiskey distilleries, steakhouses, murals, barbecue joints, trolleys, specialty grocery stores, breweries, museums, live music and art galleries galore. Also known as Paris of the Plains for its architecture, KC has on its seal the moniker City of Fountains for its approximately 200 fonts (reportedly only second in the world to Rome’s 2,000 fountains).

CLOCKWISE: THE VIEW IN FRONT OF UNION STATION SHOWS HOW KANSAS CITY EARNED ITS NAME AS THE CITY OF FOUNTAINS. THE SPRINT CENTER, LOCATED ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT, HOSTS A VARIETY OF EVENTS. THE CROSSROADS ARTS DISTRICT HOSTS A FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL. PHOTOS COURTESY VISIT KC

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Museums

Museums you can reach off Main Street from Country Club Plaza are the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Money Museum (part of the Federal Reserve Bank), Union Station’s Science City (with the Gottlieb planetarium) and the National World War I Museum.

Districts

Power & Light, Westport, Crossroads Art, City Market, Brookside, Waldo, West Bottoms and Southwest Boulevard all have never-ending interest and eclectic appeal. Where else can you buy crepes in a

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


former opera house like Chez Elle? Around the corner, eat cafeteria-style, authentic Mexican food within a grocery store at Los Alamos, where the locals dine. Nearby is the Boulevard Brewery.

Shopping and Dining

Westport, a hip district located next to The Plaza, boasts Victorian buildings renovated into charming cafes, taverns, music stores and old-style boutiques. Visit Re-runs and Wonderland vintage stores and get a drink on the Ale House balcony. Westport is a 10-minute stroll from The Plaza. Stay at a midway point (such as the Marriott Courtyard) to be within walking distance of both districts. The Plaza is chic and classy while Westport is casual and quaint. Re-Runs has a substantial collection of vintage clothing that celebrities have frequented. It’s a must-see. City Market is a lively international farmers market. Al Habashi Mart and Carollo’s Grocery and Deli will thrill you with exotic items that you can’t find back home, like fresh spices in an open-air market that delight the senses.

A Three-day KC Weekend

Friday afternoon: Stroll 15 blocks of glorious European architecture at The Plaza. Byron, with its tailored men’s suits and clothing, is an experience once you walk in the door. Gram and Dun’s patio, Bloody Mary cart and unique way of bringing you the bill are defining Plaza treats. Evening: If you’re in town at the beginning of the month, go to the First Friday Art Crawl in the Crossroads Art District and enjoy this free event through art galleries. There’s also street dancing. Regardless, make reservations at Lidia’s restaurant for an Italian farmhouse atmosphere or The Majestic, a historic steakhouse with a jazz club on the original speakeasy, basement level. Saturday: Choose from the following: the city’s museums; the NCAA Hall of Fame and College Basketball Experience; the Kansas City Zoo; Worlds of Fun; Schlitterbahn; Kansas City Fun Tours; the Kansas City Streetcar; brewery and barbecue tours. Late afternoon: Have cappuccino at Kaldi’s Coffee in The Plaza and enjoy magicians, street performers and live music while watching horsedrawn carriages stroll by. Christmas lights on The Plaza last until midJanuary. Then go for happy hour at Tom’s Town Distilling Co. on Main Street. Other options include, depending on the season, Top Golf, a Royals baseball game, a Chiefs football game or a Sporting KC soccer game. Dinner: Make 7:30 p.m. reservations at Tasso’s Greek Restaurant on Wornall Road for an unforgettable taverna experience of

food, interactive open dancing and belly dancing. Dine and stay all night to enjoy the show. Sunday: Stroll the idyllic Loose Park near The Plaza. After breakfast at the Classic Cup Cafe, drive Ward Parkway to gaze at the mansions of Mission Hills. Union Station’s Science City opens at noon for an amazing family experience as well as absorbing the beauty of this enthralling depot’s interior. Have barbecue at Arthur Bryant’s, Gates or Q39. The best way to summarize KC’s magic is to quote a mural painted in the art district: “Kansas City, I’m So in Love!” GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

TOP: BROOKSIDE IS A POPULAR SHOPPING DISTRICT IN KANSAS CITY. MIDDLE: THE NATIONAL WAR WORLD I MUSEUM IS ONE OF MANY MUSEUMS LOCATED IN THE CITY. BOTTOM: COUNTRY CLUB PLAZA WILL HAVE CHRISTMAS LIGHTS ON DISPLAY UNTIL MID-JANUARY. PHOTOS COURTESY VISIT KC

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

ST YLE

Resort Repose

January is the perfect time for a warm weather escape – get ready to relax with plenty of resort-inspired style choices.

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN CIRCUS TRICKS SCARF, $385, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE ALICE AND OLIVIA PEASANT FLORAL TOP, $250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE THEORY YORISA 3/4 LENGTH STRIPE TOP, $160, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

VINCE TEXTURED TANK, $220, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

PAIGE DISTRESSED DENIM JEANS, $239, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JOIE BRIGHTON SLEEVELESS TOP, $178, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MILLY STRIPED BOX CLUTCH, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALICE AND OLIVIA STRIPED DRESS, $330, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

REBECCA MINKOFF DENIM CLUTCH, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE


MANOLO BLAHNIK BLACK FLORAL ANKLE STRAP HEELS, $985, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO FLORAL PUMPS, $750, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

TORY BURCH BLOSSOM ESPADRILLE, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO FLORAL OPEN TOE HEELS, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MANOLO BLAHNIK PINK FLORAL ANKLE STRAP HEELS, $985, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG PENELOPE WRAP DRESS, $468, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO FUCHSIA ANKLE STRAP HEELS, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

TORY BURCH FRINGE SANDAL, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

LOEFFLER RANDALL FLORAL CLUTCH, $350, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF SILVER CLUTCH, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

KENDALL AND KYLIE ROSE GOLD CLUTCH, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

ST YLE

Shades of... The winter months call for rich, deep purple fashion items – but don’t stop there. Burgundy, aubergine, magenta and violet showcase the perfect pop of purple, too.

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN SKULL SCARF, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

BAILEY 44 COLD SHOULDER SILK TOP, $158, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA TAYLOR WASHED LEATHER JACKET IN SUGAR BEET, $895, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

360 SLASH SLEEVE SWEATER, $288, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

THEORY SLEEVELESS DRESS, $355, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

BCBG MAX AZRIA BELL-SLEEVED BLOUSE, $228, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF BIKER CROSSBODY, $145, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

NIC & ZOE LEATHER TRIMMED SHIRT, $108, DONNA’S FASHIONS

ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTALFRAMED LUCITE CUFF BRACELET, $145, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF SUKI CLUTCH, $175, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

SPLENDID COLD SHOULDER DRESS, $148, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

ALEXIS BITTAR FACETED LUCITE BANGLE, $100; ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTALENCRUSTED ORIGAMI INLAY HINGE BRACELETS IN ANTIQUE SILVER AND LAGUNA BLUE, $225 EACH; ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL-ENCRUSTED HINGE BRACELET, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE


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Life & Style

SCENE

NORMAN CHIEF OF POLICE KEITH & PAMELA HUMPHREYS, ED HARRIS, RAY GOINS; AN EVENING WITH ED HARRIS, WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER, NORMAN

DR. GARY SHAFFER, PEGGY HELMERICH, LYNDA BROWNSON, BILLY COLLINS; PEGGY V. HELMERICH AWARD DINNER, TULSA CITY COUNTY LIBRARY, TULSA

SHARI HOLDMAN, RANEY COOPER, JENNIFER BIGHORSE AND CASSIE REESE; GO RED FOR WOMEN, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, TULSA JONO HELMERICH, KIM JOHNSON, DR. GARY SHAFFER; PEGGY V. HELMERICH AWARD DINNER, TULSA CITY COUNTY LIBRARY, TULSA

RABBI MARC FITZERMAN, NANCY COHEN, JOLENE SANDITENSTEPHENS, MARK GOLDMAN; CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, CONGREGATION B’NAI EMUNAH, TULSA SAM PRESTI, SALLY NICHOLS STARLING, KATIE PRIOR, KARI WATKINS AND MIKE TURPEN; REFLECTIONS OF HOPE AWARD LUNCHEON, OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL MUSEUM, OKC

COURTNEY THOMAS, DAMON LANE, MIKI FARRIS; BINGO FOR BABIES, INFANT CRISIS SERVICES, OKC

DR. SONJA HUGHES, SUE WEHBA, MARION PADEN; CELEBRATE PINK OKC LUNCHEON, OKLAHOMA PROJECT WOMAN, OKC

MICHAEL BARON, DON T. ZACHRITZ, RANDY COMPTON; ROYAL BROADWAY BALL, LYRIC THEATRE, OKC

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

KATHY L. WILLIAMS, MARY FRATES, DAVID BOREN; VISIONS 2016: A CELEBRATION OF NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP, OKLAHOMA CENTER FOR NONPROFITS, OKC

SANDY BEALL, JOE DORMAN, CANDICE PAYNE; VENETIAN BALL, OKLAHOMA LAWYERS FOR CHILDREN, OKC

POLLY NICHOLS, SUE ANN HYDE; VISIONS 2016: A CELEBRATION OF NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP, OKLAHOMA CENTER FOR NONPROFITS, OKC


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS HOSPICE CARE We spent time with my parents during the holidays and were discussing the need for a living will. Can you explain how they work?

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

Grace Hospice can provide you more information about Advance Medical Directives and other related topics. Please call 918-744-7223 or visit www.gracehospice.com.

Study common investment terminology: It helps to understand what all the abbreviations stand for. Use an online investment dictionary or ask your financial advisor to explain them to you. Enroll in a class: Take advantage of free webinars, seminars or workshops DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC® on investing fundamentals. Follow the news: Start following the business and financial sections of your favorite media outlet to see the types of activities that influence the marketplace. Watch investment programs: Public radio and television stations often feature investment programs aimed at new and seasoned investors, but be wary of infomercials disguised as informational investment programs. Check out stock market apps: There are hundreds of apps focused on helping consumers understand investing. Track your favorite companies: Pick some of your favorite publicly traded companies to follow, then check their stock price, company newsroom and social media accounts daily. Work with a financial professional: A professional can help you understand your investment options and make financial decisions that are best for your individual needs.

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

A living will is one type of “Advance Medical Directive.” The other is called a medical power of attorney. A living will allows you to write down your AVA HANCOCK wishes concerning medical treatment when you are facing the end of your life. Before it goes into effect, two physicians must certify you are unable to make medical decisions and have a medical condition covered by the state’s living will law. A medical power of attorney allows you to appoint a person you trust as your healthcare agent, who is authorized to make medical decisions on your behalf. Before a medical power of attorney goes into effect, a person’s physician must conclude that he or she is unable to make medical decisions.

BUSINESS COACH

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL What is your New Years’ Resolution when it comes to Insurance? We all make those New Years’ resolutions to work out more, eat healthier, lose weight, and so on. Unlike other promises made and broken, insurance resolutions are easy to do and guilt free. RUSS IDEN Stop and ask yourself what has changed in your life this past year. Did you buy a new car or home? Add a youthful driver on your auto policy? Did you inherit money or property? Take time to review your limits of coverage starting with your home and auto liability to ensure they are adequate. On your home, think about adding coverages that your policy doesn’t include like earthquake, flood, or a personal liability umbrella for increased protection. For your autos, don’t eliminate valuable coverages like uninsured motorist, comprehensive, collision, or rental coverage in order to save money. Raise your deductibles or reduce your coverage if necessary first. Life insurance is another great way to protect your assets and provide coverage for your loved ones in a time of need. If you have questions about any home, auto, or life insurance coverages, call a AAA agent near you.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

How can I increase my knowledge of the stock market?

How do you set New Year’s Resolutions and make them stick? 1. Get Clear. The first step to getting what you want is being clear about what that is. Instead of “make more money” or “travel more,” be clear on how much you desire to earn or when/where you AMANDA FRANCES are going to take that trip. Most importantly – be aware of how it will feel when you achieve your goal. 2. Believe in Your Goal. Choose a goal that will stretch your faith but not one you believe is impossible. Your belief in the goal’s inevitability is the secret sauce. If you don’t believe it’s possible then it’s not the right goal for you. If you do believe you can reach it, but you’re not sure how you’ll do it – there is your sweet spot. 3. Manifest It, Baby! Once you get clear on your goal and believe it’s possible, the next step is fun. Feel the feelings in your body of already having achieved your desired outcome. Just visualizing it won’t work. Feel the feelings of joy, accomplishment, or celebration like your goal has already been reached. The next steps will show up. Seem too good to be true? With this practice, I’ve doubled my company’s revenue each year, traveled the world, and today live a life beyond my wildest dreams.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.

Amanda Frances Business Coach for Women Entrepreneurs amandafrances.com amanda@amandafrances.com

I am looking to create a new and better me in 2017. My goal is to lose 35 lbs. in my stomach and tone and tighten everywhere else. What recommendations do you have to make this a reality? Our team of experts offer a wide variety of different weight loss plans individually designed for you to help you most effectively meet your weight loss goals. Our plans combine different tools and medications with constant support both during and after your weight loss journey to help our patients keep the pounds off for good. However fat loss, toning, and tightening via diet and exercise can only go so far, as our bodies hold onto fat in certain stubborn areas. Coolsculpting® is a noninvasive procedure that targets and cools fat cells to the point of cell death. When used with a weight loss program, patients get that “WOW” factor to creating their ideal body. To schedule your complementary consultation, call 918.872.9999. MALISSA SPACEK

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY My shoulders have been sore from outdoor chores. Can physical therapy help me? Shoulder pain this time of year is a common occurrence. Certain injuries, such as an inflamed bursa or rotator cuff irritation, can arise from overuse of the shoulders due to raking leaves, cleaning out gutters, shoveling snow or TIM MINNICK, PT ice and other seasonal tasks. Shoulder pain can start out very innocently, then over time can cause you to avoid certain movements or daily activities and could let a more serious injury go untreated. You can come directly to physical therapy for an evaluation or if you are referred to physical therapy by a doctor, your physical therapist will address these very treatable conditions. Strengthening exercises, stretches and other modalities can be performed to decrease pain, inflammation and to help recover the range of motion in your shoulders. Don’t let seasonal outdoor chores lead to long-term avoidable shoulder pain.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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O

Oklahomans Despite significant achievements, this quartet has regularly turned the spotlight on others.

OF THE YEAR

Humility links our selections for Oklahomans of the Year. From the ringmaster of counterculture (Leon Russell) and the man running the state’s only major sports franchise (Sam Presti) to the chief of a tribe literally and figuratively reclaiming its culture (Geoffrey Standing Bear) and one of the world’s preeminent researchers on autoimmune disease (Judith James), each has given up the limelight to support others and make them better.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

TAKING ONE FOR THE TEAM Active involvement in the community is not Sam Presti’s career and life a showpiece for Sam Presti. It’s about values. It surpasses the self. It’s instinctual, virtually have always been about genetic. putting others ahead of himself. As a literal illustration, Presti, general to seek to understand things I could never know. manager of the Oklahoma City Thunder, … That creates the setting for honest conversarecalls a favorite photograph: his 85-year-old tion and, most importantly, empathy.” grandmother protesting the closure of a library near her house. She Presti, an Emerson College graduate with a bachelor’s degree in “belonged to every board, committee and cause there was,” he says. communications, politics and law, started three years for the Division A few swatches of Presti’s social fabric include funding scholarIII Lions. Captain his junior and senior years, he switched roles beships for inner-city youth in Boston, shepherding the Forward Thinkcause better players joined the team and went from leading scorer to ing Leadership Program in Oklahoma City, linking the Thunder with “the guy making the extra pass or making a defensive play,” he says. the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum and supporting Away from basketball and studies, Presti volunteered as an asthe Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice. He does so with a sistant coach at his old high school and raised money for Boston desire to remain in the background. Children’s Hospital by producing three CDs featuring funk, jazz and “Sam is a terrific guy! And he’s extremely humble on top of that,” hip-hop musicians from around the city. says Moises Echeverria, OCCJ’s president and chief executive of“Without being a part of the community, you are denying yourself ficer. His group named Presti a right to experience a its Humanitarian of the Year in well-lived life,” he says. September. “We as people have to be Putting others before self is present and aware of our second nature to Presti. In adown selves to see the opdition to his grandmother, his portunities all around us “grandfather was very focused to serve.” on philanthropy and community, Echeverria praises helping your fellow man was a Presti’s inclusive leadercommon refrain I heard a lot,” he ship, philanthropy of three says. Oklahoma high schools, “People are untapped possiand accommodations and bilities of potential, and the more respect for various relieclectic, diverse and intersectional gions of Thunder players. groups and teams can be, the “Sam has demonstrated better for progress, learning and a level of leadership ideas,” he says. “We often look which ought to be dupliat diversity as a destination or a cated not just within the box to be checked when it’s really NBA, but in businesses a starting point or, better yet, a and organizations in our launching pad. Diversity is an state,” he says. “The alternate definition for progress.” Thunder has one of the Presti, 40, credits others for deonly women in the NBA veloping his social consciousness. to have responsibilities of At Concord-Carlisle Regional the collective bargaining High School outside Boston, basagreement, and she is a ketball teammates Keenan Smith, young African-American Anthony Halls and Mike Johnson woman at that.” “had a profound impact on me Mandy Winton, in terms of diversity, acceptance, OCCJ’s director of fund self-reflection and not being development, adds, “He afraid to open up on these issues,” recognizes the … signifihe says. “Sometimes people don’t cance of these intentional talk out of fear of saying the choices because they wrong thing. … Keenan, Anthony improve the outcomes for and Mike took that concern off the organization.” the table for me, and I’m grateful BRIAN WILSON for that. ‎People I work with today ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Read our full interview with Sam Presti @ OKMag.com. still do that for me; they allow me JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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RECLAIMING THE NATION Osage Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear focuses on expanding the tribe’s land, language and heritage.

The refrain is simple: “Language, culture and territory.” Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear chants these inseparable entities regarding the sustenance of the Osage Nation. In 2016, he took major strides toward expanding the Nation’s growth in those three areas. Over the summer, the tribe bought the 43,000-acre Bluestem Ranch from tycoon-preservationist Ted Turner. In November, the Osage Nation began to expand its primary casino in North Tulsa. And throughout the year, the tribe grew the language immersion program that Standing Bear has pushed for children. That last accomplishment gets him excited. “We now have 28 kids under the age of 6 in the classes,” Standing Bear says, “and they come up to me and talk Osage. That’s never happened before! And they expect me to reply in Osage, so I have to pick my words carefully. Our language is coming back!” Standing Bear, chief since 2014, understands that Osage language, culture and traditions are interconnected with territory, “which was governed by our people long before the United States of America became a country, long before Oklahoma became a state,” he says. The double play of the Bluestem Ranch acquisition and the casino expansion will help the Nation grow because “if we don’t sustain now, it’s gone forever,” he says. “We cannot maintain our culture and language without territory. We have to share the songs of our ancestors … and we have to have territory to express this.” Acquiring the Bluestem is personal with Standing Bear because “we reversed a trend of losing land since 1890s,” he says. “It’s a great honor as a chief to sign a document to acquire land instead of giving it up. And we have to keep going because that bond we have with our ancestors going back 1,000 years through the land is strong. They’re talk

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

PHOTO COURTESY THE OSAGE NATION

ing to us. We listen to our elders through our songs and their stories.” The United States forced the Osage to cede nearly 1.5 million acres of land in 1906, but the Bluestem adds to the tribe’s viability for generations to come. The purchase came through profits from the Tulsa casino and financing for the casino’s expansion. Everything goes together for Standing Bear and the Nation. “Language … culture … territory … or we’re done,” he says. Standing Bear, 63, wants 9,000 acres in the northwest corner of the Bluestem to become the Wah-Zha-Zhi Nature Preserve (the name is the Osage word for its people) with bison and rolling plains. Standing Bear, on the Nature Conservancy’s board of trustees when it created the Tall Grass Prairie, foresees something similar with the Bluestem. With a few more acquisitions, the two preserves may eventually connect. “The Tall Grass Prairie works because it’s all based on science and ecosystems,” he says. “That’s the model we want to duplicate.” Outside the devotion to Julie Standing Bear, his wife of nearly 40 years, the Osage chief is synonymous with Native American causes. He was the winning attorney for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation against Oklahoma in 1985 in a case that opened the state’s tribal lands to gaming. In law school at the University of Tulsa, he vowed that he would delete the chapter on Indian law known as the Oklahoma exception, which severely limited tribes’ power over their lands. “I have a natural passion for this,” Standing Bear says. “But I’m just one person in a situation that’s gone on for a long, long time.” BRIAN WILSON


NOT ALWAYS A FAVORITE SON

PHOTO COURTESY OKPOP MUSEUM ARCHIVE COLLECTION

Even as far back as the early 1960s, a case could’ve been made for naming the late Leon Russell as an Oklahoman of the Year. In the vanguard of Tulsa rockers who headed west at the end of the ’50s, Leon soon climbed to the very top of The late Leon Russell made Los Angeles’s studio-musician ladder. A member of what came to be known as the Wrecking Tulsa famous for rock, but Crew, an elite aggregation of players that at one time only later was he an or another also included future stars Glen Campbell eminence grise. and Leon’s fellow Oklahoman Barney Kessel, he had a hand in shaping the sound of America’s popular music by playing keyboard on some of the bestknown recordings of the day. By their very nature, however, studio musicians aren’t in the spotlight. So perhaps that wasn’t the right time to honor him. Then, there was that great period of activity that began in the first part of 1970, when Leon hit the road as the music director for Joe Cocker’s Mad Dogs & Englishmen tour and ended up headquartered in northeastern Oklahoma, showering Tulsa with rock ’n’ roll stardust. Those were the days when you might see George Harrison walking down the sidewalk, Eric Clapton jamming in a little club or Leon himself pulling up to Pennington’s Drive-In in his Rolls Royce to order up a wedge of black-bottom pie. T-Town was a magical scene then, ripe with possibilities, and, as with Mad Dogs & Englishmen, Leon stood firmly at its axis, the top-hatted ringmaster of the whole damn circus. At the same time, he’d entered the most high-profile period of his solo career, recording hit albums and singles and penning future standards like “This Masquerade,” “A Song for You,” “Tight Rope” and “Superstar.” The attitudes and prejudices of the ’60s, however, still hung around. Far from being the locally celebrated eminence grise he became in his last few years, Leon and everything he did then represented the counterculture. To a significant segment of Oklahoma’s population, that meant he was a hippie, a freak and a threat to the American way of life. (The implied danger associated with rock music and its performers was perfectly summed up on a bumper sticker affixed to the bus that carried members of the Medicine Ball Caravan, another roadshow that careened across America in ’70. It read, “We Have Come for Your Daughters.”) So, a sizable number of folks would likely have looked askance at designating this hippie boy, influential as he was, as an Oklahoman of the Year during the early ’70s. Over the next four-plus decades, Leon never let up, never went away. He continued creating great music, new labels, fresh songs, memorable shows. In his last years, as Elton John turned a spotlight on him, his international profile elevated and reminded others what many of us never forgot: Leon Russell was nothing less than a major figure in American popular music. Now that he’s gone (in November at age 74), we realize it even more. Thus, this posthumous honor. JOHN WOOLEY

(An Oklahoma Magazine columnist and contributing editor, John Wooley is working with author Steve Todoroff on the upcoming Leon Russell biography, Longhair Music.) JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Tens of millions of Americans with one of 80 autoimmune diseases could not have a stronger advocate than a rheumatologist-microbiologist-immunologist from tiny Pond Creek. Judith James began groundbreaking trials in 2016 with the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and secured a policy-making position with the National Institutes of Health, the federal government’s biomedical research arm. Yet her grassroots in rural Oklahoma provide as much heft to her being one of the world’s leading researchers as her medical and doctoral degrees from the University of Oklahoma. One mission when she attends meetings on autoimmune diseases is to spotlight those suffering in America’s hamlets, villages and towns. In November, James, professor of medicine at OU’s Health Sciences Center, was appointed to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, a logical step from her landmark research into lupus, cited in more than 1,000 professional papers. Rheumatoid arthritis runs in James’s family, and she saw firsthand how it could destroy the body. Her grandmother was one of four children from Verden (west of Chickasha); two escaped the disease’s ravages. A great-aunt and great-uncle did not. “It was devastating to see how a disease could affect some in the family and leave others alone,” says James, noting that one in 12 Americans has an autoimmune disease, a

leading cause of death in young and middleaged women. James’s great-uncle lived long enough to see her treat people with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and other maladies, and “he used to always tell me, ‘You need to get back to work trying to cure this disease,’” she says.

THE PRIDE OF POND CREEK Judith James, a triple threat in medical research, advocates for those suffering in rural America.

BRIAN WILSON

PHOTO COURTESY OMRF

On Sept. 1, James and the OMRF began the first U.S.-based rheumatoid arthritis prevention trial, followed three months later by the world’s first prevention trial for lupus. “My great-uncle and -aunt would be delighted that we’ve begun these,” says James, 49. Growing up 20 miles south of the Kansas state line on her parents’ farm in Pond Creek (population 856), James knew as a youngster that she would become a doctor. After graduating from Pond Creek-Hunter High, she matriculated to Oklahoma Baptist University

in Shawnee and received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry (with a minor in mathematics). As an undergraduate, she began working for OMRF. From there, she went through OU’s specialized M.D.-Ph.D. program; she completed her medical residency in internal medicine and rheumatology and earned doctorates in microbiology and immunology. In her role with the NIH council on arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases, James will help to shape federal policy and funding and “provide input on priorities for the whole institute,” she says. “I will speak totally on behalf of patients, doctors and the people, especially from often overlooked rural areas. We need advocates for Oklahomans, and not just hear” from the East and West coasts. According to the National Health Interview Survey, arthritis alone affects 52.5 million Americans (22.7 percent of the adult population); 22.7 million have limitations due to arthritis. This survey projects that 78 million adults will have arthritis by 2040 and 35 million of them will have some sort of debilitation. James will speak freely and frankly because of “the escalating burden of arthritis on our population and workforce,” she says. “It may be several times before finding the right ears.” And given her lengthy track record, James will be heard.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


Tips for a Better Budget 1 Pay Yourself First Set a fixed dollar amount to go to savings.

2 Pay Off Debt

Living A Financially Sound Life Without question, finances can be daunting. But with a little understanding and a fair measure of discipline, you can make those decisions with focus...and reap some rewards along the way. The key to financial success, whether for an individual, family or a business, has always involved an effective budgeting plan. Every decision is driven by goals and

As your debt is reduced, try to increase the amount you pay yourself.

3 Don’t Deviate When unplanned expenses happen, find an item or two on the budget that can be cut next month.

priorities, and discipline. When done effectively, budgeting helps families and businesses achieve their most important financial objectives. The principles are universal and can be applied easily through an organized and disciplined approach to everyday budgeting. It’s a shared philosophy of making your hard earned money work hard for you. One that will help you live with better determination and peace of mind.

© 2017 Bank of Oklahoma, a division of BOKF, NA. Member FDIC. The tips suggested in this article are provided as guidance only. We understand everyone’s financial situation may be different. We welcome the opportunity to provide you with financial planning and guidance for your future at any Bank of Oklahoma banking center.

4 Establish Benchmarks & Incentives Set clear goals and reward yourself when you reach them.

For more tips like these, visit: www.bankofoklahoma.com/tips


LEARN

TO

LO THOUSANDS OF OKLAHOMANS will make a New

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Year’s Resolution to get fit in 2017, but many of them will give up before reaching their goals. While it may seem difficult to stick with a fitness plan, there are ways to approach your workout differently and find the motivation to keep going until you reach your goals.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

Get Help With a Plan

Gaye Campbell, 49, faced the same slowing metabolism as everyone else as she got older. She signed up for a gym membership to help her stay in shape, but she had trouble truly committing to a fitness plan. “I would just go in, maybe get on the elliptical or the treadmill and maybe lift a


DIET MATTERS While becoming active is an important step to getting fit, what you eat has a major impact on your fitness goals. An important step in watching your diet is to keep track of what you eat. Popular apps like MyFitnessPal and Lose It! make it easy to track your food, especially for people who end up having to eat out a lot. Most apps have a large database of dishes at popular restaurants, making it easy to choose what you eat and keep track of the amount of calories against a goal customized for you based on your needs. While no app can do the work for you, seeing how many more calories a side order of fries contains than a side salad can help provide willpower at lunch.

OVE

FITNESS Approaching your workout from a new perspective can help you stay fit.

By Justin Martino

couple of weights,” the Sapulpa resident says. “I thought I was doing something, at least, but the older you get, you kind of start packing on the pounds. They don’t come off. And I thought, ‘Maybe I need to switch something up.’” Six months ago, she entered the Jumpstart program at St. John Siegfried Health Club, part of the St. John Health System. Jumpstart helps people by providing an evaluation of their current fitness program and ways to take it it to the next level. At the end of the program, participants receive a laminated workout card with suggested weekly exercise routines, which allowed Campbell to know what she would be doing every time she went to the health club. Since then, Campbell went from visiting the gym off and on to working out three to four days a week.

“Just a little bit of a tweak to my workout routine made all the difference in the world, and I actually like going to the gym,” she says. “I go really early in the morning, so it used to be a struggle for me to get up. Once I had a schedule and a plan and knew what I was going to be doing when I got there, it was not so hard to get up and go.” While many of the changes in her plans were just tweaks, she added to her routine by joining a spin class, where she says she has made several good friends. She also started using free weights, something she had avoided before because she had no training with them and found the possibilities daunting. “It is overwhelming, and that’s why I never did anything like that,” she says. “I just thought, ‘I don’t even know what I’m doing.’

With a trainer, it was really helpful. You’re in front of a mirror, but they can see what you’re doing.” Besides enjoying her gym trips now, Campbell says she’s already seeing results. She has lost about 15 pounds since beginning her modified workout routine. She admits to being a bit discouraged with a lack of immediate results, but adds that trainers can also help get past the initial frustration. “Everyone’s impatient,” she says. “Right away, you drop maybe 3-4 pounds, which doesn’t take very long, but then you’re like, ‘Well, this week I didn’t lose anything.’ That’s another thing with a trainer – you have someone who just keeps preaching persistence and to stay with it. I did, and it was beneficial. I was really excited with the results.” JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

Find Something You Love

While Tulsa resident Aaron Waken participated in martial arts at an early age in his childhood, events in his life, such as moving from his hometown of Enid, led to a long term pause to his training. In third grade Waken was diagnosed with absence seizures. He began to take seizure medication that affected his metabolism and caused him to develop a heavier frame. He dealt with bullying and harassment in middle school, largely because of the weight gain caused by his medication, and he adopted a more sedentary lifestyle, playing video games to cope with the stress. Over time, his weight increased to 265 pounds. Six years ago, Waken decided to make some changes. He pursued his love for the martial arts again by taking classes with Carter Hargrave, a twotime World Martial Arts Hall of Fame instructor in Tulsa. Waken also discovered parkour, a style of running that encourages looking for new ways to move

TRAINER TIPS

through the environment. Waken now weighs 185 pounds (“181 on a good week,” he says) and stays active through both martial arts and parkour. “The discipline I have gained from practicing the martial arts has transferred not only into the way I train Parkour, but

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One of the best choices a person can make with a fitness routine? Change it up. Adriane Lakin, a trainer at Saint Francis Health Zone, says changing up your fitness routine does more than keep you out of a mental rut. It also has physical benefits. “Our bodies get so used to the activities that we do that you need to put your body through different ranges of motions, different intensity levels and different exercises,” she says. “Our muscles adapt pretty quickly, then they get kind of complacent. So we need to keep shocking them and doing as much as we can to shake them up a bit.” New workouts such as high-intensity training (quick burst workouts with low recovery time) are gaining popularity, but those programs are even more beneficial when coupled with workouts such as a barre or yoga class, which exercise the body’s stabilizers instead of just the large muscles in the body. Lakin says many people underestimate how OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

my daily lifestyle as a whole,” he says. “Together, American Combat Kempo and parkour have been the driving forces to my lifestyle change. Thanks to the awesome combination of these training methods I have lost the weight, and because these arts, especially parkour, are so physically demanding, I have also gained a want and need to improve, causing me to drill and condition on my own time on a regular basis.” Waken says he would get discouraged occasionally as he worked at losing weight, but he kept the mental image of what he wanted and remembered his goal of losing weight to keep him going. “When it came to the question of, ‘Do I want to eat this candy bar as I sit on the couch and watch TV, or do I want to get my speed vault down?’ my love for the arts I practiced always outweighed my interest in instant satisfaction,” he says. “If I messed up on my diet or exercise on any given day, I’d try not to hold it against myself, and instead I told myself I would do better tomorrow.” Not only has Waken managed to lose 80 pounds and change his lifestyle, he also plans on becoming a certified personal trainer and life coach. He works with students as a level 2 certified American Parkour instructor and is an assistant instructor as a Nidan (2nd degree black belt) at Hargrave’s school. “The best advice I could give anyone trying to adopt a healthy lifestyle is this: Find something active you really enjoy doing and want to excel in rather than trying to stick to a boring workout routine you will likely fall out of,” he says.

Spend Time With Your Family

Greg Heiple, 52, was a competitive road rider on bicycle and played indoor soccer until he was 47, but he never expected to take up rock climbing. “It was the wildest,” he says. “I drive home one day, and I notice that my son was hanging from the second story of our house. I knew that he’d been watching climbing videos on YouTube, and just out of raw fear I put him in the car, and I drove out to Climb Up [a climbing gym

difficult barre or Pilates may be, but the classes are gaining popularity – even with men. “It only takes one time for them to try it out, and they realize how hard it is in some cases,” she says. “In barre and Pilates, you can see every part of your body start to shake and quiver. You may look at someone lying on the mat doing the smallest, tiniest movement, but it requires every bit of your body, and people don’t realize that. I think the more men try it out, the more they realize it is a workout.” Health Zone offers small group personal training for people who feel like they’re getting into a rut in their workout routine. The program, called ZoneFit, pairs a trainer with a group of two to eight people and focuses on teaching a new kind of workout. “I just did a session with six people in it,” Lakin says. “They had been members of the Health Zone for years and years, but had never used weights. I got to work six weeks with them, three times a

week, and now they have a whole new workout they can come in and do.” For people just starting a fitness routine, Lakin says it’s important to realize you may not see instant results and to not give up early. She tells people they have to give her two weeks of a class before they decide if they like it or hate it, and that people need to give themselves 3-4 months and realize it can be challenging. Lakin is also passionate about the role of a trainer in keeping people motivated. “I think for any new member, they have to realize it’s never instant gratification,” she says. “Your body is a very complex machine, and it’s going to take a while for your muscles to respond and tear down and regrow. “I think a lot of that falls on us in the fitness industry. We really need to take the time to educate people and sit down and talk to them and set their goals with them and really help them understand their expectations and keep encouraging them.”


PHOTO COURTESY GREG HEIPLE

A premier private independent school with a powerful Catholic Benedictine identity, Monte Cassino School offers dynamic and diverse co-curricular programs that foster critical thinking, spiritual formation and personal excellence.

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HEIPLE

in Norman]. I told him, ‘If you’re going to do this, let’s learn how to do it safely.’ And we fell in love with it.” Later, Heiple’s other son started joining them, and a year after Heiple made his first drive to the climbing gym, Zach, 18, and Xander, 15, have become dedicated climbers – a change that Heiple never expected. “They’re both in band, they’re straight-A students, they are great at killing little digital men, and they play their instruments extraordinarily well, but neither of them really wanted to do anything as far as organized sports go,” he says. Besides introducing his sons into fitness and keeping him in shape as well, Heiple says the love the family has developed for rock climbing has created more opportunities for them to spend time together. Last summer, they traveled to Horseshoe Canyon in Jasper, Arkansas, and river climbed, where climbs start from the water and climb a wall, went up elevations more than 100 feet and bouldered, a form of climbing performed without ropes or harnesses. While rock climbing may look intimidating at the beginning, Heiple is quick to point out that people of all ages can do it. “Start in the gym, and it’s just like anything,” he says. “It’s kind of like bowling – you rent the equipment, you start easy, and you figure it out. I think a lot of people look at it and go, ‘I’m not that strong’ or ‘I could never do that,” but it’s more about balance and coordination and technique than it is about raw strength.” Heiple says his wife and 9-year-old daughter have also started climbing. While neither has quite developed the same love for the sport as Heiple and his sons, it gives all of them a way to spend time together while staying active. “This is something you do in the family, and it gets in your blood,” he says. “It’s the greatest bonding time in the world, and let’s face it, there is no texting or tweeting or Facebook when you’re belaying someone 100 feet up on a rock. You truly do get that bonding moment, and, not to sound too cheesy, but it’s as special a gift as any dad could have with his two sons.”

Look inside for all the excellent reasons to attend Monte Cassino.

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By Tara Malone

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The legends of Oklahoma’s most notorious outlaws live on. Long before our legislators filed into the halls of the Capitol in Oklahoma City, and for many years afterward, criminals made their own laws in Indian Territory. Oklahoma has played host to some of the most storied names in outlaw history, from train robbers and statesmen to Depression-era gangsters. Each has left his – or her – bloody fingerprints on our state’s history. JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The Dalton Gang

In the 19th century, it wasn’t unusual for criminals to turn lawmen, or vice versa. Such was the case with Bob and Grat Dalton of Pawhuska. When law work didn’t pay enough, the brothers turned to theft and murder with their brothers Emmett and Bill, forming the newly minted Dalton Gang. Like their relatives, the Younger brothers of Missouri’s JamesYounger Gang, the Daltons became violent experts at bank and train robberies. In 1892, the gang attempted to rob two banks in Coffeyville, Kansas, on the same day, but the locals were having none of it. They gunned down Bob and Grat, along with their compatriots at the time, as the outlaws exited one of the robbery sites. Bill Dalton rode with the Wild Bunch and took part in the bloody Battle of Ingalls, which left three U.S. marshals dead in 1893. Bill survived the skirmish, but he didn’t live to enjoy it for long; he was killed by a posse the next year. Emmett was the only Dalton to survive his criminal family tradition. After sustaining 27 bullet wounds from the Coffeyville shootout, he served 14 years in prison before pursuing careers as a real-estate agent, actor and author in California.

Pretty Boy Floyd

Pretty Boy Floyd wasn’t born with his moniker – he entered the world in Georgia as Charles Arthur Floyd and moved to Oklahoma at age 7. His nickname came from one of his many victims, who thought he was much too adorable to truly be a criminal. That assessment turned out to be mistaken as Floyd cut a swath of robberies across the Midwest and south central states. He was one of the most infamous outlaws in the nation’s history, but questions surround Floyd’s life and crimes. He may have been a Robin Hood figure, stealing from banks to give to victims of the Depression and destroying mortgage papers during every robbery. He was certainly protected by Oklahomans who felt he was an outlaw hero. Or maybe he was the vicious criminal who gunned down four law enforcement officers in Kansas City. Historians remain unsure. To the FBI, after the death of gangster John Dillinger, Floyd was known simply as Public Enemy No. 1. In an Ohio cornfield in 1934, Floyd met the same fate as Dillinger at the hands of the same man, gunned down by a team led by FBI Agent Melvin Purvis.

Belle Starr

Sharpshooter. Horse thief. Bootlegger. Fashionista. The Queen of the Oklahoma Outlaws, Belle Starr was all of the previous and then some. Distantly related to the Hatfields of Hatfields and McCoys fame and twice married into a Cherokee family of outlaws, Starr reigned as the most infamous female outlaw of her day. In 1883, she was convicted of horse theft and came before Isaac Parker, the dreaded Hanging Judge. Perhaps due to her sex, Starr received a nine-month prison sentence instead of death. Many folktales surround Starr and speculation tends to overlap with fact, but she was a confirmed associate of the James-Younger Gang of Missouri and was thought to share a hideout with Jesse James in what is now Robbers Cave State Park in southeastern Oklahoma. Like her life, her bloody end remains enigmatic. According to some, she was murdered by a rejected suitor. Others claim that multiple suspects, including her own husband and children, had motives to hasten her demise. To this day, nobody knows who ambushed Starr with a shotgun outside Eufaula in the winter of early 1899, but her legend certainly lives on.

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BLUE DUCK AND BELLE STARR

FREDERICK S. BARDE COLLECTION, COURTESY OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, #4631


Fred Tecumseh Waite

FRED TECUMSEH WAITE

The Outlaw Statesman is yet another example of the thin line between criminals and the law in the 19th century. A member of the Chickasaw Nation and a college graduate, Fred Tecumseh Waite was not your average outlaw. Then again, neither was his partner, Billy the Kid. A native of Garvin County, Waite headed west in 1875 and wound up in Lincoln County, New Mexico, where he became a major player in the Lincoln County War. As members of the Regulators, Waite and Billy the Kid led a posse of ranch hands and farmers out to avenge the death of their boss, John Henry Tunstall. After numerous shootouts that left 19 people dead, the Lincoln County War ostensibly ended and the Regulators disbanded. While many went on to form Billy the Kid’s gang, Waite sought to escape his violent life by moving back to present-day Pauls Valley in Indian Territory and starting a family. After ranching and serving as a lawman, he was elected as a senator, speaker of the House, and attorney general of the Chickasaw Nation. Unlike his outlaw compatriots, he died peacefully as a respected statesman in 1895, shortly after his nomination for governor of the tribe.

Cherokee Bill

Somehow, Crawford Goldsby doesn’t really have the ring of an outlaw name. Nonetheless, Cherokee Bill was born as Goldsby in Texas in 1876 as the child of a former Buffalo Soldier and Cherokee freedman. Some say his criminal career began at age 12, when he was told by his brother-in-law to feed the pigs. Goldsby declined … with his gun. His official criminal career, however, began after a dance in Fort Gibson, where he shot down Jake Lewis and immediately went on the run. Thus began Goldsby’s twoyear crime spree in Indian Territory, during which he and the Cook brothers robbed everything they could wave a gun at. After multiple vicious murders, one made during an attempted jail break, he went up before the court of Isaac Parker in Fort Smith, Ark. He did not fare as well as Belle Starr did with the Hanging Judge, who called Goldsby “a bloodthirsty mad dog who killed for the love of killing.” The outlaw swung for his crimes in March 1896, just past his 20th birthday. When asked if he had any last words, he said, “I came here to die, not to make a speech.”

Zip Wyatt CRAWFORD “CHEROKEE BILL” GOLDSBY

ZIP WYATT

It’s no surprise that the children of a man known as Old Six-Shooter Bill, a drunk of some repute from Guthrie, should come to no good. One son, Nim, inherited the nickname Six-Shooter Jack and wound up dead by a bullet by 1891. The other was Zip, who would gain infamy throughout Indian Territory. At first, it seemed like Zip might turn out all right. He settled with a wife and daughter in the town of Mulhall and was close to the straight and narrow. Alas, this wasn’t in the cards for Wyatt; he began his criminal years by shooting up the town and wounding two of his fellow citizens. A murderer and inveterate thief, Zip proved difficult to keep caged by escaping jail and traps laid by posses multiple times. Fortunately for the innocents of Indian Territory, his luck didn’t hold. Two posses from Sheridan and Enid caught up with the outlaw near Marshall and made sure this time that he wasn’t in any shape to escape. Boasting of murdering 11 men, Wyatt died of his wounds in jail a month later. JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Legendary Ludivine

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LUDIVINE’S MENU CHANGES DAILY BASED ON THE AVAILABILITY OF LOCAL AND SUSTAINABLE INGREDIENTS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

OKC’s Midtown culinary titan continues to deliver on its early promise.

t’s small, discreet, easy to miss. If you stroll through the sidewalks of Midtown in Oklahoma City, you might walk right past without catching sight of one of the most lauded restaurants in the state. Since Ludivine opened in 2010 as one of the first truly “farm-to-fork” restaurants in Oklahoma, it has feted celebrities, local movers and shakers, and anybody else who wanders in

for a taste of lovingly prepared local flavor. While locally sourced restaurants have been all the rage lately, Ludivine remains head and shoulders above its peers. Part of this, as chef-owner Russ Johnson explains, is because Ludivine’s efforts go far beyond simple geography. “It’s about relationships, practices and information,” he says. “It’s about knowing that the products you are using are the best and freshest avail-

able because you know who raised them and how. We serve fresh fish every night at Ludivine. Obviously, we are nowhere near an ocean, but we work with individuals who have longstanding close relationships with captains of small fishing vessels, and who are known to employ sustainable fishing practices, in keeping with the same values we would expect from a farmer or rancher that we deal with right here in Oklahoma. “By the same token, I would much rather buy a pastured lamb from a small family producer in Texas or Colorado than beef from a feedlot that just happens to be 10 miles from my restaurant.” The menu at Ludivine changes daily and is based on local and sustainable availability and the whimsy of the chef. Picking an evening to dine is like playing a game of JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

TARA MALONE

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L O C A L F L AV O R

A PINCH OR A DASH Five sisters comprise the Next Generation of their grandmother, the esteemed Wanda J.

“Oh you MUST get the fried chicken!” the family at the next table calls over. “It’s fabulous!” Sometimes the snug, cozy, whitewalled interior of Wanda J’s Next Generation restaurant seems like a gathering of old friends. And of course they’re right – that sizzling juicy chicken is a miracle of succulence and crunch, worth a trip from anywhere, and those sides (fried corn on the cob, mac and cheese, greens) are just fine, too. So give your order to the waitress. She’s also the chef, the dishwasher and the owner. Five sisters run this place in Tulsa’s Greenwood District, and if they look more like college kids than waitresses, it’s because they are. Tonight it’s Glory Walker, her hair pulled back and her glasses slipping down a bit, who takes your order. “When we were little, we stood on a step stool behind the register at Grandma’s restaurant, walked behind the waitresses, and we baked, too,” she says. “Grandma has a special touch and we learned it all. We don’t use recipes when we cook; we add a pinch or a dash. We just look at it and know what’s missing. We do it all, but they come check on us.” Grandma is famed Tulsa chef Wanda J. Armstrong, who has been wowing Tulsa with her Southern cooking since the early 1970s. She’s not here tonight, but the sisters’ mom, Crisshone Walker, watches from the register as, in back, Glory and another of her sisters dredge chicken legs in flour. Their father, Ty Walker (Wanda’s son and himself an expert chef and restaurateur), has come in to help, and the whole family works together. “So, do you picture yourself doing this for the rest of your life?” Glory is asked. “Oh no!” she answers. “I’d like to get more involved at the catering end of the business.” BRIAN SCHWARTZ

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Taste

culinary Russian roulette that you can’t lose. Recent offerings have included crispy roasted pheasant with beets and mushrooms, braised lamb neck with eggplant, suckling pig with poblano cheddar grits, and a maple pot de crème that will make you hear “Dreamweaver” in your head. For those who like the comfort of familiarity, appetizers like the famous charcuterie board and the roasted bone marrow with grain mustard and local condiments are always available. The only rivals to the fare at Ludivine are the drinks. Bartenders Colby Poulin and Chris Barrett create thematically decadent cocktails each season (watch for the latest iteration in January). Their latest concept is the Public Enemies menu, inspired by and named after gangsters of the 1930s. Barrett says all of the cocktails are Ludivine’s unique takes on classic drinks from that era, and each features a different amaro (a bittersweet Italian herbal digestivo). While there’s not a bad choice among them (trust us, we know), one highlight is the Scarface – inspired by Al Capone, of course – with rye whiskey, Cynar liqueur, homemade banana liqueur, coffee liqueur and bitters. The Queenie – a confection of gin, green Chartreuse liqueur, absinthe cream, egg white and champagne – is fit for royalty. Soon, you may not even need to hunt for the small, intimately lit, brick-and-mortar location; Ludivine can come to you. Johnson says the restaurant will soon launch a new line of retail products, as well as offer a new concept called Soiree, which provides “two totally different but equally exciting options for in-home, multi-course dinner parties.” It doesn’t get much more local than that. Ludivine is at 808 N. Hudson Ave. For information on the daily menu, visit www. ludivineokc.com.


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Taste

C H E F C H AT

Tea for Two Sara Creed-Piper and Susan Blair offer fresh food and rare hot brews in Tulsa.

S

THE CHOCOLATE CHIP CROISSANT BREAD PUDDING IS ONE OF THE MADE-FROM-SCRATCH DESSERTS AVAILABLE AT DRAGONMOON. RIGHT: SISTERS SUSAN AND SARA OPENED DRAGONMOON IN TULSA EIGHT YEARS AGO.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN

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isters Sara Creed-Piper and Susan Blair had a love for cooking – and tea – long before opening DragonMoon Tea Co. in Tulsa. “I started when I was 8, and it was because my mother always made buckwheat pancakes from a mix,” Blair says. “I wanted pancakes from scratch, so she told me I’d have to do it myself. I figured I could read, so I could read a cookbook, so that’s how I started.” Blair moved on from pancakes to cakes and, by the time she was 13 or 14, she and her sister made most of the family dinners. Blair and Creed-Piper combined their love for cooking and their love for tea when they opened DragonMoon in Tulsa eight years ago while also creating a cozy, inviting atmosphere designed to stimulate conversation. The restaurant feels more like a home than a business – an intentional concept by the sisters. “You’d be amazed at how many people come in, sit down, and start talking to the people at the table next to them,” Creed-Piper says. “People have made friends at the restaurant. The one thing we agreed on to begin with was no television and no internet. This is a place to talk and relax and get to know the people you came in with for lunch, high tea or afternoon tea.” Creed-Piper and Blair enjoy bringing rare teas to Tulsa and helping people learn about their characteristics. Creed-Piper estimates that of all the teas they try, only about 10 percent end up meeting the standards of DragonMoon. Many of the teas they serve are difficult to find not just in Tulsa, but in the United States. The knowledge Creed-Piper and Blair have developed lets them work with other people to discover new teas, an activity they both enjoy. “I just had a young lady in today with her mother, and she wasn’t fond of teas,” Creed-Piper says. “We had her smell a few teas, and she tried a Machu Picchu tea and absolutely loved it and thought it was great fun.” The two also enjoy helping customers pair food and teas. Blair says tea has many of the same chemical components as wine, and, just like wine, some teas pair better with some food. And while the tea is important, Creed-Piper and Blair focus just as much on the food. “We enjoy making everything from scratch,” Creed-Piper says. “We don’t want to buy something frozen and sell it. We want to make sure it’s fresh.” Just as fresh as the pancakes Blair made when she was 8 years old. JUSTIN MARTINO


R A N D O M F L AV O R S A descendent of Lebanese immigrants, Edmond Slyman incorporates tabbouleh into the menu at Freddie’s Barbecue and Steakhouse, which he runs with his wife, Sherian Wieberdink. Tabbouleh is a salad made from bulgar, vegetables, herbs, olive oil and lemon juice; Freddie’s adds a “gourmet touch” to this recipe to make it especially delectable. You can order tabbouleh as an appetizer, side or by the tub for a family-style or catered event. 1425 New Sapulpa Rd., Sapulpa; freddiesbbq.com.

FILE PHOTO

A Taste of Tabbouleh

Ducking Delicious

PHOTO COURTESY SYRUP

Along with its distinct taste, pan-seared duck without the skin can actually have fewer calories than chicken. It also is rich in protein, iron and zinc. Try this entree at Guernsey Park in the middle of Oklahoma City’s Paseo district. Guernsey Park offers a modern twist on popular Asian cuisine amid attractive, historical architecture. With greens and red peppers, this dish is hard to beat. 2418 N. Guernsey Ave., OKC; guernseypark.com.

Drizzle on the Syrup

Syrup, a breakfast boutique in Norman, might require juicy rationalizations. “I deserve this” is what you need to tell yourself, especially with succulent delights like cinnamon roll pancakes and their sugary streusel on top. However, you can also feel good about yourself because the local owners are committed to seeing the community’s “families supported, the poor uplifted, and the economy grow.” 123 E. Main St., Norman; syrup-breakfast.com.

PHOTO COURTESY GUERNSEY PARK

IN SEASON

LUCKY BLACK-EYED PEAS

If you’re like many Americans, particularly in the South, you’ll have had your black-eyed peas for good luck on New Year’s Day. However, this tradition has a dark history … and a different type of luck. In at least one version of the story, hungry Southerners, whose land was laid waste by federal troops at the end of the Civil War, scavanged for any food. Many considered themselves fortunate if they found cowpeas, a common, cheap fodder for livestock at the time. These black-eyed peas, as it turned out, are nutritious for humans because they’re high in protein, so they became a staple in Southern kitchens. Plus, they’re versatile. You can cook them with chopped vegetables and ham hocks, mash them for a hummus-like dip or mix them into a multi-bean soup. The good eatin’ itself is enough to make you lucky. JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

A Bug’s Life

PHOTO COURTESY BOK CENTER

E

Cirque du Soleil’s new insect-themed show will stun and enchant guests.

nter into the fascinating world of a natural ecosystem in Cirque du Soleil’s OVO, where you’ll find a colorful explosion of life waiting to be explored. In this exciting new production, different insect characters navigate through existence in their own little world. The Ladybug, a lonely but strong leading lady, spends much of her time waiting for something magical and exciting to occur. Her wish is granted when The Foreigner buzzes into the ecosystem, sending a shockwave of energy into a town used to its routine. The members of the ecosystem also uncover a mysterious egg – in Portuguese, ovo – that reminds them of the never-ending cycle of their own lives. “OVO is teeming with life,” says Eric Schleicher, the marketing manager at the BOK Center. “Insects work, play, fight and look for love in a non-stop riot of energy in motion.” This show combines all aspects of a riveting live performance with music that works as a blend of samba, funk and electro music created by Brazilian composer Berna Ceppas. “When attending Cirque du Soleil OVO, one can expect to see char-

acters dressed up in incredible costumes while performing magnificent acrobatics and grand stunts on an extraordinary set,” Schleicher says. “This show will leave the audience completely enchanted.” The show’s acrobatic acts are performed by different characters, such as hard-working ants, seductive spiders and ethereal butterflies. The diligent ants spend their days collecting food, but often play with their fare with precise, breath-taking foot juggling. The enticing spider captivates naive crickets by weaving her body through her brilliant web as they stand in awe. A pair of butterflies perform an aerial ballet paux-de-deux in complete unison. Every moment of OVO promises new forms of artistry – all while appealing to a broad audience. “BOK Center always enjoys when Cirque du Soleil comes to Tulsa to perform,” Schleicher says. “We strive to always bring a variety of events to the venue, and Cirque is always a great one to bring because it’s fun for the whole family.” OVO comes to the BOK Center Jan. 25-29. For tickets and further information, visit bokcenter.com. MARY WILLA ALLEN

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Your Day Made Perfect The Oklahoma Wedding Show, where you can plan every facet of your wedding day under one roof, is coming back to the Expo Square on Saturday, Jan. 14. Your wedding day should be an occasion marked with care-free enjoyment, but last-minute planning snags often can get in the way of a perfect day. To combat those exasperating moments, this allday show is your perfect solution. With an impressive list of Oklahoma retailers, bakers, florists, photographers, caterers and more, the event will be a delightful, productive occasion for every bride, groom, family member or friend. Participate in one-on-one consultations with experts in every aspect of your wedding journey – from entertainers to travel experts to wedding planners. Bakers and caterers will be on hand to assist and even offer free samples of their work. For a glimpse at the trendiest bridal styles for the 2017 wedding season, head to the fashion shows taking place at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., where local and national designers will highlight their best gowns. And for even more excitement, enter into the Dream Wedding Give-Away to win prizes like a Mikimoto pearl necklace from Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels, a five-hour ride in a Rolls Royce from Crown Charters or several coveted gifts from Williams-Sonoma. The Oklahoma Wedding Show will take place on Saturday, Jan. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Expo Square in Central Park Hall, 4145 E. 21st St., Tulsa. For more information, visit oklahomawedding.com.

IN TULSA THE OKLAHOMA WEDDING SHOW Jan. 14 EXPO SQUARE, CENTRAL PARK HALL Each couple shares a distinctive story. At The Oklahoma Wedding Show, couples can find the vendors and wedding experts who can help make the big day a truly unique experience. – oklahomawedding.com COMMITMENT DAY Jan. 1 LIFETIME FITNESS Start the New Year off on the right foot – literally – by joining thousands of others for a nationwide 5K Fun Run and Walk. Continue the celebration by inviting all of your family and friends for a weekend filled with entertaining events and activities for everyone. – commitmentday.com HANGOVER BALL 2017 Jan. 1 CAIN’S BALLROOM Enjoy the first day of the year with musical acts, including Jason Boland, Cody Canada and Mike McClure, with delicious barbecue from Oklahoma Joe’s. – cainsballroom.com BLOWN GLASS EXHIBIT Jan. 6-29 PAC GALLERY This exhibit is presented by the Tulsa Glassblowing School, an open access hotshop and kiln studio offering unique experiences for anyone interested in the beauty of glass art. Visit the PAC Gallery to see work from several Tulsa artists. – tulsaglassblowing.org LEVELS & EVENS Jan. 6-Feb. 19 AHHA TULSA Anyone who’s ever marveled at the wide Oklahoma sky on a cloudless summer day or the vibrant orange of a maple tree in autumn will recognize that sense of wonder at this exhibit by Elizabeth Downing. – ahhatulsa.org

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MONSTER JAM Jan. 7-8 BOK CENTER The most adrenaline charged motor sports experience for families on the planet returns for two nights of action. – bokcenter.com CHILI BOWL Jan. 9-14 EXPO SQUARE Two weeks after Christmas, the Midget Nationals arrive like a gift from Santa Claus. Without sun or wind to harm it, the indoor garden (roughly a quarter-mile circle) is heavily saturated so that the boldest dirt track artists of our time can truly shine. – chilibowl.com TANYA TUCKER Jan. 12 HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO, TULSA Country music icon Tanya Tucker’s sultry voice and vivacious stage presence make her one of the most admired and respected female vocalists in the genre. – hardrockcasinotulsa.com LUIS ALBERTO URREA Jan. 13 TULSA TOWN HALL Acclaimed writer Luis Alberto Urrea uses his dual-culture life experiences to explore greater themes of love, loss and triumph. Born in Tijuana, Mexico, to a Mexican father and an American mother, Urea’s humble beginning to Pulitzer Prize finalist and beloved storyteller is a story in itself. – tulsatownhall.com LISA LAMPANELLI Jan. 13 BRADY THEATER Often called the Queen of Mean, Lisa Lampanelli specializes in insult comedy, as she believes it’s “fun to make fun of everybody.” – bradytheater.com BILL O’REILLY & DENNIS MILLER Jan. 13 BOK CENTER Political commentator Bill O’Reilly and comedian Dennis Miller take the no-spin zone on the

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

Where & When

COMMUNIT Y

road with The Spin Stops Here Tour 2017. The tour will also feature Jesse Watters, a regular contributor to O’Reilly’s Fox News program, The O’Reilly Factor. – bokcenter.com BEETHOVEN’S FOURTH SYMPHONY Jan. 14 TULSA PAC While catching his breath before returning to the heroic struggles of the Fifth Symphony, Beethoven found inspiration for his illuminating Symphony No. 4 while retiring in the country estate of a devoted admirer. – tulsasymphony.org THE RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS Jan. 14 BOK CENTER The Red Hot Chili Peppers have announced the first leg of their 2017 North American Tour to support their 11th studio album, the worldwide No. 1 The Getaway. – bokcenter.com WWE LIVE Jan. 15 BOK CENTER WWE Live returns to Tulsa. This year’s show features U.S. champion Roman Reigns, Seth Rollins, WWE universal champion Kevin Owens, plus many more favorite WWE Superstars. – bokcenter.com WINTERFEST Through Jan. 17 DOWNTOWN TULSA Arvest Winterfest is Tulsa’s largest annual holiday celebration. The newly extended, 52-day event, open daily, features outdoor ice skating beneath the Tulsa skyline, delicious seasonal concessions, horse and carriage rides, and free holiday entertainment on the outdoor stage. – tulsawinterfest.com CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS PRESENTS: MEN ARE FROM MARS, WOMEN ARE FROM VENUS LIVE! Jan. 20-21 TULSA PAC When Mars and Venus collide, the adventures are earth-shatteringingly hysterical. It’s a great recipe for a night out: a little storytelling blended with some comedy and a dash of sage wisdom from the


R E C R E AT I O N

Anchors Up

Adventure seekers and travel aficionados – look alive. The Tulsa Boat, Sport & Travel Show will come to the River Spirit Expo Center from Jan. 30 to Feb. 5. The show will be an expansive affair, with over 500,000 square feet of new 2017 boats and RVs to peruse. “This show ranks as the fourth largest of its kind in the U.S.,” says Jennifer Maricle, executive director of the show. But never fear – this event isn’t just for those with millions of dollars to spend. Larry Stockhausen, who handles public relations for the show, says models exist for “every lifestyle and budget, with the best prices of the season,” including small boats,

personal watercrafts, ski boats, fishing boats, luxury yachts and more. Apart from the array of boats, Maricle promises “a lot of travel within the show,” including motorcycles, fifth-wheel trailers, campers, travel equipment and destination vacation bookings available for purchase, along with a brand new activity sure to please adrenaline junkies. “The biggest feature for this year will be the indoor zip line,” Stockhausen says. This activity will allow guests a bird’s eye view of the show as they glide through the Expo Center. For further information, head to tulsaboatshow.com.

book. A delicious evening of entertainment. – celebrityattractions.com TOYLAND BALL Jan. 21 COX BUSINESS CENTER Toyland Ball is The Parent Child Center of Tulsa’s annual signature fundraising event. This black tie gala with a whimsical theme offers an elegant evening of dinner and dancing with a live auction. – coxcentertulsa.com 4 GIRLS 4 Jan. 21 BROKEN ARROW PAC When four dynamic, awardwinning musical stars from Broadway, film, TV and recordings come together in concert on the same stage, what transpires is an evening of song, laughter and memories. – brokenarrowpac.com COPLAND RODEO Jan. 21 TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE-SOUTHEAST, VANTREASE PACE Bring your boots, prepare for a hoedown and enjoy an exploration of cowboy culture with a multimedia presentation in the performance hall and a cultural exhibit in the lobby. – signaturesymphony.org CHOREGUS PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: NATHAN GUNN Jan. 22 TULSA PAC Also a distinguished concert performer, Gunn has appeared with the New York Philharmonic, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra and many more. He will be accompanied in this recital of opera and pop favorites by his wife, Julie Gunn. – choregus.org THEATRE TULSA NEXT STAGE PRESENTS: PETER AND THE STARCATCHER Jan. 27-Feb. 5 TULSA PAC Peter and the Starcatcher upends the century-old story of how a miserable orphan comes to be The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up (a.k.a. Peter Pan). From marauding pirates and jungle tyrants to unwilling comrades and unlikely heroes, Peter and the Starcatcher playfully explores the depths of greed and despair and the bonds of friendship, duty and love. – theatretulsa.org MICHAEL CARBONARO Jan. 28 BRADY THEATER From his hit television series The Carbonaro Effect on truTV, magician Michael Carbonaro brings his signature blend of bizarre antics, audience interaction, hilarious video clips and mind-blowing magic, live on stage. – michaelcarbonaro.com

PERFORMANCE

A Night With Don Quixote

ballet troupe every season, a franchise that we are pleased to continue offering to the area,” says Ryan Malone, concert manager at Armstrong. “The titles for the company vary each year; but since we offered this one a few years back, we felt it was a great time to revive it.” This ballet will honor the original movements of Marius Petipa, a Russian

PHOTO COURTESY ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM

Rousing adventure, comical knights, brave matadors and exquisite dancing await you at the Russian National Ballet Theatre’s rendition of Don Quixote. Armstrong Auditorium holds a long-standing tradition with Russian troupes during its seven-year tenure in Edmond. “Since opening in 2010, Armstrong Auditorium has provided a touring Russian

artist known as one of the most influential choreographers in history. With his prolific work and the talented Russian National Ballet Theatre to perform it, this event will captivate its audience at every turn. “This ballet offers a great energy. The choreography is renowned for its daring leaps and, set in classical Spain, the choreography showcases exciting elements of this culture,” Malone says. Don Quixote runs Jan. 30-31. For tickets and information, visit armstrongauditorium.org.

JANUARY 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Where & When

IN CONCERT

ZELDA COMES ALIVE

IN OKC FIRST DAY HIKE AT LAKE THUNDERBIRD STATE PARK Jan. 1 LAKE THUNDERBIRD Join Lake Thunderbird State Park staff for the park’s annual First Day Hike. Meet at the Lake Thunderbird Nature Center for a moderate two-mile hike. Afterward, there will be complimentary hot chocolate, coffee and healthy snacks. – travelok.com BANK OF AMERICA’S MUSEUMS ON US WEEKEND Jan. 7-8 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM The museum welcomes Bank of America customers taking advantage of Museums on Us the first full weekend of every month. Any ATM, credit or check card from Bank of America provides free general admission for the cardholder. – nationalcowboymuseum.org WU MAN, PIPA WITH SHANGHAI STRING QUARTET Jan. 12 ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM Wu Man and the Shanghai String Quartet meld the sounds of China with the Western string quartet and lute-like pipa in an unforgettable concert experience. – armstrongauditorium.org OKLAHOMA WINTER QUILT SHOW Jan. 12-14 STATE FAIR PARK This quilt show, in its 14th year, features an exciting vendor mall filled with products and services by exhibitors from across town and the United States. – qscexpos.com RED EARTH TREEFEST Through Jan. 13 RED EARTH MUSEUM This popular new holiday tradition features over 15 Christmas trees decorated with handmade ornaments created by Oklahoma Native tribes. Ornaments on each Christmas tree showcase the distinct, diverse cultures of the Native nations of Oklahoma. – redearth.org DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. HOLIDAY PARADE Jan. 16 DOWNTOWN OKC Oklahoma City has the third largest Martin Luther King Jr. Parade in the United States. The Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Coalition has organized this and related events for 30 years and has made it into one of the most diverse in the country. – okcmlk.org OKC RV & BOAT SHOW Jan. 16-18 COX CONVENTION CENTER With so many innovations happening yearly in both the RV and boat industries, this is a grand opportunity to find the product that best

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fits your lifestyle and budget at no cost to you. – coxconventioncenter.com JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OKC PRESENTS SPEAKER IN THE CITY: CARRIE FISHER Jan. 18 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL The Junior League welcomes actress and writer Carrie Fisher as the keynote for Speaker in the City. Proceeds from this talk and a VIP event afterward will be invested locally. – jloc.org OKLAHOMA CITY HOME + GARDEN SHOW Jan. 20-22 STATE FAIR PARK People in Oklahoma visit the home show to become inspired, informed and energized with helpful advice, thousands of solutions and the coolest

SPORTS

new products. – oklahomacityhomeshow.com PROFESSIONAL BULLRIDERS Jan. 21-22 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA PBR returns to Oklahoma City for a high-energy event that will keep you on the edge of your seat. – chesapeakearena.com THE OAK RIDGE BOYS Jan. 27 RIVERWIND CASINO The four-part harmonies and upbeat songs of The Oak Ridge Boys have spawned dozens of country hits and a No. 1 pop smash, earned them Grammy, Dove, CMA and ACM awards and garnered a host of other industry and fan accolades. – riverwind.com

A Day of Destruction The Mad Dog Demolition Derby Tour stops into the Claremore Expo Center in January, and it’s a can’t-miss for those who love destruction. “This event has been going on for six years now,” says Jay Reynolds, the event coordinator. “And anyone can enter. We encourage anyone who wants to try it to come enter.” But what, exactly, occurs at a demolition derby? It’s quite simple but wickedly entertaining: Cars crash into each other repeatedly until only one is left running. It’s an experience that is just as much fun to watch as it is to participate in. According to Reynolds, there will be

PHOTO BY JOSE Z. LIM, JR. COURTESY CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL

Center. “It’s a unique blend of classical philharmonic music with a multimedia presentation that should appeal to both traditional symphony goers and gaming fans alike.” In the same vein, McClintock expects a diverse group to attend this particular show due to its duality and broad appeal. “Many people come to this kind of show who haven’t visited the Civic Center before,” she says, “and this gives us the chance to welcome them and show them the kind of quality performing arts and programs they can attend locally.” The show will run at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 21. For tickets, visit okcciviccenter.com.

PHOTO COURTESY MAD DOG DEMOLITION DERBY

Nintendo fanatics will mix with the philharmonic crowd for the Civic Center Music Hall’s unique musical event, Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses. The show will offer video entertainment in the form of Zelda clips and will also explore four movements of music, each recounting a specific storyline from the Zelda series. These movements are “A Link to the Past,” “Ocarina of Time,” “Twilight Princess” and “The Wind Walker.” “The Legend of Zelda will take guests on an interactive, musical journey through over 30 years of music from the Zelda franchise,” says Jennifer McClintock, public information manager at the Civic

four classes of demolition available to watch or join, ranging in car size from compact to heavy-weld and modified vehicles. Typically, 50 cars participate annually, and there’s even an option for youngsters. “Kids aged 4-9 can participate in our Power Wheels Derby,” Reynolds says. “It’s like a miniature demo derby for kids; it’s pretty entertaining to watch.” Kids who plan to participate get in free, but need their own power wheels and helmets to join in the derby. The Mad Dog Demolition Derby takes place Jan. 21. Visit motorheadevents.com/ demo_derby for tickets, rules and information.


OKC PHIL PRESENTS: DISNEY IN CONCERT: A TALE AS OLD AS TIME Jan. 27-28 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Join us for a magical journey into storytelling and music as only the timeless tales of Disney can evoke. Brought to life through stunning vocals and animated feature film sequences, this concert explores iconic moments, plot twists and feats of daring from Frozen, Beauty and the Beast, Cinderella, Lion King and more. – okcphil.org JOEL MCHALE Jan. 28 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Joel McHale is one of the most sought after comedians and actors in the industry. McHale recently wrapped his 12th and final season of E!’s The Soup, and he is best known for his starring role on the hit comedy series Community. – riverwind.com

AROUND THE STATE RON WHITE Jan. 1 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Celebrate the new year with comedian Ron “Tator Salad” White as he cracks up the crowd once again in the Global Event Center. – winstarworldcasino.com JURASSIC QUEST Jan. 6-8 SOUTHEAST EXPO CENTER, MCALESTER Jurassic Quest brings a dinosaur adventure for the whole family. The main exhibit features ultra-realistic, life-size animatronic dinosaurs. Visitors can interact with these huge creatures, learn about them and even ride a few. – jurassicquest.com HERMAN’S HERMITS Jan. 7 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE WinStar World Casino and Resort presents Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone, The Association and Chubby Checker live on stage in the Global Event Center. – winstarworldcasino.com

AN EVENING WITH DIONNE WARWICK Jan. 7 GRAND CASINO HOTEL & RESORT, SHAWNEE Scintillating, soothing and sensual best describe the familiar, legendary voice of Dionne Warwick. The five-time Grammy Award winner has become a cornerstone of American pop music and culture. – grandboxoffice.com KNID AGRIFEST Jan. 13-14 CHISHOLM TRAIL EXPO CENTER, ENID The largest and best farm show in the region proudly displays over $150 million in equipment and agriculture-related products. The KNID Agrifest originated in one room of the Expo Center and now encompasses four buildings and some outdoor spaces. – 107knid.com HENNESSEY HOMETOWN HOOTENANNY Jan. 14 HENNESSEY PUBLIC LIBRARY This will be an unforgettable music event with country, bluegrass, folk and gospel music. – hennesseyhometownhootenanny. com TRAVIS TRITT Jan. 15 CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK CENTER, ENID This concert will be an up-close and personal event punctuated by stories and anecdotes about Tritt’s life and musical influences. Performing some of his biggest hits, the Grand Ole Opry member will bring his award-winning songs to life. – cnbcenter.com WESTERN HILLS WINTER BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL Jan. 19-21 SEQUOYAH STATE PARK, HULBERT Enjoy gospel and traditional bluegrass music amid a fast-moving display of musical talent with a handful of bands showcasing their skills on the fiddle, banjo and guitar. – travelok.com CHARLEY PRIDE Jan. 20 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE This classic country music legend puts on a show to remember featuring some of his all-time greatest hits,

from “Kiss an Angel Good Mornin’” and “I’m Just Me” to “Just Between You and Me” and more. – winstarworldcasino.com RED RIVER SHOWDOWN Jan. 20-21 STEPHENS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, DUNCAN This third annual event has a large number of kart racers coming from all over the Southwest. – redrivershowdown.com EVERYBODY LOVES OPAL Jan. 20-22, 26-28 GASLIGHT THEATRE, ENID A cheerful, wealthy recluse is besieged by three incompetent con artists out to murder her and collect the money from her estate in this whimsical comedy. – gaslighttheatre.org KID ROCK Jan. 26-27 CHOCTAW CASINO & RESORT, DURANT Kid Rock is a multi-platinum award-winning American rock ‘n’ roll icon whose musical style ranges from hip hop and rock to heavy metal and country. He has sold over 26 million albums around the world. – kidrock.com PITBULL Jan. 27 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE International rap and hip-hop sensation Pitbull, also called “Mr. Worldwide,” rocks the resort with an electrifying mix of his hottest hits and legendary beats. – winstarworldcasino.com KIWANIS KARNIVAL Jan. 27-28 ELK CITY CONVENTION CENTER Family fun awaits at this comfortable indoor carnival full of games. Children can test their skills at a variety of booths, including ring toss, skeeball and basketball. Concessions will be available. – travelok.com

FOR EVEN MORE EXCITING EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM.

R E T R E AT S

PHOTO BY HOLLY PEEVYHOUSE COURTESY BIG OM YOGA RETREAT

Inner Peace at Big Om For a weekend of reflection, inner peace and personal connections, visit the Big Om Yoga winter retreat at the Lodge at Sequoyah State Park near Hulbert. Joe Picorale, the owner of Be Love Yoga Studio and creator of the retreat, was unable to find a local haven for yoga enthusiasts and was spurred into action. “I personally wanted to have a fun, local and affordable retreat for myself. It didn’t exist, so I created it,” he says. “These retreats are also a taste of what a strong ongoing community would be like to live in.” With four retreats a year, every season brings a different theme and focus to the gathering. The upcoming winter retreat will concentrate on renewal. “The winter retreat will be about creating the you that you want to be,” he says. “The classes will also include lots

of deep internal work via discussion and interaction style workshops.” With such an overwhelming atmosphere of suppport, participants often create strong bonds with each other during their stays. “The sense of a loving community is so strong at these retreats,” he says. “It is incredible.” With an intentionally low price to keep the retreat accessible, Picorale promises that everyone – from young to old, coach potato to seasoned athlete – is welcome. “People often ask if they are ‘good enough’ to come. Everyone can come,” he says. “We had people from ages 13 to 60 at our retreats, and they all loved it and all did great.” The Big Om Yoga Retreat takes place Jan. 6-8. To reserve your spot, visit bigomyogaretreat.com. JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTO COURTESY THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Where & When

FILM AND CINEMA

Reel Flowers in OKC

The OKC Museum of Art will show an Italian classic on 35mm this month. As digital film has taken over the film industry, it has become increasingly rare for new films to be released on actual film stock. This is a real shame since – for reasons too complex to get into here – films recorded and projected on real film have a life and character that cannot be reproduced in a digital copy. I snap up any opportunity to catch a film shown on the big screen from a 35mm print (the usual size of film stock, though the wider 70mm films are even more worth catching), and I heartily recommend the practice to all who want to deepen their appreciation for the aesthetics of film. The Oklahoma City Museum of Art is doing a real service to film stock fans on Jan. 5, when it will host a screening (on 35mm!) of one of the greatest of all Italian films, Roberto Rosselini’s The Flowers of St. Francis. An episodic, rich account of the life of the medieval saint, who forswore possessions and communed with nature, the film paints St. Francis’s life with both humor and reverence. It’s one of the great films about faith, and its being shown in Oklahoma on film is itself a minor miracle.

At Home

François Truffaut’s debut film, The 400 Blows, is actually the first of five films following protagonist Antoine Doinel as he grows up (but doesn’t always mature). Part of the fun is watching actor Jean Pierre Léaud get better over time, but this initial entry in the series has a raw immediacy fueled by the age-old struggle of a young man against his dull superiors. An iconic final scene on the beach is one of the finest expressions of futile rage against society – mixed with the pure joy of feeling free – ever captured on film. The Blu-ray coming out from The Criterion Collection in January looks to situate the film within the context of Truffaut’s life, drawing biographical connections between the director and his subject. I’m sometimes suspect of movements like that, but in the case of a personal film like The 400 Blows it makes sense.

PHOTO COURTESY THE CRITERION COLLECTION

Around Town

In Theaters

PHOTO COURTESY DISNEY

A lot of talk surrounding Moana has centered on the extent to which it does or does not subvert the typical Disney princess story. While it’s great to have a Pacific Islander princess, and refreshing to have her engaged in a plot that lacks a romantic arc, in the end none of this would matter if the film didn’t pop with style and bristle with fun. Thankfully it does. The oceanic setting allows for multiple wild and exciting set pieces, and the songs, co-written by Broadway man of the moment Lin-Manuel Miranda, achieve a nice balance between hum-ability and complexity (I especially like a glam-rock number featuring Flight of the Conchord member Jemaine Clement). Dwayne Johnson continues to be a comic force, here playing a vain demi-god, and the whole enterprise floats nicely along by mixing humor and pathos to great effect.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


CLOSING THOUGHTS

Kimberly Johnson

T

he Tulsa City-County Library appointed longtime employee Kimberly Johnson as its new chief executive officer, effective Jan. 1. Johnson, a native of the Bronx, New York, has worked for the library system since 1998 after she earned her bachelor of arts degree from the University of Tulsa and master’s degree in Library and Information Studies from the University of Oklahoma. Johnson, the library’s first African-American CEO, started as coordinator of the African-American Resource Center at Rudisill Regional. In 2005, she became manager of the South Broken Arrow branch; in 2010, she was promoted to manager of Hardesty Regional, one of the largest libraries in the system. She continued her climb in 2012 (as regional director), 2013 (as deputy director and chief innovation officer) and 2014 (as chief operating officer). We caught up with Johnson and got her thoughts on ...

... her immediate goals.

It’s a privilege to lead this well-respected organization within a diverse community of readers and learners of all ages. As CEO, I will bring to the position what has guided me these last 18 years and that is service. Throughout my career, I’ve always been guided by two questions: 1) How can I be of service? 2) How can the library add value to the city and the citizens in the county? With this in mind, one of the library’s goals is to promote lifelong learning and literacy in all forms. Through the generosity of longtime library supporter Ruth Nelson, the library has a new bookmobile to reach early childhood facilities and customers in underserved communities.

... changes and events.

Like most organizations, we are looking for ways to capture the attention of the 21st-century customer to be better able to meet their needs. The library has remained relevant in this high-tech connected environment. The renovated Central Library is evident of that. It is an example of what a 21st-century library can do for a city and its citizens. In addition to providing books in print and in digital formats, the library is a place for customers to convene, collaborate and create. This is evident in the new learning spaces at Central Library, such as the Pocahontas Greadington Learning and Creativity Center, the Renee F. Newald Maker Space, the American Electric Power Foundation Digital Literacy Lab, the AAON Computer Lab, the George Kaiser Family Foundation Oklahoma Room, the Herman & Kate Kaiser Children’s Area and the A.R. and Mary Louise Tandy Children’s Garden.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

... how the library promotes literacy.

The Tulsa City-County Library is proud of the work it continues to do for preschool children, adult learners and our partnerships with area school districts. We know reading is the foundation to all learning. Early exposure to reading provides children a head start for educational success. For preschoolers, the library offers Build a Reader infant and preschool story time and preschool at all 24 locations. Both programs promote early literacy skills to parents and caregivers through offering literacy-rich, hands-on experiences in an interactive environment. Hundreds of children and their caregivers descend on our 24 locations each week. We’re also very proud of the vital service we offer to adult learners. One in six adults in Tulsa County cannot read the prescription label on a medicine bottle, understand a newspaper article or enter complete information on an application.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Read the full conversation @ OKmag.com JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Your Day

Made Perfect The

Saturday JANUARY 14 10 AM TO 4 PM

Expo Square • Central Park Hall • Tulsa

presented by Oklahoma Magazine The state’s premier wedding show features vendors who want to help make your big day a dream come true. Enjoy one-on-one meetings with photographers, caterers, bakers and more. Find the perfect dress, venue and entertainment options, all under one roof. Take advantage of this great opportunity to win prizes, view the latest bridal designs, chat with experts and sample some of the best cakes and catering in the region. • • • • •

Everything you need to plan your big day in one place! More than $12,000 in prize giveaways Bridal fashion shows Green Country’s top wedding vendors Cake and catering tastings

10 a.m. Doors open 11:30 a.m. Bridal Runway Show 2 p.m. Bridal Runway Show

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

OklahomaWedding.com

OKLAHOMA


Oklahoma Wedding

68 76 78 80 81

Creating Radiance The Beautiful Bridesmaid A Guide on Etiquette Sealed in Stone Finishing Touches

82 84 86 90 91 93 98 102 104 108 110

Techie Weddings Picking the Perfect Place A Timeless Celebration Unwrap Perfection Bravo to the Bravos Get Inspired The Best of the Bunch Cut the Cake Bon Appetit Dreamy Destinations Wedding Service Directory JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

GOWNS

Creating Radiance

One of a bride’s greatest assets on her big day is the glorious gown, which inspires confidence, radiance and grace. Photography by Nathan Harmon

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

Beaded bodice sleeved gown, $3,495.99; Gold beaded headband, $119.99, Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedo. Mikimoto akoya pearl and diamond pendant, $3,300; Mikimoto pearl bracelet, $4,520; Mikimoto pearl earrings, $3,450; Mikimoto diamond and pearl ring, $2,300; Jewels by Star three-stone diamond and platinum ring, $44,990; Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.


Galina Signature wedding gown with lace sleeves, $499; Mid-falling veil with lace border, $99.95, David’s Bridal. Mikimoto pearl bracelet, $3,330; Penny Perville 14K diamond entwined bangle, $6,185; Penny Perville rounded diamond bangle, $6,005; Mikimoto pearl earrings, $3,450; Mikimoto pearl ring, $2,300; Jack Kelege engagement ring, price upon request, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Jimmy Choo crystal-embellished metallic leather ankle-wrap ballet flats, $595, Saks Fifth Avenue.

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

Beaded bodice gown with tulle skirt, $1,549.99, Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedo. Kwiat princess necklace, $15,686; Kwiat three-strand diamond starbust bracelet, $18,900; Kwiat earrings, $12,800, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Jimmy Choo crystalembellished metallic leather ankle-wrap ballet flats, $595, Saks Fifth Avenue. Bridal bouquet by Miss DeHaven’s Flower Shop.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


Galina Signature beaded crepe wedding gown, $1,058, David’s Bridal. Penny Perville 14K white gold and diamond entwined bangle, $6,185; Penny Perville rounded diamond bangle, $6,005; Penny Perville straight diamond bangle, $4,590; David Yurman chandelier earrings, $1,950; Penny Perville garland ring, $4,590; Jack Kelege engagement ring, price upon request, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Jimmy Choo silver strappy heels, $895, Saks Fifth Avenue.

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

Mermaid wedding gown with sweetheart neckline and tulle skirt, $1,495, Alfred Angelo Bridal. Silver and pearl tiara, $249, David’s Bridal. Kwiat three-strand diamond starbust bracelet, $18,900; Kwiat 18K white gold and diamond dangle earrings, $5,125; Jewels By Star three-stone diamond ring, $44,990; Penny Perville garland ring, $4,590, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.

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Tank tulle wedding ballgown, $1,158, David’s Bridal. Diamond headband, $214.99, Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedo. Kwiat three-strand diamond starbust bracelet, $18,900; Kwiat 18K diamond dangle earrings, $5,125; Mikimoto diamond and pearl ring, $2,300; Jewels by Star three-stone diamond ring, $44,990, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

Mikado wedding gown with sheer illusion plunging sweetheart neckline, $1,295, Alfred Angelo Bridal. David Yurman confetti bracelet, $2,750; David Yurman silver and diamond chandelier earrings, $1,950; 3K diamond and platinum ring, $40,950; David Yurman albion diamond ring, $4,500, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Bridal bouquet by Miss DeHaven’s Flower Shop.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


Photography by Nathan Harmon Harmon has been involved in photography since the age of 14. He specializes in corporate, commercial, industrial and architectural shoots. Hair by Shawna Burroughs Burroughs is the creative director and master stylist at Jara Herron Salon in Tulsa. She specializes in bridal and editorial styling and corrective color. Makeup by Angie Wade Wade is a licensed, freelance makeup artist in the Tulsa area. She has worked with makeup for 13 years and specializes in beauty and bridal looks. Fine Jewelry by Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels Bruce G. Weber represents the finest, most renowned brands of designer jewelry and watches available in the world today. Dresses by Alfred Angelo Bridal, Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedo and David’s Bridal Alfred Angelo Bridal, Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedo and David’s Bridal offer a wide variety of gorgeous wedding and bridesmaids dresses with outstanding customer service. Furniture/Decor by Richard Neel Interiors Richard Neel Interiors is a full-service design store that offers a variety of home furnishings, lighting, art and home accessories. Models from Linda Layman Agency The Linda Layman Agency has been in Tulsa since 1971 and provides talented, professional models for all facets of the entertainment and fashion sectors.

A-line wedding gown with strapless bodice and crystal buttons, $1,095, Alfred Angelo Bridal. Veil with pearl embellishments, $79.99, Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedo. Kwiat princess necklace, $15,686; Kwiat three-strand sunburst bracelet, $18,900; Kwiat diamond and platinum earrings, $12,800; 3K diamond and platinum ring, $40,950; David Yurman pave diamond ring, $4,500, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Bridal bouquet by Miss DaHaven’s Flower Shop.

Carpet from Carpet One Floor & Home Carpet One has a large selection of carpet, hardwood, laminate, ceramic tile, vinyl, and area rugs and carries exlusive brands of the highest quality. Shoes from Saks Fifth Avenue Saks Fifth Avenue offers high-end and designer clothing, shoes, accessories, home goods and more with individualized customer service. Bouquet by Miss DeHaven’s Flower Shop Miss DeHaven’s Flower Shop has been in business since 1905 and designs each bouquet with a focus on artistry, integrity and quality.

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BRIDESMAIDS

OKLAHOMA WEDDING

The Beautiful Bridesmaid

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Whether it’s a classic church wedding, outdoor bohemian celebration or a swanky uptown affair, there’s a dress out there to perfectly complement the glowing bride.


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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

ETIQUETTE

A Guide on Etiquee

W

eddings can elicit every emotion, from elation and bliss to terror and dread. If you’re the bride, the groom or a friend holding an invitation, there seems to be an endless list of etiquette rules just waiting to be broken and faux pas to be committed. Take a deep breath as we turn to the professionals for a guide on what and what not to do at a nuptial celebration. Since it is likely everyone will attend far more weddings than they’ll take part in, let’s start with etiquette for guests. From the time you receive an invitation, there are several points of etiquette to keep in mind. Reply promptly, but before you send your response, be sure to fully understand who is invited. Guests and children should only be included if expressly mentioned on the invitation. “If ‘and guest’ is not listed on your invitation, that means the couple has only invited you – and no, it is not OK to ask them if you can bring a date,” says Camden Chitwood, owner of Emerson Events in Oklahoma City. Once it’s been determined exactly who can attend and the couple has been informed, it’s now time to decide what to wear. There are several markers you can use to help you decide this important aspect of a wedding. Pay attention to the time of the wedding as

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well as the style of the invitation. “A formal invitation to an evening wedding indicates that you’ll definitely dress up,” states Emily Post’s Etiquette, 18th edition, a definitive guide to American etiquette. “An informal invitation to a noon wedding tells you the affair is either informal or casual.” While men can almost never go wrong with a dark suit, according to Emily Post’s Etiquette, women’s appropriate attire can be more confusing. Talmadge Powell, founder and principal of TPCStudios, an event planning and branding company in Tulsa, has four rules to help: white outfits are off limits; always be respectful to religious affiliations; black clothing is fine; and it’s always better to be overdressed than underdressed. Chitwood mentions paying close attention to the location of the wedding. A wedding in a barn is sure to be more casual, while many country clubs, a common setting for weddings, have dress codes. Feel free to call the country club directly to inquire rather than calling the bride or groom, she suggests. Also, women should consider footwear carefully. “If the wedding is outdoors, you might re-think wearing stilettos and stick with wedges or flats,” Chitwood says. It’s possible for members of the bridal party to break etiquette, too. It is important to have budget conversations early in the planning process. In the past, the bride’s family was

expected to pay, but that trend has changed dramatically over the years. Both families can contribute, or the couple can pay for the wedding partially or entirely themselves. In fact, “[Today] more couples pay for the majority of the wedding themselves,” Powell says. The important thing is establishing what the arrangement will be before any planning is done. Emily Post’s Etiquette advises that “[a]ny conversation about money should be respectful and candid.” Speaking of being respectful, planning a manageable budget is also one recommendation Powell has for helping to avoid a “bridezilla” or “groomzilla” situation – or when expectations for a wedding get completely out of control. Unfortunately, the stresses of planning a wedding can cause good people to act negatively, but there are ways to help avoid this. Powell also recommends that the bride and groom “remember it’s OK to ask for help; relax and try to listen and appreciate the people helping you; expect the unexpected and embrace [all] possibilities.” So whether weddings bring you dread or excitement, Emily Post’s Etiquette sums up the special event nicely: Everyone in attendance gets to “witness the formation of a new family and to celebrate that union joyously, graciously, and with the utmost consideration for others.” BONNIE RUCKER

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Whether you’re in the party or just a guest, don’t commit a faux paus this wedding season.


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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

RINGS

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A prolific symbol of eternal commitment, the engagement ring sets the tone for the journey ahead. With so many cuts, gemstones, bands and styles, it takes plenty of work to find the right rock for the right person.

LONG RECTANGULAR CLUTCH, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

CRYSTAL FLORAL CLUTCH, $59.99, DAVID’S BRIDAL PINKY FINGER, TOP TO BOTTOM: PENNY PREVILLE EMERALD CUT RING, $22,725; FANCY NATURAL YELLOW RING, $81,530; CHRISTOPHER DESIGNS CUSHION-CUT RING, $15,850, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS RING FINGER, TOP TO BOTTOM: PENNY PREVILLE STARBURST ENGAGEMENT RING, $20,116; PENNY PREVILLE 18K ROUND CENTER RING, $27,027; JACK KELEGE PLATINUM RADIANT RING, PRICE UPON REQUEST, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS MIDDLE FINGER, TOP TO BOTTOM: CHRISTOPHER DESIGNS EMERALD CUT CENTER RING, $63,660; PLATINUM RADIANT CENTER RING, $39,990; PLANTIUM RADIANT ENGAGEMENT RING, PRICE UPON REQUEST, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS PENNY PREVILLE 18WG FEATHER BANGLE, $8,990, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

POINTER FINGER, TOP TO BOTTOM: CHRISTOPHER DESIGNS ROUND BRILLIANT ENGAGEMENT RING, $87,234; PLATINUM ROUND BRILLIANT CENTER RING, PRICE UPON REQUEST; JB STAR PLATINUM RADIANT CENTER RING, $44,990, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

PENNY PREVILLE 18KWG DIAMOND LEAF & VINE BANGLE, $6,245, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS ADRIANA ORSINI FILIGREE PAVE BRACELET, $75; ADRIANA ORSINI PAVE CRYSTAL BANGLE BRACELET, $100, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

ADRIANA ORSINI HINGE BRACELET, $250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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ADRIANA ORSINI CRYSTAL BRACELET, $135, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE ADRIANA ORSINI DAPHNE CRYSTAL HINGE BRACELET, $175, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE


ACCESSORIES

Finishing Touches

CHARLES KRYPELL 18KWG DIAMOND AQUA EARRINGS, $6,800, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

After finding the perfect dress, don’t forget the little additions for a personal pop – from jewelry and clutches to shoes and lingerie.

MIKIMOTO AKOYA PEARL AND DIAMOND EARRINGS, $3,330, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

HANKY PANKY BRIDAL BABYDOLL NIGHTGOWN, $92, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ROBERTO COIN CENTRO COLLECTION 18KWG DIAMOND NECKLACE, PRICE UPON REQUEST, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

MIKIMOTO PEARL AND DIAMOND NECKLACE, $7,320, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

FOREVERMARK 18KWG DIAMOND DANGLE EARRINGS, $6,900, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

MIKIMOTO 18KWG PEARL AND DIAMOND EARRINGS, $2,400, BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

JIMMY CHOO GOLD GLITTER HEEL, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE JIMMY CHOO GLITTER HEELS, $1,350, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO GOLD GLITTER ANKLE STRAP HEEL, $675, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

TECHNOLOGY

Techie Weddings When it comes to a Digital Age wedding, the sky is the limit.

1. Go paperless.

The birth of the virtual invite is increasing in popularity because it allows couples to skip the calligraphy lessons, perfect penmanship and stress of bulky postage, not to mention the hefty paper and postage price tag. Additionally, guests can easily add important dates straight to their online calendars. Websites like Paperless Post (paperlesspost.com) offer hundreds of styles that are as stunning as traditional invitations. But for many, the personal touch of handwritten stationary might be too hard to pass up. Couples can still take advantage of digital options with wedding websites like The Knot (theknot.com). Or, take it a step further and create an app, which can provide easy access to

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the big day’s itinerary, a map to the venue and other handy features. Appy Couple (appycouple.com) is a popular wedding app service that incorporates clever capabilities like address collection, easy RSVPs and photo sharing.

2. Hashtag your day.

Once upon a time, a disposable camera would grace each reception table so guests could help capture every precious moment. Now that just about every human has an in-phone camera, there is no longer the need to wait for the film to develop or the ink to dry. Couples can capture important moments with special hashtags on social media sites like Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, along with photo sharing apps. Be sure to keep the party going with a few selfie sticks and charging stations. For instant gratification, crowdsource the reception and project photos in real time for all to see. But, advise guests to snap with caution. Many professional photographers recommend couples consider a tech-free, or unplugged, ceremony. All too often, well-meaning guests ruin a pro’s perfect shot with extra flashes and ill-timed distractions. The professionals are well-equipped to capture the vows and the everimportant kiss, so guests can focus on enjoying the moment.

3. Capture every angle.

Stash a GoPro in the bride’s bouquet for a first-person vantage point of the walk down the aisle. Fly in a drone to get a bird’s eye view of the venue, important guests and other neverbefore-possible shots. Who knows what hidden special moments might be captured on film? Just be sure your videographer has a handle on all the footage so it can end up in one final cherished wedding video.

4. Robots, robots, robots.

While it might seem a little futuristic, some couples are employing robots to help with their special days. Instead of appointing a person, hire a robot or two to handle duties like live-streaming, officiating and even manning the bar. It’s certainly not for everyone, but robots make quite the conversation piece. For even more robot technology, a company out of Southern California called Anybots (anybots.com) rents out specialty robots that can be controlled remotely so important guests attend from afar.

5. Use 3D printers.

Got a specific decor in mind? Look no further than a 3D printer. Couples are using this cutting-edge technology for one-of-a-kind decor, intricate cake decorations, cleverly shaped candy and over-the-top favors. LINDSAY CUOMO

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Technology has seeped into all areas of life, most evident in our pocket-sized computers known as smartphones. It should come as no surprise, then, that some of the hottest wedding trends would be technology-driven. When it comes to tech in your ceremony, the sky is the limit. Just about anything a bride and groom can think up is likely possible, and that’s what makes a digitized wedding so intriguing. Technology integration can touch all aspects, from planning to the ceremony, reception and beyond.


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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

VENUES

Picking the Perfect Place The wedding site sets the tone for your special day.

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the capacity for their potential venues to further narrow down their choices. Other perks of certain venues are the items and services included in the rental amount. Some of the possible items may include chairs, tables and even linens in a few select colors. Venues may also provide a wedding planner, parking attendants and full cleaning service. A key service to consider is catering. While many venues offer the freedom of bringing a caterer of the couple’s choice, others require that their caterers be utilized. This can be either a pro or con depending on the couple – for those without a specific caterer, this option can cut costs; for those with a specific caterer, it may narrow your venue options. Decorations are another important component to think about. Many spaces are blank canvases that encourage the couple to decorate as they please, while others have set rules about decorations, such as only using artificial flowers and electric candles. A few venues are already so beautifully appointed that couples only need to bring a few decorative items to add personal touches. The choice is yours. Happy planning! ANNE BOYD

REVERSE THE REHEARSAL

Rehearsal dinners are a wonderful way to kick off a wedding with a celebration of close family and friends. The dinners are exciting to plan, and the venue can be set worlds apart in style from the wedding itself. For example, if the wedding promises to be an elegant affair with tuxedos, gowns and ornate decor, the rehearsal dinner can be the exact opposite. Try a simple gathering at a cozy restaurant – guests will be happy to have a casual evening together before getting dressed up the next day. And for the opposite situation, an informal wedding can be complimented with a formal dinner venue to allow everyone to enjoy a special time with the couple in a completely different setting than the wedding itself.

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

W

hen planning a wedding, many begin by choosing where they’d like their big day to take place. There are a variety of stunning venues to choose from in Oklahoma, and one of the best ways to narrow the search is to consider a few key points before deciding which place to book. One of the first factors to consider is the type of settings available to you. Some of the venues in the state sit in open countryside, others overlook expansive lakes, some are situated on top of hills and several are nestled in the city. It’s also important for a couple to think about the option of having an indoor or outdoor wedding. Some venues only offer indoor spaces and others only offer outdoor spaces, while many offer both. If planning an outdoor wedding, couples often decide to only tour venues that have an indoor area as backup in case weather doesn’t cooperate. Outdoor weddings are often more flexible for capacity while indoor weddings can be limited for space. By planning ahead and having a headcount in mind, couples can research


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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

A Timeless Celebration Annie Atkinson and Henry Bodmer celebrated their elegant nupitals at Philbrook.

Annie Atkinson and Henry Bodmer were born worlds apart – Annie in Tulsa and Henry in Zurich, Switzerland – but they both found themselves in New York City in the spring of 2013. A mutual friend introduced them, and their love story developed from there. Following a year-long engagement, the couple was married at Philbrook Museum in Tulsa on Sept. 17. Friends and family from New York, Zurich and Annie’s hometown attended the elegant event. Annie looked like the essence of effortless beauty in her white gown adorned with ostrich feathers as Henry waited down the aisle. There were 12 bridesmaids and 12 groomsmen, and everyone watched with excitement as the bride and groom were surprised with a Swiss alphorn. It was played on that beautiful autumn night on the lawn of the museum. The florals throughout the occasion were done in Dutch masters style, with a pink ombre effect carried from the bridesmaids’ dresses at the ceremony to the pink cotton candy served to guests at the end of the night. Fresh flowers were used as the final garnish on the dinner plates, and even some of the museum’s statues were decorated in pink flowers. The museum was washed in a vivid pink light that made for a dramatic, elegant setting. After the band played its final song, the guests were taken to a private venue that had been transformed for the newlywed’s after party. The couple celebrated with their friends and family until the early hours of the morning. The Bodmers honeymooned in Chile, and they plan to establish their new home in Zurich, Switzerland.

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ANNIE AND HENRY CELEBRATED THEIR NEW COMMITMENT AT PHILBROOK MUSEUM. THE COUPLE TIED THE KNOT WHILE SURROUNDED BY FRIENDS AND FAMILY WHO TRAVELED FAR AND WIDE FOR THE NEW BODMERS. AMBIANCE WAS IMPORTANT TO THE COUPLE, WHO CHOSE TO HOLD THE RECEPTION IN A TENT WITH A CEILING DECORATED IN OVERSIZED PASTEL BALLOONS. A PINK OMBRE STYLE TIED THE WEDDING TOGETHER IN EVERY ASPECT – FROM THE FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS TO THE BRIDESMAIDS’ GOWNS. PHOTOS BY ELY FAIR PHOTOGRAPHY


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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

WEDDING GIFTS

Unwrap Perfection With etiquette constantly evolving, how does one master the art of the ideal present?

A

fter the joy of hearing about a newly engaged couple, the anxiety about the “perfect gift” can overcome a guest who wants to impress. Many stick to the registry, others go off-script and get creative, and the practical few keep it simple and offer cash. Which of these options, if any, is the proper way to go about a wedding gift? With expert help from wedding sites like The Knot (theknot.com), you can navigate this delicate ordeal with the end result being a relieved mind and a happy couple.

very considerate to spend less than $50 on a gift.” The price increases the closer you are to the couple. As a rule of thumb, spend $50-$75 for a coworker or distant friend and $75–$150 for close friends or family members. The price can also fluctuate depending on the cost of living in your city. And finally, Vogue presents an alternative if you can’t afford anything left on the registry: Get the couple a gift card to one of the registered stores. That way they can put your contribution toward a gift no one purchased for them.

Do I need to get a gift, espe- If I’m in the wedding party, do I need to get a gift for cially if I don’t plan to go? every event? This is a tricky question, and one that experts often disagree about. Some say that if an invitation is sent to you, a gift is required. Others say a simple handwritten note will suffice if you can’t attend, especially if you aren’t close to the couple. The choice is yours. The bottom line remains: If you go to the wedding, bring a gift.

How much money do I need to shell out?

According to Vogue, “Even if you aren’t close to the couple, it’s not

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Yes. With simple budgeting, you can afford to get a gift for engagement parties, showers and the actual wedding. Wedding experts recommend 20 percent of your spending on both the engagement party and the wedding shower, plus 60 percent on the actual wedding gift. For an engagement party, think small, couple-centric gifts like monogrammed towels or champagne glasses. For a shower, get something more personalized to the specific bride or groom, like a picture frame, tote bag with

honeymoon essentials, or even a delicate jewelry box. Save the heavy financial lifting for the wedding.

What are popular gifts right now?

According to The Knot, the most popular wedding gifts are usually the most practical. Think glass bowl sets, Tupperware, blenders, drinking glasses and other common household items. Although they aren’t necessarily the flashiest or most exciting things to open, these gifts will get a ton of mileage and will outlast the unnecessary, trendy gifts.

I want to get creative with my gift. Is that OK?

It’s not impolite to go off registry, but it is risky, so proceed with caution. It’s recommended to only get creative if you know the couple well enough to guarantee they’ll love your gift. If not, just stick to a gift they suggested from the registry.

Is just giving cash or a check tacky?

At the end of the day, a couple will never be angry about receiving money, especially if they’re fronting the wedding costs themselves. Add a personalized note, and you’ll be set. MARY WILLA ALLEN


Wedding Announcement

Bravo to the Bravos An ethereal reception welcomed guests arriving from across the country to Southern Hills Country Club on Oct. 1 after the long-awaited nuptials of Brittlyn Warren and Clark Bravo. Brittlyn, the daughter of Steve and Randa Warren, grew up in Tulsa and now works as a senior sales operations specialist in Atlanta, Georgia. Clark, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Bravo, was raised in Southlake, Texas, and acts as a portfolio management associate, also in Atlanta. The two met and began their relationship while attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. At the ceremony at Parish of Christ the King, Brittlyn stunned in a Robert Bullock gown, and Clark awaited her in an Armani tuxedo while renowned organist Tom Starnes, vocalist Phil Armstrong and the music of the Tulsa Strings captured the sentimentality of the occasion. There wasn’t a dry eye in the house as Clark and Brittlyn became Mr. and Mrs. Bravo. “I have never been to a wedding like Brittlyn’s and Clark’s,”

Randa Warren says. “To see my precious daughter walk down the aisle gripped my heart and my whole being unlike any experience in my life.” After the ceremony, guests enjoyed a four-course gourmet dinner prepared by Jonathan Moosmiller, Southern Hill’s executive chef, with rousing musical entertainment by the band Hook. The happy couple’s first dance began with a backdrop of maple trees, draped with colorchanging lights to enhance the mood. Perhaps the most heartfelt moment arose during the father of the bride dance as the pair fought back tears. Guests enjoyed special hospitality bags with Topeca coffee and other wedding favors as a thank you for traveling far and wide to celebrate the couple. A sparkler send-off concluded the evening, and Clark surprised his new wife with a vintage 1972 baby blue Cadillac convertible for their grand exit. The couple then made their way from the club into the night as a new chapter in their lives began.

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PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Brittlyn Warren and Clark Bravo tied the knot during a gorgeous ceremony in Tulsa.


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Designer wedding gowns provide a wealth of inspiration for any blushing bride.

JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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94

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017 CAROLINA HERRERA

NAEEM KHAN

CHRISTIAN SIRIANO

ANGEL SANCHEZ

KELLY FAETANINI

REEM ACRA

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

ALVINA VALENTA

AUSTIN SCARLETT

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

JENNY PACKHAM

ALON LIVNE WHITE

OKLAHOMA WEDDING


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KAREN WILLIS HOLMES

KELLY FAETANINI

CAROLINA HERRERA

REEM ACRA

NAEEM KHAN

JENNY PACKHAM

ALON LIVNE WHITE

WHITE BY VERA WANG

KENNETH POOL

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

CHRISTIAN SIRIANO


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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017 CAROLINA HERRERA

JENNY PACKHAM

JIM HJELM BRIDAL

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

NAEEM KHAN

REEM ACRA

WHITE BY VERA WANG

AMSALE

BLUSH BY HAYLEY PAIGE

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

NAEEM KHAN

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

OKLAHOMA WEDDING


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MONIQUE LHUILLIER

WHITE BY VERA WANG

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

REEM ACRA

LELA ROSE

HAYLEY PAIGE

LAZARO

TARA KEELY

NAEEM KHAN

TRULY ZAC POSEN

CHRISTOS BRIDAL

SAREH NOURI


OKLAHOMA WEDDING

F LO W E R S

The Best of the Bunch The right floral arrangement is the key to a perfect wedding. Photography by Natalie Green

WHITE CALLA LILIES, ROSES, HYDRANGEAS AND WILD SMILAX TONI’S FLOWERS AND GIFTS, TULSA

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MULTI-COLORED GERBERA DAISIES WITH HIDDEN HYDRANGEAS TONI’S FLOWERS AND GIFTS, TULSA

WINTER WHITE BOUQUET WITH MAGNOLIAS, WHITE GARDEN ROSES, BRAZILIAN BELL, SEEDED EUCALYPTUS AND PROTEA GREENS TED AND DEBBIE’S FLOWER AND GARDEN, TULSA

WILD FLOWER BOUQUET OF MANGO CALLA LILIES, ROSES, ANTIQUE HYDRANGEAS, MUMS AND BUPLEURUM MARY MURRAY’S FLOWERS, TULSA

FALL BOUQUET WITH SPRAY AND GARDEN ROSES, HYDRANGEAS AND PRIVET STAGE DOOR FLOWERS, TULSA

RUSTIC COUNTRY BOUQUET WITH CORAL GERBERA DAISIES, CORAL WREATH ROSES AND TEAL BABY’S BREATH FLOWERGIRLS WEDDINGS, TULSA

SPRING BOUQUET WITH GARDEN SPRAY ROSES, PEPPER BERRY, LILY GRASS AND BRUNIA STAGE DOOR FLOWERS, TULSA

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING SUMMER BOUQUET WITH PEONIES, DAHLIAS, MINI GREEN HYDRANGEAS, ASCLEPIA, GREEN TRICK AND LILY GRASS STAGE DOOR FLOWERS, TULSA

GARDEN BOUQUET WITH EGGPLANT CALLAS, GARDEN ROSES, BERRIES AND SEEDED EUCALYPTUS FLOWERGIRLS WEDDINGS, TULSA

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BURGUNDY CYMBIDIUM ORCHIDS, RED ROSES AND MAUVE SUCCULENTS MARY MURRAY’S FLOWERS, TULSA

SUMMER BOUQUET OF WHITE GARDEN ROSES, SUCCULENTS AND COTTON BALLS WITH FERNS, SEEDED EUCALYPTUS, ACACIA AND DUSTY MILLER WILD IRIS, TULSA


INDIAN SUMMER BOUQUET WITH MANGO CALLA LILIES, DELPHINIUM, BERRIES, SPRAY ROSES AND SUNFLOWERS FLOWERGIRLS WEDDINGS, TULSA PINK AND RED GARDEN ROSES, SEEDED EUCALYPTUS AND WILD SMILAX TONI’S FLOWERS AND GIFTS, TULSA

FALL BOUQUET WITH ANTIQUE HYDRANGEAS, BRIDAL PROTEA, SEEDED EUCALYPTUS, PEPPER AND ILEX BERRIES, CHAMPAGNE ROSES, RANUNCULUS AND PHEASANT FEATHERS TED AND DEBBIE’S FLOWER AND GARDEN, TULSA

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

METALLIC LAYERED CAKE ROSEBEARY’S CAKES, OKC PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

CAKES

Cut the Cake 10-INCH RED VELVET BUNDT CAKE WITH CREAM CHEESE FROSTING NOTHING BUNDT CAKE, TULSA

As an iconic part of every wedding, the cake lets each couple express their personality through a delicious dessert.

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

SMALL MULTI-COLORED CAKE BROWN EGG BAKERY, OKC PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

GOLD DRIP CAKE ALL THINGS CAKE, TULSA PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

FLORAL PAINTED CAKE AMY CAKES, NORMAN PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

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SPRING-INSPIRED PAINTED FLORAL CAKE MERRITT’S BAKERY, TULSA PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

LAYERED POLKA-DOT CAKE BROWN EGG BAKERY, OKC PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

THREE-TIER PAINTED CAKE ANDREA HOWARD CAKES, OKC PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWARD

FALL-INSPIRED PAINTED CAKE AMY CAKES, NORMAN PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

C AT E R I N G

Bon Appetit

Oklahoma has a wide assortment of catering options for every kind of nuptial celebration. Photography by Natalie Green

MULLIGATAWNY SOUP WITH CURRY CHICKEN AND RICE DRAGONMOON TEA CO., TULSA

PERUVIAN MARINATED GAME HEN, FRIES AND AVOCADO GARNISH TORERO BAR AND KITCHEN, TULSA

HOUSEMADE DOUGHNUTS BRAMBLE BREAKFAST AND BAR, TULSA

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GELATO IN RASPBERRY, CHOCOLATE CAKE, VANILLA ORANGE AND PUMPKIN CINNABOMB FLAVORS STG GELATERIA, TULSA


POTATO PANCAKE TOPPED WITH LOX, CUCUMBER, CHIVE CREME FRAICHE AND CAVIAR AILA’S CATERING, TULSA

SHRIMP SKEWERS WITH A SWEET CHILI SAUCE KEO, TULSA

MOZZARELLA CAPRESE SALAD WITH OLIVE OIL GLAZE TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO, TULSA

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING LAMB CHOPS ON GUYERE LAYERED POTATOES WITH ADRIATIC FIG GLAZE AND FLEUR DE SEL AILA’S CATERING, TULSA

OPULENT MAC & CHEESE WITH PENNE, PECORINO ROMANO, MOZZARELLA, SHREDDED PARMESAN AND CREAM ANDOLINI’S PIZZERIA, TULSA

PORK BELLY WITH TOMATO JAM, BEEF PUREE, CELERY ROOT PUREE AND APPLE PUREE TALLGRASS PRAIRIE TABLE, TULSA SUSHI PLATTER IN THE RAW, TULSA

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ESPRESSO-SOAKED TIRAMASU WITH RICOTTA CHEESE POUND CAKE, MASCARPONE MOUSSE, WHIPPED CREAM AND CHOCOLATE PASTILLES DRAGONMOON TEA CO., TULSA

TIRADITO NIKKEI, THINLY SLICED FISH SWIMMING IN A SPICY SEA OF CITRUS TORERO BAR AND KITCHEN, TULSA

THE DEMARCO OF BROOKLYN PIZZA WITH DOP SAN MARZANO TOMATOES, FRESH MOZZARELLA, BASIL, PECORINO ROMANO AND EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL ANDOLINI’S PIZZERIA, TULSA SEAFOOD PESCATORE WITH TRI-COLORED PASTA, SHRIMP, LOBSTER, CLAMS, SCALLOPS AND PESTO OLIVE OIL SAUCE TI AMO RISTORANTE ITALIANO, TULSA

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Bonus photo gallery @ OklahomaWedding.com JANUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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D ICELAN SY BLUE LAGOON PHOTOS COURTE

OKLAHOMA WEDDING

Iceland Lake Tahoe

HONEYMOON

Dreamy Destinations Two hearts, one love and five remarkably romantic retreats for newlyweds.

T

he word honeymoon dates back to the fifth century when, during their first moon of marriage, newlyweds drank mead (honey), an alcoholic beverage thought to have aphrodisiac qualities. No matter who you drink your honey with, these five exquisite locations around the globe will create the perfect backdrop for a romantic nuptial celebration.

shops, bars and cafes. Luxury spas take advantage of geothermally heated water, the most famous of which is the Blue Lagoon. Reykjavík actually sports its own geothermal beach with white sands and warm ocean water, assisted by geothermal injection. Where to stay: the CenterHotel Thingholt, a stylish boutique hotel in downtown Reykjavik. centerhotels.com/hotel-thingholt

Iceland

It’s the largest alpine lake in North America – deep and wide, blue as blue can be and surrounded by the awesome Sierra Nevada. Water and winter sports abound, naturally, and make sure to check out South Lake Tahoe’s nightlife and blackjack, the shopping and spas, the golf, fishing, and hiking along with paddle

Yes, as improbable as it sounds, Iceland is quickly becoming “the place” to travel. The land of fire and ice boasts active volcanoes as well as huge glaciers. Reykjavik, the capital, is filled with performance artists and art galleries, exclusive shopping and fine restaurants, coffee

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Lake Tahoe

boats and zip lines. Fly into Reno and stay at the incomparable Deerfield Lodge at Heavenly on the lake’s south shore. Rebuilt in 2014 after a fire, the historic blends with the modern in a tranquil mountain setting where every room has a fireplace. tahoedeerfieldlodge.com

Hong Kong

Immerse yourselves in a new land and a new culture. But don’t be deterred. Hong Kong has great mass transit – easy and inexpensive – and the Chinese people love tourists. Lots to see and do: the Museum of Tea Ware, Victoria Peak (view HK from the island’s highest point – take the tram), Harbour City and its 700 shops, Repulse Bay’s popular beach, the Walled City Park and Po Lin Monastery with its world’s largest Buddha statue.

Best of all, prepare to sleep in – most stores open late and stay open late. There are 6.8 million people packed into HK – but whether they’re surrounded by 68 people or 6.8 million, do honeymooners really care? Accommodation recommendation: the elegant Mandarin Oriental Hong Kong, the first and flagship Mandarin Oriental hotel. It overlooks Victoria Harbor and features a spa, salon, bars and four gourmet restaurants. mandarinoriental.com/hongkong

Turks and Caicos

Magnificent turquoise water, soft white sand, pristine beaches – ahhh, paradise – thanks to the third-largest coral system in the world. The islands’ tourist season lasts from the end of November through March.


PHOTOS COURTESY PEAK TRAMWAYS COMPANY, LIMITED

Hong Kong

PHOTO BY HOLLY HALEY PHOTO

PHOTOS COURTESY AMAN RESORTS

GRAPHY COURTESY DEERFIELD

LODGE AT HEAVENLY

Turks and Caicos

PHOTO BY DOUG HICKOK COUR

PHOTOS COURTESY EXPLORE CHARLESTON

TESY EXPLORE CHARLESTO

N

Charleston

Turks and Caicos, southeast of the Bahamas, is home to expansive Grace Bay Beach: luxury resorts, shops and restaurants. Swimming, fishing, snorkeling and scuba diving are popular activities, and there is plenty of natural beauty to see, such as humpback whales visible from Grand Turk Island and sunsets enjoyed from Chalk Sound. Stay at Amanyara on the western shore of Providenciales. The lavish

resort’s open-air pavilions and villas provide direct access to the sea, backed by a vast wilderness of protected parkland and looking out over the unspoiled reefs of a national marine park. www.aman. com/resorts/amanyara

Charleston

Always a fan favorite, the peninsula city of Charleston, South Carolina, has it going on: friendly

people, cobblestoned Southern charm, colorful history, intriguing waterfront, ocean views, a lively arts scene – and the scenic Battery, a palm tree-lined promenade next to the sparkling Atlantic, full of finely preserved historical homes and lovely gardens. Exploring the historic district is best done on foot, but beware: You’ll be delayed by the many interesting shops, bars and res-

taurants, frequented by College of Charleston students as well as tourists. Stay in the AAA Four Diamondrated John Rutledge House Inn, a refined B&B in the Historic District, built in 1763. johnrutledgehouseinn.com Honorable mention: Venice, Italy. For all the right reasons. CHUCK MAI, AAA OKLAHOMA

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Bramble Breakfast & Bar and Tallgrass Prairie Table

A rustic and beautiful space that lends itself wonderfully to all kinds of events, rehearsal dinners, receptions, graduations and private parties. We use locally sourced products and can accommodate all price ranges with buffet, small plates or plated options. 313 E. 2nd St., Tulsa 918.933.4495; 918.933.4499 bramblebartulsa.com; tallgrasstulsa.com

Celebrity Restaurant

2017

Wedding Service Directory Bridal, Formal Attire

Alfred Angelo Bridal

Enjoy the ultimate bridal consulation at our Alfred Angelo signature stores. Choose from any of our collections, from romantic to luxurious, classic or princess-inspired. Your dream. Your dress. 8802 E. 71st St., Tulsa 918.307.0355 alfredangelo. com

Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedo

A full-service salon offering an outstanding selection of gowns and services. With strong emphasis on quality, selection, romance and sophistication, our gowns are sure to fulfill every bride’s wedding dream. 6808 S. Memorial Dr., Suite 356, Tulsa 918.250.1991 alyssas.com

David’s Bridal

Visit David’s Bridal to find out how to receive $50 off your bridal gown, or visit us online at davidsbridal.com. 10123 E. 71st St., Tulsa 877-923-BRIDE davidsbridal.com

Ann’s Bakery

Cakes

Wedding cakes are Ann’s specialty. The bakery offers a wide variety

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

of sizes, styles, flavors and fillings for you to choose from. Let Ann’s help you create the wedding cake of your dreams. 7 N. Harvard Ave., Tulsa 918.834.2345 annsbakery.com

Catering

2 Pops Catering

BBQ, boneless chicken, homemade sides and desserts. Starting at $10 per person with a 1/2 pound meat, 1/2 pound sides, rolls, pickle, peppers, onions, plate and utensils. 5451 S. Mingo Road, Tulsa 918.516.8277 2popscatering.com

Andolini’s

Andolini’s catering can please any crowd or budget. Pizza, pasta, salad, cocktail hour, appetizers and more! Contact us for a complimentary tasting at catering@ andopizza.com 1552 E. 15th St., Tulsa 918.728.6111 andopizza.com

Aunt Pittypat’s Catering

For more than 20 years, Aunt Pittypat’s has been Oklahoma City’s most trusted caterer for attention to detail and commitment to quality food and service. Specializing in formal and casual weddings and reception din-

For nearly 50 years, Celebrity Restaurant has been a Tulsa favorite for its award-winning menu and fine dining experience. 1309 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa 918.743.1800 celebritytulsa.com

Riverbend Arena

We offer a venue to hold 300+ guests for weddings, receptions and events, complete with on-site catering decorated with repurposed barn wood. 12900 E. 600 Road, Inola 918.543.7950 riverbendarena.com

Ted’s Cafe Escondido

From rehearsal dinners to receptions, we can do it all! Just ask for information about our catering and banquet room services. 3202 W. Kenosha St., Broken Arrow 918.254.8337 tedscafe.com

Ti Amo Ristorante Italiano

Spacious meeting rooms, flexible table layouts, beautifully paneled rooms, limitless menu options, state-of-the-art audiovisual system, portable bar and removable dance floor in two locations. 219 S. Cheyenne Ave, Tulsa; 6024 S. Sheridan Road, Tulsa 918.592.5151; 918.499.1919 tiamotulsa.com

Whole Foods Market

Whole Foods Market is a natural and organic grocery store featuring foods that are free of articifial colors, flavors, sweeteners and hydrogenated fats. 1401 E. 41st St., Tulsa; 9136 S. Yale Ave, Tulsa 918.712.7555; 918.879.0493 wholefoodsmarket.com

Entertainment

Strictly Ballroom Event Center

A beautiful 10,000 square feet event center to rent for wedding receptions and other events. Learn your first dance choreographed to your music. Reserve your special date now. 6928 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa 918.493.2623 strictlyballroomtulsa.com

Event Planner

J.A. Mathis Company

A full service event and wedding planner with a complete floral department. P.O. Box 52279, Tulsa 918.298.7055 jamathis.com

Florist and Decor

Flowergirls Weddings

Trendy, creative, unique: wedding flowers for every bride, budget and style. 5800 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa 918.949.1553 flowergirlsoftulsa.com

Stage Door Flowers

A full service event and wedding planner with a complete floral department. P.O. Box 52279, Tulsa 918.298.7055 jamathis.com

Stems

Fresh wedding flowers – wedding party and table decor. 1702 Utica Square, Tulsa; 510 W Rogers Blvd., Skiatook; 918.742.1410; 918.396.4147 tulsaflorist.net

Toni’s Flowers & Gifts

Complimentary consultation by appointment. Toni’s serves all your wedding needs. 3549 S. Harvard Ave., Tulsa 918.742.9027 tonisflowersgifts.com

Whole Foods Market

Whole Foods Market is a natural and organic grocery store featuring foods that are free of articifial colors, flavors, sweeteners and hydrogenated fats. 1401 E. 41st St., Tulsa; 9136 S. Yale Ave, Tulsa 918.712.7555; 918.879.0493 wholefoodsmarket.com

Gift Registry

Williams-Sonoma

Williams-Sonoma’s wedding and gift registry – from the big day to everyday! 2016 Utica Square, Tulsa 918.742.5252 williams-sonoma.com

Health, Beauty and Wellness

Rodan + Fields

Premium skincare developed by renowned dermatologists Dr. Kate Rodan and Dr. Kathy Fields. Our multi-med therapy regiments will change your skin and change your life! 405.714.0241

Tulsa Surgical Arts

The cosmetic surgeons of Tulsa Surgical Arts offer the most rewarding cosmetic surgery procedures and latest techniques to enhance your natural beauty. 7322 E. 91st St., Tulsa 918.392.7900 tulsasurgicalarts.com

Utica Square Skin Care

Offering medical skin care and a variety of services and therapies to help you look and feel your

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

OKLAHOMA WEDDING

ners. 1515 N. Portland Ave., Oklahoma City 405.942.4000 auntpittypatscatering.com


best. 1325 E. 35th St., Tulsa 918.712.3223

Hotels and Venues

Battle Creek Golf Club

Thank you for considering Battle Creek for your ceremony and reception venue. You’ve found your perfect fit in your beloved, and now it’s time to determine your ideal date and location. We’re here to help! 3200 N. Battle Creek Drive, Broken Arrow 918.355.4850 battlecreekgolf.net

The Bond Event Center

Located in the trendy East Village neighborhood, the brick walls, original tin ceilings and large sunny windows create a timeless venue. This space has the potential to be transformed into an array of styles for any type of event. 608 E. 3rd St., Tulsa 918.442.2993 bondtulsa.com

Bramble Breakfast & Bar and Tallgrass Prairie Table

A rustic and beautiful space that lends itself wonderfully to all kinds of events, rehearsal dinners, receptions, graduations and private parties. We use locally sourced products and can accommodate all price ranges with buffet, small plates or plated options. 313 E. Second St., Tulsa 918.933.4499 bramblebartulsa. com; tallgrasstulsa.com

The Campbell Hotel & Event Center

We are a uniquely designed boutique hotel with 26 rooms. We are attached to Maxxwell’s Restaurant and can offer catering for events. We have two event centers with different atmospheres that are perfect for any event. 2636 E. 11th St., Tulsa 918.744.5500 thecampbellhotel.com

Champagne Penthouse

Book your next holiday party, fundraiser or wedding reception here. Impress your guests with an evening at the luxurious Champagne Penthouse. 301 N.E. Fourth St. #16, Oklahoma City 405.626.0934 champagnepenthouse.com

Dresser Mansion

Dresser Mansion is a historic venue in downtown Tulsa. We can accommodate up to 200 guests for your event. Built in 1919 and full of charm. 235 W. 18th St., Tulsa 918.585.5157 dressermansion.com

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa

We offer a variety of event spaces for wedding receptions. Your out-of-town guests will enjoy our luxury hotel with a golf course and spa. Our in-house bakery specializes

The Perfect Setting… In Mid-town Tulsa

in all styles of wedding cakes from simplistic to elaborate designs. 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa 918.384.7931 hardrockcasinotulsa.com

A 1920’s Italian Renaissance mansion surrounded by the lush gardens and urban forest of Woodward Park.

Har-Ber Village Museum

With its rustic charm and gorgeous lakefront views, Har-Ber Village is a vintage wedding venue your guests will remember for years to come. 4404 W. 20th Rd., Grove 918.786.3488 har-bervillage.com

Weddings, receptions, dinners, private and corporate parties

Historic Tulsa Elegance

Holiday Inn Tulsa City Center

Our contemporary banquet space is perfect for all of your wedding needs, from hotel stays and bridal showers to your ceremony and reception. 17 W. Seventh St., Tulsa 918.585.5898 ext. 7155 ihg.com

Meadowlake Ranch

A rustic ceremony and reception venue located beside beautiful spring-fed lakes with both indoor and outdoor options available. 3450 S. 137th W. Ave., Sand Springs 918.494.6000 meadowlakeranch.com

OK40 Ranch

We love hosting weddings and 2435 South Peoria receptions at OK40 Ranch. We welTulsa, OK 74114 come you to share your event ideas with us or ask about ours. Weddings can be on property in our outdoor gazebo, in the woods, indoors at the 22424 Tulsa Garden Center.indd 1 Hacienda Vestibule Grande or in our Reception Hall. 14370 Creager Road, Mounds 918.230.1099 ok40ranch.com

www.tulsagardencenter.com 918-576-5153 12/16/16 3:35 PM

RIVERBE N D

RIVE RBE N D ARENA

Oklahoma Aquarium

Imagine wedding vows being exchanged in the beauty of our underwater world. Receptions in the aquarium are equally stunning, providing one-of-a-kind photo opportunities and comfort and beauty for your guests. 300 Aquarium Drive, Jenks 918.296.FISH (3474) okaquarium.org

OKLAHOMAʼS PREMIER EQUINE COMPETITION CENTER

ARENA

OKLAHOMAʼS PREMIER EQUINE COMPETITION CENTER

Oklahomans for Equality

Serving LGBT Oklahomans and their allies since 1980, Oklahomans for Equality is home to a diverse, vibrant, and engaged community of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons, knowledgeable staff and dedicated volunteers. 621 E. Fourth St., Tulsa 918.743.4297 okeq.org

Riverbend Arena

We offer a venue to hold 300+ guests for weddings, receptions and events, complete with on-site catering decorated with repurposed barn wood. 12900 E. 600 Road, Inola 918.543.7950 riverbendarena.com

Tulsa Garden Center

Beautiful italianate mansion in Midtown for weddings, recep-

• • • • • •

Seating for 300+ Indoor and outdoor events Indoor decorated with reclaimed barn wood and tin Outdoor ranch and pond views Onsite catering from Chow House Restaurant Private bride and groom suites

12900 E 600 Rd. Inola, OK RiverbendArena.com | 918.543.7950 22421 Riverbend Arena.indd 1

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING

tions, parties, corporate and non-profit events surrounded by a natural park area. 2435 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa 918.746.5133 tulsagardencenter.com

Tulsa Marriott Southern Hills Wedding venue space and sleeping rooms. 1902 E. 71st St., Tulsa 918.493.7000 marriott.com

Tulsa Zoo Management, Inc.

$

EACH TUXEDO RENTAL When you join our Bank Account rewards program. Prices starting at $39.99.

Whether you’re looking to host a sunset ceremony or an afternoon affair, the Tulsa Zoo creates a unique experience for your special day. 6421 E. 36th St. N., Tulsa 918.669.6601 tulsazoo.org

White House Mansion

A historic, charming mansion situated on 10 acres of land. Wide open ballroom with indoor and outdoor options. Flexible catering and ample parking. 1 W. 81st St., Tulsa 918.313.0808 whitehousemansiontulsa.com

Jewelers

Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels 15407999JABT_V6

22425 Jos. A. Bank.indd 1

ering! For the perfect gath

12/19/16 11:12 AM

Located in the trendy East Village neighborhood, the brick walls, original tin celilings, and large sunny windows create a timeless venue perfect for any event!

Bruce G. Weber represents the finest, most renowned brands of designer jewelry and watches available in the world today, with competitive “meet or beat” prices and personalized sales and service. 1700 Utica Square, Tulsa 918.749.1700 brucegweber.com

Lighting

OMNI Lighting, Inc.

Lighting, curtains, chandeliers, bistro lights, dance floor lighting, sound systems and video. Set up and operation or rental. 1333 E. Fourth St., Tulsa 918.583.6464 omnilighting.com

Photography

405 Brides Photography

Over 16 years experience as an amazing photographer in Oklahoma. Specializing in weddings, engagements, boudoir and families. 2125 Whiteoak Circle, Norman 405.514.0004 405brides.com

Chris Humphrey Photographer

Now o B oking!

Chris Humphrey Photographer delivers exquisite wedding photography with attention to detail and a genuine care for you, your family and friends on your wedding day. 12324 E. 86th St. N., Suite 250, Owasso 918.625.4630 chrishumphreyphotographer.com

TIFFANY TURNER-COATS Catering Director 608 E 3RD ST | TIFFANY@MCNELLIES.COM | 918 442 2993 | THEBONDTULSA.COM

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22113 McNellie's Catering Group.indd 1

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My Treasured Memories Photography

Full service wedding photography studio providing a unique luxury experiene for each couple. Our

premier collections are all-inclusive. “Let us capture your love story.” 9329 S. 255th E. Ave., Broken Arrow 918.805.6012/918.949.5052 mytreasuredmemories.net

Rentals and Supply

ABCO Rents

Complete wedding and party rental for rehearsal, ceremony and reception needs. 2033 E. 11th St., Tulsa 918.583.6557 abcoparty.com

Transportation

Crown Car Charters

Luxury chauffeur service in vintage 1963 Rolls Royce Silver Cloud. Licensed and insured. Trust us to get you there in style. Beautiful in photos. Tulsa 918.857.1286 crowncarcharters.com

Travel

All Seasons Travel

A full service travel agency. We specialize in all-inclusive vacations and destination weddings. We have been in business since 1984. 1203 W. Main St., Durant 580.924.9201 allseasonstravelok.com

Warren Place Travel

Warren Place Travel is a full service, award-winning travel agency specializing in honeymoon and destination weddings worldwide. 6100 S. Yale Ave., Suite 100p, Tulsa 918.492.4724 warrenplacetravel.com

Tuxedos

Jos. A. Bank

Jos. A. Bank is not just another menswear retailer. What makes us unique is a heritage of quality and workmanship, an extensive selection of beautifully made, classically styled tailored and casual clothing, and prices typically 20 to 30 percent below our competitors 1744 Utica Square Space 15, Tulsa; Woodland Hills Mall, 8247 E. 71st St, Tulsa 918.749-2604; 918.252.2799 josbank.com

Video Production and Photography

Captain Video Production and Photography

For over 30 years, Captain Video and Photography has produced wedding videos with state-of-theart equipment. 1429 N. Umbrella Ave., Broken Arrow 918.521.4726 captainvideoinc.com


ESCAPE TO THE WOW. Discover a resort destination that pairs big fun with tranquil relaxation. Start with action on our gaming floor before being pampered at our world-class spa. Then enjoy award-winning dining, a show from the top names in entertainment at our state-of-the-art Grand Theater or take in some family-friendly fun at The District. End the day in our AAA Four Diamond accommodations. No matter what you’re in the mood for, we have the WOW to match.

DURANT • POCOLA • GRANT • McALESTER • BROKEN BOW • IDABEL • STRINGTOWN • STIGLER • CASINO TOOs

Hwy 69/75 • ChoctawCasinos.com • 888.652.4628 Management reserves all rights. Gambling Problem? Call 1.800.522.4700.


Local. Personal. Professional.

www.donthorntonauto.com

Oklahoma Magazine January 2017  
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