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VOTE NOW FOR 2015 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM JANUARY 2015

OKLAHOMANS

OF THE YEAR Seven individuals who have left a positive mark on the state

a m o h a l k OWEDDING Special Issue:

18TH ANNUAL

Everything you need

THE

OKLAHOMA

WEDDING SHOW SATURDAY, JANUARY 17 10 A.M.-4 P.M. EXPO SQUARE CENTRAL PARK HALL

to plan the perfect day


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Brisk air and a new year filled with possibilities. It’s the perfect time to grab your favorite people and head to Utica Square. Make it a relaxing day of shopping, toasty drinks, and mouthwatering entrees. Everything you need to make your resolutions a reality is here at Tulsa’s hometown treasure.


January 2 015 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

VOL. XIX, NO. 1

FEATURES

46

40

Oklahomans of the Year

PHOTO BY NINO MUNOZ/NBC.

A Gathering Place For Tulsa

A dream more than seven years in the making, A Gathering Place broke ground in September. When finished, the park will span more than 100 acres in central Tulsa and serve as a place for Tulsans to play, celebrate and gather together.

Every year, Oklahoma Magazine recognizes individuals in the state and from it who have made a difference. This year’s honorees represent a wide variety of areas – from arts and entertainment to philanthropy to advocacy. We acknowledge seven Oklahomans who have improved the state in 2014.

SPECIAL SECTION

69 Oklahoma Wedding

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

VOTE NOW FOR 2014 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM!

VOTE NOW FOR 2015 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM JANUARY 2015

January 2015

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

OKLAHOMANS

OF THE YEAR Seven individuals who have left a positive mark on the state

klahoma OWEDDING Special Issue:

18TH ANNUAL

Everything you need

THE

OKLAHOMA

WEDDING SHOW SATURDAY, JANUARY 17 10 A.M.-4 P.M. EXPO SQUARE CENTRAL PARK HALL

2

OKMAG.COM

to plan the perfect day

ON THE COVER: OKLAHOMA WEDDING HAS ALL THE BASES COVERED WHEN IT COMES TO BRIDAL BEAUTY, WEDDING PLANNING AND MORE. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries. MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!


MORE THAN A NEW NAME. A NEW MEDICAL COMMUNITY. Introducing St. John Clinic

St. John Clinic brings together the primary care physicians, specialists and staff you’ve known and trusted for years under one banner. Backed by the resources of the St. John Health System, St. John Clinic embodies the best in comprehensive, coordinated care.

Combined with online access to your medical records, payment options and lab results via the new St. John Online, we’re placing your health in your hands.

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Contents

DEPARTMENTS The State

13

13

Legendary car enthusiast and innovator Darryl Starbird celebrates the 20th anniversary of his museum located along Route 66 in northeast Oklahoma.

16 18 20 22 24 26 28

People Culture Education The Insider Oklahoma Business Scene Living Space

A Maple Ridge home received a facelift to make it suitable for a family of six to live comfortably in style.

32 Your Health 34 Style 38 Destination

Taste

53

28

The smells of exotic spices waft through the kitchen and out to diners at Cumin, Tulsa’s newest Indian restaurant. Chef and co-owner Shifali Bhullar has extensive experience in operating restaurants and serving dishes that bring hungry patrons back for more.

54 56

The Buzz What We’re Eating

Entertainment

59

Legendary country music superstar and Oklahoma native Garth Brooks brings his tour to Tulsa’s BOK Center for seven performances that will no doubt bring the house down.

60

Calendar of Events

56

59 34

4

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015


11 ANNUAL HEALTH & WELLNESS EXPO TH

SATURDAY, JANUARY 17 | 9 A.M. TO 1 P.M. | FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Whatever you have promised yourself to do this year—trim down, tone up, eat healthier, exercise more—now is the time to get started. Join us on Saturday, January 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and sample everything the Health Zone at Saint Francis has to offer. The event is free and open to the public and will include fitness classes, cooking classes, free health screenings and wellness education with Warren Clinic physicians.

JOIN FOR FREE.

Valid January 17, 2015.

Health Zone features and services: 70,000 square-foot fitness facility Full schedule of classes • Premier cardio, weight training and strength equipment • A dedicated Pilates equipment studio • Two indoor saltwater pools • Year-round swimming lessons • Boot camp, suspension training and CrossFit

Indoor cycling Zumba, barre and yoga • Basketball and racquetball • Massage services • Weight loss and life balance classes • Locker rooms with steam room, sauna and towel service • Parents’ night out • Annual kids’ triathlon

Cooking classes for kids and adults Kids Zone activity center • Indoor walking track and outdoor trail • Grab-and-go deli with smoothies, wraps and sandwiches • Summer programs for kids and teens

5353 East 68th Street | Tulsa, OK 74136 | saintfrancis.com/healthzone | 918-494-1671


OKLAHOMA

Private ColleCtions to PubliC treasures New Acquisitions at Gilcrease Museum

OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX ASSOCIATE EDITOR KAREN SHADE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN

Continues through MarCh 29, 2015

GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER NATE PUCKETT DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB INTERN KARISSA ZIEGLER CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM Edgar Alwin Payne, Sunshine and Shadows, oil, GM 01.2580

1400 N. Gilcrease MuseuM rd. Tulsa, OK 918-596-2700 Gilcrease.uTulsa.edu TU Is an EEO/aa InsTITUTIOn. 20629 Gilcrease.indd 1

11/26/14 10:39 AM

ALL YOU NEED IS

Find everything your hearts desire at

THE OKLAHOMA WEDDING SHOW OKLAHOMA 918.744.6205 • advertising@okmag.com

COMING SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 2015

Expo Square • Central Park Hall • Tulsa 1-3 wedding show LOVE.indd 1

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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 12/13/14 4:20 PM

ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2015 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily TM represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates. 2013

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AT OKMAG.COM LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

WE’VE DONE IT AGAIN! We asked. You answered. 40 Under 40’s Class of 2015 is the most impressive yet. Be sure to pick up the April issue to see who OKLAHOMA made the cut.

OKLAHOMA

Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com Call 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA 8 1 OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015 1/2 40 under 40.indd

I have been a bridesmaid a few times. Three, to be exact, and each time, I served as a maid of honor. The first time, my 21-year-old self stood next to my sister-in-law when she married my brother. I had no idea what was required of me, and I don’t think I did much more than attend showers and show up for dress fittings. For my second tour, I was asked by my best friend, Lauren. This time, being 24 and a little more mature and responsible, I threw a shower, attended all mandatory functions and even wrote a speech (sorry it was so short, Lauren!) to deliver – with gusto – at the reception. By my third time serving as a maid of honor – this time for my sorority sister, Heather – I was well prepared. I had learned that the maid of honor’s job is not only to be completely supportive of every decision the bride makes, but to also act as a security guard. As we drew closer to the big day, I grew increasingly protective. There’s a problem with the reception décor? Talk to me. I decided who was dispatched to handle the problem. The DJ has questions about what song to play when the newlyweds enter the reception hall? Ask me, then I’ll ask the ball-ofnerves bride in a kind and relaxed way. Nothing and no one got to Heather on her big day before they got to me. I stood in for the bride during the rehearsal, delivered not one, but two speeches – one at the rehearsal dinner, the other one quite emotionally at the reception. At 26, I came into my own as a maid of honor. Afterward, I considered opening a maid of honor business. I have many dresses that would suit a wedding, all in a variety of colors. I have the experience and, more importantly, the speechwriting abilities to make a room full of people drop their forks and dab their teary eyes. Though my business venture never got off the ground, I still think it’s an idea that would easily sell on Shark Tank. Planning a wedding isn’t an easy task. There’s lots of stress, money and time spent on pulling off the bride and groom’s perfect day. That’s why this month’s Oklahoma Wedding, a special section devoted to all things wedding, is so handy. Have a look at gowns, cakes, flowers and catering options available at local vendors. Take advantage of the service directory, which provides a comprehensive list of those who provide wedding services in the region. The Oklahoma Wedding Show (Jan. 17) will also bring many of these vendors together under one roof, which makes planning the special day a breeze. Take as much stress out of your big day with our handy section. And while you may not see any businesses offering maids of honor for rent, just remember, you can always contact me. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

12/19/14 9:29 AM


Patient-Centered Cancer Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility.

As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home.

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer 800 NE 10th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73104

centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-6822 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


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LAHOMA OK

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GAZINE

Voting for Oklahoma Magazine’’s The Best of the Best is now open. BY CASTING A BALLOT, YOU HAVE A VOICE IN THE YEAR’S MOST ANTICIPATED ISSUE.

VISIT OKMAG.COM

TO VOTE For Advertising opportunities emAil Advertising@okmAg.com cAll 918.744.6205

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Watch our web exclusive videos for expanded coverage.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 20159:35 AM 12/19/14

O K L A H O M A W E D D I N G S H O W C OV E R A G E The Oklahoma Wedding Show is back, and Oklahoma Magazine is set to capture all the festivities in web exclusive coverage. See all of the latest bridal fashions from our runway shows, featuring stylish formal wear from a variety of Tulsa’s and Oklahoma City’s top wedding retailers. Wedding gowns, cakes, flowers and bridesmaid dresses – The Oklahoma Wedding Show will have it all and more on Saturday, Jan. 17. This is the only wedding show you need to attend. N E W Y E A R ’S R E S O L U T I O N S Need to start eating better? Have a bad habit you want to quash? Never fear, the New Year is here! We take a trip to Tulsa’s Food Truck Wednesday to ask local patrons and business owners in downtown Tulsa about their New Year’s resolutions. We also meet with experts in the fields of physical fitness and nutrition to get pro tips on how to change your lifestyle and be healthier, one step at a time.

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The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

CUSTOM CAR PIONEER DARRYL STARBIRD LOOKS FORWARD TO THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE NATIONAL ROD AND CUSTOM CAR HALL OF FAME MUSEUM IN JUNE. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

Back to the Futurista

Darryl Starbird looks back on a lifetime of dreams and forward to a big anniversary.

D

arryl Starbird was just a kid when America began its deep love affair with the car. In the mid-20th century, Americans, finished with Europe and tired of war, returned home to play, and their favorite toy was the automobile. It rapidly became a steel symbol of the American dream, an emblem of hard work. Like America, it was full of possibilities, and Starbird and a handful of talented designers and builders were hell-bent on exploring every one of them. The National Rod and Custom Car Hall of Fame Museum sits, fittingly, on Route 66 near Grand Lake. Home to more than 50 unique automobiles, its mission is two-fold: to recognize the best design-

ers and builders on the custom car scene that exploded after World War II and to memorialize America’s love affair with the automobile. “I want people to appreciate not just the cars. I want them to appreciate the designers and the skill and effort it takes to build the cars,” says Starbird. “Mostly, I just want to keep the American love affair with the automobile alive and well. That’s really what it’s all about.” Founded by Starbird and his wife, Donna Starbird, in 1994, the museum holds 52 custom vehicles at any given time. Twentysix are Starbird creations, a snapshot of his five-decade career as a custom car builder. The rest of the specimens are on loan from other builders around the country. To be considered for display at the museum, a car must excel in one area: uniqueness. It must, above all other things, be one of a kind. The cars are stylistically wild, the futuristic imaginings of dreamers, who paid full attention in shop class. As unique as it gets, they’re named like horses: Predicta, Futurista, Debonair, Reactor Mach II. “We have all types of cars in the museum,” says Starbird. “The main criteria is that they must be one-of-a-kind, exotic vehicles. We don’t display [cars from] even your average show car. They must be unique. We’ve only got room for 52 of them, so the cars must be well-known, as well; maybe they’ve gotten a lot of publicity or won awards.” Starbird’s career began with tinkering. He had no formal training as an automobile designer but earned his chops doing bodywork in his hometown of Wichita, Kan. He picked up mentors along the way, heavy-hitters on the nascent custom car scene: George Barris, Sam Barris and Joe Bailon. In 1954, Starbird began customizing his own vehicles, a hobby financed by his fledgling business, the Star Kustom Shop. After a couple of well-received entries at custom car shows, Starbird hit the big time in 1959 at the National Hot Rod Association’s National Custom Car Show in Detroit, then the automobile capital of the world. His entry, a 1957 Thunderbird lovingly named Le Perle, swept the JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State top honors. With its smooth lines, accented fins and tubular styling, the car hinted at the aerodynamic designs that would become the Starbird trademark over the years. “I went to school to be an aeronautical engineer. I worked at Boeing while I was in college. That background and being from Wichita, which was the airplane capital of the world back then, made an impact. The aerodynamic part of it, the aircraft influence of it, has affected my designs more than anything else,” says Starbird. Starbird’s 1960 entry further wowed the auto world: the futuristic Predicta, a heavily modified 1956 Thunderbird that featured stick steering, a television, and most importantly, a bubble top – edge-to-edge glass with no support. The Predicta erased all suspicions that Starbird was just a flash in the pan and earned him the nickname of “The Bubble Top King.” Until Starbird put bubble tops on working cars, they were little more than sketches and drawings in the pages of Popular Mechanics. The Predicta was named “Car of the Future.” Custom car aficionados know Starbird’s name. They also know that his contributions to the popularization of the custom car scene weren’t limited to his unique creations. In 1957, he donned the promoter’s hat and hosted his own show in Wichita. It was a hit, and he expanded his repertoire to include 15 major cities across the country. His Tulsa show is the largest indoor car show in the nation. “Darryl made two big contributions. One was producing car shows. It was significant because it brought a large number of people to see those beautiful automobiles. That’s one facet of his career. The other contribution is in the cars he built,” says Tom Vodele, editor of StreetScene magazine. With these new and expanding outlets for creativity, the custom car scene exploded. As the shows drew in hundreds of thousands, Starbird and other creators focused solely on competition, rejecting lucrative orders from private collectors and auto enthusiasts. Many of the popular draws for those shows live at the museum these days. Gene Winfield’s Reactor Mach II is a favorite for visitors. A modified 1956 Citroen DS, it

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

found its way on to television shows like Bewitched, Star Trek and Batman. It proved that no Hollywood imagination of the future could fly without a serious imagination of the car, as well. For Starbird and his colleagues, designing and building custom cars has taken on a cultural significance. “I feel that it’s a sport because of the competition,” he says. “The guys actually build the cars to enter in the car shows around the country to win trophies. They’re competing with their skills, like you would in any sport. It takes real skill to build a car, and they’re definitely competing.” As the audience grew, Starbird redoubled his efforts to inject custom cars into popular culture. In 1975, he founded the National Rod and Custom Association, an organization charged with spreading the enthusiasm for custom cars. Starbird’s biggest pop culture coup sprang from the aisles of toy and hobby stores. A 1963 offering, the aptly named Futurista, was the first car built wholly by Starbird. The car body was handmade, and with stick steering, a double bubble top, fully electronic controls and a ton of other dream accessories, it’s considered futuristic even by today’s standards. It was also one of the first kits released by the Monogram model company with Starbird’s name on it. As a design consultant with the company, Starbird ultimately contributed 15 kits. Over the years Monogram has sold more than a million units of Starbird’s designs, and several are still available. “Through his relationship with Monogram and his model car kits, he inspired many people. I hear so many people at our events tell Darryl, ‘I remember building that model car kit that you designed with Monogram!’ They inspired a lot of young people to get into this hobby,” says Vodele. For his part, Starbird knew that custom cars had dented pop culture when his name popped up in George Lucas’s masterful teen epic, 1973’s American Graffiti. Though he served as a consultant on the film, Starbird wasn’t expecting to hear his name dropped in it. “I thought it was just a B movie that would run at [drive-ins] and go away,” he says. “Lucas picked me over other designers because he, like me, was very much interested in futuristic things. My cars, of course, are futuristic. I felt really good about it. I probably got more mention from that one sentence in American Graffiti than I’ve gotten from all the cars I’ve built.” Now 82 and theoretically retired, Starbird can still be found in his Grand Lake shop every day. He continues to add to the more than 200 cars he’s designed and built over five decades. The game has changed over the years as new technologies and materials become available. The emphasis these days, he says, is not so much on body styling. Contemporary enthusiasts are retooling engines and replacing interiors. The quest for singularity, however, remains. The museum’s 20th anniversary celebration, set for June, will be big. Custom car designers from around the world will attend an award ceremony that’s garnered a reputation as the Oscars of the custom scene. Two new creators are slated for induction THE BUBBLE-TOPPED into the hall of fame, and a few of their cars will be on hand. DesignCOSMA RAY IS JUST ers and builders from around the world will converge on Grand Lake, ONE OF THE MORE and they’ll bring some of their cars with them. More than 200 unique THAN 50 CUSTOM VEHICLES ON DISPLAY creations, past and present, will be on display for the public. AT THE NATIONAL “The museum is the only place in the world that pays homage to ROD AND CUSTOM CAR HALL OF FAME these builders. There are museums for NASCAR. There are museums MUSEUM. of drag racing. There are basically museums for all mainstream forms of motorsports. This is the only spot that pays homage to custom car ABOVE: LIL’ COFFIN IS AMONG STARBIRD’S builders and hot rodders. For that single reason, it’s important,” says BEST KNOWN CUSVodele. TOM CARS. PAUL FAIRCHILD


ROMANCE IS IN THE AIR

Nothing says romance like a cozy retreat at an Oklahoma State Park. Secluded cabins, crackling fires and misty mornings are just some of the alluring amenities available. Turn up the heat this February with 15% off a lodge or cabin stay and score romantic bonus points that will last until next Valentine’s Day. Visit TravelOK.com/SPDeals for more offers, and plan your retreat to remember.

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The State

NATIVE OKLAHOMAN TAMBRA RAYE STEVENSON WAS NAMED A NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC 2014 TRAVELER OF THE YEAR FOR HER WORK WITH HERITAGE FOODS.

PEOPLE

Will Travel For Food

Oklahoma native and National Geographic 2014 Traveler of the Year Tambra Raye Stevenson is on the hunt for heritage foods.

N

utritionist and culinary historian Tambra Stevenson’s passion for food and health began early. “I started a restaurant when I was a kid, and my sister was my loyal customer. The special of the day was always mom’s leftovers,” Stevenson recalls. Stevenson was born in Oklahoma City and raised in Midwest City and attended Oklahoma State University. “I originally went to Oklahoma State University as a biology

16

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

pre-med major, but when a classmate heard how I was disgruntled with the PHOTO BY SCOTT SUCHMAN path I was on, they recommended nutrition. It was a perfect fit.” Stevenson now lives in Washington, D.C., where she runs a community kitchen project called NativSol. At NativSol, Stevenson teaches families about the power of creating health through heritage foods – foods eaten by a person’s ancestors. The idea for NativSol came through traveling and thinking deeply about purpose. “After an outreach program I helped out with in Gulfport, Miss., I thought a lot about how I could impact my own community. My interest has always been in food, but I wanted to know my own role and how I could best help people,” she says. “The American diet is not working well for so many people, so I started looking for solutions.” Part of that includes incorporating heritage foods. For those of African descent, Stevenson says, heritage foods include resilient crops like millet. “If you want to be a strong and healthy person, you don’t need to look any further than these types of foods. I’m a food hunter; I’m always looking for different things that can help people become healthier,” Stevenson says. “I’m inspired by Julia Child and what she did to introduce French cuisine to the U.S. It’s similar to what I want to do with African heritage foods.” Food hunting has taken Stevenson all over the world. Recently, it led to National Geographic Traveler magazine naming her a Traveler of the Year. She says she first caught the travel bug after visiting the Dominican Republic after college. She later went on to visit Ghana, Ethiopia, South America and more. Through it all, her Oklahoma heritage has been an integral part of her identity, Stevenson says. “As I get older, and [after] having two children, I reflect more on Oklahoma and valuing where I came from. In Oklahoma, it’s all about faith, food, family and football, and you can find that all over the world – except it might be soccer instead of football,” she says. “Where I live now, it helps to have that Oklahoma mindset of not being impressed by job titles. In Oklahoma, it’s all about how grounded you are, and that’s been something that I’ve found has added value to many different situations. Even if you don’t think much about where you’re from, you have way more to offer than you can imagine.” Stevenson contributed to the exhibit Food: Our Global Kitchen at the National Geographic Museum by offering several cooking classes (west African soups and stews and east African spices). She held a Kwanzaa class during the holidays. “I’m also hoping to go to Nigeria and the northern region of Africa,” she says. “I want to learn more about their traditions.” Able to pursue her passion every day, Stevenson says she believes everyone has a purpose. “I feel sometimes that I’m not doing enough, but I try to appreciate each step of the journey,” she says. “Things have happened to me this year that I never thought would happen. I never thought I’d be in National Geographic, for one thing. But I hope others realize that it’s important to believe in what you do.” MEGAN MORGAN


- Opening Spring 2015 -

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The State

CULTURE

Sports Stories

H

Hometown Teams brings the Smithsonian to Oklahoma.

– “the cowboy code.” Each city will explore ometown sports teams conhow sports have influenced its culture. nect us all to the American and human experience and The six locations that will host the exhibit to one another, says Caroline all have their own local story to tell, Lowery Lowery, program officer at the adds. The Guymon Public Library will Oklahoma Humanities Council. showcase rodeo culture, Muskogee’s Five “Sports are a way to educate, enlighten and Civilized Tribes Museum will highlight empower Oklahomans to explore their own the Native American sports legacy, and the personal narrative,” she says. “Sports teach Ralph Ellison Library in Oklahoma City will us about ourselves, our communities and our highlight African-American sports stories. shared cultural experiences.” The Miami Public Library will cover local sports heroes, Ponca City’s Pioneer Woman These concepts are explored in the Museum will explore Smithsonian exhibit women in sports, and Hometown Teams: Weatherford’s Museum How Sports Shape on Main Street exhibit America. Six will highlight various Oklahoma towns aspects of the commuwill receive the nity’s sports culture. privilege of hostHometown Teams ing the interactive hits Oklahoma City in collection of sports March 2015. It will rehistory, culture and main for six weeks bememorabilia. fore it moves to its next “The exhibit Oklahoma destination. has ambient sports Lowery says thousands sounds in the are anticipated to turn background, TV out at each stop for this monitors featuring exhibit covering everysports stories, iPads thing from football and that lead visitors on baseball to skateboarda question-and-aning and surfing. Guests swer scavenger hunt are sure to discover an and even scented aspect of the exhibit squeeze bottles that appeals to their that let you ‘smell love of competition or the game,’” says community. Lowery. “Children “We are so proud and adults alike and honored to bring can experience how the Smithsonian to sports shape our Oklahoma,” says lives through all Lowery. “I encourage five senses.” everyone to go see Guests can also FROM TOP: THE BATES COLLEGE TEAM (REAR) the exhibit with their share their own COMPETES IN THE NCAA WOMEN’S ROWING friends and families. sports stories on the CHAMPIONSHIPS, 2012. PHOTOS BY STEVE JOHNSON/MAAC. Whether you are a sports supplemental app enthusiast, a player, a titled “Stories on ALTHEA GIBSON SHATTERED RACIAL BARRIES IN TENNIS AND GOLF. SHE WON BOTH THE U.S. OPEN fan, a cheerleader, a Main Street.” AND WIMBLEDON IN 1957 AND 1958. IN 1964, SHE mascot, a band member, Lowery explains BECAME THE FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN TO JOIN a soccer mom or a lover that sports have a way THE LADIES PROFESSIONAL GOLF ASSOCIATION. PHOTO COURTESY LIBRARY OF CONGRESS, PRINTS AND PHOTOGRAPHS of history, this exhibit is of shaping several DIVISION, NYWT&S COLLECTION. for you.” aspects of our lives, THE GULF COAST CARDINALS CELEBRATE A VICincluding language More at www. TORY, LAKE JACKSON, TEXAS, 2009. – “throwin’ in the museumonmainstreet.org. PHOTO BY BRENDA READ PHOTOGRAPHY. BETH WEESE towel” – and ethics

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

S TAT

8%

Lots of people vow to change in the New Year, and most of those resolutions revolve around health: lose weight, exercise more, eat healthier. Other popular resolutions include spend less, volunteer more, quit smoking and manage stress. But according to research conducted by the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania, just eight percent of people who set new year’s resolutions actually achieve them. John Norcross of the University of Scranton has said that it’s best to be concise and specific when setting resolutions. “We say if you can’t measure it, it’s not a very good resolution, because vague goals beget vague resolutions,” he says in Forbes magazine. According to the American Psychological Association, it’s best to start small and change one behavior at a time. Don’t be too hard on yourself if you slip up, and don’t be afraid to ask for support from friends and family to achieve goals. – Jami Mattox


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The State

E D U C AT I O N

Winning Agriculture

Oklahoma State University’s animal science judging teams earn accolades. “Cattle” and “communication” aren’t two words that most people would necessarily link together. When used to describe Oklahoma State University’s award-winning animal science judging teams, however, the words together make perfect sense. OSU’s meat animal evaluation team recently won the national championship at the 2014 Meat Animal Evaluation Contest in Lubbock, Texas, defeating the other 11 teams from universities all over the U.S. It was OSU’s second time in the last four years to claim the title. Earlier in 2014, the OSU livestock judging team claimed the title of champion team at both the National Western Stock Show in Denver and the Dixie National Livestock Show and Rodeo in Jackson, Miss. The OSU Department of Applied Animal Science sponsors four other judging teams in addition to the meat animal evaluation and livestock judging teams: the dairy cattle judging team, equine judging team, quadrathlon team and the meat judging team. Each team has unique aspects when it comes to membership and competition, but all have several things in common. For example, those who participate must have a love of animals, the desire

AG BOON

Langston University, located about 20 miles southwest of Oklahoma State University, also has a thriving agricultural program, and it recently received a boost. The U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded Langston University $1.5 million to further agricultural research at the institution. “We are ideally positioned to provide new insight into the rapidly developing field of agriculture,” Dr. Marvin Burns, dean of agriculture and applied sciences at Langston, says. “We are grateful for the financial support of this important research and look forward to sharing the results [in 2015].” According to Langston University spokeswoman Christina Gray, the funds will go

20

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

to work as a team, a capacity for analytical thinking and, most importantly, great communication skills, says Dr. Blake Bloomberg, OSU livestock judging team coach and assistant professor for the applied animal science department. Many members join for job preparation

and experience. Some of the most successful breeders and influential leaders in the livestock industry trace their roots back to participation on competitive livestock judging teams. From a competition standpoint, the school’s livestock, meats and horse teams have finished in the top three teams in 79 percent of the contests they have participated in, winning more than $62,000 in academic scholarships and prize monies, says Bloomberg. Accolades and scholarships are just a small part of membership; students also learn skills for life and gain advantages to further their professional ambitions. Lessons in responsibility, leadership, pride and dedication are all part of livestock judging, says Bloomberg. “The students who graduate through our judging program learn and perfect the art of communication,” he says. “This is one of the biggest reasons our students are so heavily recruited into various job markets.” Team members typically graduate with a degree in animal science, food science, agricultural education or agricultural communications. “The judging team members at Oklahoma State are the absolute reason the team has received the success and recognition that it has,” Bloomberg says. “Oklahoma has always been full of talented students and we strive to recruit the top students from all parts of the U.S.” SHARON MCBRIDE

LANGSTON

toward sevUNIVERSITY eral research KEEPS GOATS ON ITS projects to CAMPUS AS mine data PART OF AGRICULTURAL – including RESEARCH. studies on PHOTO COURTESY sustainable LANGSTON UNIVERSITY. control of greenhouse gas emission by ruminant livestock – as well as food and agricultural science career pathway awareness and opportunities and the creation of a state-of-the-art centralized agriculture laboratory. Other supported research will look at enhancing the health and productiv-

ity of dairy goats along with a comparison between goats and other biological control methods on Eastern red cedar, considered an invasive species in Oklahoma. – Jami Mattox


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The State THE INSIDER

The Best Nightmare

Tulsa native Heather Langenkamp reminisces on her role in a cult classic.

I

t’s taken her the better part of two decades, but Tulsa native Heather Langenkamp has finally come to terms with the role that made her famous, the besieged but resourceful Nancy Thompson of A Nightmare on Elm Street. It was a gradual process, she says, happening as she began accepting more invitations to appear at film conventions and screenings of the picture, such as the highly successful benefit event at Tulsa’s Circle Cinema in early November, where she was joined by her Nightmare nemesis, Freddy Krueger portrayer Robert Englund. Smart, sharp and articulate, Langenkamp separates her ongoing work in the film industry from what she calls her quasi-professional life as a horror-movie icon and convention guest. It’s the latter, she notes, that finally brought her to an acceptance of Nancy and her importance to untold numbers of movie fans. “What I noticed in this other life I lead, the quasi-professional life, was the things people would say about this character and what she meant to them,” explains Langenkamp. “It was very mystifying at

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

first and then flattering, and now it’s incredibly heartwarming, and I’m just really grateful that the fans have embraced this character as they have. “It took 20 years, but now, when people want to see the movie and talk about it like it’s an important American film, I can stand in front of it and have a totally different kind of attitude than I had about it in the past. I just have to show up. I don’t have to do anything.” She says, laughing. “It’s really amazing. I can just talk about this character, and talk about Robert Englund – it’s one of the easiest, fun jobs you can have.” Langenkamp was a student at Stanford University back in the early 1980s when she got the Nightmare role; at the time of the picture’s official release, in November 1984, she’d only been out of her teens for a few months. She was no movie rookie, though, having already played the female lead in Nickel Mountain – a drama adapted from a John Gardner novel – by the time the cameras rolled on Nightmare. Perhaps Langenkamp’s entry into the movies can be traced back to an unlikely place: Tulsa’s Philbrook Museum of Art. “They had a kids’ summer program, and I took acting there,” she recalls. “I remember playing a witch and painting on these crazy curlicue eyebrows in the bathroom and thinking to myself that I felt so powerful, being not only a strange character, but being a witch. I don’t remember even one line or what I did. I just remember putting on my makeup in that bathroom and loving the kind of feeling it gave me.” That feeling persisted when the family moved to Washington, D.C., after her father, noted Tulsa attorney R. Dobie Langenkamp, was offered a job with the U.S. Department of Energy under the Carter administration. “My drama teacher was strict, and she made us do things they probably wouldn’t make you do now. For example, if you were playing even the smallest part, you had to show up at every rehearsal,” she recalls. “You had to be there as part of the group. You did your homework in the aisle of the theater. You’re striking the sets at the end of the show, no excuses. So you learned a work ethic, and I really think that carried me through the hard work this business involves.” The family arrived back in Tulsa in the early ‘80s, just in time for Langenkamp to get in on the excitement of director Francis Ford Coppola’s time in the city. Coppola and Tulsa author S.E. Hinton were then in the midst of working on two film adaptations of Hinton novels, The Outsiders and Rumble Fish, and Langenkamp visited the local casting office in hopes of getting a role. “I was lucky enough to turn my photo in to Janet Hirschenson, who was the casting director for Francis,” she recalls. “We had a nice conversation, and she said, ‘Well, why don’t you read a line?’ They gave me a piece of dialogue, and I read it, and I think I must’ve done a pretty good job, because later on, when they were doing ABOVE: PART OF THE Rumble Fish, MOVIE POSTER FOR THE FILM A NIGHTMARE ON she saw me ELM STREET. again. LEFT: HEATHER LANGEN“I was lucky KAMP (FROM LEFT), JOHN to be on the WOOLEY AND ACTOR ROBERT ENGLUND MET set that night,” UP AT THE CIRCLE CINEMA Langenkamp SCREENING OF THE MOVIE says. “A friend IN NOVEMBER. PHOTO COURTESY CIRCLE CINEMA. of mine had


brought me along, because it was a night shoot in kind of a bad neighborhood, and her mom didn’t want her to go by herself. When I saw Janet, she said, ‘Oh, you’re here. That’s great. Francis wants someone to shout out from the wedding party, to [actor] Matt Dillon, ‘Come on up and join the party.’ So she gave me that line, and I got my SAG card that way. It didn’t make the cut, but who cares?” That Screen Actors Guild card, identifying her as a working film professional, became a valuable possession with her move to the West Coast. Although she did earn a degree in English from Stanford, it took her seven years because movie and TV work kept getting in the way. Her resume includes two more appearances in the Nightmare franchise: Nightmare on Elm Street III: Dream Warriors (1987) and Wes Craven’s New Nightmare (1994), a film that took director Craven’s trademark self-referentialism to the outer limits – he, Englund and Langenkamp all played themselves, the director and two lead actors from the original Nightmare, who were somehow being stalked by a real Freddy Krueger. “People don’t realize what a unique idea Wes Craven had,” she says. “The character was me, and there was no place to go after that. I realized that I wouldn’t be playing Nancy anymore, and Wes realized that he wouldn’t be directing Freddy and Nancy anymore. That’s what makes the movie even more interesting.” Following New Nightmare, Langenkamp and her husband, Academy Award-winning makeup-effects artist David Leroy Anderson, had a son and daughter, and, she says, “I realized that if I was going to Jan 2015 SCI_Ok Mag (CS).pdf 1 11/19/14 9:35 AM spend time with my husband, we were going to have to work together.

New You

Otherwise, we’d always be traveling to different places. We’d always have different schedules.” With Anderson getting ready to travel to Canada for the Dawn of the Dead remake, Langenkamp offered to accompany him as his office manager. “I told him, ‘I’ll take care of all the bookkeeping, all the hiring and firing, and I’ll take care of all the meetings with production so you don’t have to go to those, either,’” she says. That’s been their relationship ever since, as partners in AFX Studio, which specializes in special-effects makeup. “He keeps thinking I’m going to go away and become an actor again,” she says, “and I might, but we’ve built our company to a great place now, and it can survive that.” Although she hasn’t had to leave AFX, Langenkamp has nonetheless continued to amass screen credits, most recently with a supporting part in 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness and a major role, alongside horror legend Barbara Steele, in the 2012 independent shocker The Butterfly Room. “I take small roles that are offered to me that are good,” she says, “and the characters in the independent films I’ve played recently are so interesting and have really big parts. “So many people ask me to do cameos in their movies, and I say, ‘You know, I have nothing to gain with a cameo in your low-budget independent film. But give me the lead, give me a part so that I can have something to show people, and I’ll do it in a minute.’” JOHN WOOLEY

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23


The State

LAKE ALTUS-LUGERT IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA HAS BEEN HIT HARD BY THE ONGOING DROUGHT. LAKE LEVELS HAVE DROPPED DRAMATICALLY, AFFECTING AREA FARMING AND AGRICULTURE BUSINESSES. PHOTO BY AND COURTESY JIM REESE.

OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

P

Welcoming Rains

The effects of Oklahoma’s drought spread beyond agriculture.

lease, pray for rain,” says U.S. Rep. Frank Lucas, member and former chairman of the U.S. House Agriculture Committee. A rancher himself, Lucas says the current drought is worse than any he’s seen in a lifetime of living in Oklahoma. Persistent drought conditions over the last several years have had wide-ranging effects on the economy as well as the budgets of state and local governments and the consumer pocketbook at the grocery store, says Lucas. Oklahoma agriculture is mostly non-irrigated, so farmers depend on rainfall for crops. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research shows that drought is especially impactful in farm states like Oklahoma. According to researchers at Oklahoma State University and numbers from the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, Oklahoma has suffered about $2 billion in agriculture sector losses annually since 2010. U.S. Drought Monitor research shows that water wells are drying up, ranchers raise less livestock and agriculture-related industries – such as equipment sales – are lagging. Municipalities feel the pinch to provide water, especially in western Oklahoma; and wildfires strain county budgets. Even tourism is impacted, as many lake levels have dropped significantly in the years since the drought began. The drought is at its worst in five counties of southwestern Oklahoma, while 64 percent of the state is experiencing moderate to exceptional drought, says Jim Reese, secretary of the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry. Reese, however, is reservedly upbeat about the future. “While some will say we’re historically doomed for more droughts, I am hopeful we will receive the rain we need,” Reese says. “Negative projections are based on the fact that we went 20 years with wetter-than-average rain, and so they think it will be 20 years of drought to balance out the average. But I am optimistic.” Many government-led proactive measures are underway, say both Reese and Lucas. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has designated all of Oklahoma’s 77 counties a natural disaster area due to drought, which opens the door to USDA assistance and special provi

24

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

sions, including a two-year IRS tax deferral on livestock sales. Other measures include disaster loan availability and the exemption of oversized loads of hay on highways in Oklahoma and nearby states, as well as an updated and improved state hay registry and the formation of a pasture registry to assist producers. Innovative planning is a priority, says Reese. Other actions afoot to address drought conditions include the passage in 2013 of the state’s first Drought Emergency Fund, providing $3 million in relief, loans and grants to agricultural producers and droughtaffected municipalities for water projects. Also, Oklahoma State University is utilizing a $1 million USDA grant to tackle beef cattle climate adaptability and to research beef genetics for feed/water and natural resource usage efficiency. Tom Buchanan farms cotton, wheat and cattle near Altus in southwest Oklahoma – the heart of the current drought. Buchanan is also president of the Oklahoma Farm Bureau and manages the Lugert-Altus Irrigation District. “This is a drought of historic records, and we are still in its grips in western and southwestern Oklahoma,” he says. “The irrigation district started in 1946 to irrigate about 50,000 acres annually. Up until 2011, there was only one year in the 1950s where we had a minimal amount. But from 2011 to 2014, we have had zero release out of Lake Lugert.” Buchanan places little value on wondering when the weather will change. Instead, he focuses on what it takes to survive the current conditions. “My first cotton crop was in 1980, and I bought my first cow herd then, too,” says Buchanan. “I have fewer cows today as a result of having to sell them because of lack of water for them to drink. You make adjustments, like selling cows, but maintain a seed crop of cattle. You reduce your input to just scrape by until better times come. The agriculture producer himself, even with federal crop insurance, can recoup a portion of loss. However, the local infrastructure – like labor, seed sales, fertilizer and fuel – suffers. If I’m not making a payroll, then the guys aren’t buying groceries and shoes, so it negatively impacts the local economy greatly. Therefore, the state as a whole is suffering.


“I’m not sure people understand that when it starts to rain again, we will again produce crops that [immediately] will be back in the economic engine,” Buchanan says. “But the largest economic impact – the beef industry – will take years to rebuild, so the economy will suffer from lack of beef income for years to come.” Buchanan adds that he hopes Oklahomans will learn from this drought and push to improve water resources so that all residents benefit, “because our lakes, pipes and wells are under a big strain,” he says. “It is time for Oklahoma to improve her water resources and make plans for the future, because there will eventually be another drought when this one ends.” As bad as the current drought has been, it doesn’t compare to past dry spells in the region, including the Dust Bowl, says Lucas. “The drought is the worst seen in my lifetime. My parents and grandparents talked about the 1950s and the great drought of the 1930s. But fortunately in this time in history, we have a safety net system that wasn’t in place then and which does help somewhat, such as crop insurance and some products to help livestock producers deal with drought

that didn’t exist then,” Lucas says. “But most of all, conservation efforts have gotten better and stronger, technology has improved, seed germinates faster, equipment is faster – which means we didn’t get giant dust storms. Farmers and ranchers have become very conscious of conservation to keep our soil on the land and out of the waterways, therefore avoiding another environmental catastrophe.” Weather is a constant focus for Gary McManus, state climatologist at Oklahoma Mesonet. “We do look at similar oceanic patterns that occurred during some of our past droughts, such as the 1930s and 1950s droughts, and see how similar they are to the present situation,” McManus says. “When we compare the very dry period from 1950-1975 in our state’s precipitation history, we see very similar oceanic temperature anomalies such as El Niño and La Niña, Pacific Decadal Oscillation and Atlantic [Ocean] temperatures. “Since the oceans have such a profound impact on the world’s air patterns, this gives us some indication that we might be facing a long-term drought such as the 1950s and possibly an extended dry pattern that we saw during that previous 25-year span,” McManus adds. “This is certainly not a prediction, but something we take into account, considering we just recently came out of our wettest 30-year period in the last 120 years.” But what about Oklahoma’s most drought-stricken areas? Is there any hope for adequate rainfall in the near future? “There is no relief in sight right now for western Oklahoma,” says McManus. “We’re entering the driest part of the year, so it would normally be tough to get widespread drought relief for the next several months. The good news is that it’s generally cool and the plants are dormant, so little water is needed [or] being used.” While scientists and meteorologists study oceanic currents and weather patterns past and present, folks like Buchanan remain focused on the reality of running an agriculture business daily. “For all the technology we have, weather prognostication past a couple of days is just a shot in the dark in my personal experience,” he says. TRACY LEGRAND

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25


The State

SCENE

Lawrence and Cindy Field and Charles Stephenson Tom McDaniel, Kristin Chenoweth and her parents, Junie and Jerry Chenoweth

The Basket Ball 2015

Oklahoma native Kristin Chenoweth was a hit at The Basket Ball fundraiser gala at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum for the Stephenson Cancer Center.

Gene Rainbolt, Charlotte Lankard and Kelly and Brock Schnebel

Peggy Stephenson and Sherri Coale

Oklahoma County District 2 Commissioner Brian Maughan and Robin Yeager

Chris and Stephanie Shilling and Shubham Pant

Jennifer Kiersch, Liz McLaughlin, Sherri Coale and Lee Allan Smith

Sara Bost Fisher, Amber Valletta, Blane Snodgrass, Kate Jennemann and Brandon Miller enjoyed the art and company at Tulsa Girls Art Schools’ gala, Through a Child’s Eyes: Beauty Beyond Borders.

Marcia MacLeod, Kathy Taylor, Shari Holdman and Heidi Ducato enjoyed the American Heart Association Go Red For Women’s Circle of Red & Red Tie Society holiday party.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

Adam Paluka, 2015 Pink Stiletto chair-elect, and Sher’ron Underwood, Pink Stiletto chair, are ready for the big event, booked at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa on Feb. 14.

Tulsa Hall of Fame co-chairs Donna Dutton and C.S. Lewis III took part of the hall of fame induction activities with Barbara Smallwood, Tulsa Historical Society & Museum board president.

Cooking for a Cause welcomed Aaron Massey, Honorary Chair Peggy Helmerich, Shane Saunders and Matt Barnard to support Iron Gate.

Carolyn and Don Zachritz and Lisa and Dr. David Flesher took part in Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma’s Broadway Ball spectacular.


Ann Patchett, Peggy Helmerich and Mary and Frank Shaw.

Sarah Coburn and Peggy Helmerich

Peggy Helmerich, Ken Lackey and Ann Patchett

Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award Dinner

Kristin Bender, Ann Patchett and Jim Bender

Susan Savage and Ann Patchett

Tulsa luminaries and leaders turned out for the Tulsa Library Trust’s Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award Dinner honoring writer Ann Patchett in December at the Librarium in downtown Tulsa.

Howard and Billie Barnett, Mary and Frank Shaw and Belynda and Weldon Spitzer

2014 Oklahoma Hall of Fame inductees: Harold T. Holden, Blake Shelton, Peggy Clark Stephenson, Wanda Jackson, Neal McCaleb, Alfre Woodard and Thomas H. McCasland Jr.

2014 Oklahoma Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

The 87th class of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame was inducted in a ceremony and celebration at the Cox Convention Center.

Blake Shelton, Nadia Comaneci, Bart Conner, Kathy Keating and Miranda Lambert

Blake Shelton, Harold T. Holden and Chuck Schroeder

Larry Nichols, Peggy Clark Stephenson and Polly Nichols

Miranda Lambert and Wanda Jackson

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

27


The State

AN EXISTING SOFA WAS USED AND NEW LEATHER CHAIRS PURCHASED FOR THE LIVING AREA. THREE PENCIL DRAWINGS BY TIM MOORE OF RAP STARS ARE THE CONVERSATION STARTERS IN THE ROOM. LEFT: DESIGNER LORI SPARKMAN CREATED A BAR IN A FORMER PANTRY.

L I V I N G S PA C E

Saved And Restored

A Tulsa couple gives some TLC to a Maple Ridge home.

W

Photos By Nathon Harmon

hen Tyler Mosher and her husband, William, first saw their Tulsa Maple Ridge home, the project seemed insurmountable. “There were unrepaired roof leaks, and some of the ceilings had collapsed,” says Tyler Mosher. “It was definitely in a state of disrepair.” But the home had features the couple needed, specifically the potential to house six. The midtown lot offered enough acreage to enlarge the house and still have plenty of outdoor play space for the couple’s four children. Initially, the project was overwhelming, but the Moshers have a solid background in construction renovation. Mosher’s company, Nest, purchases homes to renovate and put back on the market, while her husband has a commercial construction business. “We had plenty of experience,” says Mosher. “Plus, we have our connection of trusted subcontractors.” The family purchased the home and, extraordinarily, moved in while the renovation was in progress. “Last winter, when it was two degrees, we had an open wall on one side of the house,” Mosher recalls. The entire project took about six months, including the addition that transformed the small

28

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015


JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29


The State

kitchen by adding 20 feet to the home and creating a combination family room and spacious kitchen. “With four children, I needed to be able to work in the kitchen while I could keep track of the kids,” she says. The new construction also included a covered back patio and two new bedrooms upstairs. The original four-bedroom, twoand-a-half-bath home now contains five bedrooms, three full baths and two half-baths. “The home had great original moldings and details,” says Mosher. But the homeowners decided early that all the exterior windows and doors needed to be replaced. Noticeably, there are no window coverings in the open areas. “We wanted to take advantage of the natural light,” says Mosher. The wood floors were refinished throughout the home, while neutral colors were selected for the walls and trim. And as they repaired the ceilings, new lighting was installed, specifically placed to accent the couple’s unique art collection. In the living room, three pencil profiles by Moore artist Tim Hearne were purchased at Brookside’s Aberson Exhibits and feature rappers Snoop Dogg, Jay-Z and Biggie Smalls. “They are a serious conversation starter,” says Mosher, laughing. “They wanted the living room to be a comfortable place to casually entertain,” says Lori Sparkman, owner of Fifteenth and Home, who worked with the couple to furnish and decorate the home. Sparkman utilized the family’s existing sofa and chose the classic lines of Savino camel leather chairs from American Leather with nickel detail on the base that wraps onto the front of the arms. Adjacent is a custom chaise upholstered with longhorn cowhides, an homage to the couple’s home state of Texas. Local craftsman Eric Fransen, who crafted all the kitchen and bathroom cabinetry, created the custom walnut cocktail table that features a subtle inlay of brass sections in the walnut. The area rug is a wool textile from Calvin Klein. “Because the owners have more of a transitional style, we chose a red Alpaca wool for

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

ABOVE: THE HOMEOWNERS TRANSFORMED THE KITCHEN BY ADDING 20 FEET, WHICH MEANT THEY HAD TO OPEN UP A WALL IN THE MIDDLE OF WINTER. LEFT: THE LUXURY MASTER BATH IS ONE OF THE THREE FULL BATHS IN THE RENOVATED HOME. BELOW: THE HOMEOWNERS WERE LOOKING FOR A HOME WITH THE POTENTIAL TO HOUSE THEMSELVES AND THEIR FOUR CHILDREN. MORE BEDROOMS WERE ADDED IN THE RENOVATION.

the American Leather chairs by the fireplace that are a contemporary take on the traditional wingback chair,” says Sparkman. In what was the original pantry off the dining room, Mosher created an open bar area. Fransen crafted the navy cabinetry with brass hardware. The countertop is a single piece of unlacquered brass with a contiguous sink. Fransen also crafted the walnut wall and shelves. Next to the wine refrigerator is a pellet icemaker, probably better known to Oklahomans as “Sonic ice” – from the much-coveted ice used at Sonic Drive-Ins. “It’s probably my favorite purchase in the house,” Mosher says. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON


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The State

CDC IMMUNIZATION RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADULTS Some of the CDC recommended immunizations for adults 19 years and older include the following:

Influenza

YO U R H E A L T H

Beyond The Flu Shot Decide what adult immunizations are right for you.

E

very year we’re reminded to get the flu shot in hopes of bypassing the nasty bug. For many, it’s the one vaccine they keep up with and receive regularly. However, there are a few more vaccines you may want to consider. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a variety of immunizations for adults – 19 and older – for the prevention of several potentially severe illnesses. To know whether or not a vaccine is appropriate for you, begin with a visit with your physician. “It’s important for patients to talk with their doctor about which vaccines are right for them based on their age, occupation and lifestyle,” says Dr. Andrea Miller, an internal medicine physician at Mercy Clinic Primary Care in Oklahoma City. “There are varying recommendations from various sources, but I don’t like to provide a general recommendation to all of my patients. Since each patient is unique, physicians must consider patients’ individual needs and concerns.” She adds that it’s important for patients to know if a vaccination is a one-time dose providing life-long immunity, or if it’s part of a series, because some vaccines require a booster. “Most people don’t keep track of their vaccination records, but it’s actually very important. It can keep you from being revaccinated and save you a lot of trouble when something comes up and you need to know if your vaccinations are up-to-date,” she says. “Having your records on file may also save you from having a blood test to learn what vaccines you’ve already received.” Dr. Sarah Andrews, an internal medicine physician at Utica Park Clinic in Tulsa, also emphasizes the benefit of maintaining current health records. “I think all patients should keep an accurate record of all their medical problems, surgeries, medications, etc., including vaccination history,” she says. “It is imperative to remember adverse reactions to vaccines or any medication.” REBECCA FAST

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Andrews encourages her patients to get the flu vaccine in October. “Although the strains of the flu virus may vary year to year, October is usually a good month to begin vaccinations regardless,” she says. “If you get vaccinated too early, say in August, the influenza vaccine may not be effective for the entirety of the flu season.”

Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis (Td/Tdap)

A common but often forgotten vaccine is the Td/Tdap. The CDC recommends a one-time dose of Tdap, then a Td booster every 10 years. “The Tdap is a preventative vaccination against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis, or whooping cough,” says Miller. “We often see caregivers and grandparents who are going to be around infants come in to get their booster, because whooping cough can be very serious for young children.”

Varicella and Zoster

A virus that affects both young and old is the varicella-zoster virus, which causes chicken pox in children and shingles in adults. “Once you’ve had chicken pox, the virus stays in the body. As you age, your immune system may be less effective, and because viruses are opportunists, it can reactivate as shingles,” says Miller. “I recommend the shingles vaccine to my patients because the timing and location of shingles is so unpredictable. The painful rash associated with shingles can have severe and long-term complications. There is also the possibility of chronic nerve pain, which requires prolonged treatment and pain management.”

Meningococcal

According to the CDC, the meningococcal vaccines help protect against most types of meningococcal disease with a recommendation of one or more doses. “Most people receive this vaccine during childhood, but it is recommended for adults,” says Miller. “College students, anyone living in a dormitory, patients who had a splenectomy or people with a compromised immune system are most at risk.”

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) and Pneumococcal

In regard to the MMR vaccine, the CDC states that “generally, anyone 18 years of age or older who was born after 1956 should get at least one dose of the MMR vaccine, unless they can show they have either been vaccinated or had all three diseases.” The pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for anyone over 65 or under 65 if they have a chronic medical condition, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, heart disease, etc.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

There are 40 strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), and the HPV vaccine is a preventative for the most common types of HPV that may cause cervical cancer and genital warts. Three doses of the vaccine are recommended for men and women between the ages of 19 and 26.

Hepatitis A and B

For the hepatitis A and B vaccines, individuals should consider criteria, such as age, chronic medical conditions, expected travel, employment settings and other possibilities of exposure to high risk populations.


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The State

STYLE

Mad About Mod Reinvent your wardrobe with retro shoes, flattering A-line silhouettes and Swinging Sixties prints. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG POPPY SCARF, $228, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

CLOVER CANYON NEOPRENE MULTI-PRINT DRESS, $282, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG MIXED MEDIA DRESS, $498, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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THEORY KNITAND-LEATHER DRESS, $525, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

REBECCA MINKOFF LEATHER AND MESH OXFORDS, $175, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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ALICE + OLIVIA NEOPRENE MINI SKIRT, $330, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN.

MARA HOFFMAN PSYCHEDELIC RACERBACK TANK TOP, $148, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


TORY BURCH CROSSBODY SHOPPER, $250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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AKRIS PUNTO TILE PRINT DRESS, $995, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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SALVATORE FERRAGAMO THONG JELLY SANDALS, $240, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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The State BURBERRY WOOL CAPE, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALICE + OLIVIA DRAPED SWEATER WITH FUR COLLAR, $597, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STYLE

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ST. JOHN TEXTURED SHAWL, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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DONNA SALYER’S FABULOUS FURS FUR-TRIMMED SHAWL, $166, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

BURBERRY BLANKET WRAP JACKET, $950, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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The State ABOVE: THE THREESTORY CASTLE OF CHAMBORD IS AMONG THE GREAT ARCHITECTURAL MASTER WORKS IN THE LOIRE VALLEY. BELOW: A GARDEN IN VILLANDRY, JUST ONE OF MANY POPULAR TOURIST STOPS IN THE RIVER VALLEY REGION.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

D E S T I N AT I O N

Chateau Country

E

The Loire Valley offers travelers a different peek of France.

xtravagant châteaux and country villages standing along ancient waterways mark France’s Loire Valley as a must-visit destination on any French vacation. While Paris and the French Riviera may get all the holiday headlines, tourists who roam the region are rewarded with royal residences and a slice of French country life. Nestled along the Loire River, the town of Amboise is a handy base for touring the area. Just two hours southwest of Paris by train, Amboise and the surrounding countryside make for a slow-paced escape from the big city frenzy. The tourism highpoint in Amboise is the royal Château d’Amboise. Rising mightily above the valley below, the château’s buildings date from the 15th and 16th centuries. A former residence of kings, the château’s terraces and ramparts offer commanding panoramic views of the river and the town. Among the château’s

highlights are the Gothic spire of the St. Hulbert Chapel, the council chamber, King Henri II’s chamber and the Orléans chamber. Just a short walk from the royal château is Clos Lucé, the home of Leonardo da Vinci, who died in Amboise in 1519. His final residence is home to an exhibit celebrating his life and work. While Amboise is known for its royal château and as da Vinci’s final home, a visitor can easily find other opportunities to explore the narrow and winding streets of the old town. Along the road from the royal château to Clos Lucé are numerous cave dwellings, former limestone quarries that have been fashioned into tiny homes. The pedestrian commercial center houses shops and cafes. An evening stroll across the bridge to the Ile d’Or provides views of the lighted château looming high above the river. Amboise is also home to a bustling Sunday market, one of the largest in the region, which


draws tourists and locals alike. With vendors peddling everything from leather belts to live chickens, the market is a carnival of sights, sounds and smells. With many majestic châteaux dotting the valley’s landscape, it can be hard to choose which to visit. While a true architecture or history buff may want to rent a car in order to visit many of the fine estates in the region, a guided day tour is likely the easiest route for the casual tourist. Numerous companies operate from Amboise and visit a sampling of châteaux in the course of a day. The region also boasts several vineyards, and tours and wine tasting opportunities abound. The grandest of the Loire châteaux, Chambord is a three-story goliath. With more than 400 rooms and almost 300 fireplaces, the château’s rooftop is a mass of chimneys, domes and spires. Chambord also boasts almost 80 staircases, including a fascinating double-helix staircase, which was an architectural marvel of its time. Constructed in the 16th century, the Château de Chenonceau, quite literally, straddles the River Cher. The château’s gallery, which spans almost 200 feet across the river, was built atop a bridge in the late 1500s. Unexpectedly, the château’s kitchens are located in the base of the bridge piers built into the river. Chenonceau’s rooms are elegantly decorated and display a fine collection of furnishings and tapestries.

THE GARDENS AT THE CHATEAU IN VILLANDRY ARE FAMOUS FOR THEIR MANICURED ELEGANCE AND COLOR.

CHATEAU DE CHENONCEAU WAS BUILT ON A BRIDGE TO BE REFLECTED IN THE RIVER CHER. BELOW: ARCHITECTURAL DETAIL ON CHATEAU ROYAL DE BLOIS.

Built on an island in the Indre River, the Château Azay-leRideau could not be more fanciful. Pointed towers and lacey stonework are reflected in the water, an effect intentionally created by restricting the river’s flow to create a water mirror, highlighting Château Azay-leRideau’s architectural splendor. The château at Villandry is best known for its acres of elegantly manicured gardens. Designed in intricate geometric patterns, Villandry’s gardens are an explosion of color and coordination. With everything from shrubs and hedges to flowering plants and vegetables, these gardens are a spectacular sight. Back in Amboise, lodgings are plentiful, including the 17th-century manor house, Le Clos d’Amboise. Situated just outside the tourist zone, Le Clos d’ Amboise allows for an easy stroll to local restaurants and shops without the bustling noise of the city center. Rooms are available in the manor house itself or in the home’s renovated horse stables. The back of the hotel hides a peaceful courtyard with landscaped gardens and a heated pool. One simply cannot visit France without sampling the local delicacies. Several restaurants huddle at the base of the chateau and offer tasty local dishes with views of the chateau looming above. Enjoy the escargot and foie gras while taking in the fine French atmosphere. With its magnificent châteaux, royal history and the crooked lanes of its villages and towns, the Loire Valley is sure to captivate even the mosttraveled visitor. int.rendezvousfrance.com CHARLIE PRICE

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JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

39


Oklahomans OF THE YEAR The tie that bonds together this year’s honorees is that each is an agent for change. Their platforms are different – human rights, philanthropy, economics and public service and arts and entertainment – but each worked to make Oklahoma a better state in 2014.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015


PHOTO BY MICHAEL PARMELEE/NBC.

Alfre Woodard When she was told she was to be inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, Alfre Woodard confesses that she understood little about the honor. But in November, as she stood beside Blake Shelton, Wanda Jackson and the rest of her 2014 class, Woodard suddenly was “gobsmacked.” “Each of those people who have been inducted [through the years] are such strongly unique individuals and contributors to our state and to our world. It was like joining this sort of epic sorority/fraternity,” she says. “Yeah, it got deeper and deeper, the significance of it, for me, because it didn’t have to do with just the moment. It links me to the past, and it links me to the future.” Even without such honors, however, Woodard, a Tulsa native, is and will be known as one of the most respected actors of her time. Endowed with numerous awards for her acting on television, film and stage, Woodard is still in hot pursuit of those creative projects offering a new experience. As U.S. President Constance Payton on NBC’s primetime hit State of Affairs, Woodard flexes the political savvy she first cultivated as a child. “I walked to the [voting] precinct with my mom and dad there in north Tulsa when I was 10 years old,” she recalls, “and they always said to me, ‘This is Democracy.’ Everybody is responsible and has to get involved… it doesn’t work by itself. It works because people get in, and they work.”

Woodard continues to stay involved in the political machine by working on campaigns, participating in protests she deems necessary and visiting with elected leaders. On the State of Affairs set, her knowledge of Washington, D.C., and its protocol is a definite asset; and it’s made her more than capable of playing the tough, decisive Payton. Yet, when asked about past accolades – four Emmy Awards, a Golden Globe Award, three SAG Awards, eight NAACP Image Awards, a nomination each for an Academy and Grammy award – Woodard would never say she is “proud” of them. “I am happy and very satisfied about the things that I have done because of the feedback that different people have said – ‘This is why this touched me,’ ‘Oh, I recognize myself in that, ‘Oh, I recognize another human being in that.’ All of those things are valid, because they don’t belong to me,” she says. “It’s something that I was meant to be a conduit for as a storyteller. “I’ve enjoyed projects in very different ways, because they are very different, just like your children are different, and there are no favorites. But I just do my work. Some experiences have been memorable for certain reasons, and I think of them that way…you keep yourself out of the equation altogether.” As for the experience of playing the leader of the free world, it’s still a little early to summarize. “We’re still stirring the soup, you know? People are just starting to say, ‘Mmm, smells like soup! Smells good,’” she says, laughing, of State of Affairs. Others have made up their minds already: She is up for another Image Award for her role in the series. Woodard lives in Santa Monica, Calif., with her family; and aside from visits, she’s been away from her old hometown and state since she left at 17 to attend Boston University. “I’m going to be honest with you – I don’t think about being an African-American person during the day when I’m going about my life. I don’t think about being a woman every day. And I don’t think about having been born in Oklahoma and raised in Oklahoma, but it certainly… informs the way that I move about the world and how I interpret the world and how I interact in the world,” she says. “Do you know what I mean? I just am myself.” But Woodard never hesitates to clear up any misconceptions or stereotypes about her old home state. “Of course, anytime anybody says ‘Where are you from?’ I say, ‘Oklahoma,’ and there’s a big conversation,” she says. “It definitely flavors who I am.” KAREN SHADE

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Peggy Stephenson’s philanthropic efforts began in a junior high school classroom in the tiny Oklahoma town of Antlers. Her Future Homemakers of America class was collecting food items to fill holiday baskets. It was this project that opened her eyes to the importance of philanthropy. “I learned to always give back to your community, because you always see a need that’s more than yours,” she says. Stephenson and her husband, Charles Stephenson, took this lesson to heart by giving back to their community and state through the Charles and Peggy Stephenson Family Foundation, of which Peggy Stephenson is executive director. “[Charles and I] moved a lot, about 12 or 13 times, and that got me going into my community so I would learn about it,” she recalls. When the high school sweethearts settled in Tulsa in 1969, Stephenson began serving the community by overseeing small projects through her church. “It was always a small type of thing, but my passion was to just help anyone,” Stephenson says. Several years ago, the Stephensons were approached about contributing to a new cancer center in Oklahoma City that would be operated by the University of Oklahoma. A cancer survivor, Stephenson made a monetary donation to the center, her way of helping others through something she herself had battled. Nineteen years ago, Stephenson was given a breast cancer diagnosis. “I took my treatment from a major clinic, [the] Mayo Clinic,” she recalls, “and I was in chemo for almost a year.” When OU President David Boren and his wife, Molly Shi Boren, approached the Stephenson Family Foundation about donating funds for the building, the Borens were not aware of her prior illness, she says. “As we walked through it [the building], someone said this is going to be the future cancer center of Oklahoma,” she recalls. “Charlie said, ‘Peggy, this is something we should do.’” Stephenson says her husband’s words resonated with her, and she realized that helping fund the center would help many people. Now open for four years, the Stephenson Cancer Center is still her top priority, and Stephenson enjoys meeting those who have been treated at the facility. “The number one thing I love to do is talk to people,” she says. “Our foundation focuses on health, education and religion; that’s the boundary of our foundation. But there are many things within those [categories].” Stephenson is a 2014 inductee into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. She is also a member of the Tulsa Hall of Fame and has received an honorary doctorate degree from OU. Stephenson is active in other causes, including Oklahoma Project Woman, which helps fund mammograms for women who may not be able to afford the screening. Charles Stephenson was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 2008 and the Tulsa Hall of Fame in 2000. He has also received an honorary doctorate from OU as well as the Tulsa Humanitarian Award in 2002. Though the couple has given millions to various causes in Oklahoma through the foundation, Stephenson says they don’t do it for the praise. “The reward is the ‘thank you,’” she says. “That’s what giving back is.” JAMI MATTOX

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

Peggy and Charles Stephenson


PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Bill Anoatubby

Bill Anoatubby originally had no desire to participate in Chickasaw Nation politics, but nearly three decades after he was originally elected, he still serves as governor of the tribe. Looking back, he says, “while there were strong mixed emotions accompanying the decision to seek the governorship, it is one that has led me down the path to the most rewarding life imaginable. “My purpose and desire is to serve the Chickasaw people. Being governor is more of a calling than a job,” he says. During his seven successive terms – he was first elected in 1987 and ran unopposed several times after for the governor’s chair – the Chickasaw Nation has undergone an economic and cultural renaissance. In the 27 years since Anoatubby took office, tribal businesses have grown from four to more than 100, and the Chickasaw Nation’s tribal budget has increased a thousandfold, from $200,000 in 1987 to a staggering $202 million today. Funds go toward offering some 284 assistance and service programs for tribe members, including scholarship and education assistance that has more Chickasaws pursuing higher education degrees than ever before. “We believe the success of our economic development efforts has placed the Chickasaw Nation on a firm financial foundation,” Anoatubby says. According to the governor, this recent boom in prosperity benefits not only the Chickasaw Nation, but also the state of Oklahoma. He references President John F. Kennedy, believing that “a rising tide lifts all boats.” “We strongly believe that what is good for the Chickasaw Nation is good for the state of Oklahoma,” he says. “We also believe that what is good for Oklahoma is good for the Chickasaw Nation. While it is almost inevitable that two sovereigns in the same space will need to compromise on some issues, there is almost always a solution that works well for everyone involved.” Anoatubby says the past three decades of rising Chickasaw fortunes are just the beginning. With many more projects and programs underway, Anoatubby is positive that moving forward, tribal government will be more than capable of addressing the future needs of its members. “Chickasaws who are striving for a better education, a more meaningful career, a safer and more comfortable home for their family, a healthier lifestyle, more effective health care or to improve their life in any number of other ways will find the Chickasaw Nation is there to help them meet those goals,” Anoatubby says. “All this is part of our commitment to servant leadership. We believe it is vital to listen to the voices of our citizens and respond to those needs. When we have an idea for a new program, service, business or other initiative, our leadership team is committed to ask how it will benefit the Chickasaw people. We only move forward with an idea when we have a good answer to that question.” TARA MALONE

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Sharon Bishop-Baldwin says it was a shared love of grammar that united her and her wife, Mary Bishop-Baldwin. The two met as employees in the Tulsa World newsroom in 1995. “It was one of those crazy things,” recalls Sharon. “Mary started in June [1995], and I was on vacation. Everybody kept telling, her ‘You’re going to love Sharon.’ It didn’t even occur to me that she was a lesbian, but as our friendship developed and grew, there was more than friendship there.” By 1999, the couple was living together and beginning to think about the future. “We intended it [the relationship] to be permanent,” says Mary. “Three-and-a-half years into it, we knew it was going to last, so we wanted to mark that with a commitment ceremony.” The ceremony was also their way of declaring that permanency, Sharon adds. “It was all that was available to us at the time,” she says. In 2003, they were approached about becoming plaintiffs in a case that would challenge the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), a federal law that allowed states to refuse to recognize same-sex marriages granted in other states. Around the time they joined the class-action suit to have DOMA struck down, Sharon recalls, President George W. Bush called for a federal ban on same-sex marriage to be written into the constitution. “It was a direct fire on the LGBT community,” says Sharon. Massachusetts’ referendum allowing samesex marriage passed in May 2004. But when Oklahoma lawmakers put same-sex marriage to a vote of the people on Nov. 2, 2004, 76 percent of voting Oklahomans approved a ban. “We knew it was going to pass, so we told the lawyers, ‘Let’s get this lawsuit ready to go the day after the election,” says Sharon. The couple was eventually tossed out of the class-action suit after a federal judge ruled they were not harmed by DOMA because they did not have a marriage. In Sharon’s words: “Basically, we were suing the wrong people.” When Norman attorney Don Holladay came onto the case in 2009, he filed an amended complaint on behalf of Mary and Sharon and two co-plaintiffs, this time against the Tulsa County court clerk for refusing to allow the couple to file for a marriage license. On Jan. 14, 2014, U.S. District Judge Terrence Kern ruled that Oklahoma’s ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional. After nearly a decade, Sharon

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

and Mary had their ruling. That summer, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Kern’s ruling, and in October, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the state’s appeal. The stay put in place by Kern was lifted, and on Oct. 6, Sharon and Mary finally were married on the steps of the Tulsa County Courthouse. “It’s taken forever, but it happened all at once,” Sharon says of the ruling. The couple has received much gratitude from people in Oklahoma, both gay and straight, but Sharon and Mary did not receive the one thing they expected – a ton of hate mail. “In 10 years, we’ve had two pieces of hate mail,” Sharon says. “No phone calls. No threats. Oklahoma is not this horrible, depressing, stuckin-the-1950s place that it is often made out to be. We’re not experiencing backlash. If people are against us, they’re not telling us. Oklahomans

are nicer than that. We know there are people who don’t agree with this decision, that [believe] the courts are overstepping their authority. I can respect that discourse as long as it is civil, and it has been.” Since winning the suit, the couple has received a personal letter from President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama. They also attended a holiday party at the home of Vice President Joe Biden. “Those are awesome, but we are the figureheads of this case,” says Sharon. “It’s been important to us to say, ‘We know we couldn’t have done it without the love and support of the thousands of people that have our backs, that congratulate us and support us.’ These people are our best friends, and some we don’t know at all, but we couldn’t do it without them.” JAMI MATTOX

PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

Sharon and Mary Bishop-Baldwin


PHOTO BY VICKI FARMER.

John Fullbright

Americana songwriter John Fullbright has had a big year. On the heels of his 2012 Grammy Award-nominated album From the Ground Up, Fullbright released his stripped down sophomore effort, Songs, in May, which he performed on The Late Show with David Letterman and at the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers’ Centennial Awards. On top of it all, Fullbright toured all over the world. Now he’s looking to projects a little closer to home. “I’m trying to find a step ladder so I can paint my house,” Fullbright says. Fullbright still lives in Bearden, the small town his family is from, on 80 acres of land with his parents as his neighbors. “It’s for completely personal reasons why I’ve stayed here. I could always come home and spend time with my family, but also seclude myself in a farmhouse and drink whiskey and stay up late trying to write songs,” Fullbright says. “Maybe some of that magic is still in this house.” Seclusion and the boredom that often comes with it, he says, play major roles in his songwriting. “Boredom is really the key for me to be able to write anything,” he says. “If you’re on a roller coaster, and you’re going up the hill, about to go over the edge, you’re not thinking, ‘Wow, it’d be great to capture these emotions in a song. What rhymes with roller coaster?’ Songwriting requires sitting in a chair in the middle of nowhere and thinking and feeling.” Fullbright says that this year was “a lot compacted into a short amount of time.” He toured the country nearly nonstop and made three trips in three months abroad to Europe and the U.K. Although he now says playing the Letterman show and ASCAP awards in New York City (attended by the likes of Billy Joel, Stevie Wonder and Joan Baez) were the year’s highlights, he felt a little differently about them beforehand. “I’m so goddamned shy, so trying to do something that will form a good opinion of yourself in three minutes or less is not something I like to do,” Fullbright says. “If anyone had asked me about it the night before those events, I would have said, ‘I’d give $100,000 to trade places with anyone else in the world right now.’” Success, in Fullbright’s own terms, means something a little simpler. “If I can finish a good song, then I’m feeling like the cock of the walk, and I’m at ease with myself and my place in the world,” he says. Looking forward, Fullbright says he has no definitive plans for the immediate future and feels pretty good about that prospect. He is about to embark on his first extended break in three years. “Even with painting this house – my grandpa was a house painter, so I have low self esteem about it,” Fullbright says. “I just hope I can write something else, and put my hand in the hat again and pull out another rabbit.” MEGAN MORGAN JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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A

Gatherin An effort spearheaded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation will provide 100 acres of park land for Tulsans to enjoy.

T

hriving communities are anchored by centralized parks. It is this conclusion from the George Kaiser Family Foundation that became the basis for A Gathering Place, a large park under construction along Tulsa’s Arkansas River bank that will include more than 100 acres of riverfront space when complete. According to David Graham, an account coordinator with Saxum public relations ďŹ rm, the George Kaiser Family Foundation has partnered with numerous corporate and community philanthropists to fund the project, which the foundation hopes will have a positive cultural, economic and ecological impact on the city. The

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

George Kaiser Family Foundation and its community partners will work together to create the $350 million park. With what is believed to be the largest gift to a public park in U.S. history, GKFF donated ownership of A Gathering Place to the Tulsa River Parks Authority; the River Parks Authority will be responsible for longterm operational and management responsibilities. The hope for the park, which runs along Riverside Drive from 26th Street to 33rd Place,


ng Place For Tulsa By Jami Mattox

RENDERINGS OF THE FUTURE RIVERFRONT PARK REVEAL THE VISION OF A GATHERING PLACE AS A NATURE-RICH ENVIRONMENT FOR ACTIVITIES AND COMMUNITY. IMAGE COURTESY A GATHERING PLACE.

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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is that it will complement existing urban amenities and strengthen the connections between Tulsa and the natural environment. The model for the park was unveiled in June 2013. Ideas were submitted for the park from the public and are reflected in the design, which is by Michael Van Valkenburgh and Associates, a Dallas firm that specializes in urban projects. Oklahomabased Manhattan Construction will manage the construction of the park. “The design for A Gathering Place was heavily influenced from public input gathered at public meetings early in project planning,” says Jeff Stava, executive director of

JEFF STAVA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF TULSA’S GATHERING PLACE, LLC, STANDS ON LAND NEAR RIVERSIDE DRIVE THAT EVENTUALLY WILL BE TRANSFORMED INTO A GATHERING PLACE. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

ABOVE: CHILDREN PLAYED A LARGE PART IN SEPTEMBER’S GROUNDBREAKING CEREMONY FOR A GATHERING PLACE. PHOTOS COURTESY A GATHERING PLACE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

Tulsa’s Gathering Place, LLC. “More than 1,400 ideas were submitted, and many are reflected in the final park design. This park will truly belong to Tulsans and will be an asset for the current and future generations. The diverse features in A Gathering Place will create a park that young Tulsans will grow and develop in. Our vision is for A Gathering Place to be an inclusive space that all citizens feel welcome to experience year after year.” With park development underway since the September 2014 groundbreaking ceremony, the 66.5-acre Phase I is estimated to be completed near the end of 2017. Information

regarding project updates, photos, upcoming events and renderings can be found online at agatheringplacefortulsa.com.

A Positive Impact

The current site provides opportunity in the form of property, green space and proximity to Tulsa’s Arkansas River riverfront, says Stava. “The park design leverages these opportunities by seamlessly unifying three previously separate parcels of land with the existing River Parks system, creating a dynamic and active park space,” he says. “This unique, continuous space will be created by


CURRENT GATHERING PLACE DONORS

Williams Companies, $16 million QuikTrip, $12.5 million

Chapman Foundations, $10 million ONEOK, $10 million $5 million: Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation; Magellan Midstream Partners, L.P.; Nadel and Gussman Energy, LLC; F.W. Murphy Family Foundation; Peggy and Charles Stephenson; The Helmerich Trust; Joe Craft; The Zinke Family; SemGroup Corporation and Bank of Oklahoma. $3 million: Kathy S. Craft, Unit Corporation, Laredo Petroleum, Manhattan Construction/Rooney Families and AAON, Inc. $2 million: The Zarrow Foundations $1.5 million: Thomas Families, Susan & William and Jill & Robert and John Steele Zink Foundation. $1 million: Bumgarner Family Foundation, J.E. and L.E. Mabee Foundation, Stephen and Shelley Jackson Family Foundation, Linda & Stuart Price and Family, Pam and Tom Russell, Omni Air International, Bonnie Klein, Dekraai Family Fund and Grace and Franklin Bernsen Foundation. Other significant donors to the Gathering Place project include Sarah and John Graves, Stuart Family Foundation, John Smith, Ernie Kivisto/Jane Ann Maconi Kivisto, Bryan Close, Peter M. Walter, Ed and Kathy Leinbach, Jackie and Bob Poe and Chickasaw Nation.

A RENDERING PROJECTS WHAT A GATHERING PLACE WILL LOOK LIKE WITHIN TULSA’S EXISTING STRUCTURE. IMAGE COURTESY A GATHERING PLACE.

two massive land bridges that [will] provide the heart of the new park and serve as a recreational connection between the city and the riverfront park systems. “Not only will this allow visitors to reach and experience all areas of the park safely, it will afford Tulsans access to the Arkansas Riverfront like never before. Every aspect of the park is designed to be built intentionally to create learning opportunities for children and visitors. Major playground equipment within the park will be designed by Monstrum, based in Denmark, and Richter based in Germany. A Gathering Place will be the first U.S. based project for Monstrum,

[which] creates highly imaginative playground environments,” he adds. No doubt A Gathering Place will provide new opportunities for Tulsa residents in terms of entertainment and outdoor activities, but the park is also expected to have a large economic impact, as well. According to Graham, in a 2013 study it was projected that 580,000 visitors will patronize and experience the park annually. During the construction phase, more than 1,600 local construction jobs will be supported, and an estimated $460 million will be spent locally as a result of construction. Once A Gathering Place is completed, the park will support approximately 35 permanent jobs; and annual economic output for park operations is estimated to be in excess of $3.4 million. “George Kaiser Family Foundation, corporate and community philanthropists and the Tulsa River Parks Authority are committed to creating a vibrant park to serve as a cornerstone to our city,” says Stava. “With design developed from community input, every aspect of this project is meant to improve the life of Tulsans and citizens in the surrounding communities...Along with our partners, we feel confident in the project we have begun, and the end result will enhance our community for generations to come.” JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR Is there a sexual obligation in relationships? Feeling obligated to have sex with a partner to relieve stress in a relationship may create pressure or resentment. This can also cause levels of intimacy to drop, create communication barriers and divide sexual COURTNEY LINSENMEYERand emotional expectations. Feeling O’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR responsible for your partner’s happiness or feeling obligated to placate to their sexual agenda is exhausting and only leads to relational opposition in and out of the bedroom. Learning to communicate different understandings of intimacy and sexual needs is important in order to feel mutual investments of both are being met, and to assure that reciprocity is being made by both people.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

VETERINARIAN Winter is here and we have an outside pet. Is it okay for my pet to stay outside when it’s below freezing or snowing? Many breeds with long, thick hair are fine in the cold. However, if you have a breed with short, thin hair, it should only be outdoors for a short period DR. RODNEY ROBARDS of time during freezing temperatures. Elderly and arthritic pets should be given extra care during the winter. The cold can leave their joints stiff and tender. As a rule of thumb, you should not leave your pet outside longer than you would be comfortable being outside in the cold. Also, your veterinarian can check your pet for any medical problems that could make it more vulnerable in cold weather.

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl., Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

PERSONAL TRAINER I’m happy with my weight; can I change my diet now? Yes, you can now start moving towards your maintenance phase, which will help you stay at your target weight. Start allowing yourself 100 more calories a day until you stop losing weight. For JOHN JACKSON example, if your caloric intake was 1,500 a day while you were in your slim-down phase, you should increase it to 1,600 a day for the next week. As long as your weight stays the same, continue with the same amount of calories. You will also need to stick with at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (jogging, zumba, spin) five days a week. Moreover, if you are fit enough to participate, do 30 minutes of vigorous exercise like basketball, tennis or BOOTCAMP offered at St. John’s Health Plaza. Ballistic exercise should not be done more than three times a week and rarely in back-to-back workouts.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL How does replacement cost really work? A fairly common question from customers is why the insurance value on their homeowners insurance policy is higher than what the home is worth. The primary reason is that most homeowners policy contracts provide replacement cost coverage for the home. In the event of a total JARED PETERSON loss, the company has an obligation to replace/rebuild a NEW home at a level of “like kind and quality.” This obligation is to rebuild, not to cash settle for market value. This is why insurance agents and insurance companies need to insure the home for what it would cost to build a brand new home, not for what the home might sell for in the real estate marketplace. In addition, most replacement cost home policies will have an inflation guard provision which will increase the coverage of the home each year based on inflation and construction costs. If you would like to discuss this issue further or receive a homeowners insurance quote from AAA, contact a AAA agent nearest you.

Jared Peterson, AAA Oklahoma 2121 E 15th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.748.1030 Jared.Peterson@aaaok.org

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT How can automation marketing help my business? Industry statistics show that nurtured leads make 47 percent larger purchases than non-nurtured leads. Automation marketing helps you nurture your leads and communicate with your customers JESSICA DYER throughout the sales process. For example, when a patient schedules dental surgery, the dentist can communicate with the patient pre- and post-op via targeted emails about what to bring on the day of their surgery, post-op instructions and links to articles about what to expect during recovery. In tough economic times, it is still possible to increase your revenue by offering current customers additional products and services. You can automatically generate emails based on their purchase history, to keep them buying from you instead of your competitor. Increased market share is what we all want; often, marketing and sales support are cut first. Marketing automation enables you to outsource your marketing, automate your administrative functions, and keep your sales people where they do you the most good: out in the field.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539-777-6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

PHYSICAL THERAPY I recently moved to Oklahoma and the state I previously lived in allowed me to see a physical therapist without a doctor’s prescription. Can I do this in Oklahoma?

What you are describing is called Direct Access, and the law went into effective Nov. 1, 2014. This TIM MINNICK, PT new law allows for a person to directly go to a physical therapist for 30 days of care without physician referral. If care beyond 30 days is required, then a physician referral is necessary for continuation. The passing of Direct Access should decrease overall medical costs, make injury evaluation more convenient and improve timeliness of recovery from an injury. So if you hurt your knee playing basketball, strain your back working in the yard, wake up with a stiff neck or have a sore shoulder after painting your house, you can now go to Excel Therapy immediately and start treatment.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. HOSPICE CARE

MARRIAGE COUNSELOR My husband and I need marriage counseling, but he won’t come. What can I do? A lot of people experience this same frustration as you. They know they need help but have a really difficult time convincing their significant other to take that first step to seek outside help. Others BRAD ROBINSON, LMFT have found that if they book the first appointment with us, and then tell their partner that they have a counseling appointment, they are most likely going to come. If they come to that, they are most likely going to stick with counseling. Of course they transform their relationship as they stick with counseling.

Brad Robinson, CEO, LMFT Marriage Solutions 2121 S. Columbia Ave Suite 301 Tulsa, OK 74114 918.281.6060 www.MarriageSolutionsTulsa.com

LEGAL SERVICES Does Oklahoma have a Financial Privacy Act? Yes. The Oklahoma Financial Privacy Act is found at Okla. Stat. tit. 6 Sections 2201-2208. Generally the Financial Privacy Act prevents a financial institution from releasing financial records of a customer BRAD BEASLEY to a governmental entity unless the governmental entity complies with the Act. In most cases, the requesting governmental entity (which includes subpoenas issued in a pending lawsuit) must notify the customer of the records requested and provide the customer at least 14 days within which to file a motion to quash the subpoena. There are some exceptions including records requested as part of a criminal investigation, records provided to a regulatory agency in connection with its regulatory functions and litigation in which the customer is a party. Written certification of compliance with the Act is required before a financial institution may release requested records.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

AVA HANCOCK

My father has been battling cancer for more than a year. The doctors say the prognosis doesn’t look good and has recommended we consider hospice care. My mother is resisting and feels as if she would be giving up on my father. Any advice you can offer?

That is a common concern many people have when a doctor recommends hospice care. However, actually hospice care means you are providing your father comfort by managing his symptoms and alleviating any pain. It can also help your mother as well. In fact, hospice care can not only improve the quality of life, but in some cases can extend a patient’s time. Sometimes we will see patients improve to the point that they are removed from hospice care. For more information, please call us at 918.744.7223 or visit www.gracehospice.com.

Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Every New Year my resolution is to lose weight, and every year my resolution eventually fizzles out. How can I make this year different and achieve my goal? The truth behind weight loss is that there is no cure-all plan; each of us MALISSA SPACEK loses weight a little bit differently, which is exactly why the BA Med Spa staff treats each of our patients on an individual basis. We start by assessing your needs, utilizing the information gathered from lab work, medical history and current lifestyle to form the best plan for you. Our plans combine different tools and medications with constant support both during and after your weight loss journey to help our patients keep the pounds off for good. Call us today and let us make your resolution a reality.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT How can I dress like a CEO with a low-dollar budget? First of all, know that you can look like you spent a lot by spending very little. There are too many men out there who have fallen into the trap of paying thousands of dollars for one suit. Now men feel as if that is the AUTUMN POHL unreachable standard. Fortunately, with the help of a personal style consultant, you can prevent yourself from overindulging and overpaying. High prices do not always equal high quality. My number one rule, for whatever suit you chose, is choose the fit that makes you look as if it was made for your body. Taking your wardrobe to the tailor to achieve that fit is the best thing you can do for yourself, plus it’s inexpensive in comparison to buying designer. Your perfectly tailored suit will get much more attention and credibility from the boss than any high-priced suit made for the masses. The right fit and confidence will put you at the top, right where you need to be.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

My significant other is always telling me that I am too emotional. I’m not even sure what that really means. Is there such a thing, and what do I do about it? There are degrees to which each individual expresses emotion, often stemming from previous experiences and what was fostered in ways to express thoughts and feelings. We filter expression of emotions depending on the situation. For example, the way I share my emotions will vary when I am at home with family versus standing in line at a supermarket checkout. Some may struggle with using this filter appropriately. Also, the way we perceive emotions from others can also be skewed, causing us to feel hurt or angry at the slightest change in a person’s tone or facial expression. To begin addressing such concerns, it is important to learn the function of emotions and to understand they serve a purpose. Though they serve an important role, emotions are not designed to dictate our behavior. Therapy is often designed to help individuals understand the natural function of their emotions more clearly so that they can utilize them appropriately and advantageously. AMY KESNER, PHD, LPC, LADC

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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RATED MOST ACCURATE 9 YEARS IN A ROW

OKLAHOMA'S

K E E P I N G  Y O U   S A F E   T H I S   W I N T E R


Taste

FOOD, DRINK AND OTHER PLEASURES

FLAVORFUL CHICKEN SPINACH ROLLS AT CUMIN HONOR THE TRADITION OF INDIAN COOKING TECHNIQUES AND DISHES STRAIGHT FROM THE HOME KITCHEN. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

T

The Flavors Of Home Cumin stirs up great Indian dishes one spice at a time.

he best meals in India are served in private homes, behind closed doors the tourist can never enter; and the best chefs are women born in tiny villages, immersed in Indian food traditions from birth, taught by their mothers who learned from their mothers before them. “What you find at home,” says Shifali Bhullar, chef at Cumin, “you can’t find at restaurants.” Bhullar grew up in a family of foodies. “My dad cooks, my mom cooks, my brother cooks; everyone cooks in my family,” she says. Bhullar is standing in Cumin’s sparkling, new kitchen. Three pans, slick with oil, are heated on the stovetop. She throws mustard seeds and a sprig of curry leaves into one pan, cumin seeds in another, some garlic in the third. She tosses some onions in the first pan, stirs, then adds a pinch of ginger, a few ounces of pureed tomatoes, a bit of cayenne, then salt and sugar. Into the second pan, meanwhile, goes salt, cayenne and cumin seeds, each addition punctuated by a graceful stir and swirl. Finally, in goes an eggplant that has been roasting in a

tandoor, the traditional Punjabi oven. “It’s never-ending,” says Bhullar of helming the kitchen at Cumin. “I come to the kitchen at 7:30 in the morning to start work for the lunch buffet. That takes four hours. The minute the buffet is ready, I start work preparing dinner.” The dishes for the lunch buffet are made fresh every day. Bhullar also cooks special dishes for the weekend buffet. You might find dum biryani, a paella-like rice dish that takes almost four hours to make. Even on weekdays, the buffet lineup changes daily. “I’m just doing it the way I cook at home,” says Bhullar as she mixes roasted fenugreek leaves into the eggplant pan. She’s happy now, immersed in the cooking, moving from pan to pan with a balletic grace. A swirl of creamy coconut milk goes into the first pan, followed by slices of fish fillet. “That’s Goan fish curry,” she says. It’s not a dish she grew up with, but, she says as she adds in a bit of tamarind paste, “it’s my take on it.” Food is plated and carried into the dining room, where the JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Fave somewhat sparse decor is livened by crimson tablecloths and paintings that Bhullar acquired on a special trip to India. They’re colorful and modern, vaguely abstract mosaic designs and sultry women in saris. There are quite a few diners at the tables, and some of them have encountered Bhullar before. She and her family have been in Tulsa since the

CHEF SHIFALI BHULLAR IS NO STRANGER TO THE TULSA CUISINE SCENE, BUT SHE’S MAKING A NEW MARK WITH CUMIN, HER NEW RESTAURANT, WHICH SPECIALIZES IN HOMESTYLE INDIAN COOKING, SUCH AS THE LAMB CHOP MASALA.

NHINJA SUSHI & WOK

Several years ago, Kang and Mary Nhin opened their first Nhinja Sushi & Wok in Oklahoma City. With a goal of providing high quality, healthy food in a fast-casual environment, the concept of Nhinja quickly took off in the metro area, and several more locations were opened. Today, Nhinja Sushi & Wok operates five establishments, including the newest one located in Tulsa. The menu at all locations is the same: Traditional Asian staples such as miso soup, seaweed salad, rice and noodle bowls and, of course, sushi. Nhinja’s take on the roll is decidedly non-traditional but nonetheless adventurous. The JoJo is made of grilled steak and asparagus topped with eel sauce, while the Fish Lips includes tuna, salmon, yellowtail or crabstick. The Thunder, homage to Oklahoma City’s favorite sports team, is a concoction of tempura shrimp, avocado, crabsticks and spicy mayo. Five locations statewide. www.nhinja.com – Jami Mattox THE THUNDER ROLL – TEMPURA SHRIMP, AVOCADO AND CRABSTICKS DRIZZLED IN SPICY MAYO – IS NHINJA SUSHI & WOK’S HOMAGE TO THE OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

late 1990s, when they left India to join an uncle who emigrated to Broken Arrow decades before. “I try to visit India every few years to show my children where they’re from,” Bhullar says, “but it’s not my home. I’m American now.” More plates come out of the kitchen, their bright colors forming a rainbow of epicurean delight. Lamb chop masala is covered in a firered sauce dappled with specks of brown. Bhullar is proud of this dish, which she says conveys the essence of Punjabi cuisine. Its mellow, toasty sauce enriched by the drippings from the lamb merit pride. Bright green plates of lamb saag and palak paneer are sprightly dishes with fresh vegetable flavor highlighted by notes of citrus and spice. Several of the dishes shine with a tawny, autumnal glow. Their colors blending amber and umber, butter chicken, chicken shahi korma and paneer pasanda may look alike, but they taste completely different. Each has a rich, complex blend of ineffable flavors. Some have a deep, nutty flavor from ground cashews. All the chicken is roasted in the traditional tandoor oven. In contrast with these bright sauces, many of the menu selections, including most of the extensive vegetarian lineup, have no gravy at all. Instead they’re studded with a medley of fresh herbs and spices. All dishes are expertly cooked and efficiently served. Though Cumin is new, Bhullar isn’t a novice. For four years, she and her husband ran Tulsa’s Indian Corner. Bhullar had to close that restaurant to care for family. But, says her husband, “we couldn’t stay away from it; it’s a passion for both of us.” 8242 E. 71st St., Tulsa. 918.994.7404 BRIAN SCHWARTZ

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T H E B UZ Z

URBAN JOHNNIE

The name “Johnnie” in Oklahoma City evokes images of juicy burgers piled high with shredded cheese, pickles, lettuce, tomato and onions. Indeed, when founder Johnnie Haynes opened his first Johnnie’s Charcoal Broiler in Oklahoma City more than 40 years ago, the goal was simple: Provide charcoal-grilled burgers that are hearty, tasty and affordable. Haynes’ goal was realized; the Oklahoma City area now boasts seven Johnnie’s locations. Urban Johnnie is the latest incarnation in the Johnnie’s empire. The restaurant, located in the city’s trendy Deep Deuce district, offers a menu that is wide-ranging and upscale. Soup and salad, tacos, sandwiches and, of course, burgers are all on the menu. Four different burger patties are available: beef, chicken, crab cake and veggie. Gourmet burger toppings include blue cheese, roasted poblano peppers, mushrooms, hummus, vegetarian chili and fried egg. Highlights of the menu are the pot roast, served with roasted vegetables and mashed potatoes; chicken fried chicken, served with mashed potatoes; and, of course, Johnnie’s Cheese Theta. JOHNNIE THE GREEK, A CHICKEN BURGER, IS This favorite is comprised SERVED WITH OLIVES of a beef patty, shredded AND ONION RINGS AT American cheese, hickory URBAN JOHNNIE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. sauce, house-made pickles and mayonnaise. It’s a crowd-pleaser made famous by the original Johnnie’s more than 40 years ago. 121 NE Second St., Oklahoma City. www. urbanjohnnie.com – Jami Mattox


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Taste

E N T E R TA I N I N G

Meal Of Good Fortune

Inject a little southern style into the New Year meal. Eating a big plate of greens and black-eyed peas may not appeal to everyone, but for millions of Americans – particularly in the south – these foods, traditionally served with pork on New Year’s Day, represent good luck, prosperity and fortune. Hosting friends and family for a New Year’s Day feast can be a fun way to celebrate the upcoming year and also keep tradition alive. Keep the menu simple, and focus on the classics. Just be sure to have plenty of cornbread to serve alongside the ham, greens and black-eyed peas. – Jami Mattox BRUNCH AT IN THE RAW CONSISTS OF SWEET TREATS LIKE THE FRUIT AND GREEK YOGURT PARFAIT. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

IN THE RAW

The sushi-serving staple that originated on Brookside has now become a statewide favorite. In The Raw boasts a location in Oklahoma City’s popular Bricktown district, as well as two locations in Tulsa and one in Broken Arrow. In an effort to further wow diners, the Brookside location now offers brunch. Favorites are given an Asian flair, like the sake poached king salmon served with lemon-dill yogurt sauce and crostini, as well as the raw gulf oysters and select sushi rolls. Eating from the buffet allows diners to sample lots of other favorite dishes, including buttermilk biscuits slathered with southern style sausage gravy and an omelet with lump crab, tomato, spinach and avocado-cilantro sauce. And what brunch is complete without a little booze? Bloody Marys, mimosas, Irish coffee and other cocktails are on the menu at ITR. 3321 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa. www. intherawsushi.com – Jami Mattox

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

Maple and Brown Sugar Glazed Ham Recipe courtesy Farmer’s Almanac.

1 1/2 c. 1/2 c. 1/2 c. 1 tbsp.

fully cooked ham, about 6 to 8 pounds pure maple syrup brown sugar apple juice brown or Dijon mustard Dash cinnamon and ginger or allspice

Place ham, fat side up, on rack in foil-lined roasting pan; score fat and stud with cloves, if desired. Bake at 325 degrees for approximately 18 minutes per pound, until meat thermometer reads 148 degrees. Combine glaze ingredients in saucepan; boil approximately two minutes. Twenty minutes before ham is done baking, spoon about half the glaze over top of ham, then about 10 minutes before done, spread remaining glaze over ham.

Black-eyed Pea Salad 1/2 1 1 2 tbsp. 2 tbsp. 2 1/4 c. 1/4 c. 1/2 tsp.

medium red onion, finely chopped small red bell pepper, finely chopped jalapeno, finely chopped chopped green onions chopped fresh parsley leaves (15-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained unseasoned rice wine vinegar canola oil sugar salt and freshly ground black pepper

Combine the first six ingredients in a bowl. In a separate small bowl, whisk together the rice wine vinegar, canola oil, sugar and salt and pepper. Toss all together and let marinate for up to 8 hours in the refrigerator before serving.


in

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Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

The Champion

COURTESY SMG TULSA.

O

After a long absence from the music mainstream, Garth Brooks still wins big with seven concerts in Tulsa.

ne minute, he’s talking about making his first new album in years. The next, he’s announcing the opening date for a huge world tour and topping the charts with a new single. For Garth Brooks, 2014 was an eventful year, but it may be nothing compared to 2015. Country and American music’s dynamic Brooks is back on the arena stage, where many would say is right where he belongs. He rocked audiences to the hustle and twang of his hit recordings, including “Friends in Low Places,” “Shameless” and “The Thunder Rolls,” throughout the ‘90s. And even though time has rolled on, he remains, by all reports, the complete entertainment package. Following shows in Little Rock, Ark., Minneapolis, Minn., and Atlanta, Ga., to name a few, the man and his music calls on home when Brooks plays the BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., in Tulsa. His wife, country music star and TV cooking show host Trisha Yearwood, is also slated for some stage time during all his shows. Brooks will play seven performances, the first on Friday, Jan. 9.

Following his Tulsa shows, Brooks will set off for Boston, Buffalo, N.Y., and even farther reaches. It’s only the beginning. Garth Brooks concert dates: Back in November, just Friday, Jan. 9, 7 p.m. days after the Tulsa shows Saturday, Jan. 10, 7 and 10:30 p.m. were announced, Brooks’ Sunday, Jan. 11, 7 p.m. ticket sales broke his previ- Thursday, Jan. 15, 7 p.m. ous Tulsa record, set back in Friday, Jan. 16, 7 p.m. 1997 at the old Drillers Sta- Saturday, Jan. 17, 7 p.m. dium. Then, his five shows sold 79,855 tickets. On Nov. 14 – the day tickets went on sale for his first BOK Center concerts ever – more than 105,000 tickets were sold. Even if the music industry has changed, the humble Brooks remains the undeniable king of the box office and entertainment and country music. Tickets are $70 each, available at www.bokcenter.com. KAREN SHADE

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY Auditorium. www.armstrongauditorium.org

COMMUNITY

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES The Book of Mormon

Thru Jan. 4 The musical satire by the creators of television’s South Park and the lyricist of Avenue Q tells of two Mormon missionaries bringing their message to villages brutalized by a local warlord in the Tony Award-winning Best Musical touring to the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www. okcciviccenter.com

Once

Jan. 6-11, 13-18 The 2012 Tony Award winner for Best Musical stops at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center with the story of a Dublin street musician, a Czech immigrant cleaning houses and the music they inspire together. The production moves to Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall following its Tulsa run. www.myticketoffice.com

Wit

Jan. 8-18 The drama of a brilliant scholar and renowned English professor as she experiences living with terminal ovarian cancer is brought to the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall stage by Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre Company. www.myticketoffice.com

August: Osage County Jan. 8-18 Theatre Pops presents its vision of Tracy Letts’ Pulitzer Prize-winning drama of family secrets at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. myticketoffice.com Kindness Jan. 9-31 Carpenter Square Theatre presents playwright Craig Wright’s drama of an ill woman, her teen son and the meaning of mercy. www.carpentersquare.com A Little Romance

Jan. 10 Oklahoma City Philharmonic welcomes back pianist

The Oklahoma Wedding Show Wedding dreams are made of everything soon-to-be brides and grooms will find at The Oklahoma Wedding Show, Saturday, Jan. 17. Presented by Oklahoma Magazine, this premier show returns to Central Park Hall, located at Expo Square, 4145 E. 21st St., in Tulsa with row after row of vendors and booths set up to help make any kind of wedding possible. Have questions about seasonal floral arrangements, venue issues or dress fittings? Green Country’s top vendors and experts will be on hand to answer questions. Also look for a variety of caterers and cake bakers – offering samples of their work – as well as wedding photographers, entertainers, event planners, lighting designers and more. The Oklahoma Wedding Show will also be giving away more than $12,000 in prizes – including a pair of Mikimoto pearl earrings from Bruce G. Weber – during the show. With two bridal runway shows planned for the day, couples will find plenty to do from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $10. For more, visit www.okmag. com/weddingshow.

Jean-Yves Thibaudet to the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall stage to play a night of romantic favorites, including Saint-Saens’ Piano Concerto No. 5. www.okcphilharmonic.org

The Giver Jan. 10-11 Tulsa Youth Opera brings a cautionary tale of society, memory and freedom to a young audience on the Tulsa Performing Arts Center stage. www.myticketoffice.com World Traveling Violin

Jan. 12-13 The Brightmusic Chamber Ensemble welcomes guest solo violinist Cyrus Beroukhim as it plays pieces featuring the violin and taken from around the world. www.brightmusic.org

Juilliard String Quartet Jan. 15 The celebrated quartet will deliver a true tour de force to the Armstrong Auditorium in Edmond for a chamber music concert of Beethoven, Haydn and Ran. www.armstrongauditorium.org Seven Brides for Seven Brothers Jan. 16 The rip-roaring stage version of the popular MGM musical bursts with energy on the Reynolds Performance Hall Stage at the University of Central Arkansas in Conway, Ark. www. uca.edu/publicappearances

Simply Classical

Jan. 17 The Tulsa Oratorio Chorus is the night’s special guest performance group when the Tulsa Symphony reconstructs a couple of classical heavies – Beethoven’s Symphony No. 8 in F major and Mozart’s Requiem Mass in D minor. www. tulsapac.com

Matuto

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

Matuto Jan. 18 Presented by the Tulsa Children’s Museum, this six-member band brings Brazil’s magical folklore music to life with infusions of American bluegrass at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice.com

Varekai

Jan. 21-25, Jan. 28-Feb. 1 Cirque du Soleil reimagines the tale of Icarus through the eyes of artists in a touring production set in a mythical forest near a volcano. Bringing together athleticism, artistry and grace, the production stops at the BOK Center and later at Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.bokcenter.com, www.chesapeakearena.com

All That Jazz: A Symphonic Celebration of Kander & Ebb Jan. 23-24 Join Oklahoma City Philharmonic for a dazzling tribute to the songwriting team that gave the world such musicals at Cabaret and Chicago. The philharmonic plays Broadway at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www. okcphilharmonic.org

Signature Symphony Classics 3 Jan. 24 Michael Rossi leads the Signature Symphony in works by Verdi, Dvorak and Tchaikovsky at VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education. www.myticketoffice.com

Rastrelli Cello Quartet

Jan. 24 Playing music “between the genres,” this singular ensemble combines music and stylings from Bach to Brubeck and The Beatles at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.choregus.org

Anything Goes Jan. 25 The Cole Porter musical comedy sets sail for the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center with some great songs, including “I Get A Kick Out of You” and the play’s namesake. www.brokenarrowpac.com Russian National Ballet Theatre’s Swan Lake Jan. 26-27 Tchaikovsky’s magical musical masterpiece is presented in movement by the ballet company at Armstrong

Shaping Sound

Jan. 29 Dancers give shape and form to sound with rhythmic moves and choreography on the stage of the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com

The Odd Couple Jan.29-Feb.15 Mismatched roommates create a hilarious classic about an unlikely friendship from Neil Simon in this Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma production at Lyric at the Plaza. www.lyrictheatreokc.com David Gonzalez’s Sleeping Beauty Jan. 30 Get ready for a rendition of

the fairytale as you’ve never heard or seen it before as storyteller, actor, musician and poet David Gonzalez tells the tale through live music, multimedia and verse at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com

Dancing With the Stars Live!

Jan. 31 The television dance show is now a live dance spectacular featuring the stars and their partners from the latest season of competition at the Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Dancing Pros: Live!

Jan. 31 Pro dancers from television dance competitions join this showcase and competition of various dance styles at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcciviccenter.com

The Drunkard and The Olio

Ongoing The melodrama continues with over-the-top characters plus a musical revue featuring celebrity drop-in guests most Saturdays at the Spotlight Theatre. www.spotlighttheatre.org

IN CONCERT Hangover Ball 2015 Jan. 1 Cody Canada, Wade Bowen, Jason Boland, more at Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Texas Hippie Coalition

Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Jan. 2 Cain’s

Parmalee

Jan. 8 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Clutch Jan. 9 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Garth Brooks, Trisha Yearwood Jan. 9-17 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com

Travis Ledoyt

Jan. 10 Elvis impersonator at Riverwind Casino. www.riverwind.com

Racers for Autisum

Jan. 12 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Eric Church Jan. 14 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com Kevin Nealon

Jan. 15 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

ZZ Top

Jan. 15, 16 7 Clans First Council Casino & Hotel, Newkirk. Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.firstcouncilcasinohotel.com, www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Tulsa Playboys

Jan. 16 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Eric Benet Jan. 17 Riverwind Casino. www.riverwind.com Dr. Hook Jan. 17 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. www.grandresortok.com Brandon Jenkins

Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Jan. 17 The Blue

Gladys Knight Jan. 17 Winstar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com My So Called Band Jan. 17 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com Riverfield Rocks

www.cainsballroom.com

Jan.17 Cain’s Ballroom.

Black Label Society

Jan. 20 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Reckless Kelly, Kevin Fowler

Jan. 22 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com


with the Chili Bowl Midget Nationals. www. rcchilibowl.com

Lucas Oil Chili Bowl Nationals Jan. 13-17 The biggest race for some of the smallest cars on track is back at Expo Square with more action drawing everyone from NASCAR pros to backyard mechanics hoping to catch the prize. www.chilibowl.com

IN CONCERT

PHOTO BY LESLIE RYAN MCKELLAR.

Shovels & Rope The Academy of Contemporary Music at the University of Central Oklahoma (ACM@UCO) is all about giving UCO students a “real world” experience of the music industry. Husband and wife duo Shovels & Rope will give it to them. Michael Trent and Cary Ann Hearst bring their blend of folk, rock and rhythm to the academy’s Performance Lab stage, 329 E. Sheridan Ave., in Oklahoma City at 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29. One of the works the pair is likely to sing is “Birmingham,” a semi-autobiographical anthem of how Shovels & Rope materialized from a struggling act to a name quickly gaining notice for its twangy brilliance and originality. Folk music enters the 21st century with surprising grace, resonance and kick. Rising singer-songwriter Caroline Rose opens for the duo, and tickets are $20 at www. ticketstorm.com. For more information, go online to www. acm.uco.edu. The performance is open to the public, but tickets are expected to go fast.

Stoney Larue

Loretta Lynn

Moe Bandy & Joe Stamley Jan. 23 7 Clans Paradise Casino, Red Rock. www. firstcouncilcasinohotel.com

Jan. 29 ACM@UCO. www.acm.uco.edu

Jan. 23 Winstar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com

K.C. Clifford

bluedoorokc.com

Jan. 24 The Blue Door. www.

Night Ranger

www.riverwind.com

Jan. 24 Riverwind Casino.

Seth Meyers Jan. 24 Winstar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Waka Winter Classic 2015 Jan. 24 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Badfish, a Tribute to Sublime

Jan. 25 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Railroad Earth Jan. 18 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Todd Barry acm.uco.edu

Jan. 22 ACM@UCO. www.

Puddle of Mudd

Jan. 24 Oklahoma City Farmers Public Market. www.ticketstorm.com

Railroad Earth

Jan. 28 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Jan. 29 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Shovels & Rope, Caroline Rose Kongos

Jan. 30 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Randy Rogers Band

Casino. www.riverwind.com

Jan. 30 Riverwind

Smokey & The Mirror

Jan. 31 Woody Guthrie Center. www.woodyguthriecenter.org

Big Smo

Jan. 31 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. www.grandresortok.com

Kathy Griffin Jan. 31 Winstar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com

SPORTS OKC Thunder

www.nba.com/thunder v. Washington Jan. 2 v. Utah Jan. 9 v. Golden State Jan. 16 v. Minnesota Jan. 26

OKC Blue v. Iowa Jan. 9

www.nba.com/dleague/oklahomacity

ORU Men’s Basketball

www.

USTRCWillRogersChampionships Jan. 30-Feb. 1 “Rope the Ozarks” with skilled cowboy teams at this U.S. Team Roping Championships competitive event at Expo Square. www.ustrc.com

High School Hoops Showcase Jan. 31 The 2015 showdown will feature 16 of the best high school teams from the Tulsa area playing at the BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com

FAMILY Aqua Tots

Jan. 16 Monthly story time in the Shark View Room at Oklahoma Aquarium for small children. www.okaquarium.org

Junie B. Jones

Jan. 20 Literature Live! presents the musical theater adaption of the popular children’s book about a precocious little girl and her adventures at the Cox Business Center. www.coxcentertulsa.com

Drop-In Family Art Day

OSU Men’s Basketball

www.

www.okstate.

www.

soonersports.com v. West Virginia Jan. 4 v. Texas Jan. 14 v. Oklahoma State Jan. 19 v. Texas Tech Jan. 24 www.

com v. Houston Jan. 4 v. Connecticut Jan. 13 v. Memphis Jan. 21 v. USF Jan. 31

www.bokcenter.com

Tulsa Shootout Jan. 1-3 Micro sprint car racing keeps pace in Tulsa’s Expo Square as one of the largest events of its kind in the world for drivers, supporters and enthusiasts. www. tulsashootout.com

ORU Women’s Basketball

www.

Jan. 3-4 The annual volleyball tournament hosted by Oklahoma Edge Sports Academy will be played at the Cox Convention Center. www. coxconventioncenter.com

Runway Run

Jan. 10 Get ready to take off from the Tulsa International Airport runway for this running event with planes parked along the race strip. www.tulsaairandspacemuseum. org

R/C Chili Bowl

Showing Edison: The Work of Edison Preparatory School Students Jan. 2-31 The Tulsa Artists’ Coali-

Wanderlust: Nomadic Interpretations of Contemporary Africa

Redland Rendezvous Volleyball

www.tulsahurricane.

Thru February Repurposed cardboard drums create a hands-on puzzle that allows children to crawl in and climb to solve. www.tulsachildrensmuseum.org

tion Gallery welcomes all to see the diverse work created by students of the Tulsa school. www. tacgallery.org

v. Chicago Jan. 24 v. Saltillo Jan. 30

www.soonersports.

Red Dirt Dinos Thru February The Tulsa Children’s Museum and its Discovery Lab brings animatronic dinosaurs and hands-on exhibits to its gallery. www.tulsachildrensmuseum.org

ART

tulsahurricane.com v. Memphis Jan. 10 v. East Carolina Jan. 14 v. Houston Jan. 17 v. SMU Jan. 28 v. UCF Jan. 31

Tulsa Revolution

com v. Kansas State Jan. 3 v. Texas Jan. 10 v. Texas Tech Jan. 21 v. Baylor Jan. 27 v. Oklahoma Jan. 31

Jan. 19 Families celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day with plenty of art activities at the Zarrow Center for Art and Education. www.gilcrease.utulsa. edu

Move It! Scramble

TU Women’s Basketball

oruathletics.com v. IUPUI Jan. 7 v. Omaha Jan. 14 v. IPFW Jan. 17 v. South Dakota State Jan. 24 v. Tabor Jan. 27

oruathletics.com

Mad Dog Demo Derby Jan. 24 Stand back for the demolition derby that includes the mini car derby and mower derby at the Claremore Expo Center. www.motorheadevents.com

OU Women’s Basketball

Tulsa Oilers www.tulsaoilers.com v. Brampton Jan. 2 v. Rapid City Jan. 3-4 v. Brampton Jan. 29-30

com v. Baylor Jan. 3 v. Kansas State Jan. 10 v. Oklahoma State Jan. 17 v. Texas Tech Jan. 28

Once

PBR Oklahoma City Invitational Jan. 23-25 The baddest bulls in the land squareoff with daring bull riders for the ultimate throwdown at Chesapeake Energy Arena. www. chesapeakearena.com

OSU Women’s Basketball

v. Texas Jan. 6 v. Texas Jan. 16-17 v. Rochester Jan. 18 v. Lake Erie Jan. 30-31

TU Men’s Basketball

Jan. 16-18 Rodeo champs in a variety of categories hit the Oklahoma State Fair Park arena for the big round-up of winners. www.ipra-rodeo.com

okstate.com v. Texas Tech Jan. 7 v. Kansas State Jan. 14 v. West Virginia Jan. 17 v. TCU Jan. 24

www.okcbarons.com

OU Men’s Basketball

Expo Square. www.exposquare.com

International Finals Rodeo

v. South Dakota Jan. 8 v. IUPUI Jan. 15 v. Western Illinois Jan. 17 v. Omaha Jan. 24

v. Reno Jan. 10 v. Los Angeles Jan. 13 v. Canton Jan. 23 v. Austin Jan. 24 v. Erie Jan. 29

OKC Barons

2015 Tulsa Nationals and Novice Nationals Jan. 15-17 Youth wrestling at

Jan. 13-16 Remotecontrolled cars take to the track at Expo Square for this special race event running concurrent

Jan. 2-31 A group show of work will be curated by Ebony Iman Dallas at Project Box Community Art Space. www.theprojectboxokc.com

Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate Jan 2-Feb. 26 The works of more than

60 artists – responding to a call challenging the ideology of a Montana-based hate group – are part of this special traveling exhibition at Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts.org

Transform Hate Community Project Jan. 2-22 The ongoing community art project initiative continues with discussion, art, learning and healing at Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts.org

Cowboy Artists of America 49th Annual Sale and Exhibition Thru Jan. 4 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum presents fine Western art in everything from drawing to painting and sculpture. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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was most loved. www.ou.edu/fjjma

THE TRAIL BY CATHRYN THOMAS. IMAGE COURTESY OKLAHOMA CONTEMPORARY.

Entertainment

Fever & Flash: Pop in the 1970s

ART

ArtNow 2015 Anyone who’s ever wondered what art in Oklahoma looks like today should walk straight to Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center and the ArtNow 2015 exhibition. The special art exhibit and sale showcases some of the state’s most recognizable names in art, including Michi Susan, Bert Seabourn and Romy Owens, in a display of work across multiple genres and highly representative of Oklahoma City’s creative energy and spirit. ArtNow goes up on Monday, Jan. 12, in the art center at 3000 General Pershing Blvd., in Oklahoma City for view during regular gallery hours. Works will then be sold during the ArtNow Gala on Friday, Jan. 23, to benefit Oklahoma Contemporary operations and programming. It’s worth noting that fundraiser also keep the gallery free and open to the public throughout the year. The exhibition closes on the night of the gala. For more about the exhibit and Jan. 23 gala benefiting the arts center, visit www. oklahomacontemporary.org. Macrocosm/Microcosm

Thru Jan. 4 A new exhibition at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art examines Abstract Expressionism in the American Southwest through works by artists from all over the country who found inspiration in the landscapes of Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico in post-World War II America. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Traditional Cowboy Arts Association 16th Annual Exhibition & Sale Thru Jan. 4 The arts of silversmith-

ing, saddlemaking and other specialty crafts used to create stunning specimens of practical ranch-life implements are showcased at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

A Creative Union: Howard Cook & Barbara Latham Thru Jan.4 Philbrook

Museum of Art looks at the works of artist couple Howard Cook and Barbara Latham and how each influenced the other’s works in a variety of media. www.philbrook.org

Formed in Stone: The Natural Beauty of Fossils Thru Jan. 4 The

photographic exhibit reveals the geometric beauty found in fossils dating back millions of years. Several physical specimens are included in the exhibition at the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History. www.snomnh.ou.edu

STUDIO: New Works by AHHA Studio Artists Thru Jan. 4 A group show

at the Hardesty Arts Center highlights the work of artists John Bryant, Brooke Golightly, John Hammer, Sharyl Landis and Daniel Sutliff – all participants of the AHHA Studio Artists program. www.ahhatulsa.org

John James Audobon and the Artist as Naturalist Thru Jan. 5 The

famed naturalist and artist known for his vibrant paintings of American wildlife and plants is explored at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. www. crystalbridges.org

Ocean of Thought Jan. 10-Feb. 22 Tulsa artist Michelle Firment Reid explores questions of fate, transition of thoughts and the ocean in a new exhibition at the Hardesty Arts Center. www. ahhatulsa.org All About Words

OPEN 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. DAILY

918-742-4563

3310 E. 32nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma Across from Walmart Neighborhood Market

Jan. 10-Feb. 22 The participatory art project invites guests to write affirmative words that will be placed in a sculpture, which will be set on fire at the end of the exhibition at Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahhatulsa.org

Impact: The Philbrook Indian Annual Thru Jan. 11 Philbrook Museum of Art explores the impact of the Philbrook Indian Annual exhibition, a juried exhibition and sale that highlighted the fine art of American Indian artists from 1946 to 1979. Works from Allan Houser, Dick West, Joe

62 OKLAHOMA 2015 PM 11798 PhillsDiner.indd 1 MAGAZINE | JANUARY 5/2/14 12:41

Hererra, Helen Hardin and others entered into the annual through the years and purchased will be part of this retrospective show. www. philbrook.org

Whistler and the British Etching Revival Jan. 11-April 5 Philbrook Museum

of Art exhibits a collection of works highlighting etching and printmaking techniques, revived in part by American-born artist James Whistler, in the 19th century. www.philbrook.org

My Generation: Young Chinese Artists Thru Jan. 18 An exhibition at the

Oklahoma City Museum of Art looks at the new generation of Chinese artists born after the Cultural Revolution. The exhibit will include paintings, video installations, multimedia work, photography and more. www.okcmoa.com

Here & Now: Contemporary Native American Art of Oklahoma Thru Jan. 18 Contemporary American

Indian artists working across multiple media – both traditional and current – present pieces at 108 Contemporary. www.108contemporary. org

The Many Faces of Jerusalem Thru Jan. 31 The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art exhibits this collection of art quilts from the Israel Quilters Association that presents the patchwork of Jerusalem’s diverse life. www.jewishmuseum.net

Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves Thru Jan. 31 The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art brings a show of portraits by the accomplished photographer and actor best known for his role as the original Spock in the Star Trek franchise. www.jewishmuseum.net

Born of Fire: Ceramic Art from Regional Collections Thru March 2 Fired clay takes many forms in this exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark., and explores its use around the world. www.crystalbridges.org

Drama, Death, Dirge: Frederic Remington’s American West Thru March 8 The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art exhibits four exceptional pieces by the famed painter that display the attributes for which he

Thru March 15 Pop art’s hold into the 1970s is the focus of a new exhibition at Philbrook Downtown and examines the contributions of Claes Oldenburg, Eduardo Paolozzi and others. The exhibit also features an album of Polaroid photos by Andy Warhol. www.philbrook.org

Frontier to Foundry: The Making of Small Bronze Sculpture in the Gilcrease Collection Thru March 23 The Gilcrease Museum collection of art contains more than 200 small bronze sculptures by such names as Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell and reveals the development of the bronze casting craft by 19th century American sculptors. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Private Collections to Public Treasures: New Acquisitions at Gilcrease Museum Thru March 29 The

exhibit looks at some of the latest art works to be added to the collection of Gilcrease Museum. The show will include work by such diverse artists as Joseph Henry Sharp, Pablita Verlarde and Edgar Payne among others. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

Shifting Focus: Historical Photos, Contemporary Art Thru April 26 Historical photos by the likes of Edward S. Curtis of American Indian leaders and ordinary people provide the inspiration for works by contemporary American Indian artists, who translate images and portraits of old into modern media and works in an exhibit at Philbrook Downtown. www.philbrook.org

Coyote Songs, Desperado Dreams: The Art of Robby McMurtry Thru May 10 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum remembers the artists, illustrator, writer and mentor to countless youth, the late Robby McMurtry. The exhibition looks across his career with 35 pieces spanning 1973 to 2012. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Beyond the Battlefield: Depictions of War Thru May 10 An exhibition at Fred

Jones Jr. Museum of Art examines war through the eyes of artists. Beyond the Battlefield focuses on conflicts of the 20th century with paintings, prints and photography. www.ou. edu/fjjma

Orly Genger: Terra Thru Oct. 2 This massive outdoor art installation made of more than a million feet of lobster-fishing rope – woven, painted and stretched across Oklahoma’s City’s Campbell Park – create a unique experience. www.oklahomacontemporary.org Identity & Inspiration

Ongoing Philbrook Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s extensive collection of American Indian art work and artifacts. www.philbrook.org

Recent Acquisitions of Photography and Works on Paper Ongoing Art work in a variety of media and styles collected over the past five years by the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art go on display for the public. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Opening Abstraction Ongoing Philbrook Downtown exhibits abstract work in all its manifestations. www.philbrook.org

Rare: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species Thru Jan.19 The

Sam Noble Museum of Natural History presents a collection of portraits from Joel Sartore’s book of the same name. Works include portraits of bald eagles, sea turtles, species on the rebound (red wolves, American alligator) and those that went extinct as the book was produced. www. snomnh.ou.edu

ArtNow 2015 Jan. 12-23 Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center exhibits work to be auctioned off during the benefit gala on Jan. 23. www.oklahomacontemporary.org Fire & Ice Thru Jan. 25 Handcrafted art glass and contemporary glass pieces created by students and staff along with guest artists at Tulsa Glassblowing School are displayed in a show of sculpture, vases and more at the Zarrow Center for Art and Education. www. gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers at UCA


Entertainment

Tulsa Remodel & Landscape Show Jan. 16-18 Homeowners can visit with

top experts on ways to improve their property with the latest bells and whistles at Cox Business Center. www.homeshowcenter.com

Twister Agility Dog Trials

Jan. 16-18 Dogs run through tunnels, leap obstacles and more as the Twister Agility club holds its agility trials at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. twisteragility.com

Oklahoma City Home & Garden Show Jan. 16-18 The show filled with new

products for homes will feature Kevin O’Connor from TV’s This Old House at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.oklahomacityhomeshow.com

The Oklahoma Wedding Show

PHOTO BY EIKO ISHIOKA.

Jan. 17 Soon-to-be brides and grooms will find everything they need to plan that special day under one roof at Oklahoma Magazine’s premier wedding show, featuring fashion shows and valuable door prizes. Takes place at Expo Square’s Central Park Hall. www.okmag.com/weddingshow

Dr. Martin Luther King Soul Food Cook-Off Jan. 17 The best cooks stir up

homemade favorites for this delicious competitive cook-off at Muskogee Civic Center. 98.684.6363

Block Auction

Jan. 17 Auto auction at Expo Square. www.blockauction.com

PERFORMANCES

Oklahoma Cheer Challenge

Jan. 1 7 - 1 8 C o x B u s i n e s s C e n t e r. w w w. coxcentertulsa.com

Varekai The supreme grace, athleticism and artistry of Cirque du Soleil returns to Tulsa and Oklahoma City in 2015 with an old story in contemporary appeal. Varekai opens at the BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., in Tulsa on Wednesday, Jan. 21. Set in a magical forest “at the edge of time,” Varekai explores possibility and the extraordinary as a young man named Icarus flies into a series of adventures translated through playful, acrobatic feats, dance and art. As a tribute to the freewheeling, traditional traveling circus, Varekai is a perfect vehicle for touring – the production continues through Sunday, Jan. 25, for seven performances in Tulsa before it opens at the Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 W. Reno Ave., in Oklahoma City on Wednesday, Jan. 28. It closes its Oklahoma City run on Sunday, Feb. 1. Tickets to the Tulsa showings are $42-$147 at www.bokcenter.com, while admission to Varekai in Oklahoma City are $35-$100 (fees may apply) at www. chesapeakearena.com.

CHARITABLE EVENTS Holiday Helpers

Nov.-Jan. The Children’s Center’s annual gift drive through New Year’s Day helps children in need with essentials and a Christmas wish. www.tccokc.org

National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame Induction Luncheon Jan. 16 The event takes place during the Lucas Oil Chili Bowl Nationals at Expo Square. www. exposquare.com

25th Toyland Ball

Jan. 17 The Parent Child Center of Tulsa’s signature fundraiser is a black-tie gala filled with elegance and whimsy combined in a perfectly entertaining evening. The silver anniversary ball will include dinner, a live auction and cake at the Cox Business Center. www.parentchildcenter.org

Snowflake Gala

Jan. 22 Celebrate another successful fundraising campaign with United Way of Central Oklahoma by helping others in the community. The gala includes dinner, entertainment and an awards presentation at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. www.unitedwayokc.org

OKC Charity Fight Night

Jan. 22 The gloves go on for the black-tie boxing night with

celebrity hosts and entertainment at the Bricktown Events Center. This year’s host is Thomas “Hitman” Hearns. www.okcfightnight.com

ArtNow Gala

Jan. 23 Join the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center at its gallery for an important (and very cool) art exhibition and sale of work by some of the state’s most celebrated artists. The exhibit will run Jan. 12-23. www. oklahomacontemporary.org

Bishop Kelley Trivia Night

Jan. 24 Teams of trivia buffs do battle at Bishop Kelley High School to support the school’s programs. www.bishopkelley.org

Boots and Ball Gowns Gala

Jan. 24 The Western-themed gala celebrates Infant Crisis Service’s work helping mothers in need and their children with a fun fundraising night at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. www.infantcrisis.org

Cooking Up Compassion

Jan. 29 Tulsa’s top chefs serve their best at the Cox Business Center with a side of auctions and entertainment at the 10th annual event benefiting Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Tulsa. www.cctulsa.org

Toast to the Arts

Jan. 30 Toast the

collections of the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art as it salutes artist Oscar Brousse Jacobson, the museum’s founder with wines and more. www.ou.edu/fjjma

A Taste of Tulsa

Jan. 31 Tulsa’s finest restaurants bring their best to the Cox Business Center along with exciting auction packages, live music and dancing for the event’s 30th anniversary and to help Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma. www.bbbsok.org

Chocolate Festival and Arts Day Jan.31 The 33rd annual fundraiser for the Firehouse Art Center holds a sweet promise at the NCED Hotel and Conference Center in Norman. www. normanfirehouse.com

Thru Jan. 18 Ice skating, live music, carriage rides and more are back in downtown Tulsa near the BOK Center for this annual festival of lights and holiday spirit. www.bokcenter.com

Martin Luther King Jr. Parade Jan. 19 The annual Tulsa parade honoring freedom and the civil rights icon has a new theme for 2015: “Celebrate Change.” www.mlktulsa.org

Grand American Arms Show

Jan. 3-4 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. grandamericanarmshows.com

Downtown in December Thru Jan. 4 Downtown Oklahoma City gets dressed in holiday color and lights for the annual festival that covers multiple events, including outdoor ice skating, snow tubing and the performing arts. www.downtownindecember.com Oklahoma City Land Run Antique Show Jan. 4-5 Vendors present antiques, collectibles, jewelry and more at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.heritageeventcompany.com

Oklahoma City Winter Quilt Show

Holland Hall Trivia Night

Jan. 31 Sharpen your game and focus for this annual trivia challenge at Holland Hall School. www.hollandhall.org

Jan. 8-10 Serious hobbyists will find everything they need, including ideas, for quilting in traditional styles and beyond at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.qscexpos.com

Buttercup Bash Jan. 31 The annual cocktail charity event hosted by the Junior Women’s Association of the Tulsa Boys’ Home will be at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame with casino-style games, dancing and Vegas glamour. www.tulsaboyshome.org

Oklahoma City Bead & Jewelry Show Jan. 9-11 Jewelry, beads, jewelry

supplies and more at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com

Price Tower Annual Gala Jan. 31 Join the fun at this fundraiser event for Bartlesville’s celebrated landmark, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The annual gala will take place the Bartlesville Community Center. www. pricetower.org

COMMUNITY Oklahoma Paint Horse Club Holiday Classic Thru Jan. 3 Horsemen,

families and fans of the paint horse turn out at Oklahoma State Fair Park for the 10th annual celebration of the breed and riding with shows, New Year’s Eve exhibitor party, auctions and a chili cook-off. www.oklahomaphc.net

Arkansas Shorts: A Night of Short Film Jan. 3 The eighth annual night includes

Smokey & The Mirror

Arvest Tulsa Winterfest

screenings of short films by Arkansas natives and current residents in Hot Springs, Ark. www. lowkeyarts.org

James Warhola: A Night with Uncle Andy Jan. 15 The children’s book

author and artist shares a personal side of his uncle, pop artist Andy Warhol, at Philbrook Museum of Art. www.philbrook.org

Fareed Zakaria: America in a New World Jan. 16 The CNN journalist,

known for his insightful analysis of world political and economic trends, takes the podium at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center for Tulsa Town Hall. tulsatownhall.com

Arkansas Tackle, Hunting and Boat Show Jan. 16-18 Fishing ponds for

children, a dog jumping show, bow fishing, archery and outdoor entertainment are just part of this year’s outdoors sporting expo in Fort Smith, Ark. www.arkansastackleandhuntingshow.com

The OKC RV & Boat Show Jan. 16-18 A first look at the newest models in recreational vehicles, boats, watercraft, ATVs and more for the outdoors at Cox Convention Center. www.freervandboatshow.com

Oklahoma City Boat Show Jan. 23-25 Look ahead to warmer days in the outdoors at the annual show with the latest boat models as well as other equipment and gear at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okcboatshow.com Trail Dance Film Festival Jan. 2324 Duncan’s Simmons Center plays host to this showcase of indie filmmakers from all over the world and their screened works in a variety of genres. www.traildancefilmfestival.com Green Country Home & Garden Show Jan. 23-25 Expo for new products and services for the home at Expo Square. www. exposquare.com

The Price is Right Live!

Jan. 2325 Jerry Springer hosts this live touring version of the famous TV game show. Look for it at the Grand Casino Hotel Resort in Shawnee. www. grandresortok.com

R.K. Gun Show Jan. 24-25 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com Oklahoma Tackle & Hunting Show Jan. 30-Feb. 1 Get the latest tackle and gear for outdoor living and sports – including apparel, archery equipment and boats – at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okctackleandhuntingshow. com

Greater Oklahoma Hunter Jumper Schooling Show Jan. 31-Feb. 1 Equestrian riding and jumping event at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.goshow.org

Oklahoma City Gun Show

Jan. 31-Feb. 1 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okcgunshow.com

To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at. OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR or email to events@okmag.com.

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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CARES, but she recalls, “It was all because of Charles Faudree, who told me, ‘You’re coming with me.’” The Red Ribbon Gala raises money to support the projects of Tulsa CARES, an organization that provides support to individuals and families in Northeastern Oklahoma affected by HIV/AIDS. Brian Hughes, showroom manager of SR Hughes in Tulsa, is event chair of the 2015 gala. He says Faudree was not only a lifelong friend to his grandmother, but he was also Hughes’ business landlord early in his career and a source of inspiration and information. “I’d wrongly thought that HIV/AIDS was something that we, as a society, had covered because, today, you can still live even if you have the virus as long as you get the medicine,” Hughes says. “But, I have come to find out we don’t have it covered at all. “In Oklahoma HIV infection is on the rise; BRIAN HUGHES (FROM and among developed nations in the world, LEFT), TONI GARNER AND SHANNON HALL ARE the U.S. ranks near the bottom in preventing READY TO HELP TULSA HIV infection,” Hughes says. “We need more CARES WITH THIS YEAR’S help for those in our community suffering RED RIBBON GALA. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN. from this disease, and the Red Ribbon Gala is a great vehicle to raise awareness.” The Red Ribbon Gala began in 1999 as a small affair that about broke even its first year, says Shannon Hall, SPECIAL PROMOTION executive director for Tulsa CARES. “In the second year, we raised $7,000, and now we net about $400,000 per year; and that provides our operating costs,” says Hall. “We have a capital campaign also and are set to break ground in early 2015 for our new site to be called The Charles Faudree Center.” Hughes says he is excited to get more involved at a time when the organization is on the brink of doubling its capacity of service from 500 to about 1,000. Work on the Charles Faudree Center will begin when the required $2.5 million has been raised to fund its construction. Supporters have met about 90 percent of that goal. Hughes credits the Tulsa CARES staff and board for its leadership in helping HIV/AIDS patients and their families with such assistance as housing, food, prescriptions, transportation and emotional support. The legacy of Charles Faudree “I’m lucky to have joined in when this is poised to blossom into continues to impact Tulsa the kind of organization our community needs it to be,” Hughes says. CARES and its “It’s a beautiful story for the past 25 years of helping clients that continues to grow.” fundraising efforts. Gala tickets and sponsorships are available. Patron levels start at hen it comes to a passion $500 per ticket, while sponsorship levels include a range of ticket and for Tulsa CARES, the table seating packages. chairs of the upcoming “I also love that it’s just a big party with dancing and people havRed Ribbon Gala credit ing fun,” says Hall. the late Charles Faudree. For all the fun, there’s still a message and a mission. Toni Garner of “We have an amazing Toni’s Flowers & party planned with the gala,” Gifts in Tulsa serves says Hughes. “And through as honorary chair of that, we want to help educate Saturday, March 7 • Cox Business Center this year’s gala. She the community at large while The event will feature a live auction, dancing, dinner and doesn’t remember open bar. For more information or sponsorship opportunities, helping the people depending when in the 1990s she on our services.” contact Ally McGinnis at 918.834.4194. began supporting Tulsa TRACY LEGRAND

Red Ribbon Gala

W

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

RED RIBBON GALA


Join us for our Pink Stiletto Soiree.

Date: February 14, 2015 | Time: 6:30 p.m. Place: Hyatt Regency Tulsa, 100 East Second Street The evening will include dinner and dancing as well as a silent and live auction. For more information or to buy tickets, visit www.komentulsa.org/get-involved/pink-stiletto/

Presented by

Investing in the Cause Seventy-five percent of the money raised by Pink Stiletto will support local screening and education programs dedicated to the breast health needs of our community and twenty-five percent will fund the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Award and Research Grant Program funding cutting-edge breast cancer research. Susan G. Komen® Tulsa Affiliate • 1560 E. 21st Street, Suite 202 • Tulsa, Oklahoma 74114 • komentulsa.org • 918.392.2745 • info@komentulsa.org


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Oklahoma Wedding 70

With This Ring 72

Beauty: Inside And Out 74

You’re Invited 76

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Oklahoma Wedding

With This Ring

Style is important when picking dresses, suits and accessories for the wedding party. But when it’s time to choose the rings, it’s even more crucial – to last a lifetime, the rings must be timeless. Choices and designs come and go, but there are qualities enviable for now and always. It’s hard to go wrong with a classic solitaire in a clean, gorgeous setting, but these days couples are looking for pieces that are as individual as they are themselves. Wedding sets and trios sometimes are mismatched, but there is almost always a quality connecting them. White gold and platinum are still popular choices, but couples are warming to rose gold and yellow gold as a striking contrast to the icy fire of diamonds. Cluster diamond rings have something that solitaires can’t always deliver – a ton of sparkle. Grouping together smaller diamonds in an inventive setting has a contemporary appeal, plus it may be a more affordable option. Some couples are going even further to make diamonds an accent to rubies, sapphires, emeralds and other brilliant gemstones taking the spotlight. No matter what kind of stone you choose or how many, turn tradition on its side with a broad-cut stone set horizontal with the band. It’ll make it look bigger. Vine, leaf and petal details are also hot now. Both feminine and delicately delightful, they lend an heirloom quality to rings that are in line to be passed down for generations to come. – Karen Shade

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

IMAGES COURTESY BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS AND B.C. CLARK JEWELERS.

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Oklahoma Wedding

Beauty, Inside And Out

NAILS: A CLEAN FRENCH MANICURE

Bridal trends blend blooms, subtlety and a hint of boldness.

HAIR: BRAIDS AND FLOWERS

What bride doesn’t want to look pretty on her wedding day? Luckily, there’s a look for every personality, and the bridal runway shows for 2015 showcased several. The eyes have it in bridal beauty, and soft, smoky eyes added a dramatic touch on some catwalks, in contrast to the minimal make-up looks that were also hot. Using a pencil instead of powders for lasting power, softly lined eyes accentuate not only beauty, but a bride’s personality. Just remember to go with a waterproof option. There’s nothing more lovely than a blushing bride, except a glowing bride. Cosmetic shimmer powders look especially illuminating over a clean foundation. A light dusting of opalescent platinum shimmer powder across the brow, cheekbones and eyelids lends a subtle-yet-noticeable glow. Somewhere between pink and red, rosy lips have a soft luster that sets well with any style of eye make-up and dress tone. Plus, it compliments a lot of skin tones. Models in several shows trailed their tresses behind them in loose waves, but a number of designers threw in braids and plaiting to showcase their designs. Whether it’s a full-on French plait up-do or a loose side braid, the trend pairs well with another hair do – flowers. Individual blossoms of baby’s breath woven throughout are delicately beautiful, while flower laurels are a crowing glory for any bride and have been used in lieu of veils and traditional tiaras. As for nails, keep it simple with a classic French manicure or semi-nude nail colors, but get creative with sparkling embellishments and carefree nail art.

FACE: SMOKY EYES, ROSY LIPS

PHOTO CREDIT

KAREN SHADE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015


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Oklahoma Wedding

You’re Invited

Wedding announcements are a couple’s calling card for the big day.

KAREN SHADE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

IMAGES COURTESY WEDDING PAPER DIVAS AND LETTERPRESS OF TULSA.

Of all the “musts” involved in planning a wedding, the invitations are one of the most important to decide early. Wedding invitations herald the event and give guests an idea of what to expect. Will it be a regal affair or a barefoot frolic filled with Bohemian touches? Will the wedding have a playful tone in an unexpected setting, or will it rival the most glamorous soiree? The invitation gives clues to what’s ahead and says much about the pair headed for the altar. This year, expect new options from invitation printers and designers. The royal treatment is especially “now.” Tastefully spare and with just the right amount of ornate lettering, this classic style stays current with subtle adjustments. These days, elegance calls for a hint of color, relating a mindful grandeur. The opposite of muted are invitations waving rich embellishments and bold borders. Go ahead and pair vintage scrolls and floral patterns for a look that is truly luxe. Speaking of color, gone are the days when couples kept to the sunnier side of the palette. Darker, more saturated hues standout and make a strong impact, whether used as feature elements or font colors. Handwritten invitations are always familiar, warm and personal. And who says calligraphy is a lost art? Once the rule rather than the exception, calligraphy styles today are fresh, inspired, even playful.


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Bridesmaid gowns are more fashionable and versatile than ever.

78

AMSALE

JENNY YOO

ZAC POSEN

ANN TAYLOR

JENNY PACKHAM

AMSALE

ZAC POSEN

AMSALE

JENNY PACKHAM

ZAC POSEN

AMSALE

ZAC POSEN

and sizes. Brides are increasingly allowing bridesmaids to select the dress styles that make them most comfortable, coordinating dress colors with one another and the theme. Trends for 2015 range in style, but popular colors include blush and champagne, along with mint green, gray and crimson. These elegant colors are a great complement to a perfect day. – Jami Mattox

ZAC POSEN

Bridesmaid dresses can be as imaginative or simple as the bride wants. We’ve heard about brides that choose versatile, stylish bridesmaid gowns that can be worn again at a later date. Unfortunately, we’ve also all heard – and likely witnessed – the bridesmaid horrified by her wedding day get-up. Regardless, a bridesmaid is helpless in the matter; at the end of the day, the bride’s decision is final. There are plenty of dresses that are flattering for various shapes

ANN TAYLOR

Oklahoma Wedding

Maid To Order

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015


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Oklahoma Wedding

Portraits In Light

Brides will shine in this year’s gowns, featuring rich lace, crystals, beadwork and even feathers. Photography by Nathan Harmon. Makeup by Taylor Ledbetter. Models courtesy Brink Model Management and Linda Layman Agency. Flower bouquets courtesy Toni’s Flowers & Gifts.

Melissa Sweet chantilly lace trumpet gown with illusion sleeves, $1,150, David’s Bridal, locations statewide. Adriana Orsini pave teardrop earrings, $125, and link bracelet, $225, Saks Fifth Avenue. Hair by Shawna Burroughs of Jara Herron Medical Spa and Salon.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015


Oleg Cassini tea-length cap sleeve dress with illusion neckline, $800, and blusher veil, David’s Bridal, locations statewide. Penny Preville doublet opal earrings, $3,765, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Adriana Orsini pave hinged crystal bracelet, $350, and sterling ring, $180; Manolo Blahnik satin pumps, $965, Saks Fifth Avenue. Blue fur vest, $3,500, Miss Jackson’s. Hair by Shawna Burroughs of Jara Herron Medical Spa and Salon.

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Oklahoma Wedding

Maggie Sottero fairytale ball gown with Swarovski crystal encrusted bodice and organza skirt, $1,500, and Edgar Berger crystal veil, Bridal Palace. Forevermark diamond eternity band, $7,065; Kwiat platinum necklace with diamond heart pendant, $6,400, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Adriana Orsini pave crystal hinged bangle, $350, Saks Fifth Avenue. Hair by Shawna Burroughs of Jara Herron Medical Spa and Salon.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015


Alfred Angelo semi-cathedral train gown with netting, lace, crystal beading, rhinestones, pearls, sequins and organza owers, $1,049, Alfred Angelo. Mikimoto pearl drop pave earrings, $8,000, and pearl strand with double diamond closure, $16,380; Jack Kelege engagement ring, $6,370 for the setting, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Hair by Shawna Burroughs of Jara Herron Medical Spa and Salon.

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Oklahoma Wedding Antiqued halter mermaid gown with lace applique and bead and crystal bodice and neckline with an overlaid tulle skirt, price upon request, and brooch, Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedo. Adriana Orsini pave crystal hinged bangle, $350, Saks Fifth Avenue. Hair by Shawna Burroughs of Jara Herron Medical Spa and Salon.

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Alfred Angelo semi-cathedral train gown with embroidered lace and sash, $1,149, Alfred Angelo. Adriana Orsini pave teardrop earrings, $125, sterling silver pave “Love� script necklace, $125, and pave crystal hinged bangle, $350, Saks Fifth Avenue. Hair by Shawna Burroughs of Jara Herron Medical Spa and Salon.

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Oklahoma Wedding

Sottero and Midgley metallic embroidered oral lace applique gown with Swarovski crystal beaded neckline and keyhole back, $1,389.99, and earrings, Bridal Palace. Adriana Orsini gold hinged bangle bracelets, $100$145; sterling silver ring, $180, Saks Fifth Avenue. Hair by Andrea Sands of Philosophy Salon.

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Strapless gown with sweetheart neckline and lace applique and crystals and beads, price upon request, and pearl earrings and headpiece, Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedos. Hair by Andrea Sands of Philosophy Salon.

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OSCAR DE LA RENTA

VERA WANG

J. MENDEL

Oklahoma Wedding

Brides Ă La Mode

Designer gown choices are numerous for the bride with sophisticated tastes.

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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90 VERA WANG

J. MENDEL

J. MENDEL

J. MENDEL

J. MENDEL

NAEEM KHAN

NAEEM KHAN

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

JENNY PACKHAM

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

Oklahoma Wedding

Be a Sweetheart

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015


AUSTIN SCARLETT

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

CAROLINA HERRERA

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

AMSALE

Straps With Style

CAROLINA HERRERA

NAEEM KHAN

J. MENDEL

J. MENDEL

J. MENDEL

Simply Strapless

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015 JENNY PACKHAM

VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

NAEEM KHAN

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

NAEEM KHAN

J. MENDEL

Go For Something Different

JENNY PACKHAM

J. MENDEL

VERA WANG

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

NAEEM KHAN

Oklahoma Wedding

Short and Sweet


Relax, We Can help you find the Destination Wedding or Honeymoon of

your Dreams!

For a chance to win a fabulous honeymoon see us at The Oklahoma Wedding Show.

918.256.4200 alldestinationstravel.com

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One Hotel, Two Venues

Historic Elegance or Contemporary Design

Choose Your Style

B

oth the Ballroom located inside the historic Campbell Hotel and the Renaissance Square Event Center next door have a lot to offer for your wedding or reception or both. • • • •

4000 s.f. • Media packages • On site parking Tables & chairs included

Guest accommodations Catering through Maxxwells Restaurant available

2620 E. 11th Street and 2636 E. 11th St. • Tulsa, OK 74104 | thecampbellhotel.com | 918.744.5500

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015 MONIQUE LHUILLIER

KENNETH POOL

VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

CAROLINA HERRERA

NAEEM KHAN

J. MENDEL

HONOR

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

Show Some Sholder

JENNY PACKHAM

MARCHESA

CHRISTOS

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

Oklahoma Wedding

Keep ‘em at Arm’s Length


Oklahoma Wedding

Blooming Fashion

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCOTT MILLER.

Traditional or modern, these bouquets will make a great complement for any wedding theme.

Calla lilies with leaves, electric blue viburnum berries and lily grass. Petal Pushers.

Orange roses and hanging amaranths. Toni’s Flowers & Gifts.

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Roses, mini cala lilies, peonies and lizanthus. Petal Pushers.

White gardenias, hydrangea blooms, lamb’s ear, eucalyptus and evergreens. Mary Murray’s Flowers.

Green beauty roses, mini-green hydrangeas, solidago, caramel carnations. J.A. Mathis.

Vendela roses, garden roses, veronica, freesia and bupleurum, hand-tied with antique ivory rosette ribbon wrap. Wild Iris.

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Oklahoma Wedding

Peonies, feathered acacia, bonsai eucalyptus, pheasant feathers, manzanita branch, dusty miller, with a white chiffon ribbon. J.A. Mathis.

Pink garden spray roses, pink long-stemmed roses, Queen Anne’s lace and baby’s breath wrapped in ivory satin with pearl trim and buttons. Flowergirl Weddings.

Safari sunset, hypericum berries and emerald handtied with lily grass wrap. Wild Iris.

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Mango mini calla lilies, sunset garden roses, ranunculus pincushion proteas, confetti roses, billy balls, dill, seeded eucalyptus and lily grass wrapped in champagne satin. Flowergirl Weddings.


Gardenias, roses, hydrangeas and lily grass. Toni’s Flowers & Gifts.

Salal leaves, eucalyptus berries, italian ruscus with clusters of pearls and gold jewelry wire. Mary Murray’s Flowers.

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Oklahoma Wedding

Cake, Please

The sweetest part of the wedding should also be stylish.

A MIX OF PINK AND WHITE LACE, FLOWERS AND PEARLS WITH A FLORAL FRAMED MONOGRAM. ICING ON THE TOP. PHOTO BY SCOTT MILLER.

SOFT PINK BUTTERCREAM WITH FONDANT DETAIL AND GUMPASTE FLOWERS. FINISHED WITH PEARL DETAILS. BROWN EGG BAKERY. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

THREE-TIER CAKE WITH QUILT AND BEADWORK, RHINESTONES, RIBBON AND A FLOWER. ANDREA HOWARD CAKES. PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWARD.

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THREE-TIER, TROPICAL-THEMED CAKE WITH RIBBON, FLORAL ICING WORK AND OVERSIZED FLOWER AND LEAVES. MISHELLE HANDY CAKES. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

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Oklahoma Wedding

GOLD ACCENTS AND PETITE PIPING CONTRAST WITH MODERN, MULTISHAPED TIERS AND A LARGE SUGAR FLOWER. ALL THINGS CAKE. PHOTO BY SCOTT MILLER.

FIVE-TIER CAKE WITH GOLD AND PURPLE SATURATION, RHINESTONE BUCKLE AND GILDED FLOWERS. ANDREA HOWARD CAKES. PHOTO BY ANDREA HOWARD.

ABSTRACT DESIGN CAKE FOCUSED ON DEPTH, TEXTURE AND HAND-PAINTED, GEOMETRIC FONDANT CAGES WITH EDIBLE PIGMENTATION. BROWN EGG BAKERY. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

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This is What Style Tastes Like!

Featuring the trendsetting culinary talents of Chef Christine Dowd

405.942.4000

www.auntpittypatscatering.com Setting the Standard in Events for over 35 years!

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WEDDING. RECEPTION. HONEYMOON. Our Tulsa, Oklahoma hotel is the perfect place to say “I Do.” Memorable venues, professional staff and spacious accommodations await you at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa. For more information, call 918 582 9000, email us at sales.info@hyattregencytulsa.com or visit tulsa.hyatt.com.

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WHITE HOUSE MANSION 918.313.0808 •

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WHITEHOUSEMANSION@GMAIL.COM

WEDDINGS • RECEPTIONS • EVENTS 1 West 81st Street • WhiteHouseMansionTulsa.com

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Oklahoma Wedding

BLACK FONDANT WITH CHEVRON DETAIL AND GUMPASTE FLOWER. MISHELLE HANDY CAKES. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

INSPIRED BY A METAL-WORK COLLAR NECKLACE AND KEPT SIMPLE TO SHOWCASE THE BEAUTY AND COMPLEXITY OF THE NECKLACE. ICING ON THE TOP. PHOTO BY SCOTT MILLER.

THREE-TIER CAKE WITH ORNATE LACE AND FLOWER WORK. ROSEBEARY’S DESIGNS IN BAKING. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

A FOUR-TIER, INVERTED CHANDELIER CAKE WITH HAND-PIPED SCROLLS AND A SIMPLE PALETTE OF BLACK AND WHITE IS TIMELESS. ALL THINGS CAKE. PHOTO BY SCOTT MILLER.

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Ann's is the Place for Weddings! 7 N Harvard Ave, Tulsa | 918. 834.2345 6820A E 41st St, Tulsa | 539.664.4158

Annsbakery.com

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Wedding

Make us a part of your special day. For reception and wedding information, call 918-596-2771.

Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs is the ideal spot for your next event. Our event center can accommodate receptions for parties of hundreds or an intimate affair. Contact us at 918.283.8805 to start planning your special event. Will Rogers Turnpike at Exit 255 Claremore, OK • CherokeeCasino.com

1400 N. Gilcrease MuseuM road n Tulsa, oK n 918-596-2700 n Gilcrease.uTulsa.edu n Tu is aN eeo/aa iNsTiTuTioN

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Oklahoma Wedding

Great Feats of the Wedding Table

Providing a feast for any number of wedding guests is best left to the professionals, who know how to charm and impress in a single, inventive bite.

Southern Gentlemen Barbecue & Catering

When tasting the barbecue stuffed chicken bomber from Southern Gentlemen Barbecue & Catering, focus on the explosion of flavor in every bite. Always looking for new takes on culinary traditions, Southern Gentlemen offers the Cajun shrimp and grits martini, an inventive kick on a Southern favorite.

Polo Grill

Never to be outdone, Polo Grill serves up seared scallops with roasted red pepper coulis and jalepeño poppers – a carousel of surprising flavors, texture and fun.

Aila’s Catering Kitchen

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN.

On the sweeter side of Aila’s Catering Kitchen, delicate fruit tarts topped with fresh kiwi, citrus and a berry assortment are paired with Bailey’s Irish coffee and doughnut holes Beef Wellington – a beef filet coated in a blend of exquisite ingredients before it’s all wrapped in puff pastry and baked – is an extra special deluxe dish in richly flavorful bite sizes that are easy and fun to serve to many guests.

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The Vault

The Vault’s fried chicken and waffles sandwich is more than a mouthful of buttermilkbreaded and fried chicken breast stacked atop fresh veggies between two sections of a homemade waffle. Yep, that’s gourmet bacon on top! The deviled eggs with salmon is a playfully decadent spin on a party favorite with beet-rich color and a smoky dollop of thinsliced salmon.

Palace Café

The grilled rosemary salmon skewers from Palace Café are perfection of color, aroma, texture and flavor for the most refined palates and wedding receptions. Don’t expect the usual suspects on the grilled vegetable skewer. This tasty hors d’oeuvre includes gently roasted zucchini, peppers and fruity chanterelle mushrooms. The grilled scallop with tomato chutney on top of a slice of Yukon gold potato is the height of creative eating. KAREN SHADE

JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Oklahoma Wedding

Marriage,

Then MiniMoon

Shorter getaways are growing in popularity with newly married couples. Consider these four destinations for truncated luxury. The excitement and leisure of a two-week honeymoon has virtually become a thing of the past. Though some couples can afford the expense and break from work that an extended, post-wedding vacation requires, more couples are opting for “mini-moons” – shorter trips that take less time and money. Though mini-moon destinations can be far-reaching, many locales in North America pack a great vacation into a short period of time.

Napa Valley, Calif.

A trip to Napa lets the romance from the wedding continue. Upscale hotels, resorts and bed-and-breakfast spots offer a range of amenities depending on the season during which a couple visits. Napa is a great place for hiking and biking and even hot-air ballooning, but the star of Napa Valley, of course, is the plethora of wineries. Hundreds of wineries dot the landscape of Napa Valley, ready to welcome guests on tastings tours. Restaurants serve a variety of cuisines and range from small cafés to Michelin-starred establishments. The area is also renowned for golf and tennis and for its upscale shopping opportunities. Perfect for: Wine aficionados Be sure to: Take a wine tour, whether it’s by plane, train or automobile. Stay at: Auberge du Soleil, a five-star hotel located in Rutherford, Calif.

New Orleans

New Orleans offers varying experiences depending on the time of year: Mardi Gras, professional sports, festivals and art exhibits. But there are also some satsifying constants: food, drink and exciting nightlife. Traditional cuisine, including gumbo, po’

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boys, muffalettas and beignets, can be found all around the city in small cafés. There’s also a wealth of five-star international cuisine for those who are looking for something a bit more adventurous. Tours of the city are available through various outlets, but perhaps the best way to take in New Orleans is by walking through the historic French Quarter. Soaking up the culture, music and nightlife of this great American icon provides entertainment, romance and a lifetime of memories. Perfect for: Night owls Be sure to: Stop into a French Quarter nightclub to hear the city’s music. Stay at: The Roosevelt Hotel, just one block from the French Quarter.

Sugarloaf, Maine

An outdoor lover’s dream, Sugarloaf offers a wide variety of activities year round. It’s the largest ski resort and destination east of the Mississippi River, and the conditions are favorable for top-notch skiing from mid-November through May. It’s also a great place to people-watch; many notable Olympic skiers train at Sugarloaf. During summer months, the mountain provides hiking, golfing, zip lining and mountain climbing. Several restaurants occupy the mountainside, providing opportunities for both casual and upscale dining as well as hotspots for nightlife. Perfect for: Outdoor enthusiasts Be sure to: Try your hand at snowboarding in Sugarloaf’s newest expansion, Brackett Basin. Stay at: Sugarloaf Mountain Hotel, a quaint, upscale hotel located just yards from chairlifts in the heart of Sugarloaf Village.

Victoria, B.C.

The oldest city in the Pacific Northwest, Victoria is located just north of the Canadian border with Washington state. The city is famed for its rich culture and abundance of museums, art galleries, festivals and cultural events. Tours of various historical venues, including castles, churches, temples and museums, are available. The Butchart Gardens, renowned for its floral show garden that draws nearly one million visitors each year, is a favorite among tourists. The garden is built upon land that was once an old limestone quarry. Perfect for: History buffs Be sure to: Tour the Craigdarroch Castle Historic House Museum, a great example of Victorian architecture. Stay at: Clayoquot Wilderness Resort, an exclusive destination that combines luxury with traditional camping. JAMI MATTOX JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The Holiday Inn Tulsa City Center has more than 8,000 square feet of banquet space fitting up to 200 people for a reception or rehearsal dinner. We offer full-service catering with customized menus. Discounted wedding guestroom blocks available for friends and family traveling in from out of town. 17 W. Seventh St., Tulsa. 918.585.5898. www.holidayinn.com

Hyatt Regency Tulsa

The lap of luxury in the heart of Tulsa, over 30,000 square feet of event space. 100 E. Second St., Tulsa. 918.582.9000. www.tulsa.hyatt.com

Meadowlake Ranch

Rustic settings, waterfalls, spring-fed lakes, old growth forests and pristine pastures abound at Meadowlake Ranch. This is the perfect place to hold your wedding or event! 3450 S. 137th West Ave., Sand Springs. 918.494.6000. www.meadowlakeranch.com

Moore Farms

Wedding Service Directory

Hotels and Venues

Campbell Hotel, Event Center & Spa

The Campbell Hotel and Event Centers are located on Historical Route 66. Enjoy a spa, lounge, 26 luxurious rooms and restaurant. 2636 E. 11th St., Tulsa. 918.744.5500. www.thecampbellhotel.com

Champagne Penthouse

Oklahoma City’s premier location for high-end events including private parties, fundraisers, company meetings and wedding receptions. Block 42 Development, 301 NE Fourth St., Unit 16, Oklahoma City. 405.626.0934. www.champagnepenthouse.com

Gilcrease Museum and the Restaurant at Gilcrease

With various reception spaces throughout the museum and beautiful gardens for outdoor activities, your special event will take on a distinctive flair at Gilcrease. 1400 W. Gilcrease Museum Road, Tulsa. 918.596.2771. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Glenpool Conference Center

Rentals available for brides, bridesmaids, flowergirls, tuxedos – Bridal Rentals & More for all your prom, pageantry, bridal and special occasion rental needs. 12135 E. 11th St., Suite B, Tulsa. 918.622.2229. www.bridalrentalsandmore.com

David’s Bridal

More than 300 locations nationwide. Beautiful dresses, smart prices, amazing colors. Fabulous new styles, including one that’s uniquely you. 877.921.BRIDE. www.davidsbridal.com

Red Hot Designs

Specializing in couture bridal gowns and formal wear for the bridal party. 7903 E. 50th St., Tulsa. 918.948.5700.

ONEOK Field-Tulsa Drillers

Ann’s Bakery

ONEOK Field is the perfect venue for your next wedding, reception or rehearsal dinner. Nestled in downtown Tulsa, ONEOK Field offers stunning views from its meeting and event spaces. 201 N. Elgin Ave., Tulsa. 918.574.8308. www.oneokfieldevents.com

Osage Casino Hotel – Skiatook

The beautiful, new Skiatook Osage Casino and Hotel features an elegant, 3,000-square-foot ballroom, onsite catering, luxury all-suite hotel rooms and much more. 5591West Rogers Blvd., Skiatook. 918.947.5075. www.osagecasinos.com

Will Rogers Downs

We offer an event center that will seat up to 500 people along with three other rooms that can accommodate smaller weddings as well as catering. 20900 S. 4200 Road, Claremore. 918.283.8805. www.cherokeecasino.com/will-rogers-downs

White House Mansion

This hidden treasure of Tulsa is a charming, historic mansion in a country setting. From elegant to exuberant weddings, we serve customers with Southern hospitality. 1 W. 81st St., Tulsa. 918.446.8181, 918.313.0808. www.whitehousemansiontulsa.com

Bridal, Formal Attire Alfred Angelo Bridal

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa

Alyssa’s Bridal & Tuxedos

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

Bridal Rentals & More

Cakes

A beautiful, versatile facility with outdoor and indoor options that can accommodate any size or style of wedding. An affordable venue conveniently located at 121st Street and U.S. 75. 12205 S. Yukon Ave., Glenpool. 918.209.4632. www.glenpoolconferencecenter.com

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Specializing in couture designer accessories for the bride and her bridal party. By appointment only. 918.272.2346. www.bridalcouturegirls.com

Whether it’s a lovely ceremony in our outdoor, nature-inspired landscape, hosting an indoor reception in our rustic barn, family reunions or private parties, your celebration will be an enchanting event that brings together friends and family in a beautiful, country setting on the farm! 9353 W. 500 Road, Pryor. 918.697.1498. www.moorefarmsrusticweddings.com

Alfred Angelo has been dressing brides and bridal parties for over 80 years. We offer a variety of sizes from 0-26W at no additional charge and 62 color options. 8802-C E. 71st St., Tulsa. 918.307.0355. 6310 N. May Ave., Oklahoma City. 405.842.4044. www.alfredangelo.com

We set the stage for romance and memories – 75,000 square feet of event space, 450 hotel rooms, 18-hole golf course, variety of dining options and more! 777 W. Cherokee St., Catoosa. 918.384.7931. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Bridal Couture Girls

A full-service salon offering an outstanding selection of gowns and services. With strong emphasis on quality and selection, romance and sophistication, our gowns are sure to fulfill every bride’s wedding dream. 6808 S. Memorial Drive, Suite 356, Tulsa. 918.250.1991. www.alyssas.com

All Things Cake

All Things Cake offers custom wedding and grooms’ cakes decorated with buttercream or fondant icing. All Things Cake offers customized design and many flavor and filling combinations. 8256 E. 71st St., Tulsa. 918.994.4490 Wedding cakes are Ann’s specialty. The bakery offers a wide variety of sizes, styles, flavors and fillings to choose from. Let Ann’s help help you create the wedding cake of your dreams. 7 N. Harvard Ave., Tulsa. 918.834.2345. www.annsbakery.com

Sam’s Club

Custom solutions in custom-ordered cakes, jewelry, floral arrangements and more for your special event. www.samsclub.com

Catering

Aila’s Catering Kitchen

We provide superior quality ingredients and stunning displays with each and every menu created for weddings, corporate events, family gatherings or intimate dinners. 4900 W. 71st St., Tulsa. 918.859.8786. www.cateringkitchentulsa.com

Aunt Pittypat’s Catering

For more than 20 years, Aunt Pittypat’s has been Oklahoma City’s most trusted caterer for attention to detail and commitment to quality food and service. Specializing in formal and casual weddings and reception dinners. 1515 N. Portland, Oklahoma City. 405.942.4000. www.auntpittypatscatering.com

Celebrity Restaurant

For nearly 50 years, Celebrity Restaurant has been a Tulsa favorite for its award-winning menu and fine dining experience. 3109 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa. 918.743.1800. www.celebritytulsa.com

Palace Cafe

Palace Café has been catering elegant, private celebrations since 2002. We cater wedding receptions, rehearsal dinners and other special occasions for parties of 35 to 500 people. Let our catering and baking excellence add an extra measure of perfection to that important day. 1301 E. 15th St., Tulsa. 918.582.4321. www.palacetulsa.com

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

Oklahoma Wedding

Holiday Inn Tulsa City Center


Rib Crib BBQ

Providing mouth-watering barbecue each and every day! Specializing in customizing events. 918.728.6469. www.ribcrib.com

Southern Gentlemen Barbecue & Catering

We offer full-service, buffet-style or to-go catering specializing in, but not limited to, barbecue with a Southern flair. 539.664.6302. www.southerngentlemencatering.com

Counseling Services Forever. For Real.

Learn how to listen and be heard, understand each other better, keep the romance alive and much more when you attend this free workshop. 3 E. Main St., Oklahoma City. 405.848.4046. www.projectrelate.com

Event Planners Eventures, Inc.

Eventures is a full service event planning and wedding design company in the Oklahoma City area. 340 S. Vermont Ave., Suite 135, Oklahoma City. 405.755.3333. www.eventures-inc.com

J.A. Mathis Company

J.A. Mathis Company is a full-service event management and design company. With experience and excellence, we’ll partner with you to make your corporate or social event a success. For parties, conferences and more, trust the pros at J.A. Mathis Company. 6130 S. Maplewood Ave., Suite A, Tulsa. 918.298.7055. www.jamathis.com

Lasting Impressions of Tulsa, Inc.

One-of-a-kind weddings. 7107 S. Yale Ave., No. 308, Tulsa. 918.629.1877. www.litulsa.com

Florists and Decor Flowergirls Weddings

Trendy, creative, unique: Wedding flowers for every bride, budget and style. 5800 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa. 918.949.1553. www.flowergirlsoftulsa.com

Mary Murray’s Flowers

Mary Murray’s Flowers, your Tulsa wedding florist, offers a wide selection of bridal bouquets, wedding ceremony flowers, floral cake decorations and centerpieces to fit any budget. 3333 E. 31st St., Tulsa. 918.743.6145. www.marymurraysflowers.com

Petal Pushers

All wedding flowers, bouquets, corsages, boutonnieres, center pieces, arches, votives, rental items, candelabras, vase stands and great ideas. 1660 E. 71st St., Suite. H, Tulsa. 918.494.0999

Toni’s Flowers & Gifts

Complimentary consultation by appointment. Toni’s serves all of your wedding needs. 3549 S. Harvard Ave., Tulsa. 918.742.9027. www.tonisflowersgifts.com

Wild Iris

Floral bouquets and arrangements that complement the bridal party and transform venues. 20193 E. 37th Place South, Broken Arrow. 918.704.6662. www.wildirisweddingflowers.com

Health, Beauty and Wellness ARCS

ARCS specializes in colors and cuts. Ask about wedding specials. 8624 E. 71st St., Suite A, Tulsa. 3511 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa. 918.250.2213, 918.596.6700. www.robertcromeans.com

BA Med Spa & Weight Loss

Lose weight. Look great. Enhance. BA Med Spa & Weight Loss offers medical weight loss programs and other services to make you look your best on your big day. 50 S. Elm Place, Broken Arrow. 918.872.9999. www.baweightspa.com

Chris Ward, DDS

Implant, cosmetic and sedation dentistry. 18 months SAC financing. We file all dental insurance as a courtesy. Open five days a week. 12814 E. 101st Pl. N., Suite 101, Owasso. 918.274.4466

Fidelity Health Care Consultants

It Works Body Wraps: Tightens, tones and firms in as little as 45 minutes. Nerium: age-defying face and body cream. Juice Plus+: whole-food supplementation. Lymphatic massage. 5555 E. 71st St., Suite 7120, Tulsa. 918.367.6960. www.fidelityhealthcareconsultants.org

Haley Naifeh Snodderly at Salon DiVago

Offering services for wedding parties, group parties, individual airbrush make-up or traditional make-up. The latest in hairstyling, cuts, colors, smoothing treatments, up-dos and facial waxing are also available. 5800 E. Skelly Drive, Suite 170, Tulsa. 918.637.3733. www.haleysnodderly.com

Skin Care Institute

A medical and wellness spa providing the finest in treatments and products in a relaxing, soothing atmosphere to help men and women feel their best. 6566 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa. 918.948.9639. www.skincareinstitute.net

Skin Renewal

Skin Renewal offers an array of services in the field of restorative dermatology. The majority of our services are treatment-based, which include Botox, fillers and chemical peels. Skin Renewal also has three state-of-the-art lasers. 2118 E. 15th St., Tulsa. 918.293.1287. www.skinrenewaloftulsa.com

Sky Fitness & Wellbeing

Sky Fitness & Wellbeing is a full-service fitness facility located in Tulsa. Enjoy weight loss boot camp, yoga, group fitness and state-of-the-art equipment all in one luxurious location. 4103 S. Yale Ave. and 10121 S. Sheridan Road, Tulsa. 918.641.5501. www.sky-fit.com

Smile Design & Family Dentistry

Dental services for your wedding day and every day. 5510 S. Memorial Drive, Tulsa. 918.663.9990. www.besttulsadentist.com

Tulsa Surgical Arts

The cosmetic surgeons of Tulsa Surgical Arts offer the most rewarding cosmetic surgery procedures and latest techniques to enhance your natural beauty. 7322 E. 91st St., Tulsa. 918.392.7900

Utica Square Skin Care

Offering medical skin care and a variety of services and therapies to help you look and feel your best. 2111 S. Atlanta Pl., Tulsa. 918.712.3223

Vein Care Center of Oklahoma

Treatment of varicose and spider veins. Antiaging skincare line. 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1-302, Tulsa. 918.502.3600. www.vccok.com

Invitations

Joan’s Print Shop Inc.

Custom wedding invitations, save-the-dates, programs, reception table cards, candy bags, guest and bridal gifts. Graphic design and printing in one location. 9706 E. 55th Place, Box F11, Tulsa. 918.624.5858. www.joansprintshop.com

Jewelers

Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels

Bruce G. Weber is Tulsa’s premier jewelry store showcasing some of the world’s most prestigious and sought-after designer jewelry lines. Our extensive bridal collection features brilliantly crafted and certified diamonds. We pride ourselves in offering the highest quality jewelry at competitive prices with outstanding personal service. No jewelry store pampers its customers more than Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. 1700 Utica Square, Tulsa. 918.749.1700. www.brucegweber.com JANUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Oklahoma Wedding

Epic Photography

Unlimited time, every time. Two-week turnaround time. High-resolution disc. Print release. 1609 S. Boston Ave., Suite 200, Tulsa. 918.794.2659. www.epicphotostulsa.com

Jennifer Edwards Photography

With 13 years as a portrait photographer in Tulsa, Jennifer has mastered the balance of photojournalism and fine art photography. Her goal is to make your wedding the day you’ve always dreamt it would be. 202 N. Armstrong, Bixby. 918.943.6353. www.jenniferedwardsphotography.com

Tabor Warren Photography

Beautiful, professional and affordable. Tabor Warren Photography specializes in wedding photography coverage. Print release, editing and DVD included with every package. 918.902.5663. photosbytabor.com

Photo Booth

Duet Photo/Video Booth

Our booths can help with whatever event you are planning and we make it so easy! Duet photo booths are designed to blend in and complement your event while adding another level of entertainment for your guests. 918.382.7278, 405.310.9181. www.duetphotobooth.com

Excellence Photo Booths

Lighting

Empire Lighting Design

918.382.7278, 405.310.9181. www.tulsaparty.com, www.okcparty.com

OMNI Lighting, Inc.

You will be hard pressed to find another company with as much experience and a 100-percent positive customer satisfaction rate. You can have confidence when choosing Excellence Photo Booths that you are getting not only a beautiful photo booth and a professional knowledgeable attendant, but also an experienced company. 918.899.0299. www.excellencephotobooths.com

Registry

St., Suite 260, Tulsa. 4334 NW Expressway, Suite 151, Oklahoma City. 405.607.4863. www.mysouthernjourneys.com

Warren Place Travel

Warren Place Travel’s honeymoon and destination wedding specialists have served Oklahomans for more than 34 years! We are THE Sandals and Beaches preferred Oklahoma agency. 6100 S. Yale Ave., Suite 100P, Tulsa. 918.492.4724. www.warrenplacetravel.com

Tuxedos

Beshara’s Formal Wear

Formal wear and tuxedo rental. Weddings, prom, any occasion: Beshara’s carries its own stock. 3539 S. Harvard Ave., Tulsa. 918.743.6416

Videography Atria Creative

All inclusive wedding photo, video and photo booth packages. 801 Jana Kay Terrace, Norman. 918.850.3131. www.atriacreative.co/

Captain Video Productions

Offering multiple HD camera coverage and stedicam that discreetly captures your event. Tulsa families have trusted Captain Video Productions with their memories since 1985. 1429 N. Umbrella Ave., Broken Arrow. 918.622.4441. www.captainvideoinc.com

Wedding Resources Tulsa Wedding Society

A select group of wedding professionals providing Tulsa area brides a resource where they can find the very best vendors for their dream wedding! 918.706.4131. www.tulsaweddingsociety.com

Williams-Sonoma

Winery

Offering harp music for elegant events in many capacities – pre-wedding, service, receptions or all of the above. 918.521.6380

Rentals and Supply

Girouard Vines is an urban winery located in downtown Tulsa producing the award-winning Tulsa Deco wine brand. The seven wines in the label series are excellent choices for serving at weddings and giving as gifts. Tulsa Deco wines are widely available in Tulsa area retail stores. 817 E. Third St., Tulsa. 918.231.4592. www.tulsawine.com

DJ Connection

Complete wedding and party rental for rehearsal, ceremony and reception needs. 2033 E. 11th St., Tulsa. 918.583.6557 or 918.584.1030. www.abcoparty.com

Lighting and audio/visual productions, rentals, sales and service. 1333 E. Fourth St., Tulsa. 918.583.6464. www.omnilighting.com

Entertainment

Anne Spencer Mocha, professional harpist

Creating memorable experiences for humans since 1999. Award-winning DJs, unlimited time, uplighting and high fives. 1609 S. Boston Ave., Suite 200, Tulsa. 918.481.2010. www.djconnectiontulsa.com

With more than 50 years of experience in the kitchen, Williams-Sonoma has perfected the art of cooking and celebrating special occasions by providing the finest cooking equipment, tools, recipes and foods available. 2016 Utica Square, Tulsa. 918.742.5252. www.williams-sonoma.com

ABCO Rents

Zach Downing Entertainment

Engage 2 Dance

Complete planning solutions for all your party and reception needs, including DJ, lighting and light design, photo and video booths and live music. 403 S. Cheyenne Ave., Suite 501, Tulsa. 918.382.7278. www.tulsaparty.com

The Slicks

Travel

Photography

The perfect destination wedding or honeymoon at Sandals booked with us will allow your questions and concerns to melt away. 204 S. Wilson St., Vinita. 918.256.4200. www.alldestinationstravel.com

DJ Express Oklahoma

918.382.7278, 405.310.9181. www.tulsaparty.com, www.okcparty.com 918.933.1700

Wedding band. Contact Mat Maxwell. 918.555.2424

Chris Humphrey Photographer

“When happy clients say things like, ‘These are some of the best wedding photos I have ever seen,’ I try not to interrupt.” – Chris Humphrey. 12324 E. 86th St. North, Suite 250, Tulsa. 918.625.4630. www.chrishumphreyphotographer.com 112

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2015

All Destinations Travel

Southern Journeys

Vacation and travel experiences have allowed us to send more than 250,000 happy clients to vacation destinations of their choice. 7718 E. 91st

Girouard Vines


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THE 2015

NX BEYOND UTILITY. BEYOND BOUNDARIES.

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January 2015 Oklahoma Magazine  

Oklahomans of the Year Every year, Oklahoma Magazine recognizes individuals in the state who have made a difference. This year’s honorees r...

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