Page 1

VOTE NOW FOR 2015 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM FEBRUARY 2015

SINGLE IN THE CITY

Meet 9 of Tulsa’s hottest singles

CONSCIOUS

BODY

Trends and advances in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery

THE

BRUNCH TABLE

Lazy Sundays never tasted so good

TULSA EDUCARE + A NATIONAL MODEL


Capture, Share #uticasquare

uticasquare.com

#datenight #leaveroomfordessert #valentinesday #tablefortwo

What sounds good to you? Stroll around Utica Square with that special someone to discover which of our ten tempting restaurants fit your mood and cravings. Soft lighting, smooth drinks and delectable dishes invite couples to cozy up for a romantic evening. Make it extra memorable with a savory dessert for two. Love is in the air at Utica Square, Tulsa’s hometown treasure.


VOL. XIX, NO. 2

FEATURES

46

Conscious Body

February 2 015 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

What triggers someone’s want or need to get cosmetic surgery? Tulsa area doctors give us the latest trends in cosmetic treatments and ways plastic surgeons are helping their patients feel best in their skin.

54

Single in the City

Read about nine of Tulsa’s most eligible bachelors and bachelorettes. Find out what they love most about being single as well as what they’re looking for in a partner. We got the scoop on their interests, hangouts, deal-breakers, first date ideas and favorites.

67

60 The Brunch Table

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

Closing The Gap

Tulsa is at the forefront of a much-needed, countrywide focus on early childhood development and education. With 21 programs across the United States, Educare understands how important early childhood is to the generations to follow. Learn about the Educare model and how Tulsa’s program is impacting the nation.

Choosing the restaurant you’ll spend Sunday brunch at is an important and sometimes difficult decision. Brunch can be, and many times is, a daylong event. Knowing what kind of food is offered, whether they have a full bar and coffee, what the atmosphere is like and the answers to other important questions is critical to an enjoyable afternoon. We have made this process easier for you, and therefore, your brunch more enjoyable. Our list, of the top 20 brunch spots in Oklahoma, lays out exactly what you need to know.

74

SPECIAL SECTION:

Education Guide

OKMAG.COM

FEBRUARY 2015

February 2015

SINGLE

IN THE CITY Meet of Tulsa’s hottest singles 9

CONSCIOUS

BODY

Trends and advances in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery

THE

BRUNCH TABLE

Lazy Sundays never tasted so good

EDUCARE +ATULSA NATIONAL MODEL

2

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

VOTE NOW FOR 2014 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM!

VOTE NOW FOR 2015 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM

ON THE COVER: BEING SINGLE IN A CITY LIKE TULSA POSES CHALLENGES. READ ABOUT NINE SINGLES, WHAT THEY ENJOY ABOUT FLYING SOLO AS WELL AS CHALLENGES THEY FACE. PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries. MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!


“I PROMISED MY DAUGHTER I’D BE THERE FOR HER. THANKS TO ST. JOHN, I KEPT THAT PROMISE.”

JOHN LEE, ST. JOHN HEART INSTITUTE PATIENT

JOHN LEE ALMOST MISSED HIS DAUGHTER’S WEDDING BECAUSE HE WAS RUSHED TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM WITH AN IRREGULAR HEART RHYTHM. For five years, he’d struggled with constant ER trips, but his life changed when he found St. John Heart Institute and Dr. Mark Milton. Trained at the Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins, Dr. Milton recommended a treatment he pioneered in Tulsa: atrial fibrillation ablation. Since undergoing the procedure, John Lee hasn’t visited the ER once. Life-changing experiences like John’s are our passion. Equipped with advanced diagnostics, an all-digital imaging center and a first-class cath lab, our skilled doctors prevent, diagnose and treat heart disease. AT ST. JOHN, YOUR HEART IS IN THE RIGHT PLACE.

St. John P U L S E L I N E P H Y S I C I A N R E F E R R A L 918 - 744-0123 ST. JOHN MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN SAPULPA | ST. JOHN OWASSO | ST. JOHN BROKEN ARROW JANE PHILLIPS MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN VILLAS | ST. JOHN CLINIC URGENT CARE | ST. JOHN CLINIC STJOHNHEALTHSYSTEM.COM


Contents

13

DEPARTMENTS The State

13

After college, Rob Key worked for his father’s company repairing airplanes. What Key didn’t know then is that those experiences would prove valuable as his career transitioned from repairing things to creating them. Since Key started crafting ornamental ironwork, he has sketched, designed and handforged countless masterpieces.

16 18 20 22 24 26 28 32 38 40

People OK Then Culture The Insider Oklahoma Business Scene Living Space Style Your Health Destination

Travel to the Emerald Isle with Tulsa’s Honors Orchestra and experience the history, culture and landscape that Ireland has to offer through the lens of photographer Nathan Harmon. Venture to Dublin, Kilkenny, Waterford, The Ring of Kerry and Galway. See the Cliffs of Moher and taste the freshness of Guinness straight from the brewery at The Guinness Storehouse.

32

Taste

91

When you walk into Dalesandro’s, you’ll feel like you just entered a home in Italy, where family and food is everything: the walls covered with photographs and the food plated with perfection. Sparkling at night, this quaint Boston Avenue restaurant has a dim-lit dining room that pairs nicely with the hot, flavorful dishes and great wine selections served there.

94 95

What We’re Eating Sip

95

Entertainment

97

Iron Man, Captain America, The Hulk, Thor, SpiderMan, Wolverine and a host of other heroes – and of course villains – of the Marvel Comics roster will fly, swing and pummel their way to Oklahoma City’s Chesapeake Energy Arena. Don’t miss the battle as the good guys try to stop the evil Loki from his plan to obliterate the entire universe.

98

Calendar of Events

97

4

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

40


Sharolyn D. Cook, D.O. |

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY

WARREN CLINIC

With an inquisitive mind and a passion for helping those with critical heart problems, Dr. Sharolyn Cook considers herself lucky to be part of the region’s best cardiovascular team.

How did you become interested in internal medicine?

In high school, I knew all of the bones of the human body. My teacher said, “You could be a doctor some day.” Years later, while working as an X-ray technician, I asked the doctors how they diagnose a condition and I always wanted to know more. That’s when I knew I really wanted to be a doctor.

Do you have a special motto you live by?

Yes, Isaiah, 40:31 of the Bible: Those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.

What is the most amazing thing to you about the human body?

The heart is unbelievable. Nothing in nature works as hard and is as resilient. No other organ has the ability to compensate to adverse conditions and repair itself to the same degree. The more we study it the more mysterious and marvelous it becomes. Every day I witness just how miraculous the heart truly is.

Is there one thing you wish every patient knew?

could have been greatly reduced if not entirely prevented. And, of course, regular exercise also does wonders for the heart and circulatory system.

What sets Warren Clinic and the Heart Hospital at Saint Francis apart from others? When I arrived I was struck by how knowledgeable and helpful the people were. They took me under their wing, so to speak. I have some great mentors and I’m very lucky to be a part of Warren Clinic’s team of medical experts. The staff is very friendly and also very hard working. That combination of friendliness and a strong work ethic really does set us apart. Warren Clinic provides a multispecialty group of physicians who can assist all of my patients under the umbrella of one health system.

Take good care of your body and it will serve you well for a long time. I always advise a diet high in fruits and vegetables, and with less red meat, sugar and salt. Too many people suffer from heart and circulatory problems that

Warren Clinic Cardiology of Tulsa 6151 South Yale Avenue, Suite A-100 | Tulsa, Oklahoma 918-494-8500 | saintfrancis.com/hearthospital SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL | THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | WARREN CLINIC | HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL SOUTH | LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL | SAINT FRANCIS BROKEN ARROW


OKLAHOMA

Frontier to Foundry the Making of Small Bronze Sculpture in the Gilcrease Collection

OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX EDITORIAL ASSISTANT BRITTANY ANICETTI CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN

DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER EMILY HECKER ADVERTISING/OFFICE ASSISTANT ALYSSA HALL CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB INTERN KARISSA ZIEGLER

deceMber 21, 2014 – March 15, 2015 The Bernard Titowsky Collection, John D. Calandra Italian american Collection (Queens College, CUnY).

Title sponsor of the Gilcrease Museum 2015 exhibition season is the sherman E. smith Family Foundation.

1400 N. Gilcrease MuseuM rd. Tulsa, OK 918-596-2700 Gilcrease.uTulsa.edu TU Is an EEO/aa InsTITUTIOn. 20717 Gilcrease.indd 1

12/22/14 4:38 PM

THERE’S MORE THAN ONE PLACE TO FIND A

CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2015 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. TM Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2013

Unlike any other university in Oklahoma, OSU Institute of Technology in Okmulgee offers an applied education where students learn by using the latest equipment and technology found in their field of study. With industry-experienced instructors and internships as the cornerstone of our programs, our job placement rate among graduates is one of the highest in the state.

PISTOLS FIRING from OSUIT in OKMULGEE

Member

440 0 UNDER

Find out more at osuit.edu or call 800.722.4471 20737 OSUIT.indd 1

6

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

1/5/15 12:28 PM

TM


10% off

any surgery scheduled in the month of February, me nt ion th is ad to ge t th e sp ec ia l! Expires Feb. 28th, 2015

Happy New Year, Happy New You. Tulsa Surgical Arts offers a full line of Cosmetic Surgical and skin care procedures to help you look your best on your special day. Angelo Cuzalina, MD

918.392.7900 | tulsasurgicalarts.com


AT OKMAG.COM LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Used to be, brunch was reserved for celebratory Sundays. Hungry diners would pack restaurants on Easter and Mother’s Days, hungry for eggs Benedict and thirsty for coffee. Over the past several years, brunch has transformed from a once-in-a-while meal to a whenever-you-can rite. Friends and family now plan weekends around the ritual of Sunday brunch. Saturday night antics are discussed, the upcoming work week is dreaded and the days spent sipping mimosas with loved ones are cherished. Oklahoma offers a wide variety of brunch options. In “The Brunch Table” (p. 60), we tour some of the hottest brunch spots the state has to offer. From the spicy tastes of Doc’s Wine and Food and Café Do Brasil to the sweet offerings of the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s Museum Café (bread pudding French toast, anyone?), there are brunch meals to satisfy those who are searching for both sweet and savory options. Also in this issue, writer Shaun Perkins takes a look at Tulsa’s successful Educare program (“Closing The Gap,” p. 67). The national nonprofit serves underprivileged children and their parents in 21 cities across the nation. Tulsa Educare, which operates three sites at elementary schools across the city, serves as a national model and is touted as a great example of how private and public partnerships can ensure that all children are given a great chance at educational success.

WE’VE DONE IT AGAIN! We asked. You answered. 40 Under 40’s Class of 2015 is the most impressive yet. Be sure to pick up the April issue to see who OKLAHOMA made the cut.

OKLAHOMA

Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com Call 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA

8

1/2 40 under 40.indd 1

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

12/19/14 9:29 AM

Jami Mattox Managing Editor

FRENCH TOAST AT THE MUSEUM CAFE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.


S U P E R S T A R S

VanGogh

Rothko

MASTERWORKS FROM THE ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to view 76 masterpieces by more than 40 superstars of the art world, including Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol, and Mark Rothko.

F E B RUARY 21

J U NE 1 , 2015

$10 , FREE for Members and youth ages 18 and under. Reserve tickets online or at guest services (479.418.5700). SPONSORED AT CRYSTAL BRIDGES BY

Harriet and Warren Stephens, Stephens Inc.

Art Agency, Partners Rick and Beverly Chapman Family Stout Executive Search

CrystalBridges.org BENTONVILLE, ARK ANSAS

This exhibition was initiated by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, and was organized by Albright-Knox Chief Curator Emeritus Douglas Dreishpoon. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. ABOVE: Vincent van Gogh, La Maison de la Crau, 1888, oil on canvas, 25 1/2 x 21 1/4 in. Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY. Bequest of A. Conger Goodyear, 1966. Photograph by Tom Loonan.


What’s Hot At

BE THE BEST. LAHOMA OK

the

BEST of the BEST 2015

GAZINE

SINGLE I N T H E C I T Y 2 015 It’s almost time once again for the annual Oklahoma Magazine Single in the City dating auction. We have gathered a group of Tulsa’s most eligible singles and will auction them off to lucky bidders during a night of dinner and drinks, all for a good cause. Watch the festivities unfold in a night of live music, cocktails and some of the best local food Tulsa has to offer. Be sure to visit okmag.com to see additional photos from the shoot, get details on when and where the event will be held, see exclusive video of the auction and check out interviews with each of our brave singles. It is all for a good cause, as proceeds from the event will be donated to local Oklahoma charities. To find out more information about the event, like us on Facebook.com/okmag and Twitter @oklahomamag.

Voting for Oklahoma Magazine’’s The Best of the Best is now open.

S TAY CONNECTED

MA

OKMAG.COM

BY CASTING A BALLOT, YOU HAVE A VOICE IN THE YEAR’S MOST ANTICIPATED ISSUE.

OK

VISIT OKMAG.COM

TO VOTE For Advertising opportunities emAil Advertising@okmAg.com cAll 918.744.6205

1/3 Strip.indd 1

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 10

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 12/19/142015 9:35 AM


“My integrative treatment plan helps me fight my cancer without slowing me down on the farm.”

Chemotherapy Oncology Radiation Acupuncture Nutrition Therapy Genomic Testing Surgical Oncology

Mike Fincham’s Integrative Care Plan

Chiropractic Care Hormone Therapy Naturopathic Medicine Spiritual Support Gastroenterology

When the 41-year old farmer and father of five was diagnosed with colon cancer, it was a priority for Mike to be able to continue to work as he went through treatment. His team at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® designed a personalized plan for Mike utilizing a comprehensive array of leading cancer technologies and therapeutic options to help him fight his cancer, boost his energy and keep him strong. Allowing Mike to continue living the life he loves.

The of power of integrative care lives here. cancercenter.com/tulsa 888-568-1571 No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results. ©2015 Rising Tide

Atlanta | Chicago | Philadelphia | Phoenix | Tulsa FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The

CHICKASAW NATION

T U R N E R FA L L S DAV I S , O K

United We Thrive

W I N STA R G O L F CO U R S E T H AC K E R V I L L E , O K

B E D R É F I N E C H O CO L AT E S DAV I S , O K

C H I C KA S A W C U LT U R A L C E N T E R SULPHUR, OK

Bill Anoatubby, Governor www.Chickasaw.net

T H E A RT E S I A N SULPHUR, OK


DESIGNER ROB KEY CRAFTS DOORS, STAIR RAILINGS, BALCONIES AND GATES FROM IRON. PHOTOS BY NATHAN HARMON.

The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

The Key To Design

Ironwork crafter Rob Key discusses his passion that pairs form and function.

A

fter working on “Billionaire’s Row” in West Palm Beach, Fla., for five years crafting custom architectural ironwork for some of the nation’s most luxurious homes, nothing much phases Rob Key, owner of Rob Key Designs in Tulsa. He spent several months creating ornamental iron stair rails, decorative gates and bronze grills over the windows for a 64,000-square-foot, $107 million home that at the time was the most expensive newconstruction home in America. The wealthy neighbors included an eclectic mix of the rich and famous, from Rush Limbaugh to Rod Stewart. Key worked on Donald Trump’s Mar-aLago estate, the 114-room villa originally built over four years in the 1920s by Marjorie Merriweather Post. He also spent time creating custom ironwork for the home of the late Malcolm Glazer, former owner of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. It was quite an adventure for the tall, lanky kid who grew up in the small town of Oilton, Okla. “At that point in my life, everything was about basketball,” he laughs. Key played college ball but now laments the fact that the small school he attended didn’t offer any arts courses. After college, he headed back home to work for his father’s company. He learned welding while overhauling turbine engines used in aviation and received experience handling the exotic metals those repairs required. He eventually became a Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welder and was certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

But after awhile, Key was ready to move on, and for nearly five years he ran his own FAA repair company and worked on virtually every part required to hold an airplane together. “And that process required exact precision,” says Key. It was Sept. 11, 2001, that changed the trajectory of his career. The terrorist attacks that day took a toll on the aviation industry and caused Key to consider other uses for his extensive experience in ironwork. It’s what eventually led him to transition his iron skills into crafting ornamental ironwork in Florida. “I knew how to weld. This experience taught me how to forge. I came to art late in life,” says Key. Once he grasped his passion for design, he continued to push himself. Key says he loves the artistic and creative process. “Instead of repairing something, I was creating something,” Key says. He began sketching designs that he would hand-forge into distinctive ironwork. In 2005, Key moved back to Oklahoma from Florida, unsure of what he was going to do. “My brother owned a flooring company, so I helped him out when he needed it,” says Key. During that time, he met contractors around Tulsa. He rented 1,000 square feet of space in Bixby. He exhibited examples of his work in a Parade of Homes tour, and within a few months he expanded his workspace to 7,000 square feet and hired three employees. He primarily produced ornamental stair railings, balconies and gates. “Then I started making doors, and all of a sudden we had to double our space,” he adds. His doors serve as entrances to homes in Oklahoma as well as Arkansas, Kansas and Texas. “I’ve even shipped a set of doors to Brooklyn,” he adds. Interior designer Kent Oellien, owner of Oellien Design, Inc., in Tulsa, has nothing but accolades for Key after working with him on several projects. “Rob is a master genius at his trade,” says Oellien. “Trusting in the quality of his product allows us to glide through the job.” Key hand-sketches all his designs and excels working in various styles, from traditional scrolls influenced by English, French and Spanish designs; to the clean lines of transitional and modern styles. “It’s the simple designs that really showcase Rob’s talent,” says Oellien. “There is no place to hide any flaws.” What also distinguishes Key’s work from others is that none of his products are pre-

14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

KEY’S DESIGNS HAVE BEEN SHIPPED TO HOMES ALL OVER THE COUNTRY. EACH DESIGN CARRIES HIS SIGNATURE (BELOW).

fabricated. Everything is hand-forged, beginning with the raw iron ore that is heated to 2,300 degrees to become malleable. Each piece is then hammered by hand into a pattern. Key has also cultivated his affinity for art into a series of metal-crafted sculptures, mainly for his own enjoyment. And although he’s only had a couple of small shows, he has been contacted by designers from New York City who are looking at his sculptures for high-end hotel clients. Key is most excited about a new expansion of his business. “I am building a spec house in southeast Tulsa,” he says. The style is transitional to modern with large, open areas framed with his hand-crafted iron windows and sleek iron doors. It’s a style he and his wife, Melissa, preferred for their custom home; Key crafted a stunning open iron staircase with a glassed-in wine storage space tucked under the stairs. Typically, Key doesn’t craft iron furniture or accessories, but he made the exception for his own house and created a custom wine rack. As Key reflects on how his business has thrived, he is mindful of the constant process to give energy and detail to each and every ironwork project. Key continues to transform his passion for ironwork he discovered years ago. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON


A Top 100 National University

n 11:1 student-faculty ratio n Faculty-mentored undergraduate research n More than 60 majors in four colleges

n 91% placement rate for 2014 graduates n 18 NCAA Division I sports teams n Diverse campus

“A Top 50 Best Value Private University” (Kiplinger’s) & 2015 Top College (Forbes)

TU is an EEO/AA institution.

Apply online: apply.utulsa.edu. For more information or to schedule a campus visit, contact the Office of Admission, 1-800-331-3050, or 918-631-2307, or www.utulsa.edu/admission

W W W . U T U L S A . E D U / A D M I S S I O N


The State

NANCY OWENS, FOUNDER OF LA CHEMIE. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

PEOPLE

Pretty Women

“I was inspired to start my line because I had never really found a skincare line that worked for me, so I decided to develop one myself,” Owens says. “I wanted pure, natural and nourishing products made from the best possible ingredients.” Owens began research on how to develop her own line and ended up with extensive knowledge in several areas and earned a master’s level certification in clinical aromatherapy, a master’s degree in health policy as well as knowledge in biology, microbiology, anatomy, physiology, chemistry and nutrition. “These credentials have helped in forming my skincare line because in order to develop a product line that is effective, particularly using essential oils, it is important to understand and respect how the body works,” Owens says. The La Chemie line consists of a variety of moisturizers, scrubs, bath salts, eye creams and balms, all infused with natural ingredients like Frankincense oil or Dead Sea salts. The products worked so well on her own skin that Owens began providing samples to her friends.

“When they told me how much they loved the products and started asking me where they could buy them, I knew I had something really worth pursuing on a larger scale,” says Owens. La Chemie is offered in some of the nation’s finest luxury hotels and as gifts for Hollywood celebrities during VIP events. For a second year in a row, La Chemie products will be given out at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel’s pre-Oscars event, says Owens. Additionally, La Chemie products are available in Tulsa at Nourish Drink Cafe and both SALT Yoga locations as well as online. In the future, Owens hopes to expand her line into more hotels and other brick-andmortar locations. Owens also plans to keep giving back to the environment through her business. “I am grateful that nature provides the exceptional ingredients needed to produce La Chemie,” Owens says. “So I feel a strong duty and responsibility to give back to nature to help replenish the earth’s natural resources.” SHARON MCBRIDE

LA CHEMIE SKIN CARE PRODUCT LINE.

A Tulsa businesswoman helps women of all ages feel good in their skin.

O

klahoma native Nancy Owens is helping women everywhere feel beautiful with her luxury botanical skin and body care line, La Chemie. The Tulsa resident began La Chemie three years ago after feeling dissatisfaction with her own skin.

N AT U R E

DOG DAYS OF SUNDOGS

Ten years ago, a weather phenomenon occurred in Norman skies that left many baffled. The phenomenon, known as sundogs and halos, occurred in the late afternoon of Feb. 10, 2005, and produced bright spots and arcs that resembled halos. “Sundogs and halos are fairly common but are most often observed in the winter when the clouds that produce them occur most frequently,” says David Andra, meteorologist in charge at the National Weather Service’s Norman office. “Both are caused by thin, high-level clouds composed of ice crystals. Hexagon-shaped crystals refract, or bend, the light to create the bright regions we know as sundogs and halos.” The sundogs refer to the bright “mock suns” that A SUNDOG SPOTTED IN appear around 22 degrees on either side of the sun. MANITOBA, The arc that connects the sundogs is known as the CANADA. halo. – Jami Mattox

16

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


ROMANCE IS IN THE AIR

Nothing says romance like a cozy retreat at an Oklahoma State Park. Secluded cabins, crackling fires and misty mornings are just some of the alluring amenities available. Turn up the heat this February with 15% off a lodge or cabin stay and score romantic bonus points that will last until next Valentine’s Day. Visit TravelOK.com/SPDeals for more offers, and plan your retreat to remember.

ROMAN NOSE

BEAVERS BEND

ROBBERS CAVE

LAKE TENKILLER

ROMAN NOSE - ONE OF THE ORIGINAL 7 OKLAHOMA STATE PARKS


The State

OK THEN

Made for You and Me

across the globe, with groups from Britain to Sweden to Turkey making the song their own, tweaking the lyrics to fit their respecWoody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” turns 75. tive countries. oody Guthrie didn’t set out 75 years ago to write the most iconic folk In some ways, though, success has diminsong of all time. It just sort of happened. Disgusted by what he saw as ished the core message of the song, which the tidy patriotism of Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America,” Guthrie is about the hardships facing everyday penned a response song, originally titled “God Blessed America.” Americans. McCloud notes that most people Though he dropped the direct reference to Berlin’s work in the final do not sing the fourth verse, about the evils draft, Guthrie kept the biting wit and social commentary. of capitalism, or the final verse, in which “This Land Is Your Land” has all the compoGuthrie reflects on the lines of nents of a great folk song. The tune, borrowed people he sees outside the relief “The sounds of the crowd from an old Baptist hymn by way of the Carter office: “I stood there wondering Family’s song “Little Darlin’, Pal of Mine,” singing along to that song is if/This land was made for you is catchy and propulsive. Since the verse and and me.” It’s a dark thought, but what the country is all about one more in line with Guthrie’s chorus have the same tune, even the least musically inclined people can pick it up in a matter intent than the sanitized – work together, sing together original of minutes, which makes it ideal for that staple version many sing. and make a difference of folk music performance, the sing-along. That The power of the song consense of inclusiveness carries over to the lyrics, tinues to this day. It has such in our society.” where Guthrie welcomes the audience into an meaning for so many that it America governed by everyday people. was even sung by Guthrie’s old the lyrics,” says McCloud. According to Deana McCloud, execufriend, Pete Seeger, at the first inauguraNo doubt the down-to-earth familiarity of tive director of The Woody Guthrie Center, tion of President Obama. Seeger insisted “This Land Is Your Land” is part of what has on singing the original version, with all the Guthrie wrote the song while living in a made the song an enduring classic. Though rundown boarding house in New York City. verses. McCloud points out the significance Guthrie at first neglected the song – he He based the lyrics on experiences he had of Seeger’s performance. didn’t record the song until four years after and sights he saw crossing the country. This “The sounds of the crowd singing along he had written it – it soared in popularpersonal touch extended to the way Guthrie to that song is what the country is all about: ity when it got picked up by the protest wrote the song. Work together, sing together and make a difmovements of the 1960s. Since then it has “Woody used a typewriter to compose ference in our society,” she says. become a staple in multiple contexts, sung many of Maybe, in an age of renewed economic THE HANDWRITTEN LYRICS TO in classrooms and rallies everywhere. It has his lyrics; trouble, Guthrie’s song, with its mixture of WHAT WE NOW KNOW AS “THIS been covered by many musicians, includhowever, on despair and hope, is more important than LAND IS YOUR LAND.” ing folk legends Peter, Paul and Mary. As this song, he ever. COPYRIGHT WOODY GUTHRIE PUBLICATIONS. PHOTO COURTESY WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS American as the song is, it has also spread handwrote

W

18

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


BEST IN THE METRO, BEST IN THE STATE.

U.S. News and World Report has released its 2014-2015 hospital rankings, and for the third year in a row, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center is ranked best hospital in the OKC metro and Oklahoma’s best hospital, with four high-performing specialty areas. These rankings make it easy to find a healthcare provider with a proven track record. And we’re confident that you’ll find the same caliber of care at each of our 19 campuses and 100 clinics across the state, because INTEGRIS Health is Oklahoma’s Most Trusted Name in Healthcare. And we just proved it. Again.

integrisok.com | 405-951-2277

Diabetes & Endocrinology • Gastroenterology & GI Surgery • Nephrology • Pulmonology


The State

CULTURE

S

Taking Aim

Students around the state find a new passion in archery.

tudents across Oklahoma are setting their sights on a sport that may be new to them but has ancient roots. Whether it is because of adventurous Merida in Brave or the defiant hero that is Katniss in The Hunger Games, kids today have been inspired to grab a bow and arrow and give archery a shot. Helping facilitate this growing interest is Jay Rouk, the information and education specialist for the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. “Archery has definitely received a boost from the movies, especially from females and recreational archers,” he says. Since 2004, Rouk has helped introduce archery to 450 schools across Oklahoma through The National Archery in Schools Program, allowing more than 30,000 students in fourth through 12th grades to reap the benefits. “Students love it,” he says. “Schools contact me regularly to bring this program to their school.” Once the curriculum is in place, students learn about archery history, safety practices and shooting techniques. The program is designed to improve mental concentration and selfdiscipline. Shooting in teams of up to 16 members or as individuals, students compete at the local level to qualify for one of six regional shoots. The young archers work toward a perfect score of 300, and those who come closest go on to compete at the state shoot, which is scheduled for March 27 in Tulsa.

SHOUT OUT

20

BETH WEESE

Humble Brags

We all know that Oklahomans are a proud people. Whether it’s in connection with sports, chicken fried steak or the state’s pioneering spirit in the face of disaster – natural or otherwise – we like to show our state pride on social media and through the cunning use of T-shirts. It should be no surprise, then, that a new social media app called HeyLets found that Oklahoma ranks no. 8 in the list of the Top 20 Most Braggadocious states in the U.S. The study analyzed the nation’s self-promotional habits and asked 2,500 Americans who participate in social media to rate the number of posts they typically make on potentially self-

In the interest of fairness, there are equipment requirements that have to be met. “Archers in the NASP program shoot only one type of bow: a Mathews Genesis that has universal draw length and light draw weight,” Rouk explains. “Young and old all shoot the same model of bow.” The resurgence of this sport at the hands of pop culture has provided a great platform for positive social interaction as students share their passion and gain self-confidence. “Archery gives students a boost in self-esteem and personal success,” says Rouk. “It allows them to set a goal and accomplish that goal on a small and larger scale.” The small goal is to hit the bull’s eye; the larger goal is to become state champion, Rouk explains. The unique characteristic of archery is that virtually all students have a chance to achieve those goals if they are willing to put in the time. “It differs [from] other sports by not selecting for a particular gender or body type or particular athletic ability,” says Rouk. “It is hard to predict what student will make a great archer.”

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

promotional topics, according to Ann Murray, a spokesperson for HeyLets. The study found that about 64 percent of Oklahomans who interact using social media regularly post positively about Oklahoma and its people. California is no. 1 in the country, with 77 percent of its residents posting positive messages regarding their state. The most humble state is Utah, with just 22 percent engaging in positive state talk. The study proves what we’ve known all along: Oklahoma and its citizens are more than just OK. – Jami Mattox


The Tulsa Achieves Program gives eligible graduating Tulsa County seniors the opportunity to attend College without the cost of tuition and fees. This program began in 2007 and has broken the college barrier for thousands of students. Important deadlines are approaching for seniors who are graduating in spring 2015, with the first priority date on April 30, 2015.

Stay on track with college planning by checking tulsacc.edu/TulsaAchieves Questions? 918-595-7834

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

21


The State

T

ragedy catalyzed Cecil Cloud’s photographic quest. Technology – and his own drive – kept it going. The result is Oklahoma Stations: Work in Progress, an exhibition offering 17 black-and-white images of surviving state railroad stations selected from more than 5,000, all taken by Cloud over the past few years. Opening Feb. 12 at Tulsa’s Coffee House on Cherry Street, the exhibition represents not only a proposed book – hence the name – but also the photographer’s near-lifelong THE INSIDER fascination with trains and their Oklahoma stopovers. “I was a sickly kid,” he notes. “I had a chronic, ongoAn Oklahoma man documents the ing ear infecstate’s historical train stations. tion that made me miserable. My family discovered that I was a little more comfortable at times in a moving car, so when I was cranky and not feeling well, my father would take me out for rides to soothe me. He very quickly discovered I was fascinated by the railroad. I was intrigued by where the trains came from, where they were going and who was riding them. I was fascinated with the vision of the lights of a night train as it wound its way across the countryside.” So, of course, the elder Cloud and his young passenger would often end up at the train station in their hometown of Sapulpa. “It was such an elemental thing with me that I’ve almost lost the conscious memory of how it started,” he says. “I was 2 and 3 years old when these impressions were formed.” TOP: CLOUD HAS He’s certain, however, that those visits first PHOTOGRAPHED THE ignited his passion for the rails. Sapulpa was, DEMISE AND RESURRECTION OF SEVERAL according to press material for the exhibit, “a TRAIN STATIONS IN stop for the Meteor-Frisco’s St. Louis-to-OklaOKLAHOMA. PIChoma City streamliner. The train only stopped TURED ARE PHOTOS OF THE BRISTOW there for a minute, but it was long enough to TRAIN STATION fire a boy’s imagination.” BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER ITS RENOVA“That old station was a huge structure that TION. housed a 40-room hotel, a Harvey [House] PHOTOS BY CECIL CLOUD. dining room and lunch counter, a Harvey RIGHT: PHOTOGRAnewsstand and the railroad operations,” adds PHER CECIL CLOUD. Cloud, explaining that the restaurants run by PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN. the Fred Harvey Company were “the ne plus

Works In Progress

22

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

ultra of the railroad dining house, and in many ways the rootstock of commercial dining across America.” In 1963, however, with rail service drastically diminished, the whole building fell to the wrecking ball. “I was one indignant 4-year-old,” Cloud recalls. Perhaps seeing his favorite place in town demolished ultimately led him to try to save Oklahoma’s railroad stations, if only by capturing their images for others to see. But while his love of trains and the railroad culture persisted throughout his youth and into adulthood, Cloud didn’t make a real commitment to the Oklahoma Stations endeavor for several decades. And during those dozens of years, many more stations throughout the state were torn down, abandoned or turned into something other than depots. “This was a project I had toyed with on and off throughout the ‘80s and early ‘90s,” he says of Oklahoma Stations. “It was something I’d worked toward – I’d compiled a very limited partial list of surviving stations from newspaper articles and things like that – but prior to the widespread availability of the Internet, it was very hard to track down where the surviving stations were and what condition they were in.” Then came the tragedy that led him to really begin working on the project. “Five years ago, a friend of mine was out riding his bicycle between Shawnee and Seminole when he was struck and killed by a gentleman who had looked down to check a text on his cell phone,” Cloud explains. “My friend’s funeral was held in Shawnee, which is the home of one of the most beautiful and unique station buildings we have. It looks like a little castle. I knew that I would need something to occupy myself in the afternoon following the funeral, and I realized there was a group of about five little stations near the route I would take to and from the funeral. “So I took a couple of cameras with me, and when I left the funeral, I just went to the Shawnee station and started taking pictures. I moved on to Wewoka and worked my way back through Holdenville, up to


Bristow, and eventually home. And in reviewing the pictures I took that day, I realized I had a viable project.” By that time, also, the advance of Internet technology had made it much easier for Cloud to find the structures he wanted to photograph. “I turned to a number of websites to get information on what was still standing,” he says. “By collating about three rail-fan-oriented sites, I was able to develop a fairly comprehensive list of what was available, and I just set out trying to shoot as many as I could.” Since then, he adds, his quest has been aided by both the archives of the Oklahoma Historical Society and the virtual-map program Google Earth. “Google Earth has been invaluable in being able to settle questions about whether something is still there,” he notes. “With access to Google Earth, I can actually pull up a satellite view of a town, look for an old rail line, and see if there’s any trace of a structure left.” Many, unfortunately, have barely left a trace at all. The exhibit’s promotional material indicates that there were more than 1,000 railroad-station buildings in Oklahoma in 1938, when rail service was at its peak in the state. Now, Cloud believes there are only 154. He feels that he’s got all but 20 of those captured on film – and, as visitors to the exhibition can see, many are in pretty sad shape. “This is an era of our history, a face of our state that’s dwindling, declining, disappearing,” he says. “I’m trying to preserve as much of it as I can. One of my regrets is that I didn’t start seriously on this Feb 2015 SCI_Ok Mag (CS).pdf

New You

1

12/19/14

project 20 years earlier. “I’m doing this because there’s a remarkable diversity in our state, in our towns, in our railroad stations, in our people,” he adds. “I’m trying to catch the closing of an era.” And so far, he says, he’s been able to do a pretty good job of running down those diverse depots. “There have been a couple of wild-goose chases and a couple of things I’m still trying to pin down conclusively,” Cloud says. “A good example is the alleged Fort Smith and Western [Railway] station in Okemah. There are a couple of rail-fanoriented websites that insist part of a feed store down there is the remains of that old station. But the county historical society there, the chamber of commerce there, local residents there, tell me no, it’s gone. “Also, there are some [stations] I would like to visit that I’m having trouble getting access to,” he adds, “because they’re in the middle of private property that’s probably tied up in bankruptcy or in an estate. But I’ve had surprisingly few surprises. The biggest surprise I’ve had is how friendly the people of this state still are, how interested they are in what I’m doing and how supportive they are of the project.” JOHN WOOLEY

Oklahoma Stations: Work in Progress runs through Saturday, March 14, at the Coffee House on Cherry Street, 1502 E. 15th Street in Tulsa.

10:14 AM

resolution

Get a little help with your New Year's resolution from FDA-cleared CoolSculpting® — the non-invasive treatment that can reduce the bumps and bulges that resist diet and exercise.

CoolSculpting is FDA-cleared to reduce fat on the abs, flanks & thighs.

after

CoolSculpting (each area)

MODEL

$100 OFF

before

procedure by edward becker, md

As seen on The Doctors Show, The Today Show and Good Morning America!

Call for Your Free Consultation: 918.948.6375 CELEBRATING

YEARS EXCELLENCE

www.skincareinstitute.net 6565 South Yale Avenue Lobby Level, Tulsa

Special promotion valid until 2.28.15, and may not be combined. Must mention this ad to receive special. Individual results vary. Other restrictions may apply. 20730 Skin Care Institute.indd 1

4 201

1/2/15 10:39 AM

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

23


The State

POH HAS PRODUCED DENTAL PRODUCTS IN TULSA SINCE 1961. IN ADDITION TO BEING SOLD ACROSS THE U.S., POH PRODUCTS HAVE ALSO BEEN SENT TO SPACE FOR USE BY ASTRONAUTS. PHOTO COURTESY PERSONAL ORAL HYGIENE.

OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Tooth Truth Tulsa’s Personal Oral Hygiene sends toothbrushes worldwide and into outer space.

S

ince 1961, Personal Oral Hygiene (POH) has produced dental products used all over the world and beyond. The late Robert G. Jones, D.D.S., founded POH as Oral Health Products, Inc., with his wife at their dining room table. Robert Jones, currenty POH president and son of Dr. and Mrs. Jones, describes the family business as a result of his dad’s then-cutting-edge viewpoints and the development of optimal dental hygiene products in collaboration with health researcher and microbiologist Dr. Charles C. Bass. “Dr. Bass led dad to understand that, to be an asset, a toothbrush should do no harm,” Jones says. “Toothbrushes on store shelves at that time had rough, unpolished bristle tips that actually damaged the gum tissue. All you have to do to prevent tooth decay and gum disease is disrupt and disorganize oral bacterial plaque once a day before bedtime.” In other words, clean your teeth properly every day. “The core business of POH is the preventive dental office. These are dentists around the world who would very much like to never fill another cavity or pull another diseased tooth,” he continues. “The Bass Method of personal oral hygiene is best taught by a knowledgeable person on a one to one basis. The preventive dental office has always been the best place for patients to learn.” Jones’ family-owned and operated firm educates the public on often-misunderstood dental issues. “When dentists or hygienists talk to their patients and use the

24

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

word ‘plaque,’ people don’t really understand that they are talking about a vibrant, lively mass of little animals, plants and fungus living out their lives in the nooks and crannies of their teeth and gums,” says Jones. “Most people think that sugar is the cause of tooth decay. The fact is that any fermentable carbohydrate will serve as food for the bacteria that cause dental disease. Tooth decay and gum disease can be prevented, but only the individual can do it. For [more than 50] years, we have been told to brush X times a day with Y toothpaste, avoid sweets and see your dentist twice a year. Today we are living with the results of that advice. Too many people are brushing their teeth, but not really getting them clean.” Another significant factor to understand is that flossing prevents gum disease, says Jones. “Brushing cleans those tooth surfaces available to the bristles, preventing cavities,” he says. “Dr. Bass pointed out that if you are going to do only one and not both, then you should floss. Gum disease takes the whole tooth. Cavities take it piece by piece. You have to both brush and floss.” POH products are sold in Whole Foods, independent pharmacies and grocery stores as well as on government bases and from direct ordering from dental practices worldwide. POH even send its items into space for use by astronauts and Skylab staff. “At the factory in Tulsa, POH has always had walk-in traffic, so we put [our products] in a store for those folks,” says Jones. “In our 50 years, we have learned that POH people will go to great lengths to get their POH floss and toothbrush. It seems they get spoiled and do not like to go back to whatever they were using before.” The late Dr. Jones was known for telling anyone who cared to learn: “You only need to clean the teeth you want to keep.” TRACY LEGRAND


The Oklahoma City University Difference


The State

SCENE

Honoree Alison Anthony and her husband, Mark Wilson, celebrate YWCA Tulsa’s Centennial year at the 100 Women with Moxie event on Dec. 2 at the DoubleTree in downtown Tulsa.

Leadership Oklahoma hosted a Holiday Party for its membership and their guests on Dec. 5 in the home of Rhonda and Phil Cook of Edmond. Pictured here: Bruce Benbrook, Joe Moran and Sam Combs.

OSU First Lady Ann Hargis and OSU Chief Wellness Officer Dr. Suzy Harrington discuss OSU’s wellness programs as America’s Healthiest Campus on National Public Radio’s Living Room radio program.

Honoree Suzanne Warren with son, Andrew Warren, and Rania Nasreddine enjoy YWCA Tulsa’s 100 Women with Moxie event on Dec. 2 at the DoubleTree in downtown Tulsa

Junior Achievement’s Business Success Series Luncheon held in December at Southern Hills Tulsa Marriott. Pictured left to right: Jeff Wilson, Howard Barnett, Phil Marshall, Joy Hofmeister and Wes Mitchell.

(Left to right): Earl Johnson, TU’s vice president for enrollment & student services; Peggy Upham, TU’s first lady; Mai Pham, creator of Star Ginger Asian Grill & Noodle Bar; and L. Duane Wilson, chairman of the TU Board of Trustees gather for lunch and a cooking demonstration at Skelly Mansion.

Whitney Tatum and Brittany Attaway of Eventures, Inc.

The 2015 Oklahoma Wedding Show Hundreds of brides and grooms-to-be gathered in the Expo Square Central Park Hall to talk with dozens of wedding professionals at Oklahoma Magazine’s annual Oklahoma Wedding Show.

Michelle Holdgrafer, of Bruce G. Weber, Chera Kimiko, of Channel 6 and Vida Schuman, of Oklahoma Magazine.

26

Ann’s Bakery supplied the cake for this year’s cake dive.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Chelsea Brown and Shawna Burroughs, hair stylists for The Oklahoma Wedding Show.

Six brides-to-be dove into the cake during this year’s cake dive, digging for the diamond ring that would secure their grand prize.

Grand prize winner, Alyssa Snow (right), with her friend Brandi Hadley. Hadley was chosen for the cake dive and handed the torch to the bride-to-be.


Patient-Centered Cancer Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility.

As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home.

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer 800 NE 10th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73104

centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-6822 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


The State

WITH A GOAL OF BRINGING THE OUTSIDE IN, LARGE WINDOWS ALLOW FOR AMPLE NATURAL LIGHT TO FLOOD THE LIVING SPACE. LEFT: THE LARGE WOOD TABLE IN THE DINING ROOM WAS CREATED FOR THIS SPACE. PHOTOS COURTESY ELEMENT360 DESIGN.

L I V I N G S PA C E

Bringing Light And Life

A couple renovates a south Tulsa home into a livable and airy space.

C

alifornia casual was the style these homeowners wanted to create with the renovation of this 1980s south Tulsa home. “They were moving from a home that had a dark interior,” says Tracy Huntington, owner of ELEMENT360

Design. The house was in desperate need of an update, especially to create the light and bright space the homeowners desired. The oak wood flooring, which ran throughout the open spaces, was refinished. Huntington had the extensive amount of light oak crown molding and paneling painted white. By using the same color on the trim and walls, the space appears even larger. “One of the goals was to bring the outside in,” says Huntington. Since the expanse of living room windows face the back yard, they were left without window coverings. Local artist and family friend, Kelsey Newman, custom painted tree silhouettes on opposite walls. Matching distressed wood consoles were selected to simulate the feeling of tree bark. Wooden benches look like tree trunks and are tucked under the consoles to provide additional seating, if necessary. “Creating a conversation area in the living area was a main goal,” says Huntington.

28

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29


The State

LEFT: THE VARYING SIZES OF ROUND MIRRORS IN THE ENTRYWAY GIVE A NOD TO THE CIRCULAR DESIGNS FOUND IN OTHER ROOMS OF THE HOME. BELOW: TREE SILHOUETTES PAINTED ON THE LIVING ROOM WALL ADD NUANCE TO THE NATURE-THEMED ROOM. PHOTOS COURTESY ELEMENT360 DESIGN.

So instead of a traditional sofa, Huntington selected four custom chairs from Norwalk Furniture that are upholstered in tan velvet with a soft white Mohair used on the back and seat cushions. To add an accent, she had pillows made for each chair. Centered on the round custom white shag rug is the clients’ favorite piece among the new furnishings. The oversized 45-by-40-inch resin cocktail table, fashioned as a tree trunk, is finished in silver leaf. The white walls and trim continue in the adjacent dining room, and Huntington repurposed the existing brass chandelier, painting it white. The large wood table was fabricated in California and is surrounded by the homeowners’ existing white leather and chrome chairs. The black-and-white geometric rug was selected for two reasons. “Since the rooms are so light and open, I used some black in each room to help ground the space,” says Huntington. “Plus, it’s functional.” With a family including four children, a dark rug in the dining room seemed practical. The two light wood consoles are from Noir Furniture, and the homeowners’ blue-and-black, round mirror is centered above. Although the homeowners prefer no window coverings, because the dining room window faces the street, Huntington was able to keep the feeling of light but provide privacy by using cream silk linen for window coverings. In the entry area that leads into the living room and dining areas, Huntington utilized the homeowners’ existing black console and painted the existing brass chandelier white. She selected a pair of ceramic lights for the console. “The owner likes the feeling of symmetry, and there are several areas where I’ve used matching furnishings and accessories,” says Huntington. One exception is the series of varying sized dimensional round mirrors that Huntington randomly placed all the way up to the 12-foot ceiling, adding to the feel of the light, open space. The circular motif is repeated in each room with the living room area rug and dining room mirror. “We enjoyed working with Tracy and her team,” say the homeowners. “Their light and airy design has brought a relaxing feel to our home.” TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON

30

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


3549 South Harvard, Tulsa 918-742-9027

3509S.S.Peoria, Peoria, Tulsa, Tulsa OK 3509 OK74105 74105| | 918 918748 7488700 8700 www.madorangallery.com www.madorangallery.com

20708 MA Doran.indd 1

12/29/14 8867 11:26Toni's.indd AM 1

1/14/13 2:23 PM

Since 1964

Specializing in frameless heavy glass shower doors, mirrors, framed shower doors, glass tops and insulated glass units.

Don Tracy Glass Co. 1335 S. HARVARD â—? TULSA, OK 74112 OFFICE: (918) 744-1815 FAX: (918) 744-0917

www.dontracyglass.com

20740 OKC MOA.indd 1

1/7/15 18222 8:18 AM Don Tracy Glass.indd 1

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

31 12/14/14 4:39 PM


The State

THEORY SUEDE JACKET, $955, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. BURBERRY CASHMERE SCARF, $650, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

YOANA BARASCHI PATTERNED SWEATER, $240, MISS JACKSON’S.

JOY WHITE QUARTZ & TURQUOISE CUFF BRACELET BY, STEPHANIE KANTIS, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STYLE

TOLANI PATTERNED TUNIC, $175, MISS JACKSON’S.

Warm up your style with exotic-travel inspired pieces featuring rich tones, bohemian fringe, batik patterns and statement jewelry.

BCBGMAXAZRIA PATTERNED DRESS, $268, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

CLOVER CANYON PRINT DRESS, $268, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SW3 FAUX LEATHER FRINGED JACKET, $297, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

NEST AMAZONITE STATEMENT NECKLACE, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STEPHANIE KANTIS TURQUOISE DROP EARRINGS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ASKARI FRINGED SHAWL, $98, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STEPHANIE KANTIS QUARTZ BANGLE BRACELETS, $385 EACH, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALICE + OLIVIA FLORAL BLOUSE, $297, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ARMANI A-LINE SKIRT, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JOHNNY WAS BLOUSE, $218, AND PATTERNED SCARF, $97, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

NEST PINK HOWLITE STATEMENT NECKLACE, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. REBECCA MINKOFF FRINGED FLATS, $250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JIMMY CHOO EMBROIDERED CORK WEDGES, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

32

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

STEPHANIE KANTIS BEADED DROP EARRINGS, $325, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

Spice Route


UPCOMING EVENTS Managed by

Fine apparel

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT BOKCenter.com 1-866-7-BOK-CTR Arby’s Box Office

www.traversmahanapparel.com

South Lewis at 81st • The Plaza • 918-296-4100 20715 BOK Center.indd 1

18861 Champagne Penthouse.indd 1

12/19/14 20744 2:01 PM Travers Mahan.indd 1

1/9/15 2:06 PM

4/15/14 3:59 PM

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

33


The State

STYLE

French Kiss Travel no farther than the City of Light for a romantic look.

ALICE + OLIVIA JACKET WITH OVERSIZED BOW, $368, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LOEFFLER RANDALL LEATHER FRINGED CLUTCH, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG WRAP DRESS, $498, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TED QUIL NUE. E COBS C JA FIFTH AV R A M SAKS C BY MAR ER, $298, P SHOP

WACOAL BLACK EMBROIDERED BRA, $50, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. DAVID YURMAN SILVER ACCENTED SUNGLASSES, $339, VISIONS. ROUGE COCO HYDRATING CRÈME LIP COLOUR BY CHANEL, $35, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

KATE SPADE SILK STRIPED BLOUSE, $198, AND SKIRT, $298, MISS JACKSON’S. LACE L BLACK 2, WACOA PANTY, $3 . HIPSTER UE EN AV H FT SAKS FI

BURBERRY RAIN COAT, $1,895, AND SILK SCARF, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ALICE + OLIVIA STRIPED DRESS, $398, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

KATE SPADE OSTRICH HANDBAG, $428, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TORY BURCH LEATHER PEEP-TOE FLATS, $265, MISS JACKSON’S.

JOIE FRENCH STATEMENT SWEATERS, $298, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALICE + OLIVIA GRAPHIC SWEATER, $298, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

34

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

FURLA LEATHER AND SUEDE TOTE, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


Choctaw Nation ofFaith Oklahoma Family Culture

The Executive Entrepreneur, a new book by Jim Stovall and Paula Marshall. Now available on Amazon.com, Kindle store and iBookstore.

Capitol Museum and Gift Shop Tvshka Homma, OK

Pottery

Stickball

Social Dancing

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma is the third-largest federally recognized tribe in the United States.

200,000 Tribal Members Worldwide

Jim Stovall

According to Jim Stovall, Hamlet was wrong. For business owners, the question isn’t, “To be or not to be?” The question is “To grow, or to die?”

Chief Gary Batton Assistant Chief Jack Austin, Jr.

Paula Marshall

800.522.6170 | choctawnation.com

20723 Choctaw Nation.indd 1

1

2

of the greatest surveys of twentieth century Native American art.

1

locations.

12/23/14 12885 10:04 AM Bama Companies 2.indd 1

1/22/15 9:29 AM

3

artworks to find. Find all three artworks at Philbrook and Philbrook Downtown and receive a prize with this ad! Write the artist’s name next to each object and bring this ad to the front desk at either location to claim your prize.

2

3

Philbrook 2727 S. Rockford Rd.

20747 Philbrook.indd 1

Philbrook Downtown 116 E. M.B. Brady St.

1/9/15 2:27 PM

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

35


The State

STYLE

Sporty Chic

Working out has never looked so good. New trends transition from the yoga mat to the coffee shop and beyond, now more than ever.

BLAC 3D PRINTED FRONT SUNGLASSES, $715, HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR.

RUN: PACE SETTER SKIRT, $58, LULULEMON.

EXQUISITE TANK, $58, LULULEMON.

PATTERNED BRA, $42, WITH HOUNDSTOOTH LEGGINGS, $92, LULULEMON.

ASH SNAKEEMBOSSED LEATHER SNEAKERS, $198, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ZARA TEREZ LEGGINGS, $78, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ASH LEATHER SLIP-ON SNEAKERS, $170, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ZARA TEREZ LEGGINGS, $78, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SPLENDID MESHPANELED TANK TOP, $74, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE ZARA TEREZ LEGGINGS, $78, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PUFFY WINDKET, BREAKER JAC N. $178, LULULEMO

CORAL CROSSBACK TANK, $64, WITH GRAY SWEATSHIRT, $78, LULULEMON.

MARC JACO BY MARC B BACK S QUILTED P FIFTH ACK, $198, SAKS AVEN UE.

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

TANK WITH PLEATED SKIRT, $64, LULULEMON.


Attached Teeth in a Day • call for a complimentary x-ray and Free Consultation.

Implant, Sedation, and Cosmetic Dentistry

Chris Ward, DDS

2014

918-274-4466 • owassodentalimplants.com 20711 Elk City.indd 1

12/22/14 12641 1:54 PM Chris Ward DDS.indd 1

10/8/14 4:46 PM

Visit Us Online At www.bankofoklahoma.com

MORE PEACE OF MIND Get Mobile Alerts On Your Phone Or Tablet

© 2015 Bank of Oklahoma, a division of BOKF, NA. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

37


The State

YO U R H E A L T H

Keys To Your Heart Treat your body right, and your heart will thank you.

K

eeping your heart healthy should be a top priority. Give your heart the attention it deserves by following these recommendations by the American Heart Association (AHA) for maintaining a healthy heart and preventing heart disease. Small changes can make a big impact.

Stay Active and Maintain a Healthy Weight

Dr. Lance Garner, an interventional cardiologist with INTEGRIS Heart Hospital in Oklahoma City, says the benefit of exercise begins with the physiologic, cellular-level effects on the heart arteries and the heart muscle itself. “First, exercise preserves the natural, vital physiologic reactivity of our coronary arteries, which allows our heart arteries to appropriately dilate or constrict under different physiologic conditions,” says Garner. “Secondly, it improves the heart’s efficiency at oxygen consumption and utilization. Overall, both of these help the heart perform its job as a pump at maximum efficiency with much less effort and with less energy expenditure.” The AHA recommends at least 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise. “Extra weight puts a higher work load on the heart,” says Dr. Chris Dalton, a family medicine physician at Warren Clinic in Jenks. “Obesity in general is associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, lower HDL (the “good” cholesterol) and high triglycerides. Belly fat is even more concerning – it’s a key indicator for metabolic syndrome: high blood glucose, low HDL, high triglycerides and elevated blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome significantly raises one’s risk for heart disease.”

Control Your Cholesterol

To address high cholesterol levels, Dalton recommends a diet low in saturated fats (animal fats, fried foods and dairy products) and high in omega-3 fatty acids found in nuts and fish oils. He also suggests exercise. However, he adds that while this diet helps raise HDL levels and lower triglycerides, it can be a struggle to lower LDL, also known as the “bad” cholesterol. “Genetics often play a big factor in how high a person’s LDL is,” says Dalton. “So, we often get help from medications. While statin drugs often draw criticism, they are generally safe and well-tolerated, and reduce LDL cholesterol by 35 to 55 percent.”

38

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Eat A Heart-Healthy Diet

To help you stay on track, Garner says to keep your eating plan simple. If a diet is too complex, it often becomes overwhelming and too hard to sustain. “I encourage portion control and a heart-healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables and meats low in saturated fats, such as fish or chicken,” says Garner. “I advise sodium restriction with three simple rules: 1) avoid the salt shaker; 2) avoid sodium where it’s hidden, such as in processed, packaged or preserved foods, fast food restaurants and vending machines; and 3) seek out low sodium versions of some of the foods you already eat.”

Manage Blood Pressure And Reduce Blood Sugar

According to the AHA, one in three Americans has high blood pressure. However, one out of every five doesn’t know they have it. If you’ve been told you have elevated blood pressure, Garner says to take the news seriously. “Do your research to better understand its causes, its potentially devastating consequences and ways to curtail it,” he says. “Be proactive and take it upon yourself to start a home blood pressure diary. I too often see patients passively not engaged in their own blood pressure monitoring and not employing simple lifestyle changes that can have huge effects on blood pressure management.” For those with high blood sugar, Dalton explains that specific testing can reveal a 90-day average blood sugar level and help you and your physician develop a plan to lower it. His office helps patients identify carbohydrates, what the body turns into glucose (blood sugar), in their diet. The common culprits include bread, rice and items made from flour. However, some vegetables are high in carbohydrates, such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, corn (and anything made from corn), peas and butternut squash. “Once we teach them about carbs, we ask that they limit [themselves] to two carb servings with every meal,” he says. “A carb serving is one (normal sized) open palmful of food. We also recommend they add exercise – 30 minutes, three to four days weekly. This brings down sugars as well.”

Stop Smoking

The list of benefits is long when it comes to quitting smoking. Along with overall better health, Garner shares that it reduces your risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease – and more specifically you can reduce your coronary heart disease risk within one to two years of quitting. REBECCA FAST


FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

39


The State

THE SCENIC ROUTE OF THE RING OF KERRY – A 160 KILOMETER DRIVE. RIGHT: BOATS IN A SHELTERED PORT IN GALWAY BAY. TWO WOMEN WORK BEHIND THE COUNTER OF A POPULAR KILKENNY, IRELAND CAFE: BLAA BLAA BLAA SANDWICHES. BLAA IS A DOUGHY, WHITE BREAD (ROLL) SPECIALTY. HARMON CHATS UP TWO IRISHMEN ABOUT THE WORLD CUP. A MAN PLAYS HIS ACCORDION ON THE STREETS OF GALWAY. THE CLIFFS OF MOHER, ONE OF IRELAND’S MOST SPECTACULAR SIGHTS, STAND 230 METERS – 253 YARDS – ABOVE THE GROUND AT THEIR HIGHEST POINT.

D E S T I N AT I O N

The Emerald Isle

E

Photographer Nathan Harmon explores Ireland with Tulsa’s Honors Orchestra.

Photography by Nathan Harmon popular belief that Guinness tastes different in Ireland. very year, Tulsa’s Honors Orchestra ventures “They don’t pasteurize it like we do in the United to a new part of the world, and the only criteStates. They simply write the date it was made on the ria is that the adventure take the orchestra to keg, and by the time that date comes around it better be a place rich in musical history. Members of the orchestra have explored the tunes of Italy, empty because it will get thrown away either way,” he says. Austria, Germany and Argentina. For a second time, The group touched down in Ireland at the Dublin the orchestra recently landed on the small island off the Airport and spent the next nine days enjoying the food, western coast of Great Britain: Ireland. scenery, music and history that Ireland has to offer, with Photographer Nathan Harmon tagged along with his stops in Waterford, Killarney, Co. Kerry, Galway and wife, Karen, and daughter, Lexy, to capture the imagery County Meath. the trip offered. Karen, director of Tulsa’s Honors Orchestra and organizer of their yearly trips, learned everything from her mother, who started the Orchestra Welcome to Ireland 35 years ago. Upon the group’s arrival to Dublin, they met with a On this adventure, students between the ages of 7 and local guide for a Panoramic City Tour, which would 25 traveled some 1,200 miles, by bus, across Ireland’s introduce them to the principal sites the city has to offer: green landscape. They visited churches, famous cafés elegant Georgian squares, Trinity College, St. Patrick’s and restaurants, castles, farms and, of course, for those Cathedral (Ireland’s largest cathedral), Christ Church of age, pubs. Cathedral and The Guinness Storehouse. The orches“It was a great chance to make sure Guinness was still tra would delve deeper into these sites’ histories when making [its beer] right,” Harmon says, agreeing with the they’d return to Dublin on the last leg of their trip.

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


From Dublin to Waterford

On the group’s second day in Ireland, after a full Irish breakfast, many times including bacon, sausages, black and white puddings, eggs, vegetables and potatoes all fried in creamery butter with homemade Irish soda or brown bread for soakage, the group departed to Waterford. On their way, they made a quick pit-stop in Kilkenny to see the famous Kilkenny Castle. Built by the Anglo-Normans in the 12th century, the castle stood tall and strong as the orchestra toured its grounds and renovated interior. Afterward, the group boarded the bus and traveled south to Waterford, Ireland’s oldest city. FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

41


The State

After reaching Waterford, “By hook or by crook,” – a slogan coined by Henry II when searching for the city in 1170 – the group took a walking tour with a local guide. They sneaked through Waterford’s narrow alleyways that jet off its larger streets exploring the still present Viking culture that has survived the centuries. The group ventured to Reginald’s Tower, Ireland’s oldest civic building and part of the historic Viking Triangle, as well as the French Church. Before leaving Waterford, the Orchestra toured the Waterford Crystal Visitor Centre, where they walked through the factory getting an up-close view of the centuries-old tradition of making Waterford Crystal. Blazing furnaces and wooden mold-making and crystal blowing production areas filled the space that creates the world’s most famous crystal.

42

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

A CYCLIST ENJOYS A RIDE OUTSIDE THE RING OF KERRY NEAR KILLARNEY. BELOW: A REPURPOSED MILL NEAR KILKENNY CASTLE.


LEFT: HARMON IS PICTURED WITH HIS WIFE, KAREN, AND DAUGHTER, LEXY, AFTER KISSING THE BLARNEY STONE ATOP BLARNEY CASTLE. RIGHT: THE CHRIST ICON INSIDE KYLEMORE ABBEY’S SMALL GOTHIC CHURCH IN GALWAY. BELOW: THE STONE WORK ON THE WALLS INSIDE CHRIST CHURCH IN DUBLIN REPRESENTS THE STRUCTURE’S GOTHIC STYLE.

Waterford to Killarney

As the orchestra watched Waterford fade in the distance, the bus drove onward toward Blarney Castle, one of Ireland’s oldest and most historic castles situated in Blarney Village, just outside Cork City. Here, the group joined tourists from all over the world in kissing the stone the castle is made of. “It’s a tourist trap,” says Harmon. “We had to [kiss the stone].” The current standing castle, built in 1446, is famous for its Blarney stone, The Stone of Eloquence. The legend says that the stone has the power to bestow the gift of eloquence on all those who kiss it. And that’s just what they did. The route to Killarney ventured onto the Iveragh Peninsula, also known as the Ring of Kerry, where they enjoyed the most panaramic drive in Ireland: beautiful mountains, bogs, lakes and views of the Atlantic ocean stretch the 166 kilometer, roughly 103 mile, route.

Kerry to Galway

Traveling up to Galway, the group crossed River Shannon by ferry continuing to the Cliffs of Moher, whose sheer face dips 213 meters down into the waters of the Atlantic. Farther north, they entered the Burren Regions, famous for its limestone pavements, which have, over the years, eroded into a distinctive pattern. Once in Galway, the group enjoyed dinner, music and entertainment at Padraicins Seafood Restaurant. Later, they visited the Connemara region. Made up mostly of the Twelve Bens mountain range, this region’s position on the Atlantic coastline also FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

43


The State

welcomes many creeks, bays and harbors for sightseers to indulge in.

AN EMPLOYEE AT RATHBAUN FARM SHEARS A SHEEP.

Back to Dublin

HARMON’S DAUGHTER, LEXY, STANDS OUTSIDE THE GUINNESS STOREHOUSE.

As the group headed back to Dublin, they stopped by Rathbaun Farm, where the Connolly family farms its 80 acres. Sheep, cows and horses inhabit the land. Time spent here gave students a glimpse into the daily workings of an Ireland sheep farm. Arriving in Dublin later that night, the group would wake the next morning to explore the famous, Gothic style St. Patrick’s Cathedral. One of the few buildings left from Medievel Dublin, the present structure was built in 1220. They also toured The Guinness Storehouse, Europe’s largest stout producing brewery, and its seventh-floor Gravity bar where they could sample “firsthand, the elixir of life – a pint of Guinness,” as the orchestra’s itinerary described it. To cap off the day, a dinner at Merry Ploughboy Pub awaited the group. The nightly shows are “undoubtedly the must-do Irish music experience on any Dublin trip,” the group’s itinerary also mentioned.

Farewell to Ireland

The day of departure, the group said goodbye to Ireland in the only way they saw fit – a final Irish breakfast. Tulsa’s Honors Orchestra’s next stop? Quebec City, Canada. BRITTANY ANICETTI

44

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

BELOW: WILD HORSES IN KILLARNEY OVERLOOKING THE FAMOUS GAP OF DUNLOE IN COUNTY KERRY, ON THE GROUNDS OF THE DUNLOE HOTEL.


1660 E. 71st, Suite H, Tulsa, OK 74136

dis

918.494.0999

11871 Petal Pushers.indd 1

1/4/13 11:01 AM

Mommy Maids • Residential or Commercial • Call for FREE Estimates

Gift Certificates Available!

$75 for 2 hours of Basic Cleaning Just mention this ad. Offer expires 1/31/15

918.938.8222

www.mommy-maids.com

“It’s hard to compete with a Mom’s touch.”

18405 Mommy Maids 1-8H.indd 1

11/19/14 2:53 PM

55th Annual

February 28, 2015 A Tulsa Tradition

Georgia O’Keeffe, Lake George- Autumn, 1922. Oil on canvas. Collection of Jan T. and Marica Vilcek, Promised Gift to The Vilcek Foundation

2014

AMERICAN MASTERWORKS

Petal Pushers

cov

er

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Admission $1 per person Featuring tens of thousands of used, rare and children’s books, games, toys and movies.

5666 East 81st Street, Tulsa hollandhall.org

20720 Holland Hall Book Fair.indd 1

FEB. 8 – MAY 3, 2015

12/22/14 20748 1:06 PM Philbrook.indd 1

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45

1/9/15 2:35 PM


You

All About By Jami Mattox

Cosmetic and reconstructive trends – both surgical and nonsurgical – can change the way the world sees you.

46

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


Surgical Trends We all have things we’d like to change about ourselves. With the help of the right surgeon, that wish list can come true. Dr. Angelo Cuzalina, a cosmetic surgeon at Tulsa Surgical Arts, says that buttock enhancement is a popular trend with his clients. “There are three ways to enhance the buttocks,” he says. “A butt lift, or booty lift, is usually best for people who have lost weight and have sagging skin.” Another popular buttock enhancement is for people who don’t have shapely buttocks. Gluteal implants are solid silicone and are rounded to add shape for an individual that otherwise has no shape to his or her buttocks. The Brazilian butt lift adds fat taken from other areas of the body to the buttocks to create a very exaggerated shape. “[With] women who have fuller physiques in the hips and waist, we can contour the buttocks by taking fat from those areas and transplanting it into the buttocks,” Cuzalina says. “We can sculpt it into the shape you want. It looks good and is less expensive than a butt lift or butt implants.” Cuzalina says that with the in-

crease of bariatric surgeries comes an increase in patients who have sagging skin that needs to be corrected. “Tummy tucks – they’ve been around a long time – but because of bariatric surgery and just being more comfortable with cosmetic surgery,” the procedure is as popular as ever, Cuzalina says. “One of the most common places that bariatric patients sag is in their belly.” Dr. Arch Miller, a board-certified plastic surgeon with Tulsa Plastic Surgery, says that a recent advancement in plastic and reconstructive surgery using stem cells has aided him in rebuilding bone for patients that have suffered from ailments that affect the structure of the chest. “One of the things that has really helped us in aspects for cancer patients and for heart patients who have had chest infections and sternums that are falling apart has been a com-

pany that is purifying and getting stem cells for us to use for rebuilding bone and making new ribs and sternums for patients,” Miller says. “We take patients that don’t have ribs, and we build with the dermal matrix.” Working with a company called AlloSource, materials like bone marrow, stem cells and pipelines that attach to sternums are used for the procedure. “It is one of the biggest advances as a reconstructive surgeon I’ve had [in my career],” Miller says. He also says that a couple of machines in his office are making it easier to treat common complaints from patients. “One of [the machines] is an ultrasound machine that you hold over the fat in the tummy,” Miller says. “Soundwaves penetrate through the skin and kill fat cells. There’s no pain, no downtime, no shots and the whole procedure takes about an hour.” The other machine, he says, is not as new in terms of technology but new in that it is easier now for those who struggle with excessive sweat to fix the problem. Called MiraDry, the machine exposes sweat glands in the armpit to a radio frequency that causes them to stop working. “Once you’ve had this treatment, you don’t sweat anymore,” Miller says, “but the important thing of it is that it basically stops you from perspiring. If you’re a public speaker, a pageant contestant or someone who sweats excessively, that’s a big deal.” Both Miller and Cuzalina say that the use of fillers and injectables continues to be popular among patients. Miller has seen an increase in popularity of the “liquid facelift,” a technique in which injectables and fillers are used over several treatments, eventually resulting in a facelift that does not require surgery.

2013 COSMETIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE PLASTIC SURGERY TRENDS 15.1 million cosmetic procedures 1.6 million cosmetic surgical procedures 13.4 million cosmetic minimally-invasive procedures 5.7 million reconstructive procedures

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

47


2013 TOP 5 COSMETIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES Breast augmentation Nose reshaping Eyelid surgery Liposuction Facelift

290,000 221,000 216,000 200,000 133,000

Source: American Society of Plastic Surgeons

The Undoing

Lots of people, perhaps when they’re young, may think it’s a great idea to get that tattoo or piercing, imagining they will love it forever. A few years down the road, however, circumstances – and tastes – can change. Suddenly, those large ear piercings or neck tattoos don’t seem like such great ideas. Dr. Arch Miller, board-certified plastic surgeon at Tulsa Plastic Surgery, says that when these decisions made years ago no longer fit a lifestyle, there are options open to correcting them. Tattoo removal, closing large piercings and downsizing breast implants are procedures that Miller regularly performs. He says that many men and women are having neck and forearm tattoos removed because

of the U.S. Army’s requirements for entry. “[People] have gotten tattoos on their neck and forearms, and they want to join the Army, but the Army won’t let them,” he says. Miller says that depending on how large the tattoo is, there are two options for removal. “One is to cut the tattoo off and close it. You will have a scar, but it works,” he says. “The second best way is to laser it, but the problem is that you leave a ghost. If you can get rid of the tattoo, the skin color is lighter, or there is a pattern or outline. A lot can be rid of, but you have 10, 12, 15 treatments to get there.” Miller recommends that men and women get

48

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

tattooed in areas that can’t be seen, or get tattoos small enough that they can be removed. Dr. Angelo Cuzalina, a cosmetic surgeon at Tulsa Surgical Arts, says that he has had to perform surgery on earlobes that have been disfigured by enlarged ear piercings. He says that one woman liked her gaged piercings, but she was entering the military, and she was required to close the holes. “A lot is job-related,” Cuzalina says. “The employer didn’t like the enlarged piercing, or a person has the need to look presentable for a job interview. If they feel like people are going to think about their big piercing, it’s something that can be corrected easily.” Cuzalina says it’s a lot easier to correct the large piercing holes than it is to laser off a tattoo. “A lot of people are mistaken that if you have a tattoo, lasers can take it off,” he says. “They do not work well in general for tattoos. Depending on the person’s coloring and the type of ink, it can work, but for others, it can still cause skin discoloration.” He says that people shouldn’t get tattoos believing that they can be erased in a couple of years. Miller says that to correct a large piercing, the skin that has been stretched is put back together in a coil. Then, skin is closed over it so that the lobe appears normal again. It is possible to re-pierce the earlobe after nine months of healing. Some women receive breast implants when they are young, only to find that as they age, the implants may sag or begin to feel too large. “The most common corrective surgery I do is for women who get good-sized implants, and maybe they’re the right size or a little larger, then they sag as they grow older or gain breast tissue,” Cuzalina says. Some women may opt to have the implants removed, he says, or have a lift, but most women opt to have the extra tissue removed, which will make the breasts smaller and perkier. Cuzalina adds that the goal is typically to improve appearance of the breasts in clothing. Both surgeons caution that not every problem can be fixed, so exercise caution when making decisions regarding altering your appearance.


Thermage & Fraxel a winning combination for full skin rejuvenation!

YOUR LIFE. LIVE IT BEAUTIFULLY!

+ Now offered at

New Appointment Times Available 18162 Utica Skin Care.indd 1

Travel Issue

Great places to visit in Oklahoma and beyond.

o visit in 1/8 travel.indd beyond.

918-712-3223 Welcome Kristen Rice, M.D., Dermatologist 12/26/13 JUNE 2015

8:40 AM

Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205

1

1/19/15 20706 4:58 PM Skin Renewal.indd 1

12/19/14 5:20 PM

Featuring Liquid Facelii • LOOK YOUNGER • NO SURGERY • NO DOWNTIME A non-surgical Liquid Facelii can be undertaken to accomplish any of the following: • Reduce wrinkles, creases, crows feet and laugh lines • Restore face to a more youthful look • Sooen the features • Reduce marionette lines from nose to mouth • Rejuvenate and refresh the face

You may not quite be ready for a surgical facelii. You may have a big event coming up and need results fast. You may not have time to set aside for the downtime required for a surgical facelii. If any of this applies to you then the liquid facelii is the answer.

20719 Tulsa Plastic Surgery.indd 1

1/10/15 11:23 AM

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

49


Non-surgical Trends No one likes to look in the mirror and see signs of aging. Unfortunately, our skin doesn’t lie; fortunately, those signs can be altered and even reversed by taking advantage of technology and the latest advances in nonsurgical and minimally invasive procedures. “We like to look at a person and talk about what bothers them the most,” says Pamela Klein, RN and registered nurse injector at Skin Renewal of Tulsa. “A lot of times what bothers them is not what I see, necessarily. A lot of people say, ‘I want to look younger, what do you see?’ I show them things that I’m capable of doing versus plastic surgeons. I refer clients to plastic surgeons because of what they need. Some don’t want that, but others are fine to go with plastic surgery. Some things you can do without going to a plastic surgeon.” Klein says she sees lots of clients that are interested in injectables and skincare treatments like chemical peels and Fraxel laser, which stimulates collagen, diminishes pigmentation, improves texture and minimizes fine lines and wrinkles. Karen Weidner, owner of Utica Square Skin Care, says that microneedling is a trend

she is having clients ask for frequently. “Fractional microneedling makes micro-injuBotulinum toxin type A 6.3 million ries to the skin, so what is Soft tissue fillers 2.2 million replaced is healthier skin Chemical peel 1.2 million more even in texture and Laser hair removal 1.1 million color. It’s great for scars, Microdermabrasion 974,000 for pores, for revitalizSource: American Society of Plastic Surgeons ing,” says Weidner. “Microneedling is not a new frequency procedures to the already impresprocess – it’s been done sive list of treatments offered. in Europe for years – but it’s a new trend just Fractora and Forma are new devices that coming here.” tighten skin and reduce wrinkles by comfortWeidner also sees an increase in demand able, focused radio frequency skin warming. for permanent makeup. She applies perThese devices have built-in, real-time, temmanent eyebrows with a three-dimensional perature sensors that automatically keep the simulated hairstroke technique that makes skin at safe therapeutic levels, Alexander says. eyebrows appear natural. BodyFX is a new technology based on “This is a great way to give that look to someone who is lacking some hair,” she says. temperature-controlled radio frequency fat destruction and skin tightening that achieves “It can be used as a fill-in for empty spaces, enhanced, non-invasive body contouring of but it absolutely looks like hair. The differbuttocks, abdomen, flanks and thighs. ence from the old way is the mapping of the “The reason for adding these devices to pattern that is used and the needle selection. The Skin Care Institute is that this new radio It’s a high-end permanent makeup applicafrequency platform is a breakthrough in tion.” technology,” Alexander says. “It achieves unDr. Jeff Alexander, dermatologist and surpassed results with safety and comfort at a medical director of the Skin Care Institute, level before unknown in the aesthetic realm.” says his medical spa is poised to add radio

Where To Begin Patients may visit a dermatologist or medical spa in search of change but unsure of what change is needed. Luckily, there are dermatologists, nurses and aestheticians that are qualified to help those patients find a plan that fits their ideals. Pamela Klein, RN and registered nurse injector at Skin Renewal of Tulsa, says that she likes to begin sessions with a head-to-neck consultation in which she tells the patient what she has available. “I almost always have Botox or a neurotoxin [in the plan],” she says, “and then we look at areas where you could do this or that. You may have volume loss in a few areas. A lot depends on age, what bothers the client, what I see, pricing, etc.” Karen Weidner, owner of Utica Square Skin Care, says that she focuses on non-surgical treatments that can help clients feel their best “Basically, it’s important to exfoliate the skin,” she says. “My goal is to get everyone’s skin more even in tone and texture. We do our best to remove benign lumps and discoloration and refresh the skin and hydrate the skin so it looks better and feels better. I love what I do because people are so happy with how their skin looks. I think it’s

50

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

2013 TOP 5 COSMETIC MINIMALLY INVASIVE PROCEDURES

a great way to look refreshed.” Both Klein and Weidner say that they recommend laser treatments, such as Fraxel, to many clients who suffer from skin scarring, especially from acne. Klein says that for younger clients, she will often recommend laser hair removal. “It’s still a great thing that a lot of younger girls like,” she says. “I have lasered pretty much everything. It’s nice to not have to shave every day.” For clients 50 and older, Klein says that she often recommends a blepharoplasty, better known as an eyelid lift, a procedure that is performed by a surgeon. “You can get a little [lift] with Botox, but a surgical procedure is what they should do,” she says. Topical treatments and ointments can also assist in helping men and women look their best. Klein says that she often prescribes Retin-A to treat skin discoloration, Valtrax for lip sores and physician-grade skin cleansers and moisturizers. She says that one thing she tells all clients is to avoid tanning beds. “We’ve seen a huge rise in melanoma due to tanning beds,” she says. Regardless of how little or how much work clients are interested in, non-surgical procedures can go a long way in helping improve appearance and confidence.


LOVE your reflection.

405.751.LOVE

Member, Int. Society of Hair Restoration Surgery Certified, American Board of Plastic Surgery Fellow, American College of Surgeons Member, American Society of Plastic Surgeons American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery CareCredit Welcome

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM 20703 Dr Love.indd 1

51

12/22/14 12:09 PM


Healing from the Outside Disfigurement after illness or disease can be a painful reminder of the physical, mental and emotional trauma a patient has gone through. It’s an outward symbol of pain and distress that a body has experienced. Plastic and reconstructive surgeons are uniquely trained to help those men and women by repairing physical signs of disease or illness. Dr. Arch Miller, a board-certified plastic surgeon at Tulsa Plastic Surgery, says he embraces the role he plays in the healing process. “The role of the reconstructive surgeon is just getting bigger because the problems we’re facing are bigger, and patients stay alive longer,” he says. “We have to face the challenges of helping these patients. They have good medical care, and now our challenges are to fix and restore form and function.” Dr. Angelo Cuzalina, a cosmetic surgeon at Tulsa Surgical Arts, regularly performs pro bono work for individuals suffering from disfigurements from birth, like cleft palates, as well as people who may have scarring or aftereffects from previous cosmetic surgeries. “I had two different women [come to me] recently that had silicon injections in their buttocks but had a problem with it,” Cuzalina says. “What’s happening is you see illegal uses of materials, and the procedure may or may not be done by a doctor. When you’re injecting a large volume, you don’t know where these chemicals are coming from. Often the tissue that’s damaged has to be cut out, and it causes a lot of problems.” Miller adds that helping those who are in need is a very rewarding experience for surgeons. “Here’s the thing about reconstructing defects: Women have breast cancer surgery all the time, followed by radiation. The areas get infected, the cancer comes back and we have to remove large parts of their chest wall. So I, in my particular profession, have the ability to move tissue from the tummy or back and rebuild those areas destroyed by radiation and infection. These cases are very rewarding emotionally for me Tumor removal and for everyone around us Laceration repair because we’re doing the right Maxillofacial surgery thing; we’re helping someone Scar revision who needs it badly.” Hand surgery

TOP 5 RECONSTRUCTIVE PROCEDURES IN 2013 4.4 million 254,000 199,000 177,000 131,000

Source: American Society of Plastic Surgeons

52

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


L AST C H A N C E TO B E CO M E A S P O N S O R

Visit RedRibbonGala.org for sponsorship information or please contact Ally McGinnis at 918.834.4194 or allym@tulsacares.org

benefitting

Delivering social services to people affected by HIV/AIDS. tulsacares.org


Being single in a large city has its ups and downs. Meet nine of Tulsa’s most eligible singles, and get a glimpse of the state of the date.

54

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


John Bivens

Pisces, 27 Photographer & Model Run into me at: The grocery store, I love to cook. Interests: Photography, hunting, running, art, cooking, fashion, nature Best thing about being single: Limited accountability Favorite Food: New York style pizza with lots of sauce and cheese Favorite social media platform: I admit, I am a Facebooker. Favorite first date idea: A patio brunch Favorite musician/band: Right now it’s a lot of Sam Smith. He’s great for cold weather! Favorite thing about Tulsa: It offers the Christian life I need for spirit, the city life I need for opportunity, the active life I need for body and the nature life I need for mind. Does your career pose a challenge in your dating life? There are challenges in every part of life. If it’s worth fighting for, fight for it. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City? I nominated myself. I love the idea of raising money for charity and having a good time.


Laura Banks

Scorpio, 29 Social worker with LGBTQ youth Run into me at: The Yoga Room, The Phoenix and Andolini’s Interests: Yoga, travel, psychology, social justice, food, adrenaline rushes, culture, meeting new people and trying anything new Claim to fame: I can almost always remember the name of that actress you can’t remember. Best thing about being single: Getting to meet new people, having my options open, always wearing comfortable underwear and Gilmore Girls marathons Relationship dealbreaker: Lack of ambition Favorite food: Sushi or Vietnamese Favorite first date idea: Coffee and board games Favorite musician/band: The XX Favorite vacation spot: Anywhere with a beach Favorite thing about Tulsa: It is easy to be edgy and groundbreaking in Tulsa. Does your career pose a challenge in your dating life? I work a lot and am extremely passionate about my job, so the person I am with has to be very understanding. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City? It’s a good thing we’re related. Five words that sum up your dating life: How many dates do I wait to tell someone...That I drive a Prius?

56

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


Michael Grim

Cancer, 40 Casino Marketing/Advertising Run into me at: A gig: As a hobby I play in a band called Uninvited Guest. I’ve been playing on stage since my early 20s and it’s become a small part of who I am. Interests: I try and live by two rules: Serve others and make memories. I’m always interested in the experiences both rules bring. Claim to fame: My biggest claim to fame is my 11-yearold son. He’s mine, I’m happy to claim him and he’s incredibly famous to me. Best thing about being single: It’s allowed me to figure out exactly who I am and exactly what I stand for. Relationship deal-breaker: Selfishness Favorite food: The Sea Bass at Joe’s Seafood in Vegas Favorite social media platform: I’m kinda old school and don’t really play with social media for personal uses. My son got a “selfie stick” for Christmas so he could take selfies from six feet away, and I was like, “That’s it, I’m out.” Favorite first date idea: We each have $20 to spend at Walmart and we both have to buy an entire outfit, including shoes, then we go to the nicest restaurant in town. I have no idea why that’s always sounded like fun to me. Favorite musician/band: Jason Ross Favorite vacation spot: Anywhere in the Caribbean Favorite thing about Tulsa: Really, really nice and authentic people What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City? I would say I have a very cool ex-wife, because she is the one that nominated me. Five words that sum up your dating life: I’m a work in progress.

Evan Greenwalt

Leo, 31 Bartender at Cellar Dweller Run into me at: Depends on the day, depends on the time, but I do find myself at KEO pretty often. Interests: Cooking, baking, running, I’ve kind of fallen on the yoga train. Claim to fame: Sarcasm Best thing about being single: I don’t have to answer to anyone. Relationship deal-breaker: Nibbled fingers – gross! Favorite food: Asian Favorite musician/band: If I have to pick one and only one, it would have to be Wilco. Favorite vacation spot: I’ve always loved Charleston. Favorite thing about Tulsa: We have some pretty rad architecture, and I think it’s great that the city as a whole tries to preserve it and keep it alive! Five words that sum up your dating life: Ha. Ha. Ha. Ha. Ha.

Jahaziel “Jazi” Hiriart

Libra, 26 Program Coordinator at TYPros Run into me at: Latin nights at Zanmai and TulSalseros Dance Studio Interests: Dancing, culture, travel, coffee Claim to fame: I can do the “Cups” song in six different languages. Best thing about being single: Developing solid standards, independence and the ability to thrive on your own Favorite food: Besides Mexican, Indian Favorite social media platform: Yelp Favorite musician/band: Carla Morrison and Foster the People What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City? Challenge accepted! Five words that sum up your dating life: Life is full of possibilities.

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

57


Julia White

Leo, 29 Program Administrator at Guthrie Green Run into me at: Anywhere in the Brady Arts District: The Tavern is my go-to for dinner, as is Chimera for my morning cold brew. You can always find me at Guthrie Green on Sundays. Interests: People. I get in trouble for unintentionally playing the 20 questions game, but I have met some interesting folks by doing just that. Relationship deal-breaker: Selfishness and being rude to servers Favorite food: Any form of traditional Mexican smothered in a mole sauce. And churros, I have to have the churros. Favorite first date idea: A day trip of some kind – I think the best way to get to know someone is sitting shotgun on an open road. Favorite musician/band: John Moreland, Paul Benjamin, JD McPherson, Cody Brewer and Chloe Johns Favorite vacation spot: Cape Cod, Massachusetts Favorite thing about Tulsa: Tulsa has everything you’d want out of a big city with the feel and friendships of a small town. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City? You are an inspiration to become a stronger influence in this city.

Abby Kurin

Leo, 30 Director of Film, Music, Arts & Culture for VisitTulsa Run into me at: Anywhere in the Brady Arts District: Whether it be a coffee shop, restaurant, bar or venue, that’s usually where you’ll find me. Interests: Spending time with family and friends, checking out a new restaurant, attending concerts, seeing films and traveling Claim to fame: I rap for friends’ birthdays. Creative voicemails are so much better! Best thing about being single: No fighting over the remote Relationship deal-breaker: Those without a sense of humor need not apply. Favorite food: Don’t slow your roll, Yokozuna. I love everything on their menu. Oh, and most definitely Thai food. Favorite first date idea: A fun dinner with an activity – seeing a band or checking out a new exhibit at a gallery or museum Favorite vacation spot: Santa Fe is a yearly favorite. Favorite thing about Tulsa: It’s a beautiful city, with tons of creative talent. I see movement constantly, so it’s fun to watch it continue to grow. Five words that sum up your dating life: It’s adventure, that’s for sure.

58

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Elsie Paola Urueta

Libra, 29 Founder and Head of School of Tulsa Honor Academy Run into me at: The Phoenix or Chimera Interests: Creating educational equity for underserved students is my passion and my life. I’m also a very passionate sports fan: I’m all about college football (Boomer Sooner), the Thunder and the Mexican and U.S. men’s soccer teams. Claim to fame: I founded Tulsa Honor Academy, a free college preparatory charter school for students in East Tulsa. Also, I make a mean salsa. Relationship dealbreaker: You have to be able to put up with my sportsfanatic madness. Actually, you just have to keep up with me. Favorite food: My mom’s homemade Mexican everything Favorite musician/ band: The Avett Brothers, Brett Dennen, Maná and Enanitos Verdes Favorite thing about Tulsa: It’s a hidden gem: The music, the bar scene, the food, the people and the people’s passion for the city. Five words that sum up your dating life: Good times with good people.


Michael Grogan

Gemini, 29 Meteorologist for News on 6 Run into me at: Cycling along the river, grabbing something to drink at Hodges Bend, catching a show at Cain’s or around the Brady District Interests: Storm chasing (surprise, surprise!), traveling, tennis, cycling, writing, meeting new people, being involved in church and community events, crosswords and board games Best thing about being single: Spontaneity! Whether it’s just grabbing dinner with a friend or going on a road trip, it’s nice to just be accountable for my own schedule. Relationship dealbreaker: Pessimism Favorite food: Popcorn – it’s so versatile, delicious and simple. I can (and often do) eat it every day. Favorite social media platform: Lately, it’s Instagram, but I’m a big Twitter/ Facebook user too. #SocialMediaAddict Favorite musician/ band: Washed Out, Coldplay and Sigur Rós Favorite vacation spot: Somewhere mountainous: I love to ski in the winter and hike/backpack in the warmer months.

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

59


The

Brunch TABLE

By Jami Mattox

It used to be that brunch was something that only occurred on Easter and Mother’s Day. But over the last several years, the late morning meal has been heightened to the status of cool. Now young and old spend weekend mornings and afternoons sipping coffee, eating eggs and reading, chatting with friends or simply enjoying the feel of a lazy day. Oklahoma is full of places to get a terrific brunch experience. Though the state’s two largest cities are where brunch is most plentiful, many restaurants in large towns or small cities also offer Lucky’s Restaurant the experience of kickBrunch at Lucky’s Restaurant in Tulsa is an institution. Hungry diners begin lining up at 11 a.m. to get a much-coveted table. Once inside, ing back with a good the coffee and mimosas flow freely. Large storefront windows allow natural light to stream in as diners enjoy the classics featured on meal and great friends. Lucky’s brunch menu – including huevos rancheros, French toast

LEGEND

60

and omelets. Lunch options are also available on Sundays for those looking for midday delights.

Bloody Mary bar Vegetarian options Outdoor seating Seasonal menu

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Standout Dish: Chicken-fried steak and eggs, cooked to perfection and smothered in gravy. 1536 E. 15th St., Tulsa www.luckysrestauranttulsa.com


CHICKEN FRIED STEAK AND EGGS AT LUCKY’S RESTAURANT. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

61


Café 501

Café 501 created a loyal following with its standout pastries and homemade soups and sandwiches. A few years ago, the Edmond establishment opened a second location in Oklahoma City’s trendy Classen Curve shopping center. Now there are two places to quell the desire for brunch specialties like pancakes, fruit and yogurt and eggs Benedict. The sleek lines and large patio at the Classen Curve location make it a popular hangout during al fresco dining season. Standout dish: Huevos rancheros are cooked to perfection and served alongise tomatoes and a rich, hearty red chile sauce. 501 S. Boulevard, Edmond; 5825 NW Grand Blvd., Oklahoma City www.cafe501.com

Café Do Brasil

A popular Oklahoma City restaurant that pays homage to the cuisine of the largest country in South America, Cafe Do Brasil provides diners with delicious food in an environment that exudes Latin flair. Dishes are prepared traditionally with flavors that are rich, earthy and spicy. Dinner is always a treat at Cafe Do Brasil, but brunch is a special treat – it’s tough to beat a large plate of ovos rancheros served with a spicy Bloody Mary. Standout dish: Ovos rancheros are prepared expertly, with eggs, potatoes, beans and a rich, savory red sauce. 440 NW 11th St., Oklahoma City www.cafedobrazilokc.com

OVOS RANCHEROS AT CAFE DO BRASIL. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Chalkboard Restaurant

Brunch is a weekend affair at the Chalkboard. Diners can enjoy the restaurant’s brunch novelties both Saturdays and Sundays at this restaurant located inside the Ambassador Hotel. A mix of breakfast and lunch dishes, the menu offers something for everyone, from the meat-and-potatoes eater – try the grilled pork chop served with hazelnut apple sauce on a bed of potato puree – to the brunch fanatic – The Chalkboard Breakfast, which includes a choice of bacon, sausage or steak served with eggs, hash browns and toast. Standout Dish: Eggs Benedict are served classically and are a timeless favorite at the Chalkboard. 1324 Main St., Tulsa www.chalkboardtulsa.com

Cheever’s Café

The café’s Southwest inspirations are clearly seen in the brunch menu. For years, Cheever’s has served as an anchor for development along 23rd Street and has cranked out beautiful dishes that are as delicious as they are accessible, and brunch is treated no differently. Buffalo gravy is used to smother freshly baked cheddar biscuits, and the Green Chile Pork Stack is a revved-up version of traditional huevos rancheros. For those looking for something a little bit lighter, Cheever’s also offers small plates that are great for sharing. Standout dish: Giddy up for the Cowgirl Benedict, a dish of skillet potatoes, chicken fried steak and a fried egg covered in red chile hollandaise and topped with avocado. 2409 S. Hudson Ave., Oklahoma City www.cheeverscafe.com

Chimera Café

Chimera easily lives up to the dual-part essence of the Greek mythological creature its name and logo conjures. This downtown Tulsa café is extremely versatile in appearance, drink selection and menu options. A large community dining table top, made from white oak, sits on two vertical steel beams, acting as the space’s centerpiece and strangers’ meeting place. An exposed brick wall forms the backdrop of Chimera’s full bar, coffee and tea selections. A cozy gathering place for brunch, as well as lunch and dinner, Chimera caters to carnivores, vegetarians and vegans. During Sunday brunch, the smell of freshly brewed coffee mixes in the air with the sounds of the Tulsa Vinyl Society. Standout Dish: Cinderella’s Big Score features egg, wilted arugula, tomato, feta and chipotle crema wrapped in a tortilla for an otherworldly breakfast taco experience. 212 N. Main St., Tulsa www.chimeracafe.com

Doc’s Wine & Food

It’s a piece of the French Quarter dropped in the middle of Brookside, and Doc’s delivers powerful flavors with a distinctly Cajun twist. Fresh seafood is the highlight, whether it’s served on ice, like oysters on the half shell, or cooked into other dishes, like oysters and eggs or the Creole scramble. If it’s a hangover that ails, Doc’s has a full bar ready to deliver the hair of the dog. A modestly sized dining room drives many to Doc’s well-appointed patio. Standout Dish: Shrimp and grits covered in Creole barbecue sauce are heavenly any time of day, but especially served at Sunday brunch. 3509 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa www.docswineandfood.com

62

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


CINDERELLA’S BIG SCORE AT CHIMERA CAFE. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

63


Museum Café

Browsing the galleries of a world-class art museum most definitely calls for brunch afterward. It’s a good thing that the Museum Café at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art offers museumquality food to hungry patrons. The varieties of Benedicts are numerous and are offered traditionally or with spinach, salmon or steak. A beautiful patio complements any dish, as does a sunny, crisp Oklahoma day. Standout Dish: Baked Bread Pudding French Toast is decadence in food-form. 415 Couch Dr., Oklahoma City www.okcmoa.com

Palace Café

Located on Cherry Street in Tulsa, Palace Café has been a mainstay for brunch-goers for years. With an ever-changing menu that offers the best of what’s in season, the restaurant is a great stop for everything from creative brunch dishes to pastries and coffee. A traditional lunch menu, featuring salads, sandwiches and soup, is also offered alongside the brunch menu. Standout Dish: Dales Famous Migas, chock-full of eggs from nearby Fisher Farms, jalapenos and onions served with home fries and black beans. 1301 E. 15th St., Tulsa www.palacetulsa.com

Packard’s New American Kitchen

Brunch is easy and fun at a restaurant that’s in the heart of Oklahoma City. At Packard’s the drinks flow and the eggs go on Sunday mornings and afternoons, when Oklahoma City’s residents emerge for a few hours of Sunday Fun Day. Fun is prevalent at Packard’s, where dishes and cocktails are as playful as they are delicious. Bacon, egg and cheddar biscuits are smeared with jam, and duck confit is transformed into hash. Packard’s colorful rooftop deck is currently closed for the season, but warmer weather finds patrons basking in the sunny space – usually with mimosa in hand. Standout dish: The Crunch Berry French Toast utilizes the nostalgia of that childhood classic along with more sophisticated touches, like whipped mascarpone and fresh fruit. 201 NW 10th St., Oklahoma City www.packardsokc.com

Pearl’s Oyster Bar

It’s a champagne brunch that awaits at Pearl’s. The famed Oklahoma City restaurant finds every excuse to infuse Cajun flair into its brunch offerings, and the results are both luscious and delicious. Light, fluffy eggs envelop shrimp and crawfish in a decadent omelet, while other dishes, like the Cajun Eggs Benedict, topped with a Cajun crawfish sauce, showcase the restaurant’s signature Louisiana-style cuisine. Standout dish: Pearl’s Crabcake Monique features succulent crab cakes topped with perfectly poached eggs and hollandaise sauce. 5641 N. Classen Blvd., Oklahoma City www.funfresh.com

64

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Picasso Café

The café in the Paseo District is best known for its large number of vegetarian and vegan options, and that trend carries over from the lunch and dinner menus into Sunday brunch. Several dishes are available in vegetarian and vegan forms, including eggs Benedict and huevos rancheros. A large cocktail menu offers diners a special treat with brunch, with everything from Bloody Marys to housemade Ginger Ale, made with ginger liqueur, lemon-lime soda and a splash of Coca-Cola. Standout dish: For meat lovers, the House Cured Pork Belly BLT is an epic upgrade to an old favorite. 3009 Paseo St., Oklahoma City www.picassoonpaseo.com

Polo Grill

One of the most awarded restaurants in Oklahoma, Polo Grill is known for cooking perfect steaks and chops. But on Sundays, the big meat is put away for more delicate fare: Think buttermilk pancakes, frittatas and rich breakfast enchiladas. The menu is quite different from its weekday counterpart, but the service and luxury expected of Polo Grill remains. Brunch cocktails include the traditional Bloody Mary, Mimosa, Kir Royale and a creation called Irish Breakfast: Butter Schnapps, Jameson Irish Whiskey and orange juice. Standout Dish: Buttermilk pancakes, fluffy and delectable, served with a side of applewood-smoked bacon. 2038 Utica Square, Tulsa www.pologrill.com

SMOKE. On Cherry Street

Smoke is in the food, and it’s also what some patrons do at this cigar bar and upscale dining establishment. For brunch, smoke is found in the house-smoked bacon, grilled flatbreads and grilled steaks. Meals are formidable at SMOKE, as are the drinks: The restaurant delivers a powerful one-two punch with its Bloody Mary bar and Manmosas. Standout Dish: The classic corned beef hash is ratcheted up with house-made corned beef cooked with potatoes and vegetables and topped with cooked-to-order eggs. 1542 E. 15th St., Tulsa. www.smoketulsa.com

Stella Modern Italian Cuisine

Well known for authentic Italian dishes with upscale twists, Stella extends that vibe into Sunday brunch. Eggs with polenta, Italian scrambles featuring peperonata and roasted potatoes and breakfast pizzas all offer Stella’s signature swagger. Prosecco mimosas complement any menu choice.The eclectic and elegant décor makes Stella a place brunch-goers can see and be seen. Standout dish: A brick oven pizza topped with bacon, scrambled egg, roasted red pepper and mozzarella serves a bite of Italian morning. 1201 N. Walker Ave., Oklahoma City www.stella-okc.com


Stonehorse Café & Market

Brunch doesn’t always mean eggs and champagne on a Sunday; at Stonehorse Café & Market, the eggs and champagne are served Tuesday through Saturday at lunchtime. The Utica Square eatery offers a true brunch – a menu that includes egg dishes such as quiche, omelets and fruit-and-granola parfaits along with lunch standards like salads, soups, salmon and pasta dishes. Of course, champagne goes with anything – so order with abandon. Standout dish: The deep-dish quiche is complemented by a simple green salad and fried potatoes. 1748 Utica Square, Tulsa www.stonehorsecafe.com

Tavern on Brady

The Tavern’s cool vibe imbues its brunch menu, inspiring everything from traditional eggs-and-toast plates to the daily grilled cheese. Salads are also plentiful for brunch at this Brady Arts hotspot. The Tavern features a wide variety of brunch drink classics to diners, including Bloody Marys, Red Brews and crafted cocktails like the Moon Walk – fresh grapefruit juice, Grand Marnier and rose water. Come early and with an empty stomach to enjoy the bounties in the Brady. Standout dish: A Dutch Baby filled with bacon and cheddar cheese and topped with maple syrup is an impressive, filling meal. 201 N. Main St., Tulsa www.taverntulsa.com

Waterfront Grill

Dining on the water is a luxury that not many restaurants in Tulsa can offer. Luckily, Waterfront Grill delivers just what it promises. The swanky restaurant offers a diverse brunch menu, including a createyour-own-omelet option, biscuits and gravy and all things sweet from the griddle, including pancakes and Belgian waffles. Enjoy brunch inside the luxuriously appointed restaurant, or outside on the banks of the Arkansas River.

Standout Dish: Chicken and Waffles features a waffle studded with bacon and cheddar cheese topped with a fried chicken cutlet and smothered in maple syrup. 120 Aquarium Drive, Jenks www.waterfrontgrilljenks.com

West Restaurant

Saturday and Sunday brunch at West is not for the timid. Most everything on the menu is over-the-top, including the Chicken Fried Beef Tenderloin and eggs. The restaurant’s close relationship with Johnnie’s also benefits diners, who can choose from a select menu of Johnnie’s original burgers for brunch. A cheese Theta with onion rings makes a great late morning meal. Standout dish: The West Breakfast Sandwich is piled high with fried egg, bacon, cheese and a potato cake between two pieces of Texas toast. 6714 N. Western Ave., Oklahoma City www.westbar.com

The Wild Fork

The Utica Square mainstay recently began offering Sunday brunch, which is welcome news to those who swear by The Wild Fork and enjoy great food and drink on Sunday mornings. The menu is a little light on breakfast options and puts the “lunch” in brunch. Sandwiches, burgers, corn cakes and even pot roast can all be ordered off the brunch menu. Even the military-grade S.O.S. is given an update: Braised beef and caramelized onions are served on toasted Italian bread and covered in green chili gravy. Standout Dish: Grillades and Grits, a creative take on a southern dish, features pork medallions atop cheese grits garnished with tomatoes, scallions and Creole brown gravy. Eggs are cooked to order. 1820 Utica Square, Tulsa www.wildfork.com

FRENCH TOAST AT THE MUSEUM CAFE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

65


“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men,� Frederick Douglass said more than a century ago. Unfortunately, society has not learned this lesson, as federal and state funds for prisons continue to rise at the same time they continue to fall for education. However, Tulsa is leading the way in answering the call to a much-needed focus

66

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

on early childhood development with Tulsa Educare, a program formed in 2004 that now includes three Tulsa public schools and reaches at least 530 at-risk children and their families. Tulsa Educare is a program with a message that learning begins at birth and that education is the great American equalizer. The program relies heavily on research and

evaluation of its methods and outcomes; the program also brings understanding to the association between poverty and gaps in educational achievement. The achievement gap is precisely what motivated the founding organizers of Educare in 2003, when the Buffett Early Childhood Fund and the Ounce of Prevention Fund teamed up to begin the nationwide program.


CLOSING THEGAP Tulsa’s Educare program serves as a national model for how to break the cycle of poverty.

TULSA’S EDUCARE PROGRAM OPERATES THREE SITES, THE MOST OF ANY COMMUNITY IN THE NATION. PHOTOS COURTESY TULSA EDUCARE.

By Shaun Perkins

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men,” Frederick Douglass said more than a century ago.

Unfortunately, society has not learned this lesson, as federal and state funds for prisons continue to rise at the same time they continue to fall for education. However, Tulsa is leading the way in answering the call to a much-needed focus on early childhood development with Tulsa Educare, a program formed in 2004 that now includes three Tulsa public schools and reaches at least 530 at-risk children and their families. Tulsa Educare is a program with a message that learning begins at birth and that education is the great American equalizer. The program relies heavily on research and evaluation of its methods and outcomes; the program also brings understanding to the association between poverty and gaps in educational achievement. The achievement gap is precisely what motivated the founding organizers of Educare in 2003, when the Buffett Early Childhood Fund and the Ounce of Prevention Fund teamed up to begin the nationwide

program. “Tulsa is a community invested in early childhood and understands the importance that it has for the future of our next generation,” says Tulsa Educare executive director Caren Calhoun. That investment in Tulsa’s children is obvious when looking at the location of the 21 Educare programs throughout the United States, with Tulsa having more sites than any other city. Tulsa’s three Educare programs are located at Kendall-Whittier, Hawthorne and MacArthur, three elementary schools in neighborhoods of at-risk children. The Educare model involves a full-day, year-round program that includes children as young as six weeks. Children stay in the program until they enter elementary school. The program’s goal is to work with the community’s children most vulnerable to poverty, provide instruction and nurture parent-child relationships ensuring the greatest chances for success in life. Its ultimate goal is to break the cycle of poverty that exists in lowincome families and neighborhoods. Calhoun, who has worked with children under the age of 4 since she herself was 16, ran the Head Start program for the Community Action Project of Tulsa County for 10 years and was a National Head Start Fellow for a year. This background explains her FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

67


enthusiasm for the innovative program, which allows children to have the same teacher for several years in a row, quality meals, one-on-one interaction and extended hours of care throughout the day and the year. “Even with all of the research about the long-term advantages of quality early education programs, I’m not sure that everyone understands that the achievement gap manifests as early as 18 months, and most children continue to lag behind throughout school,” Calhoun says. In fact, research has repeatedly shown that such elements as cognitive and socializing functions must be in place by age 3, or a child will likely be continually behind in development. A key to the success of the Tulsa Educare program is its partnerships – with other agencies, parents, schools and the communities in which the schools operate. Tulsa Educare is made possible by federal and state funds, private sources, such as the George Kaiser

same-age peers who

“The program’s goal is don’t live in poverty. In other words, to work with the comHorm explains, munity’s children most “Early enrollment, as vulnerable to poverty, an infant or toddler in Educare, appears to provide instruction and prevent the achievenurture parent-child re- ment gap from formlationships and ensure ing.” the greatest chances for Lead By Example success in life.” Kasondra Gunnels’

TULSA EDUCARE HAS CREATED A PLACE IN THE COMMUNITY BY WORKING WITH CHILDREN AND PARENTS TO ENSURE THAT STUDENTS RECEIVE SUPPORT BOTH AT SCHOOL AND AT HOME.

68

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Family Foundation, and programs at the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University. Diane Horm, the director of the Early Childhood Education Institute (ECEI) at OU-Tulsa, says her research has shown that children who enter the Educare program as infants or toddlers start kindergarten performing similar in school readiness and social and emotional development to their

children have been a part of Educare since 2010. The program was not available at Kendall-Whittier when her oldest son, RoyLee, 12, was younger, but her two daughters have experienced it. Gunnels says she loved that Educare is “so much hands-on” and that her girls KayLee, 7, and Zoe, 2, love to read and be read to. “Zoe has really benefitted from the program,” Gunnels says. “I am so amazed by her because each day she teaches me something new and mind-blowing. Her teacher and I speak every day about her progress, and Zoe seems so advanced for her age. It is truly a blessing to have this program available.” Gunnels also thinks her children have benefited from the diversity of their peers. “The different cultures they have the pleasure of being exposed to – they enjoy knowing they have friends that know how to speak other languages, and they can pick up on some of their friends’ words,” she says. The personal feelings of enrichment that Educare has created are also bolstered by data, whose use, Horm says, is “an emerging area of work in early childhood education.” Horm says that ECEI has worked closely with Tulsa Educare doing research since 2006, and the results are something Horm, along with several colleagues, recently published in Early Education and Development. “The implementation of … the collection, analysis and use of data to track child progress and to inform program improvement – distinguishes Educare from other early care and education program models,” the journal article notes. Much of Educare’s success is based on partnerships, which is where OU comes in, by assessing the Educare program and providing feedback. This feedback, in the form of data, is the focus of Horm’s work and ensures that Educare teachers have quality information that helps them meet and exceed the program’s goals. While many teachers are familiar with a flawed evaluation process that provides little meaningful information, the partnership between ECEI and OU is trying to ensure that while assessment is rigorous and ongoing,


BE THEH BEST. LA OMA K O

the

of

BEST the BEST 2015

MA

GAZINE

VOTE NOW!!!

VISIT OKMAG.COM

TO VOTE For Advertising opportunities:

Advertising@okmAg.com

BY CASTING A BALLOT, YOU HAVE A VOICE IN THE YEAR’S MOST ANTICIPATED ISSUE.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

| 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA


it is done with mutual respect, training and relationship-building between assessors and teachers. In fact, not only is Tulsa Educare leading the way for early childhood program possibilities, but ECEI is doing some groundbreaking work in research. “Our work is contributing to and advancing the professional literature in early childhood education,” Horm says. Research shows that children from highrisk populations, such as those that the Tulsa Educare program serves, typically score well below the national average and are usually several months behind, developmentally, their more advantaged peers. But after experiencing the Educare program, the children show they are on the same level or above that of their more advantaged peers.

Educare In Action

CHILDREN ENTER EDUCARE IN PRESCHOOL AND, UPON GRADUATION, WILL ENTER THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM.

70

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

The Educare model is one that emphasizes key areas of school readiness, vocabulary, social and emotional skills and classroom quality. Calhoun notes that these areas are addressed by forming relationships with the parents. “Parents are encouraged to become a member of the Educare Policy Council to share in agency decision making and empower them as leaders,” Calhoun says. Each family with children in Educare is assigned a family advocate who helps the family with medical issues, school readiness and goal setting. “Educare believes that the engagement of families is a large determinant in the child’s future achievements,” Calhoun says. School readiness and health are partially addressed through providing families with medical resources, along with a vision, hearing, height and weight screening for each child. This comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to meeting a child’s and family’s needs is a unique element of Educare, along with its use of data to guide instruction and to work toward continual improvement. Not surprisingly, the classroom educational model is quite different from a traditional public school setting.

Each classroom has a teacher with a bachelor’s degree supported by a coach that holds a master’s degree. In addition, according to Calhoun, “Each child is placed in a multi-age classroom and assigned a primary caregiver. They remain in this safe, trusting environment with the same teaching team for up to three years to allow for a continuity of care and minimal transitions.” Calhoun adds that Educare’s model uses a “comprehensive and intentional way to achieve academic success,” along with “an interdisciplinary approach to the child, which assists in meeting their needs in the areas of health, nutrition, mental health and early intervention services.” Teri Cowan, a parent whose daughters attended the Kendall-Whitter Tulsa Educare program, says it was a great experience for both of them. Her daughter, Acacia, who participated in Educare for three years, is reading at a seventh-grade level and is also enrolled in the gifted and talented program, she says. “I attribute that to the wonderful teachers at Educare,” Cowan adds. Her younger daughter, Trinity, was enrolled in the Educare home-based program. “It was wonderful. We had a teacher come out to our house once a week for an hour and a half, and Trinity was learning what the other children were learning at the home base,” she says. Cowan, who spent two years as a policy council representative with Educare, was also elected a community representative and was part of a committee that wrote and received a grant for a program called Beyond the Walls. Beyond the Walls is a program that began in 2014 to provide opportunities and experiences for children not enrolled in quality early childhood education programs. Tulsa Educare collaborates with local agencies to ensure that children and parents are supported in early learning opportunities. Some of the Beyond the Walls programs include Reach Out and Read, which trains medical professionals to address the importance of reading aloud to children during doctor visits; Talking is Teaching, which encourages Tulsans to read, talk and sing to young children; and HappyFeet, which provides 2- and 3-year-olds a parent-child program through sports combined with stories and rhymes. “Acacia and Trinity loved [HappyFeet] so much that they were excited to go to school every day,” she says. Cowan’s daughters, both graduates of Educare, are now in regular public school classrooms. “The most memorable thing about Educare was being a part of the policy council, because I was getting to be a part of making the


school better and helping to find ways to improve the early childhood program,” Cowan says. “For me, that will always be something I remember. “Today, I’ve been asked to join a parent ambassador group, and we’re focusing on more ways to get people involved in their kids’ education and to bring about parent engagement in that,” she adds.

Learning In Place

Tulsa is a perfect place for a program like Educare. According to Andy McKenzie, Tulsa Public School assistant to the superintendent for early childhood services, “The way our laws are set up for pre-K programs, there’s a lot of flexibility that allows us to partner with community groups in offering the best educational programs and care. Tulsa gets a lot of national attention based on the fact that we have universal pre-k programs and have had them for a while.” The TPS district liaison and coordinator for relationships created with Educare, McKenzie is an enthusiastic supporter of the Educare model. An important component of Educare is the ability to learn in one place. Tulsa Educare 3, which opened in 2012 and serves 164 children, is located on the MacArthur Elementary and Hale Junior and High School campus complex. “The beauty of this site is that all programs are on one campus,” McKenzie says. “A mom can drop off all of her kids at the same place. A child can go from birth to 12th grade all at one complex.” Educare buildings are built from the ground up, their designs inherently tied to the curriculum. “The first thing you notice when you walk in an Educare site is the quality of the facility,” says McKenzie. “They are top notch. Educare planners traveled across the country to find how others are meeting the needs of all learners at their facilities. There’s so much thought put into designing the environments for children.” This thought is apparent at MacArthur, which has a water room with drains in the floor, see-through walls so children can splash around and a garage-style door that opens to the outside in warm months. “The design is a valuable learning tool built into the facility,” says McKenzie. “The children construct their learning by experimenting with lots of different elements of the environment and by trial and error.” He also notes something subtler about the Educare buildings.

“Most people probably don’t notice the continuity of care by design in the facility. The children stay in pods and rotate from one side to the other. This is the National Educare model,” McKenzie says. Educare 3 was made possible with bond moneys, federal and state funds and with moneys from the George Kaiser Family Foundation. The two previous Educare sites – Kendall-Whittier opened in 2006 and serves 212 children, and Hawthorne opened in 2010 and serves 164 children – were funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation, along with grants from other organizations. McKenzie says that there is currently no plan to add another Tulsa Educare site; instead, planning is being invested in “looking into skills for moms and dads to be employable and continue education, with our ultimate goal being trying to break that cycle of poverty,” he adds. The program has received support from OUTulsa, and McKenzie meets with Horm and Calhoun on a monthly basis. The goal of the partnership among the three is to continually build staff development programs and ways to help parents, children and teachers in the transition from Educare to regular schools. Jennifer Hays-Grudo, the head of the Human Development and Family Science department at OSU, oversees the research and projects that are collaborations with Educare. OSU faculty is conducting research projects at Educare that involve parent training, staff development and leadership training. Hays-Grudo says the collaboration with Educare allows them to collect data for research purposes and to test the findings in a real-world setting, the effectiveness of the interventions developed. “Our students get experience in working with early childhood educators and mental health professionals in recruiting and interacting with parents as well as children,” she says. This collaboration is “invaluable,” adds Hays-Gurdo. “It enables the research and training we do in our department to be grounded in reality,” she says.

NUMEROUS ACADEMIC STUDIES AND RESEARCH HAVE CENTERED ON TULSA’S EDUCARE SYSTEM.

“Educare’s ultimate goal is to break the cycle of poverty that exists in low-income families and neighborhoods.”

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

71


The Educare program then benefits because both programs are working toward the overall goal. “Their commitment to breaking the cycle of poverty by working with two generations mirrors the focus of many of our faculty members’ research, providing great opportunities for both research and training,” says Hays-Grudo.

Community Continuity

To understand why Tulsa is leading the way in the nation with Educare, one need look no farther than one of the state’s most generous philanthropists. “[George Kaiser] has been a very strong supporter, and that’s not even the right term – he is adamant about breaking the cycle of poverty through early education efforts,” McKenzie says. “There’s no doubt he’s the reason we have more Educare sites than any other city. He’s not only invested money in Educare, but time and effort, and he has dedicated lots of people in his foundation to this cause. Without him, Tulsa Educare wouldn’t be here. Oklahoma City’s Educare wouldn’t be there.” Breaking the cycle of poverty is a phrase one hears often in the Tulsa Educare community. To fully address a child’s educational needs, basic needs must also be a part of the equation. Research shows that poverty is often a problem in single-parent homes, and 67 percent of Tulsa’s Educare enrollment is comprised of one-parent families. Oklahoma ranks fourth in the nation in the number of grandparents who are raising children, a situation linked to the rate of female incarceration in the state. Oklahoma has the highest rate of per capita female incarceration in the nation. These issues of particular note in Oklahoma are only a few of those that Tulsa Educare is attempting to address with its comprehensive program. Because the prob-

lems are so far-reaching, no one agency can be successful on its own. Besides its integral partnership with the George Kaiser Family Foundation, Tulsa Educare partners with the Community Action Project, OU-Tulsa, Tulsa Public Schools and Family & Children’s Services in its attempt to build a successful, quality program. Research shows that the efforts are working. In 2013, Tulsa Educare received an Oklahoma Nonprofit Excellence Award, an award from the Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits that was given to only nine of the approximately 19,000 nonprofits in the state. The award strengthens Educare’s goal to bring children from low socioeconomic standings up to par with their peers. “Educare children have more extensive vocabularies and are better able to recognize letters, numbers and colors than their peers,” Calhoun says. Educare’s most recent program analysis detailed how the program’s children develop strong social skills, including self-confidence, persistence and methods to manage frustration. These abilities are related to success in all areas of life. The report summarized that early findings indicate the “gains Educare children make hold as they move through elementary school.” “I like the whole program, from the time I walk in the door and see all the smiling people, it’s just a great place with really helpful people,” says Gerald Foster, a grandfather and guardian of Nevaeh, who attends Hawthorne. Foster, 58, who has already raised four children, says he did not imagine he would be raising any more and is thankful for Educare. “If I had to do all the stuff they do, if I didn’t have any help, I would be really worn out,” he says. The extended hours are helpful to Foster, who works at the Tulsa Housing Authority, and takes Nevaeh to school at 7 a.m. Nevaeh, who will turn 4 in April, has an “all-around happiness” about her, Foster says, because of Educare. “She’s just a better person than she would have been. She comes in and talks about her teachers and the other children. I can see that they spend a lot of time with her,” he says. “It’s kind of a struggle being a grandfather, having a granddaughter to raise, but anything I need, any questions I have, they help me out.”

“A key to the success of the Tulsa Educare program is its partnerships – with other agencies, with parents, with schools and with the communities in which the schools operate.”

TULSA’S FIRST EDUCARE SITE WAS BUILT ADJACENT TO KENDALL-WHITTIER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN 2006.

72

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


Education

G U I D E

When School Becomes A Game Extracurricular activities give students a boost in college admissions and in life.

T

ticular activity appears more favorable in the eyes of an admissions hough the football jock, high school cheerleader and star counselor. of the school play make for great caricatures in cinema, Extracurricular activities have proven to go beyond college admisindividuals often overlook the practical benefits that sions. According to a 2012 College Board study, involvement in involvement in extracurricular activities has on a student afterschool activities while performing well acain real life. demically demonstrates positive time management Standardized test scores usually dominate the “One of the most prioritization skills, which are big indicators of education headlines because they are often seen as important questions to and success in the workforce. a significant indicator of achievement. But what’s ask is if the university Additionally, a vital purpose of extracurricular learned on the basketball court or at a student govactivities is to keep students energized and conernment meeting could be just as important. offers the program to school. High school theater productions, For students who attend schools throughout the you want and consider nected championship football games, inspiring poetry sesstate, the tools gained from participating in extrathe quality of those sions and the practical volunteer opportunities all curricular activities has become harder to come by help keep students motivated to show up to school over the last few years. Since the Great Recession, programs.” each day. Oklahoma has reduced per-student funding by “At our school we try and make it so that every student has one more than 20 percent. A 2014 report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities states that funding to Oklahoma’s public schools was thing to get excited about every day,” says Matthew Vereecke, school director at Monte Cassino. 23.6 percent lower in 2013 than it was in 2008. Ultimately, if a student is engaged, that makes the student and the Extracurricular activities have a profound impact on one’s life and can teacher’s job a little bit easier. make students much more marketable to college admission counselors. NATHAN PORTER Many high school juniors and seniors are curious as to which par

74

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


OU - OKLAHOMA’S ACADEMIC PACESETTER

ranks No. 1 in the nation among all public universities in the total number of National Merit Scholars, w OU with more than 750 National Merit Scholars enrolled. year, OU has the largest number of freshman National Merit Scholars ever enrolled at OU with 311 w This freshman Scholars. freshman class is the academically highest ranked in OU history and in state history at a public w OU’s university with an average 26.4 ACT for incoming freshmen. w OU’s freshman class is the largest in OU history, with more than 4,175 students. a ceremony in May at the White House, the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History was one w Atof the top five museums in the country to receive the National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the nation’s highest honor given to libraries and museums for service to the community.

the five-year period from 2008-09 to 2013-2014, OU averaged the lowest increase in tuition and fees w For nationwide at a statewide public university, according to a College Board report. Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education at OU has announced a new Debt Forgiveness Program. w The This innovative new initiative for debt-free teachers will help keep talented, newly graduated teachers in Oklahoma. OU is the only Big 12 university to be selected as having one of America’s 25 most beautiful campuses.

w construction beginning next year, OU will become one of the first public universities in the country w With to build residential colleges for upperclassmen and women, patterned on those at Yale, Oxford, Harvard and Cambridge in England. The living/learning communities will become the cornerstone of the undergraduate experience. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


Education

G U I D E

Questions And Answers When choosing the right university or school of higher education, know the facts.

A

school’s website. fter graduation from high school, it’s on to the next “This handy tool will help you get a picture of what it could cost step: college. Choosing which college or university for you to attend college,” says Castro. to attend can be a monumental decision prospective Susan Tolbart, the director of Academic Services and Recruitment students and their parents may have been anticipating at Oklahoma State University-Tulsa, explains that knowing what profor many years or may have just decided to start saving money to fund. Regardless, keep these things in mind when choosing grams the university offers, as well as the quality of those programs, is an important factor when choosing the right school. the right school. “The type of degree and quality of the university can have a major “I think it is important to ask yourself what you are looking for impact on long-term job earnings,” says Tolbart. first and foremost,” says Amanda Castro, director of Prospective Both Tolbart and Castro agree that in addition to questions on the Student Services at the University of Oklahoma. quality of programs and tuition, questions geared toward campus For example, Castro says, “What size of classes will I feel most safety and housing options should also be high on the list. comfortable in? How many of my classes will be large, lecture style “Public colleges and universities should publish campus crime classes? Will there be a challenging academic environment for me? statistics online each year under the provisions of “You’d be surprised to see how many schools have only a limited number of large classes,” says “Knowing what programs the Clery Act,” says Tolbart. Originally known as the Campus Security Act, Castro. the university offers, as the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Additionally, some students may find the college environment challenging, whereas others are well as the quality of those Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (20 USC looking for an environment that would include an programs, is an important § 1092(f)) requires colleges and universities across honors college, Castro adds. factor when choosing the the country to disclose information about crime on and around campuses. “Don’t simply ask things like, ‘How is your right school.” “Student safety should be a priority on every English department?’ or, ‘How is your pre-med campus,” says Castro. program?’” says Castro. If it’s not, your money will be better spent elsewhere, she adds. The more specific your questions are the better, she says. Housing selection is an important aspect of choosing the right “It is hard for a school to effectively communicate the answer you college, says Castro. Campus housing should provide students with are looking for when they get a vague question,” she continues. a vibrant community in which to live, and many times the students Financial questions should come into play, adds Castro. This may have several selections to choose from. determine what kind of school to pursue, as public versus private When looking at options for schools, prospective student and their school tuition can vary widely. In accordance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, parents must take into account their goals, lifestyle and pocketbook. SHARON MCBRIDE a Net Price Calculator should be accessible on each prospective

76

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


go.MACU.edu 888.436.3035

MACU MAY BE CLOSER THAN YOU THINK

THINGS MAY NOT BE AS THEY SEEM According to College Navigator: nces.ed.gov

S T U D E N T T O FA C U L T Y R AT I O

( A t M A C U w e d o n o t in c lu d e Te a c h e r A s s i s t a n t s in o u r r a t i o )

State Schools: 19-1 | MACU: 15-1

FRESHMEN WHO RECEIV ED FIN A NCIA L AID S t a te s ch o o l s : 79 % | M A C U : 9 9 %

UNDERGR ADUATE S TUDENT POPUL ATION S t a te s ch o o l s : 18 ,9 37 | M A C U : 2,101

CRIMES ON CAMPUS S t a te s ch o o l s : 18 2 | M A C U : 2

COST OF SCHOOL S t a te s ch o o l s : $15, 3 0 0 | M A C U : $ 2 2,118

WHAT THIS ME ANS?

A s a fe , a f f o r d a bl e , p e r s o n aliz e d, c o ll e g e e x p e ri e n c e . These numbers are an average of the three largest state schools in the state of Oklahoma.


Education

G U I D E

The Successful Student Studying, planning ahead and finding a work-life balance can help college students do their best.

W

hether new to the college scene or a seasoned student, creating a successful college experience takes work for most. Unlike high school, college is education that students pay for through loans, scholarships or savings. “You’ll want to make sure that investment pays off by getting good grades,” says Amanda Castro, the director of Prospective Student Services at the University of Oklahoma. For some students, that can be easier said than done. “I have found that many students simply did not have to study in high school,” says J.J. Smith, assistant director of Student Services at Oklahoma State University-Tulsa. “The material covered came easy to them, and they truly haven’t learned how to study.” Smith says the best advice he can offer incoming students is to not procrastinate. The theory is that students should study two hours for every hour they spend in class, he says. “If a student is taking 15 credit hours, they should reserve 30 hours a week for studying,” says Smith. Despite best efforts, there may be a time students find themselves struggling, says Castro. “College is different than high school for a reason,” says Castro. “This transition takes students from a highly structured high school environment to a highly unstructured one in college. If there is one skill that students need when they get to college, it is time management,” she says. However, the best college experience can be all about finding the right balance, says Smith. “Too much of anything can be bad for a person,” Smith says. “I think it’s very important for students to have a life outside of their studies.

78

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Finding time for everything you want and need to do is all about prioritizing your day.” Smith suggests that students make a list of things they need to do along with an estimation of how long it will take to complete the tasks. Rate each task by importance, he adds, then start to work on the list. “Typically, lack of planning is what causes most students to feel stressed in their day-today schedule,” says Smith. Finally, it’s never too early for students to start planning what they will do after earning a degree. “Students can begin working with a career services department on their resumes and interviewing skills long before a job search begins,” Castro says. “The advice they can give will assist students in becoming the most competitive candidate for a job.” Through coaching, counseling, practice interviewing and more, students who seek these services should walk into the job market ready to showcase themselves, she adds. “Typically, employers are looking to hire students during the fall semester of their senior year,” adds Smith. “Students without any field experience will have a more difficult time landing that dream job.” SHARON MCBRIDE

STUDY TIPS

Some students don’t know how to take notes that will work for them. There are a ton of books on note taking in the library, and most writing centers have tips on how to take better notes. Many students wait until night to study, but most individuals learn best during daylight hours. Figure out what time works best and make it happen. Find the appropriate study area. Some need absolute quiet, while others work best with a lot happening around them. Limit interruptions. Turn off the electronics, including cell phones. - J.J. SMITH, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY TULSA.


AD PROOF:

(JB)

Proof Due Back By: 6/27 5pm

One month. One course. No reason to wait. You can fit education into your life with our ONE COURSE A MONTH® schedule. Focus on one subject a month, complete the course and then move on to the next. Now’s the time to get started!

1.888.847.3989

JustOneCourse.com

Ad #: P31991-f-13251-3x4 Deadline To Pub: 6/30 3pm First Run: 8/1/2014 Publication: Oklahoma Magazine Section: Education Issue Specs: 3.73x4.937

 Approved as is. Peggy Approved with revisions.  Bryan CLOSE HELMERICH  Revise and resend.

Bob E.

Bishop Edward J.

JONES

SLATTERY

2015 ICONS FOR OSU IN TULSA

Initial _________ Date __________

The 2015 Icons for Oklahoma State University in Tulsa have made a huge impact on the lives of people in Oklahoma and across the nation. Through their generosity and selfless devotion to helping others, these honorees have helped create a brighter future for our state. The 2015 Icons for OSU in Tulsa will be honored at A Stately Affair in Tulsa on May 18. Proceeds from the black-tie event will support student scholarships at OSU-Tulsa and OSU Center for Health Sciences.

4608 South Garnett, Suite 110 • Tulsa, OK 74146 Brown Mackie Colleges is a system of over 25 schools. See BMCprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees and other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info. © 2014 Brown Mackie College 3403 Accredited Member, ACICS Licensed by the Oklahoma Board of Private Vocational Schools (OBPVS), 3700 North Classen Boulevard, Suite 250, Oklahoma City, OK 73118. Telephone: 405.528.3370. NP0714

20044 Brown Mackie.indd 1

918-594-8500

StatelyAffair.COM

WWW.A

6/30/14 20701 3:30 PM OSU.indd 1

12/19/14 2:19 PM

curious minds challenge the world

YOUR SUCCESS STARTS HERE

Galela Kirkland | Miami, Oklahoma | Biology Oklahoma’s Public Liberal Arts College Nationally Recognized for Affordability and Quality

Flexible Schedules | Undergraduate & Graduate Degrees Small Class Sizes | Financial Aid Available

Rigorous and Distinctive Interdisciplinary Core Curriculum

CLAREMORE | BARTLESVILLE | PRYOR | ONLINE 1727 W. Alabama Chickasha, OK 73018

20713 USAO.indd 1

USAO.edu (405) 574.1357

918-343-7777 | www.rsu.edu 12/22/14 20037 4:23 PM RSU.indd 1

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

79 6/27/14

5:13 PM


Education

G U I D E

Do Your Homework On Private Schools Parents and students each have some things to learn prior to the child attending a private institution.

E

very parent desires to provide their child with the best agrees. education possible, and private schooling may be the “We stay away from selling ourselves at Monte Cassino, but rather solution. But, the first step to a child receiving a top-notch focus on being the best fit,” says Vereecke. education is to do the homework to select the right school. For this reason, Monte Cassino, Cascia Hall and many other Each private school has different tuition prices, class private schools throughout Oklahoma encourage prospective students sizes, available activities and other qualities, and the reality is that and their parents to shadow a current student before they enroll. This parents and students are usually looking for different things in an allows prospective families to not only evaluate the school, but also academic institution. see how they would fit inside that school’s Students often look for a sense of belongcommunity. Ultimately, a private school should ing at school. Many children evaluate the “One of the best parts be just that: a community. quality of a school based on their chances of Most private schools provide smaller classof private schools is that room making a lot of friends and meeting a sigsizes than public schools and are in tune nificant other. Parents, on the other hand, are students and parents with what a child wants and needs. looking down the road at opportunities that The largest difference between a private want to be there.” might be available to their child as a result of school and a public school is that most private their enrollment. While the student is focused schools have a values-based education system. on homecoming dates and sleepovers, the This gives educators the freedom to infuse parents envision college scholarships and acceptance letters. beliefs and opinions into a lesson. This is a huge positive when the Many private school directors and admission counselors believe parents share the same values as the institution but can be negathat a student’s success is largely dependent on a student attending a tive when they don’t, thus stressing again the importance of parents school that is a good match for him or her. choosing the school that fits best. “Cascia Hall is not for everyone. I think there are a lot of great priThe true beauty of private schools is that there is a choice invate and public schools in Tulsa. I don’t think Cascia Hall is the only volved. great option. It has to be a good fit,” says Kerry Hornibrook, director “One of the best parts of private schools is that students and parof school advancement at Cascia Hall Preparatory School in Tulsa. ents want to be there,” says Hornibrook. Matthew Vereecke, school director at Monte Cassino School, NATHAN PORTER

80

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


“ L AU R E L P U T S T H E

LEADER IN

C H E E R L E A D E R .” “The first middle school football game I went to, there weren’t cheerleaders, so I asked my mom if I could get a uniform,” says Laurel, who then initiated her own middle school cheering movement. “All my friends come and join in, even the boys. And the high school cheerleaders come up and say, ‘Good job’!” Laurel also flips for new books. “I like how my school library has so many books, and they always get new books about different subjects.” It’s a good thing Laurel likes to read. When she grows up she wants to be, “A cheerleader and a doctor and a school nurse and a teacher. I like music and P.E. and science. I liked when we learned about birds and we practiced picking up popcorn with straws, like beaks. I like all the subjects.” Let Holland Hall help nurture and develop the leader in your child. Contact Olivia Martin, Director of Admission, at

(918) 481-1111.

– Laurel B., Holland Hall Second Grader

www.hollandhall.org

20716 Holland Hall.indd 1

12/22/14 4:27 PM

Be...Creative Be...A Cascian The Cascia Community congratulates Mary Cooper who has distinguished herself academically and creatively. • Oklahoma Academic Scholar • AP Scholar • Class Valedictorian • Graduate, Tulsa Ballet Center for Dance Education • Apprentice, Tulsa Ballet Second Company

Mary Cooper Class of 2014

2520 S. Yorktown Ave. Tulsa, OK • 918-746-2600 www.casciahall.org • admissions@casciahall.org

“The academic program and faculty, together with the school’s accepting and nurturing environment, prepared me to thrive in the working world. Cascia Hall taught me self-discipline as well as respect for myself and others, which has helped me be successful as I pursue my career as an artist.” Mary Cooper 20729 Cascia Hall.indd 1

12/23/14 12:44 PM

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

81


Education

G U I D E

S

Oklahoma Private School Guide Address/Phone/ Website

Total enrollment

Student/teacher ratio

Grades offered

Standardized testing

Foreign languages offered/sports programs/arts and music programs

Number of teachers with advanced degrees

Uniforms

Annual tuition

Augustine Christian Academy

6310 E. 30th St., Tulsa/ 918.832.4600/ www.acatulsa.org

218

N/A

K4-12

Iowa Test of Basic Skills; ACT Explore

Latin, Hebrew, Spanish, Chinese/No/Yes

N/A

Yes

$5,000-$6,500

Bishop Kelley High School

3905 S. Hudson Ave., Tulsa/ 918.627.3390/ www.BishopKelley.org

862

11:1

9-12

ACT average 24.6, Scholars Program average 31.4, 53 AP Scholars, 1 National AP Scholar

French, Spanish, Latin, Chinese/Yes/Yes

54%

Yes

Catholic parishioner)-$10,900 (other)

Catholic

Bishop McGuiness Catholic High School

801 NW 50th St., OKC/405.842.6638/ www.bmchs.org

710

15:1

9-12

ACT: 25.5

Spanish, French, Latin/ Yes/Yes

43%

Yes

$8,600

Catholic

Casady School

9500 N. Pennsylvania Ave., OKC/ 405.749.3100/ www.casady.org

880

8:1

PK-12

SAT: 1251/ACT: 27.4

French, Spanish, Chinese, Latin, Greek/ Yes/Yes

65%

Yes

varies by division

Episcopal

Cascia Hall Preparatory School

2520 S. Yorktown Ave., Tulsa/ 918.746.2600/ www.casciahall.org

520

12:1

6-12

ACT: 26.1; SAT: CR 595, M 600, W 593

Spanish, German, French, Latin, Chinese/Yes/Yes

65%

Yes

$12,545

Catholic, Augustinian

Christian Montessori Academy

3702 S. 90th E. Ave., Tulsa/ 918.628.6524/ www.montessorilearning.org

94

9:1

PK-8

N/A

Spanish/No/Yes

Lead teachers Montessori certified

No

$5,500

Christian nondenominational

Heritage Hall

1800 NW 122nd St., OKC/ 405.749.3000/ www.heritagehall.com

880

8:1

PS-12

ACT: 25.9

Latin, French, Spanish, Chinese/Yes/Yes

52%

No

$13,925-$21,195

None

Holland Hall

5666 E. 81st St., Tulsa/ 918.481.1111/ www.hollandhall.org

994

9:1

PK-12

N/A

French, Latin, Spanish, Chinese/Yes/Yes

52%

Yes

$4,230-$17,950

Episcopal

Holy Family Cathedral School

820 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa/918.582.0422/ www.holyfamilycathedralschool.com

161

16:1

PK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 90th percentile

Spanish/Yes/Yes

7

Yes

$3,950 (Catholic); $4,850 (nonCatholic); $4,800, (Pre-K tuition)

Catholic

Lincoln Christian School

1003 N. 129th East Ave., Tulsa/918.234.8150/ www. lincolnchristianschool.com

929

16:1

PK-12

ACT: 23.3

Spanish/Yes/Yes

10

Yes

$5,480

Church on the Move

Marquette Catholic School

1519 S. Quincy Ave., Tulsa/ 918.584.4631/ www.marquetteschool.org

512

10:1 (ECDC), 22:1 (K-8)

3 years-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 87%

Spanish/Yes/Yes

1/3 of faculty

Yes

$4,932-$6,235

Catholic

Metro Christian Academy

6363 S. Trenton Ave., Tulsa/918.745.9868/ www.metroca.com

1,017

18.5:1

P3-12

ACT: 25.5

Spanish, French, Chinese/Yes/Yes

35

Yes

$6,625-$9,265

Interdenominational

Miss Helen’s Private School

4849 S. Mingo Rd., Tulsa/918.622.2327/ www.misshelens.com

200

10:1

PK-5

Above average

Spanish/No/Yes

Some master’s degrees

Yes

$9,000 per calendar year

None

Monte Cassino School

2206 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa/ 918.742.3364/ www.montecassino.org

850

PS-8

CogAT & Iowa Testing: 98%

French, Latin, Spanish/ Yes/Yes

40%

Yes

$3,600 (two-day EC), $5,000 (three-day EC), $8,000 (five-day EC), $9,800 (K-8)

Roman Catholic

Regent Preparatory School of Oklahoma

8621 S. Memorial Dr., Tulsa/ 918.663.1002/www.rpsok.org

465

12:1

PK-12

N/A

Spanish, Latin/Yes/Yes

18 of 48

Yes

$7,120 (1-6), $7,720 (7-8), $9,100 (9-12)

Christian interdenominational

Rejoice Christian Schools

12200 E. 86th St. N., Owasso/ 918.516.0050/ www.rejoiceschool.com

809

15:1

PS3-12

EXPLORE; ACT: 23.6

Spanish, French/Yes/Yes

29%

No

$2,100-$5,970

Baptist

Riverfield Country Day School

2433 W. 61st St., Tulsa/ 918.466.3553/ www.riverfield.org

612

(based on age/ grade level)

8 weeks-12

Testing average two years above grade level; ACT: 25 (2010-13

Spanish, German/Yes/Yes

21

No

15:1

(middle and elementary schools),10:1 (ECLC)

4:1 to 15:1

average)

82

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Religious affiliation

School

chool is never really out for parents looking for the best options in their children’s education. Oklahoma Magazine makes the search for private schooling easier. We’ve contacted and polled private schools in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa metro areas to get answers to questions you have. How big is the school? What languages are taught? Which have the most to offer academically? Which offer arts and sports curriculum? How much does it cost? From enrollment figures to tuition and dress codes, read on to get a bird’s-eye-view of these prospective choices and investments.

Nondenominational

$8,600 (supporting

$8,545-$11,220 (five days, varies on grade and age )

None


University School

It’s not easy to

Educating Gifted Students

Since 1982

but it’s worth it.

Yes, at Monte Cassino we’re known as “the saints,” but it’s not simply a moniker students in Yes, at Monte Cassino we’re known as “the saints,” but it’s not simply

acquire after enrolling, it’s an honor and a reputation we also want them to earn.

a moniker studentsCassino instantlyclasses, acquire being after enrolling, an honor andtoa what is impo From the first day of Monte a “saint” it’s is tantamount

in being successful: hard work, for others, reputation we alsorespect want them to earn. a passion to overachieve, a strong moral co

It’s not easy to

and the ability to make good day-to-day decisions.

From the first day of Monte Cassino classes, being a “saint” is

So for all the other excellent reasons to attend Monte Cassino It’s not easy to (nationally recognized acad

tantamount to whatsafety is important in beingour successful: work, respect social for skills p access to team-building athletics, and security), unique, hard creative Catholic

are what set us apart from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will also set your son a others, a passion to overachieve, a strong moral compass, and the ability to

daughter apart as well.

but it’s worth it.

make good day-to-day decisions.

Want your children to have a better opportunity to succeed in life?

Call for a Tour

So for all the other excellent reasons to attend Monte Cassino Be Saint. worth Yes,a at Monte Cassino we’rebut known asit’s “the saints,” but it’s notit. simply a moniker students instan (nationally access toit’s team-building athletics, safety instantly acquire after it’s anrecognized honor andacademics, a as reputation webut also want them atomoniker earn. students Yes, enrolling, at Monte Cassino we’re known “the saints,” not simply

918-631-5060 • www.utulsa.edu/uschool

acquire after enrolling, it’s an honor and a reputation we also want them to earn.

From the first of Monte classes, being a “saint” tantamount what andday security), ourCassino unique, creative Catholic social is skills programstoare whatis importan in being From successful: hard respect forclasses, others,being a passion to isoverachieve, a strong comp the first day work, of Monte Cassino a “saint” tantamount to what is moral important The University of Tulsa is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. set us apart from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will also in being successful: hard work, respect for others, a passion to overachieve, a strong moral compass, and the ability to make good day-to-day decisions. and the ability to make good day-to-day decisions.

So for all thesetother reasons to attend yourexcellent son and/or daughter apart asMonte well. Cassino (nationally recognized academi

20718 University School.indd 1

12/22/14 4:44 PM So for

LOCATED IN THE HEART OF MID-TOWN AT 21ST AND LEWIS / 918.742.3364

all the other excellent reasons attend Monte Cassino creative (nationally recognized academics, access to team-building athletics, safety andtosecurity), our unique, Catholic social skills prog Want your children to have a better our opportunity to succeed in life? access to team-building athletics, safety and security), unique, creative Catholic social skills programs MonteCassino.org are what set us apart from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will also set your son and/ are what set us apart from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will also set your son and/or

daughter apart as well. Be a Saint. daughter apart as well.

Want your children to have a better opportunity to succeed in life? Want your children to have a better opportunity to succeed in life?

Be a Be Saint. a Saint.

LOCATED IN THE HEART OF MID-TOWN AT 21ST AND LEWIS / 918.742.3364

LOCATED IN THE HEART OF MID-TOWN AT 21ST AND LEWIS / 918.742.3364

MonteCassino.org

MonteCassino.org

JOB NUMBER HNK1182

FILENAME HNK1182 MC FP NB T_PEOPLE

ART DIRECTOR JIM KNIGHT

PUBLICAT TULSA PE

TITLE MONTE CASSINO FULL PAGE NON-BLEED TULSA PEOPLE AD

LANGUAGE ENGLISH

COPY WRITER BILL HINKLE

REVISION DATE 11/22/2013 4:43 AM

CREATIVE DIRECTOR BILL HINKLE JIM KNIGHT

FULL PAG 8 INCHES 9.875 INC

CLIENT MONTE CASSINO

20702 Metro Christian.indd 1

COLORS USED CMYK

AD VERSION 1

18452v Monte Cassino.indd 1 12/19/14 4:51 PM

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM BILL HINKLE PHOTOGRAPHER

ADOBE® A PRODUCED

7457PM SOUT 12/13/13 4:16 83 TULSA, OK

918.691.11

JIMK26@A


Total enrollment

Student/teacher ratio

Grades offered

Standardized testing

Foreign languages offered/sports programs/arts and music programs

Number of teachers with advanced degrees

Uniforms

111

9:1

PK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish/Yes/Yes

5

Yes

School of Saint Mary

1365 E. 49th Pl., Tulsa/ 918.749.9361/ www.schoolofsaintmary.com

342

15:1

PK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 94%

Spanish/Yes/Yes

4

Yes

St. Pius X School

1717 S. 75th E. Ave., Tulsa/ 918.627.5367/ www.spxtulsa.org

396

16:1

PS-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills (grades 2-8); ACT Explore Test (8th grade)

Spanish, foreign language lab/Yes/Yes

2

Yes

$4,108 (one child parish rate); $6,353 (one child non-parish rate); multiple child discount

Catholic

Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic School

1428 N. 67th East Ave., Tulsa/918.836.2165/ www. peterandpaultulsa.org

200

20:1

PK-8

N/A

Spanish, Latin/Yes/Yes

6

Yes

$3,500

Catholic

Summit Christian Academy

200 E. Broadway, Broken Arrow/ 918.251.1997/www. sca-eagles.com

430

15:1

K-12

EXPLORE; Stanford Achievement Test; Terra Nova; ACT: 23

Spanish/Yes/Yes

10

Yes

$5,045-$6,497

Assembly of God

Town & Country School

8906 E. 34th St., Tulsa/ 918.296.3113/ www.tandcschool.org

167

6:1

1-12

N/A

No/Yes/Yes

N/A

Yes

contact school

None

Undercroft Montessori

3745 S. Hudson, Tulsa/ 918.622.2890/ www.undercroft.org

205

8:1

P3-8

Stanford Achievement Test

Spanish/Yes/Yes

20

No

University School at The University of Tulsa

326 S. College Ave., Tulsa/ 918.631.5060/ www.utulsa.edu/uschool

241

5:1

PS-8

Stanford Achievement Test

Spanish, Chinese/No/Yes

16

Optional

$5,515-$10,630

Wright Christian Academy

11391 E. Admiral Pl., Tulsa/ 918.438.0922/ www. wrightchristianacademy.com

250

11:1

P3-12

Terra Nova Standardized Testing

Spanish/Yes/Yes

8

Yes

$5,041-$6,046

$3,947

(Catholic)-$4,882 (non-Catholic)

$4,745 (parishioner)

$6,000-$9,800 (primary half day to middle school)

(varies each level)

Religious affiliation

Address/Phone/ Website 2515 W. 46th St., Tulsa/ 918.446.9756/ www.saintcatherineschool.org

Annual tuition

School Saint Catherine School

Roman Catholic

Roman Catholic

None

None

Nondenominational

Riverfield is

COMMUNITY

LIFE?

READY FOR THE REST OF YOUR

Bishop Kelley graduates enter the world with spiritual strength, moral purpose and a commitment to serving the community, on top of a solid academic foundation.

Prepared in these ways, Bishop Kelley students are ready to do more than pursue the good life. They are ready to lead good lives.

3905 S. Hudson | Tulsa, OK 74135 | 918.627.3390 | www.BishopKelley.org

2 4 3 3

A C AT H O L I C E D U C AT I O N I N T H E L A S A L L I A N T R A D I T I O N

84

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

20721 Bishop Kelly.indd 1

Riverfield.indd 1 12/31/14 20709 11:47 AM

W e s t

6 1 s t

S t r e e t

n

9 1 8 • 4 4 6 • 3 5 5 3

r i v e r f i e l d . o r g

12/22/14 10:38 AM


Senior Health

Body, Mind And Soul

A Body

Improving health adds years to your life and life to your years.

ging changes us physically, but it’s never too late to improve your health – body, mind and spirit. Good health in senior years involves myriad actions, including proactivity and learning.

Senior years can either be frail or resilient. Daily living and bad habits damage the body, but good choices reverse the wear. Those good choices touted by professionals and self-promoters remain the golden rule. Enjoying life at any age should not need deprivation. The proactive person should start with a frank discussion with his or her physician. Learn about your body and take a proactive stance. Partner with your physician. If you have diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia or other diseases, learn about them. Discussing weight with a physician can be uncomfortable or embarrassing, but a healthier weight delivers benefits. A normal body weight diminishes damage to joints, diabetes related blindness, decreases the

chances of developing stroke and heart disease, insomnia and improves depression. Nutrition, or under nutrition, is a big decider of senior health. A host of social, physical and psychological factors play into nutrition deficits: dental health, living alone, low income, medications, dementia and undiagnosed malabsorption diseases being a few. Meals should be a balance of vegetables, grains and adequate protein. Learn to eliminate salt in unexpected places. Drink adequate amounts of fluids. Hydration provides a multitude of benefits, including wrinkle reduction. Before adding shakes and nutritional supplements to the diet, seek doctor’s advice. Exercise is essential for improving life, and possibly prolonging it. Experts recommend individuals exercise 30 minutes per day five times a week. The benefits include increased mobility, reduced falls and improved balance. Regular exercise can help lower hypertension and help prevent respiratory problems, joint pain and dementia progression. Exercise also alleviates depression and

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

85


improves circulation and strength. “I recommend the use of light weights to rebuild muscles, replace strength and improve balance lost due to inactivity, says Dr. Loring Barwick, a primary care physician at Oklahoma State University Medical Center. “The older a person gets, the more it hurts, but I also tell them to use it or lose it. Just keep moving your body, and the rest will follow.”

Mind

The mind is the part of our body perceiving reasons, feelings and intellect. Many adults fear the loss of their minds’ abilities. Dementia is the loss of memory, reason or judgment. Dementia’s causative origin lists numerous possibilities: stroke, accident, chemical imbalance, vascular problems, even a loss of self. Alzheimer’s dementia is a specific, irreversible dementia. “There is no cure for Alzheimer’s,” says Dr. Linda Hershey, a neurologist at OU Medical Center. “There are many new treatments on the horizon. I enrolled my first patient in a new international, multi-center clinical trial recently. Much of Alzheimer’s effects depends much on genetics. There are things research has shown to slow the process. Any patient I have with an early diagnosis, I encourage the Mediterranean diet. I recommend curtailing red meats, animal fat, olive oil and increasing eating grains, fruits and vegetables. Not an overall bad diet for any of us.” Depression is the most common mental illness in seniors and results from a chemical imbalance in the brain. It is often found in older adults but contributes to dementia. Depression can occur due to chronic illness and pain, a big move, spousal loss, decreased sense of importance and medication. Being aware of signs and symptoms and contributing factors can expedite a diagnosis. Those who suspect they may suffer from depression should talk to his or her physician. Ask questions of the doctor, pharmacist or other healthcare professional until satisfactory answers are received.

Spirit

Taking care of an older parent or spouse, or being cared for as one, impacts many seniors. “Some of my patients will not consider leaving their home or have anybody [come in] to help. This is a very dangerous situation,” says Barwick. Dealing with the future takes planning and candid discussions with children, a spouse or potential caregiver regarding wishes. AARPOklahoma’s website provides a multitude of surveys, lists and websites that can help. Some aging adults will rely on a spouse or child to become the primary caregiver. In Oklahoma 600,000 fall into this category. Oklahoma is the first state to give

86

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


A New Day Has Dawned

We are pleased to announce that our new East Wing apartment expansion is NOW OPEN! New Epworth Villa residents are moving in every day, joining the remarkable friends and neighbors and enjoying the lifestyle that has made Epworth Villa one of Oklahoma’s very best retirement communities.

Because every moment counts... Our new look reflects the vibrancy and

Grace Hospice helps you embrace moment. We provide expert passionevery of our community, its leadership medical care and counseling services to our patients including: and staff—and the vitality of those who     

call it aHOME. Nursing services 24 hours/7 days week We have a fresh vision for the future supported by our heritage, our Medications related to the terminal illness mission, and our reputation as the premier Pain and symptom management continuing care retirement community in Emotional, spiritual and bereavement counseling Oklahoma City. Family support services for friends and family

Grace Hospice serves Northeastern Oklahoma. Please call 918-744-7223 to learn how we can help you and your family.

The Celebrating 15 Years of Caring Family’s To learn more call 405.752.1200 or 800.579.8776 Phone (918) 744-7223 • Toll Free (800) 659-0307 14901 N. Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73134 Choice. www.gracehospice.com www.epworthvilla.com

Not affiliated with Grace Living Centers.

Home & Garden

18514 Villa .indd 11 19305 Epworth Grace Hospice.indd

special consideration to caregivers. SB 1536, which was signed into law in 2014, gives persons – not just seniors – the ability to designate a caregiver. “One reason [for the law] is to provide enough information so the patient will not need readmission to the hospital after release because of incorrect care. We’ve heard so many stories about how the caregivers did not understand the discharge summary,” says Craig Davis, assistant state director of AARP Oklahoma. “The bill does not surpass or replace home-health or professional health care, but provides another layer of care that often keeps people in their homes longer. All work to reduce the hospitalization costs and increase healing and peace of mind.” There are many factors involved in maintaining health in the senior years. The most important is an indefinable zest for life, to live not only a long life, but pack as much life into the years lived. There are volumes of opportunities to maintain that enthusiasm: volunteer, teach, travel, become a mentor, build houses, take up a new hobby, join a discussion group, date again. Live, live, live: Living a long life involves living a fulfilled life. RHONDA SHEPHARD

12/18/13 12:32 4:44 PM PM 7/17/14

MARCH 2015

Get the latest information on ways to update your home and outdoor space.

HG 1/4.indd 1

Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com.

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

87 1/11/14 17083 2:55 PM Grac


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR What problems can porn cause? Solitary use of porn is a huge factor in relationship breakdown and can raise unrealistic sexual expectations in which porn becomes preferable to live sex with a loving partner. Problems may involve feelings of betrayal in which porn-assisted masturbation occurs in COURTNEY LINSENMEYERan online encounter; this often leads O’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR to riskier sexual acts, and endangering health. Men in general do not view porn as a sign of infidelity, but due to the increased availability of sexual services on the Internet captured thru porn sites, many toxic problems arise as a result. Compulsive and addictive behaviors can form as well as distorted sexual expectations. Lots of men use porn for quick masturbation; this can happen even if they are in a sexually satisfying relationship. Porn may also assist women who have arousal difficulties or an inability to climax. It is a good idea if couples discuss their attitude to porn early on in their relationship and determine what type of sexual relationship is healthy for their future and if porn should play a part. There is no doubt that some couples experiment with the use of porn as an aid to perking up their sex lives, and sex education videos are often arousing as well as informative. With all considered, setting healthy boundaries with the body is critical to overall wellness.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

VETERINARIAN Is it really that important to get my pet’s teeth cleaned? Dental care is one of the most commonly overlooked areas. Eighty percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats show signs of oral disease by age three. Gum disease is an infection of the tissue surrounding the teeth and DR. RODNEY ROBARDS starts out as plaque. Initially, plaque is soft and brushing or chewing hard toys can dislodge it. Plaque can lead to gingivitis, causing gums to become red and swollen and to bleed easily. Dental disease doesn’t affect just the mouth. It can lead to serious health problems including heart, lung and kidney disease, which makes it important that you provide your pets with proper dental care from the start. Your pet’s bad breath isn’t something to ignore; it could indicate an oral problem that needs treatment from your veterinarian.

PERSONAL TRAINER Should I avoid fad diets? Yes, you should avoid fad diets because they’re generally not healthy. Only three nutrients contain calories: carbohydrates, protein and fat. If you cut one, chances are you’ll be eating too much of the other two. The current rage for low-carbohydrate JOHN JACKSON has created a nation of people eating a lot of protein and fat, and in the process inviting the risk of high cholesterol and heart disease. If you choose a starvation diet of 800 calories or less per day, you can end up dehydrated and develop kidney damage. Your body has to be fueled with nutrients in order to be functional; moreover, lowcalorie diets can lower your metabolic rate. Unfortunately, when you stop dieting, your sluggish body puts the weight back on, and more often than not, more than your original weight. You’re better off avoiding gimmicks and opting for a reduced-calorie diet that feeds your body a healthy balance of nutrients.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

88

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Have you heard about new ride sharing services sweeping the US? UBER is a ride-sharing service company in which a driver offers their car to provide rides to UBER customers. Anyone can sign up to be a registered UBER driver (background checks are required), JARED PETERSON and smart phone app technology makes it easy to connect the driver and the passenger. The technology apparently works quite well, but there is one problem that remains unsolved: Insurance. UBER requires drivers to provide proof of their personal auto policy to become registered. Personal auto policies are not commercial auto policies, and they exclude coverage for commercial use, such as UBER activities. This can create a large financial exposure for these drivers – and passengers – unless they purchase a separate commercial auto policy or verify with the ride sharing service that commercial insurance covers them. Keep in mind that you should not utilize your personal auto to perform any service for money without verifying your auto insurance company will provide coverage. If you have questions regarding your auto insurance, contact a AAA agent nearest you.

Jared Peterson, AAA Oklahoma 2121 E 15th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.748.1030 Jared.Peterson@aaaok.org

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT How can we incorporate Cause Marketing into our business? Cause Marketing refers to marketing that combines efforts of a "for profit" business and a non-profit organization for mutual benefit. To be effective, JESSICA DYER it is important to properly align yourself with causes that reflect your business' core values. A few ways to approach this include: 1. Choose causes that match your target market. For example, if your business serves mostly children, then align with causes that benefit children. 2. Finding a personal connection or passion within leadership of your business. If you love art, then align with groups that support the local ballet company or museum. 3. Looking in your own backyard. There are countless non-profits on the local level that your support can make a difference. Organizations vary from groups that address social or economic issues to ones that focus on hunger or lack of education funding.

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl., Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539-777-6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

PHYSICAL THERAPY I work at a desk all day and have headaches, neck pain, and tension in my shoulders. Can physical therapy help? Jobs that do not require routine position changes can contribute to soft tissue tightness in the upper traps and neck muscles known as TIM MINNICK, PT trigger points, which then may result in headaches. Trigger points are what most people know as tender “knots” in their muscles. It is important to take a 5 minute stretch break every 1-2 hours if possible. Getting up and moving around for a few minutes may also be beneficial. If doing this doesn’t decrease or resolve your symptoms then your condition may have progressed to a level where visiting a physical therapist is necessary. A good physical therapist can teach you more specific exercises to help resolve your pain, show you neuromobilization techniques that may reduce your headaches, and perform various manual skills on your neck and upper traps including dry needling, soft tissue mobilization, and joint mobilization, which may eliminate the trigger points and associated pain.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. MARRIAGE COUNSELOR

HOSPICE CARE

My husband and I need marriage counseling, but he won’t come. What can I do? A lot of people experience this same frustration as you. They know they need help but have a really difficult time convincing their significant other to take that first step to seek outside help. Others BRAD ROBINSON, LMFT have found that if they book the first appointment with us, and then tell their partner that they have a counseling appointment, they are most likely going to come. If they come to that, they are most likely going to stick with counseling. Of course they transform their relationship as they stick with counseling.

Brad Robinson, CEO, LMFT Marriage Solutions 2121 S. Columbia Ave Suite 301 Tulsa, OK 74114 918.281.6060 www.MarriageSolutionsTulsa.com

ATTORNEY AT LAW I had a wreck, and the other person was at fault. I didn’t have insurance on my vehicle. Will that make a difference in my recovery since I was not at fault? No it will not. On Dec. 16, 2014, the Supreme Court of the State of Oklahoma, in Montgomery v. Potter, 2014 OK 118, held that the Oklahoma legislature improperly enacted 47 O.S. 2011, Section 7-116, that served to limit the liability of the atfault party. The Court held that the accident victims who also happen to be uninsured drivers “is not prevented from the recovery of damages for pain and suffering.” Therefore, you are allowed to fully recover for all your losses, including pain and suffering. ESTHER M. SANDERS

Attorney at Law Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74120 918.745.2000 Telephone 918.745.0575 Facsimile 800.745.2006 Toll Free

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

My mother is battling cancer and is not doing well. A friend of mine recommended we explore hospice care, but I am not familiar with how it works. How can we find out if she qualifies? Medicare has specific regulations in place that physicians must follow to determine if a patient qualifies for hospice care. First, two physicians must determine that your mother has a life-limiting illness with a prognosis of six months or less to live and certify in writing. At Grace Hospice, our next step is to send one of our registered nurses to evaluate your mother, following Medicare’s guidelines. If your mother is eligible, she can choose to use her hospice benefit. At Grace Hospice, we would not only provide care during the course of your mother’s disease, but we would also offer support to you and your family throughout the duration of your mother’s care, as well as for a 13-month period of bereavement after her passing. For more information, call us at 918.744.7223 or visit www.gracehospice.com. AVA HANCOCK

Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT Does wearing designer labels help build my professional character? One misunderstanding that most guys have is that if it’s high-end or designer, then it’s a perfect fit. Not every guy can wear Tom Ford like Daniel Craig or can fit into an Armani suit as nicely AUTUMN POHL as George Clooney. The key to these famous looks is that it was made specifically for their bodies. Guys are missing this key element, and J.Hilburn has been the greatest solution. Why spend hundreds, if not thousands, on designer names that don’t quite fit your body correctly? Spend less on the name and get more from the product. When it comes down to it, guys don’t ask other guys, “Hey man, who are you wearing?” They want to know why and how you look that good in whatever it is that your wearing, whether it be a tuxedo at a gala or your fitted jeans and cool sports coat to the yacht club.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

The month of February always makes me think about love, which is sad because lately I have no desire for intimacy. What can I do to rekindle the spark in my relationship this Valentine’s Day? As we age, most men and women face the unspeakable truth that our libidos start to fade. Sound familiar? You’re not alone! For most of us, this is due to lower hormone levels, and the older we get, the fewer hormones we produce. It’s just a fact of life, but we don’t have to live with it. Bio-identical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) is a common procedure used by thousands every year to reduce hot flashes, build lean muscle, reduce risk of depression, improve sleep, mood, concentration, memory and, of course, libido. For more information on BHRT or to schedule a complimentary consultation, call BA Med Spa at 918.872.9999. MALISSA SPACEK

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR Why do men cheat? Is it insecurity? Can therapy help? It really isn’t accurate to make the generalization that all men cheat. Multiple studies demonstrate that women cheat frequently, as well. There are many reasons a person may go outside of a AMY KESNER, relationship, but each case should be PHD, LPC, LADC examined independently. Consider that if you enter a relationship assuming it will end badly, you may, albeit not purposely, be self-sabotaging. When a person works on themselves to gain happiness, confidence, self-esteem and self-value, that person attracts more positive people. Again, multiple studies and research has shown that people are attracted to confidence more than physical attractiveness. Therapy should focus more on understanding self and building up the positive qualities to increase security. When individuals feel secure and confident, they do not have a need to be validated by relationships. Unlike the line in Jerry Maguire, “You complete me,” we should complement each other. Healthy relationships are possible, and not all men cheat. Work on becoming the person you want to be so that you can attract the right person for you.

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

89


R AT E D

M O ST

AC C U R AT E

1 0

Y E A R S

I N

A

R OW

Oklahoma’s

K E E P I N G  Y O U   S A F E   T H I S   W I N T E R

visit kjrh.com


Taste

THE SWORDFISH PICATTA, A DALESANDRO’S FAVORITE, IS ONLY OFFERED ON WEEKENDS. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

FOOD, DRINK AND OTHER PLEASURES

M

Family Recipes

Dalesandro’s delivers traditional tastes in downtown Tulsa.

ore than 25 years ago, Buzz Dalesandro borrowed $10,000 from a friend and opened a bright, shiny lunch counter in downtown Tulsa. The most expensive entree, linguine with sausage, cost $3.75. Downtown wasn’t the place to be in those days, but the restaurant attracted a following. For more than a decade, loyal fans formed lines that wound out the door whenever Dalesandro’s restaurant was open. Then, unexpectedly, he lost his lease, and the building was torn down. He thought that was the end.

So imagine Dalesandro’s surprise when his son, Sonny, a professional soccer player, called his father to tell him that he wanted to open a restaurant with the family recipes. And so it was, Dalesandro’s was reborn at the corner of 18th and Boston Avenue in Tulsa, a sleek, shining-new space open for dinner with an expanded menu. Sonny Dalesandro runs the kitchen now. His family trained him well, and he inherited his father’s magic touch. “I owe it all to my kitchen staff,” he says. “When I’m not around, they cook as well as I do.” FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

91


Taste

T H E B UZ Z

EAST VILLAGE BOHEMIAN PIZZERIA

OWNER SONNY DALESANDRO AND CHEF JOSE REYES. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

A waiter proudly appears bearing an enormous platter of Caesar salad. A Dalesandro’s specialty, the salad is flavored with garlic, grated cheese and Balsamic vinegar, rich and rustic. After the salad, more plates appear, laden with simple yet addictively delicious southern Italian fare. A platter gleams bright red, a lake of rich and vibrant tomato sauce, in which five homemade pasta shells stuffed with a blend of three Italian cheeses are nestled. On another plate, a perfectly roasted half chicken is dwarfed by a mound of pasta it is served with. Yet another dish provides a stage for the lasagna, a tower of carefully layered pasta, meat and tomatoes and topped by a snowcap of gleaming, grated cheese. Though there’s enough on the table to feed a village, one dish is missing, and that’s Dalesandro’s most famous entree, the Swordfish Picatta. It’s served only on weekends, and Dalesandro’s regulars (says Sonny Dalesandro, “The vast majority of our customers are regulars.”) crowd the place on Friday to eat it. A huge, meaty hunk of swordfish is delicately pan-fried and finished with lemon sauce rich in butter and wine and accented by the tangy flavor of fresh capers. “We serve it only on weekends,” says Sonny Dalesandro, “because great-grandma cooked it rarely, as a special treat. “We keep our menu short and our dishes simple,” he continues, “so we can guarantee the quality of all our food. And we want people to feel like they’re eating at our house.” 1742 S. Boston Ave., Tulsa. www. dalesandros.com BRIAN SCHWARTZ

92

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Jeremy New is an early riser. Just after dawn, he arrives at the cozy, whimsically decorated dining space that is East Village Bohemian Pizzeria and kindles the logs in the oven, whose fire will eventually reach 900 degrees. That done, it’s time to make the dough. Made fresh daily from flour imported from Italy, the dough requires time to rest so that the yeast and sugars can do their work. New then makes the sauce by hand-crushing the finest Italian San Marzano tomatoes. That’s it. At 5 p.m. the kitchen opens. New has already put in a full day’s work, but still bursting with energy, he begins making a Pizza Margherita. He shapes the dough in his hand, flattening it but leaving an outer ridge. Then he puts it on a wooden peel, already dusted with flour, and presses it into a thin flat circle. Carefully, he spreads sauce on top, drizzles extra virgin olive oil and sprinkles sea salt and cracked pepper. He adds a handful of marinated cherry tomatoes and a few roasted garlic cloves. Then comes mozzarella imported from Naples. A few artfully placed sprigs of basil complete the picture, and then, the long, shovel-like peel is placed in the oven. New positions the pizza in the hottest part of the oven, and slowly, using the peel, rotates it to crisp each section of the crust. Then he shifts it to a cooler spot and rotates it again. Finally, he raises the peel so the pizza almost kisses the roof of the oven to sear the cheese. Then out it comes. Each pizza is unique, an individual work of art: Asymmetric, dappled with char marks and big, doughy bubbles, oozing with sauce and melted cheese. With years of training at a culinary school in Los Angeles and work at various Tulsa fine dining establishments under his belt, New has designed a long menu of innovative pizza choices, including a red potato and goat cheese pizza and a decadent S’more dessert calzone. But order the simple, traditional Margherita, because it’s perfect. 818 E. Third St., Tulsa. www.eastvillagebohemian. com – Brian Schwartz

PIZZA STUDDED WITH BRUSSELS SPROUTS IS ONE INVENTIVE PIE THAT CAN BE FOUND AT EAST VILLAGE BOHEMIAN PIZZERIA. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.


Celebrating our

52nd Year

Reserve an evening of “World Class” Caesar Salad with Steak, Lobster, Chicken or Fish. Friday & Saturday night featuring Mark Bryan.

3109 South Yale • 918.743.1 800 celebritytulsa.com

“Lemon Pecan” Pie made fresh each morning!

12842 Celebrity Restaurant.indd 1

12/23/14 5:25 PM

1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd. • Claremore, OK 74017 918-341-7333 • www.hammetthouse.com

20505 Hammett House Restaurant.indd 1

12/10/14 20727 2:56 PM Hideaway.indd 1

Visit US At

12/23/14 10:49 AM

OPEN 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. DAILY

918-742-4563

okmag.com 1/16 web.indd 1

3310 E. 32nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma Across from Walmart Neighborhood Market

11/9/14 11798 12:56 PhillsDiner.indd PM 1

5/2/14 12:41 PM

2014

16340 Freddies BBQ.indd 1

Tropical Lanna.indd 1 5/16/14 20545 9:02 AM

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

93 12/13/14 4:38 PM


Taste

W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

The Right Wing

Everyone has his or her own idea of what makes a great chicken wing. Preferences of various sauce flavors and levels of heat, as well as whether the wing is boneless or not, can impact a diner’s wing experience. But to find the best wing, head to The Right Wing. This Tulsa establishment serves, as The Right Wing says, original Buffalo, N.Y., wings. Wings and drumettes are fried crispy, then coated in sauce. Though sauce options range from mild garlic to nitro hot, the wings are best served in a classic Buffalo sauce – mild, medium or nitro hot – and served as wings were made to be served: with blue cheese dressing and carrot and celery sticks. The Right Wing offers individual lunch or dinners as well as wings for a crowd, perfect for game days. 3420 E. 11th St., Tulsa. 918.838.9464 – Jami Mattox BUFFALO WINGS ARE DONE RIGHT AT THE RIGHT WING. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

THE COW CALFHAY

94

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

BRUNCH AT IN THE RAW CONSISTS OF SWEET TREATS LIKE THE FRUIT AND GREEK YOGURT PARFAIT.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

This tongue-in-cheek joint doesn’t take itself too seriously (Cow Café, get it?), and that’s always refreshing. The eatery is run by the same folks that brought the Oklahoma City metro area City Bites, but The Cow Calf-Hay has something a bit heavier on its menu. Burgers piled high with everything from cheese and grilled onions to grilled pineapple and a fried egg make up the bulk of the menu, with fun and inventive flavors standing out. The Farm House Burger is a certified Angus beef patty cut with spicy pork sausage and topped with a fried egg, melted cheese, lettuce, tomato and spicy mayo. The Mad Cow is a patty topped with grilled chicken, two different cheeses, grilled potatoes, bacon and homemade spicy Ranch dressing. If those burgers don’t seem daunting, try taking the Six Shooter Challenge: six half-pound patties and 12 pieces of cheese are sandwiched on in between a bun and served with a full order of onion rings, BURGERS ARE TOPPED WITH curly fries and a piece of cake. The entire ANYTHING IMAGINorder must be completed in 45 minutes, or ABLE AT THE COW you lose, both your pride and $35. 3409 Wynn CALF-HAY. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. Dr., Edmond; 212 N. Harvey, Oklahoma City. www.thecowcalfhay.com – Jami Mattox

LEFT: SELECT SUSHI ROLLS ARE AVAILABLE FOR IN THE RAW’S BRUNCH. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.


T O YO U R H E A L T H

Cook For Health Don’t over-complicate it.

After the holidays, many complain that it’s time to get back on the wagon with healthy eating. It can be difficult to plan ahead and make healthy meals due to time, cost or simply habit; it’s much easier to stop at a drive through than it is to cook. But cooking healthy meals doesn’t have to take a lot of time, money or effort. Simple meals, like salads and soups, can be whipped up on the weekend and kept in the fridge for the week ahead. This quinoa salad is a favorite in my household. Grapefruit is what I use, but an orange and even fresh pineapple is tart and tasty. I also buy a pre-cooked rotisserie chicken, but feel free to roast your own chicken for this recipe. – Jami Mattox

Quinoa With Roast Chicken This salad makes a great lunch or light supper. Serves four. 1 c. 1 1/2 c. 1 1/4 c. 1

SIP

V I N TA G E COFFEE

Most who live in a large city have their pick of coffee shops. Some may prefer the anonymity of frequenting a large, chain establishment, while others long for a shop reminiscent of Friends’ Central Perk. In Oklahoma City, that shop, where no face is forgotten, is Vintage Coffee. Serving specialty coffee drinks along with breads and sweets, the café focuses on sourcing locally and ensuring its coffees are organic. Vintage also regularly hosts Oklahoma City food trucks during the lunchtime hours. 1101 NW 49th St., Oklahoma City. 405.752.0038 – Jami Mattox

quinoa water grapefruit pecans, chopped rotisserie chicken

Heat a saucepan over medium heat. Toast the quinoa until it is slightly brown, stirring often, about 3-4 minutes. Pour the quinoa into a small bowl and set aside. Bring water to a boil in the same pot, add the toasted quinoa to the water and let it return to a boil. Turn the heat to mediumlow, put a lid on the pot and let the quinoa cook for 16 minutes. Turn the heat off and let the quinoa sit in the pot with the lid on for another 10 minutes. Fluff with a fork. Cut the grapefruit peel from the flesh. Supreme the grapefruit by running a knife along either side of the grapefruit’s membranes, creating thin slices of the fruit. Add grapefruit supremes and chopped pecans or other nut to the quinoa. Shred the rotisserie chicken. Place a generous helping of the quinoa salad into the bottom of a bowl and top with the shredded chicken. Serve by itself or with a side of roasted broccoli or asparagus.

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

95


96

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015


Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

I

To The Rescue

IMAGE: COURTESY FELDMAN ENTERTAINMENT.

Marvel Universe Live! brings comic book action and feats to the Chesapeake Arena Stage.

n a world under siege for the next big distraction, comic book fans will find the fun and action they crave in this year’s Marvel Universe Live! Iron Man, Captain America, The Hulk, Thor, Spider-Man, Wolverine and a host of other heroes (and villains) of the Marvel Comics roster will fly, swing and pummel their way to the Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 W. Reno Ave., Oklahoma City. Marvel Universe Live! plays the first of six performances on Friday, Feb. 27. The battle between forces intent on destroying the world and those trying to save it takes place on the arena stage. The evil Loki is back, and he has a plan to summon a great power that could obliterate the entire universe. The heroes of this tale have a plan to stop him, but they’ll encounter plenty of enemies along the way, including Doctor

Octopus, the Green Goblin and more menaces. Unfortunately, these heroes and villains can only do so much entertaining on their own. Thankfully, they’ll get the help of backstage technicians who will be putting on a show of their own pairing dazzling visual effects, set and light designs and pyrotechnics with the casts’ long list of super powers. Marvel Universe Live! features more than 25 characters on stage for one big show that will allow fans to experience the hero saga in a new way. Shows are at 7 p.m. Feb. 27; 11 a.m. and 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 28; and 1:30 and 5:30 p.m. Sunday, March 1. Tickets are $20-$80 and available online at www.chesapeakearena. com. KAREN SHADE FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

97


PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY modern dance to traditional Asian forms – to this production at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice.com

Perfomances CAMELOT

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES Varekai Thru Feb. 1 Cirque du Soleil reimagines the tale of Icarus through the eyes of artists in a touring production set in a mythical forest near a volcano. Bringing together athleticism, artistry and grace, the production stops at the Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena. com Tartuffe Feb. 5-15 Oklahoma City Theatre

Company brings a classic to stage with wit and naughty laughs set in the era of 1980s televangelists. Tartuffe will be at the Oklahoma City C i v i c C e n t e r M u s i c H a l l . w w w. okctheatrecompany.org

The Music of John Williams Feb. 6-7 Signature Symphony presents a program of works by beloved composer John Williams, including music for such films as Star Wars and the Harry Potter series, at the VanTrease Performing A r t s C e n t e r f o r E d u c a t i o n . w w w. signaturesymphony.org

The Mountaintop Feb. 6-15 Oklahoma City

Repertory Theatre brings the award-winning play reimagining Martin Luther King Jr. and the final night before his 1968 assassination to the stage at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.cityrep.com

Mystery and Magic Feb. 7 Solo cellist

Julie Albers joins the Oklahoma City Philharmonic for a night of works illuminating the fantastic in sound at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcphilharmonic.org

Danish String Quartet Feb. 8 Playing classical music from their homeland, the members of this dynamic group, presented by Chamber Music Tulsa, are ready to impress at

98

the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. chambermusictulsa.org

Love Song: An Evening with John Sawyer Feb. 13 Tulsa showman John Sawyer

performs a parade of songs at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center just in time for Valentine’s Day. www.thepacba.com

Romeo & Juliet Feb. 13-15 Oklahoma City

Ballet Artistic Director Robert Mills does it again with another world premiere production, this time reinvigorating the Shakespearian tragedy of young love. Performances will be at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcballet. com

Romeo & Juliet Feb. 13, 15 Oklahoma native and international opera star Sarah Coburn stars in Tulsa Opera’s telling of the tragedy of young love, played on the stage of the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsaopera.com

One of Lerner and Loewe’s best-loved musicals is back on stage and touring straight to Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. Camelot opens Tuesday, Feb. 24. The Tony Award-winning musical set in the mystical days of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table brings song to the legend and lore of chivalry, true love and bravery. Celebrity Attractions presents a new touring production that puts a less playful veneer on Merry Old England one that doesn’t look quite as merry and cheerful. Instead, chainmail and more realistic-looking armor have found their way to the stage alongside such classic numbers as “If Ever I Would Leave You” and “I Loved You Once in Silence.” Arthur, Guenevere, Lancelot and the kingdom will be brought to life at 201 N. Walker Ave., in Oklahoma City. Tickets are $15-$65, but pricing may vary on peak nights. Camelot closes on March 1 and opens March 3 in Tulsa. For more, visit www. celebrityattractions.com.

unlikely friendship from Neil Simon in this Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma production at Lyric at the Plaza. www.lyrictheatreokc.com

Jeffrey Zeigler Feb. 20 Formerly of the

Kronos Quartet, the cellist wows as a solo act and will be presented by Choregus Productions at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. myticketoffice.com

Pixar in Concert Feb. 20-21 The Oklahoma

City Philharmonic brings the music of such Pixar movies as The Incredibles, Toy Story and Monsters, Inc., to the stage at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcphilharmonic.org

The Sleeping Beauty Feb. 20-21 Artistic Director Marcello Anglini choreographed this Tulsa Ballet production of true love, enchantment and sorcery set to Tchaikovsky at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsaballet.org

The King’s Singers Feb. 24 The celebrated men’s vocal ensemble treks to Edmond’s Armstrong Auditorium for a concert of impeccable talent and class. www.armstrongauditorium.org Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company Feb. 2425 Choregus Productions presents the company bringing a plethora of dance styles – from

randa Sings goes on stage at the Rose State Performing Arts Center in Midwest City for a hilarious live show of magic tricks, comedy, hate mail readings and more. www.myticketoffice. com

82nd Annual Tulsa Gridiron Feb.27-28 Join

the Tulsa Gridiron players as they lampoon local, state and national politics and pop culture set to music at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. www.tulsagridiron.org

Marvel Universe Live! Feb. 27-March 1 All those favorite Marvel comic book heroes – including Spiderman, Captain America and Wolverine – are live and on stage in the touring show that stops at the Chesapeake Energy Arena. www. chesapeakearena.com Oklahoma Dance Film Festival Thru March 22 Films documenting modern and contemporary dance will be screened at the Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahhatulsa.org The Drunkard and The Olio Ongoing The

melodrama continues with over-the-top characters plus a musical revue featuring celebrity drop-in guests most Saturdays at the Spotlight Theatre. www.spotlighttheatre.org

IN CONCERT Kate Voegele Feb. 2 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Jack White Feb. 2 McCasland Fieldhouse

at University of Oklahoma, Norman. www. jackwhiteiii.com

The Cadillac Three Feb. 5 Cain’s Ballroom.

www.cainsballroom.com

Simo Feb. 6 ACM@UCO. www.acm.uco.edu Motion City Soundtrack Feb. 6 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

An Evening with Alice Cooper Feb. 7 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Maria Bamford Feb. 7 ACM@UCO. www. acm.uco.edu

Beau Jennings Feb. 7 Woody Guthrie

Center. www.woodyguthriecenter.org

Excision Feb. 12 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Western Hill Winter Bluegrass Festival Feb. 12-14 The Lodge, Sequoyah State Park in Wagoner. 405.273.8578

Gary Allan Feb. 13 Riverwind Casino. www.

com

Sinbad Feb. 13 7 Clans First Council Casino & Hotel, Newkirk. www.ticketstorm.com

Music of Love Feb. 14 From The Flying

Chris Tucker Feb. 13 Brady Theater. www.

Dutchman to Prince Igor, Signature Symphony plays some of the world’s most beautiful, musical love themes at the VanTrease Performing Arts Center. www.signaturesymphony.org

bradytheater.com

Josh Abbott Band Feb. 14 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons Feb.

Pageant Thru Feb. 15 Lyric Theatre of Okla-

14 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com

homa brings to the stage a musical comedy beauty pageant that has contestants doing just about anything to win the glittering tiara. www. lyrictheatreokc.com

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

Peter and the Starcatcher Feb. 24 Zany fun tops the bill at Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center for this touring production taking audiences through a magical and hilarious Neverland prequel to the Peter Pan story. www. brokenarrowpac.com

Miranda Sings Feb. 27 YouTube star Mi-

riverwind.com

with Theatre Tulsa and the sizzling Kander and Ebb musical about 1920s jailbirds out for infamy, performed at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.theatretulsa.org

roommates create a hilarious classic about an

tional Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum premieres an original commissioned work played by the Oklahoma City University symphony orchestra. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Eunja Chang Feb. 27 The classical pianist gives a concert at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center. www.thepacba.com

Tom Skinner, Greg Jacobs, Randy Pease Feb.13 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.

Chicago Feb. 13-22 Get into “All That Jazz”

The Odd Couple Thru Feb. 15 Mismatched

Windows to the West Feb. 21 The Na-

Camelot Feb. 24-March 1 The Lerner and Loewe classic musical of King Arthur and his knights tours in a new production to the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall before it travels to Tulsa March 3. www.celebrityattractions.com

Eric Johnson, Mike Stern Feb. 14 ACM@ Magic and Mystery: Julie Albers

UCO. www.acm.uco.edu

The Toasters Feb. 15 The Conservatory. www.

conservatoryokc.com


with the Edmond Running Club for the 20th annual running event at Edmond’s Mitch Park on Valentine’s Day. 405.808.7371

Monster Jam Feb. 14-15 Big trucks on giant

wheels make a smashing entertainment event a t C h e s a p e a k e E n e r g y A r e n a . w w w. chesapeakearena.com

ORU Whole Person Indoor Triathlon Feb. 21-22 The sixth annual triathlon consists of swimming, biking and running events at Oral Roberts University’s aerobics center. www. mabeecenter.com

In Concert

PHOTO BY LESLIE RYAN MCKELLAR.

ALICE COOPER Does it surprise anyone that Alice Cooper’s current hot-ticket tour is titled Raise the Dead? What if the godfather of shock-rock spectacle pared down the theatrics (bye-bye, guillotines) for a more intimate performance billed as An Evening with Alice Cooper? The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer is anything but predictable, so when guests arrive at the Brady Theater for his Saturday, Feb. 7, concert, they’re as likely to find a spirited solo act featuring the one and only Mr. Cooper as they are a fully-staged nightmare in progress. Let there be no mistake: There will be blood, fake, of course, and plenty of hair-raising fun. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and the show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets to An Evening with Alice Cooper are $45-$85, available at www. bradytheater.com. If anything is certain, this evening will be an unforgettable one.

v. Texas v. San Antonio

Tulsa Oilers

Feb. 24 Feb. 27-28

www.tulsaoilers.com

v. Rapid City v. Quad City

Feb. 5, 7 Feb. 14

ORU Men’s Basketball v. Western Illinois v. South Dakota v. North Dakota State v. Denver

www.oruathletics.com

Feb. 12 Feb. 14 Feb. 26 Feb. 28

OSU Men’s Basketball v. Kansas v. Iowa State v. West Virginia v. West Virginia v. Iowa State v. Texas v. TCU

Gordon Lightfoot R.L. Grime Feb. 17 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

David Cook Feb. 18 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Cody Johnson Band Feb.20 Cain’s Ballroom.

www.cainsballroom.com

Casey Donahew Band Feb. 20, 21 Diamond

Ballroom, www.diamondballroom.net. Brady Theater, www.bradytheater.com

Bill Engvall Feb. 21 Two shows at 7 Clans First Council Casino & Hotel, Newkirk. www. ticketstorm.com Gordon Lightfoot Feb. 26 Brady Theater.

www.bradytheater.com

Styx Feb. 26 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino.

www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Paper Diamond Feb. 27 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Sinbad Feb. 27 Riverwind Casino. www.

riverwind.com

Sonia Disappear Fear Feb. 27 Woody Guthrie Center. www.woodyguthriecenter.org

August Burns Red Feb. 28 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Red Dirt Rangers Feb. 28 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

SPORTS OKC Thunder

OKC Blue

Feb. 2 Feb. 6 Feb. 8 Feb. 11 Feb. 19 Feb. 22 Feb. 24

www.nba.com/dleague/oklahomacity

v. Santa Cruz Feb. 17 v. Texas Feb. 22 v. Rio Grande Valley Feb. 25

OKC Barons v. Adirondack

v. SMU v. East Carolina v. Temple v. Tulane

www.okstate.com

www.soonersports.com

Feb. 3 Feb. 9 Feb. 17 Feb. 28 www.tulsahurricane.com

Feb. 7 Feb. 18 Feb. 22 Feb. 25

www.okcbarons.com

Feb. 20-21

v. Denver v. North Dakota State v. South Dakota State v. IPFW

Feb. 7 Feb. 11 Feb. 13 Feb. 28

OSU Women’s Basketball v. Baylor v. Texas v. Iowa State v. Kansas

www.okstate.com

Feb. 4 Feb. 11 Feb. 14 Feb. 21

OU Women’s Basketball www.soonersports.com v. Iowa State v. Kansas State v. TCU v. Baylor v. Kansas

Feb. 4 Feb. 7 Feb. 14 Feb. 25 Feb. 28

for the American Lung Association in this race up multiple flights of stairs at Leadership Square. www.lung.org

FAMILY Knights & Princesses Feb. 8 The Oklahoma City Philharmonic plays music recalling heroic knights and brave princesses at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall, where families will also find plenty of arts and crafts, games and a symphonic instrument playground for hands-on learning. www.okcphilharmonic.org Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat Feb. 9-March 6 Oklahoma Children’s Theatre presents this stage adaptation of the famed children’s story about a whimsical cat and the power of imagination. www.oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

Taming of the Shrew Feb. 20-March 1 Shakespeare’s classic comedy of embattled, would-be lovers Petruchio and Katherine is told by Clark Youth Theatre at Henthorne Performing Arts Center. 918.746.5065 Akdar Shrine Circus Feb. 26-March 1 The

circus comes to T-Town with family attractions and fun at Expo Square. www.exposquare.com

www.tulsahurricane.com

Feb. 10 Feb. 21 Feb. 28

USTRC Will Rogers Championships Thru Feb. 1 “Rope the Ozarks” with skilled cowboy teams at this U.S. Team Roping Championships competitive event at Expo Square. www.ustrc. com famous basketball entertainment team trots to the BOK Center and the Chesapeake Energy Arena for a new match and more fun. www. bokcenter.com, www.chesapeakearena.com

Red Dirt Dinos Thru February The Tulsa Children’s Museum and its Discovery Lab bring three animatronic dinosaurs and plenty of hands-on exhibits to this gallery. www. tulsachildrensmuseum.org Move It! Scramble Thru February Repurposed cardboard drums create a hands-on puzzle that allows children to crawl in and climb to solve. www.tulsachildrensmuseum.org Second Saturdays Ongoing Families

enjoy the Philbrook Museum of Art and participate in art activities for free on the second Saturday of every month. www.philbrook.org

Tiny Tuesdays and Drop-in Art Ongo-

held at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okstatefair.com

ing Guest artists at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art Education Center help families with young children create together and understand the museum artworks the third Tuesday of each month through May. Drop-in Art is open Saturdays from 1-4 p.m. www.okcmoa.com

Tulsa Heritage Rodeo Feb. 7 The Tulsa Rodeo Association holds its annual multicult u r a l r o d e o a t E x p o S q u a r e . w w w. tulsarodeoassociation.com

Glitch/Analogue Feb. 6-March 26 A new

Oklahoma State Jr. High Wrestling Championship Feb. 6,7 Tournament will be

Liquid Nitro Arenacross Tour Feb. 13,14 Racing motorbikes fly through Expo Square for fast-paced competition and gravity-defying jumps. www.motorheadevents.com

ORU Women’s Basketball www.oruathletics.com

www.nba.com/thunder

v. Orlando v. New Orleans v. L.A. Clippers v. Memphis v. Dallas v. Denver v. Indiana

TU Men’s Basketball

v. Temple v. UConn v. Tulane

Fight for Air Climb Feb. 28 Go the distance

Harlem Globetrotters Feb. 6-8 The world

Feb. 7 Feb. 18 Feb. 21

OU Men’s Basketball

TU Women’s Basketball

Polar Plunge Feb. 28 Brave souls go for a dip in frigid waters to support the athletes of Special Olympics of Oklahoma (SOOK). Events in Tulsa and Oklahoma City are scheduled. www. sook.org

Nadia Comaneci International Invitational, Bart Conner International Invitational Feb. 13-15 The Cox Convention

Center becomes the site of an international gymnastics competition for young gymnasts at all skill levels from all over the country and world. www.bartandnadiasportsexperience.com

Bart & Nadia Sports Experience Feb. 14 Get moving to the Cox Convention Center for a hands-on health and fitness expo for all ages that focuses on nutrition, exercise and play. Other related events include RUNderground, a 3.1 mile run in downtown Oklahoma City’s tunnel system starting from the Boathouse District, and the OKC Riversport Indoor Championships, a challenge on indoor rowing and kayak training machines, and more. www. bartandnadiasportsexperience.com

Frigid 5 Race Feb. 14 Get your heart going

ART group show of digital and mixed media work goes on exhibit at Living Arts of Tulsa. www. livingarts.org

1958 Kodachrome: Interpreted by Whit Todd Feb. 6-28 Artist Whit Todd interprets images from Kodachrome slides taken in 1958 Mexico by his grandfather through watercolor works at the Tulsa Artists’ Coalition Gallery. www.tacgallery.org Ephemeral Gradations Feb. 6-28 Fringe

artists Krystle Brewer, Kalee Jones W., Laura Reese and Brooke Rowlands are featured in a group show at Project Box Community Art Space. www.theprojectboxokc.com

Innovators and Legends Feb. 6-March 22 Tulsa’s 108 Contemporary looks at the rise of fiber arts as fine art and its continued movement away from decorative toward innovative. www.108contemporary.org

From New York to New Mexico Feb. 8-May 3 With a subtitle Masterworks of American Modernism from the Vilcek Foundation Collection, this exhibition, organized by and

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

99


Entertainment

Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at Guthrie Green and other venues. www.thebradyartsdistrict.com.

2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A THE TRAIL BY CATHRYN THOMAS. IMAGE COURTESY OKLAHOMA CONTEMPORARY.

monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman.com

Sports

BART & NADIA SPORTS EXPERIENCE It’s February, and some of those New Year’s resolutions are looking a little shaky. The Bart & Nadia Sports Experience enters the scene just in time to inspire good health and fitness regardless of age. The annual event takes place across Oklahoma City, but the main activities inviting participation take place at the Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, in downtown Oklahoma City on Saturday, Feb. 14. Look for fitness challenges in archery, rowing, basketball and more sports along with health screenings and information about good nutrition and health care. That day, Oklahoma City Riversport will host RUNderground, a fun-run through the city’s tunnel system, and the Indoor Kayak & Rowing Challenge. Over at the University of Central Oklahoma, guests will take on other challenges in archery. Starting on Friday, Feb. 13, also watch for several gymnastics meets that are part of the experience, including the Perfect 10 Challenge for collegiate gymnasts, at the convention center. For more, go to www.bartandnadiasportsexperience.com.

exhibited at Philbrook Museum of Art, looks at America’s first true homegrown avant-garde movement, which took place in the first half of the 20th century. www.philbrook.org

Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival Feb. 13-15 Great artists from all over the country bring their works to the Glenpool Conference Center, where guests will also find storytelling, live musical performances and more. www.tulsaindianartfestival. com

Madonnas of the Prairie: Depictions of Women in the American West Feb. 13-May 10 The exhibit at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum includes more than 100 works focused on American women from the late 19th century to the present as they are viewed by artists. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World Feb. 14-May 10 The Oklahoma

City Museum of Art spotlights more than 60 works by con artists and reveals the talent, charm and audacity they used to fool the art world. This study includes authentic works by Matisse, Signac and others alongside their fakes. www.okcmoa.com

Van Gogh to Rothko: Masterworks from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Feb. 21-June

6 The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art looks at the career of the artist, University of Oklahoma School of Art instructor and art museum founder, with a collection of pieces spanning his fifty-year career in southwestern landscapes and more. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Ansel Adams: Masterworks from the Collection of the Turtle Bay Exploration Park Feb. 28-May 10 Ansel Adams’

best-loved and most famous photographs, which he called “The Museum Set,” go on display at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum and reveal the artist’s elegant eye for nature. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Born of Fire: Ceramic Art from Regional Collections Thru March 2 Fired clay

takes many forms in this exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark., and explores its use and art through time and around the world. www.crystalbridges.org

Drama, Death, Dirge: Frederic Remington’s American West Thru March 8 The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art exhibits four exceptional pieces by the famed painter that display the attributes for which he was most loved. www.ou.edu/fjjma

1 Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark., brings a collection of art by some of the most influential names in art since the late 19th century to study the course of avant-garde art through the decades. Artists represented include Picasso, Dali, Warhol, O’Keeffe and more. www. crystalbridges.org

Fever & Flash: Pop in the 1970s Thru

Ocean of Thought Thru Feb. 22 Tulsa artist

The Nature of Man: Paintings and Drawings of Harold Stevenson Thru

Michelle Firment Reid explores questions of fate, transition of thoughts and the ocean in a new exhibition at the Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahhatulsa.org

Speaking Volumes: Transforming Hate Thru Feb. 26 The works of more than 60

artists, responding to a call challenging the ideology of a Montana-based hate group, are part of this special traveling exhibition at Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts.org

A World Unconquered: The Art of Oscar Brousse Jacobson Feb. 26-Sept.

100

March 15 Pop art’s hold into the 1970s is the focus of a new exhibition at Philbrook Downtown and examines the contributions of Claes Oldenburg, Eduardo Paolozzi and others. The exhibit also features an album of Polaroid photos by Andy Warhol. www.philbrook.org

March 15 The artist’s exploration of masculinity and the human form is explored in an exhibition at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. www. ou.edu/fjjma

Frontier to Foundry: The Making of Small Bronze Sculpture in the Gilcrease Collection Thru March 23 The Gilcrease Museum collection of art contains more than 200 small bronze sculptures by such names as Frederic Remington, Henry Kirke Brown and Charles M. Russell. A new exhibit reveals the

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

development of the bronze casting craft and industry and how 19th century American sculptors shaped it and art. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

Private Collections to Public Treasures: New Acquisitions at Gilcrease Museum Thru March 29 The exhibit looks at

Recent Acquisitions of Photography and Works on Paper Ongoing Art work in a variety of media and styles collected over the past five years by the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art go on display for the public. Works include photos by Laura Gilpin, prints by Andy Warhol and more. www.ou.edu/fjjma

some of the latest art works to be added to the collection of Gilcrease Museum. The show will include work by such diverse artists as Joseph Henry Sharp, Pablita Verlarde and Edgar Payne among others. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Opening Abstraction Ongoing Philbrook

Chris Ramsay: Meditations in Stillwater Thru March 29 More than 30 mixed

homa City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa.com

media works tracing the passage of time by Oklahoma State University professor Chris Ramsay are on exhibit at the Zarrow Center for Art & Education. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Shifting Focus: Historical Photos, Contemporary Art Thru April 26 Historical

photos by the likes of Edward S. Curtis and others of American Indian leaders and ordinary people provide the inspiration for works by contemporary American Indian artists, who translate images and portraits of old into modern media and works in an exhibit at Philbrook Downtown. www.philbrook.org

Coyote Songs – Desperado Dreams: The Art of Robby McMurtry Thru May 10 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum remembers the artist, illustrator, writer and mentor to countless youth, the late Robby McMurtry. The exhibition looks across his career with 35 pieces spanning 1973 to 2012.www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Beyond the Battlefield: Depictions of War Thru May 10 An exhibition at Fred

Jones Jr. Museum of Art examines war through the eyes of artists and focuses on conflicts of the 20th century with paintings, prints and photography. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Identity & Inspiration Ongoing Philbrook Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s extensive collection of American Indian art work and artifacts. www. philbrook.org

Downtown exhibits abstract work in all its manifestations. www.philbrook.org

Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the Okla-

Focus on Favorites Ongoing A new Gilcrease

Museum exhibit highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

First Friday Gallery Walk Ongoing The

galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo.com First Friday Art Crawl Ongoing Stroll the

Weekends On Us Ongoing Free admission to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum the first full weekend of every month. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

CHARITABLE EVENTS Culinary Excellence Awards Feb. 3 The best in the restaurant and culinary business will be awarded at the annual Oklahoma Restaurant Association event recognizing dining excellence. www.okrestaurants.com

Chocolate Decadence Feb. 5 This sweet gala for the Automobile Alley District takes place in the Hudson-Essex Office Loft Building. www.automobilealley.org Icons & Idols Feb. 7 Toast the night with cocktails followed by dinner and the Tulsa Ballet at the Cox Business Center. The event benefits Tulsa Ballet. www.tulsaballet.org Tulsa Heart Ball Feb. 7 The grand soiree invites all to support the American Heart Association with an evening of fine dining, auctions and entertainment, all at the Expo Square Exchange Center. www.heart.org

Taste of Oklahoma City Feb. 7 The 36th

annual tasting event benefiting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma features auctions, dancing and live music plus delicious fare from Oklahoma City’s best restaurants at the Chevy Events Center. www.bbbsok.org

Juliette Low Leadership Society Pearl Sale Feb. 7 The Girls Scouts of

Eastern Oklahoma’s much-anticipated sale event moves to a new month and brings more precious pearls and jewelry to The Vault. www. gseok.org

Heart of Henry Feb. 7 The Tulsa Day Center for the Homeless organization’s third annual dinner and awards ceremony will be held to remember a notable philanthropist and to raise funds to continue aiding the homeless community. www.tulsadaycenter.org Wild Hearts Ball Feb. 7 Dance away the night at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center for Oklahomans for Equality’s annual affair of the heart. www.okeq.org My Furry Valentine Feb. 8 Helping stray and homeless cats find good homes through StreetCats Inc. has never been sweeter with this fundraiser serving desserts, wine and coffee at the Tulsa Historical Society. www. streetcatstulsa.org 2-1-1 Day of Dining Feb. 11 Dine out at

participating restaurants and a portion of proceeds will go to 2-1-1 Helpline. www.211tulsa. org

2015 Pink Stiletto Feb. 14 A fun and eventful night filled with excitement awaits supporters of Susan G. Komen Tulsa and breast cancer prevention. Dinner and entertainment events take place at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa. www.komentulsa.org

Harlem Globetrotters


MARKETPLACE JULY 2015

North of Woodland Hills 6837 S. Memorial Dr. North of Utica Square 2139 E. 21st St.

918.254.1611

www.visionsunique.com

Voted Tulsa's The Best of

Luxury Homes

You’re cordially invited to join us for an insider's tour of some of Oklahoma’s most innovative and fabulous homes.

the

Best

Advertising opportunities available • Contact advertising@okmag.com • 918.744.6205

MARKETPLACE LUX HOME.indd 1

$10 cons fo$r 10 ecu1 0 for t i v daycsons e 10 * ecu days tive

1/19/15 20731 5:11 PM Visions.indd 1

*

Experience “The World’s Most Beautiful Teeth” JOHN ROGERS, DDS 918.933.4889 | refreshdentistrytulsa.com

20707 Refresh.indd 1

1/5/15 3:41 PM

1708 Utica Square and 8931 S. Yale, Suite S

www.saltyogatulsa.com *new clients only, please.

1/12/15 20714 9:35 AM Salt Yoga.indd 1

12/29/14 4:58 PM

FIND A UNIQUE GIFT OR SPECIAL ITEM FOR YOUR HOME

Z

ZOLLER DESIGNS

& ANTIQUES, INC. 1343 E 15TH ST, TULSA • 918-583-1966

20738 Lawn America.indd 1

1/9/15 10:43 20725AM Zoller Designs.indd 1

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM 1/6/15 101 PM 4:34


Entertainment

Norman Mardi Gras Parade Feb. 14 A little bit of New Orleans comes to the streets of downtown Norman at this fun parade of floats, musicians, dancers and colorful festivities. www. normanmardigrasparade.com The Orchid Show Feb. 14-March 14 In its second year, the show invites the public to join horticulturist and conservatory specialist Nate Tschaenn as he introduces an exquisite display of orchids at the Myriad Botanical Gardens. www.myriadgardens.org

Gun, Knife & Outdoor Equipment Show Feb. 14-15 Oklahoma State Fair Park.

www.okstatefair.com PHOTO BY EIKO ISHIOKA.

18th Annual Motorcycle Show Feb.

INTENT TO DECEIVE: FAKES AND FORGERIES IN THE ART WORLD

If an art forger has luck on his side, the world will never know his name, ambitions or abilities. Five of the most successful, captured and disgraced, however, are the subjects of an exhibit opening this month at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, in Oklahoma City. Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World will display more than 55 works by both original artists (including Matisse, Picasso and Daumier) and the forgers who copied them. The painting of a Girl With a Pearl Earring in the collection isn’t the famous 17th-century masterpiece of Johannes Vermeer. It was brilliantly and publicly created “in the style of” Vermeer in 2012 by former art forger John Myatt, who made a few hundred fakes back in the day and sold them into the art market as genuine. Intent to Deceive also looks at the “careers” of Han van Meegeren, Elmyr de Hory, Eric Hebborn and Mark Landis by exhibiting their personal effects along with the materials they used to deceive. The show opens Saturday, Feb. 14. For more, visit www.okcmoa.com. caught up in an evening of intrigue, romance and live music based on the famous film Casablanca. The fundraiser at the Fort Smith Regional Art Museum in Fort Smith, Ark., will also feature an open bar, raffle prizes and delicious food. www. fsram.org

Live United Luncheon and Awards Feb. 17 The Tulsa Area United Way thanks individuals, companies and groups for service to the greater good and a successful 2014 fundraiser campaign with an awards luncheon at Cox Business Center. www.tauw.org

Metro Juliette Lowe Leadership Society Luncheon Feb. 19 Cheryl Strayed, author of bestselling memoir Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, is this year’s special guest speaker for the Girl Scouts of Western Oklahoma event at the Oklahoma City Golf and Country Club. www.gswestok.org

Hollywood Bowl Feb. 20 Company, orga-

nization and club teams compete at AMF Windsor Lanes in Oklahoma City to support youth programs in financial literacy education and entrepreneurship through Junior Achievement of Oklahoma. www.jaok.org

Winterset Feb. 21 The Osteopathic Founders

Foundation’s annual winter gala returns with more great food and entertainment to raise money for local charitable groups helping the community. www.osteopathicfounders.org

for seniors at LIFE Senior Services. www. lifeseniorservices.org

Dance of the Two Moons Feb. 21 Dinner,

the late country music legend and entertainer with a screening of the film about his life along with other activities at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.voaok.org

dancing and auctions of great art, hotel stays, vacations and other bidding packages are the night’s entertainment along with American Indian drumming and dancing at the Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino to support Indian Health Care Resource Center of Tulsa. www.ihcrc.org

The Monarch Ball Feb. 21 The black-tie

gala for DVIS/Call Rape brings dining, dancing and other fun to the Cox Business Center to support those who have made the move to independence and self-determination. www.dvis.org

Hike for Healing Feb 21 The hike up Turkey Mountain supports grief advocacy programs at the Tristesse Grief Center. www.thegriefcenter.org Envision the Future Luncheon Feb. 25 Lunch is served to benefit NewView Oklahoma and programs helping blind and visually impaired individuals achieve independence. www.newviewoklahoma.org

Puttin’ on the Dog Feb. 26 Dinner, entertainment and auctions highlight a memorable night at the Cox Business Center benefiting programs

I’ll Be Me Movie: The Glen Campbell Tribute Feb. 27 Volunteers of America honors

CASA Casino: Celebrating Gatsby and 30 Years of Advocacy Feb. 27 Casino games, live and silent auctions of great items and a fine dining experience are in the cards for participants of this fundraiser for children and Tulsa Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa. www.tulsacasa.org

Street Party 2014 Feb. 27 Get ready to

Oklahoma Tackle & Hunting Show Thru Feb. 2 Get the latest tackle and gear for outdoor living and sports, including apparel, archery equipment and boats, at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okctackleandhuntingshow.com

Tulsa Boat, Sport and Travel Show Feb. 2-8 Get ready for the newest, fastest boats for your spring and summer plans plus all kinds of attractions for the entire family at Expo Square. www.tulsaboatshow.com

Oklahoma City Heart Ball Feb. 28 The

Yukon Chocolate Festival Feb. 7 The

American Heart Association’s gala of fine dining, entertainment and auctions, benefiting the mission of better heart health, will be at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. www.heart.org

Sip For Sight Gala Feb. 28 The night of fun

and entertainment benefits Prevent Blindness Oklahoma, which provides vision screening for children and vouchers for exams and glasses. This year’s event takes place at OSU-Tulsa. www. preventblindnessok.org Moonlight in Morocco Feb. 28 Junior League of Tulsa creates a special night of cocktails, dining, dancing and auctions set against an exotic, fairytale backdrop for its spring gala. www.jltulsa.org

Single in the City Feb. TBA Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

1 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okcgunshow. com

Home Sweet Home Chocolate Festival Feb. 7 More than 30 vendors will bring their

28 Awards will be given out for distinguished members of Oklahoma communities at the Leadership Oklahoma event at Southern Hills Country Club. www.leadershipoklahoma.com

Holland Hall Book Fair

COMMUNITY Oklahoma City Gun Show Thru Feb.

party at the Cox Business Center with Tulsa’s alternative high school, Street School, and a stroll down “Famous Streets.” www. streetpartytulsa.com

Excellence in Leadership Gala Feb.

102

Mardi Gras Parade Feb. 17 The Blue Dome District brings back the Mardi Gras parade that’s for the whole family with plenty of beads, masks and fun. 918.582.2035 Darryl Starbird’s National Rod & Custom Car Show Feb. 20-22 With more

Art

Rendezvous in Casablanca Feb. 14 Get

14-15 Bike vendors and more set up at the Oklahoma State Fair Park for two days of memorabilia, talk and hogs. www.jwswapmeet. com

Magazine sponsors the event featuring some of Oklahoma’s most eligible bachelors and bachelorettes, each auctioned off to benefit a good cause. www.okmag.com

sweetest creations, such as cakes and candies, to the Muskogee Civic Center. 918.681.1470

afternoon at Yukon’s Robertson Activity Center includes chocolates and treats from local businesses and more. 405.350.8937

R.K. Shows Gun & Knife Show Feb. 7-8 Expo Square. www.exposquare.com

Prairie Classic Quarter Horse Show Feb. 11-15 The Kansas Quarter Horse Association presents the best in horsemanship plus a tradeshow and other events at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.kqha.com

Hikes, Hearts and Hugs Weekend Feb. 13 Enjoy the historic Mather Lodge on Petit Jean Mountain near Morrilton, Ark., and be treated to a romantic weekend in one of the lodge’s guest rooms or nearby cabins. Couples activities such as guided scenic trail hikes provide the perfect Valentine’s Day getaway. www.petitjeanstatepark. com Home and Tech Show Feb. 13-15 Explore

the industry’s newest trends for remodeling and building the home of your dreams with experts explaining how to grow an iris, design a kitchen and more. Show will be in Springdale, Ark. www. nwahomeshow.com

than 1,000 entries anticipated for the annual show, the competition in custom car design and alterations will be bigger than ever at Expo Square. www.darrylstarbird.com

Friends of the Library Annual Book Sale Feb. 20-22 Bring a sturdy bag to this an-

nual sale of thousands of books at Oklahoma State Fair Park, which benefits the Metropolitan Library System. www.supportmls.org

Leake Classic Car Show & Auction Feb. 20-21 Collector cars go on the auction block for display and sale at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.leakecar.com Little Rock Flower and Garden Show Feb. 20-22 Get a sneak peek of spring as you walk through the live indoor display gardens and amazing floral works of art. Shop for home and garden items and attend educational presentations on a variety of gardening topics at this Little Rock, Ark., event. www.argardenshow.org

Vintage Tulsa Show Feb. 20-22 Antique and collectibles vendors at Expo Square. www. heritageeventcompany.com James Bradley: Doing the Impossible Feb. 27 The author of the bestselling book Flags of Our Fathers shares his insight and experience at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center for Tulsa Town Hall. tulsatownhall.com Holland Hall Book Fair Feb. 27-28 The

annual sale of donated media and goods such as DVDs, rare books, toys and games will be at Holland Hall. The preview party is slated for Feb. 27. www.hollandhall.org

Backwoods Hunting & Fishing Expo Feb. 27-March 1 The 28th annual expo show brings seminars, exhibits and vendors with the latest in outdoors sports at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.backwoodsshow.com

Greater Oklahoma Hunter Jumper Schooling Show Feb. 28-March 1 The next

event for the Greater Oklahoma Hunter Jumper Association takes place with competitions at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.goshow.org

Oklahoma City Bead Market Feb. 28-March 1 The bead and jewelry show returns to Oklahoma State Fair Park with vendors in everything from jewelry equipment, precious stones, beads and more. www.thebeadmarket.net

To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at. OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR or email to events@okmag.com.


MARKETPLACE LEISURE SOCIETy Shop Online Now

Now at The Market at Walnut Creek. 81st & Harvard

918.704.1982

2020 Utica Square www.hicksbrunson.com 918.743.6478

Gypsy-House Design

20504 gypsy house design.indd 1

12/1/14 20704 2:56 PM Hicks Brunson.indd 1

2014

The Ultimate Luxury Eyewear Experience

12/29/14 10:47 AM

1512 E 15TH STREET \\\ TULSA, OK \\\ 918.794.0071 \\\ FIFTEENTHANDHOME.COM

20643 15th and home.indd 1

12/11/14 10:00 AM

FABULOUS IN FEBRUARY

TRUNK SHOW FEBRUARY 26TH 10:00AM – 5:30PM

10051 S. Yale, Suite 105 | 918.299.6565 | donnasfashions.com

20337 Native.indd 1

12/9/14 20736 4:30 PM Donna's Fashion.indd 1

FEBRUARY 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM 1/7/15 103 AM 8:23


IN PERSON

UCO CAMPUS ARCHITECT DAVID STAPLETON STANDS IN FRONT OF OLD NORTH, ONE OF THE THE STATE’S OLDEST BUILDINGS DEDICATED TO HIGHER EDUCATION.

Preserving Old North

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

One of Oklahoma’s oldest buildings devoted to higher education receives much-needed repairs.

O

ld North Tower, a revered icon at the University of Central Oklahoma, is undergoing a multimillion dollar renovation that will give the building a new lease on life. When David Stapleton, UCO’s architect and director, toured the building in 2000, he saw a structure begging for help. “The floors were like trampolines,” he recalls. “The closer you got to the center of a room, the bigger the bounce. The structure was overloaded. I questioned what the builders were doing in 1892 when they constructed Old North for $50,000. “There were no Lowe’s or Home Depots in that era. The builders used whatever was available on trains passing through Edmond,” Stapleton adds. “Old North was architecturally and structurally decrepit. Its flaws seemed to come from the timbers. As wood distorts, it sags, stretches and cracks. It gives a warning that says, ‘You shouldn’t be here.’” The building was first deemed derelict in 1906. “Decrepit is a nice word to describe the structure,” Stapleton says. “The four-story building was cobbled together with inadequate materials, even for that era. Floor and ceiling heights were inconsistent. Most of the workmen were likely unskilled in construction.” UCO President Don Betz recalls that 2000 visit to Old North 14 years ago. “I was provost then, and after touring the building, [Stapleton] and I decided it needed to be closed for safety reasons,” Betz says. “In late 2000 it became apparent the exterior could be repaired,” Stapleton says. “However, the interior was a major issue. When the building closed in July 2001, planning studies began regarding renovation.” Demolishing Old North seemed unthinkable. Its rich history resonates with students, faculty and alumnae. “Old North opened Jan. 3, 1893, as a Normal School to train teachers. It was one of the earliest buildings in Oklahoma devoted to higher education,” Betz notes. “The men and women who first came here arrived with a passion for training teachers.” Through the years, Old North was frequently repaired. In 1996 and 2006, two bond issues provided $5.5 million for exterior repairs. The third phase has received $6 million; $800,000 is needed for completion. Randy Ross, a UCO Foundation Board member, and Dr. Lee Beasley, campaign co-chairman, take pride in UCO’s landmark symbol. Both attended classes in Old North and enjoy representing the college as alumnae. Betz became UCO president in 2011 and made Old North a completion priority for UCO’s 125th anniversary, which will be celebrated in December. Occupancy is scheduled for 2016. When completed, Old North will house classrooms, conference areas and historical displays that will fill the 40,000-square-foot structure. With a nostalgic nod to history, several areas will resemble a 125-year-old building.

104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2015

“I want to see this building alive again with the hopes and dreams of students who will leave UCO with a great education and a great experience in a unique building,” Stapleton says. “Looking up at the clock tower reminds me of Old North’s historic role as a seat of higher learning from the first days of Oklahoma Territory,” says Betz, “and of the continuing responsibility we embrace to offer exceptional education and access to those we serve every day.” M.J. VAN DEVENTER


Lewis at 71st • 68th at Memorial • Utica Square


THE 2015

NX BEYOND UTILITY. BEYOND BOUNDARIES.

LEXUSOFTULSA.COM | 918.665.3987

February Oklahoma Magazine 2015  

The Brunch Table. Choosing the restaurant you’ll spend Sunday brunch at is an important and sometime difficult decision. Brunch can be, and...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you