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VOTE NOW FOR 2017 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM FEBRUARY 2017

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Finding the Right College Fit

Private School Guide Image Matters

Cocktail Creators

Bartenders on the craft of mixology

Fit at

Any Age

Four stories of fitness commitment

Single

in the City

The changing face of dating in the state


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Features February

2017 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXI, No. 2

44 A Guide to College Applications

Parents relinquishing control and teens embracing responsibilities ensure a successful college application process.

52 Private School Guide

For parents deciding on a private school for their children entering pre, middle or high school, this comprehensive guide will be sure to alleviate stress.

60 Image Maers

Cosmetic treatments help turn back the hands of time.

56 Fit at Any Age

These Oklahomans have made fitness part of their lifestyles for years, helping them feel great at any age.

66 Life Behind Bars

Oklahoma Magazine talks to Tulsa and OKCbased bartenders about how they came to love the craft of cocktails.

FEBRUARY 2017

Dating in a metro area offers more options than ever before with technological advancements and apps leading the way in 2017.

Finding the Right College Fit

Private School Guide Image Matters

Cocktail Bartenders on the craft of mixology

Fit at

Any Age

Four stories of fitness commitment

2

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

Plus

Creators

Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES

VOTE NOW FOR 2017 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM

February 2017

70 Single in the City

WANT SOME MORE?

Single

in the City

The changing face of dating in the state

ON THE COVER: CRAFT COCKTAILS IN OKLAHOMA ARE EVEREVOLVING. OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SAT DOWN WITH FOUR OKLAHOMA BARTENDERS TO DISCUSS LIFE BEHIND THE BAR. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

MORE PHOTOS

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes even more great Oklahoma events.


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Departments 11 The State 14 16 17 18 20 22

Chocolatiers like Glacier Confection and Bedré Fine Chocolate make their marks in Oklahoma.

People Culture History Sports Business Insider

11

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

26

25 Life and Style 26 32 34 36 38 40 43

Interiors

Interior design reflects modern and midcentury themes in this newly renovated Tulsa home.

FYI Cities Destinations Health Style

40

Dress to impress in sexy and sleek numbers for your romantic date night.

Scene

75 Taste 76 78 79 79

Recently opened Bread and Butter Kitchen and Bakery provides upscale, homestyle food in Tulsa.

Local Flavor Chef Chat In Season Random Flavors

81 Where & When 82 86

Chamber Music Tulsa’s Winter Festival explores 16 quartets that define the prolific Beethoven.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

88 Closing Thoughts

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

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When deciding on a nursing specialty, she went with her heart. Forty years ago, Susan Bonner was trying to determine her nursing specialty when she began working in the Saint Francis Hospital Cardiac Intensive Care Unit—and she found her passion. “In addition to nursing care, I have always felt strongly about educating people about their health,” she said. “Back then, I began visiting with our patients to provide information on taking better care of themselves.” Today, as a clinical manager at the Heart Hospital at Saint Francis, she oversees Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation, which includes monitored exercise, heart health education and nutrition classes. It’s a program that has significantly improved outcomes for patients. “The Heart Hospital at Saint Francis has outstanding physicians and staff, the latest technology and a comprehensive range of procedures,” she said. “We have the services patients need to help maintain their heart health.”

Susan Bonner, BSN, RN CLINICAL MANAGER HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS

Healthcare for life.


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™ OKLAHOMA

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Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2017 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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CREATIVE THINKING. INSIDE THE BOX. Good things happen inside the box— in our new Blue Sky Bank branch in The Boxyard.

George Bashaw (above, right), Blue Sky Bank customer and Barry Gibson, Vice President, Blue Sky Bank

The Boxyard is downtown Tulsa’s exciting new destination for shopping, entertainment, and dining. Innovative in concept and design, it’s the perfect setting to complement Blue Sky’s progressive new outlook backed by our long-standing dedication to serving the private banking sector as well as commercial accounts and forwardthinking entrepreneurs. We invite you to come tour an exciting new development, dedicated to the revitalization of our downtown district. Then visit with our team at Blue Sky Boxyard. We’re here with creative solutions to help turn your out-of-the box vision into reality. Inside this box, your possibilities are sky high.

bluesky.bank


LET TER FROM THE EDITOR Technology has changed people’s lives in many ways over the past 25 years. With Valentine’s Day approaching, Oklahoma Magazine looks at how it has changed dating in our Single in the City feature this year. We talk with people about their dating experiences and how heavily many people rely on websites or apps to find other singles, often texting or messaging them for weeks before actually meeting. Of course, dating is more than messaging, so we also look at some fun first-date ideas – and some safety tips for when you meet someone face to face the first time. The cocktail craze has swept the nation, and Oklahoma is no exception. Many bartenders in the state take the craft very seriously – we talk to a few of them about the growing mixology scene, their favorite drinks and how they ended up behind the bar. Also this month is our annual Image Matters feature. Many people consider cosmetic surgery, but it’s important to understand your options. Doctors offer more noninvasive procedures than in the past, and it’s become possible to achieve more with less time and effort than ever before. Finally, choosing a college can be a stressful time for both parents and students, but with the right approach and the proper planning, it’s possible to complete the process successfully. As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com Sincerely,

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Justin Martino Justin Martino Managing Editor

What’s HOT At

OKMAG.COM

Socialites

Vote OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

For more great content from Oklahoma Magazine, bookmark okmag.com to find web-exclusive information not seen in the magazine. This month, we interview some of the top bartenders in Tulsa to find out why they love doing what they do and what factors need to come together to make a great cocktail. Also this month, we join 74-year-old Ronny Altman at Tulsa’s Downtown YMCA as he demonstrates how age doesn’t have to get in way of physical fitness.

@james_marsden 386,000 @james_marsden Model turned actor James Marsden has had a long career in the film and television industry. Born in Stillwater, Marsden has appeared in a number of high-profile projects, including the popular X-Men film franchise as the character Cyclops alongside critically acclaimed actors Hugh Jackman and Halle Berry. Most recently, Marsden made a splash as the gunslinging Teddy Flood in the hit HBO show Westworld, sharing the screen with University of Oklahoma alumnus Ed Harris. On Instagram, Marsden regularly posts candid photos showcasing his latest projects and press tours.

PHOTO BY LARRY RICHMAN.

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college exp e rie nce help e d you get to whe re you are to day. Whe n you refle c t on that time , you may b e ove r whelme d by fond me morie s — me eting your sp ouse , cele brating a big football win , pulling an all- nighte r to stu dy or laughing with p e ople who b e came your lifelong frie nds . To day ’s O kla h om a State U nive r sit y students are having the same experiences as they pur sue bright orange futures . Visit OS Ugiving.com to learn how you can b e a par t of their journey.


State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Sweet Success

BILL COPELAND OPENED GLACIER CONFECTION’S FIRST RETAIL LOCATION IN TULSA IN 2010.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

F

Chocolatiers make their mark in Oklahoma.

ine chocolate and February make a sweet pair. Valentine’s Day is sure to send people searching for the best chocolate in their town. In Tulsa, a first stop may be Glacier Confection downtown. Founded in 2000 by Bill Copeland, with its first retail store

opening in 2010, Glacier produces more than 95 unique truffles. “We make a watermelon feta chocolate,” Copeland says. “We also make a banana split. We make root beer float. Peanut butter and jelly is a very popular product. We have a birthday cake, which is outstanding. I personally like the FEBRUARY 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State TOP LEFT: BEDRÉ FINE CHOCOLATE BEGAN IN ADA BEFORE MOVING TO DAVIS. TOP RIGHT: BEDRÉ SELLS ITS CHOCOLATE IN 80 LOCATIONS ACROSS FOUR STATES. RIGHT: BEDRÉ IS OWNED BY THE CHICKASAW NATION AND CRAFTS NATIVE AMERICAN CHOCOLATE THAT PAYS TRIBUTE TO THE TRIBE’S PAST. PHOTOS COURTESY THE CHICKASAW NATION

caramel macchiato.” During the Valentine’s Day season, Glacier adds colorful heart-shaped truffles to its lineup, some flavored like peach Bellini and strawberry champagne. Glacier offers so many options, Copeland says there just are not enough hours in the day to make all its truffles available at the same time. “It’s about a three-day process whether you are making one or a thousand because you have to wait for that process,” he says. “After you actually hand brush or hand paint the molds to create the color that we do, that has to crystallize. We make a shell. That shell is then cooled and contracted so it gets nice and hard and then we’ll actually make the center into that shell. That’s another whole day, and in some cases two days to crystallize correctly.” This process is something many people have been asking to see up close, but Copeland says Glacier’s building at Brady Street and Boston Avenue just couldn’t accommodate tours or classes. Glacier’s next step will change that. “In June 2017, we’re going to be launching a new facility at [215 E. Archer St.] in downtown Tulsa, and that is going to have a full bean-to-bar production facility,” Copeland says. “We’ll be going right from the cacao pod. We’ll be doing roasting, cracking, winnowing and conching to make the chocolate from scratch from the tree. We’ll be doing tours. We’ll be doing

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

classes. We’ll have an educational component finally in place that’s structured. It’s going to have floor-to-ceiling glass walls where you’ll be able to see the entire process. It’s going to be a lot of fun.” Copeland hopes that at this new location, the company can expand its contributions to veterans as well. Right now, Glacier donates about 10 percent of its proceeds to organizations like the Folds of Honor Foundation. With the added space, Glacier looks to add a training program for recently discharged veterans. “Hopefully, it will give them an opportunity to work in an environment that is positive,” Copeland says. “Most people are happy coming in and going out of a chocolate shop.” On the other side of the state, Bedré Fine Chocolate has been growing for four decades. What began as small chocolate shop in Ada, operating out of a former elementary school, eventually became the nationally known brand that it is today. In 2000, it was purchased by the Chickasaw Nation and moved to Davis, where it now operates. Kay Colbert worked there when it was a local favorite and learned the ins and outs of the business. Later, she returned to Bedré under the new ownership to serve as general manager. “Bedré plays an important role in my personal history,” Colbert says. History also plays a pivotal role in Bedre’s product.

“Native American cultures were some of the first to discover and perfect chocolate’s delicate recipe,” Colbert says. “Today, Bedré Fine Chocolate continues this legacy with expertly crafted Native American chocolate and natural, unique ingredients that pay tribute to our past.” The word bedré, however, does not come from the Chickasaw language. Instead, it is Norwegian for better. Colbert says this speaks to the vision of the company. “The recipes are tried and true, offering a soothing and satisfying experience to the most distinguished palate,” she says. Bedré’s recipes are also diverse. In addition to traditional treats, Colbert says the


shop specializes “in a variety of handmade chocolate creations, including White Fudge Twists, which are delectable crunchy corn twists covered in our signature white fudge, and Chocolate Crisps, which are potato crisps enveloped in either milk or dark chocolate.” Bedré’s products are available in 80 stores across four states, and the chocolates can be shipped worldwide. “Bedré is also home to Bedré Box, a bimonthly subscription box featuring a newly created handcrafted chocolate delicacy combined with a selection of Bedré original favorites delivered directly to doorsteps,” Colbert says. “The recent December 2016 Bedré Box marked the first full year of subscribers receiving gourmet chocolate at their doorsteps.” In 2016, Bedré was awarded the Mark

Costello Entrepreneurial Excellence in Oklahoma Award for its positive economic impact in the state. “Chocolate is something almost everyone loves,” Colbert says. “Being a part of Bedré’s past and seeing Bedré grow into the company it is now, I come in everyday excited to work toward Bedré’s future.” BETH WEESE

BOTTOM LEFT: ERIN GROFF WORKS ON CREATING CHOCOLATE IN THE GLACIER FACTORY. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

BOTTOM MIDDLE: BILL COPELAND AND HANNAH SCHRIEVER INSPECT THE COMPANY’S CREATIONS. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

BOTTOM RIGHT: GLACIER PRODUCES A WIDE VARIETY OF CHOCOLATES AND TRUFFLES. PHOTO COURTESY GLACIER CONFECTION

BRINGING BEANTO-BAR TO TULSA

Tulsa will achieve a first this summer when Glacier Confection opens its 7,000-square-foot artisanal chocolate bean-to-bar factory and cafe in a renovated warehouse at 215 E. Archer St. Bill Copeland says there are fewer than 50 similar factories in the country, and the facility will be the first of its kind in Oklahoma. Breaking new ground isn’t unusual for Copeland, however. The U.S. Army veteran worked at Eastman Kodak Co. until 1994 before deciding to start a digital imaging business. The business provided visual content for national shows, including Home Improvement, Jeopardy and Ellen. After selling that business, he and Cynthia Calvert began to work together to build other companies – the two later married and now have three children and three grandchildren. Copeland then turned his love of chocolate into a business, spending 10 years learning from experts and traveling across the globe to see how different chocolate businesses operate. He graduated from the Ecole Chocolat in Vancouver, British Columbia and completed the Master Chocolatier program in Hermitage, France and the Master Program at Barry Callebaut in Belgium. He and his wife opened the retail store in downtown Tulsa in 2010. After opening a factory space at 11th Street and Sheridan Road, the new facility will return the company to the thriving downtown area – though Copeland didn’t anticipate the rise in businesses when he first opened Glacier. “We just kind of accidentally ended up in the middle of it,” he says. “I went there because I wanted to be in an eclectic, artistic community. I wanted to be around those kinds of people so we could build a business.”

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

PEOPLE

A Moment of Wonder

Grace Grothaus Grimm combines new and old techniques in her art in the Center of the Universe.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

some of that messiness of doing things by hand. I think we lost a little bit of the wildness.” Grimm also enjoys GRIMM FOCUSES ON COMBINlearning new ING DIGITAL AND TRADITIONAL concepts or TECHNIQUES IN HER ART. PHOTO BY MARC RAINS revisiting skills she hasn’t used in a while. She’s brushing up on her skills for a project where make people think about she will rewire “I hope people will walk themes in her work. sculptures so “I think there’s a through that doorway moment of wonder I’m they change in lighting as and ask questions able to create, and I people come lure people in with that of themselves.” close to them. moment of wonder,” she The pieces will says. “There’s a quality be arranged in a space so each sculpture to my work that’s inexplicable at first, and interacts with others as well as the public, that invites questions. I hope people will but she says it may be some time before the walk through that doorway and ask queswork debuts. tions of themselves or have a dialog with While the media she uses for different each other or talk to me about it.” projects may vary, Grimm’s main focus is to JUSTIN MARTINO

PHOTO COURTESY GRACE GROTHAUS GRIMM

T

hose who have visited the Center of the Universe in downtown Tulsa in the past year are already familiar with Grace Grothaus Grimm’s art, even if they may not realize it. Grimm teamed with artist Geoffrey Hicks to create “Trace,” a series of 300 brick-like pavers that use solar panels to power their illumination. They glow white on and off, then bright blue when a person steps on that paver and stays on to show that person’s path. The public art piece, on Boston Avenue just south of Archer Street, is a blend of technology and tactile experience, an important element of Grimm’s work. She works with a combination of digital techniques and more traditional methods, which she describes as analog, to create art that raises questions about the digital shift in society. “I was trained classically in drawing and painting growing up, as well as sculpture; as the years went by, technology became more and more part of our lives,” she says. “I’m lucky enough to have been born in ’85, so I knew life before the internet and saw how it changed everything for all of us.” In addition to her public art, Grimm also creates new media works that use translucent panels, paint and lighting, but the traditional processes are an important part of her work. “They still include paint on a translucent panel, and then I create something that on the surface looks like it could perhaps be a video or a computer screen, and if you unplug it, just like a computer screen, it goes dark,” she says. “But it’s actually made with mostly analog techniques. It’s all about that blend. I think my medium should echo my message, and so because I’m talking about that shift, I do both.” The analog techniques allow Grimm to take advantage of the benefits of digital tools while keeping what makes hand-created art special. “We prefer the organic a bit less, or rather it just takes place less,” she says. “Digital tools tend toward [photo-edited] perfection. With things being perfect and easy, we lose


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The State

I

n the early 1930s, no one would sponsor Guthrie native James Herman Banning in his quest to be America’s first black aviator to fly coast to coast. No one would lend him a plane. No one would allow him into flight school due to his race. But with the help of his friend and mechanic, Thomas C. Allen, Banning gathered spare parts to assemble his own plane, then made the 3,300-mile flight from Los Angeles to Long Island, New York, in 1932. Banning’s story is told in an exhibit opening Feb. 4 at Rudisill Regional Library in Tulsa to help celebrate Black History C U LT U R E Month. James Herman Banning Comes Alive was created by Pat Smith and Louisa Jagger of a Broken Arrow-based nonprofit, The Greatest Story Never Told, and authors of On Exhibit honors Guthrie native James Banning, Freedom’s Wings: the first African-American cross-country aviator. The Remarkable and Inspiring Story of James Herman Banning. The threecomponent educational project includes the Banning website, which has received more than 200,000 visits from educators and historians across the United States, as well as films and a traveling informational exhibition called Fly With Banning. “Much of our history leaves out the significant contributions of African-Americans and other minorities,” Smith says. Smith found one article about Banning and, after much research, discovered more than 90 stories about

A First in Flight

JAMES BANNING’S TRANSCONTINENTAL FLIGHT IS DOCUMENTED IN AN EXHIBITION AT RUDISILL REGIONAL LIBRARY.

PHOTOS COURTESY THE GREATEST STORY NEVER TOLD

the pilot in African-American newspapers. “He inspired millions and yet, because his story wasn’t told in the mainstream press, it was forgotten,” she says. “Now, it is being told. His perseverance and determination can inspire millions of children today. Inspiration is a fundamental part of education. Louisa and I decided we wanted to tell these stories, these greatest stories never told.” Banning applied to African-American colleges, but none included the engineering curriculum that he sought. Eventually, he was accepted into Iowa State College, a traditionally white school. One of his roommates there was Frederick Douglass Patterson, who later founded the Tuskegee Airmen. A friend taught Banning how to fly, and he later became a demonstration pilot on the West Coast. Eventually, Banning made the historic cross-country flight in 41 hours, 27 minutes aloft. In real time, counting stops for fuel, the trip took 21 days because he had to raise money for each leg of the trip. (The first transcontinental flight in 1911 took 49 days.) Banning’s glory quickly turned tragic. Four months after the historic flight, Banning died in a plane crash in which he was a passenger during a military base air show Feb. 5, 1933. Each component of the Smith-Jagger exhibit is geared to help children explore achievements in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. “This exhibition can help us bring STEM topics to all children of low income and children of color,” says Alice Latimer, Tulsa City County Library African-American Resource Center coordinator. “With Banning being an aviator with so many different skills, he is a great lesson for helping to open our children’s minds to becoming aviators, engineers and scientists. STEM helps us get students up to date in computer technology and to increase their knowledge of math. “For African-American children, Banning is an example of what success looks like from someone who looks like them. He was a man who graduated from the black high school in Guthrie. He played the violin, so he was well-rounded. This is a wonderful pattern of fortitude from this truly ingenious man, for our children to follow.” In addition to the book that they have written about Banning, Smith and Jagger have produced four short films on his life and achievements. For more information, visit the Banning exhibition website at www.jameshermanbanning.org. TRACY LEGRAND

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017


HISTORY

A Man of Peace

The Cherokee Nation preserves and gives respect to Sequoyah’s home.

N

THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY HAS RECENTLY TRANSFERRED SEQUOYAH’S HOME TO THE CHEROKEE NATION. PHOTO COURTESY THE CHEROKEE NATION

ear Sallisaw, Oklahoma, is the home of a man who may have done more to unite the Cherokee people – and promote the formation of their sovereign nation – than anyone in history. This cabin and acreage is where Sequoyah and his wife settled in 1829, shortly ahead of the mass relocation of many more of his tribe. Recently the Cherokee Nation and the Oklahoma Historical Society worked together to transfer ownership and responsibility for preservation of this historic site back to Sequoyah’s tribe. The site had been maintained by OHS since 1934. “We commend the state for being such good stewards of the 200-acre site and former home, and now it is time for the Cherokee Nation to lead the preservation effort,” says Chuck Hoskin, chief of staff for the Cherokee Nation. Sequoyah, also known as George Gist, was born in Georgia in the late 18th century. He moved several times as the Cherokee were pushed farther and farther west. He lived in Alabama and Arkansas and finally settled in eastern Indian Territory, near the Arkansas border. Sequoyah’s impact on history could best be described as being a man of peace, said Dr. Bob Blackburn, executive director of the Oklahoma Historical Society. He sought to unify the Cherokee people when he sensed that they were being divided, geographically, racially, politically, and economically. Sequoyah felt this separation firsthand as he moved westward. He recognized that his people needed a way to communicate across distance; they needed a written language. “I really believe he was

motivated to do that as a way to bring the Cherokee people back together through the power of the written word,” Blackburn says. Sequoyah would go on to create a syllabary, or a catalogue of symbols that represents spoken syllables, for the Cherokee language. “In our tribe’s long and unique history, Sequoyah made an everlasting impact and truly changed the way our people communicate, share ideas and preserve history,” Hoskin says. Sequoyah’s cabin home is small and modest and is completely surrounded by a larger, protective building. The interior of the log cabin measures only a few hundred square feet from the fireplace on one side to the far wall where a square wooden table and chairs are tucked. The site includes a museum and gift shop, scenic picnic area, room for children to run and play, and other out buildings from the era. Sequoyah’s tribe, the nation he supported through difficult trials, continues to value his monumental contribution by protecting his home. “We are so proud to assume ownership and management of the historical site and have the opportunity to give it the respect and reverence it deserves. We will ensure this site thrives and continues operation forever,” Hoskins says. The memory, contribution and true genius of Sequoyah will continue to live on inside the little cabin. The Muscogee (Creek) poet, Alexander Posey, summed up Sequoyah’s contribution beautifully in the final two lines of his “Ode to Sequoyah,” “At length, in spite of jeers, of want and need / Thy genius shaped a dream into a deed.” BONNIE RUCKER

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

SPORTS

Right on Target

Archery and its ancient art forms have renewed interest thanks to pop culture.

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rchery is known throughout the world. You can find historical references to it in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and the Americas, but thanks to pop culture it is gaining popularity. Ken Wilkins, owner of Archery Traditions of Oklahoma in Yukon, has had a passion for archery and bowhunting for most of his life. He says due to movies like Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit and The Hunger Games and TV shows like Arrow and The Walking Dead, archery has become a favorite pastime for many people. What drives people to the sport isn’t important, according to Wilkins; rather, most discover they truly like it and want to learn more. “The thing is, once they come in and experience it, they enjoy it and stick with it,” he says. “I’ve had very few people decide that they don’t

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

want to continue to do it.” Archery is for everyone. It teaches patience, focus and control, Wilkins says. He recommends for anyone interested in archery to start learning on a traditional bow (recurve or longbow) to get the basics down before moving to a compound. You also want to have an introductory class because, if you learn incorrect form, it is hard to correct that later. For kids, the recommended age to begin is 6, depending upon the child’s maturity.

Archery is for everyone. It teaches patience, focus and control. Bow and arrow, used for a multitude of reasons since ancient times, are some of the oldest art forms still practiced today, and traditional archery is itself artistic, Wilkins says.

While all bows take practice, using a compound is more like using a gun with fixed sights, while a recurve or longbow requires learning to judge distances and angles. The sheer enjoyment, stress relief and relaxation are what many people like about archery, but some are driven by other reasons. Pandora Figueroa gained interest in the sport after watching her favorite anime, which features an archer. Her husband, Daniel, recently bought her a recurve bow for her birthday. “We are nerds, so we like the idea of being good at it, having that random skill,” she says. Figueroa plans to take classes to learn basic form and improve her technique, but, for now, she is happy hitting the range and firing off a few arrows. To learn more about archery and what is available, visit oklahomaarchery.org or archerytraditionsok. com. ALAINA STEVENS


The State BUSINESS

For the Love of Booze Oklahoma distilleries ride a national wave.

I

JEFF MERRITT’S PRAIRIE WOLF WHISKEY HIT STORE SHELVES IN OCTOBER. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

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t’s not enough to simply imbibe fine liquor, wine or beer these days. The national trend is to appreciate your hooch with the palate of a connoisseur – and if it is crafted nearby and the purveyors are easy to chat up, then all the better. “We loved what was happening in Oklahoma with all of the new restaurants [and] breweries,” says Jeff Merritt of Prairie Wolf Spirits in Guthrie. “We had seen craft distilling catching on in different parts of the country and wanted to bring that same energy to Oklahoma and be a part of the renaissance.” For Jeff Thurmon, mastering home-brewed beer came first. Now he’s going nationwide with Moorebased Twister Distillery and his newest product, Success Vodka.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

“My father brewed beer in our home and I grew up with a desire to make better beer than dear old dad,” Thurmon says. “I managed to do so, but overdid it as my friends were drinking me out of house and home.” Thurmon eventually made a business from his distilling skills. He allied with Texas distillery owner Tito Beveridge on a four-year journey of discovery in mastering the spiritsmaking process. This hard-won expertise put him in the right place at the right time when Alvin Philipose, a chiropractor in Oklahoma City, sought a distiller for his pet project, the first legal distillery in Oklahoma. Thurmon and Philipose’s Success brand has won a gold medal at The Fifty Best competition in New York and holds a five-star rating among

tasters at VodkaBuzz.com. Prairie Wolf Ranch is named for famed artist John James Audubon’s 19th-century paintings of coyotes, which he called “prairie wolves.” It’s home to the Merritt family’s distillery. From this headquarters, in a quick three years, Prairie Wolf Spirits have spread to more than 1,000 Oklahoma locations and beyond. The line began with Prairie Wolf Vodka and expanded to include Loyal Gin, named for the town of Loyal, Oklahoma, and rated second highest on Tastings.com. A big fan favorite is DARK All-Natural Coffee Liqueur, which, unlike the better-known Kahlua, is the only all-natural coffee liqueur around. Plus, M Whiskey hit the shelves in October. Quirky and some would say antiquated, Oklahoma liquor laws are a challenge, both Merritt and Thurmon say. “This industry is new to the state, so it has been a little difficult getting answers on exactly what we can and cannot do,” Merritt says. “We would love to do tastings like breweries and wineries can, but for some unknown reason the state won’t allow it. Our business is growing quickly, though, and we see the laws loosening up in the future.” Thurmon says branding is a continuing concern as many different brands battle for shelf-space. With the ever-growing interest in regionally produced liquor, word of mouth is increasing and every time someone requests a beloved beverage at a liquor store, bar or restaurant, the orders from distributors increase. This grassroots growth has also resulted in Success Vodka soon being available at casinos around the state. Twister Distillery’s offerings, including a new bourbon in the coming months, will also continue to expand. TRACY LEGRAND


OU - Oklahoma’s Leader in Excellence

• OU is the only public university in U.S. history to ever rank first among both public and private universities in the number of freshman National Merit Scholars enrolled. • OU is the only university in the nation, public or private, whose students have won Goldwater, Mitchell, Truman, Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright and National Security Education Program scholarships in the same year. • OU was recently awarded the prestigious Davis Cup for the fourth consecutive year in recognition of its record-setting enrollment of United World College international freshmen. OU is the only public university to ever be awarded the Davis Cup. • OU has produced 29 Rhodes Scholars; no other university in Oklahoma has had more than three. • The OU Honors College is one of the top 25 programs at a public university in the nation.

• With construction underway and move in set for next fall, OU will become one of the first public universities in the country to build residential colleges for upperclassmen and women, patterned on those at Yale, Harvard, Oxford and Cambridge in England. The living/learning communities, will become the cornerstone of the undergraduate experience. • OU is a leader among all American universities in international exchange and study abroad programs. OU is closing in on reaching a four-year goal to increase the number of students studying abroad to 50 percent. OU currently offers programs in 79 countries and over 225 cities in six continents. Students from 120 countries are enrolled at OU. • OU’s Research Campus was named the No. 1 research campus in the nation, placing it among such past recipients as the Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, Purdue Research Park in Indiana and University City Center in Pennsylvania.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

- The Impact of Excellence


PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPRHEY PHOTOGRAPHER

The State INSIDER

Leon’s Legacy Dozens of musicians gathering for a tribute to the late Mr. Russell embody the elusive Tulsa Sound.

E

xiting the Cain’s Ballroom stage after he and a stellar ad hoc band had romped joyously through the old chestnut “Trouble in Mind,” Rodney Lay was beaming. “Fun, fun,” he announced, to no one in particular. I happened to be on hand as emcee, and away from the microphone I asked him how long he planned to keep doing the kind of thing he’d just done. “John,” he said, “I’ll do it ’til the good Lord takes me home.” He was there because the good Lord had recently taken home one of his contemporaries, the irreplaceable Leon Russell. And Lay was only one of dozens of performers who gathered at the venerable Tulsa landmark to honor with their own talents the famed Tulsan who had pursued his art until the very end, which came Nov. 13. Lay, whose group Rodney and the Blazers was a contemporary of Russell’s earliest rock ’n’ roll bands, is 76, and he was far from the only septuagenarian to play his music for the packed house that night. The bill included Tulsa rock ’n’ roll pioneers Gene Crose, Bill Pair, Johnny Williams and Jimmy Markham, all deep into their 70s, and, like their old pal

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

Leon, all veterans of the hardscrabble T-town music scene of the 1950s, of sock hops and frat parties and joints with shifty owners who often demanded the bands play five or six sets a night. Markham, the harmonica player and vocalist who still performs regularly, organized the Dec. 15 tribute show, along with well-known area music figure Larry Shaeffer, the music promoter and former longtime owner of the Cain’s. Friends for years, the two attended Russell’s star-studded memorial service at ORU’s Mabee Center and came away convinced that they needed to put on a Tulsacentric tribute concert, bringing together people who’d known Leon, who’d worked with Leon, who’d been deeply influenced by Leon. They knew they were casting their net wide. If there’s such a thing as the classic Tulsa Sound – and more about that later – then Leon was its axis, the hub around which it all spun. By the time of the first rehearsal for what became known as A Tribute to Leon, a good three generations of talent either encouraged, nurtured or influenced by Russell had been engaged. These included, among others, the members of Leon’s final touring band: guitarist Beau Charron, drummer Brandon Holder, and Leon’s longtime bassist Jack Wessel, who

first played with Russell at the Cain’s in 1981, along with others like bassist Paul Lee and guitarist Chris Simmons, members of Russell groups in years past. Many of the participants were old enough to remember the 1969 Chess Records release Fathers and Sons, in which two old-guard stars of the Chicago blues style, Muddy Waters and Otis Spann, joined with newgeneration players Michael Bloomfield, Paul Butterfield and Donald “Duck” Dunn. This aggregation was Fathers and Sons writ large and local. There were even real fathers and sons on hand, with Chebon Markham joining his father, Jimmy, at one point for a spirited “Blues Power” and Steve White working with Don, his dad, on a convincing performance of the Leon Russell-Don Preston composition, “Stranger in a Strange Land.” But mostly, as in Fathers and Sons, the parentage was symbolic. That hardly made it any less genuine. The whole evening seemed to play to a single purpose, which was to give voice to the powerful impact Leon Russell had on our music and, by inference, on our lives. It was an event more than a show, oddly enough bringing to mind a quote from the old western-movie sidekick Smiley Burnette. In the ’60s, as a cast member of the TV series Petticoat Junction, he remarked to a journalist that the show was like a cake – you didn’t see the eggs. That analogy doesn’t completely fit A Tribute to Leon. You couldn’t help but be impressed by the generations of stars on hand, from Crose to Wink Burcham, Markham to John Fullbright, Tommy Crook to Nathan Eicher (who opened the show together, foreshadowing the multi-generational performances to come), and Williams to


Travis Fite, with the likes of Walt Richmond, Jamie Oldaker, David Teegarden, Jimmy Byfield, Charles Tuberville, Peter Mayo, and the Red Dirt Rangers in between. Clearly, they were all there for a much bigger reason than to shine a spotlight on themselves. (And they certainly weren’t in it for the money; nobody involved got a dime.) The show was staged, the cake was baked, as an offering to the powerful spirit who hovered over it. Reflecting Leon and his legacy, the songs ranged through genres, from country to blues to piano ballads to straight-ahead rock. But as wonderful as the music was, the visuals may have told the story even better, often in little moments: Teegarden and Oldaker, who’ve collectively played on some of the biggest stages in the world, grinning knowingly at one another as their dual drumming powered Lay’s “Trouble in Mind.” Burcham bopping out wearing a top hat, a la Leon. Brian Lee, who toured with Russell for years, talking about how nervous he was to be doing Leon’s material, and then silencing the crowd with a powerful “Song for You,” just voice and piano. Bassist Gary Gilmore, who came to prominence in the ’70s, waltzing out on stage and plugging in like a major-league slugger casually approaching the on-deck circle.

If there’s such a thing as the classic Tulsa Sound, then Leon was its axis.

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There was so much more. Music director Paul Benjaman, talented South Lewis at 81st • The Plaza • 918-296-4100 and unflappable, good-naturedly adapting throughout the night – sometimes at the last minute – to changes in repertoire, and then playing guitar like he’d known that particular version of the song all his22459 Travers Mahan.indd 1 life. Richmond and Fullbright (the Grammy nominee who’d perform a wonderful set of Leon songs toward the end of the evening) on piano and organ, respectively, trading spontaneous licks as though they did the same thing every evening. Russell friend and collaborator Matt Harris attacking “Shootout at the Plantation” with zest and authority. Markham and the Legacy Horns – Williams on saxophone, Steve Ham on trombone, Mike Bennett on trumpet – roaring through several false endings before finally wrestling a sizzling “Got My Mojo Workin’” to the floor. And then, the indelible picture of octogenarian superstar Roy Clark, stepping out from the back of the stage to wave at the wildly cheering crowd, and with that simple gesture giving the whole evening his imprimatur. For more than three decades of my writing life, I’ve tried to pin down the elements of the classic Tulsa Sound. A definition has proved so elusive that I’ve sometimes wondered if there’s even such a thing. After all, the gospel, blues, R&B and country influences that colored Leon’s oeuvre don’t come out the same way in the deep-groove, laid-back tunes of J.J. Cale – or, for that matter, the soft rock of David Gates, another of Leon’s Tulsa contemporaries. The more I’ve studied it, the more I’ve listened not only to our music but also to our people who made and continue to make it, I’ve come to understand that the Tulsa Sound is not so much a musical style as it is a brotherhood. It’s years of Tulsa musicians listening to and playing with one another, picking up licks and swapping songs, and while it didn’t start with Leon Russell, he was the one who stepped in and pushed it forward into the rock era. It continues to this day, an unbroken line. I still can’t tell you exactly what the Tulsa Sound is. All I can tell you is that, like a living soul in a breathing body, on that stage, on that night – well, there it was.

1/6/17 3:58 PM

JOHN WOOLEY

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FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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1/6/17 3:06 PM


Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

All About the Heart

I

February revolves around the ticker.

f you look around during the month of February, you can find evidence of hearts everywhere – both anatomical and metaphorical – and Oklahoma Magazine keeps the trend going. From sexy and sleek Valentine’s Day outfits to get your heart pumping to expert tips on how to keep your ticker running soundly, the pages ahead have all you need to know.

Since it’s Healthy Heart Month, we explore the plethora of ways to improve heart health through Life’s Simple 7, which includes managing your cholesterol and keeping up activity. But February is also the most romantic month of the year, so you’ll find heart-shaped jewelry and date night outfits within the style section. From health to romance, we have your heart covered. FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

LEFT: ORIGINAL ARTWORK BY KIM FONDER FROM EXHIBIT GALLERY HANGS ABOVE A TEAK AND WOVEN LEATHER BENCH. AN EYE-CATCHING DISPLAY OF TINY HOUSES TITLED “URBAN COMMUNITY” HIGHLIGHTS THE HOME’S MANTEL IN THE COMFORTABLE LIVING ROOM. A THREE-TIERED CONSOLE OF RECLAIMED WOOD BACKS THE SOFA. A DRAMATIC 2-FOOTLONG BOX DESIGNED BY J ALEXANDER IS FASHIONED OF GERMAN SILVER WITH TURQUOISE HIGHLIGHTS.

INTERIORS

Renovation Refines Home’s Character The new interior design reflects modern and midcentury themes.

By M. J. Van Deventer • Photos by Brian McMurtry, Focus B Studio

S

tanding tall on Tulsa’s Golf Ball Hill is a 1980s home that recently experienced a yearlong dramatic transformation with the talents of semi-retired Tulsa designer Richard Neel and Lance Cheney, the new owner of Richard Neel Interiors, Inc., in Brookside. The traditional style of the home was renovated in such a way to capture views of downtown Tulsa through the tree tops, an unusual vista for a home in an exclusive, secluded area. The sweeping renovation reflects the owners’ interest in modern furnishings and midcentury design.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017


FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

27


Life & Style

“The owners are really into the modern aesthetic, which is reflected in the furnishings they chose and their extensive modern art collection,” Cheney says. The couple bought the home from the original owners and quickly began to reorganize and change the design style of the interior. Cheney says the renovation included gutting the main floor, consisting of the living and dining rooms, kitchen and master suite. The project included an extensive new lighting system, designed by Neel. The home’s entry is like a prelude to the character and charm of the rest of the home. A voluptuously shaped console, fashioned of mahogany veneer, reveals the couple’s interest in wood accents, evidenced in select pieces throughout the home. Sconces in the shape of twisted elk horns frame a modern painting, “Under Water Tower” by Patricia Larsen. A pair of midcentury walnut benches anchors this well-planned design portrait. “The kitchen was a major focal point of the renovation,” Cheney says. “The biggest change was

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

replacing all the upper cabinets in the kitchen with windows, providing expansive views of the surrounding landscape.” Neel says: “We put in counter stools to take advantage of the new views the windows now provide. The seating area created with the undercounter stools is a functional space for dining or working, making the kitchen the heart of their home. Now, it’s the most beautiful, modern kitchen I’ve ever been involved in.” Cheney sees the new kitchen much like “a tree house” in the heart of South Tulsa. The designers also faced another challenge in the kitchen. The previous owners had placed the dining table directly in front of a door leading to the large elevated deck, creating something of a traffic problem. “By opening a hallway near the kitchen, we were able to add a breakfast area for the children and create more seating in the kitchen,” Cheney says. A gallery feeling is evident in the formal dining room, which was planned without a traditional chandelier over the table. Neel

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Life & Style TOP: A QUARTET OF COLORFUL CHAIRS SURROUNDS THE BREAKFAST TABLE BELOW ARTWORK BY AARON WHISNER TITLED “CHEVRON #4.” MIDDLE: SLEEK CUSTOM CHAIRS AND A DINING TABLE FROM RICHARD NEEL HOME STAR IN THE DINING ROOM, WHICH FEATURES ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING FOR VIEWING THE ART. BOTTOM: UPPER CABINETS IN THE KITCHEN WERE REPLACED BY WINDOWS, GIVING THE HOMEOWNERS AN EXPANSIVE VIEW OF THEIR LANDSCAPE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

designed new architecturally recessed lighting to illuminate the art and dining area. A large chocolate-colored painting, “Tilt03” by Kim Fonder, is compelling, as is an antique Thai cultivation tool. The living room exudes comfort and warmth in the muted hues of charcoal grays, off-whites and warm walnut wood. The fireplace is not only an anchoring focal point, but a conversation piece. Above the fireplace is an unusual custom installation of 102 small ceramic houses, titled “Urban Community,” designed by Brandon Reese. Each house is different and casts a small shadow on the fireplace wall above the mantel. The master suite is the epitome of serenity, designed to be a quiet, relaxing space. It is also the only area in the home with custom draperies. They reflect the color palette featuring contrasting strips of felt in shades of gray, taupe and silver. The adjoining master bath features marble surfaces and custom floating vanities with undercabinet lighting that automatically illuminates when a person enters the room. Cheney and Neel balanced the couple’s professional lifestyle and love for their family in each aspect of the extensive renovation. They designed a fresh contempory look for an older, traditional-style home. The family’s residence is visually enticing and extremely functional, dressed with an exciting mix of midcentury antiquities and modern treasures.


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Life & Style

F YI

Powerful Planning

Severe weather in Oklahoma can leave people without power for extended periods.

F

rom warm-weather thunderstorms to ice storms in the winter, weather-related power outages are bound to happen. Whether you’re facing extreme hot or cold, it is important to be prepared when your power is out for an extended period. The biggest concerns with outages are the health risks, including heat stroke or hypothermia, and the misuse of alternative heating sources. “We see an increase in injuries and deaths caused by using generators without proper ventilation, using outdoor grills inside the house, using gas ovens to heat the home, leaving candles burning overnight or running a car in the garage to charge phone batteries,” says Keli Cain with the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management. “Be sure to follow all safety precautions during a power outage as you would during other times.” Cain shares a few other tips for being prepared for power outages.

HAVE A PLAN

To start, think through what you might need for your home and vehicle in both cold and hot weather for a weeklong power outage. Ask yourself: How long will you be able to stay in your home without heating or air conditioning? Do you have family or friends you could stay with if necessary?

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

Are you able to buy a generator? Also consider maintaining the current temperature in your home during the day by keeping windows, doors and curtains closed as soon as the power goes out. Have a kit for both your home and your vehicle with the supplies you may need. Don’t rely on shopping for supplies after a power outage; stores may be closed or may sell out of the basics.

CREATE AN EMERGENCY KIT

An emergency kit should be filled with enough supplies to last at least 72 hours. This would include enough water and nonperishable food for everyone in your household, as well as flashlights, lamps, blankets, medications, extra batteries and any other provisions you may need. Include a copy of your plans for dealing with the power outage.

KNOW YOUR RESOURCES

Resources are often available at emergency shelters, churches and cooling/warming stations run by the American Red Cross. Contact your local American Red Cross chapter or emergency management office for information. You can also call 211 for referrals to nonemergency resources available in your area.

UP A CREEK WITHOUT A PADDLE

If you’re not prepared for a weather-related power outage, research store availability and road safety before venturing out for supplies. Don’t forget to dress appropriately for traveling in dangerous weather conditions. If you can go to the store, stock up to avoid multiple trips. If necessary, ask nearby friends and neighbors for supplies until you are able to get to the store. Visit www.ok.gov/OEM/Programs_&_Services/Preparedness for more details on how to create an emergency plan and for other safety tips. ALAINA STEVENS


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Life & Style

FUN FACTS

DOWNTOWN ON KIHEKAH AVENUE CAPTURES THE SPIRIT OF DECADES PAST.

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PHOTO COURTESY PAWHUSKA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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CIT Y LIFE

The Heart of the Osage

Pawhuska has modern appeal while retaining its Old West roots.

T

he Osage Nation’s home, Osage County’s seat, Pawhuska has had cultural significance long before a Pulitzer Prize-winning play and popular store came to town. The Osage people understood something special in opening their government here in 1872 and naming it after Chief Paw-HiuSkah, whose name means White Hair in English. Some say they sensed the oil that would briefly turn Pawhuska into one of America’s richest cities. Others say they recognized the nutritional value of omnipresent bluestem grass, which can add 3-4 pounds daily to a bovine. Pawhuska is the southern gateway to the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, the largest protected area of its kind on Earth. A typical auto tour is delayed by some of the 2,500 roaming bison, North America’s largest land mammal. Past and present unite in Pawhuska. Cowboys and cowgirls, from the preserve or nearby ranches, make the short drive into town daily to conduct business and pack their pickups with goods. “It’s an old western town that’s not out West,” says Joni Nash, executive director of the Pawhuska Chamber of Commerce. “Many of our historic buildings downtown are from the 19th century. The building I’m in at the Chamber was the old cobblestone house of the town’s first blacksmith, hired

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

by the Osage. It was built before any of the tribal leaders’ houses. “Visitors from all over the world just wind up here. I ran into a couple from Germany and asked why they came. They said they’d just heard that Pawhuska is a cool little town.” Pawhuska’s financial apex came during the oil boom of the Roaring ’20s. RollsRoyce opened its first dealership west of the Mississippi River. Scores of four- and five-story buildings popped up. The No. 1 customer of Tiffany’s was the Osage Nation, which handed out place settings from that New York retailer as gifts. “Money wasn’t an object back then,” Nash says. Today, Pawhuska continues to evolve. It gained attention in 2007 as the setting for Tracy Letts’s acclaimed August: Osage County; many scenes were filmed downtown when it became a movie. Since October, when The Pioneer Woman Mercantile store and cafe opened, downtown has had a regular stream of patrons, who also visit the Osage Tribal Museum, the oldest tribally owned and continuously operating museum in the country, and the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church with its storied stained-glass windows. Every turn on Kihekah Avenue or Main Street reveals historic nuance. “It’s definitely an interesting area,” Nash says. BRIAN WILSON

in the United States was organized in May 1909 by John F. Mitchell. HOME OF

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2016

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FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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1/6/17 10:30 AM


Life & Style D E S T I N AT I O N S

The ABCs of Dogwood Canyon

Amphiuma, bison and crags are just the start of what you’ll see in this Missouri nature park.

D

ogwood Canyon is a paradise of wilderness beauty. Approximately 18 miles from Big Cedar Lodge on Missouri state Highway 86 in Lampe, you can visit this invigorating nature preserve for an afternoon adventure. If traveling with a group, maximize your time by splitting up for lunch or biking through the canyon, while the rest of your group may want to take the two-hour wildlife tram tour. By car, Lampe is 3.5 hours from Tulsa, 5 hours from Oklahoma City.

Activities

What you can do at Dogwood Canyon is as varied as at any outdoor destination: fly fishing, wilderness chapel weddings, hiking, biking, a wildlife tram tour, Segway rides, horseback riding, carriage rides and private Jeep tours. Admission to the nature park is $10 for adults, $5 for children. Most activities are $15 an hour for adults and $10 for children, with stable and Segway prices subject to change. Private Jeep tours are $150-$200, with a three-person maximum. While it’s beneficial to recharge on excursions, it is especially fulfilling to enjoy this canyon in the middle of a busy school semester. Imagine how striking the dogwood trees are in the spring bloom.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: DOGWOOD CANYON HAS 14 WATERFALLS. A HANDLER READIES A MOUNT FOR A GUEST. BICYCLING IS ONE OF THE MORE POPULAR ACTIVITIES IN THE PARK. HORSEBACK RIDING ALLOWS VISITORS TO LOSE THEMSELVES IN NATURE. POOLS OF BLUE-GREEN WATER ARE COMMON.

PHOTOS COURTESY DOGWOOD CANYON NATURE PARK


Spring is a great time to bond with family after winter hibernation. If you go in autumn, the seasonal decorations of pumpkins and gourds amid holiday lights and trees create a perfect combination of excitement. The weather is nice enough to do a tram or bike ride and enjoy a hot cocoa to warm up. The canyon is especially impressive with all the hues that the seasons reveal, so be sure to take a camera.

Wildlife Tram Tour

The tram has blankets for every passenger, but bundle up with caps and layers on a brisk day. Enthusiastic guides share much information about the flora and fauna of this Ozarkian landscape. There’s even a unique animal called an amphiuma, an aquatic salamander. Passengers learn Osage history and see evidence of the tribe’s influence. You can occasionally get off the tram to feed rainbow trout. The tram drives slowly through the vistas of 14 waterfalls, a watercress patch, hand-built bridges, ancient burial caves and blue-green pools of water. Dogwood Canyon covers 10,000 mesmerizing acres of craggy ravines, streams, exquisite dogwoods and evergreens, all of which invite you to the trails of tranquility as you ascend the summit. Crossing into Arkansas takes you to the high meadows and pastures of wildlife, the climax of this adventure. You are greeted by sweet white-tailed deer. Next, you are approached by bison, elk and longhorn cattle – right up to your tram – as the guide sprinkles food to attract wildlife. You see bison skipping, elk locking antlers in a tussle and bald eagles roosting in treetops. A personal favorite memory is realizing that you’re never too old to be entertained by the antics of wild animals. It’s good for the soul to enjoy the tram ride from an innocently curious perspective. The interaction and mischief of animals this close to your face is worth the price of admission alone ($28 for adults, $19 for children). The drive down the summit reveals unique fish and amphiuma as people fly-fish, drive Segways or bike through the canyon trail.

Education Center, Grist Mill and Restaurant

At the entrance, there is a treehouse built by the TV show TreeHouse Masters and an impressive Education Center and Amphitheater. Look through microscopes and aquariums of wildlife as you drink hot beverages from the general store. A reclaimed grist mill and general store are charming attractions of this Indian Creek haven. The educational natural history lobby leads you to the gorgeous restaurant. Dogwood Canyon is so magically serene that you’ll be anxious to return.

FROM TOP: COVERED BRIDGES ADD TO THE AMBIENCE OF DOGWOOD CANYON. TRAM RIDES TAKE VISITORS FROM WHITEWATER STREAMS TO PLATEAUS WITH ROAMING BISON. THE RECLAIMED GRIST MILL AND GENERAL STORE HAVE PICTURESQUE APPEAL.

PHOTOS COURTESY DOGWOOD CANYON NATURE PARK

GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

LIFE’S SIMPLE 7

H E A LT H

1. Manage blood pressure 2. Control cholesterol 3. Reduce blood sugar 4. Get active 5. Eat better 6. Lose weight 7. Stop smoking From the American Heart Association

Having a Healthy Heart

H

Address cardiovascular disease and stroke by taking these simple steps for a sound ticker.

eart disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States, and each February, American Heart Month raises awareness to some disturbing numbers. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, heart-disease death rates have increased for the first time in decades, from 167 deaths per 100,000 Americans in 2014 to 168.5 in 2015. Stroke, the fifthleading cause of death in the nation, also increased, from 36.5 deaths per 100,000 Americans in 2014 to 37.6 in 2015. While experts say it’s too early to call it a trend, any growth in numbers raises concern because many causes of heart disease and stroke are avoidable. “Many conditions are preventable,” says Dr. Heather Cha, a cardiovascular consultant for St. John Health System in Tulsa.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

“A family history of heart disease does put one at increased risk of having the same or similar problem, but it does not mean one will certainly have the same outcome. We cannot change our genetics, but we can make lifestyle changes and control other risk factors. There are simple steps anyone can take, including blood pressure control, management of high cholesterol and blood sugar levels, maintaining a healthy weight by eating a healthy diet and staying active and exercising, and not smoking.” The American Heart Association (AHA) has trademarked these steps as Life’s Simple 7, key factors to keeping your heart healthy and lowering your risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Cha believes anyone can make these simple life changes. “The steps are not expensive and even small improvements in one’s health will make a big difference,” she says. “I encour-

age patients to just start with one to two changes and gain momentum from there.” Along with making good health choices, it’s also important to not wait for symptoms to alert you that there’s a problem. “High blood pressure, also called hypertension, is referred to as a ‘silent killer’ because there are no obvious symptoms until one’s blood pressure is dangerously too high or one has already suffered serious consequences of high blood pressure, including heart attack and/or stroke,” Cha says. “So, it is important to know one’s blood pressure by having it checked and routinely monitored.” Cha shares that the AHA and the American College of Cardiology recommend having your cholesterol checked every four to six years if you are 20 years old or older and have not been diagnosed with a cardiovascular problem. She adds, however, that you may have to have your cholesterol and other risk factors assessed more often if your risk of developing heart disease is higher. REBECCA FAST


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Life & Style

ST YLE

Valentine’s Vixen

If there’s one night of the year to pull out all the style stops, it’s Valentine’s Day. Dress to impress in sexy and sleek numbers with red and pink touches to add a little extra love to your night.

Halston Heritage organic colorblock black and white dress, $445; Jimmy Choo floral-embroidered lace D’Orsay pumps, $795; Long rectangular red clutch, $250, Saks Fifth Avenue. David Yurman diamond heart station necklace, $595; David Yurman dia heart lock cable bracelet, $575; David Yurman heart cable bracelet, $475; David Yurman pink sapphire chatelaine earrings, $695, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Robert Moore black sunglasses, $479, Visions.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017


Alice and Olivia cold-shoulder rule top, $295; Alice and Olivia front-zip leather leggings, $798; Long rectangular clutch, $250; Jimmy Choo suede point-toe pumps, $595, Saks Fifth Avenue. Circle link necklace with toggle clasp, $9,910; Open heart fob with beading, $5,965, Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. Robert Marc black sunglasses, $479, Visions.

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style ST YLE

Dapper Date Everyone’s crazy about a sharpdressed man – try velvet or plaid dinner jackets with plenty of accessories like customized cuff links, scarves and watches. Add a spray of cologne and some shades and you’ll be set.

Robert Talbott burgundy crushed velvet dinner jacket, $1,098; Sand sport shirt, $225; Jonathan Wachtel stud set, $195; Sand scarf, $195; Alberto five-pocket stretch pant, $250; W. Kleinberg black crocodile belt, $450; Martin Dingman crocodile bit loafer, $245; Pantherella tartan-plaid socks, $30, Travers Mahan. Orvis wallet, $79; Chris Reeves Mnandi pocket knife with Gabon ebony inlay, $400; Filson flask, $80; Swiss Army Victorinox I.N.O.X. watch, $650, The Gadget Company

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Bonus photo gallery @ OKmag.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017


SCENE

MIKE KRYWUCKI, JUDY HATFIELD, OWEN LAFFERTY; OPENING OF THE COMPLETE WPA COLLECTION: 75TH ANNIVERSARY, OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART, OKC

NAMITA GUPTA WIGGERS, MYRA BLOCK KAISER; OPENING OF VISIONMAKERS2016, 108 CONTEMPORARY, OKC

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SARAH TAYLOR, ASHLI MONTGOMERY, PAM MEIMERSTORF, CATHY LAIRD; AWARE LUNCHEON, ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION, TULSA

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MONIQUE AND JUSTIN NAIFEH; PATIENT FAMILY DINNER, CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, OKC

KATHY WALKER, POLLY NICHOLS, SUE ANN HYDE, KAREN BROWNE; LEGACY AND LEGENDS SURPRISE ANNOUNCEMENT, JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OKLAHOMA CITY, OKC

JACQUI BACK, JEROMEE SCOT, LEANNE TAYLOR; 2017 PINK STILETTO PREPARATIONS, SUSAN G. KOMEN, TULSA BRAD AND ROBIN KRIEGER, VALERIE AND BRAD NAIFEH; OPUS IX, ALLIED ARTS, OKC

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A

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017


Guide

By Brian Wilson

s e n g o e i l t l a o c i C l to App Parents relinquishing control and teens embracing responsibilities ensure a successful process.

THE COLLEGIATE search-and-application process can take many

months and trigger psychological highs and lows, but managing emotions and expectations induce successful outcomes for parents and children. The formula endorsed by hundreds college counselors across the country is simple, but difficult to enact: Parents choosing to see that

everything will work out decrease stress at home; children who don’t procrastinate keep parents at bay. Parents who embrace their child’s first major adult decision help themselves by admitting that the child’s choice is being made in a safe environment. Nothing bad happens. At worst, an ambitious but unmotivated teen may learn life lessons. Bruce Hunter, a 30-year college counselor from Sarasota, Florida, has helped thousands of independent-school students with their applications. He advises parents to “take a deep breath and have confidence in your son or daughter to negotiate the process while you lend support whenever it’s actually needed.” Hunter, who runs national workshops and mentors hundreds of college counselors, advocates learning from mistakes and failures. The college-application process is ideal for putting this into practice because it is not life or death. “Students grow and gain perspective and independence by stepping through this process and taking charge of their futures when they have the freedom and support to do so,” he says. FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


Life Lessons

If deadlines are missed, teens experience consequences. They don’t learn anything “when parents step in to save the day,” says Hunter, who endorses the bestselling The Gift of Failure by Jessica Lahey, his former colleague at Rowland Hall-St. Mark’s School in Salt Lake City. Hunter likens the child to a bus driver and sometimes the bus doesn’t go; the parent has a map (not the map). This is not the parent’s college application or experience (or a vicarious reliving of either); it’s the child’s. “The royal we isn’t going to work here,” Hunter says. “We’re taking the SAT … we’re working on college essays … we’re applying to these schools compromises students’ ability to take charge of the process. If they make mistakes, they recover, they move on. They mature much quicker than children whose parents jump in to rescue them.” Letting go challenges parents who have managed their children’s lives. Acknowledging this, colleges accommodate stress that comes from abdicating control. Most events for prospective and incoming students have parental elements, from tours to questionand-answer sessions. “We are so glad when parents are involved,” says Jesse Chambliss, a University of Tulsa admissions officer. “We want the family invested in this decision. We want to work with parents and answer all their questions, but we also want to address the students’ needs. “We emphasize the student taking ownership while keeping the family involved. All families are coming from a different place. Just listening and being an advocate for them is what it’s all about.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

Chuck Flint, from Oklahoma City University’s admissions office, concurs. “I engage the student when the parents are asking all the questions, but we want the parents to be comfortable, too,” he says. “We make it personal.”

Debunking Myths

Boren, has increased the number of endowed faculty members from 70-80 to more than 580, “so we have renowned experts in many fields.” Oklahoma State University’s Honors College houses top professors and most classes are capped at 22 students, with many having 15 or fewer. Courses emphasize discussion-based critical thinking, oral and written communication, and synthesizing complex materials. In addition, Dean Keith Garbutt stresses the personal touches and nuances shared by OSU and honors colleges at many public universities. “I’m clear when I talk to parents that you want to make the choice that’s the best fit for your child,” he says. “Part of that is the support given to the student. At OSU, honors students are part of a community where they’ll feel comfortable and succeed.” He cites his weekly Tea With

A misperception of many parents is that only a dozen highly selective colleges are worthy for their children. That myth has been debunked for at least 25 years, according to many publications, Hunter and hundreds of American college counselors. The United States has a glut of first-rate professors with terminal degrees in their fields; they populate nearly every position at four-year schools. For instance, the University of Oklahoma ranks No. 1 among public universities nationwide in the enrollment of freshman National Merit Scholars. There are 850 such students in OU’s National Honors Program, which has had winners of Rhodes, Fulbright, Goldwater, Adapted from Fiske Guide to Colleges, here are some responsibilities Truman and Marshall of college applicants: scholarships. • Betray no tremors when parents offer opinions. Smile and nod. “We have a • Meet deadlines to reduce or negate parental nagging. top-flight honors • Show parents what you do (or have done) so they have no college that home reason to nag. in on small classes • Embrace that this is your decision, not your parents’, not your and the top profesbest friend’s, not your significant other’s. sors on campus,” says • Take charge of the process. Jeff Blahnik, executive • Avoid contrariness by researching all options. director of OU’s office

The Teen’s Responsibilities

of admissions and recruitment. “Students are surrounded by excellent classmates, the 0.05 percent best in the nation. You get that Ivy League feel, but at a major research university.” Blahnik adds that OU, during the tenure of President David


Financial Aid

The biggest mistake when paying for college is not filing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Too many assume they will not receive aid, and/or get intimidated by the process. The FAFSA accounts for special circumstances and how many children are, will be or have been in college. U.S. citizenship is not a factor. Every collegiate financial aid advisor has the same mantra: “Fill out the FAFSA. You will be surprised.” Expensive schools may become possible because many base financial outlays on students’ FAFSAs. The FAFSA opens each year on Oct. 1. Go to fafsa.ed.gov.

Parents’ Responsibilities

Adapted from Fiske Guide to Colleges, here are some responsibilities of parents of college applicants: • Relax. Breathe. Death will not occur. • Understand mistakes will occur. Smile, nod and calmly help when they do. • Resist taking control when deadlines loom. • Celebrate that this is your child’s decision, not yours. • Keep criticisms objective and neutral. • Encourage and embrace your child’s independence. • Have a frank conversation about collegiate costs. • Drop hints of your opinions, but back off quickly.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

Compiling the List of Colleges

A common point of contention for families in the collegiate application process is The List. Parents, for intensely personal, generational reasons, may want the teen to consider only specific colleges and (gasp!) certainly not the football team’s archrival. The applicant, for intensely personal, generational reasons, may have entirely different views. Objectivity should rule. Parents should avoid injecting bias into the process. The teen should turn an objective lens toward actual grades, standardized test scores and extracurricular activities, and be realistic with what schools fit her or his needs, expectations, desires and field of study. Two invaluable sources keep it real. Big Future, the College Board’s collegiate search engine, lets an applicant customize limitless searches of a massive database. For instance, if a high school senior with an ACT of 30 and SAT scores of 700/700 wants to major in marine biology at small liberal-arts schools in warm climates, 10 options will appear. The applicant can save that search, tweak nearly two dozen criteria (maybe public universities are OK, she thinks) and up pop 31 more schools. Then use Fiske Guide to Colleges, a neutral, well-researched assessment of more than 320 schools. Edward B. Fiske has an established reputation representing colleges straightforwardly and analytically. Each school is covered in 4-5 pages, with a summary box of admissions criteria. An early draft of The List, ideally in January of the teen’s junior year, will vary with each student. It could be as small as 10 colleges or as large as 25. Regardless, it’s fluid at this point. From January through May, the teen needs to research all the schools and start to pare The List. By August, The List should number at least three schools, but no more than nine. An axiom among most college counselors across the country is, “If students apply to 10 or more schools, they haven’t done their homework.” Plus, applying to a school “just to see if I’ll get in” wastes many people’s time. On the flip side, students should not apply to schools that they have no intentions of attending. Acceptances to those schools essentially deny slots to applicants who really want to go there. Five to seven schools on The List is a good number. Because collegiate admissions have become highly competitive, a senior should only have, at most, two reach schools. The bulk of the applications should be to target schools coming closest to the child’s actual grades, standardized test scores and extracurricular activities. The student should apply to only two likely schools (the term safety is discouraged because nothing is guaranteed in collegiate admissions nowadays; plus, there’s a sense of entitlement in the usage). Being honest with what is, not what is wished, will create a proper list … and lower frustration levels.


Now is the time to Call today for a personal tour: secure your child’s spot 918-272-7235 at Rejoice Christian (Preschool / Elementary) Schools for the 2017-2018 918-516-0050 academic year. We anticipate increased enrollment, so don’t delay make plans to reserve your spot at RCS now!

(Middle / High School)

13407 E. 106th St. N., Owasso, OK

Rejoice Christian Schools admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

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Other Options

Community colleges, such as Tulsa Community College or Oklahoma City Community College, can provide smart options for students who want to work and go to school part time, have difficulties deciding on a college, and/or would like to finish their general education requirements with lower tuition to reduce costs toward a four-year degree. Others may be drawn to trades that do not require a four-year degree, so schools such as Tulsa Technology Center or Oklahoma City’s Francis Tuttle Technology Center provide yearlong programs toward becoming certified plumbers, electricians, mechanics and other well-paid professionals. A gap year is an option as long as the teen is productive. “Traveling the world” or “finding myself” is not advised; having a steady job or diving into community service is recommended.

Finding the Right Fit

Huxley at Stout Hall (Huxley is one of mascot Pistol Pete’s posse dogs), where students can stop by for something to sip or nosh. But the emphasis, Garbutt says, is on “listening to what they have to say so they can let us know if there’s a concern.” Therefore, according to New York Times columnist Frank Bruni, where young people pursue their baccalaureate degrees is far less important than what they do as undergraduates. Bruni’s bestselling Where You Go Is Not Who You Will Be shows that competition is fierce, so employers, master’s and doctoral programs and schools of medicine, law, dentistry and veterinary medicine value college graduates’ track records, not their alma maters. “[T]he nature of the student’s college experience – the work that he or she puts into it, the self-examination that’s undertaken, the resourcefulness that’s honed – matters more than the name of the institution attended,” Bruni writes. An über college (as Hunter says) does not guarantee success. Plus, the term “exclusive” may not reflect a college’s quality. An example: Fictional Tatooine College, with an outstanding reputation, wants to become exclusive (an acceptance rate below 10 percent). Achieving that status comes through saturation. Tatooine College, with 1,000 freshman slots, usually has 4,000 applications, a 25-percent acceptance rate, but mass mailing, social media and slick marketing increase applications to 12,000 without increasing freshman slots. As if by magic, Tatooine College can now boast an acceptance rate of 8.3 percent … without making itself better.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

With this realization, applicants should find three to nine colleges fitting their needs, a challenge because of socioeconomic biases favoring exclusivity. Colleges That Change Lives by Loren Pope and Hilary Masell Oswald offers practical advice for finding schools that fit. (This multi-edition book has a useful website, ctcl.org.) The process can start after the freshman year of high school, but should begin no later than January of the child’s junior year. Hunter, Bruni, Pope and Oswald stress a clean slate and acknowledging biases. For instance, a certain college may have appeal only because its basketball team makes Final Four appearances. From there, the applicant should separate “must haves” from “would be nice ifs.” Using College Match by Steven Antonoff helps. Once an ideal type of college is delineated, in-depth research forms the student’s list. Fiske Guide to Colleges and College Board’s search engine, Big Future, provide valid suggestions. An applicant should ensure every school is a winner; 3,500-plus American institutions offer bachelor’s degrees, so finding three to nine is realistic with research. College admissions offer no guarantees, so the student should be happy with any school on her or his list. The applicant shouldn’t make choices based on hearsay. Plus, a graduate program at a college has no connection to those earning a bachelor’s degree from the same place. Graduating from Yale University has nothing to do with getting into Yale Law School. Instead, teens should use criteria important to them and the realities of their grades, standardized test scores and extracurricular experiences. The “best fit” colleges are out there for each high school graduate, who easily has the means to find them.


University School University School

riverfield growing . together .

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Riverfield Country Day School started in 1984 with less than 50 students in a renovated post office. Today, Riverfield is home to 623 students, from infants through 12th Grade, on a 120acre wooded campus. Riverfield and our students are growing. Together.

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FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Private School Guide Total enrollment

Student/teacher ratio

Grades offered

Standardized testing

Foreign languages offered/ sports programs/arts and music programs

Number of teachers with advanced degrees

Scholarships offered

Uniforms

Annual tuition

Augustine Christian Academy

6310 E. 30th St., Tulsa/918.832.4600/ www.acatulsa.org

202

12:1

PreK4-12

ACT: 25; PSAT: 1157; Explore Test

Aramaic, French, Hebrew, German, Greek, Latin/No/Yes

9

Yes

Yes

(Part-time option available)

$5,850-$7,275

InterDenominational

Bishop Kelley High School

3905 S. Hudson Ave., Tulsa/918.627.3390/ www.bishopkelley.org

905

11:1

9-12

ACT: 26.3; SAT: R 617, M 625, W 659.6

French, Spanish, Latin, Chinese/Yes/Yes

83

Yes

Yes

$8,900

Catholic

Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School

801 N.W. 50th St., OKC/405.842.6638/ www.bmchs.org

720

18:1

9-12

ACT: 24.8; SAT: R 616, M 578, W 570

Spanish, French, Latin/ Yes/Yes

20

Yes

Yes

$9,000 (Catholic); $12,700 (Non-Catholic)

Catholic

Casady School

9500 N. Pennsylvania Ave., OKC/405.749.3100/www.casady.org

912

13:1

PreK-12

ACT: 28; SAT

French, Spanish, Chinese, Latin/Yes/Yes

60

Yes

Yes

$6,700 - $18,990

Episcopal

Cascia Hall Preparatory School

2520 S. Yorktown Ave., Tulsa/918.746.2600/www.casciahall.com

525

12:1

6-12

ACT: 26.1; SAT: R 605, M 696, W 595

Spanish, German, French, Latin, Chinese/Yes/Yes

65%

Yes

Yes

$13,500

Augustinian Catholic

Crossings Christian School

14400 N. Portland Ave., OKC/405.842.8495/ www.crossingsschool.org

1065

16:2 (PS) 18:1 (LS) 20:1 (MS, HS)

PreK-12

ACT: 25.8; SAT; Explore Test; Terra Nova

Spanish/Yes/Yes

50

Yes

Yes

$6,980 - $9,050

Christian

Heritage Hall

1800 N.W. 122nd St., OKC/405.749.3000/ www.heritagehall.com

876

15:1

PreK-12

ACT: 27

French, Spanish, Chinese/ Yes/Yes

65

No

No

$14,120-$18,860

None

Holland Hall

5666 E. 81st St., Tulsa/ 918.481.1111/ www.hollandhall.org

922

9:1

PreK-12

ACT: 27.2; SAT: 1366

French, Latin, Spanish, Chinese/Yes/Yes

85

Yes

Yes

$6,800-$19,225

Episcopal

Holy Family Cathedral School

820 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa/918.582.0422/ www.holyfamilycathedralschool.com

187

10:1

PreK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish/Yes/Yes

6

Yes

Yes

$5,150

Catholic

Lincoln Christian School

1003 N. 129th E. Ave., Tulsa/918.234.8863/ www.lincolnchristianschool.com

940

18:1

PreK-12

ACT: 23.7; EXPLORE Test; Terra Nova

Spanish/Yes/Yes

10

Yes

Yes

$4,815-$6,420

Non-Denominational

Marquette Catholic School

1519 S. Quincy Ave., Tulsa/918.584.4631/ www.marquetteschool.org

496

10:1 (ECDC), 22:1 (K-8)

PreK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 95th percentile

Spanish/Yes/Yes

8

Yes

Yes

$5,207 (Parishioners); $6,583

Catholic

Messiah Lutheran School

3600 N.W. Expressway, OKC/405.946.0462/ www.messiahlutheranschool.com

120

15:1

PreK3-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 73 percentile

Spanish/Yes/Yes

3

Yes

Yes

$5,100

Lutheran

Metro Christian Academy

6363 S. Trenton Ave., Tulsa/918.745.9868/www.metroca.com

1,000

12:1

PreK3-12

ACT: 25.5; SAT: 1947.78; Explore Test; Stanford Achievement Test

American Sign Language, Spanish, French, Chinese/ Yes/Yes

45

Yes

Yes

$6,025-$9,875

None

Miss Helen’s Private School

4849 S. Mingo Road, Tulsa/918.622.2327/ www.misshelens.com

180

10:1

PreK-5

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish, French/Yes/Yes

3

No

Yes

$8,400

Non-Denominational

Mizel Jewish Community Day School

2021 E. 71st St., Tulsa/918.494.0953/ www.mizelschool.org

36

8:1

PreK-5

Stanford Achievement Test: 90 percentile

Hebrew/No/Yes

2

Yes

Yes

$8,066

Jewish

Monte Cassino School

2206 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa/918.742.3364/ www.montecassino.org

800

15:1 (ES & MS) 10:1 (ECLC)

PreK3-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 97 percentile

French, Latin, Spanish/ Yes/Yes

35

Yes

Yes

$4,990-$10,600

Benedictine Catholic

Mount St. Mary Catholic High School

2801 S. Shartel Ave., OKC/405.631.8865/ www.mountstmary.org

390

12:1

9-12

ACT: 23; SAT

Spanish, French, Chinese/ Yes/Yes

12

No

Yes

Oklahoma Christian Academy

1101 E. 9th St., Edmond/405.844.6478/ www.ocacademy.org

433

16:1

PreK-12

ACT: 24.4

Spanish/Yes/Yes

16

Yes

Yes

$7,500 (Average)

Church of Christ

Oklahoma Christian School

4680 E. Second St., Edmond/ 405.341.2265/www.ocssaints.org

915

12:1

PreK-12

ACT: 24.8; Stanford Achievement Test

Spanish/Yes/Yes

10

Yes

No

$9,300

Inter-Denominational

Regent Preparatory School of Oklahoma

8621 S. Memorial Drive, Tulsa/ 918.663.1002/www.rpsok.org

501

13:1

PreK-12

ACT: 28.6

Spanish, Latin, Greek/Yes/Yes

15

Yes

Yes

Rejoice Christian Schools

13407 E. 106th St. N., Owasso/918.516.0050/ www.rejoiceschool.com

968

15:1

PreK3-12

EXPLORE Test; Terra Nova

Spanish, French/Yes/Yes

19

Yes

No

52

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

(Non-parishioners)

Religious affiliation

Address/Phone/Website

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Address/Phone/Website

Total enrollment

Student/teacher ratio

Grades offered

Standardized testing

Foreign languages offered/ sports programs/arts and music programs

Number of teachers with advanced degrees

Scholarships offered

Uniforms

Annual tuition

2433 W. 61st St., Tulsa/918.466.3553/ www.riverfield.org

621

7:1

Infants-12

ACT: 25; SAT

Spanish, German/Yes/Yes

21

Yes

No

(Varies by age/grade )

Saint Catherine School

2515 W. 46th St., Tulsa/918.446.9756/ www.saintcatherineschool.org

110

9:1

PreK3-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish/Yes/Yes

4

Yes

School of Saint Mary

1365 E. 49th Place, Tulsa/918.749.9361/ www.schoolofsaintmary.com

325

15:1

PreK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 92 percentile

Spanish/Yes/Yes

5

Yes

St. Pius X School

1717 S. 75th E. Ave., Tulsa/918.627.5367/ www.school.mystpius.com

392

19:1

PreK3-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 72 percentile

Spanish, Yes/Yes

4

Yes

Yes

$4,706 (Catholic); $7,117 (Non-Catholic)

Catholic

Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic School

1428 N. 67th E. Ave., Tulsa/918.836.2165/ www.peterandpaultulsa.org

200

18:1

PreK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills; EXPLORE Test

Spanish/Yes/Yes

4

Yes

Yes

$3,700

Catholic

St. Mary’s Episcopal School

505 E. Covell Road, Edmond/ 405.341.9541/ www.smesedmond.org

141

8:1

PreK-5

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 90 percentile

Spanish/Yes/Yes

6

Yes

Yes

$2,965-$8,520

Episcopal

Undercroft Montessori

3745 S. Hudson Ave., Tulsa/918.622.2890/www.undercroft.org

205

8:1

PreK3-8

ACT; Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish/No/Yes

5

No

No

$6,305-$10,225

None

University School at The University of Tulsa

800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa/918.631.5060/ www.utulsa.edu/uschool

227

3:1

PreK-8

Stanford Achievement Test: 95.8 percentile

Spanish, Chinese/No/Yes

10

Yes

No

$10,500

None

Victory Christian School

7700 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa/918.491.7720/ www.vcstulsa.org

895

18:1

PreK3-12

ACT: 22; Terra Nova

Spanish, German, French, Chinese, Latin/Yes/Yes

N/A

Yes

Yes

$5,278-$6,620

Non-Denominational

Westminster School

600 N.W. 44th St., Oklahoma City/405.524.0631/ www.westminsterschool.org

565

15:1

PreK3-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

French, Spanish/Yes/Yes

29

No

No

$12,000-$13,625

None

Wright Christian Academy

11391 E. Admiral Place, Tulsa/918.438.0922/www. wrightchristianacademy.com

260

15:1

PreK3-12

Stanford Achievement Test; SAT; ACT; Terra Nova: 81st percentile

Spanish/Yes/Yes

10

Yes

Yes

$5,600

NonDenominational

Religious affiliation

School Riverfield Country Day School

$4,500-$13,320

Non-Denominational

Yes

$4,187 (Catholic); $5,179 (Non-Catholic)

Catholic

Yes

$6,350 (Non-

$5,152 (Parishioner);

Catholic

parishioner)

(Varies by grade)

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

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55


Fit at Any

Age By Brian Wilson

A big challenge as people age

is a decline in activity, which can affect physical and mental health. Many don’t feel up to the challenge of getting in shape or fear not doing as well as others at workout facilities. The U.S. National Library of Medicine (www. medlineplus.gov/exerciseforseniors.html) offers many suggestions and pathways for older folks to find a fitness routine and stick with it. The four active seniors featured here share what they do to stay fit and show that there’s no single way to maintain one’s cardiovascular, muscular and psychological edge.

Mixing It Up

Ronny Altman has been a literal and figurative fixture at the Downtown Tulsa YMCA since 1970.

56

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

In addition to rarely missing a spin class, self-paced workout or running group in those 47 years, Altman has his name affixed to a banner acknowledging patronage of his home away from home. He’s an advocate for the facility vocally, financially and by example. The cut, angular 74 year old, owner of Altman Energy Inc., has done cross-training long before it became popular. He mixes free weights, weighted exercise balls, aerobics, Bosu balls, resistance machines, kickboxing, running and cycling into his personal fitness program.


e RONNY ALTMAN EXERCISES LARGE AND MICRO MUSCLES WITH DUMBBELLS ATOP A BOSU BALL. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

FEBRUARY 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

57


His key to longevity is routine. He works out from noon to 1 p.m. (or a few hours later “if life or meetings happen,” he says). Regardless, he advises people having trouble getting fit to set aside a specific time everyday and make it a priority. “Sometimes when I don’t feel like coming to the Y, I come anyway,” he says. “When I exercise, I feel better. I sleep better. Everything is just better. “It suppresses my appetite. It’s a good way for me to maintain my weight. It’s just staying with the program. You have to be in a routine.” Altman got into the running craze of the early 1970s and participated in many races, especially the annual 15-kilometer Tulsa Run and various half-marathons. Through the years, many running partners developed injuries from pounding the pavement. “Fortunately, I’ve got pretty good body mechanics,” he says, “so I’ve had good luck on not getting hurt. I was not taking the chance of becoming injured like most runners who do it for any length of time and become injured and ultimately wind up with artificial joints.” His friend Frank Spiegelberg, one of his last running partners with injuries, suggested they take up cycling … and Altman has pursued that sport for the past decade. When it’s nice outside, he rides many loops used in the Tulsa Tough series of races, including Crybaby Hill off Riverside Drive. Otherwise, he’s on a stationary bike at home or in a spin class at the YMCA. Altman even bought the first six spin bikes at the Downtown Y because he had heard of this fitness craze hitting the coasts before coming to Tulsa. “That’s the way it is here,” he says. “We’re always a little behind everyone else. I’m always looking for what’s new, what’s going on with classes and exercises and programming.” Altman says those with offices downtown have no excuse not to work out. The Downtown Y, which moved from its decades-old building to the Mayo Building more than six years ago, is the perfect place. “It’s right here,” he says. “They’ll feel better and be fit.”

energy. We step and misstep throughout our lives, always trying to find the balance. In tai chi, it is called qi gong, the movement of energy. In yoga, we call it prana, or breath energy.” For many of her 15 years as an English teacher in Putnam City schools, Holloway ran dance and aerobic-dance classes in a small studio. When she left the academic classroom, she worked as an education consultant before landing in the health-andfitness classroom in the 1990s. Holloway never got into the running craze of the early 1970s, but she found her exercise outlet a few years later when fitness entrepreneur Jacki Sorensen applied to dance the aerobic concepts espoused by Oklahoma City native Dr. Kenneth Cooper. “It was a perfect fit for me,” says Holloway, who integrates her acumen of dance, diet and physiology into lessons. “For example, tai chi is essentially dance because of its movements. With that dance, class members develop balance, strength and memory. People have actually told me that they feel ‘smarter’ because of dancing!” Holloway relishes her tai chi classes for aging people because their No. 1 concern

is falling. She has received grants to help older folk with their balance; the 12-week, evidence-based program reduces risks of falling by 57 percent. Tai chi also enhances memory and flexibility. Holloway teaches eight forms: hold the ball, part the wild horse’s mane, single whip, wave hands like clouds, repulse like monkey, brush knee, fair lady works shuttle and grasp the peacock’s tail. After students learn (not master) those forms, Holloway mixes the order and starting points so they have to employ their short-term, long-term and muscle memories. Because of her dedication to teaching, “the big picture of fitness” and her older clientele, Holloway also volunteers for the Oklahoma Aging Advocacy Leadership Academy, a Department of Human Services program. She speaks to and on behalf of seniors and their health-and-fitness issues. “I have spent most of my life re-inventing myself in one way or another, as I am an avowed lifelong learner, and that … has led me down many paths,” Holloway says. “Along those curving paths I have always found my passion to be people-centered, so I have had many opportunities to … hopefully help people grow and learn.”

Fitness as a Social Network

An Expression of Life

Dance guides Carole Holloway’s 72 years of health, wellness and fitness. A certified tai chi, yoga and line-dance instructor and personal trainer, Holloway channels tap-ballet-jazz moves she started at age 6. “Dance is my passion; I love movement,” says Holloway, a teacher at the YMCA Healthy Living Center in Oklahoma City. “All the exercise in my life has revolved around dance. I have never given up my love for it. “Our whole life is really a dance of

58

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

CAROLE HOLLOWAY HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN VARIOUS FORMS OF DANCE FOR MOST OF HER LIFE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Numerous studies show that “social capital” – friends, family, clubs, groups and organizations – helps seniors lead healthier lives than those who are isolated. Tulsan Paula Reno, 73, and her enhanced fitness class illustrate this. “I could get a video and do all the exercises by myself at home,” says Reno, who worked for 30 years in information technology for various banks, “but it’s more than that for people our age. It’s the social side of things, so that’s why I really like the class. Everybody is friendly. Everybody comes up and gets to know you. It makes working out fun.” A supportive atmosphere is common in classes for seniors because many social elements tend to diminish with retirement, adult children having their own families and decreased physical activity. Reno says she feels better mentally and physically because the class


not doing anything, it’s all in your hands to do something and change. We’ve done it.” Reno stresses that trainers of seniors understand limitations and “are conscious of a shoulder injury or knee problems, so they’ll say, ‘If this bothers you, then do it this way or that way.’ They’re very accommodating so that you can do it.” Reno’s advice for contemporaries hesitant to get fit is straightforward: “Go a couple of times and see what it’s like and don’t get discouraged because everybody’s supportive. A lot of it is the mind-body connection. If you’re going to move your body a certain way and that’s not natural for you, you learn. Everybody’s been new at one time or another.”

Live and Love for the Game

PAULA RENO PREFERS WORKING OUT IN A GROUP BECAUSE IT MAKES HER FEEL BETTER MENTALLY AND PHYSICALLY. PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

is “more than just working out. We have birthdays and sing to each other.” And when Reno had recent hip surgery, “they were sending me cards and calling me and bringing me food. I know that those people in that class would support me if I needed anything because we do it for each other all the time.” Reno understands becoming dispirited when fitness is the goal. She was there after back surgery a few years ago as she looked for “something that was challenging but wasn’t more than I could handle,” she says. “That’s the last thing you want to do: get discouraged to where you don’t back.” Her search ended with a Monday-Wednesday-Friday class at the Dickenson Family YMCA in Broken Arrow, which, because of a scheduling oddity, is taught by a different instructor each day. Reno likes this variety because class members expand their regimen with multifold exercises using resistance bands, fitness balls and weights, along with low-impact aerobics and weight-bearing lunges and step-ups. The biggest problem is getting started. Reno frequently tries to get friends to join her. Some do; others don’t. She empathizes. “When I first started going, I couldn’t do all the things they were doing,” she says. “But whenever you start just sitting, it’s all over. We don’t want to do that. If you find yourself

played basketball intermittently while turning his attention to running for several decades. He ran many 10-kilometer races in his 30s, he says. But he retained his hoops passion, and in 1986, he began playing 6 a.m. pickup games at various churches and gyms in Oklahoma City and Edmond (his hometown). Collier underplays his individual contribution to the teams he has played with over the years. “I’m certainly not a ringer. The Ball Hawgs have guys who are 6-foot-4 to 6-foot-8; I’m just 6-foot,” he says. “I’m just a good team player. It’s all about the team, the teamwork, the camaraderie. “I know hundreds of people all over the city just from playing basketball,” he says. “I have a lot good friends from all over the United States because of it. Of course, your teammates are your good friends. It’s just a great game.” But it’s not the social element that drives Collier as a basketball player: “I’m too competitive to do it just to socialize.” And he maintains that intensity because of “his love of the game and the opportunity to play. If you know where a good game is, you just keep going.”

Mike Collier’s reference to being technically dead for many minutes is so casual that one thinks he’s talking about someone else. His on-court collapse 12 years ago is told as an aside as he recounts a lifelong love for basketball. “I’ve played pretty much non-stop since joining the team I’m on now over 20 years ago … except for that time I had a heart attack and died,” says the 72-year-old Collier, who was saved by CPR from gym staff and defibrilation at the nearby St. Anthony Hospital emergency room in December 2004. “I missed about a month, but I slowly got my game back.” Collier, who has had his insurance business with Oklahoma Farm Bureau since 1978, has won several national senior titles and numerous state championships around the country with the Ball Hawgs, which is based in Houston but has transplanted Oklahomans on it. During a decade-long run, the Hawgs were 156-1 in national play alone. They have won the Oklahoma Senior Games and similar championships in Texas and other states. The Hawgs, like most senior squads, play the quick-paced, no-check form of half-court ball and “it’s probably faster than full court,” Collier says. Collier has played basketball since he was a kid in Hemet, California, near Riverside. He competed on the streets and for his high school, along with a stint “as a junior college player, but nothing MIKE COLLIER HAS major,” he says. PARTICIPATED IN EARLY After winding up in Oklahoma MORNING BASKETBALL LEAGUES FOR MORE and getting a degree in electronTHAN 30 YEARS. ics at Southeastern Oklahoma PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS State University in Durant, Collier

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

59


Im

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017


mage MATTERS Cosmetic treatments help turn back the hands of time.

By Rebecca Fast

W

hile aging gracefully sounds poetic, the reality is that many of us would like to keep or regain our youthful glow for as long as possible. Fortunately, with the latest advancements in nonsurgical and surgical cosmetic treatments, there are a variety of ways to achieve a younger-looking you. According to Dr. Jaun Brou, a plastic surgeon with Premier Plastic Surgery and Aesthetics in Oklahoma City, one of the most common noninvasive procedures is the injection of neuromodulators such as Botox, Dysport and Xeomin. “Neuromodulators act by blocking the muscles that produce wrinkles such as the frown lines, forehead lines and crow’s feet,” he says. “Their effect is temporary, lasting three to

four months on average.” He says the next most common injectables are fillers. “Fillers are most commonly made out of hyaluronic acid, which is a natural component of the connective tissue of the body,” Brou says. “When injected on the face, they fill out wrinkles or restore volume lost in the aging process. There are many kinds of fillers available now, and each is created for specific uses. Some are better for fine wrinkles, and others are better for restoring volume. They have different durations as well, but on average, the results should last a year.” Brou offers a new filler called Volbella. It’s another version of a hyaluronic acid filler, but it works better for the correction of superficial wrinkle lines because it’s made lighter. FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

61


T

ackling trouble spots, Kybella helps take away a double chin. “Kybella is deoxicholic acid, a bile salt, that when injected into the fatty tissue of the chin, dissolves the fat of that area and reduces the double chin without surgery,” Brou says. “Some results are amazing!” However, he emphasizes that results will vary according to the severity of the condition and the laxity of the skin in that area. He also adds that results can be seen after a month from the application, and multiple treatments are sometimes required, with some skin retraction being expected. “Another nonsurgical fat reducer is CoolSculpting,” Brou says. “Although CoolSculpting is not that new, there have been several innovations lately that improved upon the original technology. There are new applicators that fit different areas of the body previously not accessible and there are new applicators that reduce treatment time almost in half.” Dr. Tim R. Love, a plastic surgeon and owner of Tim R. Love Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in Oklahoma

City, offers the Profound system, the latest radio-frequency device for lifting and tightening. “We are all affected by both environment and genetics, and Profound can help reverse and restore a more youthful appearance,” Love says. “As our body ages, we begin to make less collagen, elastin and hyaluronic acid. Profound is the only radio-frequency fractional microneedling device proven to

create elastin.” Profound claims a 100 percent response rate for wrinkles and a 95 percent rate for skin laxity. “The dermis begins remodeling and accelerating during the first couple of months and continues over the next six to twelve months,” Love says. “Profound is often paired with our Fraxel Dual in what we call a ‘ProFrax Package,’ which consists

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of one Profound treatment followed by four Fraxel Dual treatments. Fraxel Dual offers the gold standard of resurfacing to greatly improve wrinkles, acne scarring and hyperpigmentation.” Dr. Angelo Cuzalina, a cosmetic surgeon and owner of Tulsa Surgical Arts, shares that the ThermiVa treatment for women is becoming increasingly popular, especially after childbirth. “ThermiVa uses radio frequency to tighten the labia and vagina with no pain and no downtime,” Cuzalina says. “It’s also great for somewhat older women after menopause to increase lubrication that normally decreases with age and help improve symptoms of urinary leakage.” One of the top noninvasive procedures for men is laser hair removal. “Men are big users of laser hair removal, especially to reduce hair on backs, chest or tenacious beards,” Brou says. “Male necks often develop shaving rashes that respond very well to hair reduction.” He explains that the laser targets the melanin pigment that accumulates in the hair follicle and then heats and destroys it. “Since hair follicles are constantly cycling, a few treatments are recommended, spacing them six weeks apart to ensure satisfactory results,” Brou says. “Once these are achieved, yearly touch ups are sometimes necessary.” He adds that men tend to do more neuromodulators such as Botox. “They are also interested in skin care, particularly the treatment of acne scars with peels, microneedling or laser resurfacing,” he says.


Home & Garden

March 2017

OKLAHOMA

Surgical Procedures

For individuals interested in surgical treatments, there are several new and popular procedures available. “The newest surgical breakthrough I’ve come across is HydraSolve,” Brou says. “It is the newest form of liposuction that harvests fat very efficiently. Fat grafting, nowadays, enjoys multiple Advertising applications such as restoration of facial volume in rejuvenation, opportunities buttock augmentation and even corrective and reconstructive available. breast surgery, to name a few. The great thing about HydraSolve is that it does liposuction efficiently with minimal damage Contact advertising@okmag.com • 918.744.6205 to the surrounding connective tissue, thereby eliminating irregularities and other scar deformities common in other 1/8H Home & Garden 17.indd 1 1/17/17 2:35 PM modalities of liposuction, even with aggressive treatment. Karen Weidner, R.N. It also prepares the fat extracted for use as fat grafting, and particularly when large volumes are needed, and this fat has the greatest viability ensuring good results. I’m really Kristen Rice, M.D. impressed with this technology.” Advanced skin treatments Cuzalina shares that the Brazilian butt lift has spiked in and cosmetic dermatology. popularity over the last two years, noting that celebrities such as the Kardashians and Beyonce have helped make a rounder, USSC welcomes Kesha Buster, M.D. fuller buttock more desirable. He explains that anyone with and Tracy Adams, L.E. enough fat elsewhere on the body that can be used to augment the buttocks is a good candidate for this surgery. “Ideally there is excess hip and waist fat, which, when removed, enhances the result even more than just fat added 918-712-3223 1325 E 35th Street Suite B to the buttock,” Cuzalina says. He is sculpting three different buttocks out of clay to help patients see options and assist them in determining what they want. He also says that he performs more gluteal 21389 Utica Square Skin Care.indd 1 7/5/16 5:26 PM implants than ever before. “I use gluteal implants for two reasons,” he says. “First, if a patient has a small buttock and not enough fat elsewhere to do a Brazilian butt lift and, second, if the patient wants a very large and very rounded buttock that could not be achieved with fat even if plenty were present.” Oklahoma’s only source for PicoWaytm Laser He adds that implants are more costly than using fat and Tattoo Removal that patients are usually sore for the first week following surgery. The Premier Alternative to Traditional Laser Tattoo Removal * He has also recently added platelet-rich plasma procedures, a new technology, to his service list. “Platelet-rich plasma is taken from the patient’s own The PicoWay® Difference blood and used for multiple purposes, such as during • Minimal discomfort micro-needling of the face during a special facial or after • Few treatments laser skin resurfacing, or mixed with fat for better fat graft• Fast clearance ing outcomes,” Cuzalina says. • Treats a broad range of tattoo colors & types For Love, popular surgical procedures include breast en• Can be used on different skin types hancement such as augmentation, lift and reduction, male breast reduction (gynecomastia), liposuction, tummy tucks your first tattoo removal treatment! and hair transplantation. “Mommy makeovers have become increasingly popular for moms out there wishing to regain their pre-pregnancy bodies,” Love says. “Each patient is unique but this can include breast augmentation, a tummy tuck and liposuction.” SCHEDULE A COMPLIMENTARY Before choosing a physician and undergoing any CONSULTATION TODAY! procedure, Brou encourages individuals to research providers to ensure that they have the highest credentials 918.293.1287 in the specialty. He also encourages patients to read online www.skinrenewaloftulsa.com reviews in order to gain an idea of the kind of treatment they may receive and to be sure to ask several friends and acquaintances for their opinions – and to not base your decision upon the recommendation of one person.

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12/26/16 9:22 AM


BARS

Pina Colada 1.5 oz

pineapple infused Cana Brava Rum 0.5 oz Cointreau 0.75 oz pineapple juice 0.5 oz lime juice 1 oz Coco Lopez or sweetened coconut milk 1 egg 2 dashes orange flower water Shake hard and dump into hurricane glass. Garnish with pineapple, pineapple fronds and an umbrella.

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By Justin Martino

A Heck of a Party in OKC

You might not expect to find Anna Mains, the co-owner of Rockford Cocktail Den, DEKORA! and Knucks Wheelhouse, behind the bar that often. Far from being more work, however, her shifts behind the bar serve as a retreat. “There’s something invigorating about working behind the bar,” she says. “I have had days where I am in hands-down the worst mood, stressed beyond any sort of stress I ever thought I could handle, and the moment I walk behind the bar and I start making drinks and I start interacting with guests and I see people having a good time, my mood is always completely transformed.” Mains had worked at restaurants while in college, but it wasn’t until she moved to Oklahoma City and began bartending at in the raw that she started on her current trajectory. When the owners wanted to sell the location, she and her husband purchased it and rebranded it as DEKORA! While the performance of DEKORA! led to new projects, Mains didn’t become interested in creating a cocktail-focused bar until she was staying home after having her first child. “I enjoyed a cocktail, but it kind of seemed like something to me that was cool, but not anything that was applicable to what we would see in Oklahoma,” she says. “All of a sudden, especially in the first couple of months, I was at home a lot and started reading all the cocktail books, and it kind of grabbed me. I realized it was something I wanted to learn more about, and I really wanted to be able to take all these things that were going on across the nation and bring some of the fun cocktails to Oklahoma City.” From there, Mains conceptualized and founded Rockford Cocktail Den, which provides those types of cocktails in a relaxed environment. She is also working with Proprietors LLC, the group responsible for high-profile cocktail bars such as Death & Co. and Nitecap in New York and Honeycut in Los Angeles, on a new project in Oklahoma City. Mains is excited about the new project, but she says it will probably be her last for a while because she has realized how much she enjoys working behind the bar. “In my eyes, we’re kind of in the entertainment industry,” she says. “I am a horrible actor. I am a horrible singer. I can’t entertain people that way, but I can make sure that when you come into my house, my bar, I’m going to throw you a heck of a party, and I’m going to make sure I go above and beyond to treat you special and make sure you’re going to enjoy your time there.”

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Life Behind

While many people may think of handcrafted mixed drinks as being the domain of bars in New York or Los Angeles or restricted to stuff y rooms, the cocktail scene is alive and growing in Oklahoma. We talked to four bartenders about the newest trends in drinks, how they got into the business and what they love about bringing the craft of cocktails to customers.


PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

A Taste for the Classics Dressed in a tie, herringbone vest and pinstriped pants, Jamie Jennings looks exactly like the person to teach others about classic cocktails. “People have been drinking for so long, everything has been made,” says Jennings, bar manager at Hodges Bend in downtown Tulsa. “All these crazy drinks people are making these days are based on some historical drink. So if you can understand the history and the past, then you’re set.” While Hodges Bend doesn’t ignore signature drinks (Jennings estimates the bar has created 50 or 60 signature drinks since the business opened in 2014), the focus on classic drinks helps guide what’s available to the customer. All employees at Hodges are taught how to make classics before trying anything original. Jennings’s search for inspiration for drinks goes beyond the classics, and he actively seeks new recipes to study and try. “With today’s technology, I have access to a lot of stuff that has been scanned into libraries and books dating back to the 1870s and 1880s, and we have a pretty solid library here at Hodges that we can go to,” he says. “I have a lot of really good,

regular customers who will bring us old books that they have found and let us work through them before we give them back. I’m always reading old literature, especially based on bartending. “I think we take this very seriously, and people don’t always realize that. This is a serious thing. Bartending is not going anywhere, and we want to specialize in it, so we do take our time to study.” Jennings started his career as a hotel bellman who started cleaning and setting tables because he wanted to watch football games in the bar. That turned into an offer to bartend, and he worked at several different taverns before landing at Hodges Bend. While he enjoys working behind the bar, he says he doesn’t anticipate remaining a bartender and sees himself perhaps in the kitchen at some point. He enjoys working with food for the same reason he enjoys mixology. “I love it because, in the end, a good bartender understands balance and so does a good chef,” he says. “It’s about balancing your citrus, your spirit, your sweet and your bitter, and it’s the same thing in the kitchen. I think they have a lot of commonalities, and it’s all about balance at the end.”

Lion’s Tail 2 oz 0.75 oz 0.5 oz 2 tsp

bourbon fresh lemon juice St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram (liqueur) Gomme syrup (2:1 Simple syrup is an acceptable substitute)

1 dash Angostura bitters

Shake and strain over ice in a rocks glass. Garnish with lemon wheel. FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Zozobrara 1.5 oz

rum (blend of tobacco infused Brugal Anejo, Hamilton Saint Lucia and Smith & Cross)

0.75 oz lime juice 0.75 oz pineapple juice 0.75 oz grilled pineapple syrup Shake and strain over crushed ice in a rocks glass. Add more ice and garnish with a pineapple leaf.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

While Lesley Nelson, bar manager at Torero, may be skilled at crafting cocktails, she’s at least equally proud of her unofficial title of “Tulsa’s Youngest, Hottest Sommelier.” “I’ve held that title for almost three years,” she says with a laugh. While Nelson has developed many skills, she says wine was her first passion. Starting as a server for a chain steakhouse, she moved behind the counter and worked at a wine bar before stints at Hodges Bend and Saturn Room, which led to her new position at Torero. In addition to serving as bar manager, she is certified with the Guild of Sommeliers and helps customers pick out wines as well as creating the wine list and educating the staff on the subject. Nelson is also a certified specialist of wine with the Society of Wine Educators, a different organization that focuses on knowledge and standards instead of service. Though wine may have been her first love, she developed an equal passion for mixology.

“Bartending just came really natural to me,” she says. “I was good at memorizing drinks, and I liked it a lot.” Like many other bartenders focused on mastering the craft, she studies classic drinks, reads anything she can get her hands on and tries mixing drinks from classic recipes, though she admits the results sometimes require some work. “I’ll see a cocktail that’s something I’ve never seen before,” she says. “Some crazy, obscure recipe, and I’ll try to make it good. And usually they’re not that good, and that’s where I’ll tweak them and make them good.” Nelson says she enjoys working behind the bar, and appreciates the respect the profession is given as more interest is being given to craft cocktails. That increased interest helps push her to improve. “People consider bartending a career now,” she says. “All over the U.S., there are career bartenders, basically. There is a lot that goes into it if you want to be good, and even the consumers now know a whole lot more about what everybody’s serving now. You’ve got to be able to know what you’re doing to impress customers or get them interested in what you’re doing.”

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

A Bartender and Sommelier


The Accidental Bartender

Either way, he says he goes back to the classic cocktails, considering how and why they work. “Most recently, though, we’ve been developing concept cocktail menus at Ludivine,” he says. “We start with a concept, then decide on the names of the cocktails that fit that concept and then create a drink that, to us, fits the name. It’s working backward from a name to a cocktail.” Barrett doesn’t see the cocktail resurgence as anything truly new and compares it with other skills you’d find in a restaurant. “The word ‘mixologist’ dates back to the 1800s when creating drinks was a highly respected craft,” he says. “But I tend to agree with Anthony Bourdain’s view of cooking being more of a craft than an art. Cooking, mixology and bartending are crafts with immense room for creativity.” Barrett’s favorite cocktails run to the classics: the Martinez, The Last Word and the Vieux Carre. At home, he says he’s more likely to drink straight liquor or something simple, such as a Manhattan, martini or Negroni. If he has guests, though, he’ll make something fun for them. “But I don’t drink much at home anyway,” he says. “I’d rather go to a bar.”

1.5 oz. 0.75 oz. 0.5 oz. 0.5 oz. 3-4 2 dashes

blended Scotch Pedro Ximinez sherry lemon juice honey syrup basil leaves aromatic bitters

In a shaker, muddle the basil with the honey syrup. Add the remaining ingredients and shake with ice. Double strain into a coupe glass and garnish with a basil leaf.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Chris Barrett didn’t intend to become a bartender. Originally, he was hired to wait tables at a restaurant in Bricktown, but offered to help as a barback because he started work on Valentine’s Day weekend, where the crowds made going through training difficult. He did a good enough job as a barback that the owner asked him to fill an open position as a bartender – but that doesn’t mean his start behind the bar was completely smooth. “I remember on the first day of training, the owner overheard the bartender teaching me the most basic of things (I think it was how to make a martini), and he asked me if I had ever bartended before,” Barrett says. “When I said no, he got this [panicked] look on his face then said reluctantly, ‘Well I guess you gotta learn somewhere.’ I did learn, and I’ve been bartending ever since.” Twelve years later, Barrett still hasn’t stopped. Now serving as bar manager and head bartender at Ludivine, he’s long past learning how to make basic drinks and creates his own. His methods for working on a new creation vary – sometimes he starts with a spirit he likes and tries to create a drink to highlight its features, and sometimes he starts with one of the non-alcoholic ingredients.

Scotch Yer Nose

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Single

CITY in the

By Tara Malone

Dating in a metro area offers more options than ever before.

Jane Austen wrote in Pride and Prejudice, “A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.” While her statement is satiric, even the progressive Miss Austen might be shocked by Tinder. Dating over the decades has undergone many face-lifts, from the straightup “What’s your income?” hookups of Austen’s day to the pageantry of clubbing courtships and speed dating. But like many other social interactions, the internet changed everything about the way we meet mates. These days, it’s much easier to chat someone up online than to meet for a drink at the bar. Aaron, a bartender in Norman for seven years, has a lot of experience in observing the bar approach. (He and oth-

ers in this article speak frankly with the condition of not using their last names.) “A lot of what I see is more guys trying to work up the courage to even talk to a girl, and they often ask the bartender for advice,” he says. “With dating apps, you don’t have the same fear of face-to-face rejection. It takes away a lot of the anxiety, and by the time you meet you already have rapport established.” Brian, 36, has only used dating apps and never tries an in-person pickup. To him, seeking dates in a bar just never seemed like a good way to meet potential partners. “Approaching people cold without knowing anything about them seems inherently risky,” he says. “Also, very rude. And more prone to failure.” Singles who find connections online FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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DATE A

LITTLE DIFFERENTLY Getting Star-Crossed ONE IN 10 AMERICANS ARE NOW USING AN ONLINE DATING PLATFORM. are no longer stigmatized as desperate or unattractive in real life; in fact, it’s the savvy approach in the modern dating world. Dating apps like Tinder and OKCupid have taken a lot of the anxiety out of approaching strangers for everything from long-term dating to a casual hookup. Finding potential dates online, regardless of one’s relationship goals, sometimes fosters greater intimacy. Two people can meet, connect and learn more about each other before taking the dive together. While singles of all sorts have changed their games in the face of digital dating, the potential for romance online has had a major impact on LGBTQ individuals looking for intimacy. Online dating services have made it easier for singles to meet others, but it’s not without its caveats, says Anya, a 34-yearold bisexual woman from Norman. “I think dating apps have made it much easier to meet other LGBTQ folks, but there are still the pitfalls of all online dating,” she says. “Namely, is this person really who they say they are? For an LGBTQ person, that not knowing can be more dangerous, especially in a red state. I think the LGBTQ community has traditionally relied on the kind of personal reference given by other folks in the community who know the person they are interested in, and that’s missing in a dating app. But there is also a chance for those who have not traditionally been a part of the LGBTQ community to find dating partners that may have had a difficult time doing so before the advent of dating apps.” Erica, another Norman native, also has found dates online, but takes a different approach even when looking for other female partners. “I’m bisexual, but I don’t usually mark that box when filling out an online dating profile,” she says. “I get far fewer matches and messages when I do, and they come almost exclusively from well-meaning polyamorous couples or desperate straight couples looking to spice things up. I once had a couple somewhat stalk me on OKCupid after I’d turned them down. The wife messaged me several times trying to convince me to meet up with them. She said, ‘We’re so disappointed; you were so perfect for us!,’ as though they’d selected me from a menu of marriage-saving sexual encounters.” While Erica has an active dating life, she’s

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There’s no need to jettison all the trappings of traditional romance; a night under the stars is still a surefire way to set the mood, and being in the city is no longer a problem for fans of the night sky. The Tulsa Air and Space Museum offers wild rides through the cosmos in its planetarium, as does the Oklahoma Science Museum in OKC. Better yet, grab a blanket, some hot chocolate and a telescope and head away from the city lights to check out the real deal. February is a great time to scope out the Gemini twins, Castor and Pollux, or Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky.

First Fridays

It’s possible to be an art enthusiast without dressing up like Andy Warhol and sipping champagne at the museum. For more down-toearth fans who want to take in some culture, First Fridays in Tulsa and Oklahoma City offer the opportunity to mingle and observe some great local artists in action. In Tulsa’s Brady Arts District, thousands come out for patio drinks and free admission to downtown galleries and museums. In OKC, head to the Paseo Arts District on the city’s northwest side to hear live music, grab a slice of pizza and check out the myriad galleries on Paseo Drive.

not afraid to go it alone either. More and more men and women embrace a rewarding single life. For many singles today, “alone” does not equate with “lonely” at all. “I told my parents at a young age that I didn’t want to get married or have kids,” she says. “My role models were always strong, single women, both real and characters from literature and film: the woman who had it together, had the freedom to be spontaneous and crude, and would take and leave a partner on her own terms. I’m

35, and despite lifelong warnings from my parents, friends, strangers and gynecologists, I have not changed my mind. I date a lot, but still have not met anyone that I’d take on debt or childhood anger issues for. Yes, my biological clock still ticks, but I have an IUD firmly in place for that.” Regardless of sexual identity or orientation, men and women everywhere experience more freedom when it comes to choosing their own dating adventures, or striking out on their own paths to fulfillment.


Playing Mind Games

Getting locked together in a strange room and desperately trying to escape may sound creepy, but, as it turns out, it can make a great date night. Couples who enjoy a mental challenge but are bored by the idea of a Trivial Pursuit date night can take an adventure of the mind together by escaping a “puzzle room.” Work together cooperatively to solve puzzles and mysteries and escape your trap in under one hour, or else … or else you just get let out of the room. Both OKC and Tulsa are home to multiple escape adventure opportunities. Pro tip: Legitimate purveyors of escape adventures do NOT advertise on Craigslist.

59%

OF U.S. ADULTS BELIEVE ONLINE DATING IS A GOOD WAY TO MEET PEOPLE.

SAFETY SAVVY As much as we’d all like to trust our fellow humans, The Great Outdoors

Sometimes it’s good to escape the crowds downtown or skip the old dinner-and-movie routine for something more relaxed. Kayaking or taking a float trip on the Illinois River is a great option to get away with a potential significant other. For poor swimmers, the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge offers several perfect day-hikes and breathtaking views, as well as opportunities for observing some of the native wildlife. Oklahoma is home to a host of ideal locations for outdoor romance. Just don’t get carried away. There are laws, people.

LIAR, LIAR

The downside of online dating is the inability to know or prove if someone is being completely honest about who he or she is. According to the Pew Research Center, 53 percent of online dating users lie in their profiles. What about, exactly? It varies slightly with men and women. Men most often lie about age, weight and income. Women most often lie about age, weight and physical build. PROCEED WITH CAUTION, FOLKS – AND STAY HONEST!

the dating world is still fraught with peril. Regardless of your gender or orientation, it pays to be a skeptic. At the bar or club, guard your drink like someone could take it away from you at any moment. It only takes a second for some enterprising creep to slip something in. Additionally, while it may seem chivalrous for someone to bring you a drink, don’t accept one that you didn’t watch your bartender make. Keep an eye out when returning to your car or walking home alone, and make sure to notify the bartender or other staff if someone gets too pushy. If you’re meeting a date for the first time in person, no matter how long you’ve been exchanging messages, always meet in a public place. Let a friend or loved one know where you’re going and any information you have about the person you’re meeting. If sparks fly and you decide to venture home with your new amour, make sure to let someone know. If you go to that person’s place, take your own car or ride and make sure to text the address to a trusted friend. You should also feel free to get technical. Services like Kitestring offer free or pocket-change plans that will send occasional text messages to your phone at times of your choosing to check up on you. If you don’t text that you’re OK within your predetermined amount of time, the service will phone your emergency contacts for you. Apps like bSafe will let friends or family of your choosing track you via GPS on date nights. At any time, you can hit the SOS alarm and they will automatically be notified and given your current location. FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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CHIEF METEOROLOGIST

CHERA KIMIKO BRIAN SANDERS BRETT ANTHONY KAREN LARSEN

WEEKNIGHTS

5P / 6P / 10P


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

The Bread and Buer of the Maer Exclusive preview of this upscale, homestyle eatery reveals a ‘pirate’ running the kitchen.

Y

BREAD AND BUTTER KITCHEN FOCUSES ON PUTTING TIME AND LOVE INTO THE CLASSIC STANDARDS. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

ou’ve seen her before. Maybe in a law office (she was a partner in one of Tulsa’s most select firms), maybe at a committee meeting (she’s helped organize more charity events than you can count), maybe at one of her quirky, memorable birthday parties at Southern Hills Country Club, maybe only in the society pages of this magazine. And now Rania Nasreddine is where you’d least expect her, flitting around a busy construction site as the white, spacious dining rooms of her new restaurant, Bread and Butter Kitchen, are built and filled in and nailed together by a large, busy army of workers. She navigates her way past an area where banquettes and chandeliers are being installed and points to a big oak counter. It’s the shop, she says; appropriately enough for a building that once held Marie Callender’s on East 51st Street in Tulsa, there’s a big bakery, where pies and cakes will be sold retail. A man runs over with a question. A women asks her about

bathroom decor. (“It should be warm and welcoming, yet stylish,” Nasreddine tells her.) Her iPhone rings. “Mom, I’m getting interviewed!” she shouts into the phone. Nasreddine has never been involved in the restaurant business, except as a diner, but her father, a prosperous businessman, once owned a few, and her whole family is involved. It’s one of those formidable families that can march over obstacles as if they didn’t exist. “My staff is more important,” she says as she calls to a nearby group of men nailing panels to a wall. “You guys have had a long day; just wait half an hour and we’ll have food for you.” This puts her in mind of food. “We’ll have all the classic standards everyone loves, but better,” Nasreddine says. “Our trout has capers and sun-dried tomatoes, and you won’t believe our chicken-fried steak. We put so much time and love into everything. The fried chicken takes a day to prep and marinate. FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

special joy because I’m able create food that’s recognized and loved by average people, but made with a serious culinary approach. Ninety-nine percent is made from scratch. It’s real home cooking.” Robuck pauses. A plate has come out of the kitchen, and it’s lovely, but the presentation doesn’t satisfy him. “Put art on the plate!” he yells to the line cooks. “Make it beautiful! Take pride! Show off! Make every plate the best plate you can make!” He looks to the visitors. “There’s fried catfish coming!” he calls to the crowd, which by now has melded into a chaotic, happy group a lot like a family reunion. Meanwhile, Nasreddine says to one guest: “You have to leave for a dinner appointment? Oh, you’re not leaving anytime soon. There’s so much food coming. Here. Try a pickle; they’re homemade. You’re not eating anything after you leave here. “Hey!” she calls to the crowd. “Someone needs to eat this baked potato!” Editor’s note: This article was written before Bread and Butter Kitchen’s official opening. The restaurant is now open. BRIAN SCHWARTZ

THE RESTAURANT WILL SELL CAKES AND PIES AS WELL AS SERVE FOOD.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

LO C A L F L AV O R

Breakfast Tribalism OKC’s Hatch, battling for first-meal domination, defends its turf with fork-stabbing delectables.

Competition for first meal superiority in Oklahoma City is fierce, and it can get a bit Lord of the Flies between different fans of OKC’s breakfast heavies. Well, it’s time to put away your rocks and sharpened sticks because Hatch is the new place just about everyone can agree will soothe your savage breakfast beast. One of the most recent additions to the Automobile Alley district, Hatch does “early mood food” with charm, creativity and a dizzying array of selections. Fans of sweets will not feel left out by the beignets, denser and not as sugary as their New Orleans counterparts, but long on flavor all the same. Each order comes with sides of Nutella, peanut butter bacon sauce and orange glaze; rigorous taste tests have determined they are all amazing. Even waffle fans will want to try the Famous OK Pan Cake, a state-shaped, sweet-cream batter flapjack with bacon, pecans, bourbon maple glaze and mascarpone butter. Just be prepared to stab someone with a fork to defend it. The same goes for the aptly named hash brown tumblers – these deep fried balls of perfectly seasoned potatoes seem to tumble into your mouth at a rapid clip and are a fitting complement to a savory breakfast choice like the chicken-fried egg. If you really need something to get you moving, try one of the many espresso cocktails to get you riled up. It’s tempting to demand one of everything, but regardless of what you order at Hatch, you’ll find yourself eager to set the alarm and return for second breakfast. Hatch is at 1101 N. Broadway Ave. in Oklahoma City. TARA MALONE

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Taste

“And our chicken pot pies! That’s a 24-hour process. The prep chefs roast the chicken. The pastry chefs make the crust. Then the line chefs season, sauce and bake it. It’s delicious! And wait till you see the chicken with biscuit.... You get white pepper gravy or bacon honey glaze and the biscuit we pour the chicken on is homemade and it’s bigger than your head! The biscuits are life-changing.” Someone hands her a glass of a concoction that will come from the full-service bar with craft cocktails. “Not sweet enough,” she opines. “It needs something.” She continues: “The hamburgers are swoon-worthy.” But she, too, has had a long day and is famished. “Food’s ready!” someone calls, and all the folk on-site force themselves into a gleaming, professional and spacious – but at this point, overcrowded – kitchen. Construction workers loudly chat in Spanish and English and a large kitchen staff gets some cooking practice. There are a few elegantly dressed friends of Nasreddine’s, even a few policemen whom she has invited and whom she quickly mobilizes to help carry trays. “Tienes hambre? Come, eat!” calls a pirate. Grizzled, wiry, with earrings and tattoos, that’s what David Robuck looks like: the guy who, with teeth clenching a knife, would climb the rope and board your ship. He was Dilly Diner’s pastry chef, baking those pies and muffins that brought the place fame, and he later became executive pastry chef to the entire McNellie’s group. That’s his position here, even though there’s no executive chef. Nasreddine is too kind-hearted to impose a hierarchy, but Robuck is on his way to filling the top chef’s role. “Guys, that chicken has been out of the marinade too long,” he calls to the cooks. “I’m supposed to get a hint of orange and that’s what makes the dish pop.” Back to his vision. “I did pastry for job security, but I can cook entrees, too. I love making flavors. I love blowing people’s minds. It doesn’t matter if it’s pastry or savory. This place gives me


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Natureworks

2016

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1/5/17 11:57 AM


Taste

C H E F C H AT

The Perfect Dish Robert DeCoste serves his classic take on Italian dishes in Downtown OKC.

WINTER SPICED BOLOGNESE Serves 6 to 8

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

executive chef there and at Notti Bianche in Washington. “That’s when Todd English just made it big,” he says. “He had just put out his cookbook and opened his second restaurant. That’s probably where I learned the most, at Olives.” When DeCoste’s wife, Amanda Yaun, a neurological surgeon, was recruited by OU Medical Center, the two decided to make the move for multiple reasons, including the high cost of starting a restaurant in the Boston or Washington. In Oklahoma City, DeCoste began his restaurant in the growing Avana Arts District, across the street from the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. “That was part of the reason we thought this was a good move, not just for her but also for me, because we could open a restaurant and get in just as stuff was getting off the ground – before real estate prices get too high,” he says. “It’s a good idea to get in now and build a name before it gets too big.” No matter how good DeCoste’s timing was, Patrono’s relies on its food and DeCoste’s classic approach to dishes for its success. While many restaurants may keep trying new approaches in order to make their entrees different, DeCoste knows adding new flavors just for the sake of it is rarely the best approach. “That’s what I try to avoid,” he says. “You have to know when to stop, when to say, ‘OK, this dish is perfect.’ It doesn’t need that one extra thing that’s going to throw people off.” JUSTIN MARTINO

3/4 tsp. 1/2 tsp. 1/4 cup 1 pound 1/2 cup or 1/2 cup

olive oil ground pork or veal ground beef celery stalk, diced carrot, diced onion, diced garlic, minced dry red wine beef broth 16 ounce can of tomatoes, preferably San Marzano, pureed cinnamon nutmeg salt and pepper heavy cream your choice of pasta cooked (I suggest a wide flat noodle such as Pappardelle or Fettuccine) fresh grated Parmigiano Reggiano ricotta cheese

Heat the olive oil in a deep saucepan. Add the ground veal/pork and beef and cook over high heat until browned and remove from the pot leaving just enough oil to cook the vegetables. Reduce the heat to medium and add the celery, carrot, onion and garlic and cook until tender.

Return the meat to the pot and add the red wine and reduce by half. Add the beef stock, tomato, cinnamon and nutmeg and simmer over low heat covered for about 2 hours.

Add the cream just before serving, blend well, season with salt and pepper and toss with your choice of pasta and top with cheese.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

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obert DeCoste has worked in restaurants since he was 14, but it wasn’t until he was on his honeymoon that the owner and chef of Patrono in Oklahoma City found what he truly wanted to cook. “I’d worked in a few Italian restaurants, and they weren’t doing traditional Italian food,” he said. “They were trying to do modern Italian. When my wife and I got married, we went to Italy for our honeymoon. I had the actual dishes in Italy the way they were meant to be made, and I just thought it was so much better. “I don’t try to reinvent classic dishes. I try to prepare food the way it has been done ever since the recipe was first created.” That’s why his menu has linguine vongole (clams with garlic and peppers), orecchiette calabrese (chicken thighs with bread crumbs and parmigiano reggiano) and chicken al mattone (a 10-ounce breast grilled “with a brick”). DeCoste started as a dishwasher as a summer job in his home state of Massachusetts and says he was amazed about how much happened in the kitchen and what it took to make a restaurant work. That energy drew him to the business and has kept him in it since. He worked there for seven years before deciding to make the move into fine dining. He left Massachusetts for New Orleans and worked with Paul Prudhomme. After that, he moved back to Massachusetts and worked for Todd English at Olives, eventually serving as

3 tbsp. 12 ounces 12 ounces 1 1 1 4 cloves 1/2 cup 1 cup 1


IN SEASON

DON’T FEAR THE SPROUT

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unchroom disgust. Family dinner dread. “You have to finish your greens!” – said every mom ever. A negative connotation has terrorized green vegetables like a dark cloud throughout almost everyone’s childhood, and many people still hold grudges against their greens. Brussels sprouts are no exception, but perhaps it’s time to take another look at the much maligned vegetable. Despite their bad reputation, they are not only high in nutrients, but low in calories. Usually associated with other hearty vegetables, such as kale and broccoli, Brussels sprouts carry many of the nutrients the body needs, and they don’t pack on the pounds. In need of Vitamin C or Vitamin K? Just one serving of Brussels sprouts a day satisfies both. While some childhood horror stories might differ, Brussels sprouts are actually adored for their sweet, nutty flavor. Roasted, sautéed, candied, steamed, as a side dish or main course, Brussels sprouts can be eaten any way at any time. If you buck up the courage to try them, you just might learn to love them, too.

R A N D O M F L AV O R S

Iron Star Urban Barbeque

PHOTO BY RYAN WELLS

Iron Star Urban Barbeque takes after its namesake, the infamous Oklahoma outlaw Belle Starr, as it serves comfort food gone wild. With a focus on healthy, naturally good food, Iron Star’s menu features everything from its famous Dutch oven sweet potatoes to an array of house-smoked meats. The atmosphere of an upscale, urban restaurant coupled with its traditional Oklahoma roots makes Iron Star a favorite for an easy lunch or dinner date. Unlike other barbecue places, Iron Star is not defined by sticky fingers, paper plates and plastic cutlery. It is bettered characterized by its unique rustic decor and a variety of dishes made to delight. It provides great barbecue and an appealing ambiance without the hassle. 3700 N. Shartel Ave., Oklahoma City; ironstarokc.com.

Scout Fresh Foods and Cafe

For anyone overwhelmed by the swell of downtown restaurants with stiff chairs and low lighting, Scout Fresh Foods and Cafe is a breath of fresh air. Located in the heart of downtown Ardmore, Scout stands apart from the big chains with its array of breakfast and lunch foods served simply. It’s trendy, easy and all together yummy. With a team dedicated to providing authentic, fresh foods, the cafe is a favorite for locals because of its combination of delicious daily specials, cozy company and an upbeat atmosphere. The restaurant’s creative recipes take on classics, such as its Cobb sandwich and hand-mixed granola, making every visit a unique one. But even if the standard dishes don’t suffice, Scout offers a “build your own” option for any sandwich or salad. Plus, its “dip and dippers” option, with three types of dip with any multitude of chips, pretzels, carrots or any other “dipper,” starts every meal off the right way. 333 W. Main St., #120, Ardmore; scout120.com. FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS HOSPICE CARE My elderly grandmother is battling cancer. Her doctor tells us her days are numbered, and he has recommended hospice care. She would like to stay in her home. Is that possible? Yes, it is definitely possible. Hospice care is all about making the patient as comfortable as possible, which means AVA HANCOCK we want to provide the care in a place that is best for the patient and his or her family. In fact, about 80 percent of all hospice patients do receive care in their home or a senior living facility. Our team of experts will be happy to work with you and your family to create a specialized plan of care and ensure your grandmother is comfortable at home surrounded by the people who love her. Please call Grace Hospice at 918744-7223, and we will be happy to provide you with more information.

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

The best way to set yourself up for a successful and stress-free tax season is to start getting ready now with these simple steps. Break tax preparation tasks into small manageable parts so that they don’t seem so daunting. DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC® Decide who is going to prepare your taxes. If it’s a professional, ask for a checklist of items they need from you. Create a paper or electronic folder for tax-related documents so that you can store them in one easy-to-find place. Sort your receipts into categories and put the receipts for tax-deductible expenses in a special file. Total your paychecks. Check your tax forms against your records to verify the forms are accurate. Track your mileage for charitable or business activities as it may be tax deductible. Shred non-tax documents that contain personal information to help protect yourself against identify theft. Schedule time on your calendar or make an appointment with a professional to prepare your taxes. For additional advice, consult a tax professional.

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Why is a personal articles floater policy important?

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

I see a lot of teenage athletes who suffer from overuse injuries. I was a high school athlete in the 80’s and we usually had several months during the year where we didn’t focus on our primary sport and participated in something totally different. However, over the last 30 years athletes have “specialized” at a younger age and many of them perform the same sport 12 months a year with little to no break. I generally recommend 2-4 weeks off for every 4-6 months on. This doesn’t mean the athlete should be a couch potato, but it does mean they should completely take a break from their primary sport and participate in something different such as swimming or cycling. Athletes benefit both physically and mentally from this break and have a better chance at avoiding injury and burnout.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

FDA-approved Coolsculpting® is the non-invasive procedure available today that uses cooling technolMALISSA SPACEK ogy to target and destroy fat cells, giving you a permanent solution. Coolsculpting® can be done in as quickly as one hour with no downtime and lasting results. Our patients begin to see a noticeable reduction of fat in as little as three weeks and continue to see improving, long-lasting results for up to three months following a treatment. This procedure is ideal for those looking to get rid of a little extra in their tummies, love handles, bra fat, arms, and thighs! To schedule a complimentary consultation to learn more about Coolsculpting® call today at (918) 872-9999.

LEGAL SERVICES

My son runs for his high school cross country and track teams and continues to run between the seasons during the winter and summer breaks. I’m worried he will be injured by not taking time off from his sport. What are your thoughts? TIM MINNICK, PT

Winter is almost over, and I need to get my summer body back. What treatments are available to help me get rid of this extra tummy fat?

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

Have you ever stopped to think about how hard it would be to replace valuables you’ve bought or items left to you by loved ones? In many cases, people find out too late that their home or renters’ policy has a defined amount that is paid out RUSS IDEN on personal belongings. By applying some simple rules, you can find out if special items will be covered or not. It’s a good place to start by looking at your homeowners or renters’ policy to see if it has any enhanced coverage that includes items like personal belongings. Then, try to assess the value of the items you want insured and contact your insurance company. Also, have your insurance company review if the policy is a standalone policy or if they have added an endorsement to your existing policy as it could be subject to a separate deductible and different policy exclusions. In either case, the cost to insure them versus replacing them on our own is worth it. It’s also great peace of mind knowing your valuables are well protected. If you have questions about a personal articles floater or any other insurance needs, call a AAA agent near you.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

What are some simple steps for a stress-free tax season?

What are the differences between bankruptcy filings under Chapters 7, 11, 12 and 13? Chapter 7 is a liquidation bankruptcy. Most debts are discharged and non-exempt assets are liquidated to pay creditors. However, most taxes and student loans, alimony and child support debts remain. Chapter BRAD BEASLEY 13 is only for individuals or married couples filing jointly. The debtor in a Chapter 13 is required to repay all or a percentage of his or her debts from future income over a period of time, usually five years, pursuant to a plan. Chapter 11 is primarily for businesses and allows them to reorganize their debts while continuing in business. Chapter 12 is for farmers and commercial fishermen and allows them to reorganize their debts while continuing their business operations.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Becoming Beethoven Chamber Music Tulsa’s Winter Festival explores 16 quartets that define a prolific composer.

PHOTO COURTESY CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA

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string quartet meant something extremely intimate to legendary composer Ludwig van Beethoven. To him, quartets were reserved for expressions about his most private experiences. To hear these movements performed by the celebrated Miro Quartet, visit the Beethoven Winter Festival, brought to Oklahoma by Chamber Music Tulsa. The festival will cover all of Beethoven’s 16 quartets, performed in chronological order over six concerts. Highlighting the successes and failures of his life, these compositions explore such themes as personal struggle, coming of age, illness, love and, lastly, death – all through the use of only two violins, a viola and a cello. “This musical journey speaks to the power of the human spirit and the triumph of creative genius,” says Bruce Sorrell, executive director at Chamber Music Tulsa. “It is a mark of the sophistication of our Tulsa audience and the operational capacity of Chamber Music Tulsa that we are able to offer this landmark event here this year.” The festival began in December with Beethoven’s Birthday Celebration, a daylong commemoration that included specially prepared treats, a beer tour and more at Tulsa-area locations. Along with panel and book discussions in January and a residency by the Aeolus Quartet this month, the Winter Festival offers both cultural and academic appreciation for an iconic musician.

“We have planned a large number of free events to engage as many Tulsans in the extraordinary world of Beethoven’s quartets as possible,” Sorrell says. Chamber Music Tulsa has also teamed with the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges to bring an art exhibition, entitled Gifted, to the Performing Arts Center Gallery from Feb. 1 to 28. Gifted will feature works by members of the center’s programs who, much like Beethoven, overcame physical disabilities to create meaningful art. “The idea of art created by individuals with disabilities seemed like a natural addition; Beethoven composed his set of great final quartets at the very end of his life while in a state of complete deafness,” Sorrell says. “We were thrilled that the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges accepted our invitation to participate.” With many activities to participate in and quartets to listen to, Sorrell promises that the festival has much more than just a night of good music. “I expect [the festival] to be a transformative experience, spiritual even, and something I will talk about the rest of my life,” he says. “Encounters with great art leave us changed forever.” The concerts will run at 7 p.m. Feb. 17, 18, 21, 23 and 25 and at 5 p.m. Feb. 26 at the Tulsa PAC. Visit chambermusictulsa.org for tickets and details. MARY WILLA ALLEN

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Where & When

ART

With the state slogan of “Native America,” Oklahoma has many ways to honor its American Indian culture and heritage. Gilcrease Museum contributes to this homage with a new exhibition, Textured Portraits: The Ken Blackbird Collection. Textured Portraits explores Native American culture through photographs depicting day-to-day experiences and special occasions on reservations in Montana and Wyoming. From quiet moments on the ranch to exciting occasions like fairs and rodeos, Blackbird presents 33 portraits of a small slice of America’s heartland. “These beautiful and touching images of contemporary Native American life show Ken Blackbird’s vision of the American West as he’s lived it,” says Natalie Panther, a project manager at Gilcrease. “His

IN TULSA ERIC CHURCH Feb. 2 BOK CENTER Eric Church heads to Tulsa on his Holdin’ My Own Tour. For the first time ever, there will be no support act on this tour. Church and his band will play two full sets with an intermission in between. – bokcenter.com

photographs offer a more contextualized and nuanced view of Native American peoples and culture.” Along with several breathtaking portraits, Blackbird also sits down with several subjects for oral history interviews, which can be heard during the exhibition. Ultimately, Panther would like this exhibition to change and enhance the perception of Native Americans and their culture. “There are a lot of misconceptions about contemporary Native American life,” she says. “And we hope that visitors who come to see this photography exhibition will gain a deeper appreciation and understanding of life in Indian country.” Textured Portraits runs from Feb. 27 to Aug. 27. For details, visit gilcrease.org.

ELEMENTS OF LEARNING DIS-ABILITIES / DIFFERENCES Feb. 3-March 26 AHHA TULSA This exhibition builds an open community that can talk freely about exploring the terms, symbols, traits, features, writing history and oral history of learning “dis-abilities / differences.” – ahhatulsa.org ELI YOUNG BAND Feb. 4 CAIN’S BALLROOM Camaraderie and creativity fused

PERFORMANCE

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA OPERA

PUCCINI TO POP

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Combine soaring well-known arias and beloved American favorites for an unforgettable night of music at Puccini to Pop, created by Tulsa Opera. The show features five different operatic talents: sopranos Alyson Cambridge and Sarah Joy Miller, baritone Michael Todd Simpson, world famous II Divo tenor David Miller and seasoned veteran Leona Mitchell. They perform classics from Giacomo Puccini, George Gershwin and Georges Bizet as well as classic favorites like “Tonight” by Leonard Bernstein from West Side Story and “You Are Love” by Jerome Kern from Show Boat. Add in a few surprise pop songs and talented composer James Lowe, and Puccini to Pop will be easily accessible and unique. “Puccini to Pop goes beyond opera and storytelling. It is designed to be a night to introduce opera to music lovers who are unfamiliar with or wary of the genre,” says Aaron Beck, music administrator at Tulsa Opera. “One could call it an opera sampler. No other opera company has tried this before. We can’t wait to get this product in.” Expert lighting and videography add a theatrical layer to the performance, with the idea being to “travel beyond Tulsa in the future” while listening to music of the past and present that represents “love and all of its foibles,” Beck says. Puccini to Pop runs one night only, Feb. 25, at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. Visit tulsaopera.com for tickets.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

TWO FANCY DANCERS, KEN BLACKBIRD. BUFFALO BILL CENTER OF THE WEST, CODY, WYOMING, USA, COURTESY GILCREASE

Textured Portraits

into an intoxicating cocktail have propelled this talented foursome to the vanguard of contemporary country music. – cainsballroom.com TULSA BALLET’S ICONS AND IDOLS Feb. 4 COX BUSINESS CENTER This event benefits Tulsa Ballet and includes cocktails and entertainment. – iconsandidols.org LUSHA NELSON PHOTOGRAPHS Feb. 5-May 5 PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART The range of Nelson’s work is broad and offers dazzling views of American life, from Wall Street and Coney Island to circus sideshows and sanitariums. While Nelson photographed commercially and portrayed the glamour of Hollywood and New York through his work at Vanity Fair, Esquire and Vogue, he was also active in the New York photography scene documenting social issues. – philbrook.org ARIANA GRANDE Feb. 9 BOK CENTER Ariana Grande returns with her all new Dangerous Woman Tour. – bokcenter.com STYX Feb. 9 HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO The multi-mega million selling rock band has four decades of charttopping hits to its name, with a wide range of styles from joyous singalongs to hard-driving deep cuts. – hardrockcasinotulsa.com JON WOLFE Feb. 10 CAIN’S BALLROOM The best introduction to Jon Wolfe is the basic yet not so simple fact that he’s a country singer and songwriter. He offers country music as it was, is and always should be, with boots firmly standing on the bedrock of tradition and an eye focused on taking it into the future. – cainsballroom.com NATIONAL FIDDLER HALL OF FAME Feb. 10 MABEE CENTER The Time Jumpers was established in Nashville in 1998 by an assemblage of high-dollar studio musicians who wanted to spend some spare time jamming with their sonically gifted buddies. The notion of building a rabidly devoted following was the


last thing on their minds. But that’s what happened. – mabeecenter.com TULSA BALLET PRESENTS: DOROTHY AND THE PRINCE OF OZ Feb. 10-12 TULSA PAC Through a collaboration with BalletMet of Columbus, Ohio, the World Premiere of Dorothy and the Prince of Oz takes place in Tulsa and is guaranteed to delight audiences of all ages. – tulsaballet.org BMX SOONER NATIONALS Feb. 10-12 FORD TRUCK ARENA Get ready for bicycle motocross galore. – usabmx.com GREATER TULSA INDIAN ART FESTIVAL Feb. 10-12 GLENPOOL CONFERENCE CENTER This event is a cultural celebration of the American Indian. This year’s theme is “Honoring Native American Athletes.” The festival includes a national, juried fine art show, cultural exhibitions, traditional dancing, entertainment, storytelling and much more. – tulsaindianartfestival.com TULSA PROJECT THEATRE PRESENTS: AVENUE Q Feb. 10-18 TULSA PAC Tulsa Project Theatre is the city’s only Actor’s Equity Association-affiliated organization. – tulsaprojecttheatre.com RANDY ROGERS BAND Feb. 11 CAIN’S BALLROOM Every note and every word on the Randy Rogers Band’s new album Nothing Shines Like Neon ring with an authenticity that makes each song linger with the listener long after the music fades. – cainsballroom.com YOUNG THE GIANT Feb. 12 CAIN’S BALLROOM This Los Angeles quintet

continues to brave new sonic landscapes with its wildly adventurous third album, Home of the Strange. On this release, the band explores its expansive musicianship with boldly eclectic arrangements anchored by a keen melodic presence. – cainsballroom.com GROUPLOVE Feb. 15 CAIN’S BALLROOM It turns out that a big mess can actually be a good thing. In the case of Grouplove’s third studio album, Big Mess refers not only to a lyric in the buoyant lead single “Welcome To Your Life,” but also to the situation in which band members found themselves when they got off the road following 2013’s Spreading Rumours. – cainsballroom.com BAREFOOT IN THE PARK Feb. 17-26 BROKEN ARROW COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE Paul just doesn’t understand Corie, as she sees it. He’s too staid and too boring, and she just wants him to be a little more spontaneous. Running “barefoot in the park” would be a start.… – bacptheatre.com TWENTY ONE PILOTS Feb. 21 BOK CENTER Twenty One Pilots with special guests Jon Bellion and Judah and the Lion present their Emotional Roadshow tour. – bokcenter.com TULSA ORATORIO CHORUS PRESENTS: SOLOMON Feb. 18 BOSTON AVENUE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH One of George Frideric Handel’s lesser-known oratorios, the double-chorus Solomon is exceptionally rich in musical beauty, with dramatic expressions of faith, love, goodness and humanity. Fellow composer Felix Mendelssohn was particularly fond of Solomon. – tulsachorus.com AKDAR SHRINE CIRCUS Feb. 23-25 EXPO SQUARE Cars with clowns and performing

elephants and other animals, music and fun for the whole family await you at the Akdar Shrine Circus. – exposquare.com SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: NIGHT AT THE OSCARS Feb. 24-25 TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE Something magical happens when the perfect score augments the emotional pull of cinematography. We owe these transcendent moments to the directors of the brilliant and the composers of the magnificent. Together they have crafted wonder. Tonight we present the Oscar to.... – signaturesymphony.org THE ROCK AND WORSHIP ROADSHOW Feb. 25 BOK CENTER The Rock and Worship Roadshow is hosted by Carlos Whittaker. This year’s lineup includes Rend Collective, Steven Curtis Chapman, Francesca Battistelli, Passion, Family Force 5 and Jordan Feliz, with pre-show entertainers Derek Minor and Urban Rescue. This year’s speaker is Tony Wolf. – bokcenter.com

OKC CHOCOLATE DECADENCE Feb. 2 AUTOMOBILE ALLEY Chocolate Decadence is proud to celebrate its 20th anniversary, and we invite you to join us for this special milestone and fundraiser with an evening of decadent chocolate, gourmet coffee, wine, champagne, smooth jazz and a Valentine auction. – automobilealley.org POWER AND PRESTIGE CHILDREN’S GALLERY Feb. 3 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM Designed to complement the temporary

AN ACTOR PORTRAYING DANSHICI KUROBEI IN THE PLAY ‘NATSU MATSURI’, TORII KIYOTADA VII, GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. ALBERT J. KIRKPATRICK, COURTESY OKCMOA

C U LT U R E

The Floating World

Enter into 17th-century Japan at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s newest exhibition, After the Floating World: The Enduring Art of Japanese Woodblock Prints. The exhibition features several images carved into wooden blocks, called Ukiyo-e, translated as “pictures from the floating world.” The subject matter ranges from Kabuki actors and portraits to folktales and mythology, all filled with colorful depictions of a bygone world. This exhibition is an OKCMOA original, curated from the museum’s permanent collection. It displays works from Torii Kiyotada VII and Hiroshi Yoshida, two artists at the forefront of the revolution of Ukiyo-e during the 20th century. The two men focus on different subject matter but both utilize a unique Western influence. “While Torii Kiyotada’s prints depict traditional Kabuki plays and actors, the influence of European Art Deco style with stylized forms and bold colors is apparent,” says E. Michael Wittington, OKCMOA’S president and CEO. “Hiroshi Yoshida traveled throughout the world during the 1920s and 1930s and his landscapes are a beautiful blend of Japanese sensitivity with Western subject matter. “My favorite work in the exhibition is a print by Yoshida depicting the Taj Mahal bathed in moonlight. I’m sure this will also be a favorite of our visitors.” After the Floating World runs Feb. 18 to May 14, in conjunction with another exhibition from OKCMOA’s permanent collection, The Unsettled Lens. Visit okcmoa.com for tickets and more information.

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Relevant in Rock

The iconic ’80s band Bon Jovi returns to the Chesapeake Energy Arena this month to play classics like “Living on a Prayer” and “It’s My Life” along with songs from the band’s most recent album, This House is Not for Sale. Bon Jovi has won a slew of honors through the years, including one Grammy, two American Music Awards and six Billboard Touring Awards. The quintet also had the highest grossing tour in the world three times during a six-year period, a feat only accomplished by one other band, the Rolling Stones. On top of selling out tours worldwide, Bon Jovi also champions the difficult task of staying relevant in rock for four decades. See the band at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 21. Visit chesapeakearena.com for tickets.

FENCES Feb. 10-March 4 POLLARD THEATRE Set in the 1950s, Fences focuses on Troy Maxson, a former baseball star of the Negro Leagues who now works as a garbage man. Excluded as a black man from the Major Leagues during his prime, Troy has a bitterness that takes its toll on 84

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

relationships with his wife and his son, who wants his own chance to play ball. – thepollard.org OKC BALLET PRESENTS: THE SLEEPING BEAUTY Feb. 17-19 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL A feast for the eyes and ears, The Sleeping Beauty is a charming fairytale featuring some of classical ballet’s most challenging yet enchanting choreography. Follow the story of Princess Aurora, the evil Carabosse and the charming Prince Desire, who pulls the Sleeping Beauty from her 100-year slumber. – okcballet.com BEDLAM BASKETBALL GAME Feb. 18 GALLAGHER ARENA Watch as the OU Sooners visit the OSU Cowboys on the court during Oklahoma’s favorite rivalry game. – okstate.com COMMUNIT Y

LAISSEZ LES BONS TEMPS ROULER!

Shake off the winter blues and celebrate New Orleans style at the Norman Mardi Gras Parade on Feb. 25. The parade began in 1994, created with a focus on family-friendly fun. A handful of like-minded, enthusiastic friends coordinated to create a community event to commemorate Mardi Gras. “Many citizens say this parade is one of Norman’s best kept secrets, a joyful ruckus among friends and family, freezing rain or wind,” says Aimee Rook, parade coordinator. A rowdy celebration of music, art, culture and community, this event offers a variety of activities: live music, delicious gumbo, marching bands, street vendors, a parade and an awards ceremony following. Awards include Best Costume, Best Marchers, Wackiest Family and Best Doggie Gras (in layman’s terms, Best Pet Costume). “I love seeing how businesses and creative folk work together, creating so much fun and showing it off down Main Street,” says Rook. The parade begins at 7 p.m. Head to normanmardigrasparade.com for more information.

PHOTO COURTESY NORMAN MARDI GRAS PARADE

exhibition Power and Prestige: Headdresses of the American Plains, the museum offers a fun activity space to explore bravery, pageantry, artistry, community and respect for culture and diversity. – nationalcowboymuseum.org JOSH ABBOTT BAND Feb. 3 RIVERWIND CASINO Thanks to its inherently upbeat and singable material, the Josh Abbott Band has become one of the leading acts in Texas music by winning four trophies in the inaugural Texas Regional Radio Awards, along with a slew of national awards. – riverwind.com PAINTED SKY OPERA PRESENTS: VERDI’S LA TRAVIATA Feb. 3-5 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL La Traviata is Giuseppe Verdi’s classic tale of a Parisian’s forbidden love and great sacrifice and features some of Verdi’s most loved music. – paintedskyopera.com OKC PHIL PRESENTS CLASSICS 5 Feb. 4 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Classics 5 will comprise movements from Claude Debussy, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and Dmitri Shostakovich, with exciting guest conductor Andreas Deifs. Christine Lampra will accompany on cello. – okcphil.org OKC BROADWAY PRESENTS: PIPPIN Feb. 7-12 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Some 30 years before writing Wicked, Steven Schwartz had an early success and now Pippin is back on tour for the first time since it thrilled audiences 40 years ago. – okcbroadway.com LYRIC THEATRE PRESENTS: ASSASSINS Feb. 8-26 LYRIC AT THE PLAZA Assassins is a groundbreaking musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. This fictional portrayal of the men and women who attempted (successfully or not) to assassinate presidents of the United States explores the issues that drove these people to commit horrific crimes that still affect Americans today. – lyrictheatreokc.com FOREIGNER Feb. 10 RIVERWIND CASINO Foreigner has nine Top 10 hits and is a band still relevant in today’s music society. Foreigner’s leader and founder, Mick Jones, wrote or co-wrote every Foreigner song, and produced or co-produced every album. – riverwind.com

PHOTO COURTESY CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA

Where & When

MUSIC

RICK SPRINGFIELD Feb. 18 RIVERWIND CASINO Over the past three decades, Rick Springfield has worn many hats as an entertainer and performer. The creator of some of the finest power-pop of the ’80s, a Grammy winning singer, songwriter and musician, Springfield has sold 25 million albums and scored 17 U.S. Top 40 hits. – riverwind.com THE UNSETTLED LENS Feb. 18-May 14 OKC MOA The Unsettled Lens showcases new acquisitions in photography from the museum’s permanent collection. Each of the photographs in the exhibition builds tension with the viewer based on a sense of the uncanny. – okcmoa.com MONSTER JAM Feb. 18-19 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Monster Jam is the most action-packed live event on four wheels, where world class drivers compete in front of capacity crowds around the globe. Monster Jam features high-octane, spontaneous entertainment and intense competition with the most recognizable trucks in the world. – monsterjam.com FIVE IRISH TENORS Feb. 21 ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM This group is a celebration of the wonder and majesty of five of the most dynamic classically trained voices in Ireland. The journey continues to America as the five pay homage to eclectic artists as diverse as Frank Sinatra, the Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, and Billy Joel. – armstrongauditorium.org ADAM DEVINE: WEIRD LIFE TOUR 2017 Feb. 22 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Adam Devine has announced his latest major multi-city standup comedy tour. Devine is quickly becoming one of the most sought after young performers and actors in the comedy world. – okcciviccenter.com CITYSPACE THEATRE PRESENTS: MR. BURNS, A POST-ELECTRIC PLAY Feb. 23-March 5 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL What will endure when the cataclysm arrives, the grid fails, society crumbles


and we’re faced with the task of rebuilding? Anne Washburn’s imaginative dark comedy, one of the most produced new plays in American theater, propels us forward nearly a century, following a new civilization stumbling into the future. – okcciviccenter.com OKC PHIL PRESENTS POPS 4: SINATRA AND BEYOND WITH TONY DESARE Feb. 24-25 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL With three Billboard Top 10 jazz albums and a host of national appearances with symphony orchestras, DeSare returns to celebrate a night of Frank Sinatra and other favorites. – okcphil.org FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE Feb. 25 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA The hit-making genre busters and reigning three-time Country Music Association Vocal Duo of the Year, Florida Georgia Line will be joined by guests Dustin Lynch and Chris Lane on the winter leg of their Dig Your Roots Tour. – chesapeakearena.com ALL THAT SOUTHWEST JAZZ EXHIBIT Through March 1 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS A photographic exhibit featuring Oklahoma legends instrumental in creating the music form that was to become known as jazz is featured at the Myriad Gardens. This is part of the Oklahoma Museums Association’s touring exhibition service and is produced by the Oklahoma Arts Council. – oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com

AROUND THE STATE HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS Feb. 2 CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK CENTER, ENID The Original Harlem Globetrotters are preparing for their action packed world tour. A star-studded roster will have fans on the edge of their seats to witness the ball handling wizardry, basketball artistry and one-of-a-kind family entertainment that thrills fans of all ages. – cnbcenter.com KATHY GRIFFIN Feb. 3 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT Two-time

Emmy and Grammy award-winning comedian Kathy Griffin is on her Celebrity Run-In Tour. A towering figure on television, on tour and in publishing, Griffin breaks through the entertainment clutter with her universally recognized brand of pull-no-punches comedy. – winstarworldcasino.com RANDY ROGERS BAND WITH CASEY DONAHEW Feb. 3 CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT The Randy Rogers Band and the Casey Donahew Band are both Texas country-and-western groups, with the former from Cleburne and the latter from nearby Burleson (both just south of Fort Worth). See them perform together Feb 3. – choctawcasinos.com MCALESTER PRO RODEO Feb. 3-4 SOUTHEAST EXPO CENTER Get ready for edge-ofyour-seat action as some of the best professional rodeo performers compete. Sanctioned by the PRCA, this event will draw hundreds of contestants and is sure to be an exciting show for the whole family. – eventful.com STEPHENS COUNTY COIN SHOW Feb. 10-11 STEPHENS COUNTY FAIR AND EXPO CENTER Located in the Territory Hall Room, this coin show will showcase some of the state’s most unique and rare coins. – stephenscountyok.com 19TH ANNUAL HOME AND GARDEN SHOW Feb. 10-12 GROVE CIVIC CENTER Get ready for spring by visiting nearly 100 exhibits of home and garden products. Speak one on one with area contractors and check out the latest ideas in home improvements, decorating ideas, landscaping and remodeling. – groveok.org GARY ALLAN Feb. 11 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO Country music star Gary Allan makes his way back to the Global Event Center. – winstarworldcasino.com HOME SWEET HOME CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL Feb. 11 CASTLE OF MUSKOGEE This food and beverage sampling party benefits Habitat for Humanity in Muskogee and offers all things chocolate. – muskogeehfh.org

OUT OF THE BOX QUILT SHOW Feb. 17-18 LAWTON The Wichita Mountains Quilt Guild holds its Out of the Box Quilt Show at the Great Plains Coliseum. See hundreds of unique quilts on display and admire the craftsmanship and dedication that is involved in quilting. There will also be a raffle for a quilt made from Civil War era prints. – eventful.com TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS Feb. 19 FIRELAKE ARENA Watch the best bowlers in the world compete for the most coveted title in bowling at the Professional Bowlers Association Tournament of Champions, live on ESPN. – firelakearena.com TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD Feb. 23-26 MIAMI LITTLE THEATRE Scout, a girl in a quiet Alabama town, is about to experience dramatic events that will affect the rest of her life. Wide-eyed Scout is fascinated with the sensitively revealed people of her small town, but, from the start, there’s a rumble of thunder just under the calm surface of the life here. – miamilittletheatre.com KISS IN CONCERT Feb. 24 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO Join us at the Global Events Center as the legendary rock band brings its Freedom To Rock Tour to the stage for an epic night of heavy-metal thunder and hard-rock entertainment. – winstarworldcasino.com TESLA IN CONCERT Feb. 25 CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT Formed in 1984 in Sacramento as City Kidd, the band was renamed Tesla during the recording of its first album, 1986’s Mechanical Resonance. The group defines itself as blues metal and will appear at Tulsa’s Brady Theater on Feb. 28. – teslatheband.com

FOR EVEN MORE EXCITING EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM.

O N T H E S TA G E

PHOTO BY STEVE SCHOFIELD COURTESY WINSTAR WORLD CASINO AND RESORT

A Master of All Trades For those looking for a laugh this month, head to the WinStar World Casino, where funny man turned TV and film star Billy Crystal will perform Feb. 4. Crystal began his career with improvisation in New York before quickly moving to a television role in Soap. He graduated to film in the late ’70s and nabbed roles in When Harry Met Sally... and City Slickers. Winning a Tony in 2005 for his one-man play, 700 Sundays, Crystal proves no entertainment medium is off-limits. He is now a bestselling author and has hosted the Academy Awards nine times, a number only surpassed by Bob Hope with 19. Crystal describes his comedy style as “unpredictable and intimate,” combining stories from his life in show business and his views on the world. The show begins at 8 p.m. Visit winstarworldcasino.com for details and tickets.

FEBRUARY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

85


Where & When

FILM AND CINEMA

Ready for Oscar

Get the full experience of the Academy Awards by attending showcases and watch parties.

AROUND TOWN

I

t’s appropriate that the Oscars fall halfway between the holiday season and tax time. They can be just as exciting as the former, and just as frustrating as the latter. Here the show is again, inevitably, ready to serve up another round of glitz and pomp Feb. 26.

LA LA LAND

PHOTO BY DALE ROBINETTE

Like the Super Bowl, the Academy Awards is a night that’s just as much about what goes on around the edges as the action at its center, and like the big game, it’s best watched in a large group. I recommend putting on your best duds, getting out of the house and going to a watch party. Many movie houses host them, including Circle Cinema in Tulsa.

Prepare by going to AMC’s annual Best Picture showcase, where for a reasonable price you can view all of the nominees for the main prize. The theater chain has not announced details as of this writing (nor have the nominations been announced), but the event usually happens the weekend before, and is a great chance to catch up on a large number of good films.

AT HOME

How good is Kirsten Johnson’s Cameraperson, easily my favorite documentary of 2016? Well, it’s receiving the relatively rare honor this month of joining the illustrious library of the Criterion Collection immediately after its release (usually the company releases older, classic films). And yes, it absolutely deserves the red carpet treatment. A collection of unused footage that Johnson has shot for other films over the course of 20 years, Cameraperson asks the audience to situate itself in the place of a documentary cinematographer to figure out on the fly what to capture on film and what to leave out. The clips are strung together in dizzying fashion, but rhythms slowly emerge over the course of the film. It’s an original, absolutely thrilling experiment, and worth seeking out. The Criterion release includes a making of the feature that’s more interesting than most as Johnson and her editors dive into the logistics of choosing which clips to put where and how to make a coherent whole out of seemingly disparate parts.

CAMERAPERSON

PHOTO COURTESY KIRSTEN JOHNSON, INC.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA

PHOTO COURTESY AMAZON STUDIOS

IN THEATERS

Kenneth Lonergan’s Manchester by the Sea is one of the films sure to gobble up a number of nominations for the Academy Awards, and it’s easy to see why. The film, in many ways a classic melodrama, bristles with a tension and nervous energy that strain nicely against the somber tragedy at its core. The story of a hard-luck janitor who receives custody of his teenage nephew upon the death of his brother, the film unspools slowly and never hurries to play its narrative cards. What results is a slow burn of deep, unspoken emotion. Lonergan’s script sparkles, as does the beautiful cinematography, but ultimately the movie belongs to Casey Affleck as Lee, a man unable to beat his own demons. Affleck’s performance exists in silences and stares, and it is a marvel to behold. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS


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C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

my heart. Now that CurioCity – a 20,000-square-foot fully immersive exhibit that encourages learning through play – is open, I have to say I really, really love the interactivity and immersion it offers. But there is one area in the museum that calls deeply to that 9-year-old explorer who attended camps here as a young girl: The Tinkering Garage. It’s a place for all young inventors with its monthly activities varying from taking apart electronics, producing stop motion animations or looking at math concepts through art and weaving. The idea of real tools, real risks and real science to make discoveries on your own terms is extremely appealing. This is where you will find me when I need to get away and create.

herry Marshall, the new president and CEO of Science Museum Oklahoma, didn’t have much research to do when she started her position in December. The Oklahoma City native visited the museum, then known as the Omniplex, as a child and first joined the facility as a museum educator in 1994 before serving as director of education and director of the Oklahoma Museum Network. We caught up with Marshall and got her thoughts on …

… how the museum has grown since she first joined the staff.

I love that we have changed and grown so much while still embracing and respecting our history. I remember Adm. John Kirkpatrick telling me stories about the difference this place makes for our community, how important it is to have a place where children can explore. When I started, the museum was everything I remembered as a child. It was as magical and wonder-filled as ever, and it managed to stay that way with few changes. There was a very pivotal moment when the administration decided to consciously invest back in the museum … a movement to update exhibits, infrastructure and institutional capacity. This began a time of exponential growth; we created new experiences, updated technology and explored new programs and partnerships. The museum you see now embraces all of the magic of the past and inspires learners of the future. You will find experiences here unlike any other. We are now a nationally recognized museum that is a leader in open-ended exploration and interactive exhibit offerings.

… her favorite area of the museum.

I truly cannot choose just one. As a physicist, I have always been partial to our experiences that explore sound and light. We still have an exhibit that was here when I was a child: a tree with lights that reacts to sound. It will always have a special place in

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2017

… the opportunities for the museum’s future.

Right now we live in an exciting time of technology, creativity and innovation. I am eager to see how we can integrate new ideas to create even more relevant and immersive experiences that excite people about learning. We are also seeing a new generation of civically minded citizens eager to get involved in the community. It will be interesting to see how we can engage these young thinkers in new programs and planning.

… the value of museums.

Don’t underestimate the value of museums, art and culture in our society. It is through these resources we develop communities of informed citizens, creative thinkers and logical decision makers. We support, grow and enrich our city. Science Museum Oklahoma is a valuable resource and a great foundation for fun family engagement. If you haven’t visited lately, you should soon because there is so much new to do and see. You don’t want to miss a moment of it.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Read the full conversation @ OKmag.com

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

S

Sherry Marshall


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