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VOTE NOW FOR 2016 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM FEBRUARY 2016

A State of Innovation Local experts identify architectural masterpieces

THE

ART OF

A FINE

l i a t k c o C

Single in theMeetCity 9 of Oklahoma's eligible singles.

Image Matters A Younger, More Youthful You Spa Days For Men • Mommy Makeover


DUSTIN MATER

BRENT GREENWOOD

MARGARET WHEELER

NELSON GARCIA

MIKE LARSEN

DANIEL WORCESTER

S AT U R DAY, M AY 2 8 N A T I V E

A M E R I C A N

BRENDA KINGERY

A R T I S T S

from across the country will gather in Sulphur, Oklahoma for the world’s fastest-growing Native art market. Welcome! JOANNA UNDERWOOD BLACKBURN

W E S T M U S KO G E E AV E . , S U L P H U R , O K • 5 8 0 - 2 7 2 - 5 5 2 0


Features February

2016 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XX, No. 2

46 A New Year, A New You

Learn about the latest cosmetic and dermatological procedures and trends. We talk to local experts to learn more about surgical and non-surgical options for you in the new year.

52 A State of Innovation

We talk to local experts to find out more about the special buildings across the state.

58 Single in the City

With Valentine’s Day around the corner, we found some of the state’s most eligible bachelors and bachelorettes. Learn more about these 9 individuals and what it is like to be single in Oklahoma today.

62 Cocktail Hour

We visit some of the most popular bars and restaurants across the state to get the scoop on their best mixed drinks. Learn how you can make these drinks at home for your own happy hour or cocktail party.

VOTE NOW FOR 2014 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM!

VOTE NOW FOR 2015 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM

Choosing the right school is no small feat. We compile information from the experts about choosing the best fit for K-12 and also higher education options today.

SPECIAL SECTION 84 Senior Health

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FEBRUARY 2015

February 2015

66 Making the Grade

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read

A State of Innovation Local experts identify

expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

architectural masterpieces

MORE PHOTOS:

THE

ART OF

A FINE

Cocktail

Single in theMeetCity 9 of Oklahoma's eligible singles.

Image Matters A Younger, More Youthful You

Spa Days For Men • Mommy Makeover

ON THE COVER: THE FEN LI COCKTAIL FROM VALKYRIE IN TULSA’S BRADY DISTRICT.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.


WISHING YOU A

HAPPY HEART MONTH AND A HEALTHY HEART LIFE.

Today and every day throughout the year, your health is in great hands at St. John Heart Institute. We’re standing by 24 hours a day with heart attack response times that are faster than the national gold standards of both the American Heart Association and The American College of Cardiology.

Heart Month is the perfect time to focus on early detection. A cardiac scan can save your life. Schedule yours today. No doctor referral required.

C A L L T H E P U L S E L I N E AT 918 - 744-0123


Departments 13 The State

The legacy of bluegrass and western swing lives on through Texas Playgirl Ramona Reed and her son Jim Paul Blair.

14 16 17 18 20

OK Then Happening Nature The Insider Oklahoma Business

13

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

23 Life & Style 24 26 28 30 32 34 40

42 44

Style Accessorize Matters of the Heart Gadgets Art Living Space Destination

Get a first-hand account, in words and photos, of a trip to colorful and vibrant India.

Your Health Scene

91 Taste

Add another restaurant on your list to visit on Broken Arrow’s Main Street. Franklin’s Pork and Barrel offers new, flavorful twists on favorite dishes to great acclaim.

94 95

Three for One Local Flavor

97 Entertainment

Catch your favorite dancers in action as they bring the magic of Dancing with the Stars live to Oklahoma.

98 Calendar of Events 102 In Tulsa/In OKC

104 In Person

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Take good care of your heart and it will take good care of you.

Dr. Sharolyn Cook knows that the human heart is resilient. As a cardiologist at the Heart Hospital at Saint Francis, she and her colleagues care for patients with a broad range of conditions that include heart attacks, arterial blockages, congestive heart failure, vein conditions, arrhythmias and so much more. But even though the heart is resilient, people should be mindful of preventing heart disease, Dr. Cook says. “It’s very important for people to monitor their blood pressure and cholesterol. However, taking those extra steps by quitting smoking, being more active, adding more fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains to their diets, and reducing sweets is just as important,” she says. The Heart Hospital at Saint Francis provides experienced cardiac care, the latest technologies and treatments for patients. “I always tell my patients,” Dr. Cook says, “Take good care of your heart, and it will take good care of you.”

Dr. Sharolyn Cook INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGIST

Matthew E. Meyer, M.D. LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIST

Healthcare for life. saintfrancis.com/hearthospital | 918-488-6688


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA Hair Cuts & Styling Color Extensions

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

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CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ELIZABETH WOZOBSKI, JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN

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What will the next 20 bring?

ANNIVERSARY

th ANNIVERSARY

March 2016 will mark a significant milestone for Oklahoma Magazine, one that we are extremely proud of and have worked very hard to achieve. It’s our 20-year anniversary and we will celebrate with a special anniversary issue. Don’t miss out on being part of the celebration. Call now for special advertising opportunities for the March issue!

GRAPHIC DESIGNER BEN ALBRECHT DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB

CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2016 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates. TM

The publisher and staff of Oklahoma Magazine would like to thank our advertisers, readers and the people throughout our great state who, with their diverse talents and cultures, have allowed us to bring their stories to life each and every month.

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We look forward to your continued support in the coming years, and can’t wait to see what the next 20 will bring!

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LET TER FROM THE EDITOR

F

ebruary is for matters of the heart. Valentine’s Day is the time to show your loved ones just how much you care. On the following pages we include inspiration for your holiday shopping, from jewelry to clothes. But February is also American Heart Month – an annual reminder that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to the State of the State Health Report for 2014, Oklahoma has the third highest rate of death due to heart disease in the United States. We talk to Oklahomans who have survived – and thrived – serious heart health scares, along with giving you an overview of the latest technology available to help you seize the moment to get heart healthy. Also inside you will find our annual installment of “Single in the City.” These eligible bachelors and bachelorettes from Tulsa and Oklahoma City are sure to set hearts aflutter. And you’ll be able to treat your someone special to an equally special cocktail with recipes and instructions from the state’s most popular bars and restaurants. Get ready to raise a glass and toast to the month of love and cheers to your health in the new year. Elizabeth Wozobski Contributing Editor

RED RIBBON GALA

FEBRUARY 27, 2016

this is not a function. this is a night to remember. EVERYONE’S FAVORITE PARTY. JUST WEAR RED. COMMEMORATING 25 YEARS OF TULSA CARES. BECOME A SPONSOR AT REDRIBBONGALA.ORG 1015_RedRibbonGala_OkMag_HalfPg_011116.indd 21713 Red Ribbon.indd 1 1

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OKMAG.COM

SINGLE IN THE CITY

February is the month of love. To mark the occasion, each year we gather a group of young singles in Tulsa and OKC for a fun and flirty photo feature. Go behind the scenes of our annual Single in the City Tulsa photoshoot and meet a selection of Oklahoma’s most eligible bachelors and bachelorettes.

HAPPY HOUR

We visit one of Tulsa’s most popular bars and are given directions on how to perfectly prepare the watering hole’s signature cocktail. Get expert instruction from one of Tulsa’s best mixologists and impress your friends with your drinkmaking skills at your next dinner party. Cheers!

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

Also on OKMAG.COM:

OK

See extended fashion photo galleries, updated entertainment event calendar, web-exclusive video and much more.

WE’VE DONE IT AGAIN!

We asked. You answered. 40 Under 40’s Class of 2016 is the most impressive yet. Be sure to pick up the April issue to see who made the cut.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com Call 918.744.6205 40 under 40 1/2H.indd 1

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OKLAHOMA 1/18/16 1:58 PM


Jane Elterman Lung cancer patient at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® and LUNG FORCE Hero

THE SIGNS OF LUNG CANCER

As dangerous as lung cancer can be, it is treatable and survivable. MORE THAN 400,000 PEOPLE DIAGNOSED WITH LUNG CANCER ARE ALIVE TODAY.4 Your best chances of successfully fighting lung cancer start with early detection. To learn more about lung cancer screening, visit LUNGCANCERSCREENINGSAVESLIVES.ORG. WARNING SIGNS If you experience any of the following symptoms, see your doctor right away:

A COUGH THAT DOESN’T GO AWAY, OR COUGHING UP BLOOD

What every woman should know about

LUNG CANCER Yes, lung cancer. Many women are concerned about breast cancer. But did you know: LUNG CANCER IS THE CANCER KILLER OF WOMEN1

#1

LUNG CANCER KILLS ALMOST AS MANY WOMEN AS ANY OTHER CANCER2

2X

IF YOU ARE DIAGNOSED Education is empowering, so learn about your type and stage of lung cancer and the latest treatment options. Find a team of experts with whom you feel comfortable, one that will take the time to answer all of your questions and explain the alternatives. And don’t delay.

LET’S STOP LUNG CANCER! #ShareYourVoice. To donate or learn more, visit LUNGFORCE.ORG.

LUNG CANCER HAS INCREASED AMONG WOMEN SINCE 1978 3

98%

While women are more likely to develop breast cancer, lung cancer is far more dangerous. It can strike anyone, at any age, even if they have never smoked.

CTCA is proud to support LUNG FORCE by the American Lung Association.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) is a national network of five hospitals that offer an integrative approach to care that combines advancements in genomic testing and precision cancer treatment, surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, with nutritional counseling, naturopathic medicine, mind-body therapy and spiritual support to enhance quality of life while reducing side effects both during and after treatment. Consistently rated among U.S. hospitals that deliver the highest quality of care and patient experience, CTCA® provides patients and their families with comprehensive information about their treatment options and encourages their active participation in treatment decisions. Learn more at cancercenter.com or call 800-333-CTCA. References: 1. cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/data/women.htm 2. lungforce.org/womens-lung-health-barometer-infographic

UNEXPLAINED RECURRING SHORTNESS INFECTIONS SUCH OF BREATH OR AS BRONCHITIS WHEEZING OR PNEUMONIA

3. U.S. National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute: SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1973-2011 4. lung.org/lung-disease/lung-cancer/resources/facts-figures/lung-cancer-fact-sheet.html

Atlanta Chicago Philadelphia Phoenix Tulsa

© 2015 Rising Tide


Vaginal Health

Dr. Melanie R. Blackstock, M.D. 6465 South Yale Ave. Suite 310 918.236.3064 www.monalisatulsa.com

Look who’s talking about it.

“It” can be vaginal dryness, itching or burning, and it happens to a majority of women after menopause. Now there’s something you can do about it that is clinically proven to bring long-lasting relief. With the MonaLisa Touch laser treatment, vaginal health is restored due to new collagen, elastin and vascularization. This quick, in-office treatment requires no anesthesia and results in virtually no downtime. Thousands of women have been successfully treated since 2008—and now, millions more don’t have to suffer. That’s something to talk about.

Dr. Blackstock and her staff cordially invite you to attend an open house on Tuesday, February 9th. Please RSVP by calling our office at 918.236.3064. This is a great way to learn about the Mona Lisa Touch.

MonaLisa Touch is a trademark of DEKA M.E.L.A. Srl – Calenzano - Italy.

©2015 Cynosure, Inc.


State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

RAMONA REED PERFORMS WITH HER SON JIM PAUL BLAIR (RIGHT). ALSO PICTURED IS BAND MEMBER BILL MORGAN. PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

Like Mother, Like Son

J

The legacy of bluegrass & western swing lives on through Texas Playgirl Ramona Reed and her son Jim Paul Blair.

im Paul Blair’s childhood memories are different from most. At four-years-old, it was commonplace for young Blair to hang out in his mother’s motel room with the likes of Bob Wills, Eldon Shamblin, Keith Coleman and Tommy Allsup. “I just knew that she was involved in music,” says Blair. “The rest of it never registered with me–I didn’t realize that my life was different.” His mother is Ramona Reed, famed vocalist and yodeler, an original member of Tulsa’s own Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys and no stranger to Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry. Blair was the youngest of three children at the time – a younger brother would come along later. His two older sisters were in school so he had the pleasure of tagging along with Mom as she embarked on the resurgence of her career. “I did a lot with Bob Wills and I just took Jim with me,” says Reed.

Born in Tahlihina in 1930, Ramona Reed’s stardom started at around age 12, performing for community organizations, USO events and radio shows. Word has it that she could yodel before she could speak. At 13, she convinced her mother to take her to St. Louis for voice lessons. She auditioned for instructor Louise Kregor who advised Ramona to wait until age 15. Reed was disappointed – then the sign advertising the opportunity to make a record caught her eye. “I begged my mother to go in,” says Reed. “I made a couple of records and the guy told my mother that she needed to get me some auditions.” Fast forward to 1951, age 19, when Reed started performing with Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys. She married Jimmie Blair of Clayton, Okla. in 1952 and had been with Wills’ band for several years when Jim Paul came along in 1961.

Blair mentions that his dad, Jimmie, was an engineer. He wasn’t musically-inclined, but he loved to dance. Blair believes the musical legacy began with his maternal grandfather. “My grandfather was an entertainer. Keep in mind that he was born in 1898 – back in the days of vaudeville,” says Blair. Reed remembers her father singing, dancing and even yodeling. “He taught me a lot of songs when I was a little girl,” says Reed. At age 12, Jim Paul Blair decided to become a drummer. “She [Reed] would get jobs working with bands at rodeos, and they would hire me to play the drums,” says Blair. “I was bored to death playing country music –I wanted to play rock and roll.” Little did he know that his opinion of country music would drastically change. It’s no surprise that all of the Blair siblings are FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

talented musicians. “My youngest sister was the first one of the kids to really start performing,” says Blair. “My brother has always been drawn to country music – early on he was playing bass and fiddle.” At 16, Ramona Reed graduated high school. In the fall of 1947 she left home to attend the Colorado Women’s College in Denver. Reed recalls that she once received two demerits from her house mother for yodeling. Also in 1947, the Ted Mac Amateur Radio Hour came to Denver (the American Idol of the day). Reed landed a spot in the semi-finals and then took third place. It was time for another road trip. “She hops on a train to Nashville with her mom – no appointment,” says Blair. “They get off the train at Union Station and catch a cab to WSM. Back then, WSM was a 50,000 watt radio station and, at night, you could pick it up in eastern Oklahoma.” Within minutes of getting off of the train, Reed ends up in the office of Jack Stapp, the manager of the Grand Ole Opry. “I just walked into the office in my cowgirl clothes and got an audition,” says the confident Reed. Shortly after noon she was performing on

Roy Acuff’s Noontime Neighbors radio show, and appeared on the Grand Ole Opry that night. “A pretty incredible success story,” says Blair with pride. “She became the voice of Martha White. That was her job – to be Martha White and plug the flour.” Jim went to high school in Clayton. He admits that he would have liked to forget college and just play music. However, this was not an option in the Blair household. “‘You’re going to college’ was always engrained in me,” states Jim. So, Stillwater it was – his older sister was already there. “He always had good study habits and he’s very smart. He sure didn’t get any of that from me,” says Reed. “I’m just proud of him. He graduated in the upper 10 percent at OSU But I don’t want to brag too much!” “I did well in school but I felt a little lost. I needed to start playing music again,” says Blair. He went down to the local music store to put a drum kit in layaway – then he noticed a banjo hanging on the wall. “I’d had this fixation with the banjo that went all the way back to Herman’s Hermits and “Mrs. Brown You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter,” laughs Blair. “I was intrigued, and for $125 I

could take a banjo home and start playing it, so that’s what I did.” Before long he was a master of the strings, and he met fellow OSU Cowboy, Garth Brooks. Blair’s musician sister was actually responsible for their introduction. “We became friends and, over the years played in some bluegrass bands together,” says Blair – a short summation of a long, interesting story. “Once Garth even performed with me and my mom [Reed] at the student union.” In 2009, Ramona Reed was inducted into the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame. Jim and his brother had the privilege of accompanying their mother on stage. The rest of the band were Texas Playboys, thanks to long-time friend, Tommy Allsup. “That was a big night,” remembers Blair. “She was thrilled to be honored.” Blair mentions that his mom’s memory is extremely sharp.“A few years ago I’m at her house,” says Blair. “She pulls out this dress and says ‘This is the dress that I was wearing when me and Audrey had a falling out.’” Audrey was Hank William’s wife and the “spat” was over a particular song that Reed had performed at the Opry, resulting in Reed quitting her job

THE MUSEUM’S TROPHY ROOM TRANSPORTS YOU TO A BIG GAME SAFARI. RIGHT: MIDGLEY HOUSE WAS BUILT IN 1947 FROM STONES AND PETRIFIED WOOD EXCAVATED DURING THE TRAVELS OF DAN AND LIBBIE MIDGLEY. FILE PHOTO

OK THEN

A Heartland Cabinet of Curiosities

Enid’s Midgley Museum continues to enchant and intrigue visitors from across the state.

E

ach year during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Dan and Libbie Midgley pulled up stakes from their farm in northwest Oklahoma to travel the nation, selling their lucrative hay and

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

wheat harvests. Upon their annual arrival back in Oklahoma, they returned with a harvest of a different sort: an eclectic array of geological treasures and artifacts. Now, over a century since the couple first settled their 160-acre farmstead, the Midgley

Museum, or the “Rock House” as it is locally known, occupies a place as one of the most beloved attractions in Enid. It was the couple’s fondest dream that their fascinating collection of minerals, gems, fossils and more — indeed, their home itself — would become an exhibit


and heading to Texas. Next on the slate was the Big D Jamboree – the Grand Ole Opry of Texas. Hank Williams, Sr. was the first artist that really caught young Blair’s attention. He was riding in the back seat of his dad’s Jeep in 1964 when “Hey, Good Lookin,” started playing on the radio. “That was the first song that ever really spoke to me,” he says with a laugh. “There was an immediate connection.” Blair performed his first Hank Williams tribute show on New Year’s Eve 2002, the 50th anniversary of his death. In 2009, Blair was cast as Hank Williams in Muskogee Little Theater’s production of “Lost Highway.” Today, Blair’s popular “Hankerin for Hank” tribute keeps the legend of Hank Williams, Sr. alive. He even dresses in a suit that was custom-made for him by Nashville’s Manuel who was Hank’s personal tailor in the day.

The theater life didn’t end there for Blair as he went on to portray Buddy Holly in MLT’s production of “The Buddy Holly Story” in 2013. “Being friends with Tommy Allsup, I really wanted get the part,” says Jim. Allsup was Buddy Holly’s guitar player, best known for losing the coin toss to Ritchie Valens. Holly was 22 at the time of his death and Blair was 52 at the time of the audition – but still landed the leading role. Blair’s three daughters were also raised surrounded by music. “My middle daughter was really enthralled with it,” says Blair, adding that she graduated from the Belmont School of Music Business. At 85, Ramona Reed is

a spunky great-grandmother who still loves the stage. Blair lost his father in 2000 following a courageous, 23-year battle with cancer. Reed continues to perform with the Texas Playboys and enjoys demonstrating her yodeling skill to school children. She is still an area favorite, performing her classic songs accompanied by Jim. Jim Paul Blair’s life has come full circle, his love of music and that education that “wasn’t a choice” has combined to form a beautiful life song of sorts. He and wife Tracy have made Muskogee their home and, as the executive director of the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame, he proudly showcases the state’s rich musical heritage that is so close to his heart. Blair’s current project, the G-Fest Music Festival, is a dream of his that is quickly becoming a reality – with four stages and over 30 acts, it is scheduled for June. Will Ramona Reed will be performing? “Nobody’s really asked me that,” he says with a laugh. “It’s not out of the realm of possibility.” As for the next generation, Blair has 5-yearold twin grandsons – who already have guitars.

moose, reindeer, a buffalo weighing in at nearly a ton, javelinas (pig-like creatures from Central and South America) and other wild game from the family’s hunting trips abroad. Due to the weight of the hunting trophies, the stonemasons brought in from Texas to construct the home built extra reinforcements into the walls of the room. In the other rooms visitors can find an extensive variety of unique geological wonders, mostly collected from areas of the American Southwest. A gem of a different sort for geology lovers, the exhibits include more than 30 varieties of fossils, agates, petrified wood, crystals and more. A small closet, called the Black Light Room, is dedicated to displaying rocks and minerals that may look ordinary by daylight, but put on a fluorescent light show under

the right conditions. Elsewhere in the museum, marvels include a large fireplace carved from fossilized stone and the largest gypsum selenite crystal ever retrieved from Oklahoma’s Great Salt Plains. However, the Midgley Museum is much more than simply a showpiece for physical treasures: the museum offers a peek into the everyday lives of this adventurous pioneer couple. In addition to the geological curiosities, visitors can witness more intimate objects such as the couple’s wedding cigars and English wedding china, their musical instruments collection and their daughter Eva’s antique toys. The family furnishings and priceless silver still occupy honored places among the collection, along with quilts, coins, stamps, arrowheads and even shark’s teeth. Other objects trace the history of the couple’s activism in their local community. Garber estimates that despite limited hours (the museum is often closed during the winter), between 500 and 800 visitors are drawn to the museum annually. If you would like to join them, the Midgley Museum is located at 1001 Sequoyah Drive in Enid, Okla. Admission is free, although donations are welcome.

RAMONA REED PERFORMING ON WSM RADIO IN NASHVILLE, TENN. IN THE 1940S, OKLAHOMANS COULD PICK UP THE 50,000 WATT STATION AT NIGHT PHOTO COURTESY OF RAMONA REED.

for all to see. In fulfillment of her parents’ wishes, Eva Midgley lovingly arranged the couple’s artifacts collected during their travels, as well as their day-to-day possessions for public display, and the museum was opened to the community in 1991. Upon Eva’s death, it was willed to the City of Enid and is now operated by the local Masonic Lodge and Daughters of the Eastern Star Chapter. Home to an unusual and intimate snapshot of the geology, lifestyles and history of the southwestern United States, the house serves as the centerpiece of the museum. It was built by the couple in 1947 from stones and petrified wood excavated during their travels. Greeting visitors who come to the museum grounds is a 7,000-pound. petrified tree stump, brought by the family to Enid from the Woodward area. “It’s a fabulous house,” says Judy Garber, co-director of the museum, “and everything in it is fabulous.” Stepping into the museum’s Trophy Room is to be transported to a big game safari. In addition to game birds and animal hides, the room is home to stuffed specimens of royal Canadian elk,

LAURIE GOODALE

TARA MALONE

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

15


The State

THE HAPPENING

OKLAHOMA MOVES UP IN

AMERICA’S

HEALTH RANKINGS

According to the latest report from the United Health Foundation, Oklahoma is moving in the right direction. The state now ranks 45th in overall health – progress from the ranking of 49th assigned to the state in 2009. The last year saw a significant increase in the number of Oklahoma children being immunized, from 62.7 percent in 2014 to 73.3 percent. Of particular note in the report is the lowest smoking rate reported at 21.1 percent. However, hurdles remain. The high prevalence of obesity, the high rate of cardiovascular deaths and a limited availability of primary care physicians are all noted as challenges in the report.

GRABBING THE PERFECT SELFIE WITH FIDO

DRINK MORE COFFEE!

OKC ZOO CELEBRATES NEW ADDITION

Already mastered the selfie? The New York Times reports on a study from the Time to move on to grabbing Harvard School of Public Health that should come as the perfect shot with your What’s black and white and the welcome news to coffee lovers: drinking coffee could favorite pooch. The Pooch newest member of the Oklahoma actually help you live longer. The study points to reSelfie is an attachment for City Zoo family? That would be the duced risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, diabetes, your phone that is sure to Grevy zebra foal born in Novemneurological diseases and suicide. Coffee drinkers keep your dog’s attention ber. Mom Sassandra, dad Ziggy who had at least one cup of joe per day (who were for the camera. A squeaking and the male foal are all in good also non-smokers) had a six percent reduced risk Pooch Selfie ball fits into the health. The Grevy zebra is not only of death when compared to those who did holder atop the phone, holdthe largest breed of zebra but also the not drink coffee. According to the results, ing the gaze of your dog while most endangered in the wild. Indeed there was, however, little difference you take a selfie or take a photo the Oklahoma City Zoo participates in between drinking caffeinated or of the dog from afar. Designed for the Zebra Species Survival Plan with decaffeinated coffee. iPhones and the Galaxy phone, but the Association of Zoos and Aquariums in the makers, Clever Dog Products, say an effort to ensure the future of the Grevy zetheir creation also works with most bras. Visit the zebras on Wild Dog Row, weather smartphones and tablets on the market. permitting of 40 degrees or above in dry conditions. The Oklahoma City Zoo is located at the crossroads of I-44 and I-35 and hours of operation are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Regular admission is $8 for adults, and $5 for children ages 3-11 and seniors ages 65 and over. Children two and under are admitted free.

$500,000 Matching Grant Announced for Conservation

The Kirkpatrick Family Fund announced last month a $500,000 matching gift for the continued preservation of the J.T. Nickel Family Nature and Wildlife Preserve near Tahlequah, Okla. It will be administered via an endowment fund through the Oklahoma City Community Foundation.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

“This recent gift will help the Nature Conservancy maintain the Nickel Preserve for years to come,” said Christian Keesee, President of the Kirkpatrick Family Fund. “Most importantly, it will enable them to help sustain the plant and animal communities on the preserve, as well as develop the land as a demonstration site in land management best practices.” The J.T. Nickel Family Nature and Wildlife Preserve is the largest privately protected conservation area in the Ozarks with 17,000 acres. Donors have until Nov. 30, 2016 to make matching gifts to the James K. Hotchkiss endowment fund for The Nature Conservancy of Oklahoma and can do so by visiting occf.org/ncok or contacting Gayle Farley the Oklahoma City Community Foundation at 405.606.2910.


N AT U R E

A Soft Landing Tulsan Lisa Moser’s noisy life is dedicated to assisting homeless companion birds.

C

PHOTO CREDIT NATALIE GREEN.

lyde is a good boy!” states the extremely social, white cockatoo (Clyde) as he and his buddy B.J., an African grey, entered the Oklahoma Magazine studio with their mom, Lisa Moser. It was a road trip for the two feathered friends–their day to tell their story and show-off for our camera. Moser is the founder of Soft Landings Parrot Rescue, Inc., a home-based, 501(c) (3) organization that serves dislocated companion birds – finding homes for those that are adoptable, while providing permanent sanctuary for those that are not. We hear a lot about animal rescues, but a parrot rescue in Tulsa, Oklahoma? “There aren’t a multitude of parrot rescues across our country like there are dog and cat rescues,” says Moser. “But all of them stay full.” Clyde and B.J. are two of over 25 birds that currently reside at Soft Landings, aka Lisa Moser’s family home. It all started six years ago when the family adopted an African grey named Cody Bird. “He was our first large parrot,” says Moser. She went on to talk about how Cody is madly in love with her daughter Ericka. “We began educating ourselves on caring for Cody and started reading about rescue,” explains Moser. “I had no idea that bird rescue existed!” Only a few months had passed following the Mosers welcoming Cody into their home when Lisa and husband Chad began discussing another addition. “I started following a rescue near Red Oak, Texas and they had a situation come up with a pair of cockatoos,” recalls Moser. It was an all to common situation – an adoption that didn’t work out. The Moser’s made the trek down to Austin to pick up “Sonny and Cher,” sight unseen. Upon arrival they were led into an empty, dark condo by a neighbor. “These people had moved and left them [Sonny and Cher]. The neighbor was coming over once a day to feed them. I was just heartbroken. I mean, how could you do that?” It wasn’t long before Moser knew that her heart was leading her

to become more involved. In the meantime, Clyde joined the family. “My intentions were to foster him and find him a home,” Moser remembers. Instead, Clyde became her son Nathan’s bird. B.J. came to the rescue accompanied by a pair of cockatoos and a macaw. Their owner was moving to an assisted living center. “These guys are intelligent and live forever,” says Moser. “I have birds who have outlived their owners. We’ve had everything from it [the bird] is too loud and messy, to horrible abandonment cases,” she adds. “I’ve even heard ‘If you don’t take it, I’m just going to throw it outside!’” She doesn’t even know the number of small birds that have been found – thrown outside. Moser gets a lot more leads to surrendered birds than she does to potential adopters. Soft Landings works with other sanctuaries across the country both transferring and taking in birds. The rescue strives to educate owners, while promoting adoption over purchasing a bird from a breeder. Moser explains that parrots have the average intelligence of a six to eight-year-old child and the emotional maturity of a three-year-old. They need daily interaction, a healthy diet, exercise and proper veterinary care. “These guys need things to do. They need to get out of their cages,” says Moser. “People want a pretty bird that doesn’t bite, can talk and will ride on their shoulder.” This is not usually the reality of living with a bird. “A lot of things that are labeled as behavioral problems are just them being who they are. They are birds – they chew, they are messy and they are loud.” The work associated with the busy rescue is anything but a “soft landing” for Moser who takes on most of the responsibility herself. Is she looking for volunteers? Always! LAURIE GOODALE

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

17


The State THE INSIDER

Taking the Show On the Road The strange tale of Ingagi’s Claremore screening.

A

n attentive reader might wonder why I’ve now done two columns in a row that have to do with the city of Claremore. Maybe it’s subconscious. I grew up in Chelsea, 18 miles down Highway 66, and Claremore was the place where we went to have fun. So perhaps on some subliminal level I still think of Claremore as an entertainment para-

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

dise worthy of continued exploration. More likely, though, it’s just serendipity. For last month’s installment, I wrote about how Claremore’s great playwright and poet, Lynn Riggs, had finally gotten his due in his hometown. And I’d no more than finished that piece when I ran across a column in the Claremore Progress by Larry Larkin, my friend and collaborator (on the book J.M. Davis Arms & Historical Museum, along

with Wayne McCombs). A part of Larry’s “Remembering Back When . . .” series, it was about a long-ago run-in between a visiting lecturer and some local boys he’d hired to help publicize his appearance. The man, who called himself Leon Dillingham, had been in town to appear at the local movie theater with an African-safari feature called Ingagi. That got my attention. As a lover of ancient, offbeat movies, I knew how notorious Ingagi had been, and how much of an effect it had improbably exerted upon the nation’s popular culture of the time. I had first run onto the title in a book by another one of my friends and collaborators, Michael H. Price of Fort Worth, Texas. In Forgotten Horrors, a groundbreaking work first published in 1979, Price and collaborator George E. Turner wrote in detail about how this alleged documentary from 1930 had been cobbled together by “an old-time circus impresario” and independent film producer named Nathan M. Spitzer. Spitzer combined, without bothering to get permission, scenes from an actual 1914 safari picture called Heart of Africa with patently bogus new stuff shot in California, featuring a soon-to-be-legendary portrayer of gorillas named Charles Gemora running rampant in an oversized ape suit. “Although it was all supposed to be in Africa, [Spitzer] took that footage from Heart of Africa and added soundstage stuff, mixing in flora and fauna of the New World,” notes Price. “But, gosh, when you look at the footage of Charlie Gemora on the rampage, it is powerful stuff.” Released by an independent outfit called Congo Pictures, Ingagi also features a reptile, as Price and Turner wrote, that’s allegedly “so venomous it cannot be brought to civilization.” In fact, this horrifying creature is a customized African leopard tortoise, which the filmmakers covered with the armor of a scaly anteater, gluing on a pair of laminated bird wings for good measure. That creature led to the film drawing a resolution of protest from the American Society of Mammalogists, one of several groups that piled on the supposedly factual picture. “Congo Pictures really bit off a lot more than they could chew,” Price says. “They were not counting on the controversy from the scientific community.” That also goes for the film’s narrative thread, which has to do with mating between gorillas and humans, presented in a way that would be wildly offensive not only to scientists, but also to today’s moviegoers. However, in 1930, Boy Scouts and other school-age children were invited by some theater owners to view this “educational” picture at special screenings. And that’s a good place to segue into the


The State

Claremore engagement of Ingagi. It’s not known if the Oklahoma youngsters involved were promised tickets or their own preview by the visiting Leon Dillingham; what is known is that Dillingham arrived in town via train sometime in late August of 1930, stepped onto the Frisco platform decked out in a sporty safari outfit, checked into the nearby Sequoyah Hotel and enlisted the aid of several local kids to plaster the town with handbills advertising his big event. As a member of the actual expedition, along with credited leaders Sir Hubert Winstead and Daniel Swayne, Dillingham was to give a lecture at each showing. As noted earlier, all the film’s African footage had been shot a decade and a half earlier by someone else and then pirated by producer Spitzer for Ingagi. (That someone was a British woman, Lady Grace Mackenzie, whose son eventually won a judgment against Congo Pictures for unauthorized use of the material.) So, since there was no Ingagi expedition, Sir Hubert Winstead and Daniel Swayne were not real people. Neither, it seems, was Leon Dillingham. Being an independent feature, without major-studio backing (although it was later picked up for booking by RKO Pictures), Ingagi made a lot of its money via roadshows, in which a studio representative would travel from town to town, carrying a copy of the movie and arranging screenings at local theaters. This worked especially well in the entertainment-starved heartland of America in the ‘30s and ‘40s, when crowds would queue up to watch just about anything that moved on a screen. While this was an economical way of doing business – a small company didn’t have to come up with the amount of cash necessary to make a ton of 35mm prints – it also provided plenty of opportunities for film piracy. An unscrupulous roadshow man could, as Michael Price explains, “schlep a print over to a lab and have a copy made – a dupe – and start booking this bootlegged print himself. Ingagi probably got pirated away from the original makers more times than anyone knows.” Now, maybe Leon Dillingham was legitimately a representative of Congo Films. But, regardless of whom he said he was, we know he hadn’t been on any Ingagi expedition, and since the film itself was created and promoted on such a bedrock of lies, what would be the harm of one more misrepresentation, of either bootlegging a print for his own gain or colluding with another film pirate to distribute one? It’s not like anybody was going to catch him. So I want to believe that “Leon Dillingham” was a grifter, falsely identifying himself as an African explorer as he wove his way through the hinterlands, raking in money with a purloined print of Ingagi. And the main reason I want to believe he’s a poser and a crook is that he stiffed the Claremore kids he hired to pass out his handbills. But there’s where he erred. According to an unsigned front-page story in the Sept. 4, 1930 Claremore Weekly Progress, when Dillingham tried to get out of town without paying the boys, they broached him at the depot, pelted him with rotten eggs and took off with his luggage and hat. “They could not get their money, so they said, so they did their dead level best to take it out of his hide,” the story notes. “And in this they seem to have been successful. It is reasonable to believe that he would have fared far better if he had given each lad a small amount for the bill distribution and then left the city in peace. As it now is, he is short of his luggage and his Congo hat which he seemed to prize very much.” Maybe, just maybe, there’s an attic in Claremore where a dusty, ancient hat still resides, a lonely and forgotten one-time trophy snatched in retribution from the head of an alleged African explorer who tried to squeeze just a little too much profit out of a stop in small-town Oklahoma.

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The State

AMAS TENUMAH, ONCE A HIGH-POWERED CORPORATE EXECUTIVE, NOW CONSULTS WITH COMPANIES ON PROVIDING GREAT CUSTOMER EXPERIENCES AND IS THE AUTHOR OF THE CURATED EXPERIENCE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Doing What They Love

Two Oklahoma City millennials represent a broader trend of young professionals bucking the system and carving out their own paths.

A

mas Tenumah can’t stop smiling. At 32, he is one of a growing number of millennials turning their backs on the traditional 9-to-5 work world to pursue their passions. They’re not just switching jobs; they’re creating their own jobs. And they’re making money at them, too. Tenumah began his career in customer service. He rose through the ranks quickly, accepted more and more lucrative positions and eventually found himself, at 30, at the top of the executive ladder at Teleflora, the online flower and gift company. Tenumah slowly carved out a role for

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

himself as an evangelist of sorts, a preacher who spreads the word that customer experience should be every company’s first priority. It should come before profits. It should come before shareholder value. With excellent customer service, the other two will follow. “I have a worldview which is somewhat contrarian,” he says. “I basically say to CEOs that the entire reason they’re in business is to deliver a great customer experience. They tell me they’re here to make money. I explain that profits and growth are byproducts of that experience.” Edmond resident Lexi Piper, 26, is smiling equally as broadly. She gave up her

job as a retail clerk at an art supply store to pursue silversmithing and photography, two art forms she trained for at the University of Central Oklahoma. She makes jewelry that she sells on her online Etsy store and Facebook page. She also takes custom orders and has reached a point where her passion pays the bills. But she’s not limiting herself to jewelry. “I would like to be making artwork to sell to the public and make a living through either teaching or creating art. I’m a little different from some artists in that I tend to bounce around and do several different things as far as things that will make me money in the art world,” she says.


Employees First, Then Everything Follows

Tenumah sums up the philosophy that spun him out of the 9-to-5 work world nicely in his book, The Curated Experience. He likes to deliver his message in ways that shock, ways that wedge brains out of the ruts of regular business practices – the kinds of practices that riddle the conventional work world. “I point out how we devalue people who work in service and expect them to tolerate abusive customers,” he says. “These companies even write policies about how much abuse you should take depending on your pay grade. Those are the people on the front lines that are interfacing with your customers. I like telling the story of Southwest Airlines. They had a very loyal customer who flew with them for years. But all she did was complain. And it eventually got escalated to their CEO. It took him one minute to respond: ‘We will miss you.’ He understands that in his hierarchy, it’s his employees first,” he says. He puts the exclamation point on the story by noting that during the airline industry turbulence following 9/11, and all of the lay-offs and corporate restructuring that accompanied it, only one airline remained profitable: Southwest. And they didn’t have a single layoff. It’s stories like this that fire Tenumah up and put that wide, bright smile on his face. It’s where his passion comes from. But it’s the kind of story that isn’t received well in the traditional work world. Yet when he makes the connection, when he finds the CEO who is smarter than the others, he moves in, begins consulting and helps companies redesign their customer engagement programs from the ground up. Maybe he reconfigures that irritating phone tree put into place to save money on employee salaries. Maybe he shows companies how to use their customer data to respond more efficiently and effectively to customer requests. “There was a big ‘ah-ha’ moment for me,” he says. “It was around Thanksgiving and Christmas. Very big time in retail. We sold a lot of flowers. Our staff is sitting there planning, and it just dawned on me that all of our calculations were just inside out. It was all about how we saw Christmas, not from the customer’s point of view. Little things, like why is it that during holiday seasons, wait times just go through the roof? And we all just accept it. But wait a second. This should not be a surprise to anybody. Christmas has been around for awhile. That’s when I began to see myself as the outsider.”

Tenumah started a series of conversations inside the company. They weren’t enthusiastically received. It was then that he realized he needed to move on. He just didn’t know what was next. There were a couple of attractive job openings in the wings, but they felt like they’d just be more of the same. He founded his own company, BetterXperience, instead.

Freedom To Discover

For Piper, the 9-to-5 work world never appealed to her, even as a child. Her family lived in that world, and it never seemed like it would be a good fit for her. “I remember being very young and thinking I never could decide exactly what I wanted. Like, what do you want to be when you grow up? My answer was always changing. Everybody I worked with had jobs that they’d had since they were my age, and they stayed in them for the rest of their lives, and I never thought that seemed right for me. I never wanted to be locked into anything,” she says. Piper wants room to move, freedom to discover and opportunities to push boundaries. In addition to being a silversmith and photographer, she’s also a painter and illustrator. Her work has been featured in local galleries, and she’s well-known for being a switch-hitter in the art world, something she couldn’t do if she were working one job, in one chair, at one desk, at one company. “This kind of life allows me to explore and learn so many different kinds of things even though it’s definitely not the most stable of life paths,” says Piper. “I just never gravitated toward any kind of career that was permanent. I always thought, well, I’ll do this for a little bit and I’ll do that for a little bit, and hopefully something would stick. I guess I’m bohemian in the sense that I think you should be able to do what you like to do. If you don’t wake up and think, I really want to go to work today, then you should be considering doing something else.” Tenumah enjoys the same freedoms. “What I found at the end of the day, was, that what I’m really, really interested in – what drives me – is the ability to make really positive, long-lasting change within customer experience,” Tenumah says. “Sitting in my chair there at Teleflora, I was extremely limited. Within the corporate structure, they just weren’t aligned with my thinking. I needed a bigger platform. Where I was sitting, it wasn’t a big enough platform.”

AS A CHILD, LEXI PIPER KNEW THAT A TRADITIONAL 9-TO-5 JOB WASN’T GOING TO BE FOR HER. SHE NOW MAKES A LIVING THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY AND SILVERSMITHING. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

PAUL FAIRCHILD

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

The Sweet Taste of Love

E

Modern day love has ancient beginnings.

very February, love is in the air. From jewelry to chocolates to a night on the town with that special someone, Valentine’s Day is a time to show someone how much you care. But how much do you know about the holiday itself? There are varying legends surrounding Valentine’s Day. One is that Valentine was a priest in third century Rome. When the Emperor

(Claudius II) outlawed marriage for young men (the idea being they would make better soldiers without such attachments), the theory goes, Valentine continued to perform marriages in secret. He was ultimately put to death for doing so. Another theory is that St.Valentine was killed for assisting Christians in escaping Roman prisons, also on Feb. 14. Yet another tale is that the holiday derives from the pre-Roman festival of Lupercalia – an annual event to rid

the city of evil spirits. Today’s celebrations of the holiday include approximately one billion cards exchanged (second only to Christmas cards), somewhere around eight billion candy hearts produced, and almost 50 million roses given to a loved one. According to U.S. News and World Report, spending for the holiday in 2015 was approximately $18.9 billion. In the following pages you will find some inspiration for holiday shopping for that special someone – from jewelry to clothing and ideas in between. You will also find information for another important happening in February – and fittingly so – as it is American Heart Month. Hear from the experts about what you can do to keep your heart healthy, what gadgets and apps are available to help keep you on track, and hear stories from those who have survived – and thrived – after serious heart problems. ELIZABETH WOZOBSKI

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

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Life & Style

1

2

3 ACCESSORIZE

Shimmering Chic

4

On Valentine’s Day you can’t go wrong with the gift of bling. 6

5

7

8 10

9

12 13

11

14 1. Adriana Orsini Deco Pave Triangle Small Drop, $95, Saks Fifth Avenue. 2. FOS Pink Rose Stone Necklace, $36, Donna’s Fashions. 3. Adriana Orsini Eden Crystal Necklace $275, Saks Fifth Avenue. 4. Adriana Orsini Pave Bracelet $75, Saks Fifth Avenue. 5. Adriana Orsini Pave Circle Neckace, $295, Saks Fifth Avenue. 6. Adriana Orsini Deco Pave Triangel Burst Necklace, $110, Saks Fifth Avenue. 7. Adriana Orsini Pave Crystal Rosette Pendant Necklace, $100, Saks Fifth Avenue. 8. Adriana Orsini Deco Pave Arrow Cuff Bracelet, $150, Saks Fifth Avenue. 9. Adriana Orsini Pave Crystal Hoop Earrings, $100, Saks Fifth Avenue. 10. FOS Pink Rose Stone Gold Bracelet, $36, Donna’s Fashions. 11. Adriana Orsini Pave Crystal Silverstone Huggie Hoop, $85, Saks Fifth Avenue. 12. Adriana Orsini Pave Chandelier Earrings $125, Saks Fifth Avenue. 13. Adriana Orsini Eden Pave Bracelet, $150, Saks Fifth Avenue. 14. Adriana Orsini Pave Crystal Three-Row Bangle Bracelet, $160, Saks Fifth Avenue. 15. Adriana Orsini Eden Pave Crystal Bangle Bracelet, $275, Saks Fifth Avenue.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016


Whatever is happening in your li fe,

there’s a good chance your

college exp e rie nce help e d you get to whe re you are to day. Whe n you refle c t on that time , you may b e ove r whelme d by fond me morie s — me eting your sp ouse , cele brating a big football win , pulling an all- nighte r to stu dy or laughing with p e ople who b e came your lifelong frie nds . To day ’s O kla h om a State U nive r sit y students are having the same experiences as they pur sue bright orange futures . Visit OS Ugiving.com to learn how you can b e a par t of their journey.


Life & Style

M AT T E R S O F T H E H E A R T

Survivors

Two Oklahomans share how heart disease has touched their lives.

H

eart Disease is a killer. However, some who face it find a way to learn to live, and even thrive, despite the seriousness of the diagnosis. These are the stories of two Oklahomans who are living a healthy and full life despite being diagnosed with heart disease.

Gene Swepston, Tulsa

On a random day back in 2013, Gene Swepston sat with his wife while he enjoyed a glass of wine at his favorite bar when, by chance, in walked a friend who worked with the Oklahoma Heart Institute on the campus of Hillcrest Medical Center. During their chat, Swepston learned about a heart scan, newly available at the time. Intrigued by the new technology, Swepston made an appointment shortly after learning about all the scan could show about the health of his heart. “My father and uncle died of an aneurysm,” shares Swepston, age 64. “I wanted to know so I could do something about it.” The scan and further tests found some mild blockage in the section of the heart that is commonly called “the widow maker,” or medically known as the anterior interventricular branch of the left coronary artery (LAD). Swepston and his doctor formulated a plan of a heart-healthy diet and regular exercise at least five times a week in order to combat the blockage. “I jumped right in and was really committed to this plan,” remembers Swepston. “I was excited to see many of my favorite foods in the heart-healthy options.” He also booked a personal trainer to help him safely incorporate exercise into his routine. A few years down the road, Swepston was at his Eureka Springs home when he noticed something was very wrong. “I did not feel right at all,” says Swepston. “I felt like someone was strangling me. I called [my wife] and she took me to the Oklahoma Heart Institute right away.” Tests revealed that Swepston had an aneurysm in his aortic valve and he needed open heart surgery right away. “My doctor told me I was a miracle,” remembers Swepston. “I really believe that the reason I am alive today is because of the steps I had taken in the years before to make my heart strong enough to survive. It wasn’t easy, but I gave myself the best shot possible and I am alive today because of it, that and my team of doctors.” Swepston is still sticking to his heart- healthy lifestyle and doing well, after nearly an entire year of recovery.

Doug May, Tulsa

While on an eight-mile training run for the 2015 Houston Marathon, Doug May began to feel a strong pressure on his chest and knew something wasn’t quite right.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

“I cut my run short at five miles,” remembers May. “My symptoms subsided in about 24 hours.” Since the feeling went away, he returned to his training regimen, as usual. It wasn’t until receiving an email from his running group, Runners World Tulsa, that May decided he should talk with his doctor. The routine email included reminders about some upcoming events, as well as for May, some life-saving advice on the seriousness of any sort of chest tightness or pressure while running. “I called my doctor and set up an appointment for the next day,” says May. “He listened to my story and said everything was probably fine.” But, his doctor set up an inoffice EKG just to be sure. “The EKG showed everything was not fine,” remembers May. May then immediately went to see a cardiologist who, once again, thought everything would likely be fine. They ran a cardiac CT just to be sure. “The CT revealed a 100 percent blockage of my LAD,” shares May. “And, blood tests revealed that I had had a heart attack during the long run the week before.” The diagnosis raised quite a few questions for May. “Why do I do so much to stay healthy if I’m going to have a heart attack anyway?” May thought. “And, the answer is that my heart would not have been strong enough to survive the blockage without the training. Exercise is better than any pill. Exercise is the only reason I survived the heart attack. “After a few calls to my wife and some close friends, I headed to surgery at about 1:30 p.m. that same day to have a stent placed to clear the blockage,” explains May. The treatment plan also required a series of medications, which most people have to take for the rest of their lives. In order to have a chance to get off the medicines, May radically changed his diet. “I had what I would consider a relatively healthy diet before, but I switched to a totally plant-based diet: no meat, no dairy, no eggs,” says May. “I’ve stuck with it for nearly a year and a half now, and I’ve been able to stop taking almost all of the medications.” May has also been able to complete the Tulsa Run and the Route 66 half marathon since. At press time he was training for the 2016 Houston Marathon on Jan. 17. LINDSAY CUOMO

TULSA RUNNER AND HEART ATTACK SURVIVOR DOUG MAY TRAINS FOR THE 2016 HOUSTON MARATHON. PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.


OU - Oklahoma’s Leader in Excellence

• In 2015 OU became the first public university in U.S. history to be ranked No. 1 in freshman National Merit Scholars enrolled.

• OU is the only Big 12 university to be named in the top 10 of the most impressive historic college campuses in the nation.

• OU was awarded the prestigious Davis Cup for the third consecutive year in recognition of its record-setting enrollment of United World College international freshmen. OU is the only public university to ever be awarded the Davis Cup.

• The OU Honors College is one of the top 25 programs at a public university in the nation based on A Review of Fifty Public University Honors Programs. Also on the list are the Echols Scholars Program at the University of Virginia; the College of Literature, Science and the Arts Honors Program at the University of Michigan; and Honors Carolina at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

• OU is the only university in the nation, public or private, whose students have won Goldwater, Mitchell, Truman, Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright and National Security Education Program scholarships in the same year. • This year’s freshman class is the academically highest ranked in OU history and in state history at a public university with an average 26.4 ACT for incoming freshmen. • OU is the only Big 12 university to be selected as having one of America’s 25 most beautiful campuses. • OU’s fall-to-fall retention rate this year for freshmen is at a university all-time high of 86.1 percent.

• With construction underway, OU will become one of the first public universities in the country to build residential colleges for upperclassmen and women, patterned on those at Yale, Oxford, Harvard and Cambridge in England. The living/learning communities will become the cornerstone of the undergraduate experience. • The One University Digital Initiative allows OU faculty to develop digital alternatives to high-cost textbooks, translating to an annual savings of almost $500 per student in textbook costs.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

- The Pride of Oklahoma


Life & Style

GADGETS

Heart Health APPLE HEALTH

Now a standard feature on your iPhone, the Health dashboard can help you keep track of steps taken, calories burned and nutrition. Another feature is that the owner can create a personal emergency card that stores vital health information such as blood type, allergies, medical conditions, medications and emergency contacts. Those who choose to can also participate on ResearchKit – a platform for medical researchers to use the tools on the iPhone to gather data for projects and studies.

APPS TO HELP STOP SMOKING

According to the American Heart Association, almost one third of deaths from coronary heart disease are attributable to smoking and secondhand smoke. Apps like Smoke Free not only help the user keep track of their smokefree days, but also how much money the user has saved by not purchasing cigarettes. Quit Smoking: Cessation Nation also provides games for the user to focus on when a craving hits and aims to connect users with support and motivation from other app users.

Like the saying goes, “there’s an app for that!” Heart health is no different. Take, for instance, AliveCor – the smartphone case has two sensor points that can produce an accurate ECG reading in only 30 seconds. Other devices (and their corresponding phone apps) like Angel offers an alert of irregular heart rates and can keep track of blood oxygen levels. Another option is the iHealth Wireless Pulse Oximeter. Together with the app on your phone, the portable pulse oximeter can give you a reading on your blood oxygen saturation and pulse rate. The iHealth company also makes a wireless blood pressure wrist monitor and wireless blood pressure monitor that provide instant feeback. Other apps help the user compile data over time and remind the user to monitor their heart health. The Blood Pressure Companion app, for instance, helps the user track blood pressure readings and organize the information into comprehensive reports. There are hundreds of apps working to improve the health of the user. One app – PulsePoint – even uses GPS to notify those trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when there is someone in their area with an emergency needing CPR.

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FITBIT

The popular fitness tracker brand offers six different products – while some track your steps only, their latest products will also track your heart rate, floors climbed, active minutes and sleep. Prices range from $59.95 to $249.95.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF APPLE, SMOKEFREE, FITBIT AND ALIVECOR.

PORTABLE HEART MONITORS


Medical professionals, brain researchers, fitness experts and more College is about more than developing a strong résumé. It’s about creating meaningful opportunities for the future. Undergraduate research, community engagement and international experiences are hallmarks of a TU education. The University of Tulsa’s new Oxley College of Health Sciences is seeking students in growing fields such as nursing, sports science and mental wellness. Faculty mentors are invested in our

TU is an EEO/AA institution.

students’ success, and TU’s partnerships with major healthcare researchers and providers expand career options. Students can find out more about what university life is like by scheduling a visit to TU: Tour campus, meet with faculty and have lunch with our university ambassadors. Experiences may be customized for each student. For more information, go to admission.utulsa.edu/visit.

n Top 50 Private University 2016 and Top 100 National University 2016 (U.S. News & World Report) n Colleges That Pay You Back 2016 (Princeton Review) n Best College Value 2016 (Kiplinger’s Personal Finance) n America’s Top Colleges 2015 (Forbes)

admission.utulsa.edu • 918-631-2307


Life & Style ART

U

Once In A Lifetime Enjoy the brilliance of Jackson Pollock in Dallas this spring.

se your eyes. Look, look and look again. The brilliance of Pollock is that he creates the wandering eye. Your eye cannot simply rest in the classical, perspectival way. Your eye feverishly scans and examines the canvas. Looking at a Pollock painting is a dynamic, participatory experience. He gives back to you the experience of looking. Just give in to what your eye wants to do.” That’s the advice that the Dallas Museum of Art’s Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, Gavin Delahunty offers for first-time Pollock viewers. And there should be plenty of them out there. The museum’s expansive exhibition, Jackson Pollock: Blind Spots, is only the third of its kind in the U.S. since Pollock died in 1956. It’s the first of its kind outside of New York City. The exhibition runs through March 20, 2016. Blind Spots offers another first as well, and it’s one that Pollock lovers and newbies alike should appreciate. This is the largest assembly – numbering 31 – of the artist’s famous black paintings ever to sit under one roof. “Pollock’s extraordinary, still controversial black paintings of 1951 finally get the attention they deserve. They prove to be just as radical as his earlier, more celebrated, all-over drip paintings, and speak even more

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

to our own time as well,” noted John Elderfield, Chief Curator Emeritus of Painting and Sculpture at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art. Featuring more than 70 of Pollock’s works, even veteran Pollock fans will gain a new perspective on the artist. Blind Spots isn’t limited to paintings. It offers rarely seen examples of Pollock’s sculptures, drawings and prints. “Pollock wasn’t just the Pollock that we’re familiar with, the artist with these dripped paintings for which he became world famous in the late 1940s and early 1950s. He was an artist with many strings on his bow, so to speak, and had ambitions and wants and desires. He pushed himself, like all great artists, to the limits of his technical skill. [Seeing this] is like reacquainting yourself with an old friend after many years and seeing something completely different,” said Delahunty. Delahunty especially recommends the sculptures because it’s a medium not usually associated with Pollock. There are five in the show, with an especially important terracotta offering from 1949. Because the sculptures are never exhibited, it’s not widely known that Pollock worked with them from the 1930s until his death. Only six of Pollock’s sculptures remain, and they give a startling three-dimensional view of his ap-

proach to painting. The exhibition aims to give viewers a sense of the most experimental and radical point in Pollock’s career. Two rooms dedicated to the artist’s work on paper, Delahunty says, do an especially good job of capturing this charged, playful moment in the artist’s life. They represent what critics see as Pollock’s most important work as a draftsman. Those same critics are calling this a “once in a lifetime” exhibition. Many of the works haven’t been presented in over 50 years, and several were considered lost until Delahunty unearthed them. The exhibition takes its name from Delahunty’s efforts to bring previous blind spots in Pollock’s career to light. He’s given Oklahomans another reason to make the journey to Texas other than an OU-Texas football game. “This artist was taken away from us at a moment when he was at his most experimental, radical, ambitious and dexterous moment,” added Delahunty. “The final work in the show, Portrait and a Dream, from 1953, leaves your tongue wagging, makes you think tantalizingly of what could have come next. What might have happened? That’s the big takeaway. Knowing that this truly was an artist of great genius who died tragically too young.” PAUL FAIRCHILD


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Life & Style

LEFT: THE BROOKSIDER BLENDS RUSTIC AND CONTEMPORARY. THE BROOKSIDER WAS DESIGNED AND BUILT BY TULSA ARCHITECT GEORGE E. DAY JR.

L I V I N G S PA C E

The Brooksider A crown jewel in the neighborhood.

A

Photography by Miller Photography

unique home recently completed in Brookside has enhanced the rich architectural footprint of this Tulsa neighborhood and has quickly earned the distinction of being the city’s newest architectural treasure. Christened “The Brooksider” and designed and built by noted Tulsa architect George E. Day Jr., the three-story ultra-contemporary home is a bookend to the vibrant 35th and Peoria shopping, dining and residential area. With its crisp, white exterior and classic, modern architecture, The Brooksider is a sparkling jewel, nestled gracefully among the traditional style homes in this neighborhood. The concept for the house was a vision of the owner, Rusty Patton. He had long-owned an open field abutting The Consortium shopping center on East 35th Street. Each spring, the field was covered with colorful poppies and bachelor buttons, which Rusty had planted.

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FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

While sitting on the fence, enjoying the wildflowers in 2012, Rusty began to envision a home at that location, with a rooftop deck overlooking Brookside. George and Rusty spent the next two years designing The Brooksider. A gated, walled garden is the formal entry to the home. Guests are greeted inside by a welcoming foyer, and a dramatic glass staircase supported by an eight and one-half ton, two-and-a-half-story precast concrete wall accented with geometric cutouts. The staircase was conceived as a sculpture that would transition between the floors. The lower level features Rusty’s garage, office, a multi-purpose cabana room overlooking the courtyard pool and a commercial elevator serving all three levels. Brazilian slate floors anchor each level. On the second level, the master bath and bedroom overlook the pool. This floor also houses a guest suite, utility room, ample walk-in closets and the guest powder bath. The staircase continues as a dramatic focal point on this floor, leading to the stunning crown jewel of the home, the third level entertaining area. AERIAL VIEWS HIGHLIGHT THE CLEAN LINES OF THE BROOKSIDER HOUSE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016


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Life & Style

PANORAMIC WINDOWS PROVIDE FOR SWEEPING VIEWS OF BROOKSIDE.

The spacious third floor includes the open living and dining area and kitchen. This great room opens onto an outdoor deck that provides a magnificent, panoramic view of Brookside and downtown Tulsa. As the home’s entertainment center, this floor has quickly become a popular venue for charity and cultural events. Beyond the enticing first visual impression, there is much more to admire about this unusual home. “George thinks in 3-D, and had many of his own rules to follow in designing the home,” Rusty notes. One of those rules concerned windows. His two-over-three or three-over-four design plan for window panes gives consistency and a sense of scale throughout. Nine-foot tall ceilings are throughout the home, giving each room a human scale. Neutral cream walls are accented with lighting designed for the strategic placement of art. Each tread of the glass staircase is lit with LED lights. Because of the lighting and extensive windows, Rusty says, “The house is absolutely beautiful at night.” “Design is an evolving process,” George

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016


notes. “The collaboration and trust between Rusty and me is what made this project possible. Rusty had the idea and I helped realize it.” The two men have known each other for almost 40 years. “I’ve never had a project that has had such universal acclaim. Form follows function and this home is a perfect example of that,” George says. “The house is totally related to its urban environment. The positive response to The Brooksider has been extremely gratifying. For me, the house is a work of art – a sculpture.” The Brookside neighborhood has truly embraced this elegant gem. It is beautiful at any time of the day. Like a chameleon, the home assumes a different character as the day progresses. It sparkles in the sunlight. As dusk falls, night lighting reveals another view of The Brooksider’s most dramatic, engaging character. M.J. VAN DEVENTER

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

THE TAJ MAHAL IS JUST ONE OF THE MANY MARVELS YOU WILL FIND IN INDIA.

D E S T I N AT I O N

A Wedding In India

V

Celebrating love, life and color in a magical country.

isiting the Golden Triangle and Udaipur in India was the trip of a lifetime. Dehli-Agra-Jaipur exposed us to temples, tombs, forts, mass humanity and culture. In Old Dehli, you’ll find both mass humanity and interesting architecture. Jama Masjid is the largest mosque in India and the last architectural magnificence of Shah Jahan. We drove past the Red Fort and then saw the Qutub Minar, a high tower dating back to 13th century Islamic culture. Next was the India Gate and the President’s House: Rashtrapati Bhawan. Completed in 1929, the palatial building is a blend of Mughal and western architecture. Agra was the second day of our sightseeing. We woke up at 4:00 a.m. to catch the 5:30 a.m. sunrise at the Taj Mahal. This mausoleum of Empress Mumtaz Mahal, the

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

beloved spouse of Shah Jahan, is everything you think it will be, and more. Depending on the light of day, the white marble takes on different tones. From a distance, you see an all-white or opalescent tone but as you get closer, you notice the jewel inlay. The colors of India are vibrant. Driving down the streets, we saw cows, monkeys, boars, camel carts and more. Monkeys climbed along the roofs of buildings and forts and one even jumped on our tour van. Jaipur was our next stop on the Golden Triangle and a personal favorite. We saw the Amber Fort, City Palace and Jantar Mantar Observatory. Being part of a wedding in India was an incomparable experience of love and traditions. The wedding events in India eclipsed the sightseeing for me. Three straight days of wedding extravaganza


will be an indelible memory for us. The events included: Haldi, Mehndi, Sangeet, and Baraat. At the Haldi, the bride and groom were polished with turmeric paste. The Sangeet featured traditional dances presented to the bride and groom by groups of family and friends. We presented our choreographed dance on an amphitheater stage with lasers and lights. The symbolism of the two dances performed by the groom’s family intrigued me. The dances conveyed feelings of happiness and joy and had many hand movements and drumbeats. The bride sent us videos of the dances to learn beforehand. The Baraat is the bridegroom’s wedding procession (on an elephant or horse) accompanied by bands, dancers and fireworks as it reaches the meeting point between the two families. The bride’s favorite ritual was the Mehndi, riding in on the rickshaw. The groom, who is not Indian, shared that he felt like the center of everything in a grand entrance. His in-laws welcomed him and admired that he learned a little bit of Hindi and dancing. The bride and groom were unaware of some of the details that celebrated them with a bang – literally – as fireworks and rose petals shot out of a tube during the bride’s procession to meet the groom. When asked how being Indian enriches her life, the bride referred to it as being an anchor in her life. She said the family is together often and that you learn from everyone around you. There was a focus on education and future success. She was born in the states but lived in India for ten years. Her husband pointed out that she is worldly because she went to an International School with friends from every country. Reflecting on this, she stated, “You really figure out that everyone is the same.” GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

TOP LEFT: CAMEL DECORATED IN TRADITIONAL INDIAN GARMENTS. MIDDLE LEFT: WOMEN TRAVEL WITH SUPPLIES.

PH0TOS BY GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

BOTTOM LEFT: AMER FORT CITY PALACE. BOTTOM RIGHT: BRIDE IS COVERED IN TUMERIC PASTE DURING THE HALDI CEREMONY. MIDDLE RIGHT: BRIDE AND GROOM ARE ELEGANTLY DRESSED AS THEY MEET FOR THE BARAAT TOP RIGHT: THE GROOM PERFORMS DURING THE SANGEET.

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style YO U R H E A L T H

Geriatric Physicians in Short Supply

A

Oklahoma needs more practitioners as demand increases.

s the population in both Oklahoma and the country ages, the medical profession continues to adjust to new demands on doctors and other health care providers. According to the American Geriatrics Society, the number of individuals over the age of 65 is expected to be almost 20 percent of the U.S. population by 2030. There are special medical considerations for older patients. As people age medical care from a range of different specialists can become necessary. Many elderly people have chronic illnesses to manage and a host of different drugs to remember to take. Commonplace, temporary conditions can also cause more serious complications in older, frail individuals. When these and other age-related considerations make medi-

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

cal care more complicated, the services of a geriatrician can be useful and necessary. “Geriatricians have received extensive training in caring for older adults so they are well prepared to provide care to older adults with multiple and complicated problems,” says Nancy Van Winkle, Ph.D., director of the Senior Mentor Program and cocoordinator of the Geriatric Focus Course at the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. “A geriatrician can serve as a “quarterback” or “coach” to coordinate the increasing number of specialists many older adults need to have all their specific care needs met,” says Andrew Dentino, M.D., Medical Director at OU Medical Center Senior Health Clinic. A medical professional certified in geriatrics can vastly improve the level of

care received by older individuals and, consequently, improve their quality of life. But, according to the American Geriatrics Society, in 2013 the number of geriatricians needed to care for the 12 million elderly patients who could benefit from specialized geriatric care was short by more than 9,000 doctors. And this shortfall is projected to worsen. Geriatricians will be needed in numbers close to 30,000 by 2030. The need is even more prevalent in Oklahoma. The needed number of geriatricians in this state is 237, while in 2014 there were only 33 certified geriatricians. In Oklahoma, the anticipated need for specialists in the area of geriatrics is 325 by the year 2030. “The situation is dire. Not only do we have very few geriatricians trained, but the numbers are declining rapidly. [In Oklahoma] we have the fewest geriatricians per


capita in the US,” says Dr. Germaine Odenheimer, geriatric medicine clerkship director with the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatrics at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. But why is this the case? Why are geriatric specialists simultaneously in great demand and declining in numbers? The answers rest both within the economic realities of practicing medicine and the day-today challenges presented by treating older people. “The most prominent reason [for low numbers of geriatricians] is poor reimbursement for care provided. If you take a fully trained internal medicine physician and send him for geriatric training, his income will drop dramatically. Why? Because older people tend to have complex problems that require a great deal of time to work through,” says Dr. Odenheimer. She also points out the fact that many older people have chronic diseases that require a management approach, as opposed to a cure. “These patients are complex, which can intimidate young trainees who are quickly overwhelmed by all the medical problems and medications they would have to deal with,” she adds. However, work in geriatrics also comes with some pronounced positives. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, geriatricians tend to rate higher than other specialties in career satisfaction. “One of the fascinating things is that when medical specialists have been surveyed, geriatricians are the most satisfied with their work,” says Dr. Odenheimer. “They deal with challenging and complex cases. They are making a difference in the functioning and quality of life of older adults,” says Dr. Van Winkle. The need for more specialized geriatric care is present and will only be increasing in the coming years. However, many medical students are simply not choosing to get this specialized training. Various endeavors are underway to combat this trend. Many medical school programs are recognizing the need to train all medical students in the area of treating the elderly. “As I tell my medical students, you will be working with older adults no matter what your specialty is. Even pediatricians will be working with grandparents raising grandchildren,” says Dr. Van Winkle. Both the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine and the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine are helping students incorporate geriatric training into all specialties. Even for medical students who don’t choose to pursue geriatrics specifically, having the basic knowledge

necessary to work and communicate with the over 65 population is important. “As the director of the geriatric training for medical students at OU, it is my goal to make sure that every graduating medical student knows the core geriatric principles,” says Dr. Odenheimer. At the University of Oklahoma School of Medicine, fourth year medical students are required to take a four-week rotation in geriatrics. They learn important skills such as caring for a patient at the end of life, how to handle prescriptions with older patients, how to compassionately deliver bad news and manage pain and working together in teams of care providers, according to Dr. Odenheimer. “It is very eye opening for the students and we have had a number decide to pursue geriatrics based on the experience,” says Dr. Odenheimer. At Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a Geriatric Focus Course was added in 2013 for first-year medical students. They also began the Senior Mentor Program directed by Dr. Van Winkle. This program matches first-year medical students with healthy older adult volunteers from the community. The students and the volunteers meet twice per semester to practice skills such as collecting life and medical histories, helping patients cope with stress and gather social support, and discuss topics such as nutrition, advance directives and end-of-life issues. “We hope this program will help prepare our students to work with older adults no matter what specialty they choose,” says Dr. Van Winkle. Helping patients understand and remain vigilant with multiple medications is a significant aspect of specialized geriatric care. It is important that all of a patient’s care providers know what medications have been prescribed to avoid complications and negative interactions. If patients don’t have a geriatrician organizing their medications, there is the potential for life-threatening complications. “Medication-related problems are considered the fifth leading cause of death amongst older people,” says Dr. Mark Stratton, Professor Emeritus at the Univer-

sity of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy. Dr. Stratton, through the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative and the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, is equipping seniors to take an active role in managing medication needs through the live education program titled Using Medication Safely – A Key Ingredient to Your Health. The program has been presented to more than 8,000 seniors. Training more geriatric specialists is the only way to truly meet the need. And the good news is that Oklahoma is training new geriatricians. According to Dr. Dentino, by next summer, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center geriatric medicine fellowship will have graduated five new geriatricians in three years. The need for specialized geriatric care is great across both the state and the nation. According to the American Geriatrics Society, with the future supply of geriatricians in jeopardy, our aging population may not receive the care they need. But this need is being addressed in Oklahoma by incorporating geriatric care education into the training for all medical students, educating the elderly to advocate for themselves when possible, and working hard to communicate the value and benefits of helping to extend and improve the lives of the elderly through the practice of geriatrics. BONNIE RUCKER

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

Scene REX BROWN, JACKIE BROWN AND TED REEDS, THE TULSA FOUNDATION FOR ARCHITECTURE HOLIDAY GATHERING. AMY BATES, HEATHER BERRYHILL, DIANE WHITE AND TERI AULPH, VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA OKLAHOMA, RHINESTONE COWBOY.

STEVE WRIGH DUNN. LEADERT, ERIN DONOVAN AND CH AR SHIP OKLAHO MA HOLIDAY LES PARTY.

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NEVYLE AND CAROL CABLE AND SUSAN AND MIKEY COATS, LEADERSHIP OKLAHOMA ANNUAL HOLIDAY PARTY.

TAWNI HERBURGER, BROOKE STURDIVANT AND NOLA LEDFORD, JUNIOR LEAGUE OF TULSA HOLIDAY MARKET.

KEVIN AND EM VOLUNTEERS ILY O’SHAUGHNESSY AND OF AMERICA OK BR LAHOMA, RHINIAN AND MOLLY ASPAN, ESTONE COWB OY.

PHIL KAISER, MARK BARCUS, MIRANDA KAISER AND BEN KIMBRO, LEADERSHIP OKLAHOMA ANNUAL HOLIDAY PARTY.

CHAD AND NATALIE OSGOOD, WENDY AND GENTNER DRUMMOND, EMERGENCY INFANT SERVICES NEW YEAR’S PARTY AT THE MCBIRNEY MANSION. MARK GOODSON, STEPHANIE CAMERON AND LEIGH GOODSON, LEADERSHIP OKLAHOMA HOLIDAY PARTY.

MARY PARK, KEVIN ANDERSON, EMCEE KRISTIN DICKERSON AND ROBERT MAYFIELD, 2015 GOODWILL ANNUAL AWARDS LUNCHEON.

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IMAGE MATTERS

A Younger, More Youthful

Micro-Needling, Micropeels and HyWhile no one can escape the hands By Rebecca Fast draFacials have gained popularity over of time, it may be possible to the past few years and have replaced look like we’re beating the clock. services like microdermabrasion. Advancements in nonsurgical skincare “We stopped performing microtreatments continue to offer more ways dermabrasion in our medical spa, to achieve firmer, smoother and younger Skin Care Institute, about eight looking skin, as well as provide a ‘lift’ years ago as new, less abrasive for a more youthful appearance. treatments hit the market and were “Skin tightening devices for the face, How nonsurgical skin treatdeemed more beneficial,” he says. eyelids and body that use radiofrequency ments can take years off “Micro-Needling is a great treatment for all or ultrasound waves are gaining popularity, skin types, with no downtime and can be done in as there is no downtime, it is more affordable your appearance. the summer months as well.” and has a better safety profile than the surgical Dr. Alexander offers Micro-Needling with the Eclipse MicroPen alternatives,” says Dr. Kristen Rice, a dermatologist at the Center for which uses tiny needles to create painless micro-injuries to the skin to Dermatology and Utica Square Skin Care in Tulsa. “We offer Therhelp increase collagen production and elastin and reduce the appearmage at our office for this purpose.” ance of wrinkles, acne scars, stretch marks, hyperpigmentation and Thermage is a non-invasive radiofrequency therapy that helps enlarged pores. smooth lines and wrinkles, as well as remodel collagen to improve While Botox and dermal fillers continue to be choice procedures the overall health of skin. for many, Dr. Alexander emphasizes that it’s important for patients to Dr. Rice shares that some of the most common skin complaints be educated on these options, adding that his patients receive custominclude dry, itchy skin and acne, but in her practice she mostly enized plans. counters concerns about brown spots and general skin discoloration. “No two patients are injected alike as no two faces are alike,” “Chemical peels are quite effective for the majority of facial skin says Dr. Alexander. “Voluma is a wonderful new dermal filler for the discoloration,” says Dr. Rice. “There are also resurfacing procedures cheeks that can lift the entire lower half of the face instantaneously. It that can help to even skin tone and also smooth skin texture such as also gives a very natural look that patients love. Botox is described to Clear + Brilliant and Fraxel Dual non-ablative resurfacing. Additionour patients as a muscle stabilizer to stop those repetitive motion inally, light-based treatments such as BBL BroadBand Light provide a juries that we tend to make over time with our facial expressions. We non-invasive treatment with minimal to no downtime for improvestill want to make sure that patients retain expression in their faces ment of skin discoloration, particularly brown spots and increased without causing injury to the epidermis, creating a natural look.” vascularity, both on and off the face.” She adds that the most important thing you can address in caring According to Dr. Tim R. Love, a plastic surgeon and owner of Tim for your skin is protection from harmful ultraviolet light. Her top R. Love Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery in Oklahoma City, nonsurgithree recommendations for general skin care include daily sunscreen cal procedures are on the rise nationally. He most recently introduced use on exposed areas such as the face, neck, chest and hands, nightly the Profound system (the latest in radiofrequency micro-needling use of a topical retinoid and antioxidants including vitamin C and E, technology) to create new elastin, collagen and hyaluronic acid. as well as a variety of other effective antioxidants to help improve the “These building blocks work to create dermal volume often health of skin over time. depleted with aging,” says Dr. Love. “Skin laxity can see improveDermatologist Dr. Jeff Alexander is the owner and medical direcment in nasolabial folds, cheeks, marionette lines, jawline, neck and tor of the Skin Care Institute medical spa in Tulsa. He explains that décolleté.” He shares that Fraxel Dual and Thermage CPT continue to

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provide reliable results for resurfacing and tightening while Botox and injectable fillers are also effective in slowing the aging process. “A new combination of Fraxel Dual and Radiesse has become popular for literally turning back ‘the hands of time’ with a hand treatment,” says. Dr. Love. Other nonsurgical treatments available to target specific trouble areas include Ultherapy, Coolsculpting and Kybella. “Ultherapy is an amazing non-invasive procedure for the face, neck and décolleté, using ultrasound technology to generate heat,” says Dr. Alexander. “That heat is delivered 4.5 mm deep into the fibromuscular layer, as well as 1.5 mm and 3.0 mm into the dermis. The heat that is delivered creates injury which, in turn, kicks in the body’s own collagen response.” Ultherapy helps thicken skin, as well as lifting and tightening. “Outside of surgery there is no other treatment that delivers deeper than Ultherapy,” explains Dr. Alexander. “It is considered the gold standard in the medical spa field for lifting and tightening.” CoolSculpting is a fat-freezing procedure that works to contour the body by freezing away unwanted fat. Dr. Alexander notes that it works extremely well with the right candidates. “CoolSculpting is non-invasive and works without the risk that surgery can bring,” he says. “It also creates a more even result, not always obtainable with liposuction. With CoolSculpting and now Dual Sculpting, we can treat most areas of the body even faster, including stomach, flanks, bra-line, inner thigh, outer thigh, chest (men), arms and double chin.” Another popular treatment to tackle a double chin is Kybella. “Kybella is an injectable that delivers a fat seeking molecule (deoxycholic acid) to the fat cell, which in turn destroys those fat cells over the course of six to eight weeks,” says Dr. Alexander. “Patients may need up to four treatments for optimal results. Eliminating the double chin can really change the overall appearance of the face. It sharpens up the entire jaw line and makes patients look thinner and younger.” Before choosing any skincare treatment, Dr. Alexander encourages patients to seek out a reputable medical spa that has a physician onsite, preferably a dermatologist, or someone in a related field who understands skincare. FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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IMAGE MATTERS

Spa Days for MEN

More men are receiving cosmetic treatments than ever before, making their personal appearance a priority. Men have benefited from cosmetic treatments for decades. However, in recent years more men have been making their personal appearance a priority. The American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) reports that more men are receiving cosmetic procedures “with dramatic increases in both surgical and nonsurgical options over the past five years and a 43 percent increase overall.” “We are seeing more and more men coming in for hair removal and anti-aging skin rejuvenation treatments like Fraxel Laser Resurfacing,” says Dr. Jeff Alexander, a dermatologist and the owner and medical director of the Skin Care Institute medical spa in Tulsa. “Botox is really catching on with men now, too.” Dr. Alexander saw more men for Botox in 2015 than ever before and notes that there are now new devices for home care that are specifically created for men such as the Clarisonic Alpha Fit. “The Clarisonic brush is ergonomically designed for men,” says Dr. Alexander. “Its use creates a closer shave, cleaner beard, removes oil, sweat and dirt six times better than hands alone and makes men’s skin overall more smooth and healthy.”

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Dr. Kristen Rice, a dermatologist at the Center for Dermatology and Utica Square Skin Care in Tulsa, reiterates that Botox continues to be popular among men, as men also desire a more youthful and rested appearance.

“Men and women usually need different amounts of Botox, and the placement of Botox also varies between the two genders, so it is important to have an experienced physician or medical professional administer the treatment,” says Dr. Rice. She also frequently sees men who want to target dyspigmentation, or brown spots. “In the more recent past, there is a greater understanding that both men and women care about the visible evidence of sun damage and aging on their skin,” says Dr. Rice. “Resurfacing procedures (Clear + Brilliant or Fraxel Dual) and BBL BroadBand Light are both effective for this skin concern. Which treatment is best is specific to the patient, their

skin type and the type of discoloration that is being targeted.” Laser hair removal for men can target various areas including unwanted facial and neck hair or body hair such as on the chest or back. “There are a variety of lasers that are effective at removing hair, so a discussion about your skin type and hair color and the laser options that are available is important to have with your dermatologist or medical skin care provider,” says Dr. Rice. Along with skin and hair treatments, many men also turn to cosmetic surgery. According to the ASAPS, the most common cosmetic procedures for men are liposuction, rhinoplasty (nose job), eyelid surgery, gynecomastia (removal of breast tissue) and ear shaping. “For men, the most popular cosmetic surgeries are eye surgeries and liposuction, specifically in the area of the breast,” says Dr. Mark Mathers, a plastic surgeon and the owner of the Center for Plastic Surgery in Tulsa. “Men’s breasts can enlarge throughout life for various reasons and a lot of men don’t like how they look. Many men aren’t aware of this procedure and that it’s a relatively easy surgery to undergo and recover from.” REBECCA FAST


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IMAGE MATTERS

Mommy Makeover The

A cosmetic combo to regain your pre-baby body.

Pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding can have lasting effects on a woman’s body. Changes can include stretch marks, loose skin and sagging breasts. Many women are often disappointed or self-conscious of their postbaby physique and seek out a combination of cosmetic procedures to help improve their appearance. It’s a decision that now has a trendy name: the mommy makeover. “The term ‘mommy makeover’ has become popular over the past several years but is really not a new approach to post-pregnancy revision surgery,” says Dr. Tim R. Love, a plastic surgeon and owner of Tim R. Love Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery in Oklahoma City. “The popularity and familiarity

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of the term has undoubtedly increased the number of women seeking out improvement in their post-pregnancy body condition.” He adds that although each patient is unique, the individual procedures within a makeover can include breast enhancement (augmentation, augmentation/lift, lift or reduction), tummy tuck and liposuction. “Although not a requirement, it is wise for a patient to be finished with having children when considering any component of a ‘mommy makeover’ surgery,” says Dr. Love. “We also advise patients to wait until they are as near their ideal weight as possible, post-pregnancy, to ensure that they receive the optimum benefit from surgery.” Dr. Angelo Cuzalina, a cosmetic surgeon and owner of Tulsa Surgical Arts, shares that ideally, a woman should wait until she has no plans for more children and has completely stopped breastfeeding for at least three months. In addition, depending on what procedures are chosen, women have the option of having their surgeries at the same time. “The majority of women choose to do all the procedures at the same time for multiple reasons such as lower cost, one anesthesia, less time off work and convenience,” says Dr. Cuzalina. “The key is to make sure they are healthy enough for a simultaneous opera-


tion. The classic ‘mommy makeover’ at my office is simultaneous breast lift (mastopexy) and augmentation (implants), full abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) and typically associated liposuction of the waist, hips and pubis. The two additional procedures we also perform on specific patients are labiaplasty and/or vaginalplasty for women who also want excess labial minora reduced or to tighten their vaginal canal, especially if they had tears or an episiotomy.” According to Dr. Cuzalina, a nonsurgical procedure that women may also choose to add to their makeover experience is a ThermiVa treatment. ThermiVa uses radiofrequency to treat internal and external anatomical features of the vagina. Dr. Mark Mathers, a plastic surgeon and owner of the Center for Plastic Surgery in Tulsa, says he is currently seeing a trend where people have stayed in shape but they have loose skin—whether from having children or dramatic weight loss. “You can be in shape but if you have loose skin, you have loose skin. Working out five times a day for five days a week isn’t going to change it,” says Dr. Mathers. “For moms, I tell them to be at the weight they are comfortable with and then afterward, don’t plan on losing more than five to 10 pounds at the most. The last thing you want to do is have cosmetic surgery and then lose weight because you take away from what’s been done—especially with a breast lift. If you have a breast lift and then lose 15 pounds, it’s probably going to affect your breast lift more than, perhaps, an abdominoplasty. I can only do so much. If you lose weight and have a healthy lifestyle it’s going to compliment any procedures you’ve had done.” Dr. Mathers emphasizes the importance for individuals to research their options before choosing a surgeon and notes that he uses pictures of patients he has operated on, instead of industry photos, to show patients potential results. “I spend a lot of time with my patients discussing realistic expectations. We discuss what they want, what procedures we are going to do to accomplish it and then what realistic results we’ll achieve,” says Dr. Mathers. “The biggest problem is getting people to accept the amount of downtime that’s required to successfully recover after surgery. Patients need to have someone to assist them in taking care of their family or other responsibilities during this time.” As with any surgery, taking the time to fully heal is critical to avoiding possible complications. “I tell my patients that, on average, they will be extremely sore the first two weeks, generally back to mostly full exercise at six weeks but final shrinkage of all edema can be as long as eight months and scars tend to improve for at least one year,” says Dr. Cuzalina. “Most patients after a ‘mommy makeover’ return to work between 10 to 14 days if they can be on ‘light duty.’ Everyone heals differently and has varying levels of pain tolerance. Plus, if they have areas that heal more slowly than others it can be longer.” Once a woman has had a makeover, maintaining an overall healthy lifestyle to control weight and stay fit is essential in sustaining their new look. “Tummy tuck and liposuction patients must understand that neither procedure is intended to be a weight loss tool,” says Dr. Love. “Therefore, patients must be diligent to adopt healthy eating and exercise regimens to maintain their investment.” Dr. Cuzalina recommends a healthy, low carb diet with exercise to his patients and stresses that gaining weight after liposuction isn’t good for their health since fat deposition can be in other areas like the intestines, liver or heart. “But, the good news is the opposite is true, in that if they lose a little weight after a ‘mommy makeover’ the fat proportionally can now burn more off the same critical areas (intra-abdominal regions),” says Dr. Cuzalina. REBECCA FAST

A LITLE FIX HERE A LITTLE FIX THERE.

Plastic surgery and dermatology trends and services are always changing – just like personal tastes. Below we’ve compiled a list of new, up-and-coming and unique procedures you might have never known you’ve needed.

Laser Tattoo Removal

That tattoo seemed like a good idea at the time. As more and more Americans get permanent ink, more and more are eager to have their tattoos removed when life circumstances change. Laser treatments are increasingly available both locally and around the country. The laser beams target specific tattoo ink colors and breaks them down over the course of the treatment. Most professional tattoos require at least 10 sessions to completely remove the ink according to a report from Reuters Health. Common factors impacting the cost of a removal include the size of the tattoo, color of the tattoo and age of the tattoo.

Stretched Ear Piercing Repair

Another trend of stretching one’s ear lobes can lead to a sizable investment of time and money should one decide to repair them. The lobes can be surgically repaired under local anesthesia in approximately an hour, but pricing will take into account the complexity of the case.

Bra Line Back Lift

This procedure is for those who, despite diet and exercise, cannot get the stubborn bulges to, well, budge from the upper back area. During the outpatient procedure, done under general anesthesia, fat and skin in the affected area is removed. Patients should expect to take it easy for at least two weeks after the procedure.

Belly Button Makeovers

Umbilicoplasty procedures alter the look of a belly button after weight changes, pregnancy or umbilical hernias. While the patient is under local anesthesia, the surgeon is able to make a small incision to either remove excess skin or overhang abdominal skin to the top of the belly button. Patients can anticipate a small amount of swelling and bruising.

Dimple Creation

Always dreamed of dimples? Now you – and modern medicine – can make it happen. Cheek dimple creation (dimpleplasty) is performed with local anesthesia and usually takes less than an hour. The incision is made inside the mouth itself so there are no scars evident. Costs for the procedure will depend on the complexities of the case and the level of anesthesia involved.

Eyelash Transplants

Just like it sounds – this procedure involves the surgeon implanting individual hair follicles (usually taken from the back of the patient’s scalp) onto the eyelid using a curved needle. These eyelashes will need maintenance as they are growing hairs. According to Newsweek, the procedure can cost up to $3,000 per eyelid. – Elizabeth Wozobski FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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A State of Innovation By Paul Fairchild

Local experts identify architectural masterpieces across Oklahoma.

A

rchitecture matters. The forms and shapes we give our buildings – public and private – say a lot about us. Good architecture transforms a structure from a building that merely offers shelter into a thing of beauty, a work of art that touches our souls. Floors are not just what we walk on. Walls do more than hold up roofs. And roofs do far more than keep the water off of our heads. Oklahoma doesn’t have a Parthenon or a Versailles or a St. Peter’s Cathedral. It’s a young state, barely topping 100 years old. But it does have some gems worth seeing. It’s home to some of the best architecture of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. “Architecture matters because it’s about what we think about ourselves as a culture. We could still be living in sod houses. As far as structure, we build things that please us. We build things that wow us. We do that because it’s what we think of ourselves as a culture. That’s why it’s important. We define it and it defines us,” says Russell Baker of Manhattan Construction. Oklahoma Magazine reached out to the experts, from architects and designers to builders and real estate experts, to survey them about the best architecture in Oklahoma. This is what they had to say.

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All buildings in Oklahoma are, in the grand scale of time, modern. But they’re not all built in modern styles. One building that came up in our survey is as classical as it gets – the Oklahoma State Capitol, a beautiful Greco-Roman seat of government situated in Northeast Oklahoma City. As it does with statehouses around the nation, the Greco-Roman architecture reminds us of our governmental and legislative roots in ancient Greece and Rome, and make the building a representation in the truest sense. “It’s more than just a building. It truly is a symbol that represents so much to the state and its people and I think that’s an important thing right now in our culture. I think it also represents a renaissance in Oklahoma. You see a lot of change in so many buildings around the state. That renaissance was symbolized with the addition of the dome in 2002. It makes a difference,” said Baker. The original building, completed in 1917, ten years after statehood, went without a dome for almost a century – the only statehouse in the nation without one. The dome features a 22-foot reproduction of an Enoch Kelly Haney sculpture, The Guardian. A reminder of Haney’s love of his home state, the sculpture is layered with symbolism specific to Oklahoma. Tours are available to the public.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Oklahoma State Capitol

POPS Arcadia

POPS, easily the most photographed building in Oklahoma, is more than just home to over 600 different sodas. It’s an architectural marvel. The designer, Elliot Rand, ascribes one purpose to it: to make you smile. Aesthetically, POPS distills the best of post-war Americana, concentrating it in the form of a Route 66 gas station on steroids. A visit there leaves patrons with the feeling of traveling the open road in search of adventure and fun. It’s equally amazing from a technical standpoint. The building is fully cantilevered, with no supporting beams. The eye can follow the roofline all the way from the front – gracefully – to the ground in the back. “Quite honestly, I stand underneath POPS and I look at the cantilever and I’m amazed at the structure of it. While it’s not a very fancy building per se, if you ever stood underneath that and realized that the whole entire thing is cantilevered, well, that’s amazing. I love that building,” said Baker. Interesting buildings attract interesting people. The megalithic soda pop bottle that marks the entrance of the building is a beacon for Route 66 travelers, many of them European. On any given night it’s not uncommon to hear four, five, six different languages spoken at nearby tables as tourists from around the world enjoy the Route 66 destination. “The purpose of the building is to show that Route 66 is alive and well and moving forward. Many people think Route 66 is dead and dying and will never reappear. That’s just not the case,” said Rand. FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Boston Avenue United Methodist Church Tulsa

For the sheer fun and bizarreness of it, nothing beats the old Citizens State Bank at 23rd and Classen in Oklahoma City. Most residents know it as the geodesic gold dome that has, over the years, housed a bank, various retail shops, a couple of bars and more than a few restaurants. At the time of its construction in 1958, Oklahoma City architects Bailey, Bozalis, Dickinson and Roloff aspired to the truly modern and drew on the designs of Buckminster Fuller, creator of the geodesic dome. It was the fifth of its kind created in the nation. “A purely fun piece of architecture is the Citizens State Bank. Just because [the architects] aspired to be so modern and sort of space age. I think that everybody enjoys driving past that corner,” says Randy Floyd, an Oklahoma City architect. At its inception, the building was meant to be temporary only. After all, geodesic domes can be disassembled as easily as assembled. But it’s hung on, and was eventually added to the National Historic Registry.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

This spectacular 1929 example of Art Deco architecture, exploiting that discipline’s love of the vertical to evoke long-standing European Gothic cathedrals, came in at the top of everybody’s list. It is a monument to faith – and to Tulsa’s expansion during the oil boom of the 1920s. It’s the brainchild of Adah Robinson or Bruce Goff, depending on whom you talk to, but it’s clear that both contributed significantly. Our advice: avoid the conflict. Both are luminaries of Oklahoma architecture. Art Deco, with its inherent embrace of the technological, was an odd choice, but it works as much here for a house of faith as it does in celebrations of modernity such as the Chrysler building. And it is Art Deco at its finest through and through. Even the exit signs are Art Deco. “It’s absolutely stunning. It’s Art Deco. It’s cut limestone. Paul Goldberger, the architecture critic for the New York Times once said it was one of his favorite buildings in the country. I think it’s a spectacular building,” said Peter Walter, a Tulsa real estate expert and an amateur historian of all things architectural in Tulsa. Andy Kinslow of Tulsa’s KKT Architects repeated that sentiment, but offered a new angle, too. “It’s one of the best examples of Art Deco that we have around. Churches are a way to understand the history of a city. I think it represents Tulsa at a time of rapid growth,” he said. Tours are available to the public and details can be found on the Boston Avenue Methodist Church’s official website: www.bostonavenue.org.

Citizens State Bank Oklahoma City

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Philbrook Art Museum Tulsa

After Tulsa native Waite Phillips struck oil in the early 1920s, he banked more money than most can imagine. A portion of those funds went to the construction of Villa Philbrook, an Italian Renaissance villa on the outskirts of Tulsa. Designed by Kansas City architect Edward Delk, Philbrook Villa brought modern touches to the renaissance villa model. Phillips was so impressed he also awarded Delk with, among other things, the contract for the Philtower building in downtown Tulsa. The grounds alone are worth the visit. They house elaborate gardens inspired by an Italian country estate designed by Giacoma Barozzi da Vignola in 1566. After his children commenced college in 1938, Phillips excited the Tulsa community by announcing that the villa would be the home of a new art museum. The ‘wow’ factor didn’t come from the donation itself. It came from the knowledge of Tulsan art-lovers that Waite Phillips didn’t know a thing about art. And they were right. He hired a phalanx of graduate students from the finest colleges in the nation and sent them to Europe on a mission with one key weapon in their armories: blank checks. Like his west coast counterparts, such as Huntington, he knew how to fill a museum. He instructed them to bring him the best art, no expense spared. And they did. The Philbrook Museum is now one of the finest in the nation. But visitors shouldn’t overlook the architectural fineries of the villa itself while peering at the treasures on the walls. “I like Delk’s work,” said Walter. “The Philbrook is Italian, sort of Mediterranean style, but it’s so phenomenally well done and it rings a little bit of the Southwest. He was such a talented architect and the quality of the things he built were phenomenal. There are too many things I like about it.”

The Devon Energy Center Oklahoma City

This new entrant onto the state’s architectural scene dominates the Oklahoma City skyline, as humorously represented on the city’s new “Welcome to Downtown Oklahoma City” signs. But, say the experts, it’s not the size of the building that matters. It’s the whole package. “It really stands out as far as Oklahoma architecture. When you look at the level of detail, not just for the tower, but for the whole campus, it’s extremely impressive,” said Baker. Completed in 2012, the 50-story tower is the tallest building in Oklahoma and the 43rd tallest in the U.S. It’s the northern pillar in the city’s highly ambitious – but so far successful – Core to Shore redevelopment project. The campus holds more than office space and the company’s headquarters, reaching out to the surrounding community with restaurants, an amphitheater for events and a park available to the public. “It’s just got such a high level of architectural detail,” said Baker. “When you look at the curb details, how the building touches the ground, the way the mullions are detailed and how the glass is used, those are not details typical of what we see in Oklahoma. They’re just world-class.” The campus is the brainchild of New Haven, Connecticut firm Pickard Chilton. Their work can be found around the globe, including the world-famous Petronas Towers in Malaysia. A public tour of the campus is available and well worth the time.

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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First National Bank Building Oklahoma City

This one came in on a lot of our experts’ lists, too. At the time of its construction, in 1931, this prominent downtown Art Deco monument cost a mere $5 million. Today that’s hardly enough to pay for one floor of the Devon Energy Center. “The First National Bank building [is] a wonderful Art Deco building and features workmanship you can’t find anymore. It’s just fabulous,” said historian Konrad Kessee. At just under 500 feet tall, it hardly qualifies as a skyscraper these days, but it is still the third largest building in the city. Our experts raved about the workmanship on the exterior and the interior. Practiced eyes won’t miss its similarity to New York City’s Empire State Building. As an interesting aside, the house of the original founder, E.P. Johnson, a sprawling Mediterranean product of equally amazing workmanship, still stands in the city’s Nichols Hills neighborhood, and is also worth seeing. “It came out of an age and a style of architecture that I love, the Art Deco,” said Floyd. “It is so beautiful from a distance especially because of the stepping back of the top of the building. But when you get up close to it, it’s equally and precisely detailed.” After the collapse of the bank in the 1980s, the building began to fall into a state of disrepair and is still in need of renovation. Occupancy rates dropped. The building’s current owner is slowly dismantling the original interior, and our experts urge architecture fans to see it now before the original workmanship is gone forever.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum Oklahoma City

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With taste and multiple layers of profundity, the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum commemorate the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. Designed by Butzer Architects (also the designers of the Skydance Bridge), the memorial experience is split into two parts: a museum and a reflecting pool. While the museum, with all of its opportunities to learn about the event, the victims and the survivors, will drop your jaw, true architects will be drawn to the reflecting pool. The grounds for the pool are anchored on the west wall by a surviving section of the Murrah Federal Building. Empty chairs representing those lost are arranged according to the location of the deceased in the building at the time of the explosion. Arches covering the reflecting mark various times during the explosion, helping visitors focus their thoughts as they move from one end of the reflection pool to the other. Butzer Architects was selected in a design competition that included entrants from all 50 states and 23 countries. The reaction to their work has been overwhelmingly positive and it’s an experience no Oklahoman should miss. “One of my favorites is the Oklahoma City Memorial. I think that’s pretty significant to have an architect come up with a design that is, I think pretty challenging at the very best, to symbolize what happened in Oklahoma City. I appreciate the way it evolved and came out. I think it was a pretty compelling solution for a real challenge in architecture,” said Tulsa architect Jack Arnold.


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Every year we bring you the best of the singles in our state. These are bachelors and bachelorettes looking for Charity Marcus, 30 that special someone Bixby Occupation: PR/political consultant & in Tulsa and Oklahoma founder/executive director of a nonprofit. Favorite thing to do around town: Eating City. This year’s diverse out at all the fantastic restaurants. Favorite restaurant or food truck: Sweet group talks about their Lisa’s Cafe. favorite local charities, Favorite book: 48 Laws of Power. Favorite music: Jazz and neo-soul. what they look for in an Your favorite charity and why: My favorite is the one I founded, Girls Leaderideal partner and what charity ship Society. We mentor middle and they love most about high school girls on social education, leadership training and entrepreneurtheir city. ship development. I love that I have the

opportunity to create a way to use my strengths to give back to the community in my own way! What are some of your hobbies: Dining out, love watching sports and checking out live music. What you are looking for in a partner: Someone who is driven, honest and loyal. Someone who can move easily between crowds and is very flexible. Three words that sum up your dating life: I’m crazy busy! Best thing about being single: I can focus totally on myself. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City: You’re crazy!

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Mary Elizabeth (Mary Beth) Ede, 32

Tulsa Occupation: Sales manager/photographer at Apertures Photo. Favorite thing to do around town: Movies at the Circle Cinema and the Art Crawl downtown - I love what it has done to drive interest in Tulsa artists and art. Favorite restaurant or food truck: If it’s good food, I’m there. However, Andolini’s never gets old. Favorite book: Just one? I read a lot. But I’m a big fan of Bill Bryson’s books. Favorite music: Alternative (currently on a Lord Huron kick) and EDM (Martin Solveig’s song “+1” is a great ‘single during the holidays’ anthem). Your favorite charity and why: Spay Oklahoma (www.spayok.org) or really any organization that offers low-cost spay and neuter services. After working as the foster coordinator at an animal shelter in California, I gained a huge appreciation for the services that these kinds of clinics offer, as well as their contribution to decreasing the stunning number of animals that are euthanized every year. What are some of your hobbies: Darkroom printing, long walks with my dog Bronson, cooking, road trips and wrangling the garden at my new house. What you are looking for in a partner: Height! I’m a little over 6’ tall. Someone who is fun, a bit quirky, confident and doesn’t mind getting dog hair on their clothing. Beyond that, I’m pretty open. Three words that sum up your dating life: Fasten your seatbelt. Best thing about being single: Not trying to juggle 2-3 Thanksgivings and Christmases. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City: Find a new hobby! (Just kidding. Love you, Aunt Nat!)

Nathaniel Ray Goodwin, 31

Oklahoma City Occupation: Lead business instructor & professional male model. Favorite thing to do around town: I enjoy people watching downtown and taking time out to think about the finer things in life. Favorite restaurant: My favorite restaurant is McAlister’s Deli because the Spud Max is worth the price of admission to NeverLand. Favorite book: My favorite book is Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari. The context in the book is refreshing to digest and is very informative for all ages. Favorite music: My favorite music to listen to is Dubstep tracks from Chillstep. Your favorite charity and why: My favorite charity is the Make a Wish Foundation in Oklahoma because the premise of the foundation is to help children with life-threatening medical conditions. Children are precious to me and every child deserves to be loved and experience happiness. What are some of your hobbies: My favorite hobbies include reading, writing, working out and star-gazing at the moon thinking about my future wife. What you are looking for in a partner: I look for a woman who has substance and is not afraid to let me know she is freaking awesome! Three words that sum up your dating life: Dynamite, contagious and bodacious. Best thing about being single: I can watch anime all day long and go to Comic Cons dressed as Superman. “The Galaxy is the Limit!”

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Clint Boone, 46

Tulsa Occupation: Morning meteorologist at KTUL. Favorite thing to do around town: Check out concerts at BOK, play tennis at the many clubs around town. Favorite restaurant or food truck: Andolini’s – I have a weakness for their garlic knots. Favorite book: Anything by John Grisham. Your favorite charity and why: Tulsa Day Center for the Homeless. I’ve played in their annual softball game a couple of times. They do great work to serve Tulsa’s homeless! What are some of your hobbies: Watching sporting events, tennis, jogging and crosswords. What you are looking for in a partner: A sense of humor, athletic and good grammar. Three words that sum up your dating life: Why so picky? Best thing about being single: Do what you want, when you want. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City: Thank you. Challenge accepted.

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Anna Inhofe, 29 Tulsa Occupation: Attorney. Favorite thing to do around town: Taking walks, visiting Philbrook and other local galleries, meeting up with friends for coffee or happy hour, Tulsa Ballet, the farmers market, events at the BOK and strangely –leaving. I love the feeling you get before a trip and the welcome of being back home. Favorite restaurant or food truck: Stonehorse or Keo. Favorite book: Sense & Sensibility. Favorite music: Anything that makes me want to dance. Your favorite charity and why: Women in Recovery (with Family and Children’s Services) because it provides a holistic approach to combating substance addiction within the criminal justice system and the continually high rates of female incarceration. What are some of your hobbies: Reading, traveling, learning new things, exercising, making cards, food, writing, yoga and trying to trick myself into picking up old interests (tennis, piano, biking). What you are looking for in a partner: Someone who keeps me on my toes and brings out my spontaneous side. He is supportive of my ambitions but has the drive to accomplish his own; we laugh together, compassionate, kind, independent, a down-to-earth dreamer, adventurous, open-minded, genuine and not finished learning. Three words that sum up your dating life: Stay bright-eyed. Best thing about being single: I will what I want when I want. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City: Thank you for always being so supportive – not only of me, but also of our city.

Ashlee Adams, 29 Oklahoma City Occupation: GiveSmartOKC coordinator at Oklahoma City Community Foundation. Favorite thing to do around town: I enjoy biking on the new trails, relaxing on a patio with a beer and friends, venturing out to try all the new local hot-spot restaurants, taking my dog (Finn) to the dog park and brunching on the weekends. Favorite restaurant or food truck: So many great ones to choose from, but one of my top favorites has to be Cheevers. Great service and delicious food. Favorite book: Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent and Lead by Brené Brown. Favorite music: Country and singer/songwriter. I’m currently into Penny & Sparrow and Chris Stapleton. Your favorite charity and why: My job is at a non-profit and I work closely with too many great organizations to choose just one! Although I do have a passion for helping marginalized women and mentoring and empowering younger girls. And, of course, I have a soft spot for animal rescue groups. What are some of your hobbies: Traveling (always ready to get away), water-skiing (being on the lake is my happy place), partaking in coffee and conversation (I love getting to know people), watching Thunder games, spending quality time with friends and serving on boards and committees (I stay busy). What you are looking for in a partner: Someone who has a strong faith, respectful for all, takes initiative, kind, confident and makes me laugh. Three words that sum up your dating life: Colorful, amusing, hopeful. Best thing about being single: The ability to travel whenever and wherever. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City: Thank you for trying to save me from the trenches of online dating!


Gant Hinkle, 30 Tulsa Occupation: Real estate agent and investor. Favorite thing to do around town: Watching a Tulsa sports team like the Athletics, Roughnecks, Oilers or Drillers play, or seeing one of my favorite bands in concert at Cain’s. Favorite restaurant or food truck: It would have to be Queenie’s which I’ve been known to hit up at least once a week for lunch. Favorite book: The Long Walk. Favorite music: Eli Young, Zac Brown, The Eagles and Kings of Leon. Your favorite charity and why: Big Brothers Big Sisters because of the impact it made not only in the life of my little, but how it impacted me as well. Mentorship and service are important to me. What are some of your hobbies: Spending time with good friends, traveling as much as possible, snowboarding, playing soccer, biking and exercising in general. I like trying new restaurants around town to get out of the house and see what’s good! What you are looking for in a partner: I’d have to say someone intelligent and educated, caring, adventurous, attractive inside and out, doesn’t take themselves too seriously and, most importantly, a believer. Three words that sum up your dating life: Open for business? Best thing about being single: That would have to be the flexibility in my everyday life to live it as I see fit and take advantage of opportunities as they come up! What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City: Lay off Mom and Dad, I’m working on it!

Danielle Tolbert, 32

Oklahoma City Occupation: Case worker for Angels Foster Family Network. Favorite thing to do around town: See shows at the Civic Center or anything outdoors. Favorite restaurant or food truck: Saucee Sicilian or Katiebug’s. Favorite book: The Giving Tree and Redeeming Love. I’m also a “Potter head.” Favorite music: Pretty much anything and everything. Your favorite charity and why: Dinner with Love. It is a nonprofit my family started to deliver home-cooked meals to families in need at Christmas. What are some of your hobbies: Traveling, reading, movies and yoga. What you are looking for in a partner: Good sense of humor, selfless and someone who’s always up for an adventure. Three words that sum up your dating life: First dates are the worst – that’s five words but I’m a rebel. Best thing about being single: Having full control over what to watch on TV. Lifetime marathon here I come! What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City: I’m flattered you thought of me but also, are you trying to tell me something?

Kimani Love, 24

Tulsa Occupation: Accounts payable administrator. Favorite thing to do around town: Explore the downtown Tulsa culture. Favorite restaurant or food truck: KEO. Favorite book: It would have to be between Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin or The Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell. Favorite music: I am terribly eclectic with my musical tastes. In one day I could listen to new age piano solos, rap, bebop, jazz and AT40. But at the moment Coldplay’s most recent album keeps finding me. Your favorite charity and why: TulsaCares is my favorite charity because they are able to assist so many people right here in our city. Not only with getting access to HIV medication but also mental health services, housing assistance and nutritional assistance as well. What are some of your hobbies: Practicing saxophone and flute, teaching myself piano, playing Xbox and trying new recipes. What you are looking for in a partner: Someone who is smart, cultured, independent, motivated and overall daring. Three words that sum up your dating life: Ready for adventure. Best thing about being single: The best thing about being single is having the freedom to do everything I want or nothing at all. What would you say to the person who nominated you to be part of Single in the City: You’re hilarious!

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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TULSA MIXOLOGIST AND OWNER OF THE VALKYRIE AARON POST CAREFULLY CONCOCTS THE UNIQUE BAR’S SIGNATURE COCKTAIL.

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THE

ART OF

l i a t k c o C A FINE

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPERY PHTOTOGRAPHY

Celebrating some of Oklahoma’s signature libations.

For young singles, bars and pubs can be the perfect place to meet people. But aside from mingling with friends, bars have become a sanctuary for professionals in the metro area to retreat from the hustle and bustle of the workplace. Oklahoma’s cocktail scene has taken off over the past decade. Besides the unique atmosphere and friendly clientele, what makes Tulsa and Oklahoma City bars so popular? The unique, signature cocktails prepared by a master mixologist, of course. On the following pages you will find the ingredients that are needed to prepare the signature cocktails proudly served by nine Oklahoma hot spots. According to Samantha Leal of Marie Claire, “Sipping on a cocktail at the bar is a sign of stylish class.” Regardless if you prefer it straight-up, on ice, shaken or stirred, when it comes to relaxing at the end of the day, one of these “drinks of art” might just be the ticket.

THE FEN LI FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

BERRY SANGRIA

M I C K E Y M A N T L E ’S S T E A K H O U S E

7 S. Mickey Mantle Dr., Oklahoma City • 405.272.0777

THE FRANCISCO

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPERY PHTOTOGRAPHY

Cabernet Sauvignon Orange juice Lemon juice Simple syrup Fresh muddled berries

1.5 oz. Mezcal .75 oz. Simple syrup (1:1 sugar-water) .5 oz. Sweet vermouth 1 Double shot Topeca espresso Shake, double strain into a coupe glass and garnish with a mint sprig.

H O D G E ’S B E N D

823 E. 3rd St., Tulsa • 918.398.4470

THE CUCUMBER 4 1/2 oz. 1/2 oz. 2 oz.

Sliced and muddled cucumbers St. Germain Fresh lime juice Hendricks gin

SAINTS PUB

1715 N.W. 16th St., Oklahoma City 405.602.6308

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPERY PHTOTOGRAPHY

THE FEN LI

NAPLES MARTINI Grey Goose l’orange Caravella orangecello Simple syrup Lemon juice Fresh basil

Muddle basil with simple syrup then add spirits. Shake vigorously then pour into martini glass. Garnish with basil leaf.

N A P L E S F L AT B R E A D & W I N E B A R

201 S. Denver, Tulsa • 918.879.1990

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

1.5 oz. .5 oz. .5 oz. .5 oz.

1 dash 1 dash • •

Plymouth gin Fresh lemon juice Falernum Rothman & Winter orchard pear liqueur Peychaud’s bitters Regan’s orange bitters Apple wood chips Pear slices for garnish

Ignite apple wood on a flat, fire-proof surface with a kitchen torch. Cover with a coupe or cocktail glass to extinguish and smoke the glass. Combine all liquid ingredients with ice and shake vigorously for 10 seconds. Tea-strain into the smoked glass and garnish with pear slices.

VA L K Y R I E

13 E. Brady St., Tulsa • 918.295.2160


PEAR LIME MARTINI

Juice of 2 limes Pear vodka Simple syrup Sweet and sour

1-1/2 oz. 3/4 oz. 2 oz.

Add all ingredients into a mixing glass and fill with ice. Shake till mixed and chilled through. Strain into a martini glass.

P OLO GRILL

2038 Utica Square, Tulsa 918.744.4280

AS THYME GOES BY Grey Goose la poire St. Germaine Lime juice Lemongrass thyme simplesyrup Dash of lemon bitters

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPERY PHTOTOGRAPHY

1.5 oz. .75 oz. .75 oz. 1oz.

Build over ice in a shaker tin and shake. Strain into a martini glass. Garnish with a lime wheel float and sprig of thyme.

PA S E O G R I L L

LIMONCELLO POMEGRANATE MARTINI

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

1.5 oz. 1.5 oz.

THE R&J SOUR Rye whiskey Brandy Amaretto

Egg white Lemon juice Simple syrup

R&J SUPPER CLUB & LOUNGE

320 N.W. 10th St., Oklahoma City • 405.602.5066

2 oz.

Absolut citron Housemade limoncello Pomegranate juice

Shake and serve in a martini glass with a lemon twist.

STELLA

1201 N. Walker Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73103 p.405.235.2200 f.405.606.4630

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPERY PHTOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

2909 Paseo, Unit A, Oklahoma City 405.601.1079

BOYSENBERRY OLD FASHION 2 oz. Whiskey 1 Dash bitters

1 Slice orange 6 Fresh boysenberries

Muddle orange and boysenberries in rocks glass. Add bitters. Fill the glass with ice and then add whiskey.

P OLO GRILL

2038 Utica Square, Tulsa • 918.744.4280

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Education Guide

The Joys of Learning

C

Professors throughout Oklahoma believe college fun shouldn’t be limited to parties and sports.

ollege is commonly referred to as the best years of a person’s life. Living in a dorm, parties, sporting events and proximity to peers are some of the qualities that make those four years so exciting. Classes, however, don’t normally make the cut. When discussing the dynamics of a college course, rarely do students use positive adjectives to describe the class. Words like “boring,” “difficult” and “stressful” are commonly uttered by students when discussing their classes with friends. Every so often a course might be deemed “interesting,” but seldom will a college class ever be described as fun or exciting. But at many colleges throughout Oklahoma, educators are creating courses that flip that theory upside down. A perfect example of this is a course taught at the University of Tulsa’s Chemistry department. For the past nine years, University of Tulsa Professor Keith Symcox has taught a course called The Chemistry of Cooking. In this senior level chemistry class, students dive into the science of cooking by using various chemistry principles to make everything from an angel food cake to a loaf of bread. The course has become wildly popular among students for obvious reasons. After cooking, the class will discuss the scientific processes involved. “And then of course, at the end, we have all this food, so we have to eat it. That right there increases the popularity of the class dramatically,” says Symcox. “The average student puts

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on a couple of pounds throughout the course of the semester.” Symcox believes that one of the main lessons students get out of the class is that it shows them that they can apply the things they learn in college to real world systems. Because of a lack of cooking proficiency, many Americans revert to going out every meal which can lead to serious financial and health issues down the road. “I think it’s great that we get to show these kids that it doesn’t take a lot of skill in the kitchen to make good nutritious food pretty quickly,” says Symcox. For this reason, Symcox’s course is also a class that students will use for the rest of their lives. “Some of these kids have really lived sheltered lives,” says Symcox. “I’ve had students come up to me and say, ‘Symcox, I don’t know what a spatula is. What does it look like?’ Someone who doesn’t know what a spatula is, isn’t going to do a lot in the kitchen, in which case they’re pretty much a slave to the restaurant industry for the rest of their lives.” At the University of Central Oklahoma, music professor Patrick Conlon also instructs fun and exciting courses that have very practical benefits. Each year, Conlon teaches a film scoring class that allows students to learn about the intersection of film and music, while also understanding the business aspect of both industries. “The feedback from the students has been really great,” said Conlon. “We pair [the course] with a student film festival in the area that happens during the semester, and we usually have at least five or six students score the film for that. So its great that the students get a feel for that process.”

Conlon also instructs a studio recording class where students get the opportunity to imitate their favorite artists and music producers by studying and making music in a studio with the same quality of equipment that professionals use. “If you don’t go to a school like this, pretty much the only way to get into a studio is you either pay the $150 an hour to rent, in which case you’re probably recording someone else, so you’re not just trying to learn how it works. Or you intern, and you just watch people use it; you’re not allowed to touch it for a year,” said Conlon. The class is a mix of music training, electrical engineering and everything else that happens in the audio engineering world all tied up into one. And the students absolutely love it. Conlon’s primary focus in these courses is to make the classes as practical and relevant to the industry as possible. “When you get out of college there’s often that transition where you’re not a student anymore, but you don’t quite feel like a professional,” he said. “We want it to be, by the time they get out of here, they’re not a student anymore; they’re a professional.” Additionally, exciting and practical courses are not limited to four-year institutions. Chris Tsotsoros is the director of Continuing Education and Workforce Development at Tulsa Community College, and over the past few years he has helped implement a number of credit and noncredit personal enrichment courses and workforce certification opportunities at the college. Some of the most popular classes offered are a novel writing course, a course on how to grow your own vegetable garden and a community band and orchestra. NATHAN PORTER


Education Guide

O

Private Maers Assessing and choosing a private school.

nce the decision to send a child to a private school is made, what factors go into selecting the right one? Comparing private schools can be like comparing apples to oranges. With so many facilities from which to choose, the matter of selecting a school is not simple by any standards. “Choosing a school is an extremely important decision, and parents should solicit as much information as they can in order to decide which school best addresses their children’s needs and aspirations,” says Olivia Martin, the director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Holland Hall, an Independent College Preparatory Episcopal School located in Tulsa. The first step in determining which school to attend is to address your child’s learning style and what type of environment she or he will most likely succeed in, agrees Kerry Hornibrook, the director of School Advancement at Cascia Hall, a Catholic College Preparatory School in Tulsa. “Make a list defining what the ideal school looks like and what values are at the top of your list,” says Hornibrook. “Consider all the possibilities and make sure both the parent and the potential student visit a number of schools before deciding.” Composing questions before visiting a potential private school is also a good idea. “When visiting a campus or speaking with the admission office, parents should bring

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questions that relate directly to their child’s interests and strengths,” says Martin. “If a student is a gifted cellist, parents should ask about the orchestra program and its record in competitions. “Likewise, if a student hopes to earn a Division I soccer scholarship, parents should ask about the team, meet the coach and ask a college counselor about recent soccer-playing graduates,” says Martin. “Most importantly, if a student is academically gifted or faces learning challenges, parents must ascertain if the school will address their child’s strengths and weaknesses in a comprehensive way,” says Martin. Some other things to consider are school values, educational tools, college matriculation rate, extra-curricular opportunities, teacher-student ratio and where your child feels he or she will make the best fit. “The feeling of fit and comfort should supersede the reputation of the school,” says Lisa Oliver, head of College Counseling at Cascia Hall. “A student must have the feeling, once on campus, of being happy there and fitting in, not just academically, but socially as well,” Oliver says. The most important advice you’ll ever hear is to start early. Start your search early, plan your visits early and put in your applications early. In the case for private schools, one has to plan ahead because most private schools make admission decisions for the following school year by January of the current year. Each school has its own requirements, and

some documentation (independent testing, for example) may take a while to gather. Pay attention to admission requirements and deadlines. Lastly, is college attendance a high priority for both student and parents? “Private schools can instill their students with the expectation of attending college,” says Hornibrook. “With college as a focus, students can be more goal oriented, and often the school’s curriculum will be aimed at preparing your child for college. Many private schools, such as Cascia Hall, are even referred to as ‘college preparatory.’ “Another difference between private and public schools is private schools often put a major emphasis on personal values,” says Hornibrook. “You will find many private schools have honor codes and behavioral standards that can be enforced that help students develop into mature adults.” Cascia Hall, says Oliver, provides students with strong relationships with teachers, innovative curriculum, small class sizes that encourages individual development, superior college counseling and a variety of arts and athletics. “Our graduates report every year that they have the best writing skills, laboratory experience, ability to work collaboratively, time management, confidence and public speaking skills of anyone in their freshman dorms,” says Oliver. “They are not only prepared for success in college but also in life beyond their formal education.” SHARON MCBRIDE


The Tulsa Achieves Program gives eligible graduating Tulsa County seniors the opportunity to attend College without the cost of tuition and fees. This program began in 2007 and has broken the college barrier for thousands of students. Important deadlines are approaching for seniors who are graduating in spring 2016, with the first priority date on April 30, 2016.

Stay on track with college planning by checking tulsacc.edu/TulsaAchieves Questions? 918-595-8000


Education Guide

Y

College Bound?

Selecting the right college proves to be a tough decision.

ou have finished high school — now what? Get a job or go to college? For many, it’s time to pick a college or university. There are many schools out there to choose from — some known and some less known, all worthy of attention. A college or university? A private or public option? A regional or state university? Here’s some information to help you narrow down what option is right for you. According to the U.S. Department of Education, a college is an institution of higher education that may stand alone or make up one part of a university. There may be several colleges on a single university campus (e.g., college of medicine). Generally, universities are larger and more independent than colleges. They are also more likely to offer graduate and post-

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graduate courses and degrees. Public and private colleges are both equally good options for higher education. According to the U.S. Department of Education, private colleges are owned by private organizations and are funded through tuition and donations. Typically, the cost of education in private colleges is higher than the public colleges. This may determine what kind of school to pursue as public and private school tuition can vary widely. In accordance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, a net price calculator should be accessible on each prospective school’s website. This tool will help you get a picture of what it could cost for you to attend college. Visiting the prospective school before committing to it is also a good idea. “One of the most important pieces of advice I can give to a senior is visit every college you are considering,” says Michelle Cook, director of Undergraduate Admissions at Oklahoma

City University. “You need to spend time on campus meeting with current students and faculty to know if the university is a good fit for you. “There’s nothing worse than choosing a college and then transferring after the first semester,” adds Cook. “Transferring is just simply not fun.” Michael Harris, the director of Admissions and Prospective Student Services at Tulsa Community College suggests that the prospective student sit down with parents and/or their high school counselor to discuss and rank what is most important to the student. “For instance, accessibility and cost are factors to consider,” says Harris. “If access and cost aren’t barriers, then where does the student rank college location or the institution’s documented success in their potential major? Does family legacy mean a lot?” SHARON MCBRIDE


BETTER LEARNING, BETTER TEACHING,

A BETTER DEGREE YOUR SUCCESS STARTS HERE Flexible Schedules | Undergraduate & Graduate Degrees Small Class Sizes | Financial Aid Available

Oklahoma State University-Tulsa offers a world-class OSU education in Tulsa. Our faculty and staff understand the challenge of juggling work, family and school. Many of our students are working professionals who bring unique life experiences into the classroom that enhance the learning environment. The smaller campus size enables faculty to work with you to help you succeed. Whether you want increased earning power, more opportunities or the instant credibility that comes with an OSU degree, OSU-Tulsa can help you get there from here. To watch a video about the OSU-Tulsa experience, visit www.osu-tulsa.okstate.edu.

CLAREMORE | BARTLESVILLE | PRYOR | ONLINE

918-343-7777 | www.rsu.edu 20037 RSU.indd 1

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FIND YOUR PLACE. okbu.edu

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FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Education Guide

L

Fueling the Talent Pipeline

Meeting Oklahoma’s workforce needs through educational innovation.

ast year, Gov. Mary Fallin launched the Oklahoma Works program, OU President David Boren called for a statewide initiative to raise teacher salaries and the Daily Oklahoman produced a ‘Help Wanted’ series detailing the state’s shortage of skilled workers. These three actions highlighted problems in Oklahoma’s education and workforce environments. The shortage of workers, particularly in engineering, health care, manufacturing and information technology, is an issue technical schools, universities and business organizations have been working to remedy. “The skilled labor shortage is not only an Oklahoma problem, it’s a national concern,” according to Pam Ehlers, Oklahoma State University’s Career Services Director. “Largely, it’s a problem of supply and demand. The increases in the energy, construction and aviation sectors in Oklahoma have created a skilled labor shortage. The decrease and layoffs in the energy sector may level out the shortage of skilled labor for the short term; however, the average American skilled worker is over 50 years of age, so the shortage will not go away anytime soon.” By 2020, 64 percent of Oklahoma jobs

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will require post-secondary education, although by that time, only 37 percent of adults are expected to have any level of post-secondary education. “We are experiencing a silver tsunami with our retiring baby boomers,” says Denise Reid, executive director of Mosaic and Workforce for the Tulsa Regional Chamber. “There are a couple of issues with what is happening. One, baby boomers are the largest generation. Our supply and demand is off with our incoming talent pipeline.” “Two, American companies built our retiring workforce. They trained and developed workers to do a majority of the jobs. Employers require ready-made workers today which means potential employees must have some form of post-secondary training, which could be a certificate or credential, or an associate or bachelor’s degree or higher.” Oklahoma lags behind in producing enough people who have college degrees or professional certificates. “One very noticeable change in today’s work environment, compared to that of 10 years ago, is the sophistication of work processes due to technology and, thus, the need for employees not only with good technical skills but with higher levels of cognitive processing,” says Stillwater’s Meridian

Technology Center Superintendent Douglas Major. Major noted, “At one time, many employers could accommodate individuals who had less than a high school diploma. Today, virtually all employees need to have some form of post-secondary education.” Research has shown that 40 percent of Oklahoma’s high school graduates must take remedial classes in college. This statistic is one motivator driving Boren’s call for a bipartisan movement to place a teacher salary hike on the ballot for a statewide vote. This initiative, Boren said, would help Oklahoma compete with surrounding states and would involve a one cent sales tax increase, raising $615 million a year. Oklahoma currently ranks 49th in per student funding, and the state’s share of funding per student has dropped from 50 percent to 16 percent in the last 40 years, Boren noted in an Oct. 2015 letter to the editor in The Oklahoman. “Education, equity and opportunity are a big deal,” said Reid. “This is not popular but everyone should have access to a quality school, teacher and education. Kids need to have hands-on experiential learning and understand our fast-paced work world. Kids graduating in the next five to ten years will be going into jobs that don’t exist today. The


way we teach and learn needs to be able to move at the speed of change. We are lagging in this area and have been for some time.” Gov. Fallin’s Oklahoma Works program seeks to better prepare students for the workforce by aligning education and workforce needs and finding solutions to the skills gap. According to Major, “Oklahoma is not alone in this challenge. The skills gap is a conversation in nearly every state and even in other countries. Traditionally, the education industry as a whole has not been as nimble in the change process as it could be, due largely to governance issues. One benefit that we have in the CareerTech system is our flexibility to modify our curriculum fairly rapidly in order to adjust to the changing needs of our customers–businesses needing to hire skilled employees.” While technical schools, like Meridian, can adapt quickly to address needs, the change is sometimes slower for public schools and some universities. University of Oklahoma’s Dean of the Business College Daniel Pullin, however, says that OU has a variety of ways it is working on solutions to these problems. One includes finding ways for quality teachers to get an education. “Quality teachers represent one of the largest shortages of skilled workers in our state,” says Pullin. “Great teachers work to inspire Oklahoma’s next generation workforce as well.” Through OU’s College of Education, students can take advantage of a Debt-Free Teachers program, which, Pullin says, provides “an inducement for Oklahoma-trained teaching talent to stay in the Sooner State in the years following graduation.” The program allows OU students in the teacher certification program with a 3.0 GPA to receive funding if they teach in Oklahoma in a high need area after graduation. In addition to teacher training, many programs are being developed around STEM (science-technology-engineering-math) skills. In Oklahoma, 6,700 STEM-related job openings are expected in the next 10 years, and not enough STEM students are graduating to fill those openings. One way OSU is addressing this labor shortage is through its STEM Career Fair. “The fair is open to all students with majors related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics,” says Ehlers. “This is a great opportunity for underclassmen who are considering a career in one of these majors to network with companies to learn more about STEM careers. Students will have an opportunity to visit with corporate recruiters about possible internships and summer employment opportu-

nities, as well as full-time employment after graduation,” said Ehlers. Area chambers of commerce also have much at stake where Oklahoma’s future workers are concerned. The Tulsa Regional Chamber launched an initiative called the Talent Dividend, which Reid said, is “a program exploring post-secondary attainment and the economic impact it has on cities.” “In Tulsa,” Reid continues, “if we increased our college attainment rate by one percentage point it would have a $646 million impact on our economy annually. That’s economic development. This initiative shifted the mindset around focusing our efforts on creating a stronger talent pipeline to meet the needs of our businesses and community.” Another project the Tulsa Chamber developed is the Road Trip for Teachers, a way to introduce teachers to the manufacturing industry. This program, Reid said, was designed to “dispel antiquated ideas about what types of jobs were available in manufacturing while also highlighting the wages, training and education required and the volume of jobs available.” Promoting career awareness is also a major function of the state’s technical schools. At Meridian, Major said that career development specialists meet with middle and junior high school students “to help them begin to focus on their areas of interest.” “Hopefully they can make the right choices in their course selections, which will lead them closer to their preferred career,” said Major. Career awareness is one solution for Oklahoma’s workforce challenges, yet certain statistics continually highlight this pressing concern. In 2013, only 31 percent of Oklahoma eighth-graders were proficient in math, while 41 percent were proficient in reading. These statistics drive some of the K-12 programs offered at the University of Oklahoma, including summer academies in architecture, aviation, chemistry, meteorology and engineering. In addition, OU has engaged K-12 students in its ExxonMobil Engineering Practice facility and the GEAR UP for Success program, which gives K-12 teachers interactive lessons in STEM education. At the University of Tulsa, Earl Johnson, vice-president of enrollment and student services, says the university is meeting demands in the engineering and science fields in a variety of ways. “We have programming and extensive research opportunities for undergraduates in subjects such as biology, computer science and, specifically, cyber security where job FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Education Guide

opportunities are plentiful due to the unfortunate nature of attacks on infrastructure,” said Johnson. “Mechanical engineers with our undergraduate research and preparation are poised to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing industries such as automotive and manufacturing.” In May 2015, Gov. Fallin said that Oklahoma had 68,000 job openings for skilled workers, and a few months later, secretary of education and workforce development Natalie Shirley upped that number to 85,000. Shirley has consistently described the need for trainable employees with knowledge in basic subjects. Higher wages for teachers, which is what David Boren’s initiative focuses on, is one way to attract and retain quality teachers who develop quality students with that basic knowledge. Continually developing the most effective ways to teach students is also imperative. According to Major, at Meridian, “We continually evaluate the length, content and delivery methods of instruction in an attempt to ensure that our instruction is relevant to employers and engaging to students. While our instruction has always been competency-based, today’s work environment requires more interaction and teamwork. To meet this need, much of our curriculum has become project-based in which students have to work together to solve real-world

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

problems.” Quality teacher training is necessary to provide students with basic knowledge and is increasingly needed to address the state’s growing diversity. According to Reid, in Tulsa, “Our shifting demographic is another game changer. Our fastest growing and youngest population is our Hispanic population. We need to embrace the diversity in our schools and learn more about the different cultures in our region and state.” Reid highlighted the connection between inclusion and business development. “We need to invest in creating better ties and understanding of these cultures and show that we have an inclusive culture so we retain and attract talent to our region.” At the University of Tulsa, Johnson says, “The most visible and meaningful change we have made is in the health care arena where combining the health-related programs into the Oxley College of Health Science has placed a deliberate focus on equipping students to serve the dire needs of our state, particularly in rural areas and some urban settings.” A college degree increases the chance of workforce success, yet the biggest wage gap is for workers with skills certification and associate-level degrees. Because of this gap, many employers are finding they must change the way they attract, recruit and retain workers. At OSU, Ehlers, says, “Employers are

trying new ways to meet and interact with students.” For this purpose, OSU started Flip Fairs. “A Flip Fair is where student organizations set up a booth and the employment recruiters network with students to learn more about their organization, programs of study and ways they can proactively recruit students,” said Ehlers. OU’s Sooner Promise program provides that link between STEM graduates and employers by keeping college affordable. Pullin said, “In addition to Sooner Promise, we are enhancing experiential learning programs through the implementation of new entrepreneurship and economic development offerings where students engage directly with industry mentors. “This connectivity between our students and Oklahoma role-models supports our efforts to grow and nurture our entrepreneurs from within, ensuring that the state is creating the high quality, knowledge-based jobs for our graduates,” said Pullin. Pullin points out that OU has identified key areas to attack directly: K-12 awareness and STEM emphasis, affordability and achievement, student success, internships, research and applied learning, career services and economic development. Including all people in all types of education and training is perhaps the best way to fuel the talent pipeline and face, what Boren called, one of our state’s “greatest crises.” SHAUN PERKINS


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OSUIT STUDENTS GETTING HANDS ON TRAINING.

Education Guide

PHOTO BY CACEY COTTOM, OSUIT

V

Trending Trade Building a future with real-world approach.

ocational and trade schools, and technical schools as well, are becoming more and more popular. Today, the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technical Education reports that career and technology education in Oklahoma is offered in grades six through 12 in more than 540 comprehensive schools and on 58 campuses of the 29 technology center districts. And in addition to these numbers, the rate of students choosing trade schools over traditional four-year colleges is increasing. But why? Teachers at trade schools in Oklahoma say there are many benefits. “As a non-traditional college, the number one benefit is probably that we are going beyond just the theory of the subject matter and actually applying what the student is learning,” says James McCullough of the Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology (OSUIT). “This means, at least for OSUIT, that we go much more in-depth, going beyond just learning a set of basis skills. Our students also learn the reasons and impact of how that knowledge and skill set will be used and [how it will] continue to evolve over the long term.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

McCullough, a dean for the School of Visual Communications at OSUIT, says he thinks trade and technical schools are becoming more popular because it’s easier to find job opportunities with these degrees in the current (and future) economy. “The economy definitely plays a huge role in this and will certainly continue to for the foreseeable future,” McCullough says. “In nearly all of our fields of study, the demand for talent is enormous. The skills gap is something almost every industry is facing right now.” Trade schools fill that skills gap. The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technical Education says this type of education goes well beyond explaining how an industry works; the educational tracks include the immersion of students in real-world simulation and on-the-job training for a specific job – not just a field. President of Spartan College of Aeronautics and Technology Lamar P. Haynes agrees that the benefits of trade school include developing skills related to a specific career path. He adds that “there isn’t much time or money spent on education that is unlikely to lead to employment.” Haynes also adds that he believes trade schools are increasing in popularity because of the high costs of four-year colleges. “When

a student leaves a higher education program, they will typically have incurred debt. The sooner you can translate that education into higher paying positions or upward mobility, the easier it is to pay off the debt and improve your life circumstances,” Haynes says. In the future, McCullough at OSUIT predicts that there will be even more direct industry involvement in trade school education. Haynes says he has seen a welcome uptick in female students – a trend that seems to be continuing upward. So how do you know if a trade school is right for you over a traditional four-year college degree? The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technical Education recommends that students consider academic interest and vocational goals, as well as students’ ability to learn by “doing” and the possibility of student debt from a traditional college. And Haynes at Spartan College wants to remind potential students that trade schools are by no means of lower rank. “Often trade and technical training colleges have been viewed as a downgrade in education, but in reality, they are not higher or lower to a more traditional college – just different,” Haynes says. “They are designed to be focused, accelerated and more hands-on with their style of training.” MEGAN MORGAN


OKLAHOMA COLLEGE BY THE NUMBERS

20.7

(source: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education)

Average ACT score of Oklahoma’s high school seniors in 2014 (source: ACT, Inc.)

4,175

14

The number of independent colleges and universities in Oklahoma (source: Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education)

Average SAT score of Oklahoma’s high school seniors in 2014 (source: The College Board)

The size of OU’s freshman class in 2014, the largest class ever (source: The University of Oklahoma)

The number of students at Oklahoma State University (source: Oklahoma State University)

$18,364 The estimated cost to attend a public research university in Oklahoma, for an Oklahoma resident as a fulltime undergraduate student, for the 20152016 academic year (source: okcollegestart.org)

1693

49

The number of public colleges and universities in Oklahoma

The percentage of University of Tulsa freshman in 2014 that graduated in the top ten percent of their high school class

75% (source: The University of Tulsa)

25,962

1,842

The number of degrees and certificates earned by Oklahoma college and CareerTech students as part of the Governor’s Complete College America Initiative in 2014 (source: newsok.com)

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Education Guide

Reading Between the Scribbled Lines

P

Early childhood literacy is a factor for future academic and professional success.

arents soak in all of the early markers of a child’s life. A baby taking his or her first steps, a toddler uttering his or her first words, or a kid riding a bike for the first time, are all seemingly monumental events that help further etch a sense of pride into the father and mother. One early childhood milestone, however, often has much larger implications in the life of the child: literacy. The ability to read and comprehend information is essential to academic success. Consequently, failure to read proficiently can be the quickest way to diminish a child’s future success rate. “There’s an enormous body of literature that suggests that how kids are doing when they enter kindergarten is highly predictive of that child’s future success in the academic perspective and even after they graduate high school,” says Steven Dow, executive director of Community Action Project Tulsa, an anti-poverty agency dedicated to providing children and families with the educational tools to break the cycle of poverty. Studies have shown that 80 percent of brain growth is complete in a person by the time they are five years old. For this

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

reason, a greater emphasis has been placed on early childhood education in recent years. President Barack Obama and United States Secretary of Education Arne Duncan have proposed many national initiatives to increase early education. Literacy, specifically, has been targeted as a key marker of a child’s educational development, primarily because regardless of the academic subject being studied, reading is necessary. Donna Hall is a reading specialist and board member at Creek County Literacy Program in Oklahoma. Hall believes that falling behind in reading and literacy skills can create a dangerous snowball effect in a child’s life if left unchecked. “Teaching early literacy skills can be equated to building a brick wall with each brick representing a specific early literacy skill,” says Hall. “As children acquire each skill, bricks are added to the wall, starting at the bottom. As each row of bricks is completed, children’s literacy abilities grow. With each grade level, additional literacy skills are mastered, thereby allowing their brick wall of literacy skills to grow and become stronger. Without the basic, early literacy skills, further development becomes extremely difficult. Each early literacy skill not mastered creates a missing brick in that wall. If skills are not mastered, the founda-

tion of the brick wall ultimately becomes less and less stable due to missing skills.” Many early childhood educators believe that the seeds of childhood literacy should be sown within the first year of a child’s life with oral language development and eventually phonetic skills. Scholars suggest that in order for a child to be prepared for school, he or she needs to hear at least 25,000 words per day from birth to age five. “Based on what we know, the parents clearly play a significant role in the education process early on,” said Dow. “The problem is that in many situations formal schooling does not happen early enough.” Exposing children, and even toddlers, to a vast amount of words can have a large impact down the road. But if the parent lacks the vocabulary to consistently reach this mark or, for whatever reason, isolates the child from many verbal conversations the child can suffer early on in reading and comprehension. “The state of Oklahoma has done a great job in creating preschool opportunities that most states don’t provide,” says Dow. “From birth to beginning kindergarten, the responsibility falls on the family unit and can be accomplished by spending a great deal of time talking to the child, reading and


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Education Guide

and rereading books to a child, talking to the child as they watch you throughout the day, are all ways to assist in increasing children’s oral language development,” says Hall. Additionally, families are seldom aware of the ways in which their conversation and verbal actions affect the educational development of a toddler, particularly parents who were not highly educated themselves. Very often, literacy rates among children directly reflect the socio-economic status and education level of the child’s family. When a child reaches kindergarten, the duty of educating the child shifts primarily to the school system; however, each student has different needs that require different levels of attention. Meeting all of those specific needs can be difficult. This year, Oklahoma passed the Reading Sufficiency Act, otherwise known as the Third Grade Reading Law, which requires all schools to make sure every student is reading at grade level by the end of the school year. The law was initially introduced with controversy, but the latest state test scores show subtle improvements. Based on results from the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test in December 2015, the amount of students reading at grade level or higher improved from 66.2 percent in 2014 to 69.5 percent in 2015. Furthermore, Hall adds that “In order for [literacy] skills to be developed, additional practice is required at home nightly, such as spelling words, phonetic skills, sight words, reading nightly to children and/or listening to children read once students are capable of reading on their own.” As a state, Oklahoma has taken steps to remedy this issue. Though there are large gaps in elementary reading levels among various urban and rural school districts, numerous programs and initiatives have been created in recent years to tackle the problem directly. Some of the positive educational programs include Tulsa Educare, Head Start, Oklahoma Parents as Teachers and AmeriCorps Tulsa Reading Partners. “Great strides have been made in Oklahoma to increase early childhood education despite tremendous budget constraints and legislative interventions,” says Hall. Though strides have been made, Hall and other early childhood educators agree that there is no quick solution to vastly improving childhood literacy. “It is nearly impossible to remediate these children in one year,” says Hall. “Remediation must begin as soon as skill gaps are determined; thus, allowing students to gain the necessary skills specified for each grade level.” NATHAN PORTER

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016


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S

Total enrollment

Student/teacher ratio

Grades offered

Standardized testing

Foreign languages offered/sports programs/arts and music programs

Number of teachers with advanced degrees

Uniforms

Annual tuition

Augustine Christian Academy

6310 E. 30th St., Tulsa/ 918.832.4600/ www.acatulsa.org

222

10:1

PK-12

Iowa Test of Basic Skills; ACT Explore

Latin, Hebrew, Greek/ No/Yes

N/A

Yes

$5,250-$6,750

Bishop Kelley High School

3905 S. Hudson Ave., Tulsa/ 918.627.3390/ www.BishopKelley.org

880

11:1

9-12

ACT: 24.7; SAT: R 630, M 662

French, Spanish, Latin, Chinese/Yes/Yes

51%

Yes

Catholic parishioner)-$11,000 (other)

Catholic

Bishop McGuiness Catholic High School

801 NW 50th St., OKC/405.842.6638/ www.bmchs.org

710

15:1

9-12

ACT

Spanish, French, Latin/ Yes/Yes

43%

Yes

$8,600

Catholic

Casady School

9500 N. Pennsylvania Ave., OKC/ 405.749.3100/ www.casady.org

908

10:1

PK-12

ACT: 26.7

French, Spanish, Chinese, Latin, Greek/ Yes/Yes

58%

Yes

$6,700 - $18,990

Episcopal

Cascia Hall Preparatory School

2520 S. Yorktown Ave., Tulsa/ 918.746.2600/ www.casciahall.org

525

12:1

6-12

ACT: 26.1; SAT: CR 605, M 696, W 595

Spanish, German, French, Latin, Chinese/Yes/Yes

65%

Yes

$13,125

Catholic, Augustinian

Heritage Hall

1800 NW 122nd St., OKC/ 405.749.3000/ www.heritagehall.com

850

13:1

PS-12

ACT: 27

Latin, French, Spanish, Chinese/Yes/Yes

48%

No

$8,600-$21,885

None

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

Religious affiliation

Address/Phone/ Website

chool is never really out for parents looking for the best options in their children’s education. Oklahoma Magazine makes the search for private schooling easier. We’ve contacted and polled private schools in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa metro areas to get answers to questions you have. How big is the school? What languages are taught? Which have the most to offer academically? Which offer arts and sports curriculum? How much does it cost? From enrollment figures to tuition and dress codes, read on to get a bird’s-eye-view of these prospective choices and investments.

School

Education Guide

Oklahoma Private School Guide

Nondenominational

$8,700 (supporting


Address/Phone/ Website

Total enrollment

Student/teacher ratio

Grades offered

Standardized testing

Foreign languages offered/sports programs/arts and music programs

Number of teachers with advanced degrees

Uniforms

Annual tuition

Religious affiliation

5666 E. 81st St., Tulsa/ 918.481.1111/ www.hollandhall.org

950

9:1

PK-12

ACT: 27 SAT: 1850

French, Latin, Spanish, Chinese/Yes/Yes

51%

Yes

$6,675-$18.850

Episcopal

Holy Family Cathedral School

820 S. Boulder Ave., Tulsa/918.582.0422/ www.holyfamilycathedralschool.com

161

16:1

PK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish/Yes/Yes

7

Yes

$3,950 (Catholic); $4,850 (nonCatholic); $4,800, (Pre-K tuition)

Catholic

Lincoln Christian School

1003 N. 129th East Ave., Tulsa/918.234.8150/ www. lincolnchristianschool.com

929

16:1

PK-12

ACT

Spanish/Yes/Yes

10

Yes

$6,000

Church on the Move

Marquette Catholic School

1519 S. Quincy Ave., Tulsa/ 918.584.4631/ www.marquetteschool.org

507

10:1 (ECDC), 22:1 (K-8)

3 years-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish/Yes/Yes

1/3 of faculty

Yes

$5,031-$6,360

Catholic

Metro Christian Academy

6363 S. Trenton Ave., Tulsa/918.745.9868/ www.metroca.com

1,017

18.5:1

P3-12

ACT: 25.5

Spanish, French, Chinese/Yes/Yes

35

Yes

$6,625-$9,265

Interdenominational

Monte Cassino School

2206 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa/ 918.742.3364/ www.montecassino.org

840

12:1

PS-8

CogAT & Iowa Testing: 95%

French, Latin, Spanish/ Yes/Yes

40%

Yes

$8,000-$9,800

Roman Catholic

Regent Preparatory School of Oklahoma

8621 S. Memorial Dr., Tulsa/ 918.663.1002/www.rpsok.org

465

12:1

PK-12

N/A

Spanish, Latin/Yes/Yes

38%

Yes

$7,330 (1-6), $7,950 (7-8), $9,360 (9-12)

Christian interdenominational

Rejoice Christian Schools

12200 E. 86th St. N., Owasso/ 918.516.0050/ www.rejoiceschool.com

809

14:1

PS3-12

EXPLORE; ACT: 25

Spanish, French/Yes/Yes

29%

No

$2,270-$6,450

Baptist

Riverfield Country Day School

2433 W. 61st St., Tulsa/ 918.466.3553/ www.riverfield.org

602

7:1

infants-12

SAT & ACT; ACT: 25

Spanish, German/Yes/Yes

21

No

Saint Catherine School

2515 W. 46th St., Tulsa/ 918.446.9756/ www.saintcatherineschool.org

111

8:1

PK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish/Yes/Yes

5

Yes

School of Saint Mary

1365 E. 49th Pl., Tulsa/ 918.749.9361/ www.schoolofsaintmary.com

342

15:1

PK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills: 95%

Spanish/Yes/Yes

4

Yes

St. Pius X School

1717 S. 75th E. Ave., Tulsa/ 918.627.5367/ www.spxtulsa.org

396

16:1

PS-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills (grades 2-8); ACT Explore Test (8th grade)

Spanish, foreign language lab/Yes/Yes

2

Yes

$4,483 (one child parish rate); $7,007 (one child non-parish rate); multiple child

Catholic

Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic School

1428 N. 67th East Ave., Tulsa/918.836.2165/ www. peterandpaultulsa.org

200

20:1

PK-8

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish, Latin/Yes/Yes

6

Yes

$3,600

Catholic

St. Mary’s Episcopal School

505 E. Covell Road, Edmond/ 405.341.9541

140

8:1

PK-5

Iowa Test of Basic Skills

Spanish/No/Yes

6

Yes

$2,885-$8,260

Episcopal

Town & Country School

8906 E. 34th St., Tulsa/ 918.296.3113/ www.tandcschool.org

167

6:1

1-12

N/A

No/Yes/Yes

N/A

Yes

$11,680-$13,090

None

Undercroft Montessori

3745 S. Hudson, Tulsa/ 918.622.2890/ www.undercroft.org

187

8:1

P3-8

Stanford Achievement Test

Spanish/Yes/Yes

20

No

University School at The University of Tulsa

326 S. College Ave., Tulsa/ 918.631.5060/ www.utulsa.edu/uschool

225

5:1

PS-8

Stanford Achievement Test

Spanish, Chinese/No/Yes

16

Optional

$5,735-$10,960

Wright Christian Academy

11391 E. Admiral Pl., Tulsa/ 918.438.0922/ www. wrightchristianacademy.com

250

11:1

P3-12

ACT

Spanish/Yes/Yes

8

Yes

$5,041-$6,046

School Holland Hall

$8,820-$12,025

None

(varies on grade and age )

$4,065

(Catholic)-$5,028 (non-Catholic)

$4,745 (parishioner)

Roman Catholic

Roman Catholic

$6,150-$10,045

None

(primary half day to middle school)

None

(varies each level)

Nondenominational

FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

83


Senior Health

d n a g n Livi r o i n e S g n i v o L

Today’s older adults are living longer — and better — than ever before.

O

ver the next 25 years, the Centers for Disease Control estimates that the population of adults over age 65 in the United States will double. As the baby boomers – those born during the prosperous decades after the end of World War II – continue to age, the face of the senior citizen as we know it is changing. Previous images of the ill, the helpless, the rocking chair and knitting needles are being replaced with perceptions of seniors as healthy, happy and independent individuals who are just as committed to enjoying an active life as they were during their younger years. “I think in the past, older adults perceived that later life was a time to slow down and that it was an expectation that they become less involved in the community,” says Dr. Lora Cotton, associate professor of family medicine and the statewide director for the family medicine residency program at the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences. Cotton, who also holds a master’s degree in gerontology, provides primary care for all age groups, and sees many older adult patients on a daily basis, helping them prevent and manage both chronic and acute health problems. She believes the outlook for and of modern seniors is now much brighter than it used to be. “Today, many seniors perceive later life as an opportunity to engage in life in new ways,” she says. “In other words, they see later life as being a new chapter where they can spend time realizing new goals.” “In the past, a person was old at 60, most likely with disabling health conditions and not expected to live much longer,” says Marge Jantzen, the manager and coordinator of the INTEGRIS Third Age Life Center, a health and wellness community program for adults over 50 years of age. “Now 60 is middle age and one may live another 20 to 30 years, often with a good quality of life. I think this trend is likely to continue.” Dr. Laurence Rubenstein, chairman of the Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine in the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine — home to the Oklahoma Healthy

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Aging Initiative — agrees that the tendency toward a long, full life will become a new normal for the older adults of the modern era. “Today’s seniors tend to be more optimistic and health oriented — at least until they lose a critical amount of health and/ or function and start to rapidly decline (which happens later in life than it used to). I think this trend


of having a longer period of high-functioning life will continue, as long as seniors continue to follow good health and wellness practices.” But why now? Other than their vast numbers, what differentiates today’s older adults from their predecessors, and what has spurred this cultural change in perceptions and longevity of modern seniors? While there are many factors, one of the most crucial contributors has been the revolutionary transformation of health care itself. “Over the past 100 years, we have had vast improvements in public health and improvements in medicine and medical technology,” says Nancy Van Winkle, Ph.D., professor of behavioral sciences at the OSU Center for Health Sciences. Cotton agrees. “I think there are two major reasons that seniors seem to be staying younger and healthier than ever: improvements in health care and changes in social norms. Improvements in health care allow for prevention, early detection and treatment of many illnesses so that negative effects on a person’s function are minimized. Natural aging, without serious impact by illness, allows a person to be active and healthy until very late life.” In addition to radical advances in the health care field, there has been another revolution in recent years: one of information. Jantzen sees increased access to information as a crucial component to better living for today’s seniors. “Each generation becomes better educated, which brings increased income and access to health care, potentially resulting in fewer health conditions, lower rates of disability and longer life expectancy,” she says. She cites, for example, NIHSeniorHealth.gov, the website of the National Institute on Aging, which is home to health topics, videos and other educational materials geared toward today’s older generation. In addition to access to information, Jantzen believes improved access to health care itself through programs like Medicare has allowed seniors to better detect and treat the illnesses that might have prevented a healthy and long life in the past. As the health care industry has transformed in the information age, society itself has changed apace. Social expectations and beliefs regarding seniors have undergone a sea of

change, much of it again due to the aging of the boomer population. “Changes in social norms and expectations are also playing a big role,” Cotton says. “The baby boomer generation, just by sheer numbers, has a huge influence on the role of seniors in our society. Members of the baby boomer generation expect to remain vital and involved, so they create a society that supports their expectations. In my opinion, what’s great about this is that a society that promotes the well-being of seniors seems to promote the well-being of everyone.” Van Winkle, a boomer herself, talks about some of the characteristics that make this latest generation of seniors different from those in the past. “There are a lot of us and we often are not shy in letting our needs and desires be known,” she says of her peers. “In terms of health and health care, I believe the baby boomer generation will be more health literate than past generations and will want to be more involved in making health care decisions that affect them. I think there will be an increasing effort to change and improve the long-term care system. Since many of us are living to older ages, we may be in need of long-term care services at some point in our lives. I believe we will continue to prefer to stay at home and receive services for as long as possible, rather than receive services in a long-term care facility.” Cotton says that with the advent of this

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Senior Health

large senior population, it’s not only baby boomers who will be educating themselves — younger generations have a lot to learn as well. Most immediately, she says, we should begin to consider the design of our environment and how best to develop safe and welcoming spaces for the growing number of older adults. Examples might include better or differently lit spaces for those with low vision, wider doors and more automatic doorways, or grab bars in restrooms. All of these changes should be considered universally for all environments, Cotton says, not just in places where seniors are thought to frequent. In addition, she cautions younger people to be patient, as even basic activities take more time for seniors, and allowances must be made for this consideration. Although today’s seniors are large in number and living longer than ever before, nobody is immune from the challenges of time and age. Older adults still often face a myriad of health problems. Some of the most common ailments include problems with balance and falls, cardiovascular issues, loss of memory function, diabetes, arthritis, cancer and more. Many of these conditions, though not all, may be preventable. Others, Rubenstein says, require awareness and planning. “Even though many seniors feel healthy longer, they still need to be aware that age eventually will catch up to them,” he cautions. “While continuing with optimal health and wellness practices, seniors should be planning for times when function will decline. Specifically, they need to ensure that they have their estate planning in order, advance directives for health care and a designated durable power of attorney in case they become mentally incapacitated.” Physical health isn’t the only aspect of seniors’ wellness that needs careful tending; mental and spiritual well-being also are key components for continued quality of life at a later age. “Another common concern I see is adjustment to major life changes, such as retirement, death of friends and loved ones, and changes in personal health status,” Cotton says. “Many people are resilient and adjust well to major life changes, but some people struggle with these changes and end up feeling lonely and less engaged in life.” Particularly in Oklahoma, the physical well-being and mental health of older adults has vast room for improvement. “Although we are getting better, Oklahoma is one of the worst states in terms of health habits and lifestyle,“ Rubenstein says. “We can change this if we want to and are willing to work hard (and devote resources) to improvement. We also face challenges of extreme rurality and relative poverty. Our Native American population adds a lot to our cultural richness, but many tribes face particular health challenges that need to be carefully addressed, such as increased rates of diabetes, hypertension and obesity.” “Unfortunately, Oklahoma is usually towards the bottom of the list when it comes to health indicators,” Jantzen agrees. Sedentary lifestyles, poor diets and smoking all contribute to this. “Seniors living in rural areas often have challenges accessing health care. Social isolation can occur in any setting but seniors living in cities may get ‘lost’ more easily and be harder to identify.” Improvements, however, are not out of reach. As Cotton says, “Addressing these issues in older people is very much the same as for younger adults, and older people can achieve great benefit from stopping smoking

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and normalizing their weight.” Jantzen, Cotton, Van Winkle and Rubenstein all agree that both in Oklahoma and in general, social isolation is one of the largest challenges seniors today face, and that one of the most important goals should be to remain engaged socially. This activity could mean, as it has so far for many boomers, working later in life, volunteering or participating in community programs. “Remaining socially connected is critical to well-being and this becomes more important and possibly more challenging as end of life nears,” Jantzen says. “Technology supports are more available than ever, allowing long-distance caregivers to stay in touch and monitor more closely their loved ones activities and needs.” “Connection and purposeful engagement with others is critical to emotional health,” Cotton says. For example, a larger number of seniors are continuing to work after the traditional retirement age – some even beginning new career paths later in life. Other seniors are enrolling in academic courses or commiting their time to local volunteer projects. Together with osteopathic medicine students at OSU, Van Winkle leads a program that works at both engaging seniors socially and with their own health outcomes, as well as provides training for future physicians who will work with older populations. The Senior Mentor Program pairs healthy older adults in the local community with two students each. The senior mentors range in age from 65 to 93. During the semester, the mentors meet with their students and conduct medical activities with them that address patients’ medical histories, mechanisms for social and emotional support, advance directives and more. The goals of the program, Van Winkle says, are to teach students to develop professional, long-term relationships with older adults while developing personal and communication skills, nurture positive attitudes about aging and about the field of geriatrics, and to train students as compassionate and competent doctors of the future. “We hope this program will help prepare our students to work with older adults, and all of their patients, no matter what specialty they choose,” Van Winkle says. “Through this program, students are learning and practicing relationship-building and communication skills, including how to listen. Through these experiences, we hope our students will look at future patients as individuals and not just look at their diseases. We also hope they will have a better appreciation of health care needs from the patient’s perspective.” Moving forward, Van Winkle reminds both seniors and their caregivers that they have numerous resources at their disposal. “Whether it’s physical or mental health needs, need for assistive technology or need for help in the home, there often are resources that may be able to help.” She highlights the plethora of local agencies available to help in these situations. Van Winkle also encourages younger people to remember the diversity and contributions of the senior community. “Seniors want to be valued, respected and loved just like individuals of any age. Seniors are able to make substantial contributions to their families, friends and society, and have much to offer.” TARA MALONE

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS ROOFER Should I get class 4, impact resistant shingles? Class four shingles are strongly suggested for many reasons. The number one reason for customers is savings on your premiums from your insurance company. Some insurance companies offer up to 30% in premium savings. So what exactly are class RICKY HANKS four impact resistant shingles? This type of shingle has passed the highest UL impact testing available. While they are not impact "proof," they are more resistant to larger hail. They show no evidence of cracking or ruptures after impact on the front and back of the shingle. While these shingles are great, it is still recommended that you have your roof inspected yearly. Call your insurance company today to see what savings you qualify for when switching to impact resistant shingles.

Ricky Hanks T-Town Roofing 5770 E. Skelly Drive Tulsa, OK 74135 ricky@t-townroofing.com 918.445.4400

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL What’s your New Year’s resolution when it comes to insurance? We all make those New Year’s resolutions to work out more, eat healthier, lose weight and so on. Unlike other promises made and broken, insurance resolutions are RUSS IDEN simple to do and guilt free. First, review your homeowner’s policy to make sure the coverage on your home and its contents is adequate for your needs. Ask yourself what’s changed in the last year increasing your exposure? Consider adding coverages that your policy may not include like flood, earthquake or an umbrella for more liability protection. The same goes for your auto insurance. Don’t cut coverages like uninsured motorists, comprehensive, collision or rental coverage to save money. Before eliminating any coverage, consider raising deductibles or reducing your coverage if necessary. Life insurance is another policy to consider as a way to protect your assets and your loved ones in a time of need. If you have questions about any home, auto, or life insurance coverages, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.392.4214 800.222.2582, x4214 russ.iden@aaaok.org

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FINANCIAL ADVISOR What are some tips for financial conversations with my adult children? 1. Communicate your own financial plans, especially if you’re nearing retirement or have recently retired. Share any major financial and lifestyle decisions, such as travel, relocation, health care needs, etc. If you’re currently providing financial support DAVID KARIMIAN to your adult children or grandchildren, speak CFP®, CRPC® honestly and set realistic expectations. 2. Let them know what they can expect in the future. If you may need financial assistance, or certain circumstances arise, make your children aware of this immediately. Discuss their ability and willingness to help and if needed, explore other options together. 3. Plan for the unexpected. Ask your children if they have life and disability insurance, and if they’ve established a guardianship plan for their children in case of a tragic event. Also share with them the plans you’ve made. Provide information on where important documents can be found. 4. Listen and understand one another’s values. It’s important to respect each other’s plans and wishes. Come to a mutual understanding about when financial conversations are appropriate and what types of financial decisions should be communicated between both parties.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Now that winter is almost over I need something that is costeffective and will help my scaly winter skin. What treatments work best? Our newest procedure the HydraFacial® is the newest, best way to shed your winter skin before MALISSA SPACEK spring. This innovative technology is a multi-step treatment that evenly exfoliates and extracts to remove impurities and dead skin cells while at the same time replenishing vital nutrients including antioxidants, peptides and hyaluronic acid. Thanks to the devices’ superior delivery system, these performing ingredients are able to more effectively help mitigate environmental damage, reduce fine lines & wrinkles, and plump & firm skin for long-term results you can see and feel instantly. For more information on the HydraFacial and to schedule your complimentary skin care consultation, call 918.872.9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT

My son runs for his high school cross country and track teams and continues to run between the seasons during the winter and summer breaks. I’m worried he will be injured by not taking time off from his sport. What are your thoughts?

How can we incorporate Cause Marketing into our business? Cause Marketing refers to marketing that combines efforts of a "for profit" business and a non-profit organization for mutual benefit. To be effective, JESSICA DYER it is important to properly align yourself with causes that reflect your business' core values. A few ways to approach this include: 1. Choose causes that match your target market. For example, if your business serves mostly children, then align with causes that benefit children. 2. Finding a personal connection or passion within leadership of your business. If you love art, then align with groups that support the local ballet company or museum. 3. Looking in your own backyard. There are countless non-profits on the local level where your support can make a difference. Organizations vary from groups that address social or economic issues to ones that focus on hunger or lack of education funding.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539.777.6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

I see a lot of teenage athletes who suffer from overuse injuries. I was a high school athlete in the 80’s and we usually had several months during the year where we didn’t focus on our primary sport and participated in something totally different. However, over the last 30 years athletes have “specialized” at a younger age and many of them perform the same sport 12 months a year with little to no break. I generally recommend 2-4 weeks off for every 4-6 months on. This doesn’t mean the athlete should be a couch potato, but it does mean they should completely take a break from their primary sport and participate in something different such as swimming or cycling. Athletes benefit both physically and mentally from this break and have a better chance at avoiding injury and burnout. TIM MINNICK, PT

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. ATTORNEY AT LAW I was injured on the job, now my employer is harassing me. Can I lose my job because I got hurt at work? An employer may not discriminate or retaliate against an employee for filing a claim, retaining a lawyer to represent you for the claim, or ESTHER M. SANDERS testifying about a workers compensation claim. Furthermore, the employer may not discharge an employee as a result of being off work due to the injury. The Oklahoma Workers Compensation Commission has exclusive jurisdiction for a violation of this law, per Oklahoma Statutes Title 85A Section 7, under the current law.

To protect patients and their families, there are Medicare regulations in place to determine if a patient qualifies for hospice care. First – a person must have a life-limiting illness and a prognosis of six months or less left to live. Secondly - two physicians must make this determination and certify in writing. At Grace Hospice, one of our registered nurses follows the Medicare guidelines to evaluate all patients and we can do the same for your grandmother. Once those steps are all met, the patient can then choose to use their hospice benefit. At Grace Hospice, we provide care during the course of the disease and also provide support to the family throughout the duration of care and for a 13-month period of bereavement after the death. For more information or to schedule an appointment with a hospice nurse, please call 918-744-7223. AVA HANCOCK

“Grace Hospice: Caring for patients and families in Northeastern Oklahoma for more than 15 years”

Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74120 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free

DEVELOPMENTAL OPTOMETRIST Why do children need bifocals? Bifocal glasses use a special lens that corrects vision at two different distances – a prescription on top for distance and a different prescription on the bottom for near. When bifocals are mentioned, most people MEGAN think of these lenses being used for (KIRKPATRICK) FORD, OD people over 40 who have lost their ability to focus up close due to age. However, children could also benefit from reading glasses. Many children can benefit from an addition of a bifocal in their glasses prescription. These are children who have not developed sufficient control over their focusing systems. Some children lack the ability to sustain sufficient focusing over an extended time period and others can’t make fast focusing shifts from one distance to another (such as copying notes from the board to their desk). There are also some children who have a tendency to over focus, and the additional stress causes eyestrain and headaches. Children could also benefit from no-line or progressive bifocals and multifocal contact lenses, if a need for bifocals are noted.

Megan (Kirkpatrick) Ford, OD South Tulsa Vision Development Center 8988- D1 S Sheridan Tulsa, OK 74133 918.992.2343 www.tulsavisiondevelopment.com

BUSINESS COACH

HOSPICE CARE My grandmother has Alzheimer’s disease and recently took a turn for the worse. Her diagnosis is not good and we have been discussing hospice care. What do we need to do to see if she qualifies or find out if it is a good option?

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT How can I dress like a CEO with a low-dollar budget? First of all, know that you can look like you spent a lot by spending very little. There are too many men out there who have fallen into the trap of paying thousands of dollars for one suit. Now men feel as if that is the unreachable standard. Fortunately, AUTUMN POHL with the help of a personal style consultant, you can prevent yourself from overindulging and overpaying. High prices do not always equal high quality. My number one rule, for whatever suit you chose, is choose the fit that makes you look as if it was made for your body. Taking your wardrobe to the tailor to achieve that fit is the best thing you can do for yourself, plus it’s inexpensive in comparison to buying designer. Your perfectly tailored suit will get much more attention and credibility from the boss than any high-priced suit made for the masses. The right fit and confidence will put you at the top, right where you need to be.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

I think it’s time to raise my prices in my business, but I am afraid of losing clients. How should I go about this?

AMANDA FRANCES

I get this question all of the time! The details obviously vary from industry to industry, but here is how I advise my private businesscoaching clients:

1. Know your worth. Think about this principal: The more you feel supported by your business, the better work you will do. 2. You might lose some clients, but that’s okay. You don’t need as many clients when you price yourself well. Losing some clients often makes room for the right clients. The best clients are the ones who are ready to invest in themselves. 3. Honor your long-term clients. Let your long-term clients know how much you value them. Let them know what your new prices are going to be, but offer them a special rate for their loyalty.

Amanda Frances Business Coach for Women Entrepreneurs amandafrances.com amanda@amandafrances.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR My fiance and I have been together for over five years and the other day he asked me to set a date and "get it done." I love him but am having feelings of second thoughts on getting married. Is this normal? It is normal. There is a huge difference in the commitment of marriage to that of dating. That being said, if you have been together AMY KESNER, for over five years, there would seem to be a PHD, LPC, LADC pretty high level of commitment already. Marriage should not be taken lightly. When you marry someone you are agreeing to share all aspects of your life with them. This can feel overwhelming, but this sharing should help lighten your burden, not add to it. The key to a successful relationship is, truly, communication. It is not whether or not a couple argues, but how they argue. The commitment in a relationship is to the relationship, not to yourself, not to winning a fight, being right or trying to 'one-up' your mate. Call stuff out for what it is and take ownership. If you get mad about something be honest but don't just fire off an impulsive statement in retaliation. Even though you have been together for over five years, I highly recommend couples, or pre-marital counseling so that you can address any concerns and strengthen your relationship to avoid any future chinks in the armor. You will have differences, disagreements, hurt feelings, frustrations, aggravations and major misunderstandings, but if you handle appropriately it can help the relationship continue to grow and bloom. When you make a commitment, work to have the tenacity to dig in and go the distance!

Amy Kesner Keystone Counseling & Therapeutic Services 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com FEBRUARY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

CHORIZO AND CORNBREAD STUFFED PORK CHOP WITH SKILLET CORN AND HOMINY GRITS.

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN.

Franklin’s Pork & Barrel

I

A jewel on Broken Arrow’s Main Street.

f you should happen to stroll down Broken Arrow’s thriving and delightfully renovated Main Street toward sundown, you might see two tough-looking men seated outside an attractive new cafe. One’s an amiable mountain of muscle and the other is lanky and tattooed. They chat; each completes the other’s sentences. They’ve obviously known each other a long time. They’re happy, they’re excited and it’s contagious. “Oh it shines!”

“It pops, it pops so well!” “It really sings!” What could they be talking about? As it happens, they’re celebrating their new creation. Mustard seeds pickled in Guinness. It’s something you’ll barely notice, one component among many used in two of the flamboyant, elaborate yet deceptively simple dishes served in that cafe behind them. “It takes a lot of work to make mustard seed taste good,” says Doug Zimpel. His tattoos, it turns out, are all food-related, featuring pigs

rampant among garnishes. He wears glasses and he thinks a lot. “They’re inherently bitter so you have to boil and strain them eight times. That softens, plumps and sweetens them.” Sounds like hard work. “Oh, I figured early on that cooking isn’t work. It’s fun and then you get to eat it.” That’s the mountain talking, Ben Buie. He’s Franklin’s creator and owner. He looks like a star center, and indeed he was (for OSU). He still thinks like a center; he comes up with

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TOP: A POPULAR APPETIZER AT FRANKLIN’S APPROPRIATELY NAMED “PORK FORKS.”

Taste

MIDDLE: FRANKLIN’S PORK & BARREL OFFERS FOUR DIFFERENT WINES ON TAP. BOTTOM: FRANKLIN’S EXTERIOR STORE FRONT LOCATED ON BROKEN ARROW’S POPULAR MAIN ST.

ideas and then snaps them to quarterback Doug. “Doug fine-tunes them and reads my mind.” “I take his ideas and plug in my cooking experience,” agrees Doug, who has over a decade of experience under his belt. That started one amazing day when Doug, then a worker in a big IT firm with acres of cubicles like those depicted in the cartoon Dilbert, suddenly thought “I was not born for this,” stood up, walked out and got a job at the first restaurant that would hire him. His journey took him to OSU culinary school, an apprenticeship with one of the star chefs of Napa Valley, and later a job as executive chef at the highly regarded Boston Deli. “One of Ben’s ideas was pork belly,” adds Doug. “It took me years to figure out how to cook it right. Smoking gives it a deep smoke flavor, and then braising makes it melt in your mouth.” Many, perhaps most, of the dishes feature smoking. They use an enormous beast of a smoker, a vintage Toastmaster which they’ve named Renegade. It’s a hungry, demanding beast; they have to feed in heaps of wood every half hour. “You have to be patient,” says Doug, referring not only to the slow, careful smoking but to every aspect of every dish. “When we dry-rub our pork shoulder we wait a whole day before putting it in the smoker,” Doug explains. “Most places smoke it the same day and that kills the flavor.” The sun has set and it’s time for dinner. As you walk toward Franklin’s, you’ll notice a bright, spiffy dining room to the left. Exposed brick walls, white linen tablecloths, a rainbow of abstract artwork all make you wish that this dining room were open in the evenings. Alas it’s Franklin’s sister restaurant Toast, open for breakfast and lunch only. Ben’s excited about the food Chef Doug serves at Toast. “We have three kinds of eggs benedict,” he boasts. “One of them is accented by a caprese salad. I love the mouth feel you get when cold salad hits hot eggs.” Tonight, though, you’ll have to content yourself with Franklin’s stuffed and smoked pork chop. One bite and you’ll forget about the eggs. A rich smoky flavor permeates the pork chop’s juicy, tender meat, and it’s picked up by contrasting woodsmoke whiffs from the corn succotash, the grits and the chorizo and cornbread stuffing. (And what a bargain! The huge chop is $13.) Or you might try the chili and chicken. A huge half-chicken packs a big flavor punch, and it blends well with the rich, hearty chili that it sits atop. Under that is cornbread, which melts into gooey goodness. Then there’s the barbecue platter, which features some of the best ribs you’ll find within a hundred miles. The platter also has turkey, brisket, pulled pork, red coleslaw, all on a carving board shaped like Oklahoma. Or the burgers.... “those burgers are Heaven on earth, I swear to goodness!” calls out a diner from the bar. And so they are, packed with an ineffable smoky flavor yet rich and juicy. For a lighter meal, there’s the Scottish salmon. It’s served with a mole pipian, a hard-to-find and hard-to-make Mexican sauce that features pumpkins, poblano peppers, and so many other ingredients your eyes will glaze over as Doug recites them. There’s wine by the glass to wash all this down. They use a new and rather expensive machine that uses inert argon gas to make sure that the last glass from the bottle tastes as fresh as when the bottle was first opened. “I just like to eat a lot!” says Ben Buie. With food like this, who can disagree? 203 S. Main St., Broken Arrow. BRIAN SCHWARTZ

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Taste

KATIE’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE

PHILL’S DINER

For any old school diner and breakfast lover, there is a little place off of Santa Fe in Edmond that offers all of that and more. Katie’s Country Griddle provides breakfast deliciousness every day in a comfortable, home-styled atmosphere. From eggs to pancakes to French toast, Katie’s has everything to fulfill any breakfast lover’s appetite. Because they do have so many options, Katie’s has wonderful combo options on their menu. They definitely make sure that their customers are well fed – providing a Pick 3 option and even a Pick 4 option for their breakfast entrees. No need to feel indecisive, Katie’s has all of their customers covered on breakfast cravings. On top of that, Katie’s also carries a variety of three-egg omelets, pancakes, waffles and French toasts. It’s the perfect Edmond brunch spot for any lover of all kinds of breakfast foods. Katie’s Country Griddle can be found at 229 S. Santa Fe Ave., Edmond. – Janelle Mary Archer

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

When you need good, solid diner food, Phill Hughes of Phill’s Diner is the man to see. And with breakfast served until 2 p.m., you have plenty of time to make it in for a stick-to-your-ribs meal. Staples like three-egg omelettes, hot cakes, city and country ham, waffles and chicken-fried steak are available alongside weekday and weekend specials. The $6.63 Specials are posted on a chalkboard everyday with off-menu customer favorites. Why such an odd price for a special you may wonder? Because with a cup of coffee and tax, the meal totals $9 even. If you are having a hard time deciding what to order, go with Phill’s favorite: made from scratch corned beef hash (it’s fantastic). Find Phill’s Diner at 3310 E. 32nd St., Tulsa. – Mary Beth Ede

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

EGG IT ON

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The one word to describe Egg It On in Broken Arrow is big. Big plates and big hearts are what owners Dale and Sue Lowe are serving up six days a week. From 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday, you can find one or both owners keeping an eye on their seven year venture. After years of wanting his own restaurant, Sue finally told Dale, “Why not!” and their ranked-number-one on Trip Advisor restaurant was born. Egg It On prides itself on its incredibly diverse menu, as well as its Cheers atmosphere. Regular customers have been important to the success of the business, so much so that several suggestions have made it onto the menu. Favorites from the made-fresh menu include enchiladas, mini-omelets, mini-parfaits and onion rings (battered and fried when ordered). If you are planning on a weekend visit, show up early as the line can run out the door, or go on a Friday and take advantage of Free Cookie Friday’s fresh baked cookies. 1131 S. Aspen Ave., Broken Arrow. – Mary Beth Ede


etables are a better fit, Tucker’s does have one salad on the menu – conveniently titled, “The One Salad.” For those with a sweet tooth, Tucker’s serves up absolutely delicious shakes – just like the classic diners that we all miss. Tucker’s Onion Burgers definitely leaves the vibe of something wonderfully familiar – like the diner scene in Grease. However, it also brings something new and local into the mix at each of it’s three locations in Oklahoma City. Tucker’s Onion Burgers can be found at 324 N.W. 23rd St.; 5740 N. Classen Blvd., Suite 3; and 15001 N. May Ave. – Janelle Archer

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

TUCKER’S ONION BURGERS

Inspired by diners in western Oklahoma during the 1920s who pressed onions in their beef while preparing their burgers, A Good Egg Dining Group’s Tucker’s Onion Burgers offers delicious homemade burgers in a classic, Oklahoma diner atmosphere. Tucker’s Onion Burgers is sure to satisfy any hamburger lover, serving up fresh, juicy onion burgers every day. They also serve tasty turkey onion burgers for those looking for something a little leaner but still has that classic onion burger taste. Of course, every good burger has to be paired with great fries. Tucker’s homemade, fresh-cut fries pair perfectly with anything on the menu. However, if you feel veg-

W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

PURE FOOD & JUICE

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Pure Food and Juice, located inside The Philosophy Tree gym in Tulsa, provides the first tier of the business’s three-tier vision: health, exercise and recovery. Owner Cynthia Beavers is as passionate about her raw foods, juices and smoothies as she is about educating the public about the myriad of health benefits that they can provide. Inside her cafe, customers can sit down for a served meal or pick up prepared meals togo. 606 S. Elgin Ave., Tulsa. – Mary Beth Ede

L O C A L F L AV O R

Aila’s Catering & Events

F

inding the right catering company to use at a signature event can be quite a challenge – just ask anyone planning a wedding. Aila’s Catering and Events is truly an Oklahoma gem, voted “Best of the Best” by Oklahoma Magazine seven consecutive years in a row. Started by owner/operator and chef Aila Heiskanen Wimpy, who has over 25 years of fine food business experience, and her husband Johnny, Aila’s Catering and Events serves the Tulsa and Northeast Oklahoma Community. Their specialty is European food with Mexican and Southwest twists. “I grew up around food preparation all my life in Finland,” said Wimpy. “When I came to America, I was a nanny. I always prepared food for the families. When I moved to Okla-

homa, I started to work in the restaurant business and then started my catering company in 2001.” Over the years, Aila’s Catering and Events has had much success, however, that did not come without challenges. Wimpy said that the cooking was the easy part – learning the business side was the biggest challenge. Aila’s Catering and Events caters to over 20 different venues that they have made connections with over the years. They have catered over 1,000 weddings to date with a catering menu that is seemingly endless, as well as delicious. Aila’s is also popular for their beverage bars, signature dessert bar, a late night snack bar and even some “make it yourself” options. Aila’s Catering and Events can be contacted at FOOD@CateringKitchenTulsa.com or 918.859.8786. – Janelle Archer

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

Local catering company has something for everyone.

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Entertainment

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

COURTESY OF WINSTAR WORLD CASINO

a

T

A Fierce Dance Floor Live version of Dancing with the Stars coming soon.

he 21st season of the ABC hit series Dancing with the Stars sure was a long and strange one. The season was filled with the dramatic storylines that caused many of the celebrity contestants to drop out of the competition. Despite the dramatic season, the show remained popular among pop-culture fanatics. And with stars like Chaka Khan, Paula Deen, Tamar Braxton, Kim Zolciak and Nick Carter in competition for the coveted mirror ball, the show’s dancing quality was at a high level. But over the years, the true stars of the show have become the skilled professional dancers who are paired with the celebs. Dancers like Julianne and Derek Hough have propelled themselves into household name status in their own right. Over its 21 seasons, Maksim Chmerkovs-

kiy has become a fan favorite. Maksim is definitely one of the top dancers and choreographers on the show, a fact that gets lost behind his looks and temperament. Maksim began in season two with Tia Carrere and has captured the hearts of DWTS fans ever since. But this season, the tempered dancer took a break from the show. Despite Maksim’s break, the show still starred a Chmerkovskiy. Paired with Tamar Braxton, his brother, Val Chmerkovskiy brought the heat onto the dance floor this season. Chmerkovskiy is just one of the many dancers who will bring the rhythmic heat to Thackerville, Okla. (off Interstate 35 at the Oklahoma–Texas state line) when the Winstar World Casino and Resort presents Dancing With The Stars: Live! Dance All Night Tour, Feb. 5 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Season 21 runner-up Sharna Burgess headlines

the tour with Keo Motsepe, Peta Murgatroyd, Emma Slater, Jenna Johnson, Alan Bersten and many more. You will feel as if you are a guest on the nationally televised show. In this all-new production, the dancers are freed from the ballroom to perform in a 90-minute, action-packed live show. Audiences will watch exciting and romantic performances, from choreography never before seen on Dancing with the Stars, to some of the most memorable numbers from ABC’s leading entertainment show. “What’s cool is that it’s not just isolated pockets of dancing, it’s a storyline throughout the show. We recreate movie scenes and famous characters that everybody is familiar with, which makes dancing more purposeful and more interesting for the audience,” Val Chmerkovskiy explains to ABC. NEHEMIAH ISRAEL

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PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

PHOTO COURTESY OF DARLEN BIEBER PR.

Entertainment

Calendar

IN CONCERT

Brad Paisley Some men and women struggle with gift ideas to get their significant other for Valentine’s Day. When buying a gift it’s important to plan and to also think outside the box. And if that person is a country music lover, then the answer is as simple as Brad Paisley. The country music heartthrob brings his Crushin’ It world tour to the stage of the BOK Center on Feb. 27. Yes, it’s a little late, but it’s never too late to warm your lover’s heart with their favorite country music singer. Since 1999, Paisley has been a major influence on the country music landscape with songs like “He Didn’t Have To Be,” “Letter To Me,” “The World,” “Then” and many more. A native of West Virginia, the 43-year-old singer, songwriter and guitar guru has won three Grammy Awards, 14 Academy of Country Music Awards and 14 prestigious awards from the Country Music Association, including Entertainer of the Year in 2010. Paisley’s most recent release, Moonshine in the Trunk, includes hits like “River Bank,” “Perfect Storm,” “Crushin’ It” and current single “Country Nation.” Signed to EMI Records, Paisley cracked the Billboard Top 20 with “Friday Night,” “Perfect Storm,” “Song About a Girl” and “She Don’t Love You,” all from his self-titled, 2014 album. Paisley’s current single “High Class,” will be included on a followup album anticipated for release in 2016. Tickets for the concert start at $35. For more information, visit www. bokcenter.com.

PERFORMANCES Bethel Music Worship Nights Feb. 1 Get ready for a night filled with worship music thatwillwarmyourheart. www.okcciviccenter. com

Kinky Boots Feb. 2-7 This exhilarating Broadway musical will lift your spirits to new heights. The story follows a struggling shoe factory owner who works to turn his business around with the help of a fabulous entertainer in need of some

Uncle Lucius

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

sturdy stilletos. www.tulsapac.com Lyric Theatre Presents: Mann... And Wife Feb. 3-21 Follow along the seemingly hopeless journey of Henry Mann as he searches for the perfect date to his ex-fiancee’s wedding. www. lyrictheatreokc.com Gabriel Iglesias Feb. 4 Stand-up comedian, actor and all around entertainer Gabriel Iglesias takes the stage at the Hard Rock Casino in Tulsa for his #Fluffy Breaks Even tour.  Armstrong Auditorium presents: Mariachi Los Comperos Feb. 4 Putting together some of the best musicians in Mexico and the United States, this Grammy Award-winning ensemble will have the crowd raving. www.armstrongauditorium.org Dancing With The Stars: Live! Dance All Night Tour Feb. 5 The successful reality competition show that has been on the air since 2005 takes the latest cast on the road. See some of your favorite movie, music and TV stars do the samba, waltz and fox trot. www. winstarworldcasino.com Pollard Theater present: God of Carnage Feb. 5 See what happens when two sets of equally passionate and hard-headed parents come together to discuss their sons’ bad in the school yard. www.thepollard. org Million Dollar Quartet Feb.5 Inspired by the phenomenal true story of the famed recording session that brought together rock ‘n’ roll icons Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash, this performance is guaranteed to get you out of your seat. www.brokenar-

of great music with violinist Andrea Segar and guest conductor Robert Moody. www. okcphilharmonic.org Women From The Town Feb. 6-13 A once ridiculed woman returns to her home in North Carolina to seek revenge against the people who treated her unkindly. She soon realizes that those who deserve payback are long gone, and those who remain are innocent bystanders. www. tulsapac.com Faure Piano Quartet Feb. 7 Experience the grandeur and sympathy for the human condition expressed in these moving works for piano and strings. www.tulsapac. com Kinky Boots Feb. 9-14 Oklahoma City hosts this Tony Award-winning tale of rags to riches. www.okcciviccenter.com A Midsummer Night’s Dream Feb 12-27 Arguably William Shakespeare’s most popular comedy, A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a magical mix of romance, fantasy and slapstick physical comedy. www. okcciviccenter.com Theater Arts: The Odyssey Feb. 11-12 For more than 2,500 years, Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey has reigned as one of the greatest tales of all time. See all the romance, sea voyage, shipwreck, seduction and supernatural doings come to life on stage in a theatrical performance. www. uco.edu Our Town Feb. 12-21 This play follows two families as their children fall in love , marry and eventually die. Written by Thorton Wilder, Our Town was the winner of the 1938 Pulitzer Prizer for drama, and is largely considered the finest play ever written by an American playwrighter. www.clarkyouththeatre.com Avenue Q Feb. 12-21 A laugh-out-loud musical that tells the timeless story of a recent college graduate who moves into a shabby New York apartment and meets an array of colorful characters. www. okcciviccenter.com Tulsa Ballet: Romeo and Juliet Feb. 12-14 See this emotionally stunning

Martin Sexton

rowpac.com Jerry Seinfeld Feb. 6 Funnyman Jerry Seinfeld performs at the Winstar World Casino for one night only with a hilariously refreshing stand-up act. www.winstarworldcasino.com Andrea Segar Feb. 6 As part of its Classics concert series at the Oklahoma Civic Center Music Hall, the Oklahoma City Philharmonic produces an evening

ballet that portrays Shakespeare’s tragic story of two star-crossed lovers with intensity and passion. www.tulsapac.com To Kill A Mockingbird Feb. 12-14 A compelling and timeless story told through the eyes of a six-year-old. Adapted for the stage by Christopher Sergel, To Kill a Mockingbird continues to inspire hope in the face of inequality. www.tulsapac. com


University Theater: The Trojan Woman Feb. 14 The Helmerich School of Drama presents Euripides’ dramatic account of the havoc and ravages of the Trojan War and the noble women who survived it. www. drama.ou.edu Band of Royal Marines and the Scots Guards Feb. 14 Bring the entire family for a stirring evening of marches, anthems, changing of the guards, music from the Royal Castles of England, Scotland and Ireland, highland dancing, broadswords andmuchmore. www.armstrongauditorium. org Almost, Maine Feb. 18-20 Presented by Oklahoma State University’s Theater Department, Almost, Maine is a play that explores love and loss in a small remote, mythical town. www.theatre.okstate.edu The Names Bond. James Bond Feb. 19-20 An unforgettable evening of music fromyourfavoriteJamesBondmovies. www. okcciviccenter.com Don’t Dress For Dinner Feb. 19-21 The hysterical sequel to Boeing.www.tulsapac. com TSO Classics: Spirit and Awakening Feb. 20 This program celebrates the desire to renew the human spirit. Spirit and Awakenings marks the return of guest Sarah Loanides. www.tulsapac.com Celebrate Black History Feb. 21 This concert features the evolution of the African American influence on American music, including blues, jazz, gospel and rap. www.okcciviccenter.com Scheherazade-1001 Arabian Nights-A Triple Bill Feb. 26-28 Scheherazade enraptures the senses and consumes the soul. A visual feast of exotic scenery and costumes showcasing sensual choreography. www.okcciviccenter.com Mariachi Los Camperos Feb. 4 For over 50 years, the Grammy Award-winning mariachi ensemble has celebrated the rich vocal tradition of Mexico with lively programs featuring the country’s most beloved songs. www.armstrongauditorium. org

COURTESY OF TULSA BALLET

PERFORMANCE

Romeo & Juliet What’s the one play that comes to mind when thinking of William Shakespeare? Romeo and Juliet. The classic tale of two lovers comes together in the form of flexibility and high leaps in a stunning ballet production to portray the passion of Shakespeare’s tragic story. The opening number in the marketplace sets the stage with violence that governs the citizens of Verona. Choreographed by Edwaard Liang, who is one of the premier choreographers of the ballet world, and whose works appear in the repertoires of the top ballet companies in the world. Liang’s version of this story will deliver all the thrilling beauty of ballet and all the emotional power of drama. As one of the world’s most treasured love stories, the Tulsa Ballet’s production of Romeo and Juliet is the perfect vehicle to romance your significant other for Valentine’s Day. Feb. 1214 at 8 p.m. and 3 p.m. on Sunday at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $25-$115 at www. tulsapac.com.

SPORTS

Mutemath

v. Iowa State

OKC Thunder  www.nba.com/thunder

CONCERT School of Music: Jazz Ensemble Concert Feb. 1 www.uco.edu Excision Presents: The Paradox Feb. 4  www.cainsballroom.com Hayes Carll Feb. 5  www.bluedoorokc. com Jason Aldean Feb. 5  www.chesapeakearena.com Joel Melton and Bill Lewis Feb. 6  www. bluedoorokc.com Stoney Larue Feb. 6  www.cainsballroom. com Hinder Feb. 6  www.diamondballroom. net Brillz Feb. 9  www.cainsballroom.com Lamb of God Feb. 9  www.diamondballroom.net

MartinSexton Feb.11  www.cainsballroom. com Pitbull Feb. 12 www.winstarworldcasino. com Dayna Kurtz Feb. 12  www.bluedoorokc. com Stoney Larue Feb. 12  www.diamondballroom.net Bullet For My Valentine Feb. 13  www. diamondballroom.net Arlo Guthrie Feb. 14  www.bradytheater. com Joan Jett & The Blackhearts Feb. 18  www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com Chris Young Feb. 19  www.bradytheater. com UncleLucius Feb. 19  www.cainsballroom. com Here Come The Mummies Feb. 20  www. diamondballroom.net

TobyMac Feb. 23 www.chesapeakearena. com Brogeous & Morgan Page Feb. 25  www. cainsballroom.com Brantley Gilbert Feb. 25 www.chesapeakearena.com Iron Maiden Feb. 26  www.bokcenter. com DianaRoss Feb.26 www.winstarworldcasino. com Life In Color Kingdom Feb. 26  www. bokcenter.com Mutemath Feb. 27  www.cainsballroom. com GaryAllan Feb.27 www.winstarworldcasino. com Brad Paisley Feb. 27  www.bokcenter. com

v. Washington Feb. 1 v. Orlando Feb. 3 v. New Orleans Feb. 11 v. Indiana Feb. 19 v. Cleveland Feb. 21 v. Golden State Feb. 27 OKC Blue   http://oklahomacity.dleague. nba.com/ v. Raptors 905 Feb. 6 v. Austin Feb. 27 Tulsa Oilers   www.tulsaoilers.com v. Missouri Feb. 3 v. Utah Feb. 4 v. South Carolina Feb. 10 v. Quad City Feb. 12 v. Wichita Feb. 14 v. Evansville Feb. 19 v. Allen Feb. 20 v. Idaho Feb. 23 OUMen’sBasketball   www.soonersports. com v. TCU Fec. 2 v. Texas Feb. 8 v. OSU Feb. 24 OSU Men’s Basketball   www.okstate. com v. Iowa State Feb. 6 v. Kansas State Feb. 13 v. Texas Tech Feb. 20 v. West Virginia Feb. 29 Tulsa Men’s Basketball   www.tulsahurricane.com v. Houston Feb. 7 v. Cincinnati Feb. 18 v. Temple Feb. 23 ORU Men’s Basketball   www.oruathletics. com v. IUPUI Feb. 11 v. Western Illinois Feb. 13 v. Denver Feb. 19 OU Women’s Basketball   w w w. soonersports.com v. OSU Feb. 3 v. TCU Feb. 6 v. Texas Feb. 14 v. Baylor Feb. 22

Feb. 27

OSU Women’s Basketball   www.okstate. com

v. Texas Tech Feb. 7 v. West Virginia Feb. 13 v. Kansas Feb. 24 v. Kansas State Feb. 29 TulsaWomen’sBasketball   www.tulsahurricane.com v. Houston Feb. 10 v. UCF Feb. 13 v. USF Feb. 24 ORUWomen’sBasketball   www.oruathletics.com v. North Dakota St. Feb. 4 v. Western Illinois Feb. 20 v. Omaha Feb. 25

Brillz

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SPORTS

Bedlam Game Students and fans from across the state of Oklahoma cram inside OU’s Lloyd Noble Center. The atmosphere is intense. The arena erupts in cheers after every shot made. This isn’t just any game, this is Bedlam. The Bedlam Series is the most intense rivalry in the state of Oklahoma, and one of the most important rivalries in the Big 12 conference. Since 1917, the in-state rivalry game between the Sooners and the Cowboys has been a marquee event for Oklahomans. Throughout the history of the rivalry game, the Sooners have remained dominant over the Cowboys, particularly in basketball. For the Sooners, this season has been a good one. In December, the Sooners were invited to the Diamond Head Classic in Honolulu, Hawaii. The Sooners squeaked by the hometown Hawaii Rainbow Warriors in the semifinals and trailed by halftime against Harvard before securing the win in the tournament. Despite a 109106 loss to the No. 1 ranked University of Kansas Jayhawks, the Sooners are ranked No. 2 in the nation. The Cowboys are currently sitting at a three-way tie for seventh place in the Big 12 conference standing. They will have to prove themselves when they travel to Norman for the bedlam game. The battle for bedlam kicks off Feb. 24 at 8 p.m.

Harlem Globetrotters Feb.5-7 A starstudded roster will have fans on the edge of their seats to witness the ball handling wizardry, basketball artistry and one-of-a-kind family entertainment that thrills fans of all ages. www.bokcenter.com Durant Polar Plunge Feb. 6 Brave souls go for a dip in frigid waters to support the athletes of Special Olympics of Oklahoma (SOOK). www.sook.org Monster Jam Feb. 13-14 Get ready for this tricks and high jumps by trucks out of this world. Monster Jam trucks can fly up to 125 to 130 feet in the air. www.chesapeakearena.com

ICATIONS

CHARITABLE EVENTS

COURTESY OF OKLAHOMA ATHLETICS COMMUN

Entertainment

Revision: Contemporary Navajo Weavings from the Pam Parrish Collection Thru May 8 This exhibtion showcases 22 of the more than 60 major weavings donated to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum over the past three years by Pam Parrish. www.nationalcowboymuseum. org Posed & Composed: Portraits of Women from the Permanent Collection Thru June 1 This exhibition features portraits by eleven American artists who cover periods of World War I to the 1980s. www. okcmoa.com Off the Wall Thru June 5 Discover Thomas Breeze Marcus’s larger-than-life murals and paintings in this Philbrook Downtown exhibit. www.philbrook.org The Modernist Spectrum: Color and Abstraction Thru Dec. 31 The colorful art displayed in the exhibit explores the distinction of abstract art. www.okcmoa.com Focus On Favorites: Masterworks from the Gilcrease Collection Ongoing Gilcrease Museum presents a treasure art, artifacts, and historical documents that reveal the American experience. www.gilcrease.utulsa. edu

ART On Common Ground Ongoing Through the mixing of these many works of art and cultural items depicting a great variety of people, one is reminded that all human beings have similar needs that bring us to a common ground. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu Walking Tall: A Kinky Boots inspired exhibit Feb. 2-24 Students of the Tulsa Girls Art School have transformed ordinary walking boots into unique, wearable works of art. All pieces are for sale with 30 percent of sales benefiting students. www.tulsapac. com

Hinder

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

Chisholm Trail Arts Center presents: Artrageous Feb. 4 Join the Simmons Center in Duncan for Artrageous, a unique combination of art, music and visual performance. Quilts and Color from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Thru Feb. 7 Celebrate the beauty and vibrancy of American quilts in a special exhibition organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. www. okcmoa.com Birds in Art Thru Feb. 7 Artists from around the world find inspiration from birds, their artworks on display within this exhibit.  www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu Identity & Inspiration Thru Feb. 12 For this exhibit, eight artists have each created a piece of art the size of a small billboard, which will be on display at the Invited Artists Gallery in the Underground.  www. facebook.com/OKCsecretlife Immortales: The Hall of Emperors of the Capitoline Museum, Rome Thru Feb. 14 A selection of 20 busts from the collection of the world’s oldest museum, the Capitoline in Rome, comes to the U.S. for the first time. www.ou.edu/fjjma Collision & Creation: Indigenous Arts of the Americas, 1890-2015 Thru Feb. 21 The University of Oklahoma celebrates its 125th anniversary with an exhibit showcasing ethnographic arts created by Native Americans between 1890 and 2015. www.samnoblemuseum.ou.edu The Wyeth Thru Feb. 28 This installation celebrates the fifteen Wyeth paintings in Philbrook’s permanent collection. www. philbrook.com Barbizon and Beyond Thru Feb. 28 This exhibition features paintings and prints that reflect the distinctive character of a wide range of landscapes. www.philbrook. org Doel Reed: Interludes Thru March 27 Uncover more than 20 paintings, drawings and prints by Oklahoma printmaker Doel Reed.  www.philbrook. org Oklahoma Dance Film Festival Thru April 17 International dance short films are

Pearls & Swirls Feb. 5 Honorary Chair JoAnn Carpenter, M.D. invites you to attend Pearls & Swirls for the girls, scouts for beer tasting and hors d’oeuvres. www. gseok.org Tulsa Heart Ball Feb. 6 A celebration of the American Heart Association’s work, mission, donors and volunteers. The Tulsa Heart Ball promises to be an engaging evening of fun and passion. www.ahatulsa. ejoinme.org Taste of Oklahoma City Feb. 8 The 37th annual tasting event benefiting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma, features auctions, dancing and live music. All proceeds from the event directly fund Big Brothers Big Sisters’ mission. www.bbbsok.org LaFortune Brown Bag Series: Driving & Dementia Feb. 10 This three-part program, at the Crossroads, will help inform and empower families who are

Stoney LaRue

displayed on the second floor of the Hardesty Arts Center. Each month has an unique theme, and films cycle throughout gallery viewing hours. www.ahhatulsa.org Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain Thru April 24 Stunning printmaking and paintings take center stage at the Gilcrease Museum. This is the first major exhibition to feature diverse examples of Bartow’s works. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu Honeybadgers by Blair Thurman Thru May 1 Imagery found in the Honeybadgers is reminiscent of totem poles first created by indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast of North America. However, instead of the traditional carved wooden pole, Thurman used painted plywood and his signature colored neon lights. www.okcmoa.com

caring for someone with dementia. www. lifeseniorservices.org Heart of Henry Feb. 11 A dinner and award ceremony dedicated to honoring the heart of compassion and dedication to make the Tulsa community better through helping others. www.tulsadaycenter. org Live United Luncheon and Awards Feb. 16 Join the United Way as it honors its largest campaign in it ‘90s-year history. www. tauw.org Icons & Idols Feb. 20 Toast the night with cocktails followed by dinner and the Tulsa Ballet at the Cox Business Center. The event benefits the Tulsa Ballet. www. tulsaballet.org


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COMMUNITY OKC Gun Show Feb. 1 Oklahoma State Park.  www.okcgunshow.com Buchanan’s Vintage Flea Market Feb. 1 Featuring antiques and collectibles dealers from across the United States, this market is visited by thousands of customers each year. www.okstatefair.com Tulsa Boat Sport & Travel Show Feb. 1-7 Get ready for the newest, fastest boats for your spring and summer plans plus all kinds of attractions for the entire family. www.tulsaboatshow.com Chocolate Decadence on Automobile Alley Feb. 4 An evening filled with delicious

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Entertainment

Oklahoma City Heart Ball Feb. 20 Presented by The Chickasaw Nation, this elite black-tie event is a party with a lifesaving purpose.– www.ahaoklahoma. ejoinme.org Lunar New Year Gala Feb. 20 The annual dinner is a major fundraising event and the proceeds benefit children served through the programs of Dillon International. www.dillonadopt.com Red Ribbon Gala Feb. 27 Auctions, entertainment and dining at the Cox Business Center benefits the mission to prevent the spread of HIV and offer support for those living with it. www. redribbongala.org Excellence in Leadership Gala Feb. 27 Awards will be given out for distinguished members of Oklahoma communities at The Skirvin Hilton in Oklahoma City. www. leadershipok.com Holland Hall Preview Party Feb. 26 This is a fun opportunity to get together and to preview and shop for books before the crowds. www.hollandhall.org/events Holland Hall Book Fair Feb. 27 The state’s oldest and largest sale of donated media and goods such as DVDs, rare books, toys and games will be at Holland Hall. www. hollandhall.org/events

ART

Collision and Creation: Indigenous Arts of the Americas The Native American experience is something that has often been overlooked by history books, news outlets and other medias. Through Feb. 28, the University of Oklahoma’s Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History celebrates the culture of America’s indigenous people in an engaging exhibit that is enriching to the mind. The Collision and Creation: Indigenous Arts of the Americas exhibit highlights the ways in which colonialism has affected the Native American experience. The exhibitions focal point is the new purposes indigenous artists gave to raw materials and tools and their incorporations of a broad range of design elements. The harsh realities of European settlers nurtured new forms of artistic expression and brought together a unique mixture of materials and ideas that has influenced the history and the future of Native American art. Pieces feature beadwork, ribbon work, woven mats, baskets, ceramics, basketry, boots, a canoe and Inuit snow goggles. Many of the works are by native Oklahoma artists. The exhibition is part of the University of Oklahoma’s 125th anniversary celebration. Admission is $5-$8. For more information about the exhibit, visit www.samnoblemuseum.ou.edu.

DUST BOWL LANES & LOUNGE

TULSA

PINKITZEL Nothing says romance like treating your date’s

RED PRIMESTEAK

Whisk your date away to Red Primesteak and enjoy the opulent, urban atmosphere. Red Primesteak provides a contemporary, lavish dining experience for Oklahoma steak lovers. Before you order your meal, you will be won over by the best rolls you will ever taste. Biting into the succulent steak, you immediately know what makes the award-winning restaurant so special. The steaks are dry-aged for 40 days, and each one comes with a selection of seven crusts like garlic herb, brown sugar and sea salt. The amazing food is accompanied by a stylish and posh space with 18-foot ceilings and concrete floors; the red lighting gives everything a dreamlike glow. With a décor that competes with the delicious food, Red Primesteak is the perfect restaurant to celebrate the day of love. 504 N. Broadway Ave., Oklahoma City. 405.232.2626. 102

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

Step into a fantasy world of love, fairies and a donkey. Presented by Reduxion Theatre, William Shakespeare’s most popular comedy, A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a delightful mix of romance, fantasy and witty comedy that makes for a charming Valentine’s Day date. The story portrays events surrounding the marriage of Athens royalty, a feud between fairyland’s king and queen and the escapades of four lovers. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is an immersive theatrical experience suitable for theater goers nine to 90, and is one you don’t want to miss. Enjoy this dreamy production at the Oklahoma City Civic Center, 201 N. Walker Ave.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM

sweet tooth. The newest and sweetest place in Tulsa is tucked in downtown Tulsa, adjacent to the BOK Center. Pinkitzel Cupcakes & Cakes serves the sweetest delectable desserts. As you enter Pinkitzel, you will be thrown into a magical fantasyland that is reminiscent of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory or Alice in Wonderland. There is always room to treat your family with Pinkitzel’s whimsically decorated cupcakes. 201 S. Denver Ave., Tulsa. 918.582.7465.

The best dates are the spontaneous and unconventional ones that allow you to share laughs and good times. Nestled in Tulsa’s Blue Dome District, the Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge provides the perfect date environment to celebrate you and your valentine’s love. Even if you don’t have a valentine, the Dust Bowl is the perfect place to celebrate single life with friends. With an intimate 1970s ambiance, you’ll definitely dance and bowl the night away as the in-house DJ spins all the popular past and present songs. 211 S. Elgin Ave., Tulsa. 918.430.3901.

IN

OKC


Reckless Kelly chocolate treats, gourmet coffee and more. Dress to impress and sip champagne while listening to smooth jazz and bidding on items in the valentine auction. www. chocolatedecadenceokc.com An Affair of the Heart Feb. 5-7 One of the largest arts and craft shows in the United States, is known for its quality and variety of merchandise. www.aaoth.com Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival Feb. 5-7 The Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival is a cultural celebration of the American Indian. Enjoy a fine art show, cultural exhibitions, traditional dancing, entertainment, storytelling and much more. www.tulsaindianartfestival.com Mardi Gras Parade Feb. 6 Celebrate Fat Tuesday in style at the sixth annual Mardi Gras Parade. Watch as masked, costumed revelers and colorful, elaborate floats make their way through the Blue Dome District. www.tulsamardigras.com Norman Mardi Gras Parade Feb. 6 Make your way to the streets of Yukon Chocolate Festival. www.cityodowntown Norman to celebrate this Cajun fyukonok.gov tradition. www.normanmardigrasparade. German Feast & Auction Feb. 6 A great com event in Corn, Okla., where visitors can taste Yukon Chocolate Festival Feb. 6 Feed authentic German food. Sign up for the silent your sweet tooth and get ready for an auction for gift certificates, handmade toys, and other handcrafted items. www.cornbible. afternoon of chocolate treats at the

org Eagle Tour & Loon Watch Feb. 6 Go to Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge for a tour featuring southern bald eagles on the nest. Guest are encouraged to bring binoculars. 918.489.5641 SWOSU Jazz Festival Feb. 11-12 The

46th annual SWOSU Jazz Festival will feature drummer Matt Wilson with his group, Arts and Crafts, on Thursday night. www.swosucamps. com Valentine’s Day Dinner Feb. 12-13 Enjoy a night of love at the Woolaroc Lodge in Bartlesville. The night kicks off at 5:30 p.m. www.woolaroc.org Oklahoma Horse Fair Feb. 12-13 The annual Oklahoma Horse Fair in Duncan is a two-day event that includes a trail horse and ranch horse competition followed by a working cow dog competition. www. okhorsefair.com Home & Garden Show Feb. 12-14 Browse nearly 100 vendor booths filled with a wide selection of useful products, and attend one of the how-to seminars. www. groveok.org Tu l s a Wo m e n ’s E x p o Fe b. 12-14 This event will be packed with an incredible variety of exhibits to browse, people to see and products to try. www.womenslivingexpo.com OneVoice Day Feb. 26 This event begins with OneVoice Legislative Reception which provides attendees the opportunity to discuss issues with elected officials. www.tulsachamber. com Tunnel of Love Haunted Attraction Feb. 12 Treat your special someone to something a little different. The Sanctuary is continuing this tradition with their Tunnel of Love

Haunted Attraction in Oklahoma City. www. thesanctuaryokc.com ORA Academy Feb. 16 The goal of the Academy is to offer continuing education and professional development to a particular demographic of ORA’s membership. www. okrestaurants.com Vintage Tulsa Show Feb. 19-21 Antique and collectibles vendors at E xpo Square. www.vintagetulsashow.com Leake Classic Car Show & Auction Feb. 20-21 Collector cars go on the auction block for display and sale at the Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com Darryl Starbird’s Rod and Custom Car Show Feb. 20-22 With more than 1,000 entries anticipated for the annual show, the competition in custom car design and alterations will be bigger than ever at Expo Square. www.darrylstarbird.com To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR

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IN PERSON

Securing the State

B

uilding 11 is an unassuming, humble, plain brick building on the east side of the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety campus. Even up close it looks like an unlikely home for one of the most important agencies in the state – the Oklahoma Office of Homeland Security. But Kim Edd Carter, the agency’s director, also humble and unassuming, fits in perfectly there. Carter has no agents in the field, no officers or deputies working for his department. But what he does has everything to do with the determination of the state’s counterterrorism strategies. While the world changed for everybody on Sept. 11, 2001, it had already changed for Oklahomans on April 19, 1995 with the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Building. Carter’s office distributes federal counterterrorism and disaster preparedness grants to state agencies where they’re deemed most necessary. It sounds simple, but there are countless agencies and, more importantly, countless disasters to anticipate. Carter’s job, in short, is to visualize the unseeable and forecast the unthinkable. “The Oklahoma Office of Homeland Security is probably one of the most misunderstood offices in the state,” he says. “First, we’re not an operational office where I have agents in the field chasing terrorists around everyday. 104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2016

If you strip all the things away that we do and melt it down to one thing, I would tell you we’re a grants administration office. All of the federal Homeland Security grants dollars that come to Oklahoma come through this office. We set the strategy on how those dollars are spent and then oversee and maintain the programs we fund.” But while the dollars may roll through Carter’s departments, the real currency he works with is information. How to gather it, how to analyze it and how to turn it into actionable items is a skill he began to develop as an Oklahoma City Police Department officer 38 years ago. When he later moved on to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, he honed those skills further. Information, he says, makes the difference between a proactive law enforcement agency and a reactive one. “I’m a believer in information sharing. And I’m a believer in intelligence gathering. That can sound bad to a lot of people. Intelligence is a bad word to a lot of people but that’s just silly. You can misuse it like anything else. But one of the problems with law enforcement is we’re always reactive. Using criminal intelligence is one area we could be proactive in. It’s the one area where we can help stop crimes, and that includes terrorism. That’s why the collection and analysis of information is the key,” he says.

Oklahoma has had an “active shooter” program in place since Gov. Mary Fallin tapped him for the job in 2011. Over 9,000 officers in Oklahoma have been trained to respond to an event like the one that recently occurred in San Bernardino, Calif. The first job is to gather information that stops the event before it occurs. The second is being trained to handle it if it does occur. Carter’s job covers more than just counterterrorism, though. Disaster preparedness is a must in Oklahoma. There’s no question of, say, if Oklahoma’s going to have another tornado. It’s a matter of when. Being ready for it is the only remedy. Government agencies will respond to natural disasters as fast as possible, but sometimes, particularly in rural areas, it can take hours, even days, to get to the site. Carter’s office not only trains emergency responders, it operates programs to train victims to be ready in the face of disaster. “We’re a very small office with a very big impact on the state of Oklahoma. On a regular basis, we’re working with several of the state law enforcement agencies and several public safety agencies, as well, like Health and Human Services and Emergency Management. We’re not just law enforcement. I’m working with all these other people. That’s one of the things that makes this job interesting,” he says. PAUL FAIRCHILD

PHOTO CREDIT BRENT FUCHS.

A small office with the big responsibility of protecting the heartland through counterterrorism and disaster preparedness planning.


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Feb 2016  

In this month's issue we explore the best cocktails in the state, as well as 9 of the state's most eligible bachelors and bachelorettes. We...

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