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DECEMBER 2014

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014


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Contents

DEPARTMENTS The State

13

13

32

Cultures mesh seamlessly, while entrepreneurial creativity colors the unique atmosphere of Oklahoma City’s Nani Japanese-Choctaw Kitchen, a start-up committed to sustainability and culinary adventure.

16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32

5 Qs Culture Smart Move OK Then The Insider Oklahoma Business Scene Spotlight Living Space

38 40 42 44

Style Accessorize Your Health Destination

The incomparable Sees Design revisits a home founder Carson See designed more than three decades ago. Now owned by grandchildren of the original owner, the home remains a haven of style, comfort and family heirlooms.

38 95

Taste

95

Two chefs of Oklahoma City’s refined Ludivine restaurant usher in nostalgia with R&J Lounge and Supper Club, a throwback to kitsch and fun dining with the best back-of-the-box family recipes from decades past. Contributing editor Tara Malone stops in to reminisce and taste the goodness.

96 98 100 101

103

The Buzz What We’re Eating From Scratch The Pour

Entertainment

They’re out to save souls, but who will save two young Mormon missionaries sent to remote Uganda, where villagers live under constant, very real threats? The Broadway hit musical The Book of Mormon tours to the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall this month and throws out all political correctness.

104 Calendar of Events

112

4

In Person

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

103


Second to none at putting patients first.

2014

From the day Saint Francis Hospital opened in 1960, we have been committed to one mission: to extend the presence and healing ministry of Christ in all we do. His caring is the model for how we serve patients, families and each other in Tulsa and the surrounding areas. Over the decades, we have expanded and adapted to the growing needs of the region and to ongoing changes in the healthcare industry. Thank you to the physicians, nurses, employees and volunteers for their dedication to serving patients and for making the mission of Saint Francis a reality.

saintfrancis.com


OKLAHOMA

Frontier to Foundry the Making of Small Bronze Sculpture in the Gilcrease Collection

OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX ASSOCIATE EDITOR KAREN SHADE CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER NATE PUCKETT

DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB INTERN KARISSA ZIEGLER

deceMber 21, 2014 – March 23, 2015 The Bernard Titowsky Collection, John D. Calandra Italian american Collection (Queens College, CUnY).

Title sponsor of the Gilcrease Museum 2014–15 exhibition season is the sherman E. smith Family Foundation.

1400 N. Gilcrease MuseuM rd. Tulsa, OK 918-596-2700 Gilcrease.uTulsa.edu TU Is an EEO/aa InsTITUTIOn. 20532 Gilcrease.indd 1

10/22/14 2:53 PM

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OKLAHOMA WEDDING OKLAHOMA SHOW OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA 9/15/14 2:17 PM

CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2014 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman TM Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2013

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OKLAHOMAN

OF THE YEAR

Plenty of Oklahomans work hard each year to make this state a better place. Help us honor them as a 2015 Oklahoman of the Year.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR The holidays are upon us. Traffic near shopping malls and centers has reached its peak. While the season calls for joy and merriment, fuses are, unfortunately, short and tempers are high. Why do we subject ourselves to stress during the holidays? This is a time for joy. Cherish time spent with family and friends. If your family is like mine, it’s hard to get everyone in one home at the same time. Enjoy the laughter, memories and, of course, the food. While gifts will eventually break or be misplaced (or possibly re-gifted), the memories last a lifetime. Do nice things for others. Whether it’s offering to clean the home of this year’s holiday host or paying for a stranger’s coffee, doing nice things for other people is a two-fold gift. It makes us feel good about ourselves and brings cheer to the beneficiary. Consider paying it forward this holiday season, whether it’s in the form of money, time or labor. Keep in mind Cher Horowitz’s quote from my favorite movie, Clueless: “’Tis a far, far better thing doing stuff for other people.” Give thoughtfully. Part of the stress of the holidays is shopping for the perfect gift. And there are often boundaries in place that exacerbate that stress. “Am I spending too much? Too little?” “Will this fit?” “Does Aunt Kathy still collect angels?” Gifts are certainly nice to receive, but no one wants to receive a gift at the expense of someone else’s sanity. Give yourself a break, and give from the heart. Something as simple as a batch of homemade cookies or coupons for free crochet lessons are thoughtful, original and don’t put a strain on the holiday budget. And speaking of cookies… Allow yourself a treat or two. We all worry about our waistlines during the holiday season with good reason. But splurging on a bite of sweets or an extra helping of your favorite cornbread dressing shouldn’t leave you feeling guilty. Indulge a bit – that’s part of the holidays. Of course, not all stress can be eliminated. But I encourage you all to stop and smell the gingerbread latte. Enjoy your reason for the season, whatever that may be. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

OKLAHOMA Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com Call 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA

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OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014 11/17/14 10:04 AM

A L I T T L E H O L I D AY D R A M A Celebrate the holidays this month with OKMAG.COM as we take an inside look into the 25-year tradition of the Clark Youth Theatre performance of The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Get to know the play’s director and meet the cast of this beloved Barbara Robinson holiday play. In our video interviews, learn what will make this year’s performance one for the books and discover what hijinks are in store for the Herdman children, who this year will be performed by two unique casts of talented young actors. If you’ve never seen The Best Christmas Pageant Ever, be sure to look behind the scenes with us as we rediscover why this play is a must-see this – and every – holiday season. HO HO YUM A warm, relaxing drink next to a crackling Watch our web fire is something exclusive videos for everyone enjoys expanded coverage. during the holidays. This year, take your fireside treat to the next level with some of the most delicious holiday drinks, hand-crafted by one of Oklahoma’s best bartenders. After your quick video lesson on some top season’s top cocktails, put the kids to bed, break out the nice glasses and take a refreshing sip under the mistletoe. BET TER THAN MILK AND COOKIES We’ve also got the kiddos covered, with a very special non-alcoholic treat that will warm the belly and fill the young ones with holiday spirit. Instead of milk and cookies, prepare one of our signature drinks and leave it out for Santa this year. Who knows? Maybe he’ll leave something extra special for you under the tree.

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The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

A Dining Dialogue

The owners behind Oklahoma City’s Nani Japanese-Choctaw Kitchen create community at the table.

Y

ou might think that Choctaw Indian and Japanese cultures have little in common, but Andon Whitehorn and Colin Stringer, chefs and co-owners of Nani Japanese-Choctaw Kitchen in Oklahoma City, respectfully disagree. And they’ll prove it, one dish at a time. Nani began as a pop-up dining experience, conceived by self-taught

cooks Stringer and Whitehorn, serving Oklahoma City diners unique and satisfying dinner adventures six times a year. Whitehorn says that he has always been in love with cooking, especially with Japanese cuisine and sushi. Part Choctaw, Whitehorn and Stringer began to notice surprising similarities between the two cooking cultures. When Whitehorn discovered that the Choctaw word for fish, nani, also meant “What?” in Japanese, he felt it was a fortuitous sign that his dream was meant to be. And while the fare may sound exotic to some, it couldn’t be more Oklahoman at heart. “I don’t think it’s as much about the two cuisines as much as it’s about the sensibilities that exist within both,” Stringer says. “They are actually really similar. We primarily focus on three things: sustainability, seasonality and preservation methods. We think these things are super important to our own culinary ambitions CHEF COLIN STRINGER PLATES PICKLED RADISH and also to creating the most delicious and ethiFOR A COURSE AT NANI. cal food possible. Food has to make sense from PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. all angles, and focusing on these sensibilities makes our food cohesive and, hopefully, something fresh and inspiring to OKC.” “Right now in Oklahoma City really feels like the perfect time and place for a concept like Nani,” Whitehorn adds. “Even though the overall concept is a meeting of Japanese and Native American cuisine, it’s more about taking the sensibilities of both cuisines and using them as reference points for showcasing what we feel are very Oklahoman ingredients. It allows us to show guests the very best of what this state has to offer by offering what’s been around us all along. Nani is a very Oklahoman concept, and while the sensibilities could be practiced and applied elsewhere, Nani couldn’t exist anywhere else but here.” It’s not only the choice of cultural fusions that makes Nani unique; it’s the dining experience itself. When asked if the moniker of “supper club” was accurate to describe Nani, Whitehorn agrees, emphasizing what he calls the communal dining experience. “Nani is a relatively new concept,” Whitehorn says, “and it’s constantly changing as we all learn and grow through it. We chose this style of dining to bridge the divide between the kitchen and the diner and to better relate to our guests and to give them a sense of context for their meal. We DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

much different one from anything else going on in OKC,” Stringer says. “We hope that our role encourage interaction not only between the in the Oklahoma culinary world is one of a catalyst. We know we can’t change it ourselves; we dinner guests and the staff, but between each just want people to come eat at Nani and go out and start even better restaurants. Those are the other as well; we want this to be a dialogue places we want to eat at. There needs to be fewer competitive minds in OKC’s cooks and chefs. rather than a monologue. Rather than what True progression won’t happen until that happens. We have no secret recipes at Nani. We’ll tell you might have at a traditional restaurant, you how to do it all.” where you enjoy a great meal but with often “Nani stands to challenge OKC to view food differently,” says co-owner and barista Paul Zimimpersonal service, we want our guests to feel merman. “We have a conception that to experience great quality food a connection not or art or culture, we need to fly to a coast. That simply isn’t the case. only between one another and what “OKC is rapidly becoming a mar- We have culture and quality and an abundance of beautiful resources around us…Nani may be novel and unique right now, but our they’re enjoying, ket that can support and recognize all hope and expectation is that it won’t be for long. OKC is rapidly bebut with the venue quality and craft. We are thrilled coming a market that can support and recognize quality and craft. We as well.” are thrilled to be where we are and honored that we get to see OKC’s Diners at Nani to be where we are and honored in this exciting time.” do not receive a that we get to see OKC’s transfor- transformation Most of Nani’s vegetables are either foraged or grown by the chefs standard menu mation in this exciting time.” or sourced locally with the help of Urban Agrarian, an Oklahoma from which to City farm-to-table grocery, and the farmers market at the Oklahoma choose dishes. State University-Oklahoma City campus. In keeping with their comInstead, each mitment to their home city, the proprietors of Nani have taken their concept a step further: Five small group of diners – 14 each evening – percent of all proceeds go to local charities, such as the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma or the enjoys the same 8-10 course meal, as well as Oklahoma City YWCA. several amuse-bouches, turning the dining While diners are eager to try Nani’s one-of-a-kind offerings and are appreciative of the altruexperience into a culinary community. No two istic sensibilities of the owners, no one could be more elated about the rebirth of the Oklahoma menus are ever the same, but creations have culinary scene than the proprietors themselves. included dishes like poached garlic cloves, “Oklahoma City has always had really great food,” Whitehorn says, “if only with a little less Thai basil and basil-infused oil, and sushi variety, but in recent years we’ve seen people become excited about food and becoming more zu; fried okra with toasted sesame, scallions involved and aware of their dining habits and choices. The potential for Oklahoma City is enorand tuna; and the “quail-ity thyme” – half of mous.” a quail cooked and cured in buttermilk and In this new atmosphere of conscious dining, patrons are as likely to “discover” a restaurant juniper, then seared with thyme and served that’s been in business for years as they are to encounter a new and novel establishment. with a soft-poached quail egg, a crisp of fried “We’re very excited for what this city has to offer,” Whitehorn continues, sushi rice, juniper “and we feel very fortunate to be where we are at the forefront of this culinary vinegar, pumpkin renaissance.” oil and grown and Nani is open for dinner Wednesday through Saturday. To book a place at the foraged greens. And table, visit www.naniokc.com. of course, in a nod to TARA MALONE Whitehorn’s passion for making sushi, Nani offers rolls like SQUID IS SERVED ON BEET “The Rumble” with FOAM AT NANI. LEFT: A cedar-smoked bison, NANI CHEF SMOKES A tempura negi (green PIECE OF SUSHI. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS. onion), rosemary caramel, horseradish aioli and citrus zest. “Everyone also eats each course at the same time, which adds another dimension of context and enjoyment to the meal,” Whitehorn says. “When everyone is experiencing everything at the same time, it not only gives what might be complete strangers something to talk about, but it also fulfills that very social desire to connect and belong. Eating is a very social practice, and a meal is one of the few singular experiences that not only fulfills the need to nourish yourself, but also the need to interact socially.” “All these things make this experience a

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014


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The State

5 QS

In Her Own Write Literature has shaped every part of writer Teresa Miller’s world.

T

TERESA MILLER IS A WRITER AND THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR FOR THE OKLAHOMA CENTER FOR POETS AND WRITERS.

eresa Miller is a connoisseur of all things literary and all things Oklahoma. As the executive director of the Oklahoma Center for Poets and Writers at Oklahoma State University-Tulsa and the host of the OETAproduced television show Writing Out Loud (on which she interviews prominent authors), Miller is heavily invested in the world of creative writing. She’s also an author with several works to her name, including Remnants of Glory, a novel, and Means of Transit, her memoir published in 2008. We sat down with Miller to discuss the immense role that literature and fiction have played in Oklahoma’s history and in her own life. In what ways has Oklahoma been shaped by literature? It’s been shaped by literature probably as much, if not more, than any state in the union. For instance, The Grapes of Wrath had a huge impact on the state and promoted an image of Oklahoma throughout the world that is very different than the image Oklahoma has of itself. That’s not taking anything away from John Steinbeck (the novel’s author), but at the same time, Oklahoma is much more than the literary portrait that we get in The Grapes of Wrath. Then on the other extreme, we have the musical Oklahoma! where the state is depicted as a place of great opportunity. And so there were these two extremes in the national consciousness when it came to Oklahoma in its early days. It was either a Dust Bowl or a place that was so lush that corn was higher than you can imagine. Neither image was completely true. Which author or authors have left the greatest impression on you? I am a fourth generation Oklahoman, but when I was growing up, ironically, the authors who had the most influence on me were Southern women authors like Flannery O’Connor. They were the writers who I looked up to. Then as I grew older and my eyes turned toward home and I became more comfortable with my surroundings, I began to celebrate Oklahoma authors and the great literary legacy that we have here. Share with us your experience in writing. Also, what are you working on these days? I wrote my first novel when I was in my 20s, and it was a wonderful experience. But what happened to me after that was what happens to so many writers on their first book – I developed a writer’s block that lasted a number of years. It was during that time period that I felt the need for the company and inspiration of other writers. That’s when I created the Oklahoma Center for Poets and Writers. I eventually wrote

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

another novel many years later and then a memoir shortly after that. I’m currently working on a new novel. How has the Oklahoma Center for Writers and Poets evolved over the years? One way is that now we look for books to do more than just provide literary enrichment. We see books as talking points that can help us deal with important social issues. Our motto has become “using books to broaden our thinking and enlarge our hearts to build a better community.” So, we find great satisfaction in using literature as a means to get to know each other better. What advice would you give to a young writer who wants to remain creative and passionate about literature? Stay true to your voice. I think what derailed me early on was that my voice became less authentic, and I think I was trying too much to have the voice of other people and other writers and trying to please people too much, rather than owning my words and my experiences. The most important thing anyone can do as a writer is to be authentic… yet it’s probably the part that’s the hardest. NATHAN PORTER


Winged Wonder

The American Pigeon Museum recounts the surprisingly rich history of the domestic pigeon.

“F

irst and foremost, they are not rats with wings,” explains Lorrie Monteiro, the curator of the American Pigeon Museum. “They are social, gentle birds that have had a symbiotic relationship with humans for thousands of years.” Monteiro says the Oklahoma City museum seeks to preserve the history of the domestic pigeon and share its story with the public. Founded in 1973, the museum was originally housed inside an old home; but in June, the museum was able to open a larger facility with the support of pigeon fanciers from all over the country. Exhibits feature the many facets of pigeon history, including racing homers (a breed of pigeon), performance birds and war pigeons used in the U.S. Army Signal Corp Pigeon Service during World War I and World War II. “They have served humans well, especially in times of conflicts,” says Monteiro. “These birds have been steadfast and heroic in delivering important messages and saving hundreds of lives in the process.” To some, pigeons are seen as an urban nuisance, but what most

SHOUT OUT

LOVE FOR THE 918 Nearly a decade ago, Tulsa artist Steve Cluck had an idea for how to promote his hometown. Now, Cluck is on a mission to photograph people – 918, to be exact – wearing his famed “Don’t Hate The 918” T-shirt line. So far, Cluck has photographed about 300 people who live in the northeastern Oklahoma area code. “The coolest surprise is that people are very excited to be in the project,” Cluck says. I have not had to do much recruiting. People are approaching me.” Cluck hopes that the project will showcase the diversity of the Tulsa

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

people don’t realize is that they are the same species as a bird that is held in much higher regard. “Those lovely white doves that people like to see during ceremonies are white racing homers – domestic pigeons,” Monteiro says. “Pigeon” and “dove” are interchangeable terms. They make up the family Columbidae, and there are many different kinds. “All are one species but hundreds of breeds,” she clarifies. The domestic pigeon highlighted at the museum is a descendent of the wild rock dove, also known as the rock pigeon. “Wild rock doves are still found in cliff sides of England and the Mediterranean,” says Monteiro. “This bird is not native to the United States.” Fancy pigeons come in many forms and appear in bird shows across the country. “We have a number of the fancy breeds here, so visitors can see the different standards of what they are judged on in shows,” Monteiro says. There are 22 varieties of performance pigeons – birds “that can tumble mid-flight or roll on the ground or even fly for hours on end,” she adds. The flying performers do their stunts in the air, while the parlor types do theirs on the ground. The museum also contains a racing clock collection that spans between 1903 and the 1980s, artistic depictions of pigeons and an exhibit of donations from the royal race loft. “There is so much more to this bird that most people don’t know, and we are hoping people will visit so they can see how amazing they are,” Monteiro says. BETH WEESE

area. He also wants to highlight the quality of people in Tulsa. “People here are nice and compassionate,” he says. “So I wanted to do something that puts the spotlight on the people of the 918 that illustrates how great the people really are.” This is the largest project Cluck has tackled in his 10 years of amateur photography, he says. He anticipates that it will take about a year to finish the project. To be considered for the project, contact Cluck through Facebook, Twitter or www.donthatethe918. com. – Jami Mattox

IMAGES COURTESY STEVE CLUCK.

The State

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The State

A

Next Stop: Christmas

The Eastern Flyer Polar Express boards for the North Pole from Bristow for the first time.

s Oklahoma considers the prospect of passenger train service between its two largest cities, rail’s most ardent proponents may soon be its youngest. The Eastern Flyer, a passenger train proposed to run between Midwest City and Sapulpa, has been transformed into the Polar Express, boarding most days through Dec. 28 from Bristow. This is the first year Iowa Pacific (which owns the Eastern Flyer) has brought this official train ride event to Oklahoma, says Angela Arias, vice president of sales and marketing for the Premier Rail Collection, the passenger division of Iowa Pacific. “We’re delighted to be in Oklahoma, and we’ve been embraced by the community,” Arias says. “I know everyone is going to be thrilled by this experience.” The Polar Express is a classic children’s picture book by Chris Van Allburg about a boy, who one winter night hears a train whistle. From his bedroom window, he sees a magical train outside of his house. On board, he meets other children in their pajamas headed for the North Pole. On the journey, the children drink hot chocolate, listen to music and play. In 2004, Robert Zemeckis created a computer-animated feature film based on the book with Tom Hanks as the voice of the conductor. The story and film have inspired many holiday passenger train events, but the Eastern Flyer’s Polar Express is one of a handful of official Polar

20

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Express Train Rides operating in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Arias says the Eastern Flyer’s trial run in February was part of the reason Premier Rail and Iowa Pacific decided to bring the attraction to Oklahoma. “It was so successful, and the community [of Bristow] embraced it so whole-heartedly,” says Arias. The Eastern Flyer Polar Express will board from the Bristow Historical Museum, a restored 1923 train depot operated by the Bristow Historical Society. The group rearranged its collection to accommodate the 2,000 people per day anticipated to visit, says Trudi Barnett, historical society secretary. Barnett says the town was chosen for an additional reason. “We found out Bristow was selected because we kept our history,” she says. “We renovated our depot... We’re just thrilled that [the Polar Express] is coming. I know there were several other cities that wanted it, and we were lucky enough to get it.” Children are encouraged to wear their pajamas and experience the story with their families. The Polar Express, which began its runs in late November, continues most nights through December with afternoon and evening departure times. Excursions are about one hour round-trip. Visit www.easternflyerpolarexpressride.com for ticket information, purchases and a detailed schedule. KAREN SHADE

N AT U R E

A LITTLE RESPECT Hanging berry-studded sprigs of mistletoe over doorways during the holidays is fine for most of the Western world, but in Oklahoma, the humble evergreen is well regarded year-round. Technically parasitic, the state’s floral emblem was widely considered by many as a nuisance pest that damaged trees. Today we know it as an active player in sustaining ecosystems worldwide and a necessary food source for bird species. That importance brought it prominence in Oklahoma. The mistletoe received its representative honor first in 1893 when the pre-statehood territorial legislature passed a bill making it official, states the Oklahoma Historical Society’s online encyclopedia. After 1907, the new state’s legislators revisited the question. Some wanted the exotic passionflower to symbolize Oklahoma, but a Guthrie newsman staunchly defended the mistletoe, reminding his fellow ‘89ers (participants of the 1889 land run) of the struggles and heavy costs of settling the territory. That first winter was particularly harsh, and families decorated the graves of loved ones with mistletoe, the only greenery tough enough to survive. The state bill passed in 1910. – KS

PHOTOS COURTESY PREMIER RAIL COLLECTION.

S M A R T M OV E


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The State OK THEN

The Golden Year

F

Tulsa’s chapter of The Links, Inc., celebrates 50 years of community service.

ifty years ago this month, a handful of Tulsa female civic leaders formed the city’s chapter of The Links, Inc., a national organization that focuses on giving back to the community through service and donation. “Over the past 50 years, we have contributed more than 60,000 hours in service hours and hundreds of thousands of dollars in monetary and in-kind contributions throughout the Tulsa community,” says Libby Johnson, a member of the Tulsa Chapter of The Links, Inc. The Tulsa chapter is made up of 25 members – all women. The organization’s members are business and civic leaders, role models, mentors, activists and volunteers working toward a common vision by engaging like-minded organizations and individuals for partnership, explains Eleanor Payne, the president of the local chapter. “It is one of the nation’s oldest and largest volunteer service organizations of extraordinary women who are committed to enriching, sustaining and ensuring the culture and economic survival of African-Americans and other persons of African ancestry,” Payne says. Last year alone the Tulsa chapter gave more than 1,200 service hours to commu

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

nity projects that focus on five areas: service to youth, national trends and services, the arts, international trends and services and health and human services. Each category is designed with a particular goal in mind, says Johnson. For example, in 2013 the Tulsa chapter developed a mentoring program called My Sister, My Self, which endeavors to build self-esteem and self-efficacy among area elementary students – specifically, young black women, adds Payne. “This mentoring program began in the 2012-2013 program year and earned the chapter the Tulsa Regional Chamber Partners in Education Champions Award,” Payne says. Partnering with education is not the organization’s only endeavor. In the past, the chapter has joined forces with several other

THE TULSA CHAPTER OF THE LINKS, INC., CELEBRATES ITS HISTORY IN THE COMMUNITY, WHICH BEGAN WITH ITS CHARTER MEMBERS IN 1964. PHOTO COURTESY THE LINKS, INC., TULSA CHAPTER.

nonprofit organizations in the area to meet community needs. Members have teamed up with Tulsa Habitat for Humanity and the American Heart Association for various projects, explains Johnson. In the next 50 years, the Tulsa chapter plans not only continuing to meet current needs, but to face new challenges, says Payne. “We now have a National Childhood Obesity Initiative targeting the health needs of African-American children,” she says. “We are working on closing the achievement gap in reading and math for third graders. We are working to increase literacy for kindergarten through 12th grade students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education; and of course providing programs to help deal with health issues that continue to be prevalent among African-American women.” SHARON MCBRIDE

S TAT

94%

In 2013, more than 862,000 Oklahomans traveled during the holiday season. The overwhelming majority – 94 percent – traveled by car or pickup, according to AAA Oklahoma. Last year marked the fifth straight year of increased travel by Oklahomans for the holiday season; gas prices at historic lows should contribute to a boost in vehicular travel for 2014. – Jami Mattox


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The State

DWIGHT TWILLEY’S NEWEST ALBUM MARKS MORE THAN FOUR DECADES IN ROCK. PHOTOS COURTESY DWIGHT TWILLEY.

THE INSIDER

Always on the Mind Tulsa power-pop stalwart Dwight Twilley talks nuance with a new album.

T

he just-released Always is Dwight Twilley’s first new disc in a little over three years, and one listen tells you that he put a lot of thought into every track. This thoughtfulness extends to its title – seemingly straightforward, but the way Twilley sees it, nuanced as well. “If you think about it, ‘always’ is kind of a magical word,” explains the Tulsa-based pop-music star. “In the first place, it’s a lie. Nothing is always. And yet, while it’s completely fictional because there is no ‘always,’ people still put so much value and emotion into the thought of ‘always.’” By way of stirring the “always” pot a little more, Twilley’s new disc includes a photo of him pointing in two different directions, which, he says with a laugh, “we call the international sign of ‘always.’” Whether you interpret that as “always” or “all ways” – or, for that matter, whether you feel like interpreting it at all – semantics shouldn’t get in the way of enjoyment when it comes to this record. Rock-solid and engaging from start to finish, it features a dozen new Twilley compositions, ranging from the oldies-influenced, pianotriplet-driven “Fools Like Me” to the aggressively big-beat “Till the Jukebox Dies,” all further cementing his reputation as standard-bearer for the musical genre known as power-pop.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

While “power-pop” means different things to different people, what it amounts to in Twilley’s case is crisp, melodic singing, songwriting and playing influenced by the British Invasion groups of the 1960s as well as American rockabilly and rock ‘n’ roll. Twilley has worn the power-pop mantle for decades; as recently as 2010, a writer for the magazine Sound & Vision wrote, “If we’re going to have a king of powerpop, Dwight Twilley may be the man.” “Well, you know, that [classification] changes every four or five years,” Twilley notes. “I was the father of New Wave once, back in the ‘80s. But think about the power-pop thing. What would be the ultimate power-pop band that ever existed?” He is, of course, referring to the four moptops from Liverpool responsible for starting the pop-music revolution known as the British Invasion. “There you go,” he says with another laugh. “So if anybody’s going to compare me to the Beatles, then I just absolutely have no problem with it.” Had the Beatles continued to exist, they might well have been traveling through the same kind of musical territory Twilley explores in Always, which is full of layered, upbeat harmonies; evocative lyrics; and sparse and satisfying instrumentation (including a backwardsguitar track or two), all pulled together by Twilley’s confident vocal work. Beginning with the line, “How long you gonna make me feel like I’m on fire?” – which appears to be a nod to his first national hit, 1975’s “I’m on Fire” – the disc ends with the words, “there’s always tomorrow.” Taken together, those phrases seem to point toward a theme for Always: a consciousness of the past, but an eye on the future. Then again, maybe not. “Well, I was trying not to have a theme,” Twilley says, chuckling. “The last album, Soundtrack, was a totally autobiographical album, so when we started work on this, my big effort was just to make Dwight Twilley songs. That was my plan. Anytime you do anything, you can’t help but be a little bit autobiographical; it probably slides in there whether you like it or not. But what I was trying to do was say, ‘Here are some Dwight Twilley songs. Don’t think about ‘em too much.’” Still, from that very first line on the title track, it’s hard not to find a past-consciousness flowing throughout much of the disc. And there would be a good reason for it. Exactly 40 years ago – on Nov. 27, 1974 – Twilley and his bandmates Phil Seymour (drums and vocals) and Bill Pitcock IV (lead guitar) went into Tulsa’s Church Studio to record “I’m on Fire.” The Dwight Twilley Band had just signed its first recording contract with Shelter Records, headed by local-boy-made-good Leon Russell and British producer Denny Cordell.


There’s another man from that long-ago session on the new disc, too: James Barth, who’s responsible for the string arrangements. “He co-engineered ‘I’m on Fire’ and was with the Twilley Band,” says Twilley. “Besides myself, he’s the only living person left who was on that session.” Those who have passed include Roger Harris, the other engineer who worked on “I’m on Fire,” as well as Seymour (in 1993) and Pitcock (2011), both of whom died of cancer. And while Twilley’s longtime musical comrade Pitcock left behind some licks that can be heard on “Happy Birthday,” a wistful ballad from the new album, his loss led to the large roster of guest musicians featured on Always. “While we were cutting it, we were kind of in this weird void, because we’d been working so closely with Bill [Pitcock] for so many years, and now we were starting a new album, and there was no Bill,” explains Twilley. “A lot of people said, ‘Well, you should get some of your pals and friends to start chipping in and maybe give it a different sound.’ That seemed like a good idea to me. Most of the time we were so self-contained, there was never any reason to call up anybody and say, ‘You want to play on something?’ Occasionally, a friend would be in town, and of course we’d have ‘em play, but we never spent any real thought on it. “One of the guys we’ve got who’s really interesting is Roger Linn, the guy who played all the backward guitars on [the 1976 Twilley song] ‘Sincerely,’” he continues. “He invented the LinnDrum [drum machine], and he used to play for Leon Russell; that’s where we met him. He was engineering for Leon. And actually, that song was Phil and me – just us and Roger Linn went into the studio. I wrote the song, and we recorded it and mixed it in one day. But people still talk about that guitar part.” Other contributing musicians include guitarist Aaron “Slimquik” Failes, bassist Dave Armstrong and drummer-percussionist Jeff Smith – all members of Twilley’s touring band – as well as area players with international reputations like Steve Ripley (guitar) and Jimmy Karstein (drums). They join a group of guest stars that includes vocalist Susan Cowsill, fellow power-pop star Tommy Keene and noted studio bassist and composer Leland Sklar. Steve Allen (guitar) and Ron Flynt (bass and organ) are former Tulsans who put together another major-label power-pop band, 20/20, in the 1970s, while guitarist Mitch Easter is a well-known musician and producer. Other nationally and internationally known players on the

disc include bassists Timm Buechler and Ken Stringfellow, guitarist J.B. Meijers and drummer Doug Wiley. Always was produced, recorded and mixed by Twilley and his wife, Jan, at their Big Oak Studio in Tulsa. And while any number of tunes on the disc seems “radiofriendly,” to use an old term, don’t look for any singles to be released. “For the last couple of records, we put a lot of effort into that, and a lot of money, and it just goes nowhere,” Twilley says. “Radio’s as screwed up as the record business. Once something’s released, everybody steals it anyway, and really, the only people who are going to buy it are the people who are your fans. That’s what gives us the satisfaction of working so hard, because we absolutely know there are people all over the world who will just really be happy to hear a new Dwight Twilley song.” JOHN WOOLEY

For more, visit www. dwighttwilley.com or facebook.com/ DwightTwilleyFanWorld.

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The State OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Show Me The Money

M

Planning for 2015 includes estate and digital issues.

oney matters. By taking certain steps, one can optimize finances, address estate planning and ensure that personal digital assets are preserved for future generations. “Prepare a statement of net worth,” says Brad Griffin, senior vice president and location manager for Arvest Asset Management. “Simply list your assets – home, 401(k) balance, IRAs, bank accounts, life insurance – and your liabilities – mortgage, auto loans, credit card debt. This will provide you with a base line of net worth on which to build.” Goal-setting and budget preparation are crucial, says Griffin. Pay yourself first with a savings goal of, for example, three to five percent of your pay. Contribute up to the matching amount in your company’s 401(k) or 403(b) plan or set up an Individual Retirement Account. In preparing the year’s budget, your bank’s online system and your credit card company’s year-end summaries provide useful information to consider for spending/saving goals. After reviewing, differentiate between wants and needs, thus overcoming tendencies to overspend.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Pay down credit card debt, setting a goal to pay more than the minimum amount each month. Once armed with information, rebalance your investment portfolio, as some asset classes may have performed better than others in the past year, says Griffin. This is especially helpful considering changes coming in estate taxes in 2015. “The tax-free amount, by which you can give away money during your life or after your death while avoiding the incurrence of death or gift taxes, is going up as of Jan. 1, 2015,” says Gale Allison of The Allison Firm, PLLC. “The amount will be $5,430,000 – which is an increase of $90,000. The tax rate of 40 percent is staying the same, so every dollar owned above that amount is taxed at 40 percent.” Allison points out that while the majority of folks do not have to worry about death taxes if their estate isn’t in the millions of dollars, they often erroneously think they don’t need estate planning. “Estate planning is more important than ever as income tax laws have been made more draconian,” she says. “Most American

households have an IRA or 401(k), and poor planning on these can cause the benefits to be subject to early taxation for failure to plan on state and federal taxes often exceeding 40 percent. In addition, failure to plan often means they will not avoid an expensive trip to probate court.” An attorney can do death tax planning through a living revocable trust or a will, says Allison. Properly drafted and funded, living trusts avoid the probate court procedure. “There is a myth that living trusts are for the uber-wealthy and involve serious tax planning,” she says. “There is no difference at death in what you can do in a will versus what you can do in a living trust with the big exception that passing your property by [a] will means your estate will for sure go to probate court. But if you pass your property on via a living trust, you generally avoid the public and expensive probate procedure.” Ever wonder what would happen, upon your passing, to your online finances, photographs, videos, music and other items across various platforms and social media? “People need to get their digital assets in order as this has become a serious estate planning issue,” says Allison. “Track all passwords and logins and gather all such information for inclusion in wills, living trusts and powers of attorney.” Do a digital inventory – including important items on phones, thumb drives, backup drives, computers, etc, Allison says. Many digital assets are not transferable upon death including iTunes music and e-books. By appointing a digital executor in your will or living trust and arming them with the essential data of passwords, you authorize them to take legal possession of transferable digital assets. Doing so can help prevent, for example, continual social media updates after a person is deceased. With planning and savvy, one can rest assured their financial and eventual end-of-life affairs are in order. TRACY LEGRAND


JONATHAN D. ECHOLS**

BENJAMIN P. SISNEY

AMY L. HOWE**

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DAVID W. ECHOLS* M. EILEEN ECHOLS*

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A CONTESTED AND COMPLEX FAMILY LAW FIRM For more than three decades, Echols & Associates has been providing legal advice and representation to clients in contested and complex family law cases in the valuation and division of marital estates, determination of marital and separate property, business valuations, requests for and defense of requests for support alimony, contested child custody and visitation and support, as well as jurisdictional disputes, including international law issues, paternity, guardianship, probate and domestic violence. The firm’s outstanding work has been recognized for many years by Martindale-Hubbell®’s Bar Register of Preeminent Lawyers, peer rated for both legal ability and adherence to the highest professional standards. The firm was selected as The Best of the Best in 2012, 2013 and 2014 by readers of Oklahoma Magazine. “We have dedicated ourselves to helping our clients find their future, while honoring their past, through compassionate, knowledgeable and experienced representation in the family courts of Oklahoma,” explains M. Eileen Echols, the firm’s managing attorney and senior litigator. With offices in Oklahoma City, the firm’s seven attorneys provide representation to clients throughout the Oklahoma City metro area and across the state of Oklahoma. “Our attorneys take a unique team approach to the practice of law by working together on cases,” says senior attorney David Echols. “Clients look to our firm for unparalleled quality as well as the personalized attention needed for domestic cases.” This year, the firm celebrates the selection of M. Eileen Echols and David W. Echols to the Oklahoma Super Lawyers list and Jonathan D. Echols and Amy L. Howe to the Oklahoma Rising Stars list.

M. Eileen Echols is a former family law judge, twice named “Outstanding Family Law Judge” for the state of Oklahoma by the Oklahoma Bar Association’s family law section. She is a former adjunct law professor and is a frequent lecturer on the topic of family law. David W. Echols is a fellow in the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and has been an AV-rated attorney by Martindale-Hubbell for more than 20 years. Along with Eileen, he has been selected to the Super Lawyers list multiple times and has been Chair of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s Family Law Section. He is an adjunct law professor and frequently lectures on the topic of family law to Oklahoma lawyers. Jonathan D. Echols graduated first in his law school class at OCU. He has been selected to the Rising Stars list since 2011 and, along with the other lawyers of Echols & Associates, concentrates his practice on contested, complex family law issues. Amy L. Howe has been selected by her peers to the Rising Stars list since 2013. In 2014, she was named to The National Trial Lawyers “Top 40 Under 40,” and the National Academy of Family Law Attorneys “Top 10 Under 40.” She also focuses her practice on contested, complex family law issues. Completing the team are these distinguished attorneys: Lindsey W. Andrews, recipient of the 2013 The Journal Record Leadership in Law Award from the Oklahoma County Bar Association. Benjamin P. Sisney who, prior to joining the firm, clerked for United States District Judge Gregory K. Frizzell in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Ashley D. Rahill (not pictured) is the newest attorney to join our firm. She was a recipient of the Oklahoma Bar Association’s President’s Award in 2012, and graduated from the OBA’s Leadership Academy in 2014.

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echolslawfirm.com Reprinted from the special advertising section in the November 2014 issue of Oklahoma magazine and the Oklahoma 2014 issue of Super Lawyers Magazine. © 2014 Super Lawyers, part of Thomson Reuters. All rights reserved.


The State

SCENE

Mary Shaw received the Charles Chibitty Family Community Contributor Award from Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission Chairman Robert Anquoe during the Dream Keepers 2014 awards banquet.

Russ Florence, Emily Dukes, Steadman Upham and Jayme Cox attended the Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice’s annual awards dinner, which honor Upham.

Sheldon Berger, Molly Berger, Jay Black and Julie Black attended the kickoff party for 2015 Winterset, which will be held Feb. 21.

Kristin Dickerson, Isaac and Taylor Hanson, Tom Gilbert and Nicole Burgin enjoyed the suds at the 10th annual First Draft fundraiser for the Tulsa Press Club.

Oklahoma Heart Institute cardiologist Dr. Kamran Muhammad met with transaortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients Carole Finnell, John Seratt and Jim Meehan at the OHI 100th TAVR Celebration.

Myra Kaiser, Terri Higgs, Christy Fell and Glacier Confection owner Bill Copeland prepare for the 20th annual Champagne & Chocolate Fundraiser on Dec. 4 for Living Arts of Tulsa.

Tom Allen, Meg Haizlip and A.L. Haizlip attended the induction ceremony of the Oklahoma chapter of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame.

Carlos and Claudia Martinez and Marian and Max Vowel enjoyed the 24th annual Hispanic American Foundation Gala & Auction at Southern Hills Country Club.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Marla Carter and April Hill enjoyed Uncorking the Cure, a fundraiser for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Johnny Clark, Karen Clark and Lucy Willis enjoyed an event at Southern Hills Country Club to benefit Tulsa Boys Home.

Jen Alden, Jonna Baker, Lauren Harned and Camille Nassar were chairs of Tulsa’s Young Professionals Next/Now Art Fashion Show.

Cal McKee, Michael Graves, Kathie Coyle and Nevyle Cable were honored as 2014 Distinguished Alumni by The University of Tulsa Alumni Association during TU’s Homecoming Week.


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The State

SP OTLIGHT

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Hundreds of people who work within the oil and gas industry gathered in Oklahoma City recently for the second annual Midcontinent Oil & Gas Awards. Winners were recognized for their innovations and advancements in the oil and gas industry.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014


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The State

THE LIVING AREA OF THIS HEIRLOOM HOME IS A MIXTURE OF OLD AND NEW FURNISHINGS AND FINISHINGS. LEFT: THE FOCAL POINT OF THE HOME’S ENTRY IS THE CHANDELIER, DESIGNED BY BARAN BAYLAR AND COMPOSED OF HIGHLY POLISHED, NICKEL-PLATED CHAINS.

L I V I N G S PA C E

Heirloom Qualities Fresh design blends with family treasures in a home three generations in the making.

W

Photography by David Cobb

hen Corbin See, his wife Sarah and brother Ross began a residential design for a new client, it was like “a changing of the guard.” Their client was the granddaughter of the home’s original owner, and their father – Carson See, founder of Sees Design in Oklahoma City – created the home’s original design more than 30 years ago. “Our firm has worked with three generations of this family, from our client along with her husband, her parents and aunt plus her grandfather,” says Corbin See. “But the history of this home made this project especially sentimental.” Well-known local architect Raymond Carter designed the sprawling, 4,500-square-foot Oklahoma City residence in 1978.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014


DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

“Our goal was to honor the tradition of the house, but modernize it,” says See. Walls were moved, closets were transformed into bathrooms and the original kitchen was gutted. The entry maintains the original red marble flooring with a travertine inset but is accented with a custom hairon-hide area rug. The black leather chairs are from an Italian company that acquires vintage frames, then burns and chars them, giving each chair its own unique look. Juxtaposed between the two traditional chairs hangs Hudson Furniture designer Baran Baylar’s classic Mother chandelier, made of yards of highly polished, jewelry-quality, nickel-plated chains draped from laser cut bands. The adjacent living room features paneled walls painted soft white. The original wood flooring was refinished, and a custom wool and viscose area rug provides a subtle foundation for the various seating areas throughout the room. “The couple was respectful of the original, traditional styling but wanted a more transitional feel, mixing the old and new,” says See. “The husband is interested in and very knowledgeable about quality design and took a hands-on approach as we worked through the project.” A new, custom cast-carved mantle was designed to appear vintage. Adjacent is a one-legged, cast iron ball-and-claw foot console. Above is a new mirror constructed from pieces of vintage mirrors. Many of the upholstered pieces are from Sees Design’s sophisticated 1818 handcrafted furniture line available exclusively through David Southerland Showroom in Dallas, including the sofa across from the fireplace. The floor lamp behind the sofa is wrapped in a bronzed octopus tentacle. Above is one of a pair of French chandeliers dating to the 1940s and constructed of painted steel. The tall armoire featured in the room belonged to the client’s grandfather and was retained from the original design. Nearby is another exquisite piece from the original home design – an antique eightpanel Chinese Coromandel screen. The table in front of it is wrapped with goatskin parchment and coated in resin, while the side chairs are wrapped in python skin and have woven leather seats. So the couple can host larger groups to watch televised events, a large flat screen television was recessed into the wall and is hidden when not in use. Above the buffet console is a hummingbird tapestry from the Alexander McQueen collection for The Rug Company that can be pulled to the side. The luxurious chaise is from the 1818 collection, while the cloverleaf ottoman was

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

A HUMMINGBIRD TAPESTRY FROM THE ALEXANDER MCQUEEN COLLECTION FOR THE RUG COMPANY HIDES A RECESSED FLAT SCREEN TELEVISION. BELOW: A ROCK AND LEADED CRYSTAL CHANDELIER HANGS ABOVE THE CUSTOM FABRICATED DINING ROOM TABLE.


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The State

custom designed for the space and subsequently added to the Sees’ furniture line. The blue rope-wrapped sculptural piece is by French artist Christian Astuguevieille. The door hardware is cast bronze by Rock Mountain Hardware from Designer Hardware by Faye in Oklahoma City. “We worked closely with the design team to provide all the plumbing fixtures and hardware throughout the house,” says store owner Garvin Boyd. The dining room is decidedly more feminine. The custom fabricated white-stained table seats 10 when the leaf is added. The room is accented with a rockand-leaded-crystal chandelier, a Shelley Horton-Trippe painting and a pedestal with a candelabra appliquéd with small seashells. “The new owners wanted to make this house their own but approached it as though it was a family heirloom,” says See. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

THE EIGHT-PANEL CHINESE COROMANDEL SCREEN HAS BEEN A FIXTURE IN THE HOME FOR THREE GENERATIONS. BELOW: THE CHAISE LOUNGE IS A DESIGN FROM SEE’S 1818 COLLECTION, AND THE CLOVERLEAF OTTOMAN WAS CUSTOM DESIGNED FOR THE SPACE.


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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

RAQUEL ALLEGRA MAXI DRESS, $490, ABERSONS. MANOLO BLAHNIK LACE PUMPS WITH JEWEL EMBELLISHMENT, $1,025, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG LEATHER ENVELOPE CLUTCH, $185.50, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ALEXIS BITTAR LIQUID CRYSTAL DELICATE STATION NECKLACE, $175, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE STATION NECKLACE, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

RALPH LAUREN SILK VNECK DRESS, $1,995, ABERSONS. MANOLO BLAHNIK STRAPPY HIGH HEEL SANDALS, $1,125, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL BANGLE BRACELET, $325, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. MAX MARA CLUTCH, $495, ABERSONS. DANA KELLIN PRECIOUS STONE NECKLACE, $2,125, ABERSONS.

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN.

The State

STYLE


DIANE VON FURSTENBERG HALTER BLOUSE, $268, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. KARINA GRIMALDI BEADED TANK, $262, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. PARKER METALLIC SILK HALTER TOP, $198, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. BAILEY 44 BLOUSE WITH JEWELED COLLAR, $196, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. AKRIS PUNTO BEADED BLOUSE, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

RACHEL ZOE COCKTAIL DRESS WITH LACE SLEEVES, $240, NATIVE. JIMMY CHOO BACKLESS GLITTER PLATFORMS, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. REBECCA MINKOFF STUDDED CROSSBODY BAG, $245, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALICE + OLIVIA FLORAL V-NECK PARTY DRESS, $368, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. JIMMY CHOO GOLD GLITTER PLATFORMS, $850, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. MARC BY MARC JACOBS LEATHER CROSS-BODY BAG, $398, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. RACHEL ZOE TASSEL NECKLACE, $220, NATIVE.

JOSEPH RIBKOFF SHEER BLACK POLKA DOT COCKTAIL DRESS, $271, DONNA’S FASHIONS. MANOLO BLAHNIK PRINT SUEDE PUMPS, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE LINK NECKLACE, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALICE + OLIVIA CUT-OUT BACK COCKTAIL DRESS, $597, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. JIMMY CHOO SUEDE AND LEATHER ANKLE BOOTS, $995, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. JIMMY CHOO GLITTER CLUTCH, $1,195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE AND CRYSTAL CUFF BRACELET, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE AND CRYSTAL BIB NECKLACE, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Merry And Bright

The State

ACCESSORIZE

Tart up any holiday outfit with a little glitter and glam. 1 2

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

PUMP, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 12. 9 ALEXIS BITTAR DECO LUCITE AND CRYSTAL BANGLE BRACELET, $375, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 13. YVES SAINT LAURENT ROUGE PUR COUTURE, $35, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 14. TORY BURCH METALLIC WRISTLETS, 10 $155 EACH, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 15. MANOLO BLAHNIK SATIN PUMPS WITH JEWEL EMBELLISHMENTS, $965, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 16. RACHEL ZOE ONYX TASSEL BRACELET, $286, NATIVE. 17. JIMMY CHOO STUDDED PUMPS, $995, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 18. YVES SAINT LAURENT GLOSS VOLUPTE, $32, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 19. ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE AND CRYSTAL COCKTAIL RING, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 20. ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE AND STONE BROOCH, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN.

8 1. BAJRA 13 SHAWL, $325, SAKS 11 FIFTH AVENUE. 2. YVES SAINT LAURENT NAIL POLISH, $27,SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 3. YVES SAINT LAURENT PALETTE, $95, SAKS 12 FIFTH AVENUE. 4. JIMMY CHOO POINTED-TOE GLITTER FLATS, $550, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 5. LOEFFLER RANDALL MIXED MEDIA CLUTCH, $275, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 6. ALEXIS BITTAR LIQUID CRYSTAL BROKEN GLASS HINGED BRACELET, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 7. JIMMY CHOO METALLIC PUMPS, $750, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 8. ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL COLLAR NECKLACE, $475, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 9. YVES SAINT LAURENT NAIL POLISH, $27, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. 10. RENE ESCOBAR EARRINGS, $1,375, ABERSONS. 11. JIMMY CHOO BLACK LACE AND PATENT LEATHER


INTERIOR DESIGN


The State

HOT OR COLD?

YO U R H E A L T H

P

Risk vs. Benefit

rostate screenings have become a controversial topic, says Dr. Brad Burget of INTEGRIS Family Care Central in Oklahoma City. “Several important groups no longer whole-heartedly endorse routine prostate cancer screenings,” he says. According to the American Urological Association (AUA), the greatest beneficiaries of prostate cancer screenings are men ages 55 to 69. “Those (patients) are strongly recommended to engage in a shared decision-making process with their physician,” Burget adds. The AUA recommends the same discussion for men younger than age 55 with a first-degree relative with prostate cancer and men of African-American descent. “Much of care today is shifting away from a paternalistic practice of medicine to a more patient-centered practice, which involves both the patient and the physician in the decision making process,” says Burget. The new guidelines stem from a belief that the potential harms (such as urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction) of certain prostate cancer screening methods may outweigh their potential benefits, Burget says. The shift in thinking, however, does not mean men with symptoms of or at high risk for prostate cancer should stop consulting a doctor. Symptoms of prostate cancer include decreased urinary stream, increased frequency of urination, inability to fully void, lower back pain and sexual dysfunction. “If a man is having symptoms, he should discuss them with his health care provider,” advises Burget. LINDSAY CUOMO

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

If you always feel hot or cold, there could be a number of medical reasons why, says Andrea Dryden, APRN-C, at St. John Health System’s BlueStem Cardiology in Bartlesville. “If the patient has had these symptoms long-term, it is possible that the patient is cold or hot natured,” says Dryden. “It is important to rule out any disease that may affect the body’s natural ability to regulate temperature.” And that’s worth a discussion with a doctor. “Chronic or ongoing complaints of feeling cold could be a result of a rheumatologic issue or chronic inflammation,” says Dryden. If your cooler body temperature is a recent concern and paired with weight changes, fever, tachycardia, pain, constipation, dry skin or irritability, the culprit could be a thyroid, hormone or even steroid disturbance, says Dryden. On the flip side, feeling hot is frequently associated with hormonal imbalance or rheumatologic disorders, she adds. Feeling hot would warrant quicker medical evaluation, especially with persistent fever, weight loss, night sweats, a rapid pulse or wounds with red streaking away from the injury site, adds Dryden. If the hot or cold feelings are localized to a particular area, it could be a very serious condition or possible infection. “A complaint of a hand, foot, finger or toes feeling cold could be acute arterial occlusion or blood vessel blockage,” cautions Dryden. “This is considered an emergency, and if left untreated, could lead to loss of the area affected.” – LC

THE CARB TRUTH

The popularity of low-carb and no-carb diets such as the South Beach and Atkins diets have given carbohydrates a bad rap. Registered dietician Anna Reinwand of the OSU Medical Center, however, shares the truth about carbs. “Carbohydrates are not bad for you,” explains Reinwand. “Foods containing carbohydrates have been the staple of diets of humans for a very long time. “Foods containing carbohydrates provide fiber, B vitamins, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, magnesium, manganese, chromium, as well as many phytochemicals that can help keep us healthy,” she adds. “For many of these nutrients, carbs are the best way to get them in your diet.” Carbohydrates, along with protein and fats, provide energy. “When you cut out foods with carbs, you are eating fewer calories, and you do lose weight,” says Reinwand. “If you want to lose weight and keep it off, you have to make changes in your life that you’re willing to stick with forever.” She recommends, instead, eating healthy carbs and using the USDA’s Myplate nutrition guide. “Choose healthy carb choices like fruit, vegetables, bread and crackers made from whole wheat flour, whole grain pasta, brown rice or corn tortillas every day,” says Reinwand. “Limit foods made from refined white flour, white rice, pasta and most desserts to once a week or less.” – LC


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To consistently deliver and exceed mutually agreed upon expectations through proper client and candidate communication. Abundant Solutions is a full service staffing company that specializes in Office and Industrial Employees for Temporary, Temporary Abundant Abundant Solutions Solutions isisaafull fullservice service staffi staffing ng company company thatmore specializes in our Office and Industrial Industrial Employees for forTemporary, Temporary,matches, Temporary Temporary to Permanent, and Permanent Placements. respond rapidly to customers’ needsEmployees with the best employee Abundant Solutions is a full service staffing We company thatmore specializes in our Office and Industrial Employees foremployee Temporary, Temporary to to Permanent, Permanent, and and Permanent Permanent Placements. Placements. We We respond respond rapidly to customers’ customers’ needs needs with with the the best best employee matches, matches, because we are passionately committed to being the best. to Permanent, and Permanentcommitted Placements. We respond more rapidly to our customers’ needs with the best employee matches, because because we weare are passionately passionately committed to to being being the the best. because we are passionately committed to being the best. Abundant Solutions understands that the right employee can make or break the success of your business. Finding the right Abundant AbundantSolutions Solutions understands understands that that the the right right employee employee canbut make break the success success of of your yourresources. business. business.Finding Findingwhere the theright right individual with the right skill set is critical to your company canor also dwindle your internal That’s Abundant Abundant Solutions understands that the right employee canbut make or break the success of yourresources. business.That’s Finding the right individual individual with with the the right right skill skill set set is is critical critical to to your your company company can also dwindle your your internal internal resources. That’s where where Abundant Abundant Solutions can help. We have Specialized Recruiting Services that are focused on connecting you with the right people to meet the individual with the right skill set is critical to your company but can also dwindle your internal resources. That’s where Abundant Solutions Solutions can can help. help. We We have have Specialized Specialized Recruiting Recruiting Services that are focused on connecting connecting you you with with the the right right people people to to meet meetthe the unique needs yourWe company. Solutions can of help. have Specialized Recruiting Services that are focused on connecting you with the right people to meet the unique uniqueneeds needs of ofyour yourcompany. company. unique needs of your company.

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The State

D E S T I N AT I O N

The HighLow Season

ENJOY THE SKI TERRAIN BY DAY, BUT REST THOSE WEARY BONES IN SALT LAKE CITY AT NIGHT.

PHOTOS COURTESY VISIT SALT LAKE.

Salt Lake City is a snow lover’s paradise at every altitude.

S

ome people look forward to the transition from balmy summer afternoons to chilly autumn evenings to bright, frosty winter mornings. They are called skiers, and like snow boarders, ice skaters and sled riders, the best days of the year are back. Even better, one of the best places in the world for snow sports is in the easily accessible Salt Lake City, Utah. As host of the 2002 Winter Olympics, the city went all out to create a state-of-the-art destination for serious athletes as well as recreationalists. The result is the happy winter playground that envelops the city as well as the region surrounding it. With mountains a mere 30 minutes away, Salt Lake City entices visitors to play hard on the slopes but come back at night for fine dining, nightlife and luxurious, affordable accommodations. It isn’t unusual to see people toting skis all around town. Solitude Mountain Resort The Wasatch and Oquirrh mountain ranges of the Rocky Mountains form a dramatic winter backdrop to Salt Lake City. They also create some of the best locations for skiing. Access via Solitude Mountain Resort gets skiers to the top, where they can survey more than 1,200 acres of skiable terrain. The resort also offers the Nordic Cen

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

ter, with trails for Nordic cross-country skiing. Of course, a place named Solitude also has its share of breathtaking landscapes to take in for contemplation. www.skisolitude.com Alta Ski Area One of the oldest ski resorts in the country, Alta has good snow – dry and powdery and plenty of it. Boasting steep pitches with charming names like Eddie’s High Nowhere, Baldy Chutes and Stone Crusher, Alta is a favorite for its challenge to skiers, which is a good thing because it is strictly “skiers only.” The policy isn’t popular with snowboarders, but the rule remains unchanged thus far. If you want to go where the locals are, this is it. www.alta.com Gallivan Center Skiing and snowboarding aren’t the only winter games in town. The Gallivan Center is an urban sanctuary in downtown Salt Lake City boasting the Valda E. Tarbet Gallivan Center Ice Rink. The open-air attraction brings out aspiring figure skaters, families, couples and individuals keeping a tradition alive and buzzing. www.thegallivancenter.com

AT A G L A N C E

Access: Arrive by Salt Lake City International Airport. Public transportation includes bus, light rail, commuter rail, taxi cabs. Utah Transit Authority operates a network (including a ski-bus service) between the city and resorts at Snowbird, Brighton, Alta and Solitude. Climate: Average temperature for the city in December and January is about 30 degrees (differs at higher elevations). Main Attractions: Great Salt Lake, Temple Square, Olympic Cauldron Park, mountains.


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ears in Tulsa 15 Y E S T. 1999

THE VALUE OF AN

OSU EDUCATION Oklahoma State University alumni Jack Allen, chairman of HUB International CFR, and Dave Kollmann, division president for Flintco, know the value of an OSU degree. That’s why they are leading an effort to ensure future students benefit from an OSU education as co-chairs of A Stately Affair in Tulsa on May 18, 2015. The black-tie event raises funds to support student scholarships at OSU-Tulsa and OSU Center for Health Sciences. Jack Allen (co-chair), Howard Barnett, OSU-Tulsa president, Kayse Shrum, D.O., OSU Center for Health Sciences president and Dave Kollmann (co-chair) will host A Stately Affair in Tulsa.

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DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

S TAY I N S T Y L E Grand America Hotel: Superlative luxury is found in the heart of downtown Salt Lake City. The Grand American Hotel was built in 2001 with one important consideration in mind – it’s within easy walking distance of restaurants, nightlife and cultural attractions and less than an hour’s drive from some of the state’s best ski resorts. At this 5-diamond hotel, convenience ranks right up there with comfort. Plus, the views are unrivaled. www. grandamerica.com Hotel Monaco: Upbeat, trendy and playful, Hotel Monaco in Salt Lake City brings a refreshing approach to elegance that isn’t stodgy. Located on Main Street, this star of the Kimpton Hotel group brings contemporary design to a historic building. If a stylish boutique hotel is on the checklist, this favorite is a must. www.monaco-saltlakecity.com Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort Variety is what Snowbird is all about. In the summer, the resort and Snowbird community make the most of the altitude with slides, fishing, horseback riding and aerial tram rides with majestic views. But Snowbird made its name in the winter, and the lodge in Little Cottonwood Canyon makes the most of its proximity to Salt Lake City and a partnership with neighboring Alta Ski Area – skiers can purchase joint season tickets and day passes for access to more than 20 ski lifts and a combined 4,700 acres of terrain for sking and more. www. snowbird.com Utah Olympic Oval Utah Olympic Oval is called the “fastest ice on Earth” because more than 100 world re-

THE GRAND AMERICAN HOTEL IS PRIMED TO OFFER THE BEST OF SALT LAKE CITY. PHOTO COURTESY GRAND AMERICAN HOTEL.

cords have been set in speed skating, including several during the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The Oval continues to welcome the best in speed skating to Salt Lake City as it provides the training ground for future figure skating, speed skating and hockey champions. It’s also home to the U.S. Olympic speed skating team and the North Utah Grizzlies special needs hockey team. www.utaholympiclegacy.com Brighton Ski Resort Receiving an average of more than 500 inches of snow a year, Brighton Ski Resort is a favorite for families. Many locals learned to ski at Brighton, and its no-frills, no-nonsense

environ makes it affordable to those who want to put in some serious time on the slopes. Brighton is located on the public lands within the Wasatch-Casche National Forest, and night skiing is available in certain locations. www.brightonresort.com KAREN SHADE

VISIT ONLINE www.visitsaltlake.com

T R AV E L E R ’ S N O T E S IN TOWN

Local Brews: It’s been said many times: Salt Lake City is rarely the first town to come to mind when considering breweries and pubs. Yet, the city has relaxed its restrictive laws regarding alcohol sales and cut out the mandatory “membership fees” required for service at local bars. Local brewery Red Rock Brewing Company (www. redrockbrewing.com) started in 1994 and continues to create award-winning craft beers, served at three brewpub locations. It’s not alone – Squatters

46

Craft Beers pours a dozen of its specialty concoctions at its three Salt Lake City-area brewpub locations (www.squatters. com), while Epic Brewery, the newest hop-master in town, offers samples of its prized beers in its Tap-Less Tap Room with food orders (www.epicbrewing. com). Best of Burgers: When you’ve just finished a downhill run at more than 30 miles per hour, the last thing you want is a salad. Porcupine Pub & Grille’s Big Cottonwood Burger is a whole 1/3-pound beef patty

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

loaded with bacon-sauteed mushrooms, herbed aioli and barbecue sauce, cheddar, swiss and fresh sliced veggies on a sourdough bun. Served with steak fries and a glass of froth-topped brew made locally, it’s just plain awesome (www. porcupinepub.com).

Lucky 13, however, has an undisputed heavyweight with its Big Benny, a sloppy-good gourmet behemoth stacked with housesmoke bacon, caramelized onion, cheeses and Lucky 13 sauce on 28 ounces of beef. Benny is a freshground dream measuring one foot in height (www.lucky13slc.com).


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GREAT

COMPA TO WORK LARGE AND SMALL, PUBLICLY TRADED OR PRIVATELY HELD, OKLAHOMA’S GOT THEM ALL.

Great companies are all around this state. Lots of them – both large and small – offer attractive incentives, benefits and bonuses to attract the best and brightest minds and bodies. Every employee has his or her idea of what makes a great company; no two lists are going to be the same. Likewise, companies operate in different, unique corporate structures – some answer to shareholders, others to boards of directors. Still others answer to no one but themselves; the overwhelming majority of companies in Oklahoma are small, locally owned businesses. Because of this apples-to-oranges scenario, organizations listed on Great Companies To Work For are evaluated in different ways. But from the smallest company on the list this year – Principal Technologies, a professional recruiting firm that employs 18 – to the largest – the University of Oklahoma in Norman, one of the largest employers in the state – each company offers great benefits and an exciting work environment for its employees. By no means is this a comprehensive list. We seek to spotlight a select few that are providing a great environment for their employees. In this fourth annual installment, we spotlight 45 companies representing 16 sectors – everything from aerospace and energy to transportation and tribal enterprise – that employ more than 84,000 people in Oklahoma. Oklahoma is a great place to live, work and play, and every day more people are taking notice and headed to the Sooner State. – Jami Mattox

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Insurance • Professional Engineering • Higher Educ terprise • Banking and Fina fessional Sports Team • Ene Education • Aerospace • Tr Finance • Construction • La Energy • Manufacturing • T


ANIES FOR

Sports Team • Energy • Manufacturing • Tribal Enterprise • Banking and Finance • Construction cation • Aerospace • Transportation • Insurance • Professional Sports Team • Energy • Manufactur ance • Construction • Law Firm • Engineering • Higher Education • Aerospace • Transportation • ergy • Manufacturing • Tribal Enterprise • Banking and Finance • Construction • Law Firm • Eng ransportation • Insurance • Professional Sports Team • Energy • Manufacturing • Tribal Enterprise aw Firm • Engineering • Higher Education • Aerospace • Transportation • Insurance • Professiona Tribal Enterprise • Banking and Finance • Construction • Law Firm • Engineering • Higher Educa

DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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BUILDING

GOOD BUSINESS BOK FINANCIAL CEO STEVE BRADSHAW DISCUSSES HOW HE BUILDS A GREAT COMPANY FOR EMPLOYEES.

Steve Bradshaw is president and CEO of BOK Financial Corporation. Based in Tulsa, BOK Financial provides commercial and consumer banking, investment and trust services, mortgage origination and servicing and the TransFund electronic funds transfer network. He took the position in January. Bradshaw joined BOK Financial in 1991 and became president of BancOklahoma Investment Center and BOSC Inc. He then served as senior vice president/private financial services manager responsible for a sales, marketing, and support unit comprised of private banking, personal trust and estates, retail brokerage, insurance services, fiduciary

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

tax, real estate and minerals management. Bradshaw earned his bachelor’s degree in business finance from the University of Central Oklahoma and graduated with distinction from the Southwestern Graduate School of Banking at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. Bradshaw currently serves on the board of the Tulsa Regional Chamber and is former chairman of Visit Tulsa, the chamber’s convention and visitor’s bureau. Bradshaw is a past board member of the Tulsa Community Foundation, Tulsa River Parks Authority, the Metropolitan Tulsa Urban League, YWCA Tulsa, Tulsa Habitat for Humanity,


STEVE BRADSHAW IS CEO OF BOK FINANCIAL, A POSITION HE ASSUMED IN JANUARY. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCOTT MILLER.

DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Domestic Violence Intervention Services and Junior Achievement of Oklahoma. What makes Bank of Oklahoma a great place to work? Our people. Every company says they have the best people, but we really do. Our business strategy relies heavily on teamwork and collaboration, and to do those well you have to have the best talent. We attract people who like to come together to solve problems and provide solutions for customers. Accomplishing goals as a team and enjoying the people you work with every day results in a very engaged and forward thinking workforce. What are examples of programs and incentives that employees at BOK are offered? We have employee development programs at virtually every level of the company. It starts with an expectation for managers to identify development opportunities jointly with their employees and commit to a plan of action to accomplish it. We want to see employees competing effectively for more responsibility and moving easily between departments and even geography. Some of our most successful programs bring groups of employees with diverse backgrounds together to work on a large corporate project. These could include improving aspects of the company and the work environment, invigorating an existing business or product, compelling the creation of a new business or product or providing feedback to executive management on priorities within the company. We encourage open dialogue, which translates into action and accountability. We encourage our employees to actively participate in the community, and I think that’s something that makes us stand out. It’s a selling point for our recruiters as they talk to potential new hires, and something our current employees feel pride and fulfillment in. How have BOK employees made the most of the encouragement and these programs? There are so many great examples of employees who’ve worked for the company a long time and have made good careers for themselves, and who have made positive impacts for the company. We have a very successful management training program for new college graduates called Accelerated Career Track (ACT). It’s a great way to engage new employees in our organization, give them broad experience across the company and then place them in positions that best fit their abilities and potential career path. There are a number of examples of ACT grads moving up and around in the company. For example, our OKC bank CEO, Marc Maun, is an ACT graduate who started in Tulsa

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

THE CORPORATE CULTURE OF BANK OF OKLAHOMA IS ONE OF HIGH QUALITY, ENCOURAGEMENT AND TRADITION. PHOTO BY SHANE BEVEL.

and has held a number of roles over the years in Tulsa, Kansas City and now Oklahoma City. Mickey Coats heads up energy banking for the corporation, and he’s an ACT grad. And the list goes on and on. I think the ability to move up and around within the company is a very compelling benefit we offer our employees. I joined the bank in 1991 when it purchased my small investment firm. At that time, Scott Grauer, who today leads all our wealth management business, worked for me and came to BOK Financial with me. Today I’m in my role, and he’s on the executive leadership team. That’s the kind of opportunity you find here at BOK Financial. What is most important in promoting a positive corporate culture? A positive attitude. It’s important that we never lose sight of our obligations to customers and the desire to fulfill their expectations. I enjoy celebrating the many successes our employees have every day in delighting customers, both internally and externally. It’s the best part of my job. How would you characterize your own management style? It’s hard to attribute a style to yourself; that’s probably a better question for others. I’m a positive, forward-thinking person. It’s important to have a leadership team that is diverse in terms of style and thought process. It’s my job to make sure that the team collaborates well and produces optimal results. And then stay out of the way when they do. What advice would you give to someone who is beginning to climb the ladder in corporate management? Take some risk. Don’t predispose your career path. No career progresses at the exact pace and direction that one anticipates. When you see an opportunity to learn something new and improve results, jump on it. Otherwise, you will limit your potential and value to yourself and your company.  In what ways do you encourage communication between employees and managers in such a large corporation? I try to set a strong example. It starts with clear communication around goals and vision with my direct reports and setting expectation or how we will work together, solve problems and make decisions. Then working to cascade those goals and vision to our nearly 5,000 employees. We try many different ways to do that, including small employee group meetings, large scale regional meetings, videos, emails and more. Effectively communicating who we are, what our values and priorities are and what needs to be accomplished to continue to improve and enhance the workplace for employees is critical to keeping and attracting the best talent, which we strongly believe we have at our company today. JAMI MATTOX


OU - Oklahoma’s Leader in Excellence

OU ranks No. 1 in the nation among all public universities in the total number of National Merit w Scholars, with more than 750 National Merit Scholars enrolled. This year, OU has the largest number of freshman National Merit Scholars ever enrolled at OU w with 311 freshman Scholars. OU’s freshman class is the academically highest ranked in OU history and in state history at a w public university with an average 26.4 ACT for incoming freshmen.

w OU’s freshman class is the largest in OU history, with more than 4,175 students. w At a ceremony in May at the White House, the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Service, the nation’s highest honor given to libraries and museums for service to the community.

w and fees nationwide at a statewide public university, according to a College Board report. The Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education at OU has announced a new Debt Forgiveness w Program. This innovative new initiative for debt-free teachers will help keep talented, newly graduated teachers in Oklahoma.

OU is the only Big 12 university to be selected as having one of America’s 25 most beautiful w campuses. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


A Sample of

Great Companies To Work For

American Fidelity Assurance Company Oklahoma City Insurance EMPLOYEES (OK): 1,100 HIRING IN 2015? Yes AFA strives to be an employer of choice for our colleagues. AFA works to create a collaborative, team-oriented environment where all colleagues have access to the executive team and can share their ideas for improving the company. AFA provides a competitive total compensation package with incentives, benefits, pension and 401(k) in addition to on-site perks such as a gym, grill, bank and medical clinic.

ARINC Aerospace

STATE OF THE

YOUNG

EXCELLENT JOB OPPORTUNITIES GROW INTO

OTHER PROSPECTS FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

F

IN THE STATE’S METRO AREAS.

orbes recently named Oklahoma City as one of America’s best cities for young professionals due to the city’s growth and opportunities. What specifically attracts and retains these workers to the state? Public Information Officer of the Depart-

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

ment of Commerce Don Hackler says he believes Oklahoma’s healthy economics attract and keep young professionals. “Our strong economy and employment opportunities keep people here. Jobs are first; they are key,” Hackler says. The fields of aerospace and energy seem to

Oklahoma City Aerospace EMPLOYEES (OK): 195 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Any employee throughout the organization can walk into an office of our management team and discuss comments, issues or concerns. Suggestion boxes are also located throughout our facilities to encourage employees to voice their thoughts and opinions about improving a specific process or procedure. In every organization, employees are the biggest asset, and ARINC believes that when an individual feels like they can be heard, it speaks volumes of the culture of the company.

The Bama Companies Tulsa Manufacturing EMPLOYEES (OK): 850 Each Bama facility has a fitness center and group classes available – from yoga, cardio, strength training and even marathon/5k training support. Each team member takes a class during orientation on EQ - Emotional Quotient. At Bama we believe that respect, kindness and trust are just as important as technical knowhow. More than one-third of our team members have been here over 20 years. We call them the Circle of Excellence and they are the backbone of the Bama culture.


Bank of Oklahoma

MEMBERS OF TYPROS RECENTLY TOOK PART IN THE ORGANIZATION’S ANNUAL BOOMTOWN AWARDS.

Tulsa Banking and Finance EMPLOYEES (OK): 2,961 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Bank of Oklahoma is in the relationship business, and that’s key to how the company works with clients and with each other. It’s why BOK has great teamwork and can come together to develop the best financial solutions for our clients. The organization has a very community-minded culture. Employees are incredibly involved in their communities across Oklahoma.

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA’S YOUNG PROFESSIONALS.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma Tulsa Insurance

1,082 Yes Every Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma (BCBSOK) employee is a member of Blue Corps, an internal program charged with making a positive impact on the community through volunteer events, fund and material drives, and individual engagement in the community. In 2013, employees donated more than 5,400 hours to 83 organizations, an increase of more than 46 percent over the previous year. EMPLOYEES (OK): HIRING IN 2015:

have the most draw, he says. “People are coming from all over the state into cities here because of the attractive wages and benefits these growing industries provide,” Hackler says. “People are going to go where they are paid well and where they can get great benefits.” But these workers are not just coming from around the state. “If you drive around Oklahoma City or Tulsa, you see license plates from all over the U.S. These industries are attracting young people from all over the country,” Hackler says. Shagah Zakerion, executive director of Tulsa’s Young Professionals, says one reason young professionals are attracted to these areas is the quick impact they can have. “Young people can make their mark here faster than they can elsewhere,” Zakerion says. “This is the place to write your story with unrivaled access to leaders and resources.” Drew Dugan, vice president of education and work force development for the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber, adds that in addition to great employers and jobs, which are important, Oklahoma City has enjoyed a recent renaissance while also keeping costs low. “OKC is just a cool place to live these days. With all the amenities from MAPS, central city growth and the [Oklahoma City] Thunder, the city has a cool and hip vibe that we have not had in my lifetime,” Dugan says. “Young professionals are smart and recognize the value of low-cost living. If they can

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Oklahoma City’s top three employers are the State of Oklahoma, Tinker Air Force Base and the University of Oklahoma-Norman. – Greater Oklahoma City Chamber

afford a place that is fun and has everything else, then why go anywhere else?” Dugan generally agrees with Hackler about the types of jobs attracting young professionals’ attention. “There is demand for young workers in all areas, ranging from engineers and tech workers to bio and health workers all the way down to highly skilled trade and industrial workers,” Dugan said. “There is truly opportunity everywhere. However, the highest demand right now is in the engineering and technical fields.” In Tulsa, Zakerion cites aerospace, engineering, advanced manufacturing and

Cameron University Lawton Higher Education EMPLOYEES (OK): 675 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Cameron University, located in Lawton, is an accredited institution that offers degrees in more than 50 programs at the associate, baccalaureate, and master’s degree level. Cameron’s faculty and staff receive numerous benefits, including employer-paid health, life and long-term disability insurance; full employee payment into the Oklahoma Teachers Retirement System; and a generous annual and sick leave policy, including numerous days of holiday pay.

Cardinal Engineering Oklahoma City Engineering Firm EMPLOYEES (OK): 53 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Cardinal Engineering is a consulting engineering firm providing civil, environmental, surveying and GIS services to a diverse client base throughout the Oklahoma region. Cardinal distinguishes itself by leveraging cutting-edge technology and a flat organizational structure to deliver


“Ditch Witch® takes care of all of us. Because it truly takes all of us to get the end product out the door.” -Employee, Ditch Witch Worldwide Headquarters Perry, Oklahoma

WORKING TOGETHER.

“It’s a relationship business.” -Dealer, Ditch Witch of South Louisiana Geismar, Louisiana

SUCCEEDING TOGETHER.

“When you . . . deal with Ditch Witch, it’s more on a personal level. You feel like you’re part of them and they’re part of you.” -Customer, Northwest Line Builders Portland, Oregon 2014

©2014 The Charles Machine Works, Inc.


professional services as growing fields, but adds another aspect. “There is also a growing creative class in our community that provides a rich and diverse culture to Tulsa,” she says. “Unlike cities like Chicago, New York or [Los Angeles], Tulsa is in its growth phase now, and its young people are at the helm of community development. You can be a part of building a city from the ground up here.” Looking long-term, Dugan says because metro areas are growing and changing so much, there are also great leadership prospects in other areas. “It is a place you can not only get involved, but that young professionals can also earn leadership positions in both the professional and volunteer communities. They see themselves as being lucky to be here during the early stages of dramatic community growth. They can easily be the future leaders of business, the arts, religious life or anything they want to be,” Dugan says. He adds that because life isn’t always about leadership roles, and most people prefer to also live in the city where they work, Oklahoma City offers unique types of recreation, such as the Oklahoma River for rowing and the rock-climbing gym. Zakerion adds that Tulsa also offers cultural and professional amenities for all passions. “Whether it is our strong sense of place through venues that foster community like Guthrie Green, or celebrating new music in the historical Cain’s Ballroom downtown, arts abound across the region,” she says. Metropolitan areas of Oklahoma are undeniably growing, but what could be done to further improve the rate of young professionals living and working in Oklahoma? “Our region must continue the momentum towards creating a strong urban core all young professionals can be excited about. Increasing downtown housing and transportation options will propel the Tulsa region forward in its quest to attract young talent,” Zakerion says. “The next generation of Tulsans craves density, walkability and ‘bikeability’ that pulses with energy.” Dugan believes that recruitment must start at younger and younger ages. “I think even more of our employers need to be reaching out to students in Oklahoma and other states,” Dugan says. “And, our employers need to be communicating with college students when they are freshmen and sophomores. In the past, we could wait until they were juniors or seniors but now we must begin to recruit at early ages. It is like an arms race. Companies keep recruiting younger and younger students so we (as cities) need to do that as well.” MEGAN MORGAN

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

high-quality, design, project management services and environmental compliance solutions to its clients. Through its Social Responsibility and Team Cardinal programs, Cardinal places value on healthy, creative and community-minded employees.

The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (Ditch Witch) Perry Manufacturing EMPLOYEES (OK): 1,300 HIRING IN 2015: Yes Ed Malzahn, founder and chairman of the board of Ditch Witch, invented the first mechanized, compact service-line trencher when he was 28 years old. The Ditch Witch trencher was named twice to the “one of the 100 best American-made products in the world” by Fortune magazine.

Cherokee Nation Businesses

ity industries, as well as the health care, government services, manufacturing and broadcast communications industries. Employees of the Chickasaw Nation frequently cite a sense of purpose as one of the significant reasons that the Chickasaw Nation is a great place to work. Everyone who works for the Chickasaw Nation is part of a team with the shared mission of enhancing the overall quality of life of the Chickasaw people. That mission has the desired ripple effect of enhancing the quality of life of all Oklahomans.

Choctaw Nation Durant Tribal Enterprise EMPLOYEES (OK): More than 8,000 (in 2013) HIRING IN 2015: Yes The Choctaw Nation’s industries include gaming, travel plazas, manufacturing and supplies for the federal government and branches of armed services overseas.

Tribal Enterprise Tahlequah EMPLOYEES (OK): More than 9,000 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Recently, employees of the tribe’s businesses donated more than 3,500 school supply items to various schools throughout the Cherokee Nation. Cherokee Nation Businesses was recently recognized by the Oklahoma Blood Institute as Business of the Year and by Volunteer Tulsa as Change Agent of the Year.

ConocoPhillips

Chesapeake Energy

Tulsa Construction EMPLOYEES (OK): 181 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Crossland encourages and develops their employees, offering education opportunities from our nationally accredited education program to help our employees develop their skillsets and rise to the top. Crossland believes in hiring and developing key talent with the majority of our employees being promoted within.

Oklahoma City Energy EMPLOYEES (OK): More than 5,450 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Chesapeake is a learning organization that encourages its employees to pursue career development opportunities. This includes supporting employees interested in higher education training. New in 2014, a tuition reimbursement program now offers eligible employees up to $5,250 per calendar year to pay for courses at accredited colleges or universities. Employees are encouraged to take advantage of this benefit to earn an advanced degree that supports their current position or career growth track.

Chickasaw Nation Ada Tribal Enterprise EMPLOYEES (OK): More than 10,000 HIRING IN 2015? Yes The Chickasaw Nation employs people in the entertainment, tourism and hospital-

Bartlesville Energy EMPLOYEES (OK): 1,840 HIRING IN 2015? Yes At ConocoPhillips, our culture is valuebased; performance- and results-driven; focused and aligned; efficient and nonbureaucratic; empowered and collaborative; inspired and fun.

Crossland Construction

Doerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Norman Law Practice EMPLOYEES (OK): 86 Doerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson represents clients in a variety of areas, including administrative, appellate, arbitration and mediation, bankruptcy and creditors’ rights, construction, environmental, health care, intellectual property, Native American law, tax and transportation law, among others.


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Echols & Associates

KENNY TONG / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Oklahoma City Law Firm EMPLOYEES (OK): 14 (in 2013) AREAS OF SPECIALTY: Family Law – the firm is primarily engaged in contested and complex family law cases, valuation and division of marital estates, determination of marital and separate property, business valuations, requests for and defense of requests for support alimony, contested child custody, visitation and support, jurisdictional disputes, including international law issues, paternity, guardianship, probate and domestic violence.

GREAT EMPLOYEES MAKE GREAT COMPANIES GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY CHAMBER PRESIDENT DISCUSSES WHAT, IN HIS OPINION,

W

MAKES A GREAT COMPANY.

hat makes a great company is different for each person. For some, working for a great company may mean a comprehensive benefits package that provides health care for a family. A generous 401(k) match program could woo others. Paid time off, maternity and paternity leave, telecommuting, a creative work environment and on-site day care and medical clinics go a long way to attracting talented and creative employees. And the desire for an employer to attract the best and brightest is one that can create an employee’s market. “A great company to work for is one that totally embraces the fact that its talent is the most crucial part of its business success,” says Roy Williams, president and CEO of the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber. “That fact then manifests itself in the way the company treats its people. As well, great companies to work for also appreciate and support the communities in which they reside.” Happy employees translate to happy residents, says Williams. “[Happy employees] believe in their community, and they are engaged in facets of it,”

In 2014, CNN Money named Oklahoma City the best city in America to launch a startup company, based on a NerdWallet study.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Flintco Tulsa Construction EMPLOYEES (OK): 295 HIRING IN 2015? Yes At Flintco, the mission is to build more than just buildings; Flintco builds communities and builds leaders. Flintco offers dynamic career paths and training, enabling an employee to learn all aspects of the construction industry to see what role fits them best. As the Flintco ethos states, “I believe mediocrity is unacceptable and that my training is never done...there is no finish line.”

GableGotwals Statewide Law Firm

142 Yes In a recent employee survey, a GableGotwals employee said: “I love that we stop and take the time to bring everyone together to celebrate, whether it be a big Thanksgiving lunch, Christmas presents, Administrative Assistants Week – not day – or a milestone birthday. Plus all the fun contests, such as the Chili Cook Off, Best Homemade Ice Cream Contest and the Board serving us pancakes.” EMPLOYEES (OK): HIRING IN 2015:

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Lawton Manufacturing EMPLOYEES (OK): 2,800 The plant manufactures radial passenger and light truck tires for the original equipment and replacement tire markets. The plant will produce its 600 millionth tire in May 2015.


Proud to be one of Oklahoma's Great Companies to Work For

For 74 years, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma has been there for you, through all of life’s phases. No matter which way life takes a turn, you can always count on us.

bcbsok.com A Division of Health Care Service Corporation, a Mutual Legal Reserve Company, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

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Oklahoma City | Tulsa Atlanta | Dallas | Houston | Naples | Tampa | Washington D.C.

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he says. “So great companies to work for embrace their employees, embrace their community, support community initiatives and create and encourage employees to support their communities as well.” In the most recent job satisfaction survey of The Conference Board, less than half of workers in the U.S. are satisfied with their jobs, a trend that has continued for eight straight years. The large percentage of dissatisfied employees should be a wake-up call for employers as well as community and business leaders. “Employers must continually remember that the talent of today and tomorrow is different than the talent of yesterday,” Williams says. “They have new priorities, new values, and they don’t expect to be a life-long employee.” The so-called Millennial generation is having a significant impact on how employers run business. According to a recent survey conducted by Millennial Branding, a research and management consulting firm, the generation accounts for 36 percent of the American workforce; more than 60 percent of those plan on leaving their company in less than three years. This conundrum causes headaches for companies in terms of recruiting and retention of talented Millennials. “Many companies have different philosophies about how they attract and retain talent,” says Williams. “Some companies strictly use an employee intern program to recruit employees. Some work strictly with employment agencies, others work with education institutions, and others recruit in cities across the country. Basically, they do what works best for them in recruiting the type of talent they need.” Companies are also diverse in how they strategize to retain that talent.

According to Inc. magazine’s 2014 report, 30 of the country’s 5,000 fastest growing private companies are located in Oklahoma.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Hall Estill Statewide Law Firm

224 Yes Hall Estill gives back to the community by supporting the United Way via donations and time volunteering. The firm also has a wellness program for attorneys and staff, including healthy snacks, gym reimbursements, group workout programs and more. EMPLOYEES (OK): HIRING IN 2015:

INTEGRIS Health Oklahoma City Health Care EMPLOYEES (OK): 9,258 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Working in health care is a calling. INTEGRIS employees genuinely care for people, and that is why they do what they do. Many positions require additional and advanced training, working long or odd hours, which means time away from their family and friends. Still, employees are willing to make this sacrifice because they truly believe in the mission to improve the health of the people and communities we serve. When your company is made up of these types of individuals, it is easy to see why this is such a great place to work. Community service is a founding principle of INTEGRIS Health. Each year the organization provides millions of dollars of charity care to patients throughout the state of Oklahoma.

Kimray, Inc. Oklahoma City Manufacturing EMPLOYEES (OK): 671 (in 2013) Kimray is an Oklahoma-based manufacturer of control valves and related equipment for oil- and gas-producing companies worldwide.

Latham, Wagner, Steele & Lehman Tulsa Law Firm

49 Yes Latham, Wagner, Steele & Lehman supports a casual work environment, diverse work force and a family-friendly atmosphere.

EMPLOYEES (OK): HIRING IN 2015?

Manhattan Construction Tulsa Construction EMPLOYEES (OK): 750 HIRING IN 2015: Yes Manhattan Construction is recognized by Engineering News-Record as a top 20 general builder, and in the last three years

has received more than 50 industry honors for quality and safety. Manhattan fosters a culture of bettering self and community. It offers above-average benefits packages for employees and their families and strongly encourages employees to become involved in community activities.

Melton Truck Lines Tulsa Transportation EMPLOYEES (OK): 1,210 HIRING IN 2015: Yes Melton is committed to health for its employees and boasts a state-of-the-art gym with fitness equipment, a ladies-only area and group fitness studio. A free, on-site medical and dental clinic is also available for employees and their families starting the first day of employment. Melton supports several causes in the community and regularly participates in programs that highlight its great drivers and staff.

Mid-America Christian University Oklahoma City Higher Education EMPLOYEES (OK): 541 HIRING IN 2015? Yes MACU believes that each employee contributes directly to the university’s mission as well as student growth and success. Faculty and staff take pride in being a part of a Christian campus community and the many avenues of service it affords. MACU is proud of its successful business reputation that is built upon integrity and excellent employer/employee relationships. Through teamwork, the MACU staff/faculty continues to meet the highest standards of conduct while cultivating character and academic opportunities for our students. The teamwork is forged through mission building activities such as prayer, providing assistance to a co-worker when needed and praising them for a job well done.

Muscogee Creek Nation Okmulgee Tribal Enterprise EMPLOYEES (OK): 4,500 (in 2013) HIRING IN 2015? Yes Industries that make up the Muscogee Creek Nation include gaming, oil and gas.

NORDAM Tulsa Aerospace EMPLOYEES (OK): 1,800 HIRING IN 2015? Yes NORDAM has a family-focused, servant


Our commitment to quality started in one woman’s Texas kitchen in

88 years later

2014

We have plants in three countries, and provide products to the most discriminating brands in the world.

Innovation, creativity and leadership drive our people focused, performance driven business. We are finding new momentum and new efficiencies as we build a great business and a great place to work. We are Chesapeake, and we are leading a responsible energy future.

Putting an eye on quality makes the impossible seem possible.

Bama Companies PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE BE SUCCESSFUL

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Foliart, Huff, Ottaway & Bottom

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

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LAW FIRM

R epresenting Clients for over years 60

There has been a resurgence in efforts to preserve and strengthen the Choctaw Nation’s culture and heritage. Language programs to learn Choctaw are provided from elementary school through college, as well as online programs for adults. Historical games like stickball and traditional Choctaw dances are taught to the youth. A registry of Choctaw artists who have preserved traditional skills, such as beadwork, making baskets, gourds, pipes and wood sculptures to list a few, is maintained by the tribe.

11/5/14 12:12 PM

atton

Chief Gary B

Assistant Chief Jack Austin, Jr.

The Choctaw Nation Headquarters is located in Durant, Oklahoma. •••

Contact the Choctaw Nation at: 800-522-6170 •••

choctawnation.com

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leadership culture with an open-door policy, mutual respect, team work and fun. Stakeholders participate in community events and volunteer opportunities, including United Way Day of Caring, STEM education mentorship, Junior Achievement, Heart Walk and many more.

Oklahoma City Thunder Oklahoma City Professional Sports Team EMPLOYEES (OK): 489 HIRING IN 2015?: Yes With an NBA team at its core, the Oklahoma City Thunder promotes a corporate culture that is driven by a philosophy of teamwork and humility. Throughout the organization, we recognize that every person we employ plays an important role in contributing to our corporate success, and that we all must join together to achieve our goals. One of the pillars of the organization is providing an outstanding fan experience – whether our fans come to our games, watch on TV or follow us on social media and our website. Our corporate culture is focused on supporting this goal across every department.

ONEOK Tulsa Energy

1,317 Yes ONEOK provides its employees the opportunity to enhance their careers through various personal and professional development opportunities, as well as its educational assistance program, which helps cover the expense of furthering their education in job-related fields, including the cost of tuition and books. ONEOK is committed to promoting diversity and opportunity for all employees on the basis of individual qualifications and job-related competencies. The company encourages diversity of thought and perspective in the workforce. EMPLOYEES (OK): HIRING IN 2015?

“They range from innovative financial incentives, to wide-ranging benefits, to innovative working environments, to new education opportunities, to flexible work times and environments,” says Williams. He adds that Oklahoma City has plenty of great companies that offer attractive benefits and incentives that can both entice and retain

the best and brightest. “Oklahoma City is a great place because it has become rich with quality of opportunity,” he says. “People can pursue a wide variety of interests here, people and organizations are very open and welcoming to others and the cost of living here is well below the national average.” JAMI MATTOX

Osage Nation

In addition to being the Aviation Capital, Oklahoma City is also the Energy Capital with industry leaders such as Devon Energy, Chesapeake Energy, Continental Resources and SandRidge Energy. – Greater Oklahoma City Chamber

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Pawhuska Tribal Enterprise EMPLOYEES (OK): 540 (in 2013) HIRING IN 2015? Yes The seven Osage Casinos underwent renovations and expansions, and they are hiring additional employees to work at the two new casino hotels and to cover the expanded casino floor space. The hotel at the Osage Casino in Ponca City and the hotel at the Osage Casino in Skiatook both opened this past year. Presently, the seven Osage Casinos provide Osage Nation’s most significant


Š 2014 Kimray, Inc. MKMK-0154

WE ARE KIMRAY We are machinists, engineers, salesmen, accountants, assembly workers and artists just to name a few. We know that no matter what our role is at Kimray, together we make a difference in the lives of our customers, our community and our fellow workers. We design and manufacture oil and gas control products and together we are Kimray.

www.kimray.com


GUESTS OF OKLAHOMA VISUAL ARTS COALITION’S MOMENTUM 2014 IN OKLAHOMA CITY LIVE THE CULTURE OF OKLAHOMA’S ART SCENE. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA VISUAL ARTS COALITION.

WHERE

ART AND BUSINESS MEET THE TWO SEEMINGLY OPPOSITE SECTORS HAVE A

W

SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIP.

hen one encounters a successful and thriving business economy, often not much credit is given to the arts. But, according to Holly Moye, executive director of Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition, the two are definitely connected. “Business development is a sign of a healthy community, and the arts are certainly a part of that,” she says. “Where arts and culture thrive, new businesses are more likely to be attracted. Businesses, likewise, are becoming increasingly reliant on the arts. The arts can inspire creative thinking and innovative approaches amongst their employees. And when businesses thrive, they are more likely to give back to their communities, and that often means investing in quality of life, such as the arts. “There are many examples of this happen-

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Oklahoma’s economy ranked as the fourth fastest growing in the U.S. from 2012 to 2013, according to a report published this year by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.

source of income. Privately-owned tobacco shops are a source of tax revenue for the Osage Nation through its tax commission.

OU Physicians Oklahoma City Health Care EMPLOYEES (OK): 866 HIRING IN 2015: Yes The OU Physicians’ culture stresses teamwork, customer service, community involvement and professional development. The organization places a high priority on employee satisfaction and engagement, offering a comprehensive benefits package, a health and fitness program, a community volunteer program and training and education opportunities, among other things. In a recent employee satisfaction survey, OU Physicians scored at the 93rd percentile for employee engagement, one of the highest scores among its national peers.

Principal Technologies Oklahoma City Professional Recruiting Firm EMPLOYEES (OK): 18 HIRING IN 2015? Yes The company has been in business just over 15 years, and nearly one-fourth of staff has been with Principal Technologies nine years or longer. The company leadership team urges employees to maintain a healthy work-life balance as well as their physical, emotional and financial wellness. The company offers flu shots to those who want them and ergonomic, standup optional workstations. In addition to flexible scheduling and extended holidays, working past 5 p.m. is almost unheard of.

Reasor’s Foods Tahlequah Grocery Store EMPLOYEES (OK): 2,700 HIRING IN 2015: Yes As northeast Oklahoma’s premier food retailer, Reasor’s services the greater Tulsa market and surrounding communities with full-service stores that feature expanded nutritional, gluten-free, private label and gourmet products and services.

Rogers State University Claremore Higher Education EMPLOYEES (OK): 500 HIRING IN 2015: Yes The university’s mission is to provide opportunities for our students through education. More than 70 percent of RSU students


would be the first in their families to graduate from college. There is a tremendous personal reward for our faculty and staff who help make these dreams come true for our students, many of whom overcome great obstacles before enrolling. Our most dedicated employees take pride in being able to help remove those obstacles and open doors for our students to become successful in all of their endeavors.

Saint Francis Health System Tulsa Health Care EMPLOYEES (OK): 8,200 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Saint Francis Health System has a comprehensive benefits package that is competitive in the marketplace. Parents with young children utilize the on-site childcare services and appreciate the close proximity to the hospital. Talented, caring employees join Saint Francis Health System because it is a Catholic, not-for-profit health system that provides a high level of medical services for adult and pediatric patients.

COMMERCE, INNOVATION AND ART BLEND AT EVENTS SUCH AS OKLAHOMA VISUAL ARTS COALITION’S MOMENTUM 2014 IN OKLAHOMA CITY. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA VISUAL ARTS

St. John Health System

COALITION.

ing here in Oklahoma, like the support from the energy sector in Chesapeake, Devon and Continental Resources, the great investments of the Kaiser family in Tulsa, as well as smaller local businesses like Dunlap Codding in Oklahoma City,” she continues. Ken Busby, executive director and CEO of the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, agrees. “[The arts are] extremely important, if you look at arts in a broader context,” he says. “It’s a symbiotic relationship. Businesses are looking for people who are creative and have analytical skills…you have to have a thriving arts scene with visual arts, music, etc., to nourish that group of people that is employed [in the business sector]. It’s a constant backand-forth, symbiotic relationship. One feeds the other. Economies that thrive feed into an arts scene.” Oklahoma’s two major metro areas – both Oklahoma City and Tulsa – are currently experiencing booming economies. And with these booms have come flourishing arts scenes. Arts districts have continued to grow, with new pockets popping up. Artists are finding increasing support in the form of expanded arts organizations, new museums and gallery space and affordable studio space. Busby says that the growing support of the arts is par for the course for this state. “Oklahoma is a state of creativity,” he says. “We have a spirit of entrepreneurism in the state. I think that this [growth] is recogni

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tion of the quality of arts, but we also have a rich art and cultural heritage and vibrancy. “The Brady Arts District is thriving, and the same is true in Bricktown and other creative areas around the state. Using arts as a catalyst, these are where the cool, hip people are hanging out and opening interesting restaurants, shops and boutiques…livable, walkable communities are being built and thriving,” he adds. Moye says that the booming arts scene right now is the result of work that has been years in the making.

The best city to own a home in in Oklahoma, according to NerdWallet, is the Oklahoma City suburb of Piedmont. Tulsa suburbs Jenks and Owasso follow at Nos. 2 and 3.

Tulsa Health Care EMPLOYEES (OK): 7,100 HIRING IN 2015? Yes St. John promotes a strong culture to incorporate its mission and values of integrity, reverence, dedication, creative wisdom and service to the poor. St. John is the first and only Magnet-recognized hospital in eastern Oklahoma, which makes St. John a highly desirable place to work. Approximately 70 percent of nursing applicants were influenced to apply based on this recognition. Magnet designation is nationally recognized as the gold standard in nursing excellence.

SandRidge Energy Oklahoma City Energy EMPLOYEES (OK): 1,378 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Sandridge pushes decisions out rather than up, fully believing that the individuals closest to the issue are in the best position to make a decision. They may not be the most qualified to make the decision, but they have the best vantage point and are therefore included in the decision-making process. SandRidge also encourages open-mindedness toward new ways of doing things, which is expected not just sought after. Innovation is a daily activity and the key driver in positioning SandRidge to have the lowest operating costs in the Mid-Continent.


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“The state of Oklahoma is experiencing growth in so many areas right now, and the arts are no exception. Many people and organizations have been working for years to build our state’s arts and cultural communities, but recently there has been a real emphasis on working together to make significant and lasting change,” she says. “We are lucky to have an arts community that is supportive of each other, rather than feeling competitive. We also have the relatively recent additions of opportunities for networking amongst artists and arts leaders, such as the Oklahoma Arts Council’s annual statewide arts conference. This kind of convening is so important for working together toward a common goal, and I think the results of this interaction are now coming to fruition.” Busby says he expects to continue to see growth in existing arts neighborhoods as well as new pockets popping up in both metro areas as well as around the state. “Obviously, it depends on real estate for Paseo and Brady [arts districts]. It depends on how much land is available, what buildings will be rehabbed,” he says. “What I think will happen is that there will be

additional areas developed and pockets will continue to pop up. Someone will pick an area that is neglected and say, ‘Hey, we can start an artist colony here.’ All of a sudden, there’s people hanging out there…all the district will continue to grow, and others will use that as a springboard.” Moye believes that the continuous growth of business will propel the arts. “When businesses grow, they have the potential to impact their local communities. In Oklahoma, we are lucky to have many businesses that share their success by giving back, whether that is through funding, promotion, [community] capacity building or other support,” she says. “Each has their own desired outcomes, but a common thread seems to be community improvement and increased quality of life. Arts organizations and artists can respond to these things directly in ways that foster an environment of inclusion and creativity. Together, business and art are building collaborative communities that push the boundaries of possibility.” JAMI MATTOX

Tulsa Energy

259 Yes SemGroup is a great company to work for because it has great people to work with. The management team is top notch with decades of experience. Employees are hard-working, innovative and caring toward one another. SemGroup represents a piece of Oklahoma’s booming energy sector and have a bright and growing future ahead. EMPLOYEES (OK): HIRING IN 2015?

Seminole Nation Wewoka Tribal Enterprise EMPLOYEES (OK): 360 (in 2013) HIRING IN 2015? Yes Employees are driven by their desire to “give back” to their own people and strive to provide quality services in all programs. Seminole Nation is a good community partner, and employees volunteer for Special Olympics, Seminole Nation Domestic Violence Quilt Auction and the annual Celebrating the Tradition of Service Veterans Day parade and celebration as well as many other community activities. Seminole Nation also has a very rich benefits package, including 100 percent employer-paid insurance premiums, paid time off and a five percent overall contribution to 401(k) plans.

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a job that may not exist in five years; a place where their curiosity will meet a dynamic faculty sharing one occupation and preoccupation – teaching the curious mind.

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In September 2014, Oklahoma’s unemployment rate registered at 4.7 percent, a full point lower than the national average of 5.9 percent.

Tulsa Venue Management EMPLOYEES (OK): 593 HIRING IN 2015? Yes As industry leaders serving the community, SMG relentlessly pursues superior experiences for our clients, guests and employees.

University of Oklahoma Norman Higher Education EMPLOYEES: 12,200 HIRING IN 2015: Yes OU attracts outstanding faculty from throughout the world as well as dedicated staff to provide the best possible educational experience for its students through excellence in teaching, research and creative activity and service to the state and society.

University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma Chickasha Higher Education EMPLOYEES (OK): 165 (in 2013) HIRING IN 2015? Yes USAO is a unique place where zeal for learning and academic ambition is rewarded; a place where students become part of a community of life-long learners; a place where they will not be asked to narrow their passions to a skill-set designed for

Tulsa Higher Education EMPLOYEES: 1,250 HIRING IN 2015? Yes Dedication, excellence, commitment and integrity are central to TU’s mission. The university stresses the importance of community service and allows all faculty and staff paid time each month to volunteer with charitable organizations through our True Blue Neighbors program. Employees also may receive a generous tuition assistance benefit and are invited to participate in wellness initiatives aimed at keeping them as healthy and productive as possible.

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1,100 Yes www.williams.com Williams’ employees are smart, driven, creative, honest and fun. Williams knows that to compete, the total package of pay, benefits, development and other rewards must attract and retain quality people. Williams uses a market-based approach to total pay to ensure pay programs are competitive with companies with whom it competes for employees. Williams offers health insurance, a wellness program, employee stock purchase plan, 401(k), pension, tuition assistance and more – all for no extra charge. Other benefits include on-site fitness facility, flexible work schedule, paid time off and holiday pay.

EMPLOYEES (OK): HIRING IN 2015?


PRACTICAL

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By Karen Shade and Beth Weese

Smart investments

in effort, attention and finances in key areas of life can PAY OFF in many ways. Fortune favors the prepared and well versed in finance and growth, although a little luck and timing helps, too. So when the financial rewards reaped from hard work begin to fall into place, there are infinite possibilities on what to purchase and where to invest. But no matter where you are in your career and monetary goals for both yourself and your family, there are some luxuries that are worthwhile to include along the way. A good wardrobe, good health, wise investing and experience-expanding travel all can help build achievement. They can even help further define what is most important and essential in life. Whether its adding value to real estate property, setting boundaries for personal time or contributing to a charitable organization, some luxuries are not only for the very wealthy among us, but are worth the time, effort and expenditure to make life better for both the present and future. More than Rolex watches and high thread counts, these are the luxuries we can’t afford to do without. DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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A Classic Wardrobe

There is much more to a person’s wardrobe than fabric hanging in a closet. Some pieces recall a special occasion, but in order to be worn over the years, clothes need to be timeless. “Clothes that are not too trendy – they can last a long time,” says Steve Aberson, manager of Abersons. “I have clients who bought clothes ten years ago, and they still wear them.” Having a few perfectly fitted, classic pieces that can be mixed and matched with other elements is far more beneficial than a closet crammed with average clothing items. “A great wardrobe helps with a person’s confidence,” says Aberson. “A wardrobe that is well thought out makes it easier to concentrate on more important matters.” When a person wears something they aren’t completely comfortable in, they spend the day fidgeting and tugging at hemlines and fabrics rather than staying focused on work or enjoying good company. Aberson suggests ditching the disappointing deals and shifting emphasis to quality, not quantity. A woman, he adds, needs five items for a classic wardrobe: a black pencil skirt, a simple black dress, a short black cardigan, a white shirt, and slim jeans. Those basics, however, can depend on a person’s lifestyle. “Everyone has his or her own personal style, but as we move through life, there are many experiences that influence us to change,” he says. Interpreting fashion and personal style is the specialty of boutique stores like Abersons. “Once you start wearing luxury clothing, you get spoiled and can’t wear anything else,” he says. “[The] clothes will fit better because they take more time to make them. They might go through four or five fittings before the final product is produced.”

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Money Management The clients Todd Hofmann often sees in his office are usually classified as “affluent,” but wealth management is a service from which many can benefit. Meeting financial goals starts with a good foundation. “Having the proper allocation of assets is fundamental,” says Hofmann, client advisor and senior vice-president at Bank of Oklahoma. Having the right mix of stocks, fixed income bonds and alternative assets (such as energy or real estate assets) is the surest way to create a portfolio geared for growth. Of course, an individual could approach the world of investing alone through any number of brokering companies offering online tools and information to make informed investments. Jeremy Johnson, also a BOK client advisor and senior vice-president, says a wealth management service can provide customized planning for meeting financial goals beyond investing, including estate planning and philanthropic giving. “The old world was about delivering the transaction. Today’s world is about delivering advice,” Johnson says. Wealth management and planning helps clients weather the terrain and transitions of financial

positioning in a way that is mindful of savings and tax-efficiency, Hofmann says. While attorneys draw up trusts and wills, wealth managers look out for the most cost-effective ways to accumulate income that will be used later for retirement, education funding and other long-term goals. For those just beginning the road to financial success, it starts with a few important steps that will lead to better security. “Wealth management starts with establishing your assets, so you start off with an emergency fund,” Johnson adds. Putting away enough liquid assets to cover your projected expenses for six to eight months is valuable in case of a job loss, extensive car repairs, illness or other sudden and costly changes. An emergency fund helps avoid the use of credit cards and loans, he says. Paying down liabilities, such as credit card and loan debt, is also a must. “From then on, you start to look at investing other dollars to achieve what objective you want to invest in [such as] retirement or education,” Johnson says. The easiest ways to start investing, he adds, is a company retirement plan, most advantageous when the employee contributes the maximum allowed and when the employer matches it. “You always begin with the end in mind,” Johnson says.


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Real Estate, Real Value

It’s been said time and again that one of the best ways to invest is in real estate. Kurt Barron, owner of Barron and McClary general contractors in Tulsa, says there are many ways a homeowner can build value in a residence whether the intention is to sell or stay. Not surprising, bathroom and kitchen upgrades are the most popular home remodel projects because they earn back their cost in the appraisal value of a home, he says. But there are other projects – cosmetic painting, refinishing wood floors – that can make a big impact as well. An open concept layout opens the flow of a home making it conducive to visibility and tying together multiple functions into the communal spaces of a house. “Without a doubt, I think it’s a new way of thinking. It’s not like clothes, always changing. I think open concept is going to stay.” Other wise investments are mechanical and equipment upgrades. Upgrading heat and air units along with larger appliances in the home can save money not only because they are efficient and can lower energy costs, but tax incentives are often available to make the sale more enticing. Speaking of efficiency, one of the best installations in a home is

THIS CLOSET SPACE DESIGNED BY JUDY CLAUDETTE WILLIAMS IS THE HEIGHT OF LUXURY AND THE ULTIMATE SUCCESSFUL REMODEL. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

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spray insulation – foam, cellulose or fiberglass, says Barron. “The best thing some people can do is blowing insulation in the attic,” he says. “It’s one product that pays itself back in the short term.” And considering that it stays around forever, it’ll never need to be replaced, which make it a worthy expense, he adds. Homeowners can’t go wrong with a little curb appeal. Painting the house’s exterior can help keep value in the home along with some tasteful landscaping. With that landscaping comes lawn sprinkler systems to keep the grounds lush and beautiful. Lawn sprinkler heads and systems can contribute to wood rot when water penetrates through worn or improperly sealed or fitted windowsills. The result is damage around windows inside the walls, Barron says. “Simply take a walk around your house, and take a look and see how your windowsills look,” he says. “Too many clients call us when there’s a problem and [they] have damage.” Taking the time to invest in a few upgrades and renovations that are attractive to today’s housing market are great choices for building equity in the home for both the short and long term.


Moving Experience

Me-Time

America is often viewed as an individualistic culture, with the majority of people looking out for No. 1 in order to reach that bigger, better thing in life. However, this drive to succeed can actually prevent many people from taking care of their physical, mental and emotional state. It turns the passionate into people-pleasers, who deny themselves time to unwind; and that leaves them unable to enjoy the quality of life they have worked hard to attain. Dr. Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, Ph.D, is a mental health therapist, who knows this type well. “There are those who typically set no boundaries with their own life and allow others to set their schedule based upon their needs, emotions and moods,” Linsenmeyer-O’Brien says. “These are the enablers who take a backseat to everyone else and may cope with their own and other’s stress in negative ways, such as [through] sex, eating, smoking, gaming, etc.” Balance between time for the self, family and others is an essential exercise in prioritizing. The consequences of giving too much to one area can be damaging. “If we don’t have balance, we feel overwhelmed, angry, taken for granted and even may have difficulty keeping relationships due to mood swings or compulsive schedules,” she says. The quality of downtime is also important. For instance, spending hours on social media or watching television may not be as beneficial to some people as time spent doing yoga or meditation. Once a person decides what works best for them, Linsenmeyer-O’Brien suggests they create a plan and put it into action. “Engaging in alone time can help a person relax, focus on priorities, better manage thoughts and behaviors and learn to better appreciate who they are by looking inward as opposed to [looking to] others for validation,” she says. “Having ‘me time’ and being alone at times promotes a healthy sense of self awareness, independence and knowledge of personal growth.”

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Near or far, travel can have a transformative effect. Lisa Kollath, a travel advisor at Warren Place Travel in Tulsa, can personally attest to the claim. “Travel changed me in many ways, and it opened my eyes to the world around me,” she says. “I think it has helped me through some adversities in my life, and I just feel it’s an integral part of everybody’s life. I’m very passionate about it.” Considering that Gallup polls conducted in 2013 and 2014 found at least half of American adults employed fulltime work longer than the 40-hour-week (four in ten reported working at least 50 hours a week), using the paid time off afforded by most employers is more necessary than ever. And while many people plan their vacations around relaxation, there’s much more to reap from excursions near and abroad, Kollath says. “There’s so much more to travel than just relaxing. It’s bonding with family, friends and loved ones; it’s learning about different cultures, it’s about experiencing the food and different festivals,” she says. “A lot of travel is about healing. It gets you away from everyday life…It opens your eyes and lets you get some perspective in the world.” Experience also broadens understanding and creativity, both of which can be applied to everyday life. Just as useful are the lessons learned from encounters with new situations, languages, customs and people. “A lot of the time,” she adds, “it can take you out of the comfort zones you’re in, and it helps you handle little adversities that come into your life.”

THE DON CARLOS LEISURE RESORT & SPA IN MARBELLA, SPAIN, OFFERS BOTH “ME-TIME” AS WELL AS THE EXPERIENCE OF TRAVEL. PHOTO BY DAN SCHUMAN.


Star Jewelers lights the way to the holidays with a “Toy Drive”

Family owned jewelry store hosts fundraiser for local charity November 20 - December 17, 2014

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parkle, shine, and dazzle this holiday season with Star Jewelers. The locally owned and family run jewelry store wants to put a twinkle in your holiday season but also in your heart. This year, Star Jewelers is giving back. “The holidays are about giving. Jewelry is a traditional gift that never ceases to bring joy. Here at Star, our customers give trinkets and treasures to loved ones year round but there is something truly special about December,” says third-generation owner, Dayna Matheny. For 41 years, Star Jewelers has called Main Street home. The striped awning and giant diamond on the storefront has greeted customers, both loyal and new, for decades. “Main Street is our home and Broken Arrow is our community. We wouldn’t have it any other way,” says Matheny. “The city has been so good to us throughout the years. We want to recognize the outstanding community and give back to our neighbors this holiday

season.” Star Jewelers has partnered with the non-profit Broken Arrow Neighbors in their new location to host a Gift/Toy Drive November 20 through December 17, 2014. Broken Arrow Neighbors serves 2,587 individuals (734 families) with holiday meals and gifts last year and they hope to serve more this year. “We are excited to collaborate with BAN to have a toy and gift drive. We will be collecting gift wrapping paper, stocking stuffers, and toys for children from infants to 12-years-old.” Throughout the month, Star will also be holding a raffle for jewelry items in the store to celebrate the customers as well as jolly deals so you can find the perfect gift for your loved ones. Help Star Jewelers and Broken Arrow Neighbors make the holiday season magical for everyone, November 20 through December 17, 2014.


In Good Health

Everyone is busy these days, and often that means they are too busy to exercise, eat right and find time to center. Sooner than expected, many people find themselves halfway through life with health problems that could have been prevented years earlier. “Basically, if you start off eating, sleeping, meditating, exercising and taking care of yourself, you’re going to live longer,” says Dr. Diana Kennedy, a primary care physician, endocrinologist and MDVIP affiliate in Oklahoma City. “I can’t tell you the number of people – as they hit menopause and after – that regret the fact that they didn’t do better in their thirties, forties, fifties because they have a lot of pain and weight putting a lot of pressure on joints.” Kennedy says people can make a promising start to good health by getting a pedometer, which will shed light on how little they actually move throughout the day. It’s a small investment in time and money that will pay off big later in better health and quality of life. “We sometimes forget that we need to stay physically active,” she says. “Almost all of us can go for a walk at noon. We all have enough time to get up, walk around the building or the parking lot for fifteen, twenty minutes instead of sitting through the lunch break.” Kennedy says the best way to maintain a workout program is to find an outside source that can keep one focused on their goals. “You’ve got to have somebody that is encouraging you,” she says. “You’ve got to have somebody that is making you accountable.” A good personal trainer is just that person, not only for accountability, but also to tailor activities and nutrition plans specific to clients.

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“A personal trainer will help make sure you have the right program for any special needs,” says John Jackson, a personal trainer at the St. John Siegfried Health Club. Some people are put-off by the perceived high cost of working out with a personal trainer, foregoing the individual attention for video instruction and routines. While that may work from some, others can greatly benefit from the expertise and advisement a trainer can provide in several areas of health. “The thing about it is [that] it’s hard to attain the goals you want unless you have someone making a program for you,” Jackson says. Qualified trainers take into account physical issues, such as joint problems, heart health and respiratory conditions. Many are also knowledgeable of healthy nutrition habits. Jackson says he helps his clients better understand the basics of good nutrition – carbohydrates, proteins, healthy fats – and incorporate them into their lives. As for the cost, Jackson says that some independent personal trainers often are willing to accommodate new clients at more affordable rates if the trainee shows a commitment to following through the program. That commitment could pay off in other ways. “A lot of businesses award their employees with activity bonuses,” he said. “It’s more on the preventative side of caring for yourself, and it helps the company, too.” Kennedy says good health is something everyone can afford. “I will guarantee that if we could get people to go on fruits, vegetables and whole grains; decrease the amount of fatty foods and meat; and exercise that everybody would have more energy, sleep better and be more mentally fit.”


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PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

Creative director and principal at TPC – Todd Pyland Creative/Talmadge Powell Creative, a boutique ad agency and event planning company. Wearing: Jacket, pants and shoes by Paul Smith; a T-shirt by BetterBoxProject.org, a campaign to end chronic homelessness by Mental Health Association Oklahoma, whose mission is to provide sustainable, affordable housing for people who have been living on the streets. Is there a fashion icon or someone whose style you admire most? Tom Ford is one of my favorite fashion icons. He came from humble beginnings in Texas and eventually rose to fame as the creative director of Gucci. He then created his own fashion label and continuously pushes the envelope in all things luxury, design and style. What is your favorite accessory? Vintage cufflinks from an antique shop in Abilene, Texas, called Fabulous Finds. When you want to look great with little effort, what’s your go-to outfit? Dark blue J. Brand jeans and a blue blazer from Banana Republic with a cotton button-down oxford from Uniqlo, with Tod’s driving moccasins. Add a ball cap if it’s a Saturday.

People With Style

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Dress ‘em up, or dress ‘em down: These four Tulsans have flair. By Jami Mattox DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Lisa Bennett Antry

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Recently retired Wearing: Isabel Marant leather skirt, Zara green suede top, vintage Sergio Rossi suede boots, Chloe Runway bag, Etro scarf. Is there a fashion icon or someone whose style you admire most? I admire anyone who has a style that suits his or her lifestyle and personality. But I do favor friends that add a surprise element now and then. I like a biker look with pearls or a “Jackie O” in Ray-Bans every once in a while. What is your favorite article of clothing? A large scarf, usually from Etro or Hermes, because they are so beautiful and versatile and I’m always on a plane. What is your favorite accessory? The right watch. A friend told me recently she was positive watches would soon be passé. I hope she is correct. I will start a serious collection. When you want to look great with little effort, what’s your go-to outfit? J. Brand leather skinnies with a white T-shirt in summer, or an oversized sweater in winter, with heels or boots and a scarf. Do you prefer to dress up or dress down? When I dress up, I feel fun immediately. Like the way you feel energized just because you step on a plane to New York City.

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Taft Welch

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Business development manager, TEKsystems Global Services Wearing: Blue Saks Fifth Avenue New York suit; Saks Fifth Avenue Italian tie; Tag Heuer Carrera watch. Is there a fashion icon or someone whose style you admire most? I remember when my Papa Welch got me knee high socks for Christmas. I thought, “That was nice, they ought to keep me warm.” Later I learned that it was a pet peeve of his to see other businessmen’s ankles/legs when they crossed their legs. Since then I’ve found myself being critical of the same thing. My grandpa also had a lot of very nice business suits. They were all tailored professionally and had his initials handstitched inside. They were always neatly hung up with a matching vest and tie. The man had class. What is your favorite article of clothing? The shoes. Forrest Gump was right – you can judge a man by his shoes. What is your favorite accessory? My watch. I feel naked without one. Do you prefer to dress up or dress down? I want to say “down” because I love jeans, but I’ve got to be honest – similar to my dad’s habit of over-packing for trips, I’d rather be overdressed than under.

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Cheena Pazzo

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Director, Community and Physician Relations, St. John Health System Wearing: Okie Grown shirt (sold at Dwelling Spaces); Rag & Bone jeans; Prada wedge sneakers; Michael Kors watch; Dita Mach-One sunglasses; Oklahoma bracelet from REC-Collection (at Dwelling Spaces). Is there a fashion icon or someone whose style you admire most? My favorite at the moment is Olivia Palermo. She has such an exquisitely upscale, casual style and flawlessly mixes the classics with contemporary and vintage pieces. I appreciate a versatile and creative sense of self and fashion. What was your first fashion moment? In kindergarten I wore the most awful, ill-fitting maroon corduroy pants and white sweater. I was furious all day. During recess we had a free throw contest (which I was convinced I would win), but I was so upset about my outfit that I couldn’t focus. I cried and explained to my gym teacher that my terrible pants ruined everything. She wasn’t amused. To this day I’ll never wear something that makes me unhappy. What is your favorite article of clothing? My Alice + Olivia purple dress. It has a fit-and-flare cut with a cutout back and leather waistband. It’s both pretty and a little edgy. What song best describes your fashion sense or sense of style? “I Walk the Line” by Johnny Cash.

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assisted living communities that coordinate social activities and transportation for residents. Determining specific needs for you or your loved one should be the priority when making this important life decision. Here are a few questions to guide the process. What can I afford? No matter who is paying, this is the most important factor for the majority of people. There are many useful links on the AARP website, along with representatives over the phone to assist in finding facilities based on cost. Another fact to consider is that long-term care cost has been increasing 4.5 percent each year, which is faster than the nation’s inflation rate in general. S E N I O R L I V I N G FA C I L I T I E S What location is best? While most people want to stay in their home state, looking into care that is closest to family may be the best decision. If you are staying in your area, then choosing a new home based on safety and convenience is recommended. Proximity to hospitals, pharmacies and grocery stores can be a deciding factor as well. This is especially true if the facility does not offer Choosing the living facility for a loved transportation for residents. one can be rough but rewarding. What specific needs must be met? While the basic needs of housing and meals are first here are many options to consider and foremost, extras can make all the difference. Active seniors will when choosing a senior living want a place filled with others they can socialize with regularly. Find facility for you or a loved one. out exactly what the day-to-day agenda is for each facility researched With the and how much freedom or down time ecois offered. If more medical care is nomic factor being needed, find out how many nurses are one of the most on staff. pertinent, options These certainly are not the only may be limited. questions to be asked that can lead you Nonetheless, or your family in the right direction. there are other You can never know if a place is right important issues that without visiting it. Take multiple tours arise when taking at different times of day. Ask to speak this step in life. With with not only the director of the facilvarying levels of ity, but the caretakers and kitchen staff. care offered, assessTalk to other seniors living in the coming the individual’s munity or speak to a visiting family independence level member if possible. is vital. Ratings and guidelines are not the Many facilionly criteria to consider. Getting to ties offer full care, know a facility inside and out before resembling nursing applying can make this life-changing homes, with staff transition less complicated. physicians and Once a facility is chosen, make sure caretakers to ensure you and your loved one have the necesevery need is met. sary information for contacting an Others offer only ombudsman. These are advocates that the basics, such as are on the senior’s side and are working housing and meals. to make sure everyone in assisted livThen there are the ing facilities receives good care.

Making The Decision

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR How does compulsive sex affect true intimacy? When it comes to process addictions – such as food, gambling, sex and spending – society has moral judgments about people, much like we did around drugs and alcohol 30 years ago. This one COURTNEY LINSENMEYERis fueled by anxiety, depression O’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR or other deep-seeded emotional vulnerabilities – not by reason and rationale. In 85 to 90 percent of cases, the person has suffered some kind of abuse. Consequently, treating the addiction requires identifying and dealing with the trauma. While the addiction may take various forms – from compulsive masturbation to voyeurism to victimizing another person – the disorder is classified as such when it interferes with healthy functioning. As a result, sex – the ultimate act of connection – becomes a way of avoiding intimacy. Therapy is essential to healing.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

VETERINARIAN Are you considering a pet as a gift for Christmas? Before you surprise your family, here are some things to consider so that everyone will love the surprise. A child’s age is important. If you have small children who are begging for a new pet, you might consider a guinea pig, rabbit or hamster. DR. RODNEY ROBARDS These smaller animals can be a great way to teach responsibility to younger children and prepare them for a new kitten or puppy. Cost is an important consideration. Adoption is a wonderful way to acquire a pet at a reasonably low cost. Also consider the cost of yearly vaccinations and spaying and/or neutering as well. If you use a breeder then there will be additional costs to consider. Additional vaccinations, spay or neutering, microchipping, obedience classes, etc. are all expenses that will be expected with a new pet. Owning a pet is a commitment. Pets desire lots of attention and live for many years. They will require a lifetime of care. Visits to the vet, food, supplies and time spent exercising them are all important. Pets can also be messy and may have accidents in the house or soil furniture and carpet if they get sick. So be prepared before you decide to bring a pet into your home. Overall, pets bring lots of joy and happiness, and I hope your families are excited with the new additions on Christmas morning!

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl., Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

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PERSONAL TRAINER

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

Should I avoid fad diets?

Should I file a claim or not?

Yes, you should avoid fad diets because they’re generally not healthy. Only three nutrients contain calories: carbohydrates, protein and fat. If you cut one, chances are you’ll be eating too much of the other two. The current rage for low-carbohydrate JOHN JACKSON has created a nation of people eating a lot of protein and fat, and in the process inviting the risk of high cholesterol and heart disease. If you choose a starvation diet of 800 calories or less per day, you can end up dehydrated and develop kidney damage. Your body has to be fueled with nutrients in order to be functional; moreover, lowcalorie diets can lower your metabolic rate. Unfortunately, when you stop dieting, your sluggish body puts the weight back on, and more often than not, more than your original weight. You’re better off avoiding gimmicks and opting for a reduced-calorie diet that feeds your body a healthy balance of nutrients.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

Our customers commonly ask whether or not they should file a claim on their home insurance. In Oklahoma, there are certain facts that are important to understand. The State Legislature mandates that an insurance company cannot surcharge or cancel your homeowners policy due to a weather related JARED PETERSON claim. Any other type of claim, such as theft, water damage, vandalism or liability claims are often surcharged by most insurance companies. One good place to start is to evaluate your deductible. For example, if you have a water pipe bust, and the damage caused is $2,000 and you have a $1,000 deductible, you might consider not filing a claim with your insurance company. Most companies will only surcharge for three years, but the increase in premium over the three years may approach or even exceed the $1,000 you get in a claim payment. In addition, if you happen to have another claim within the next two years or so, you will be surcharged even more or possibly canceled. The safe approach is to only file a claim when you experience significant damage.If you have any questions or would like to review your current home insurance policy, contact a AAA agent near you.

Jared Peterson, AAA Oklahoma 2121 E 15th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.748.1030 Jared.Peterson@aaaok.org

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT What are some of the new trends in communications? Infographics can make a significant impact in your marketing goals. In today’s work environment, we have become used to absorbing large amounts of information visually. Consequently, we’ve become a JESSICA DYER little lazy reading text and copy. Your audience would rather look at a photograph or a graphic illustration that represents your concept immediately. Used correctly, a smart, colorful infographic can convey your message in all of your communication materials, whether for a brochure, case study or product launch. When using an infographic, remember to keep it simple and clean. Resist the urge to inundate your client and audience with too much information and too many visuals. Keep words and graphics simple for stronger appeal. You can’t make a chart for everything, but a good infographic can sell almost anything.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539-777-6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

PHYSICAL THERAPY I have a friend who recently heard about a physical therapy treatment technique called dry needling. What is it, and what types of injuries is it used for? Over the last decade, Dry Needling has become a more mainstream treatment technique typically in TODD PETTY, outpatient clinic settings. A fine filaPT/CSMT ment needle is used to disrupt myofascial trigger points that result in pain and tissue dysfunction. We have used dry needling on a variety of patients such as runners with chronic calf tightness and office workers with neck and upper back problems. In addition to dry needling, the therapist will address joint mobility, flexibility and strength issues of the problem area. Dry needling can result in relief of patient’s symptoms in just a few visits or relief may take longer depending on the complexity of the problem.

Todd Petty, PT/CSMT Excel Therapy Specialists 918.398.7400 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. MARRIAGE COUNSELOR I’ve noticed friends avoiding me since learning about my affair. How should I handle it? You may wonder why invitations have become fewer, why friends seem to avoid you. You may never guess, perhaps they feel uncomfortable because they’ve learned you divorced due to your affair. They BRAD ROBINSON, LMFT sense that you’re a bad influence on their marriage and worry you might seduce their spouse. Avoid all the embarrassment. They won’t even know about your marriage trouble after hiring us. We guide you through the simple steps toward recovery so you’ll be like new in a short while.

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ATTORNEY AT LAW I am still working full-time, but I don’t know how much longer I can keep doing that. Should I file for my social security now? In order to be eligible for social security disability, the first question is, “Are you working?” If so, then ESTHER M. SANDERS you are probably not disabled. Generally you must be unable to earn substantial gainful income for a period of one year or more in order to be eligible for social security disability benefits. You must prove that you can’t do the work that you have done in the past, and that there is no other work that you would be able to do on a sustained basis. There are some exceptions to these rules. Therefore you should always contact an attorney with any questions regarding disability benefits.

Attorney at Law Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. • Tulsa, OK 74120 918.745.2000 Telephone 918.745.0575 Facsimile 800.745.2006 Toll Free

HOSPICE CARE

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

Our family is getting together during the Christmas holiday and we are going to discuss Advance Medical Directives. Can you explain how they work? First of all, I applaud you and your family for having the forethought AVA HANCOCK to prepare an Advance Medical Directive. There are two main types: a living will and a medical power of attorney. A living will allows you to write down your wishes concerning medical treatments at the end of life. Before it goes into effect, two physicians must certify you are unable to make medical decisions and that you have a medical condition covered by the state’s living will law. A medical power of attorney allows you to appoint a person you trust as your healthcare agent, who is authorized to make medical decisions on your behalf. Again, your physician must conclude that you are unable to make their own medical decisions. For more information, please call 918.744.7223 or visit www. gracehospice.com.

Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT What is a great gift to give the men in my life? Don't make Christmas shopping difficult this year – make it custom. What man in your life doesn't need a great wardrobe? Whether it's business or personal, there is nothing like a confident man. One thing to keep in mind is the fact that men love to dress AUTUMN POHL sharply, but they usually won't take the time for themselves. A custom shirt made specifically for him is a game changer. Plus it's fun to be your own designer. Think outside of the box. Be creative! Instead of joining him in a wine/golf/beer club...how about a shirt club? Send him one custom dress shirt every month for a year. Add your own initials to the monogram for an extra special personal touch. The best part, every time they get a compliment, they will think of you. Because nobody gets a Christmas gift like this!

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

This time of year I want to look my best for the holidays, but between errands, shopping, relatives visiting and the kids out of school, I'm having a hard time justifying doing anything for myself. The holidays are a hectic time for all of us, and everyone is under time constraints. At BA Med Spa, we understand busy schedules, and that’s why we created our 12 Days of Christmas. This gives our patients the opportunity to purchase services and products at reduced prices to use now or after the first of the year when time is more readily available. If you can’t carve out time this season, reward yourself in the new year! Whether you want to diffuse crows feet, restore volume or just refresh your skin with a lunchtime peel, we have our best pricing of the year just in time to face the holidays and ring in the new year looking your best. Call us at 918.872.9999 or visit us at www.baweightspa.com to learn more about our fantastic holiday offers. MALISSA SPACEK

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR Can adults have ADHD, or is it a childhood disorder? Absolutely adults can experience ADHD. Often the symptoms may appear somewhat different and may be more difficult to identify, as adults do not always attend school so they are not as obvious as low grades or AMY KESNER, interrupting class. Often adults assume PHD, LPC, LADC forgetting or lack of attention could be related to aging and therefore do not get appropriately screened. A mental health professional can complete a screening for symptoms and diagnosis of adult ADHD. There are a variety of treatments for adult ADHD including therapy, to incorporating some behavior modification interventions, ways to improve concentration, identifying foods and lifestyle that may exacerbate symptoms, as well as the possible need for medication. All interventions should be tailored to each individuals needs. Only a medical doctor can prescribe medication but a mental health professional may help you identify if you do have ADHD and assist in recommending some additional treatment options.

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

CHEESY CRAB TOASTS ARE A CLASSIC STARTER AT R&J LOUNGE AND SUPPER CLUB. BELOW: SMOKY MAC & CHEESE. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

FOOD, DRINK AND OTHER PLEASURES

M

Memories Are Made Of This

Ludivine chefs offer a culinary blast from the past with R&J Lounge and Supper Club.

y childhood fare was far from fancy, but I miss it every time I need comfort. My mom’s specialty was stroganoff with canned cream of mushroom soup and hamburger, a dish I haven’t had since I was a teenager, but it haunts my dreams to this day. Luckily for Oklahoma City diners who miss what mom used to make, Ludivine chefs Russ Johnson and Jonathan Stranger offer this very meal along with other family favorites from ages past at R&J Lounge and Supper Club. The offerings are culled from the chefs’ family recipes and childhood favorites. Think this is a renovated, edgy take on down-home, back-of-the-box classics? Think again. The recipes at R&J are what Johnson calls “no tricks, no pulled punches. The stroganoff has canned mushrooms, ground beef and Campbell’s condensed cream of mushroom soup because that’s what was in my thermos when I went sledding as a kid, and my attempts over the

years to elevate it with things like tenderloin, exotic mushrooms and bechamel [sauce] have always come up short. There’s something to be said for restraint and not trying to fix that which ain’t broke.” Add to the menu old-school favorites like the lobster roll, the Southern favorite chicken and dumplings and several lamb dishes, along with dated cocktails like the whiskey sour and Old-fashioned, and it’s clear that despite the decline of the supper club venue in Oklahoma, true classics never go out of style. Do you miss your grandma’s banana pudding with Nilla wafers? Miss it no more. “To me, a supper club is a casual elegance that would remind one of their own dining room, where you go to relax and dine either with the family during the week, happy hour with people from the office or late at night to celebrate good times in general,” Stranger says. “It provides a satisfying menu with good drinks that isn’t going to break the bank but will leave you satisfied every time. It really is about the atmosphere and good times with good company. There are similar places DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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around OKC that are reminiscent of a supper club, but nothing downtown anymore. We didn’t create something new; we are bringing back something that was lost in the past that we believe was great and should never have gone away.” “Supper clubs, to me, are all about nostalgia,” Johnson adds. “They harken back to a time before the celebrity chef or ego in cuisine. They often offered a nearly standardized bill of fare. The menu did not change from decade to decade, let alone season to season. They were a place to go and spend the whole evening. You got dinner, libations and often some sort of entertainment all in one package, eliminating the need to bounce around from place to place, and these thrived in the Midwest between towns, where they likely were the only place. They have a certain style about them – sort of simultaneously utilitarian and swank…there used to be a lot of these great old spots dotted throughout OKC, and one by one, year by year, we’re losing them. We have but a precious few remaining, and almost none in the downtown area. We always think about these places, ‘There’s just no way to recreate this.’ R&J is our effort to say, ‘Well, maybe you kind of can.’” While the atmosphere is “unapologetically old-school,” says Johnson, the focus is on inviting people to relive their family dinner memories through classic, filling fare. “A lot of these dishes made me feel good, not just by how they tasted, but by the memories I associate them with,” Stranger says. “There is a sentimental side to the menu for us, and the more we talked to people, we realized a lot of people share those same memories of being at family gatherings when they where young and eating these same dishes…the R&J is about the experience and where the whole place takes you.” 320 NW 10th St., Oklahoma City. www.rjsupperclub.com TARA MALONE

CHEF RUSS JOHNSON IS HALF OF THE TEAM BEHIND R&J LOUNGE AND SUPPER CLUB. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

THE BIG DADDY BURGER AT BROOKSIDE’S HOPBUNZ IS TOO GOOD TO RESIST WITH A PRAIRIE ALE. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

T H E B UZ Z

HOPBUNZ

Drive down Tulsa’s Peoria Avenue on a dark winter’s night, and just past the Crow Creek Bridge you’ll see a splash of light and color. Trees festooned with lights, glowing floorto-ceiling windows and, through the glass, below an impossibly high ceiling swathed in pastel stripes, you’ll see crowds of people eating far more than they intended. Brash, brassy and lively, HopBunz is too young to be a legend, but the burgers and shakes are the stuff of which legends are made. Step over to the counter. There’s a bewildering array of choices (five different patties, three choices of bun, 14 specialty burgers) but if this is your first trip, make it easy on yourself and order a Classic with American cheese, regular brioche bun. In a few minutes you’ll be eating a masterpiece. The meat, freshly ground in-house each morning, is a blend you won’t find anywhere else. It’s sirloin, chuck and bacon. The soft, yielding bun was baked a few hours ago at Pancho Anaya Bakery, delivered piping hot to the restaurant each morning. Dripping with juice and bursting with flavor, the rich, sizzling meat melts together with the cheese, and just the sight and smell of it triggers primal cravings. Eat and be happy. Don’t think of leaving without a shake. Your diet is already blown, and these shakes, made of rich custard, are about the best you’ll ever find. The strawberry shake is made from fresh strawberry puree, and for $2 extra, they fortify that shake with Irish cream, coffee liqueurs or a splash of vodka. Sip and linger. There’s full waiter service once you’ve placed your first order, so you might even try some of the local craft beers on tap. There’s a lot to try on future visits. Specialty burgers are created with layers of flavor. The Chicken Enchilada burger features a ground chicken patty subtly seasoned with herbs topped with tortilla strips, pepper jack cheese, salsa verde and a fried egg. Sushi-grade Ahi tuna is the star of the Maui Waui, which comes with fried nori, radish sprouts, pickled carrots and wasabi mayo. There’s a burger topped with shiitake and portobello mushrooms sauteed in balsamic reduction. All fries are made with Kennebec potatoes; its high sugar content makes for a crispy outside and soft interior. HopBunz has only one problem: It is too good. People see the slick, colorful decor and huge menu and, says General Manager Bryan Pasek, “they assume we’re from out of town and part of a chain. But we’re not. We’re unique and locally owned, and we’re excited to be a part of the Brookside community.” 3330 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa. www.hopbunz.com BRIAN SCHWARTZ

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Taste

W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

GOGI GUI KOREAN GRILL

Gogi Gui Korean Grill is an unexpected blend of influences. A small diner located in a modest strip mall at Tulsa’s 31st Street and Sheridan Road, Gogi Gui (go-gee goo-ee) takes its name from the Korean word roughly translated as “barbecued meat.” Take a look at the menu, because that’s where the real fun begins. At Gogi Gui, Korean fusion means traditional Korean grilled dishes are offered along with street tacos, burgers and fries. The galbi short ribs and beef bulgogi, both traditional to Korean culture are brought to the table with four popular banchan, or sides: kimchi cabbage, seared tofu, kongnamul (bean sprouts in oil and kosher salt) and sesame cabbage. Burgers are flavored in kimchi and Korean-style marinades, while the bulgogi tacos – beef or pork – are seasoned in spicy bulgogi sauce and topped with a tangy Asian cabbage slaw. Fries? They’re not typical, either: Gogi fries are tossed in sesame oil and Korean chili powder before other ingredients (included caramelized kimchi and bulgogi beef or pork) are added. There’s plenty from where that came. 6380 E. 31st St., Tulsa. www.gogiguikoreangrill.com – Karen Shade

THE FRESH BIBIMBAP BOWL AT GOGI GUI KOREAN GRILL. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

CHILTEPES What elevates a good restaurant to great? Homemade everything. At Chiltepes, that is the mantra that has established this Guatemalan restaurant located in Oklahoma City’s Plaza District as a favorite place for South American food. Tasty bean and vegetarian dishes, carne asada, chiles rellenos and more are made in-house and complemented by freshly griddled flour tortillas. Pupusas – thick corn tortillas stuffed with a variety of fillings like beans, cheese or pork and served with tangy slaw – are a South American staple and a favorite at Chiltepes. Traditional South American dishes like chicken enchiladas and flautas are also available, and be sure to order a side of the Russian salad for an authentic twist to any meal at Chiltepes. The mix of boiled potatoes, vegetables, eggs and mayo is a favorite in South America. 1800 NW 16th St., Oklahoma City. 405.521.1013 – Jami Mattox

PECHUGAS DE POLLO IS A FRESH TASTE AT CHILTEPES. LEFT: GUATEMALAN ENCHILADAS ARE TOPPED WITH A CHOICE OF MEAT, PICKLED BEETS AND OTHER GARNISHES. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

ON WHEELS

Mr. Nice Guys

A Tulsa reggae-inspired food truck serving tacos and mac and cheese is a recipe for success for Mr. Nice Guys. The food is fresh and the guys are genuinely nice at this establishment on wheels, which has been in operation in Tulsa for more than three years. The tacos are the real deal and come in a variety of flavors, including the jerk chicken, topped with corn, black beans and fresh pico de gallo; or the shrimp taco complete with warm tortillas and a slice of fresh avocado for a little extra. Mr. Nice Guys is also tossing taco filling into its mac and cheese for hungry diners. The

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jerk chicken mixed with perfectly cooked macaroni and creamy cheese sauce is other-worldly. Follow Mr. Nice Guys on Twitter or Facebook. Find out where the truck is parked daily at @mrniceguystulsa. – Jami Mattox

MR. NICE GUYS’ TACOS COME IN A VARIETY: SPICY PORK, GRILLED SHRIMP AND VEGGIE. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.


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Taste

F R O M S C R AT C H

Sugar Britches Café & Bakery

CREME BRULEE FRENCH TOAST AT SUGAR BRITCHES CAFE & BAKERY.

From the rustic wood flooring to griffin-stamped tin ceiling tiles of another era, Sugar Britches Café & Bakery brings eclectic home-goodness-on-a-plate to downtown Sapulpa. Opening late last year in a historic Main Street building that once housed the town’s drug store, Sugar Britches specializes in scrumptious homestyle favorites. Those favorites (meatloaf, chicken pot pie, BLT sandwiches), however, have a delectable, unexpected spin that only owners John McEachern and Kristina Lord can create – they’re both chefs. Pastries, cookies, breads and buns are made from scratch in the kitchen. Fresh-made, fluffy biscuits, even under savory sausage gravy, are like mom’s. The egg bread and buns, on which most sandwiches and burgers are served, masterfully complement any combination of flavors, yet still hold their own. And for dessert, let’s just say there will be very little of the cobblers and bread puddings left behind for a to-go box. 1 S. Main St., Sapulpa. www. sugarbritchescafe.com – Karen Shade KOLACHES COME IN A VARIETY OF FLAVORS, BOTH SWEET AND SAVORY, AT OKLAHOMA KOLACHE CO. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

SWEET TOOTH

Oklahoma Kolache Co.

The kolache, a traditional Czech treat made with yeast dough and filled with something sweet, is giving other pastries a run for their money. The kolache has grown so popular in America that in 2013, The New York Times proclaimed the kolache poised to “be the nextgeneration doughnut.” Matt Kelley, owner of Lucky’s Restaurant in Tulsa, has taken some liberties with the kolache and created his own version that is sold at Oklahoma Kolache Co., a new breakfast eatery along Cherry Street. Serving both sweet and savory kolaches, the café produces several varieties fresh-baked each day. Selections include smoked chicken, apple sausage and cheddar cheese; banana and nutella; and The Big Daddy – a combination of Granny Smith apple and green chili. The homemade kielbasa and cheddar cheese kolache is a divine breakfast treat. Oklahoma Kolache Co. also offers hot and cold drinks along with specialty coffees. If dining in, remember: The café seats only 10 or so. 1534 E. 15th St., Tulsa. www. oklahomakolache.com – Jami Mattox 100

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.


THE POUR

The Holiday Nog

Eggnog is the classic holiday drink. Though the ingredients, taken individually, can sound off-putting, once combined, they create a creamy, dreamy concoction that is warming during those cold winter months. Food Network mad scientist and food historian Alton Brown is the undisputed king of eggnog. In a 2012 interview for Mental Floss, Brown pointed out that most culinary anthropologists believe that what we know as eggnog today descended from a thick medieval concoction called posset that was made from hot milk, alcohol and spices on hand. – Jami Mattox

ALTON BROWN’S NOG OF AGES Recipe courtesy Alton Brown, as it appeared in Mental Floss

12 1 lb. 1 pint 1 pint 1 pint 1 c. 1 c. 1 c. 1 tsp. 1/4 tsp.

large chicken eggs sugar half & half whole milk heavy cream Jamaican rum cognac bourbon freshly grated nutmeg (plus more for serving) kosher salt

Note on eggs: Although alcohol will likely kill off any bad bacteria present from the eggs, if you have any doubts at all or if you’re going to be serving the elderly or someone with an immune disorder, use pasteurized shell eggs.

Separate the eggs and store the whites for another purpose. Beat the yolks with sugar and nutmeg in a large mixing bowl until the mixture lightens in color and falls off the whisk in a solid “ribbon.” Combine dairy, alcohol and salt in a second bowl or pitcher, then slowly beat into the egg mixture. Move to a large glass jar (or a couple of smaller ones) and store in the refrigerator for at least two weeks. A month is better, and two better still. Serve in mugs or cups topped with a little extra nutmeg grated right on top.

PIPING HOT PIZZA PIE IS ON THE MENU AT JO’S FAMOUS PIZZA. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

FAV E

JO’S FAMOUS PIZZA

Pizza is serious business in Oklahoma. Everyone has a favorite, whether it is classic pepperoni or a pie topped with everything. At Jo’s Famous Pizza, the classics are plentiful, to be sure, but this pizza joint throws tradition to the wind when it comes to adding new options to the menu. The newest incarnation, the chili dog pizza, is a pie topped with Schwab’s chili and franks, cheddar cheese, mustard and freshly chopped onions. The BLT pizza is topped with classic pizza sauce and mozzarella cheese, then covered in crispy bacon pieces. Once out of the oven, crispy iceberg lettuce and fresh, ripe tomatoes are added. Though Jo’s strives to keep its menu innovative, some things have not changed since the pizzeria first opened in 1962 in Purcell. Jo’s dough is made from scratch, using the same recipe for more than 50 years. 900 S. Kelly Ave., Edmond; 1438 S. Green Ave., Purcell. www.josfamouspizza.com – Jami Mattox DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

Satire Knocking At Your Door

PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS.

S

Broadway hit The Book of Mormon to visit Oklahoma City.

atire and musical theater create Tony Award-winning entertainment in the Broadway hit play The Book of Mormon, opening Tuesday, Dec. 30, at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. About a pair of young missionaries sent to a small, rural village in Uganda on a mission for the Mormon church, The Book of Mormon, which debuted on Broadway in 2011, has amused, perplexed and even provoked. The play was created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone of television’s South Park with Robert Lopez, the co-composer and co-lyricist of another Broadway hit, Avenue Q. If Parker and Stone are less acquainted with live theater, they’re old hat at blasting political correctness, and The Book of Mormon takes plenty of opportunities to do just that. Devout young men Elder Kevin Price and Elder Arnold Cunningham are sent to Uganda to fulfill a two-year mission – mandatory for those of the Mormon faith. Straight off the plane, the naïve and upbeat pair run into members of a local militia headed by a warlord. In their assigned village, they meet the residents, whose lives are constantly under threat of punishment and death. While the people of their temporary home deal with excruciating poverty, famine, disease and war, the awkward missionaries optimistically strike out to convert locals

but soon encounter inner conflict in the harsh new setting. Although the play has had its criticisms for its depiction of the villagers as one-note, uncomplicated souls facing daily horrors with bravery, The Book of Mormon has largely been hailed. It won nine Tony Awards, including the one for Best Musical, as well as top honors from the Drama Desk Awards and the Laurence Olivier Award. The play went through a long development period as the South Park pals, who have explored religion and Mormonism through their longrunning Comedy Central animated show, developed it with Lopez. To be sure, The Book of Mormon looks at the very real atrocities many people in the world know too well, but not every satire or musical is as adept at highlighting the irony of those who try to heal the world without understanding its underpinnings or even their own problems. The Book of Mormon opens at 7:30 p.m. in the Thelma Gaylord Performing Arts Theatre of the downtown Oklahoma City music hall, 201 N. Walker Ave. The play runs daily through Jan. 4 with matinee performances scheduled over the weekend. Tickets to The Book of Mormon are $35-$85, available at www.myticketoffice.com. KAREN SHADE DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

to villages brutalized by a local warlord in the Tony Award-winning Best Musical touring to the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www. okcciviccenter.com

GREGORY CRANE SET DESIGN. IMAGE COURTESY OKC BALLET.

Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES Tulsa Festival Ringers

Thru Dec. 3 Bring lunch and enjoy great music at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center as the ringers group plays holiday favorites. www.tulsapac.com

The Christmas Show

Dec. 4-6 Oklahoma City Philharmonic is at it again with a line-up of great talent for its annual holiday spectacular at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcphilharmonic.org

The Best Christmas Pageant Ever Dec. 5-14 Clark Youth Theatre stages the hilarious story of a group of no-good kids that suddenly become the stars of the annual Christmas pageant. Henthorne Performing Arts Center. www.cityoftulsa.org/henthornepac

Canterbury Christmas

Dec. 7 The sounds of the season are back and in beautiful arrangement for this program of the Canterbury Choral Society in concert with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.canterburyokc.com

A Christmas Carol

Dec. 11-23 American Theatre Company’s magical musical adaptation of the Charles Dickens’ story about a hardened soul who must reconnect to humanity before it’s too late returns to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.americantheatrecompany.org

So You Think You Can Dance

Dec. 12 The Fox television dance competition goes live in theaters for a tour. Look for it at the Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Christmas with Barry Epperley Dec. 12-13 Former Signature Symphony artistic director Barry Epperley returns to the podium for a holiday tradition of music that includes The Nutcracker, Messiah and other classical favorites at the Tulsa Community College VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education. www. signaturesymphony.org

The Nutcracker

Dec. 12-21 The fantasy and splendor envisioned by Tulsa Ballet is back for the holiday season with drama, dance, music and highlights to delight audiences at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsaballet.org

The Nutcracker

Dec. 13-22 The traditional rendition of the fantasy Christmas classic is told by Oklahoma City Ballet with never-beforeseen sets and costumes along with Tchaikovsky’s score played by the Oklahoma City Philharmonic at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcballet.org

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Moscow Classical Ballet’s The Nutcracker Dec. 19-21 The Walton Arts

Center in Fayetteville, Ark., welcomes back the Moscow Classical Ballet for the perennial ballet favorite featuring some of Russia’s finest dancers on stage. www.waltonartscenter.org

The Game’s Afoot, or Holmes for the Holidays Thru Dec.20 Carpenter Square Theatre sets the stage with the story of a Broadway actor, who made his name playing Sherlock Holmes and who must assume his detective persona in real life when a guest at his castle ends up dead during a holiday weekend stay. www.carpentersquare.com

A Territorial Christmas Carol Thru Dec. 21 This adaptation of the favorite Charles Dickens novel sets Ebenezer Scrooge in Indian Territory for a tale of brotherhood and goodwill set against the Oklahoma Land Run. www. thepollard.org Christmas Eve with The Ambassadors Dec. 24 The Oklahoma City concert

Debby Boone

choir celebrates the holiday with a concert of classical, gospel, secular and popular Christmas music. www.ambassadorschoir.com

A Ceremony of Carols and Gregorian Chant with Jazz Dec. 19 The

Lyric’s A Christmas Carol Thru Dec. 27 Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma brings back its fourth annual holiday spectacular – a musical based on Charles Dickens’ classic story about living the holiday spirit. Look for it at Lyric at the Plaza. www.lyrictheatreokc.com

Dec. 19 Best known for her 1977 hit song “You Light Up My Life,” singer Debby Boone brings a special holiday show of music and theater to the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center. www.brokenarrowpac.com

OKC Phil’s The Christmas Show

Dec. 1 Brady Theater. www. bradytheater.com

Mr. Gnome, Young Tongue Dec. 1 The Conservatory. www.conservatoryokc.com Issues Dec. 2 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Dec. 2-3 Bartlesville Community Center. www. bartlesvillecommunitycenter.com John Fullbright

www.bluedoorokc.com

Dec. 3 The Blue Door. Dec.

4 Mabee Center. www.mabeecenter.com

The Nutcracker When a company goes about re-envisioning a classic, it inevitably stares at the possibility of reinventing it. How far can you take a timeless favorite before it loses its familiar appeal? The Oklahoma City Ballet Co. certainly considered the variables when it redesigned its production of The Nutcracker, a traditional telling of the holiday classic about a girl, a nutcracker doll and a dream that creates magic on Christmas Eve. Set to Tchaikovsky’s sparkling musical masterpiece, the ballet company brings a spritely telling of the story with new sets by Emmy Award-winning scenic designer Gregory Crane and new costumes from Susanne Hubbs – both thanks to presenter Devon Energy. The Nutcracker opens on Saturday, Dec. 13, with shows at 2 and 7 p.m. at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., Oklahoma City. Single tickets for this perennial favorite go on sale Nov. 3. For more about the production and company, visit www.okcballet.org. Dec. 6 Those stirring works of the Yule season by Romantic era composers such as Tchaikovsky and Mendelssohn are the stars of a new program from Tulsa Symphony at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsasymphony.org

IN CONCERT Bush

Chonda Pierce, Jason Crabb

PERFORMANCES

Simply Romantic Holiday

The Drunkard and The Olio Ongoing The melodrama continues with heroes, damsels in distress and over-the-top characters plus a musical revue featuring celebrity drop-in guests most Saturdays of the year at the Spotlight Theatre. www.spotlighttheatre.org

Tulsa Oratorio Chorus brings the Benjamin Britten holiday favorite for harp to the Cascia Hall Performing Arts Center along with a collection of beautiful Gregorian chants in concert. www.myticketoffice.com

The Book of Mormon

Dec. 30-Jan. 4 The musical satire by the creators of television’s South Park and the lyricist of Avenue Q tells of two Mormon missionaries bringing their message

Netsky Dec. 4 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Mama Sweet

bluedoorokc.com

Dec. 4 The Blue Door. www.

Chris Duarte

Dec. 4 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Trans-Siberian Orchestra: The Christmas Attic Dec. 4 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com

Justin Timberlake

Dec. 5 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

Lee Ann Womack Dec. 5 Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center. www.brokenarrowpac. com Helen Kelter Skelter Dec. 5 Opolis Bar & Micro Venue. www.opolis.org Ryan Adams, Jenny Lewis

Dec.

6 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Mayday, Murs Dec. 6 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Aaron Carter Dec. 6 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com Krampus HQ Lounge Dec. 6 Opolis Bar & Micro Venue. www.opolis.org Melissa Etheridge

Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Dec. 7 Brady

Under the Streetlamp

Dec. 7 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. www. grandresortok.com

A Day to Remember

Dec. 7 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Aaron Lewis Dec. 7 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Trans-Siberian Orchestra

Dec. 7 C h e s a p e a k e E n e r g y A r e n a . w w w. chesapeakearena.com

The Greencards

Dec. 8 The Blue Door.

In This Moment

Dec. 9 Brady Theater.

www.bluedoorokc.com

www.bradytheater.com

Graham Elwood Dec. 11 Oklahoma C o n t e m p o r a r y A r t s C e n t e r. w w w. oklahomacontemporary.org The Brian Setzer Orchestra Dec. 11 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com


OU Women’s Basketball

www.

soonersports.com v. Yale Dec. 30

TU Women’s Basketball

IN CONCERT

PHOTO BY TOM MUNRO / RCA RECORDS.

Justin Timberlake Only a year ago, Justin Timberlake’s name was on every tongue in Tulsa. The suave entertainer and inheritor of soulful suit-and-tie appeal was set to play the BOK Center. Hotel rooms booked up, and fans – dressed to emulate the sophisticated vibe of Timberlake’s 20/20 Experience album – went out on the town to live the good life. Tulsa welcomed it and talked about it for days after the final encore. Oklahoma City is hoping to repeat the experience when J.T. brings his extended 20/20 Experience World Tour to the Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 W. Reno Ave., this month. Oklahoma City is one of several major cities added to the tour “due to popular demand.” Timberlake goes on stage at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 5. Tickets are available for $49.50$175 at www.chesapeakearena. com, but if his 2013 Tulsa show is any indicator, don’t be surprised if the remaining passes are swooped up quickly.

Kevin and Dustin Welch

Dec. 11, 13 The Blue Door, www.bluedoorokc.com, and Woody Guthrie Center in Tulsa, www. woodyguthriecenter.org

Cowboy Troy Dec. 11 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com EOTO Dec. 11 The Conservatory. www. conservatoryokc.com Tech N9ne

Dec. 11 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Stoney LaRue Dec. 12 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Brian Pounds

www.bluedoorokc.com

Dec. 12 The Blue Door.

John Fullbright, Travis Linville Dec. 13 Mitchell Hall Theater, University of Central Oklahoma. www.ticketstorm.com

From Indian Lakes

Dec. 14 The Conservatory. www.conservatoryokc.com

Tribute to Woody Guthrie

Leon Rollerson Dec. 16 Gilcrease Museum. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu December Songs

Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Jon Dee Graham www.bluedoorokc.com

Dec. 19 The Blue Door.

We The Ghost

Dec. 19 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Down

Dec. 19 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net

The Black Keys

www.bokcenter.com

Josh Abbott Band

Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Blue October

Dec. 14 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Melissa Etheridge

Dec. 17 The Blue

Jake Johannsen Dec. 17 Oklahoma C o n t e m p o r a r y A r t s C e n t e r. w w w. oklahomacontemporary.org

Kevin and Dustin Welch Dec. 1 3 W o o d y G u t h r i e C e n t e r. w w w . woodyguthriecenter.org Dec. 13 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Dec.

14 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Dec. 20 BOK Center.

Tequila Songbirds

Dec. 20 The Blue

An Evening with Ian Moore Dec. 2 0 W o o d y G u t h r i e C e n t e r. w w w . woodyguthriecenter.org 19th Annual Red Dirt Christmas Dec.20 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom. com

Ian Moore Dec. 21 The Blue Door. www. bluedoorokc.com Turnpike Troubadours Dec. 2627 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom. com

Stoney LaRue Dec. 27 Riverwind Casino. www.riverwind. com

Eddie Izzard Dec. 27 Winstar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Sir Charles

Dec. 27 Greenwood Cultural Center. www.ticketstorm.com

Moai Broadcast

www.tulsashrine.com

Dec. 27 The Shrine.

Rodney Carrington Dec. 27-28 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. www. grandresortok.com Felix Cavaliere’s Rascals

Dec. 29 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Reverend Horton Heat Shrine. www.tulsashrine.com

Dec. 30 The

Groovy New Year’s Eve Celebration Dec. 31 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort,

Shawnee. www.grandresortok.com

SPORTS OKC Thunder

www.nba.com/thunder v. Milwaukee Dec. 9 v. Cleveland Dec. 11 v. Phoenix Dec. 14 v. New Orleans Dec. 21 v. Portland Dec. 23 v. Charlotte Dec. 26 v. Phoenix Dec. 31

OKC Blue

www.nba.com/dleague/oklahomacity v. Bakersfield Dec. 1 v. Rio Grande Valley Dec. 10 v. Texas Dec. 11 v. Los Angeles Dec. 26

OKC Barons

www.okcbarons.com

v. Utica Dec. 2 v. Grand Rapids Dec. 12-13 v. Rockford Dec. 20-21 v. Charlotte Dec. 28-31

Tulsa Oilers v. Allen Dec. 2 v. Allen Dec. 5

www.tulsaoilers.com

www

.tulsahurricane.com v. Saint Louis Dec. 3 v. Arkansas Dec. 14 v. New Orleans Dec. 18 v. UALR Dec. 21 v. Cincinnati Dec. 31

Tulsa Revolution

www.bokcenter.com

v. Missouri Dec. 6 v. Wichita Dec. 27

WWE Smackdown

Dec. 1-2 The pro wrestling showdown will feature WWE superstars Kane, Dean Ambrose, Seth Rollins, Bray Wyatt and others at the BOK Center in Tulsa (Dec. 1) and Chesapeake Energy Arena (Dec. 2). www. bokcenter.com, www.chesapeakearena.com

Oil Capital Stampede

Dec. 5-7 The U.S. Team Roping Championship competition takes place at Expo Square. www.ustrc.com

Liquid Nitro Arenacross

Dec. 6-7 Motor dirt bikes make the leap in fast-paced action at the Claremore Expo Center. www. motorheadevents.com

2014 World Championship Barrel Racing Futurity Dec. 9-13 More than

$70,000 is at stake during the five-day competition at this 29th annual event at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.bfaworld.com

American Finals Rodeo Dec.12-14 The top contenders at the 38th annual American Cowboys Rodeo Association showdown will be at the top of their game for bull riding, steer roping, barrel racing and more at Expo Square. www.acrarodeo.com SandRidge Santa Run

Dec. 13 The race to the holidays is on in downtown Oklahoma City with the 5k race and other events that include appearances from Rumble the Bison and more. www.downtownindecember.com

OSU Basketball v. Wichita Dec. 10 v. Brampton Dec. 12 v. Quad City Dec. 13 v. Wichita Dec. 17 v. Rapid City Dec. 19 v. Allen Dec. 21 v. Allen Dec. 28 v. Rapid City Dec. 30

OU Football

www.soonersports.com

v. Oklahoma State Dec. 6

ORU Men’s Basketball www.oruathletics.com v. Missouri State Dec. 7 v. New Mexico State Dec. 13 v. Haskell Dec. 28

OSU Men’s Basketball

www.okstate.com

v. North Texas Dec. 3 v. Middle Tenn. State Dec. 16 v. Maryland Dec. 21

OU Men’s Basketball

www.soonersports.com

v. Missouri Dec. 5 v. Oral Roberts Dec. 16 v. Weber State Dec. 22 v. George Mason Dec. 31

TU Men’s Basketball

other walkers in Tulsa for a holiday-themed trot around downtown Tulsa followed by festivities and Santa. www.arthritis.org/oklahoma www.tulsahurricane.

com v. Creighton Dec. 3 v. SE Oklahoma State Dec. 10 v. Oklahoma Dec. 13 v. Missouri State Dec. 17 v. Incarnate Word Dec. 22

2014 NCAA Women’s Volleyball Championship Dec. 18-20 The NCAA Big

12 Conference and Oklahoma City All Sports Association host the tournament to decide the best teams of women’s college volleyball with play at the Chesapeake Energy Arena. www. okcallsports.org

ORU Women’s Basketball

www.

oruathletics.com v. SW Christian Dec. 2 v. Eastern Michigan Dec. 6 v. Grand Canyon Dec. 12 v. St. Gregory’s Dec. 29

2014 Under Armour All-America High School Volleyball Match Dec. 19 The top high school volleyball players in the U.S. unite for a match at the Chesapeake Energy Arena during the NCAA volleyball event. www.chesapeakearena.com

OSU Women’s Basketball okstate.com v. Arkansas-Pine Bluff Dec. 2 v. New Orleans Dec. 15 v. NW State Dec. 29

Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis Dec. 13 Get in the spirit with hundreds of

www.

Race Into the New Year

Dec. 31 Start 2015 right with a 5k running/walking race at 11:45 p.m. and ending with New Year’s Eve festivities and noisemakers at River West Festival Park. www.runnersworldtulsa.com

DECEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

seum of Art examines Abstract Expressionism in the American Southwest through works by artists from all over the country who found inspiration in the landscapes of Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico in post-World War II America. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Traditional Cowboy Arts Association 16th Annual Exhibition & Sale Thru Jan. 4 The arts of silversmithing,

PHOTO COURTESY PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART.

saddlemaking and other specialty crafts used to create stunning specimens of practical ranch-life implements are showcased at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

COMMUNIT Y

Philbrook Festival of Trees Year-round, Philbrook Museum of Art exhibits some of the greatest works of art from antiquity to contemporary. Housing pieces by Bellini to Picasso and Rachel Whiteread, Philbrook, once a year, shifts its focus from masterpieces to centerpieces and holiday-themed crafts and artwork. The 30th annual Philbrook Festival of Trees continues through Sunday, Dec. 14, at the museum located at 2727 S. Rockford Road in Tulsa. Featuring specially decorated trees, sculptures, paintings and craft works created by regional artists, Festival of Trees and its gift and décor sale help the museum maintain its collections and offer the experience of art to all. The festival also lights up the museum’s grounds and gardens each Thursday evening until 8 p.m., but also look for the Children’s art party on Dec. 7 and a holiday floral arranging lecture on Dec. 9. Admission is free for museum members and $12 for others ($10 for seniors). Go to www. philbrook.org for a complete schedule and more information about the festival and museum.

ART Small Works, Great Wonders Thru Dec. 1 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum holds its annual winter art sale and exhibit, giving art collectors the opportunity to purchase works by invited Western artists featured in the museum’s annual Prix de West show. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Small Works 2014

Dec. 4-24 M.A. Doran Gallery hosts its 35th annual show featuring new works by represented artists. Works include painting, sculpture, jewelry and holiday ornaments. www.madorangallery.org

AHHA Studio Artists Show

Caroling in the Caverns

FAMILY Junie B in Jingle Bells Batman Smells Dec. 1-17 Christmas is right on schedule and perfect for Junie B Jones until she pulls the name of her mortal enemy for her Secret Santa in the hilarious play at the Children’s Center for Arts from Oklahoma Children’s Theatre. www.oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

Aqua Tots Dec. 3 Monthly story time in the Shark View Room at Oklahoma Aquarium for small children. www.okaquarium.org Kids Dig Books: Imagine Yourself Dec. 4 Gilcrease Museum hosts a story time event for young children. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

Children’s pARTy

Dec. 7 Children create art projects for the holiday at this family event that includes cookies and milk with Santa at Philbrook Museum of Art. www. philbrook.org

Scuba Santa Thru Dec. 21 Saint Nicholas takes a dive at Oklahoma Aquarium with the coral reef fishes. www.okaquarium.org Funday Sunday with Santa

Dec. 21 Spend the afternoon at Gilcrease Museum and enjoy an art hunt, activities and holiday

106

cheer. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Red Dirt Dinos

Thru February The Tulsa Children’s Museum and its Discovery Lab bring three animatronic dinosaurs and plenty of hands-on exhibits to its gallery. www. tulsachildrensmuseum.org

Move It! Scramble

Thru February Repurposed cardboard drums create a hands-on puzzle that allows children to crawl in and climb to solve. www.tulsachildrensmuseum.org

Art Adventures

Ongoing Children 3-5 experience art every Tuesday morning at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman, with special guests. Go online for schedules and other information. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Second Saturdays Ongoing Families enjoy the Philbrook Museum of Art and participate in art activities for free on the second Saturday of every month. www.philbrook.org Tiny Tuesdays and Drop-in Art Ongoing Guest artists at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art Education Center help families with young children create together and understand the museum artworks the third Tuesday of each month. www.okcmoa.com

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Dec. 5-14 The Hardesty Arts Center exhibits works created through its AHHA Studio Artists program, including those by John Bryant (multimedia), Brooke Golightly (photography) John Hammer (painting), Sharyl Landis (fiber art) and Daniel Sutliff (multimedia). www.ahhatulsa.org

Champagne and Chocolate

Dec. 5-20 The art exhibit portion of Living Arts of Tulsa’s annual fundraiser gala will include inventive and unique works by area artists up for sale to support the gallery behind some of the town’s coolest shows. www.livingarts.org

Contemporary in west Texas culminates in an exhibit of video, performance, sculpture and photography to explore borderlands on display at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center. www. oklahomacontemporary.org

Frontier to Foundry: The Making of Small Bronze Sculpture in the Gilcrease Collection Dec. 21-March 23 The Gilcrease Museum collection of art contains more than 200 small bronze sculptures by such names as Frederic Remington, Henry Kirke Brown and Charles M. Russell. A new exhibit reveals the development of the bronze casting craft and industry and how 19th century American sculptors shaped it and art. www. gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Cowboy Artists of America 49th Annual Sale and Exhibition Thru Jan. 4 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum displays fine Western art in everything from drawing to painting and sculpture. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org

Macrocosm/Microcosm

Thru Jan. 4 A new exhibition at the Fred Jones Jr. Mu-

A Creative Union: Howard Cook & Barbara Latham Thru Jan.4 Philbrook

Museum of Art looks at the works of artist couple Howard Cook and Barbara Latham and how each influenced the other’s works in a variety of media. www.philbrook.org

John James Audobon and the Artist as Naturalist Thru Jan. 5 The

famed naturalist and artist known for his vibrant paintings of American wildlife and plants is explored at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. www. crystalbridges.org

Formed in Stone: The Natural Beauty of Fossils Thru Jan. 4 The photographic exhibit reveals the geometric beauty found in fossils dating back millions of years. Several physical specimens are included in the exhibition at the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History. www.snomnh.ou.edu

Impact: The Philbrook Indian Annual Thru Jan. 11 Philbrook Museum of

Art explores the impact of the Philbrook Indian Annual exhibition, a juried exhibition and sale that highlighted the fine art of American Indian artists from 1946 to 1979. Works from Allan Houser, Dick West, Joe Hererra, Helen Hardin and others entered into the annual through the years and purchased will be part of this retrospective show. www.philbrook.org

My Generation: Young Chinese Artists Thru Jan. 18 The Oklahoma City

Museum of Art exhibit looks at the new generation of Chinese artists born after the Cultural Revolution. The exhibit will include paintings, video installations, multimedia work, photography and more addressing alienation, identity and rebellion. www.okcmoa.com

Here & Now: Contemporary Native American Art of Oklahoma Thru Jan. 18 Contemporary American Indian artists working across multiple media present pieces at 108 Contemporary. www.108contemporary.org

Rare: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species Thru Jan. 19 The

Sam Noble Museum of Natural History presents portraits from Joel Sartore’s book of the same name. Works include photos of bald eagles, sea turtles, species on the rebound (red wolves, American alligator) and those that went extinct as the book was produced. www.snomnh.ou.edu

The Many Faces of Jerusalem Thru Jan. 31 The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art exhibits this collection of art quilts from the Israel Quilters Association that

Spiritual Hunger Dec. 5-27 The work of Norman artist Laura Reese gets a solo exhibition at Project Box Community Art Space. The collection includes paintings, drawings and a community garden grown in the gallery. www. theprojectboxokc.com Fire & Ice

Dec. 5-Jan. 25 Handcrafted art glass and contemporary glass pieces created by students and staff along with guest artists at Tulsa Glassblowing School are displayed in a show of sculpture, vases and more at the Zarrow Center for Art and Education. www. gilcrease.utulsa.edu

The Wild Bunch Thru Dec. 8 Lovetts Gallery holds a special group show for three artists along with live demonstrations. www. lovettsgallery.com Border Land Other

Thru Dec. 19 Artist K. Yoland’s four-month residency at Marfa

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the holidays with Oklahomans for Equality to benefit the Parish Church of St. Jerome’s food bank, A Friend for a Friend and Our House Too, which have programs assisting persons living with HIV and AIDS. www.okeq.org

Creekmore Holiday Express

Dec. 1-23 Ride the Holiday Express Train for a colorful journey featuring hundreds of animated holiday lights and visits to illuminated displays in Fort Smith, Ark., including River Park Downtown, Pendergraft Park, Garrison Avenue and the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith. www. fortsmith.org

Bethlehem Walk Dec. 4-7 Christview Christian Church of Tulsa welcomes all to its guided living Nativity, an area favorite for Christmas. 918.232.3587 UCO WinterGlow Dec. 5 The University of Central Oklahoma holds its family holiday festival on campus with a ceremonial treelighting, carriage rides, Santa’s workshop and more. www.uco.edu Festival of Lights Christmas Parade Dec. 5 Sand Springs holds its an-

nual parade, one of the oldest and largest of its kind in the state. www.sandspringschamber.com

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event includes traditional and contemporary fine arts and crafts, such as pottery, woodworking, fiber art, glass photography and more in Little Rock, Ark. www.arkansascraftguild.org

Frontier to Foundry: The Making of Small Bronze Sculpture in the Gilcrease Collection Art covers the walls of exhibit halls and rooms in Gilcrease Museum, but it also gets plenty of square footage. Frontier to Foundry: The Making of Small Bronze Sculpture in the Gilcrease Collection spotlights those treasures of the three-dimensional variety. Opening Sunday, Dec. 21, the exhibition brings some of the more than 200 small bronze sculptures in the group to the forefront. Frontier to Foundry will examine the art and skill employed to make some of the earliest casts by renowned artists Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell as well as works by Thomas Ball, Paul Wayland Bartlett and others. Examining bronze- and sand-casting techniques, the exhibit also looks at processes that revolutionized sculpture at the turn of the 20th century. Frontier to Foundry continues through March at 1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road, Tulsa. For more, visit www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu. presents a patchwork of Jerusalem’s diverse life. www.jewishmuseum.net

Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves Thru Jan. 31 The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art brings a show of portraits by the accomplished photographer and actor best known as the original Spock in the Star Trek franchise. www.jewishmuseum.net

Born of Fire: Ceramic Art from Regional Collections Thru March 2 Fired

clay takes many forms in this exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark., and explores its use in art through time and around the world. www. crystalbridges.org

Drama, Death, Dirge: Frederic Remington’s American West Thru March 8 The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art exhibits four exceptional pieces by the famed painter that display the attributes for which he was most loved. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Fever & Flash: Pop in the 1970s Thru March 15 Pop art’s hold into the 1970s is the focus of a new exhibition at Philbrook Downtown and examines the contributions of Claes Oldenburg, Eduardo Paolozzi and others. The exhibit

also features an album of Polaroid photos by Andy Warhol. www.philbrook.org

Works include photos by Laura Gilpin, prints by Andy Warhol and more. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Shifting Focus: Historical Photos, Contemporary Art Thru April 26 His-

Ongoing Philbrook Downtown exhibits abstract work in all its manifestations. www.philbrook.org

torical photos by Edward S. Curtis and others of American Indian leaders and ordinary people provide the inspiration for works by contemporary American Indian artists, who translate images and portraits of old into modern media and works in an exhibit at Philbrook Downtown. www. philbrook.org

Orly Genger: Terra Thru Oct. 2 This massive outdoor art installation made of more than a million feet of lobster-fishing rope – woven, painted and stretched across Oklahoma City’s Campbell Park – creates a unique experience. www.oklahomacontemporary.org Identity & Inspiration Ongoing Philbrook Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s extensive collection of American Indian art work and artifacts. www.philbrook. org Recent Acquisitions of Photography and Works on Paper Ongoing Art

work in a variety of media and styles collected over the past five years by the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art go on display for the public.

Opening Abstraction

Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the

Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s collection of works created by the celebrated glass artist. www.okcmoa.com

Focus on Favorites

ongoing A Gilcrease Museum exhibit highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

First Friday Gallery Walk

Ongoing The galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo.com

First Friday Art Crawl

Ongoing Stroll the Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at the Guthrie Green and other venues. www.thebradyartsdistrict.com.

2nd Friday Circuit Art

Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman.com

Weekends On Us

Ongoing Free admission to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum the first full weekend of every month. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

CHARITABLE EVENTS Holiday Helpers Nov.-Jan. The Children’s Center’s annual gift drive from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day helps needy children with essential needs. www.tccokc.org 100 Years of Women with Moxie Dec. 2 Join YWCA Tulsa at the DoubleTree by Hilton Downtown Tulsa Hotel to celebrate a century of honoring extraordinary Tulsa women. www.100womenwithmoxie.org

Brian Setzer Orchestra PHOTO COURTESY HARD ROCK TULSA HOTEL & CASINO.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary Christmas Luncheon & Fashion Show Dec. 2 Make a luncheon

Christkindlmarkt Dec. 5-7 The GermanAmerican Society of Tulsa brings the German tradition of holiday markets to Tulsa for a three-day shopping event that includes traditional German foods, ornaments and more. www. gastulsa.org The Bead Market

date with other supporters of the Salvation Army Tulsa Area Command at the Cox Business Center, where guests will find a holiday shopping event and fashion show. www.salarmytulsa.org

Jingle and Mingle

Dec. 3 The Myriad Botanical Gardens’ holiday party invites all to festive bites, auctions, vendors, drinks and entertainment in its decorated visitors lobby and the Crystal Bridge Tropical Conservatory. www. oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com

Champagne and Chocolate Gala Dec. 4 The fundraiser for Living Arts of Tulsa lives up to its name and more with decadent bites, art auctions, live entertainment and more at the gallery. www.livingarts.org

St. Jude Dinner

Dec. 4 Enjoy a special four-course experience at the Melting Pot in Tulsa and Oklahoma City with a generous percentage of the night’s proceeds going to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. www.meltingpot. com/tulsa

Night of Hospitality

Dec. 4 Hospitality House of Tulsa invites you to its annual all-out Christmas light show and the kick-off delivery of its waiting room survival kits (distributed to area hospitals for out-of-town families in medical crisis). www.tulsahospitalityhouse.org

WomenWhoCareShareLuncheon Dec. 4 Join the YWCA of Oklahoma City for a luncheon event of networking and celebrating survivors of domestic violence at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. www. ywcaokc.org

Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award Dinner Dec. 5 The

Dec. 5-7 Vendors of fossils, minerals, antique beads, equipment to make jewelry and more set up at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.thebeadmarket.net

Boys Ranch Town Drive-Thru Christmas Pageant Dec. 5-19 The

Edmond tradition continues with Boys Ranch Town residents, staff and families making up this living Nativity experience on a ranch with animals. www.obhc.org

Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Presentation Dec. 6 Author

Ann Patchett (Bel Canto, State of Wonder) shares her work, stories from her career and experience at Hardesty Regional Library as part of the Tulsa Library Trust’s weekend honoring Patchett and her work. www.helmerichaward.org

Cowboy Christmas Parade Dec. 6 Hitch up the wagon for a Western-style parade with longhorn steer, cowboys, American Indian dancers and Santa in Oklahoma City’s Historic Stockyards City. www.stockyardscity.org Carols and Crumpets

Dec. 6 The Tulsa Herb Society brings homemade crafts and art to its holiday sale and show at the Tulsa Garden Center. www.tulsagardencenter.com

Indie Trunk Show

Dec. 6 Crafters, artists and more bring their goods from handmade to vintage and repurposed to Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.indietrunkshowokc.com

Minco Honey Festival

Dec. 6 The 24th festival honors agrarian living with vendors selling the best of the region, including honey, dairy and gift products. www.minco-ok.com

National Reining Horse Futurity & Adequan North American Affiliate Championship Show Thru

Tulsa Library Trust honors renowned author Ann Patchett (Patron Saint of Liars, Bel Canto) at this black-tie dinner and ceremony sponsored by Oklahoma Magazine. www.helmerichaward.org

Dec. 6 The National Reining Horse Association brings excellence in horsemanship to Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.nrhafuturity.com

Cascia Christmas Walk

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Dec.7 Guests can tour the Cascia Hall Preparatory School’s monastery as well as three magnificently decorated homes for this annual event that includes a holiday boutique, tasty treats and more. www. casciahall.org

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Oklahoma City Train Show Dec. 6-7 Toy train collectors play at Oklahoma City State Fair Park. www.okctrainshow.com Caroling in the Caverns Dec. 6-21 Christmas comes to the Blanchard Springs Caverns near Mountain View, Ark., with live


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in downtown Oklahoma City with fireworks, live entertainment on 16 stages and a lot of festivities celebrating the arts. www. artscouncilokc.com

Rhema Christmas Lights

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Thru Jan. 1 Broken Arrow’s Rhema Bible Church flips the switch for thousands of light displays and prepares for an onslaught of visitors. www.rhemabiblechurch.com

SPORTS

Bedlam Football 2014 Bumper stickers, license plate frames, front doormats and even garden gnomes effectively proclaim an utterly fascinating fact of life in Oklahoma – many houses remain divided, showing their true colors during Bedlam. The annual pigskin showdown between Stillwater’s Oklahoma State University Cowboys and Norman’s University of Oklahoma Sooners is back on Saturday, Dec. 6, this year at Norman’s Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, 180 W. Brooks St., on the OU campus. The final game of the regular season, the Bedlam game has become one of the state’s biggest sports match-ups both on the field and off. All too often the rivalry plays out in living rooms across the state and around the nation as Cowboys cohabitating with Sooners endure one another’s verbal taunts. In Oklahoma, that’s tradition. For tickets, more about the game and about game broadcast, go to www.soonersports.com. holiday music resounding among the cavern’s formations. www.blanchardsprings.org

Tulsa Farm Show

Dec. 11-13 Expo Square presents the 21st annual agricultural and ranching show, featuring equipment and farming products plus demonstrations for professionals. www.tulsafarmshow.com

Living Nativity at Shepherd’s Cross Dec. 11-20 Claremore’s Shepherd’s

Cross decks the barns and fields for its annual living Nativity attraction and festival. www. shepherdscross.com

2 Friends & Junk

Dec. 12-13 Custom jewelry, fashions and other gift items are part of this show at Expo Square. www.exposquare. com

Tulsa Christmas Parade Dec. 13 The one-and-only holiday parade for Tulsa gets underway with a new name and all the favorite attractions, including giant balloons, marching bands and glowing floats through downtown Tulsa. www.tulsachristmasparade.org Spirit, Mind & Body Psychic Expo Dec. 13-14 The Oklahoma Psychic Educational Research Association shares research and

knowledge at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.operaok.org

R.K. Gun Show

Dec. 13-14 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.rkshows.com

Fort Reno Christmas Guns

Dec. 14 Cannons and guns make a big noise during the Historic Fort Reno tradition, based on German and American folklore to ward off bad spirits during the holidays. www. fortreno.org

Philbrook Festival of Trees Thru Dec. 14 Philbrook Museum of Art goes all out for the holidays with its annual festival of specially decorated trees, original ornaments, handmade gifts, member parties, lights display and more festivites on the schedule. www.philbrook.org

Michael Martin Murphey’s Cowboy Christmas Ball Dec. 19 This year’s holiday dance, entertainment and dining event is the 20th annual for the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum – which features the talents of Michael Martin Murphy and his “Twelve Days of Cowboy Christmas.” www.nationalcowboymuseum. org

Experience the Light Thru Dec. 20 Enjoy a Christmas festival, living Nativity scenes, drive-thru light display, Christmas carols, hot chocolate and cookies at the Great Passion Play in the Ozarks near Eureka Springs, Ark. www.greatpassionplay.com

Oklahoma City Gun Show Dec. The Black Keys 110

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014

20-21 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okcgunshow.com

A Territorial Christmas Celebration Thru Dec. 21 Guthrie’s historic

buildings are the perfect backdrop for this annual celebration that includes historic home tours, music, theater, a parade and more. www.guthrieok.com

Woolaroc Wonderland of Lights Thru Dec. 21 Woolaroc Museum

& Wildlife Preserve turns on its display of holiday lights for the season and families. www.woolaroc.org

Winter Solstice Walks Dec. 21 Walk the grounds of the Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center to mark the change of seasons and learn about the Caddoan culture and people that constructed skillfully-aligned mounds hundreds of years ago. www.okhistory.org Gun, Knife & Outdoor Equipment Show Dec. 27-28 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com

The Polar Express

Thru Dec. 28 Families can hop aboard the magical train ride straight out of the Chris Van Allsburg children’s story. The Polar Express departs the restored train depot at the Bristow Historical Museum and includes a variety of activities for children and families to enjoy before and during the excursion. www.easternflyerpolarexpressride.com

Holiday Lights On The Hill

Thru Dec. 28 The west Tulsa neighborhood lights up the holidays with drive-thru light displays, holiday music and a festive atmosphere along with hot chocolate, carriage rides and visits with Santa. 918.591.6053

Oklahoma Paint Horse Club Holiday Classic Dec.28-Jan.3 Horse-

men, families and fans of the paint horse turn out at Oklahoma State Fair Park for the 10th annual celebration of the breed and riding with shows, New Year’s Eve exhibitor party, auctions and a chili cook-off. www. oklahomaphc.net

Chesapeake Energy Holiday Lights Display Thru Jan.3 This display,

which includes buildings and trees covered in millions of LED lights, covers eight city blocks surrounding Chesapeake Energy, and is an area favorite for holiday viewing.

Santa’s Adventures on the Oklahoma River Thru Jan. 4 Take a tour and gander of the many attractions at Oklahoma City’s Boathouse District Riversport Adventures, decorated for the holidays. www.boathousedistrict.org

Downtown in December

Thru Jan. 4 Downtown Oklahoma City gets dressed in holiday color and lights for the annual festival that covers multiple events, including outdoor ice skating, a 5k run, snow tubing and the performing arts. www. downtownindecember.com

Arvest Tulsa Winterfest Thru Jan. 18 Ice skating, live music, carriage rides and more are back in downtown Tulsa near the BOK Center for this annual festival of lights and holiday spirit. www.bokcenter. com International Gymnastics Hall of Fame Ongoing Celebrate the ath-

letic and artistic elements of the sport while honoring its most accomplished athletes at Science Museum Oklahoma. www.sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Destination Space Ongoing Revealing the amazing science that allows us to travel beyond the confines of earth. www. sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Midwest City Holiday Lights Spectacular Thru Dec. 30 Millions of lights transform Joe B. Barnes Regional Park in Midwest City into a holiday wonderland. www. midwestcityok.org

Garvan Woodland Gardens Holiday Lights 2014 Thru Dec. 31 See four million brilliant bulbs transform 17 acres of the Garvan Woodland The Greencards Gardens near Hot Springs, Ark., into a memorable animated holiday display. www. garvangardens.org

Garden of Lights

Thru Dec. 31 Animated light displays and holiday activities highlight this favorite regional attraction at Honor Heights Park in Muskogee. www. muskogeeonline.org

Chickasha Festival of Light Thru Dec. 31 One of the state’s favorite holiday lights displays is back on at Chickasha’s Shannon Springs Park, complete with the 172-feet-high Christmas tree and activities. www.chickashafestivaloflight.com

Christmas in the Park

Thru Dec. 31 Yukon City Park, Freedom Trail Park and Chisholm Trail Park light up for the holidays in this well-attended display. www. cityofyukonok.gov

New Year’s Eve Powwow

Dec. 31 The annual celebration returns with a pageant of American Indian dance, music and culture at the Cox Business Center. www.coxcentertulsa.com

Opening Night

Dec. 31 Ring in 2015

Walking Tour Ongoing Take a walking tour of historic downtown Tulsa. www.tulsahistory.org Gilcrease Films

Ongoing See various films throughout the month. www.gilcrease. org

OKCMOA Films

Ongoing Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com

Planetarium Shows Ongoing Science Museum Oklahoma. www.sciencemuseumoklahoma.org To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM

Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at. OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR or email to events@okmag.com.


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Downs enjoyed participating in the show, but says it was hectic. “It really didn’t seem like a competition, but was geared more towards showing the TV audience how crazy ‘Christmas people’ like us truly can be,” he says. “Crazy” is debatable; “charitable” is not. The Downs family’s light display has raised money and food for the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma since 2008. That first year, guests contributed enough canned goods for 8,201 meals and $598 in cash. Last year, the Downs family turned over more than $38,000 in donations (thanks to matching funds from Chesapeake Energy) and 9,588 pounds of food. Since the Downs family began collecting for the food bank, the funds and food contributions to date have produced 911,695 meals. This year, the Downs family hopes to break the one-million-meals mark. Downs says he and his wife, Kim, chose the Regional Food Bank as beneficiary “primarily because we knew they had the capacity to handle the food and cash that our donations will generate, and that they are the food source for so many other local charities.” Community is important to Downs, and it’s one of the main reasons he goes through the time-consuming ritual of building displays each year. “We want to provide an outlet in which our community can come together and help one another during the holiday season,” he says. The Downs’ lights display features more than 280,000 lights, 18 miles of light strands and 13 miles of extension cords. In the yard, 70-feet-tall trees are lit with light strands weighing in total around 800 pounds. All the lights and features are synchronized by software and hardware controls spread throughout the yard. Plus, there’s CHUCK DOWNS IS READY FOR music. ANOTHER YEAR OF DAZZLING The intricate home holiday lights display HOLIDAY LIGHTS AT HIS NORattracts onlookers not only in the local commuMAN HOME. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. nity and Norman, but visitors from around the region. “Christmas memories are timeless, and we want to create special memories for our community,” Downs says. IN PERSON “We don’t really know why, but the combination of lights and music creates a lasting memory for everybody who has seen the display.” Although his childhood Christmas displays were nothing like what Downs puts on now, he says he and his family have grown to enjoy the extensive task and surpassing expectations. They also like to see what others create each year. “I think each year we appreciate Christmas lights more and more. And the displays don’t have to be crazy like ours, either,” he says. “We simply love seeing houses decorated for the season. It’s definitely the best time of the year to be out driving around town.” Chuck Downs and his family go “crazy” for The Downs Christmas lights display switched on Nov. 27 and runs the holidays and helping others. through Jan. 3. The display is on from 6 p.m. to midnight every night or a person who really didn’t like hanging Christmas lights (except on New Year’s Eve, when the display runs until 1 a.m.). The when he was a child, Chuck Downs has made a big turnDowns home is located at 2900 72nd Ave. SE in Norman. As always, around. His family’s holiday lights display in Norman has onlookers are asked to bring canned food items, which will be become such a huge event that it was featured in ABC’s donated to help fellow Oklahomans. Great Christmas Light Fight in 2013. SHAUN PERKINS

The Power Of Lights

F

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | DECEMBER 2014


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Contour® from Cox is available to residential customers in Cox service areas. Minimum of Cox Advanced TV, High Speed Internet Essential, and an iPad® or select AndroidTM enabled tablets required to enjoy all Contour features. DOCSIS 3.0 modem recommended for best viewing experience. App-based live viewing limited to in-home viewing via WiFi home network. Not all channels in TV service subscription may be available. Screen images simulated. TV Everywhere access limited to Cox TV subscription services. Network apps subject to availability from programmers; not all

Contour® from Cox is residential available to customers residential customers in Coxareas. serviceMinimum areas. Minimum of Cox Advanced TV, High Speed Internet Essential, andan aniPad® iPad®or or select Android TMenabled tablets required networks available. Broadband connection required. may apply. ©2014 Cox Inc. All rights reserved. our® from Cox is available to in Cox service of Cox Advanced TV, High Speed Internet Essential, Android tabletstorequired TM Contour® from Cox is availableInternet to residential customers in CoxOther servicerestrictions areas. Minimum of Cox Advanced TV,Communications, High Speed Internet Essential, andand an iPad® or selectselect Android enabledenabled tablets required enjoy TM

to enjoy all Contour features. DOCSIS 3.0 modem recommended for best viewing experience. App-based live viewing limited to in-home viewing via WiFi home network. Not all channels in TV

TM allto Contour features. DOCSIS3.0 3.0 modem recommended recommended for best viewing experience. App-based live Advanced viewing limited tolimited in-home via viewing WiFi home network. Not allor channels in required TVall service subscription oy all Contour features. DOCSIS modem best viewing experience. App-based live viewing toviewing in-home via WiFi home network. Not channels in TV Contour® from Cox iscustomers available to infor Cox service areas. Minimum of Speed Cox High Speed Internet Essential, and anTM iPad® select Android enabled tablets required available residential in residential Cox servicecustomers areas. Minimum of Cox Advanced TV, High Internet TV, Essential, and an iPad® or select Android enabled tablets service subscription mayimages be available. Screen images areas. simulated. TV Everywhere access limited to CoxSpeed TV subscription services. Network appsprogrammers; subject to availability from programmers; not all be may available. Screen simulated. TVsimulated. Everywhere access limited to Cox subscription services. Network appsservices. subject to Network availability from not all TM networks available. andalllogos m subscription Cox ismay available tobe residential customers in Cox service Minimum ofaccess CoxTVAdvanced Internet Essential, and an iPad® or select Android enabled tabletsNames required ce available. Screen images TV Everywhere limited toTV, CoxHigh TV subscription subject to availability from programmers; to enjoy all Contour features. DOCSIS 3.0for modem recommended for best viewing experience. App-based live viewing limited to apps in-home viewing via WiFi home network. Not allnot channels in TV eatures. DOCSIS 3.0 modem recommended best viewing experience. App-based live viewing limited to in-home viewing via WiFi home network. Not all channels in TV ofnetworks featuredavailable. program services are the property of their respective owners. connection Other restrictions apply.reserved. ©2014 Cox Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. Broadband Internet connection required. OtherBroadband restrictionsInternet may apply. ©2014 required. Cox Communications, Inc. may All rights Contour features. DOCSIS 3.0 modem recommended for best viewing experience. App-based live Communications, viewing limited toInc. in-home viewing via WiFi home network. Not all channels in TV orksservice available. Broadband Internet connection required. restrictions may apply. ©2014limited Cox All services. rights reserved. subscription be available. Screen imagesOther simulated. TV Everywhere to Cox TV subscription apps subject to availability from programmers; not all may be available. Screenmay images simulated. TV Everywhere access limited to Cox TVaccess subscription services. Network apps subject toNetwork availability from programmers; not all cription may be available. Screen images simulated. TV Everywhere access limited to Cox TV subscription services. Network apps subject to availability from programmers; not all networks available. Broadband Internet connection required. Other©2014 restrictions may apply. ©2014 Cox roadband Internet connection required. Other restrictions may apply. Cox Communications, Inc. AllCommunications, rights reserved. Inc. All rights reserved. ailable. Broadband Internet connection required. Other restrictions may apply. ©2014 Cox Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


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December 2014 Oklahoma Magazine  
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