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AUGUST 2017

Native America

How tribes are helping Oklahoma grow

A Passion for

HEALING The story of The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis

PLUS EDUCATION OUTSTANDING Seniors

Fall Arts

PREVIEW


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Features AUGUST

34 A Passion for Healing

2017 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXI, No. 8

Born of necessity, The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis thrives on community support.

46 Education

From financial planning to career services to finding the right private school, Oklahoma Magazine gives you the A-Z’s on education in the state.

56 Outstanding Seniors

This year’s group of high school seniors boasts math prodigies, star athletes, philanthropists and designers – proving Oklahoma students can do it all.

67

Investing in New Paths

Oklahoma tribes expand their services with developments in health care, education, gaming, recreation and cinema.

WANT SOME MORE? August 2017

AUGUST 2017

Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES

Native America

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

How tribes are helping Oklahoma grow

74 Fall Arts Preview

Whether you’re looking for art shows, Broadway performances or live concerts, Oklahoma has plenty to offer you for the 2017-2018 season.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

MORE PHOTOS ON THE COVER:

A Passion for

HEALING The story of The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis

PLUS EDUCATION OUTSTANDING Seniors

Fall Arts

PREVIEW

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE SPEAKS TO THE STAFF, DOCTORS, NURSES AND FORMER PATIENTS OF THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes even more great Oklahoma events.


When it comes to heart care, listening helps us see your whole picture. Caring for your heart starts with understanding what you love. AscensionÂŽ care teams at St. John take the time to listen so we can understand all aspects of you and your life.

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Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

11 State 14 16 17 18

Young professionals find that returning to Oklahoma (or staying after college) has many socioeconomic benefits.

Culture Sports Rugby, the No. 2 played

sport in the world, has grown quickly in Oklahoma without much fanfare.

Business Insider

21 Life and Style 22 26 28 30 32

Interiors Tim and Leslie Yardy retain an 85-year-old house’s exterior and revamp the interior with today’s comfort and design. Destinations Health Style School’s back in session

and so is your style.

Scene

83 Taste 84 86 87

Maryn’s in RiverWalk Crossing puts a premium on relationships with customers … and each dish is top-notch, too.

Local Flavor Chef Chat Random Flavors

89 Where and When 90 94

The newest Crystal Bridges exhibition uses outdoor trails to bring art to life.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

22

83

16

96 Closing Thoughts

30

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

89


Surgery SpecialS Receive 10% OFF any surgery booked in August or September!


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™ PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

OKLAHOMA

DANIEL SCHUMAN

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K . SCHUMAN

MANAGING EDITOR JUSTIN MARTINO

SENIOR EDITOR BRIAN WILSON

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT MARY WILLA ALLEN

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE

GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN

GRAPHIC DESIGNER GARRET T GREEN

DIGITAL EDITOR JAMES AVERY

OFFICE/ADVERTISING ASSISTANT OLIVIA LYONS

ACCOUNT EXCUTIVE CAROLINE SHAW

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOT T MILLER, DAN MORGAN, DAVID COBB, MARC RAINS, SCOT T JOHNSON

CONTACT US

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Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com

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Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2017 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

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CHEROKEE national holiday sixty-five

LABOR DAY WEEKEND 2017 TA H L E Q U A H , O K L A H O M A Arts & Crafts | Children’s Events | Parade | Powwow Sports Tournaments | Traditional Activities, Food & Games

H O M E S . H E A LT H . H O P E .

© 2017 Cherokee Nation. All Rights Reserved.


As the only one of its kind in eastern Oklahoma, The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis has touched the lives of thousands of people. The project, built out of necessity to provide state-of-the-art care to children in need of medical attention, broke ground at the beginning of the Great Recession. It has stayed true to its mission nearly 10 years later through the dedication and support of the community. This month, Oklahoma Magazine takes a look at the history of The Children’s Hospital, its dedicated doctors, nurses and other health care professionals, and how the hospital has helped Oklahomans. Also this month, we examine how Native American tribes continue to provide economic and cultural growth in Oklahoma. Through projects like the RiverWalk Crossing in Jenks and a 470,000-square-foot outpatient facility in Tahlequah, the tribes create jobs, revenue and cultural awareness in the state. August also marks the beginning of the school year, and Oklahoma Magazine looks at some trends and topics in education. Be sure to check out this feature to see the latest on financial planning for college, career services at colleges, entrepeneurship classes and suggestions on choosing a private school. As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com. Sincerely,

Justin Martino Justin Martino Managing Editor

OKMAG.COM

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

LET TER FROM THE EDITOR

OK COMING UP IN AUGUST AT OKMAG.COM

Donna’s Fashions is one of Tulsa’s most beloved boutiques. Offering men’s and women’s clothing for every season no matter your size, personal taste or budget, Donna’s can find an outfit that’s uniquely you. The south Tulsa store is among a number of successful female-owned businesses in the city. Oklahoma Magazine visits with owner Donna Brollier, who has operated the store since its opening in the mid-’90s. In this video, see a variety of some of the most popular styles this summer, learn about the importance of shopping local and discover what keeps customers coming back to a Tulsa’s favorite.

WEB-EXCLUSIVE VIDEO MEET DONNA BROLLIER AND EXPLORE THE SHOP. STICK AROUND AND WATCH ALL OF OUR WEB EXCLUSIVE VIDEO INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.

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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 6/21/17 5:34 PM


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State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Home to Roost Young professionals find that returning to Oklahoma (or staying put after college) has many socioeconomic benefits.

“I TULSA MAYOR G.T. BYNUM SEES VALUE IN YOUNG TULSANS RETURNING TO THEIR HOME CITY AND BRINGING THEIR EXPERIENCES WITH THEM.

PHOTO COURTESY CITY OF TULSA MAYOR’S OFFICE

was ready for a lifestyle change.” After living in New York for eight years, Stephanie Forrest has returned to her roots and learned the same thing many other young professionals in Oklahoma have discovered: the Sooner State is a great place to live and work. “You hit 30 and you start to think, ‘OK, is this where I want to be long term? Can I live like this long term?’ There was kind of just a gear shift, and I decided I wanted a little more space and an easier lifestyle,” Forrest says. “[Tulsans] have a beautiful city that has everything you

commutes from 36 Degrees North, a shared workspace downtown. “It’s been such a fantastic place to work. They have unlimited coffee, Wi-Fi, printers, everything you would need,” Forrest says. “I actually have my desk phone from New York. I can pick it “There’s a spirit in the up and buzz a colleague and young professional it goes right to their desk in community here that New York. It’s like nothing can’t be matched.” changed; it’s almost as if I’m there.” Forrest says leaving Oklahoma was right for her 10 years ago, but it may no longer be a Forrest moved back to Tulsa and necessary step for others from Tulsa kept the job she loves at a legal reto follow their dreams. cruiting firm in New York. She telecould want, but it’s also easy to live here. You’re not sitting in traffic all day. You’re not paying an outrageous amount for your rent. It’s easy to get your groceries.”

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State

“We’re built up by people of the 20th century who went all around the world and found the best that the world had to offer and brought it back here to Tulsa.”

STEPHANIE FORREST TELECOMMUTES TO HER NEW YORK OFFICE FROM 36 DEGREES NORTH IN TULSA.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

12

“It’s growing so, so much that it’s starting to feel like a bigger city where people have opportunities left and right,” she says. “At 36 Degrees North, there’s so many people here starting companies, coming from all

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

over to live here to make Tulsa wonderful.” Mayor G.T. Bynum sees the value of having young professionals in Tulsa after they have explored what other cities had to offer.

“We’re built up by people of the 20th century who went all around the world and found the best that the world had to offer and brought it back here to Tulsa,” he says. “Whether that was the skyscrapers they built or the museums that they built or the cultural institutions that they created or the airport that they created when most people had never seen an airplane – they did all these things with a focus on being world class. “What’s exciting right now is to see people taking a similar approach. You have young professionals coming here from other cities that they’ve lived in all around the world and bringing with them recollections and inspiration of the things that they loved about the cities that they lived in before and bringing those back to Tulsa and wanting to help create those here.” Bynum himself is an example of this. After college, he spent six years working in Washington, D.C. He and his wife moved back when they decided to have kids; they wanted to raise them in Tulsa. As a new mayor, he works to build a city that draws young talent back to the state. “There is this tremendous sense of momentum and growth here, and that creates a sense of excitement and creates an opportunity for people who want to play a part in the next era of a great American city,” Bynum says. “For people that have the chance to do that in their hometown here in Tulsa is a special thing.” Kyden Creekpaum knew Tulsa was where he wanted to be even after enjoying several years working overseas as an anticorruption lawyer and adjunct professor in Paris. For him, the quality of life in Tulsa was ideal for his family. “It’s things like the incredible downtown rejuvenation, the worldclass Gathering Place, finally putting water in the river, positive forces like TYPros [Tulsa Young Professionals] and an enthusiastic young mayor and city leadership team,” he says. “It is hard to overestimate the impact of these exciting developments.” In Oklahoma City, municipal leaders work to retain graduates as they begin their job searches. “It is simply invaluable to keep the best and brightest in central


Oklahoma,” says Drew Dugan, education and workforce director at the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce. “Our community, region and state need more college graduates. We want to keep them here regardless of if they are from Oklahoma, Texas or anywhere else. We need all levels and majors to choose Oklahoma City as home. We need more engineers, accountants, scientists and just about any other professional that require degrees, certificates or high-level education.” Dugan oversees Greater Grads, a program helping college students find internships that may lead to careers in OKC. “We know that students are more likely to stay here if they have an internship with a local employer,” Dugan says. “An internship not only gives them experience with the company and hence a better chance to get a job but also gives the student a chance to learn more about the city and community. Even if an intern does not get a job offer from the company they intern for, they will still get the chance to see what it is like to live and work in OKC and maybe meet other young interns and professionals.” Kasey Mayberry is project manager at Gulfport Energy, former president and current executive committee member for Young Professionals in Energy in Oklahoma City, and a great example of internships keeping talent in the city. “While I was a student at [the University of Oklahoma], I received an internship at Chesapeake Energy in the heart of OKC,” she says. “During my last semester of college, I worked part time at Chesapeake, and I received a full-time offer after I graduated. It wasn’t a hard decision to accept the full-time offer since I had such a great experience during my time in the city.” Mayberry says she enjoys living in a big city that feels like a small town. “The rule of three is one of the best things about living in OKC,” she says. “Whoever you meet, you probably have at least three mutual friends with that person. I love the abundance of the networking and connections across all of the companies, restaurants and retail shops all over Oklahoma City.” Mayor Mick Cornett says OKC continues to grow in a way that ap-

peals to young professionals, especially with “investments in green spaces, investments in the arts, having a professional basketball team and having affordable housing in the inner city area. We’ve created a quality of life that includes the arts, sports, a very walkable downtown.” Their efforts have made a difference. “There’s no shortage of young professionals doing cool things in Oklahoma City,” Mayberry says. “A lot of my college peers received job offers in OKC after they graduated,

and they all entered the OKC workforce with a drive to make things bigger and better here. There’s a spirit in the young professional community here that can’t be matched. The metro is expanding at such a rapid pace and [with] the amount of opportunity that exists, either in the different corporations hiring young professionals, the nonprofits around OKC or even the restaurant scene, there’s tons of ways here to grow your career according to whatever you’re passionate about.” BETH WEESE

KASEY MAYBERRY IS ONE OF MANY YOUNG PROFESSIONALS WHO CHOOSE TO LIVE IN OKLAHOMA CITY. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

C U LT U R E

Translations of Time

Converting historical documents from Native American tongues into English is no quick task.

“L

TARA DAMRON SAYS THE OFFICE OF AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURE AND PRESERVATION HAS A LARGE COLLECTION OF RECORDS IN A VARIETY OF MEDIA FORMATS. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

14

ost in translation” is a realistic, not cinematic, challenge often faced by tribal preservationists transcribing Native American documents and records into English. Preserving Native Americans’ languages and histories can be difficult because there are not always written guides and records that help in transcriptions. For example, the Oklahoma Historical Society is working on a two-year project that includes translating Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole national court and judicial documents and letters from the late 1800s into English. It is expected to be completed this fall. Ted Isham, a native speaker hired by the society to translate these documents, likens parts of the job to a scavenger hunt and discovery process. “In doing these translations, some of the words are difficult to read because of all the different handwriting,” says Isham, explaining that the Seminole people, for instance, formalized their alphabet and writing conventions later than the Creeks. “The Seminoles were all over the place with spellings and usage in their early records,” he says. “It was

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

like a puzzle. I had to go to elders to understand the forms and complexities of the language. That was really interesting and cool for me.” The Office of American Indian Culture and Preservation, founded in 2013, is a branch of the historical society, which began in 1893. The society started collecting Oklahoma’s history in the form of newspapers, which would later be turned into microfilm. “We just kind of grew from that, to photos, digitalization, museum objects … and the preservation of the native cultures grew from there,” says Tara Damron, project director of the office. There are 3.5 million documents covering the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek), Seminole and other tribes from this region. These documents are available in manuscript collections as research tools for the public. The Oklahoma History Center in Oklahoma City has a variety of oral histories from tribal peoples that are available to the public. The center has a language area in its gallery offering a look into the spoken word of the tribes and showing visitors how to say basic phrases such as “hello” in the different tribal languages. Even simple exchanges can’t precisely

convey all their meanings. “It has always been interesting to me that in a lot of tribal languages, you can’t really find a word for ‘goodbye,’” Damron says. “It goes into the idea that their way of thinking and viewing the world is completely different from how [European descendants] see it, and that when we leave each other, eventually we will not see the other person again.” Keeping the language and history of the tribes alive is important. “Often we will have people come to us and say that they have recordings and cassettes of their aunts, uncles, grandparents and elder people telling stories or memories,” Damron says. “We can take those older audio formats, like cassettes, for example, and digitize them.” The service is publicly available and Damron encourages people to use it. “It’s so important to keep these records of the people from the past, and their histories,” she says. “It’s not just important for us, but for our future generations, too.” SAMANTHA ALEXANDER


Whatever is happening in your li fe,

there’s a good chance your

college exp e rie nce help e d you get to whe re you are to day. Whe n you refle c t on that time , you may b e ove r whelme d by fond me morie s — me eting your sp ouse , cele brating a big football win , pulling an all- nighte r to stu dy or laughing with p e ople who b e came your lifelong frie nds . To day ’s O kla h om a State U nive r sit y students are having the same experiences as they pur sue bright orange futures . Visit OS Ugiving.com to learn how you can b e a par t of their journey.


The State SPORTS

Talk Lile; Play Hard

Rugby, the No. 2 played sport in the world, has grown quickly in Oklahoma without much fanfare.

T

TULSA RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB PRACTICES AT ITS PITCH AT 41ST STREET AND RIVERSIDE DRIVE. PHOTOS BY MARC RAINS

16

he first rule about rugby is there are no rules, only laws. The basic ones are run forward, pass backward and no blocking, and the referee enforces his or her interpretation of those laws throughout a match. However, there is much more to this contact sport and its players. It’s like Fight Club: No one talks about it, yet it’s a highly popular game. “Rugby is the No. 2 sport played worldwide,” says Douglas Neubauer, head coach of the University of Oklahoma’s men’s team. “In the U.S., it is the fastest-growing sport, but it has been in the shadows for years, even though it is played on almost every college campus in every city in the country.” Rugby is a fluid game that highlights and relies upon the situational awareness, quick thinking and creativity of players. It has similari-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

ties to soccer and football but many differences as well. It’s played yearround and the number of players on the pitch can vary, depending upon the season. The regular version has 15 ruggers a side playing 40-minute halves; the U.S. season is from September to May. Rugby sevens (seven players per team with 7-minute halves) is played from June to August and is the Olympic version of the game. The basic laws of the game seem simple, but it takes a certain kind of person to play rugby. Neubauer says the main attribute a person needs to have is “a commitment to improve as a player each day.”

The game doesn’t require any previous experience to play, but Luke Turner, president of Tulsa Rugby Football Club, says key traits that help are perseverance, grit, a willingness to learn and a passion for teamwork. “Rugby offers its players the chance to be a part of a global sport with an unmatched culture and unlimited opportunities,” Turner says. “If you’re a person with the patience and perseverance to learn a new sport and are willing to work in a team environment, then rugby is a sport that can take you anywhere. “It doesn’t hurt if you’re big, strong, fast and smart, but we’ll still take you if you can cover the first part.” The sport may seem male-dominated, but women’s leagues exist, too, with many Oklahoma clubs fielding both men’s and women’s teams. The OKC Crusaders will add a women’s team this fall. American men’s and women’s teams compete regionally and nationally at youth, collegiate and adult levels. You can find leagues for all sorts of rugby enthusiasts, from youth to collegiate to adult. If you’re interested in catching a rugby match or want to know how to participate, visit playrugbyokc.com, tulsarugbyclub.com or oklahomarugby.org for more information. ALAINA STEVENS

WEB-EXCLUSIVE VIDEO SEE IT IN ACTION! MEET LUKE TURNER AND THE REST OF THE TEAM ON THE FIELD IN OUR WEB-EXCLUSIVE VIDEO INTERVIEW AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.


BUSINESS

High Flying Fun

Aces Alley’s flight simulators teach piloting skills ... when you’re not having an aerial dogfight.

A

ces Alley in Broken Arrow blurs the line between video game and reality with detailed, enjoyable flight simulations. Opening its hangar doors in 2014, Aces Alley has become a premier location for high flying, adrenalinefilled fun. Owner James Cox, creator of Aces Alley, has taken a simple airplane simulation program and built an entirely functional cockpit and system around it. Every cockpit has been handcrafted by Cox, taking a massive do-it-yourself project and turning it into a deep, compelling experience for the young and young at heart. “Before building these cockpits, the only DIY experience I had was with the deck in my yard,” he says. Cox’s craftsmanship appears in the

smallest details of his program – the high-quality handmade cockpits with all the bells and whistles of a real airplane – and demonstrates Cox’s knowledge of aircraft. “I did the Tulsa Community College and Oklahoma State University flight programs,” he says. “I got all my ratings and then took to flying for airlines.” A pilot’s experience and knowledge are evident in every facet of the program. But while the craftsmanship is impressive, the true experience lies in the simulation. Cox uses third-party software augmented and modified specifically for his hardware. The program is displayed on a single monitor in front of the pilot, but through the utilization of head-tracking technology, the user is transported directly into the cockpit of a seemingly real plane. Along

with head tracking, the program uses throttles and pedals found in real aircraft for an immersive experience. The simulation is reliant on your skill as a pilot. Cox starts most people in the air because taxiing and taking off are difficult for an inexperienced pilot. Flying itself is as true to life as you can get, with stalling being a constant threat as you are in the air. “The goal is to have the client leave with basic aircraft flight skills and a smile on their face,” he says. Aces Alley also has aerial dogfights on its simulators. These high-octane skirmishes instill a sense of competition. “The every-man-for-himself dogfight is our most popular mode, pitting all eight pilots against each other,” Cox says. Aces Alley’s program consists of a 15-minute, pre-flight briefing, followed by 30 minutes of flight. Cox guarantees that you will have basic knowledge of how to pilot an airplane by the end of your mission. GAGE FRONCZAK

JAMES COX HAS BUILT AN ENTIRELY FUNCTIONAL COCKPIT AROUND AN AIRPLANE SIMULATION PROGRAM.

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

17


The State INSIDER

A Shooting Star

Chelsea-born actor Gar Moore gained fame in two Italian films in the ’40s, but his American career never ignited.

M

GAR MOORE STARS WITH MARIA MICHI IN THE ROBERTO ROSSELLINI FILM PAISAN.

PHOTO COURTESY THE CRITERION COLLECTION

18

y hometown of Chelsea, with a population that’s fluctuated between 1,500 and 2,500 for most of its existence, is one of those little Oklahoma places whose contributions to history and culture outstrip their size. Those calling Chelsea home include Ralph Terry, the great New York Yankees pitcher of the 1960s (whose story I was privileged to tell in the new book Right Down the Middle, from Mullerhaus Publishing Arts); Clem McSpadden, the hall of fame rodeo announcer, former U.S. representative and president pro tem of the Oklahoma Senate; and Admiral Joseph T. “Jocko” Clark, the World War II hero who was the first Native American to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy. There’s another Chelsea figure, however, whose name and achievements have been swallowed up in the mists of time. It may be hard to believe, but at one time Gar Moore, a kid from Chelsea, was a major matinee idol in Italy and starred in Paisan, the groundbreaking 1946 film from

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

famed director Roberto Rossellini. That and another Italian feature Moore made, 1947’s To Live in Peace, not only received major awards in their country of origin, but also saw release in America, where they were both recognized as top pictures by the National Board of Review and the New York Film Critics’ Circle. Because of Moore’s star turns in these and a couple of other Italian movies, he was wooed by Hollywood heavyweight David O. Selznick and returned to the States to pursue his film career – which didn’t turn out as well as it should’ve. In doing research on Moore, I immediately ran into conflicting data, beginning with his very name. The usually reliable Internet Movie Database (IMDb) and other sources assert that he was born Morfit Thomas Garrison. That, however, turns out to be a scrambled version of the birth name of ’50s and ’60s TV personality Garry Moore (of I’ve Got A Secret and To Tell the Truth), which was Thomas Garrison Morfit. Gar Moore was in fact Joseph Garland Moore Jr., son of Chelsea’s then-pharmacist. Gar’s mother

was Cherokee, and Chelsea-based historian Meredith Walker tells me his great-great grandmother and Will Rogers’ great-grandmother were sisters. Born in Chelsea on Sept. 4, 1920, the young Moore moved with his family to Tulsa and then Oklahoma City, where he graduated from Classen High School (future movie actress Cathy O’Donnell, three years younger, was also a student there). According to his obituary in the Nov. 14, 1985, Chelsea Reporter, Moore received a music scholarship to the University of Oklahoma after his singing won a “national baritone contest.” Graduating from OU in 1943, he headed for New York. Another source says Moore served with the American occupation forces in Italy when Rossellini discovered him – but that’s not true either. Actually, he was scouted by an Italian movie agent while appearing in the Broadway play Dark of the Moon. A Nov. 26, 1947, article in the Dunkirk (New York) Evening Observer – published in conjunction with the premiere of To Live in Peace in that city – says the agent offered Moore an all-expensespaid round trip to Rome and $350 a week, about three times the money he received for his small role in Dark of the Moon. Within the next couple of years, Moore had become a major star of Italian cinema. “The Italian public attaches a certain glamor to an American movie actor,” he told the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Edgar Williams for a feature that ran in August 1948. “They always advertise me as an American. And I think they want me to retain that touch.” By the time Williams’ story ran, however, Moore was not only back in America, but also under contract to Selznick and married to Nancy Walker, with whom he’d eloped to Tijuana on Aug. 1. (Then a New York-based stage performer known for musical comedy, Walker would much later achieve TV immortality for playing the lead character’s mom in the ’70s sitcom Rhoda.) Both Selznick and Walker only played brief parts in Moore’s life. Before a year had gone by, he and Walker were divorced. And also within a year, his much-ballyhooed signing with mogul Selznick lapsed without Moore ever appearing in a movie. According to the syndicated newspaper feature “Looking At Hol-


lywood,” written by legendary gossip columhim,” that never came to pass. He did end up nist Hedda Hopper, Moore had been back in doing a few movies for U-I, the best-known of Oklahoma visiting family when Selznick first which is probably 1949’s Abbott and Costello contacted him. Meet the Killer, Boris Karloff, then returned to Italy. When lightning didn’t strike twice for him “He had been home for only two days,” there, he headed back to Tinseltown. Hopper wrote in March 1949, “but Selznick’s “I hated Hollywood,” he told still another telegram was so urgent he went to New York newspaper movie columnist, Erskine Johnson, immediately, where he waited eight days to be in June 1951. “I received by the producer. “The Italian public was a disSince Gar wasn’t prepared for such a long stay, he had attaches a certain glamor gruntled actor who thought to buy extra clothes. With to an American movie that because his time on his hands he took actor. They always career hadn’t in all shows. All in all, gone the way it he ran up a bill of $1,899 advertise me as an might have, he while waiting. When he American. And I think was bigger than finally saw Selznick he they want me to retain the place. Now signed a contract, but that touch.” I’m a wiser hunever worked for him.” man being and I “Once I made a test [for love the town.” Selznick], but not for any picture,” Moore told Hollywood’s Aline Mosby, who wrote about him Moore’s time in front of the camera would be in a column from August 1949. “I was feted, sporadic from then on and died entirely before wined, and dined. I thought it wonderful to have the decade ended. He worked in several TV my tux on every night. But it got to be silly – shows during the ’50s, but he only appeared in three and four parties a day, so I quit that.” two more pictures, playing a supporting role in the big-budget Girl in White (1952) and ending Universal-International picked Moore up, his movie career with the horror film Curse of and, although Hopper’s rival Louella Parsons the Faceless Man (1958). By that time, he’d wrote in her Nov. 6, 1948 “Hollywood Today” column that the studio “plans a star build-up for relocated to Palm Springs, where he became

a part of the social whirl and, according to the Reporter obit, did some interior decorating and landscape architecture, bought and sold antiques, and starred in the occasional local production. Other sources tell us he found some success as a painter. For many years after his film career was over, he remained a mainstay of the society pages in the Palm Springs newspaper The Desert Sun. During that time, he married twice (and was engaged to the eldest of the then-famous Gabor sisters, Magda), the second time to Marge Sinek, whom David Ragan’s book Who’s Who in Hollywood: 1900-1976 described as a “millionairess … who is reportedly of the Oscar Meyer Weiner family.” It was in Palm Springs where Moore died of a stroke on Nov. 3, 1985. His Chelsea Reporter obit noted that he was cremated, with his ashes to be “strewn over the desert area, which he loved so much.” Yet, if you visit a certain part of the Chelsea cemetery, you’ll find an unpretentious tombstone for J. Garland “Gar” Moore – the final piece of conflicting information about an international movie star from Oklahoma who should not be forgotten. Thanks to Sandi Bible, Kristi Mariezcurrena, Connie McSpadden and Meredith Walker for their Gar Moore research. JOHN WOOLEY

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Protect Your Peepers Fashionable sunglasses can double as serious protection this summer.

UV-BLOCKING SUNGLASSES HAVE BECOME THE NORM IN THE FASHION WORLD. PHOTO BY MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY; SUNGLASSES COURTESY HICKS BRUNSON AND VISIONS

A

ugust in Oklahoma means drearily hot days under a sizzling sun. While most people rightly focus on keeping their skin protected from the rays, that means the all-important eye health can be overlooked.

Keeping your eyes protected from the rays could save you a lifetime of health issues, from cataracts and growths to cancer. It should be noted that sun damage can happen to a person’s eyes all year round – not just in the summer. But since the UV rays are at their

strongest during the hottest months, extra precautions should be taken. Luckily, UV-blocking sunglasses have become the norm in the fashion world as of late – from high-end brands like RayBan and Dior to affordable shades found in any local supermarket. Even with the protection of stylish shades, remember never to stare directly at the sun – even during a dazzling eclipse (like the one happening on Aug. 21). You can still get sun damage on a cloudy day, too, so don’t be afraid to rock shades and broad brimmed hats this summer – your eyes will thank you later. AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style INTERIORS

Modernizing a Classic Tim and Leslie Yardy take an 85-year-old house, retain its exterior and revamp the interior with today’s comfort and design. By M. J. Van Deventer • Photos by Nathan Harmon

A

native Briton and his wife/business partner have proved that an 85-year-old home can survive a total makover and still retain its initial charm and elegance. Tim and Leslie Yardy took a property near Tulsa’s Utica Square, saved the stairway and landing, and built a new house that has all the modern accoutrements that the new homeowners love – all while retaining a traditional exterior. One would expect Tim Yardy to not veer far from his English roots. “I grew up in London in a family of builders and developers,” he says. “I loved design. I grew up knowing I wanted to do something I was passionate about.” At 19, he came to Oklahoma, then graduated from Oral Roberts University and earned a master’s degree in business management from the University of Tulsa. He founded his company, La Maison, a decade ago. The home, built in 1932, was occupied by the same family for 80 years. “I wanted to keep the exterior lines and materials of the existing home,” Tim says. “The toughest part was finding the balance between the original aspects of room size and scale versus how people live today.” The Yardys began with the back lawn on the half-acre lot. They leveled the property, brought in 100 loads of dirt, built a pool and outdoor living

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

BENJAMIN MOORE’S “HAIL NAVY” PAINT GRACES THE LIVING ROOM WALLS. IT’S ACCENTED BY BRIGHT WHITE TRIM, A WHITE MARBLE FIREPLACE AND TWO WOOD WALL SCULPTURES BRUSHED WITH SILVER VENEER. A 1970S LOVESEAT WAS RESTORED FOR THIS ROOM. LEFT: THE POOLSIDE OUTDOOR LIVING AREA IS COVERED AND DESIGNED FOR USE IN A VARIETY OF WEATHER. THE LARGE CEILING FAN PROVIDES COOLING IN THE SUMMER, AND A MOVABLE FIRE TABLE BY BROWN JORDAN AND THIS SMALL FIREPIT ARE PERFECT ACCESSORIES FOR CHILLY FALL EVENINGS.


AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

area and invited Clare Ashby to create landscaping reminiscent of the home’s original design. It took a year to complete the transitional project. No design stone was left unturned. The Yardys built around the center staircase to give the interior of the home a vastly different, contemporary personality. With 18 rooms to work with, the Yardys used couture products, furnishings and accessories, all with the goal of bringing the home into the 21st century of upscale design. They also redesigned the home with family comfort as a top priority. Throughout the home, a variety of textures and finishes reinforces the more contemporary look. The color palette includes silver, gold, gray, white and cream with contrasts of navy, plum and black. A mix of textures is seen in upholstery and area rugs. Modern lighting, including pendants and unusual globes, enhances each room. “The formal living room is my favorite,” Tim says. “Living rooms don’t seem to be used so often now.” The Yardys chose a navy and white color theme for this room to create an inviting haven for relaxing or entertaining. “I redid every element of the home,” Tim says. “It had cool old bones, but everything is now all new by 2017 standards. I was very adventurous with all aspects of design. This rambling house – 5,800 square feet – is now very classical and timeless.”

Tim and Leslie Yardy

When Tim Yardy established The Maison Group a decade ago, his experience in residential building, design and renovation was limited. However, he surveyed the design/building scene and believed Tulsa was a stable market for his creative and business talents. The firm’s umbrella name is La Maison, fitting for Yardy’s European heritage. Maison is French for house and Yardy knew most of the world’s best design/trade shows favored that word in their promotions. A London native, Yardy grew up with classic design. He brought that sense of style with him when he immigrated to Tulsa in 2001. His firm is known for its expertise in restoring, renovating and rehabilitating residences to a level of classic design and comfort. Since establishing his company, Yardy has completed almost 60 projects in a distinct Midtown area of older, traditional homes. Leslie Yardy, his wife and business partner, is a consultant and designer who complements her husband’s work with a contemporary flair for transitional and timeless interiors. EXPANDED PHOTO GALLERY WANT TO SEE MORE OF THESE BEAUTIFUL HOMES AROUND THE STATE? SEE OUR NEW ONLINE PHOTO GALLERIES AND GET AN EVEN CLOSER LOOK AT THESE LUXURIOUS SPACES AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

FROM TOP: THIS VINTAGE HOME RESEMBLES CAPE COD-STYLE HOUSES DESPITE ITS LOCATION IN TULSA. THE MASTER BATH IS A LUXURIOUS PRISTINE WHITE SETTING. THE MARBLE FLOORS ARE HEATED. THE FREE-STANDING TUB IS COMPLEMENTED BY A PATTERNED WALLPAPER IN GRAY AND WHITE TONES. A GOLD FOUR-POSTER BED IS ACCENTED BY SIDE TABLES OF GOLD AND BLACK LACQUER BY JONATHAN ADLER. IN LIEU OF BEDSIDE TABLE LAMPS, PENDANT LIGHTS HOVER OVER THESE TABLES.


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Life & Style

CRUISES OFFER A CHANCE TO SEE ALASKA’S NATURAL BEAUTY FROM A NEW PERSPECTIVE. PHOTO COURTESY CARNIVAL CRUISE LINES

D E S T I N AT I O N S

Alaska by Sea

Take a break from beaches with a cruise through The Last Frontier.

A

laska cruise, Day One – The cry of “Look! There’s a bald eagle!” causes a stampede to the side of the ship where our spotter points to a vague place on shore. “Where? Where?” “There he is! Wow!” Cameras click wildly. Alaska cruise, Day Five – My son says, “A bald eagle!” I scarcely look up from my book. “Oh, that’s nice, son.” No cameras click. Yes, the wildlife in our 49th state is so plentiful that you actually become a bit blase about it … until you get back home and can’t believe you were even there. “Look … a bald eagle!” “No, dear, that’s an Oklahoma chicken hawk.” I have to be honest with you. When I first heard that people took cruise ships to Alaska, I almost laughed. There’s no sand, no beach, no reggae, no sun. Well, OK,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

there is sun. But now, having been there – forget the Caribbean. Alaska is absolutely breathtaking. The natives called it Alyeska – the Great Land – with good reason. The landscape teems with all that runs freely. The sea is home to humpback whales, sea lions, otters and Dall’s porpoises. Glaciers stand magnificently in the distance. This is life on a grand scale. Stepping onto the ship deck, breathing the brisk mountain air, I comprehend what unspoiled beauty is. Bear, moose, wolves, sheep and caribou find solace in the isolation. Mountain peaks humble climbers, earthquakes shake the quiet land (helping us Oklahomans feel right at home) and wildflowers peek out from temperate rainforests, contrasting nicely with the treeless tundra. The standout of the cruise is when the


captain gently nudges the ship into Hubbard Bay and time stands still. The small bay – insanely calm once the ripples of the ship’s entry subside – is juxtaposed against the enormity of the ship and gives the scene a movie-set quality. The turquoise-tinged Hubbard Glacier stands so close that you feel like you can almost touch it; the still air and the silence are broken only by the cracking sounds of giant pieces of ice calving from the glacier. This is truly a Great Land. Recommended excursions include a morning voyage on an actual Deadliest Catch

crabbing boat to check the pots, Juneau (on the threshold of magnificent wilderness), Ketchikan (tribal ceremonies and exquisitely carved totem poles in Saxman Village), Haines (a sanctuary for artists and nature lovers) and Sitka (once the capital of Russian America, now offering a wealth of Native Alaskan and Russian colonial history). Explore nearby Mendenhall Glacier via helicopter to capture its immensity and grandeur. And if there’s time, visit Seward, one of Alaska’s oldest communities and the starting point for the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. In Skagway, ride the White Pass & Yukon Route Railroad, which took miners and ore

back and forth over the mountains between Skagway and the gold fields. The narrowgauge railroad wasn’t completed until the Klondike Gold Rush was over. Now, it offers stunning views on a journey to a bygone era. CHUCK MAI, AAA OKLAHOMA

S C H E D U L I N G YO U R C R U I S E If you’re not sure when to cruise Alaska, following are some guidelines. BEST CRUISING SEASON: May-September. BEST TIME TO CRUISE: June-August (for warmer weather). CHEAPEST TIME TO CRUISE: May and September.

FROM TOP: WHALE SIGHTINGS ARE ONE OF THE POSSIBLE HIGHLIGHTS DURING AN ALASKAN CRUISE. HAINES IS A SANCTUARY FOR ARTISTS AND NATURE LOVERS. THE WHITE PASS & YUKON ROUTE RAILROAD IN SKAGWAY OFFERS STUNNING VIEWS. PHOTOS COURTESY STATE OF ALASKA/ REINHARD PANTKE

T R AV E L T I P Many cruises depart from Seattle, allowing you the opportunity to spend a night – or more – in the Pacific Northwest before embarking on a memory-making cruise. Most of the downtown shops and restaurants stay open late, giving you an opportunity to have some fun on land before cruising on the sea. Cruises may also launch from cities like Vancouver in Canada, so choosing a cruise line that launches from your preferred city gives an opportunity to experience even more on your vacation. AUGUST 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

H E A LT H

Finding the Words

S

Patients with aphasia face challenges, but they can regain their communication skills with speech therapy.

uccessfully communicating with the world around us is a skill most take for granted. But for those who have aphasia after suffering a stroke, head trauma or other brain injury, everyday dialogue can be difficult. “Aphasia is typically an acquired, not developmental, communication disorder that happens when there is damage to key regions of the brain responsible for the ability to use words to express ideas and converse,” says Karen Copeland, a speech-language pathologist and education coordinator at St. John Medical Center. An adjunct instructor at Oklahoma State University-Tulsa, Copeland specializes in caring for individuals who have a communication or swallowing disorder as a result of stroke or other brain-related condition. “Up to 40 percent of people who have a stroke will have aphasia, and it is estimated that 2 million Americans have some form of the disorder,” she says. “In most cases, people retain their ability to remember information, understand humor and manage tasks that don’t require speaking, reading or writing.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

While it may be difficult for most people to understand what communication is like for a patient with aphasia, Copeland says a simple exercise can provide perspective. “Try having a conversation using words with no more than four letters in them,” she says. “You’ll get the idea pretty quickly.”

“Try having a conversation using words with no more than four letters in them. You’ll get the idea pretty quickly.” According to the National Aphasia Association, the disorder is more common than Parkinson’s disease, cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy, but most people are unfamiliar with it. There are various types of aphasia, and cases can range from mild to severe. Speech therapy can help patients regain some independence. “I think the ultimate goal of therapy is to give people the tools they need to regain as much of their communication ability as possible

and to live successfully in spite of difficulties which may persist,” says Copeland, who enjoys sharing her patients’ victories. “Recently, a lady with aphasia told me that she drove by herself to Sam’s [Club]. When she arrived, she discovered that her husband had taken the Sam’s card from her wallet, so she called him to give him a piece of her mind about this,” Copeland says. “After that, she signed up for a replacement card, finished her errand and educated the Sam’s Club employees about aphasia. Game, set and match go to her.” Copeland says advances in functional neuroimaging – procedures showing the brain working during activity – have led to great gains in understanding how the brain processes information. “This knowledge will lead to improved options not only for treatment, but also for prevention of communication disorders affecting people of all ages,” she says. “While additional evidence from research is needed, use of medications and possibly the application of electrical or magnetic stimulation are likely to support traditional speech therapy, resulting in improved outcomes.” REBECCA FAST


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Life & Style

ST YLE

Smart Style

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ETNIA BARCELONA MIRAMAR SUNGLASSES, $265, HICKS BRUNSON. ALEXIS BITTAR ELEMENTS CRYSTAL DOUBLE-DROP EARRINGS, $295; ALEXIS BITTAR ELEMENTS GOLDEN ARRAY ADJUSTABLE WRAP CHOKER, $175; BELLA DAHL DISTRESSED WHITE BUTTON-DOWN, $146; ALICE AND OLIVIA EMBROIDERED JEANS, $595; ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL ENCRUSTED BANGLE BRACELETS, $275 EACH; REBECCA MINKOFF MAC NUBUCK LEATHER MINI BAG IN ACAI, $195; KATE SPADE NEW YORK EVERHART LEATHER SNEAKERS, $198, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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SCENE

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1

Cheena Pazzo, Lucky Lamons, Lindsey & Isaac Helmerich, Meredith Siegfried Madden, Pete Madden; St. John Street Party, St. John Health System, Tulsa

2

Molly Jarvis, Greg Burn; The Next Big Thing, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma, Tulsa

3

Taylor Hanson, Walker Hanson, Isaac Hanson; Brewers’ Table Dinner, Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma, Tulsa

4

Tess Dominic, Amaziah & Rosie Dominic; Purple Sash Gala, YWCA, Oklahoma City

5

John & Linda Zimmerman; Run for the Roses Gala, JRDF Oklahoma Chapter, Oklahoma City

6

Brenda & Tom McDaniel, Julie & Mark Beffort, Michelle & Gary Brooks; Dean A. McGee Awards, Downtown Oklahoma City Initiatives, Oklahoma City

7

Zeke & Amanda Chancey, Ronald McDonald, Jeremy & Shelli Schroeder; Red Shoe Shindig, Ronald McDonald House Charities, Tulsa

8

Ann Lacy, Carolyn Nimmo; Purple Sash Gala, YWCA, Oklahoma City

9

Weydan & Angela Flax, Brenda Cope, Nichole Bryant, Tames Stanton; Center Polo Classic, The Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges, Tulsa

10

Kirsten Horne, Taniya Wright, Mike Collier, Amy Calvert, Chera Kimiko; Tulsa Promise Ball, JDRF Oklahoma Chapter, Tulsa

11

Larry & Polly Nichols, Aimee & David Harlow; Campaign Celebration, Allied Arts, Oklahoma City

12

Steve & Debbie Rhines, Paxton Little, Martha Collings; Academic Awards Banquet, Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence, Oklahoma City

EXPANDED PHOTO GALLERY THERE’S MORE FUN WHERE THESE CAME FROM. SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM OKLAHOMA’S PREMIER CHARITY EVENTS AT OKMAG.COM/WEB. 8

9 7

11 10

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“PHILANTHROPY IS THE FAMILY BUSINESS,” SAYS SUZANNE WARREN, SHOWN HERE VISITING WITH LANEY KATE, LANDON, FINN, PAISLEY AND CADE, WHO HAVE RECEIVED CARE AT THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017


PHOTO COURTESY SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM

A Passion

for Healing Born of necessity, The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis thrives on community support.

B By Brian Wilson

efore The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis became a St. Jude Affiliate Clinic in 2016 … before the signature 20-foot cartoon panda topped a brand-new facility in 2008 … before the “hospital within a hospital” began in 1995 … Saint Francis committed itself to treating critically ill kids. One case came more than three decades ago, when Mike and Cathey Barkley faced a difficult pregnancy and a baby being born three months premature, a risky situation in 1984. The Barkleys chose Saint Francis because it had attained the highest rating level for pediatric care. The hospital was also the only one in Tulsa with machines that were able to warm their newborn son, oxygenate him and ventilate him. “Oh, that Barkley baby,” says Shannon Filosa, then a pediatric intensive-care nurse. “I remember him, and a lot of other babies, because you’re not just taking care of the patient but the families, too.” Today, that same nurse, Filosa, and that same family, the Barkleys, are integral parts to the operation of The Children’s Hospital, the only such facility in eastern Oklahoma, northwest Arkansas, southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas. Filosa, executive director of women’s and children’s services at Saint Francis since 2007, oversees deliveries, high-risk pregnancies, post-partum care and newborn nurseries. The Barkleys have been five-time co-chairs of the Painted Pony Ball, the largest fundraiser for The Children’s Hospital. AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Mike Barkley’s personal and philanthropic relationship with Saint Francis intertwines with Barkley Law Firm’s legal representation of the health system. He was a logical choice when the Warren Foundation needed someone to serve as chair of The Children’s Hospital Foundation at Saint Francis, and he accepted serving in that role. “It’s been an honor to do so,” he says. And Filosa, 22 years a neonatal nurse, still knows many of her former patients, not just Christian Michael Barkley, now 33. “You keep up with people because you spend so much time with the baby and the family,” she says. “People recognize me all the time and come up to me in restaurants and show me pictures of their children and grandchildren. It’s amazing.”

The emphasis on helping people, particularly children and their parents, drove Saint Francis to expand its children’s services within the main hospital to an eight-floor, 162-bed, stand-alone facility. Jake Henry Jr., president and CEO of the Saint Francis Health System since 2002, says building The Children’s Hospital was “simply the right thing to do.” The Saint Francis board committed to the plan in 2003; The Children’s Hospital broke ground in 2005 and opened in 2008 during a snow storm. “Tulsa was without its own children’s hospital,” Henry says. “Otherwise, kids would have to go to Oklahoma City [to The Children’s Hospital at the University of Oklahoma Medical Center], and just a few hours of travel can make all the difference in the life of a patient.” Henry preaches strategic planning. Shortly after he arrived at Saint Francis, he and the board of directors identified three pressing needs: an expanded emergency room and critical-care unit, a separate hospital in the southeast quadrant of Tulsa County and a separate children’s hospital. All three have become realities. “The Children’s Hospital had the ‘worst’ return on investment, but that’s what we took up first because we already had the largest pediatric load in town,” he says. “We are a faith-based, Catholic organization. Our mission of helping others through Christ drives everything we do. “Sixty-five percent of our kids here are on Medicaid … victims of child abuse, cancer, heart disease, under-developed lungs. We treat patients as Christ would.” There was a concern about the scores of millions of dollars needed for the new

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

‘The Right Thing to Do’

Suzanne Warren Suzanne Warren gathers people together and accomplishes goals. You see it in the annual Painted Pony Ball, the biggest fundraiser for The Children’s Hospital Foundation at Saint Francis. You see it in meetings, which can result in tours of The Children’s Hospital and (a side benefit) getting people to volunteer. When she moved to Tulsa 37 years ago with her husband, William K. Warren Jr., she dived into the Warren family’s contributions to the city. “I wanted to continue their vision of philanthropy,” she says. Because of her work with The Children’s Hospital and at least a dozen other organizations and institutions, the Connecticut-born Warren was inducted into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame in 2012. “I am proud to be a non-Oklahoma native in the Hall of Fame,” the former school teacher says. “I put committees together to get things done. I get people to rally around an idea. It’s natural for me to rally people.” For one so immersed and involved in The

Children’s Hospital, you might think Warren’s list of passion and visions for the facility would be lengthy. Instead, she offers one sentence: “I am ready to help in any way asked to further the mission of The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis: to extend the presence and healing ministry of Christ in all we do.” Warren is proud The Children’s Hospital has led to the search and recruitment of pediatric specialists and sub-specialists. “Their presence is what makes this possible for families in Tulsa who are faced with medical crises to receive treatment in Tulsa and remain [here],” she says. Warren has fully embraced the Sooner State. “I had never been to Oklahoma before my husband, Bill, brought me here,” she says. “Tulsa is as beautiful as Greenwich, Connecticut, where I grew up, and people have been extraordinarily welcoming. There are many opportunities to be involved in organizations that improve a person’s life. I have enjoyed a full family life, including every sport imaginable, for almost 40 years. I feel like a native.”


TULSA’S ONLY CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL.

Our pediatric specialties include:

Neonatology

24/7 Pediatric Emergency Center

Neurology

Adolescent medicine Allergy/immunology Cardiac surgery

With an emphasis on family-centered care, The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis provides state-of-the-art technology and a dedicated staff to meet the medical needs of children. More than 100 pediatricians and 65 pediatric subspecialists work as a team, so you can rest assured your child will receive the most comprehensive medical care available in eastern Oklahoma.

Cardiology Child abuse pediatrics Child and adolescent psychiatry Critical care medicine Emergency/trauma care

saintfrancis.com/childrenshospital The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis 6161 South Yale Avenue, Tulsa, OK | 918-502-6000

Oculoplastic surgery Ophthalmology Oral/maxillofacial surgery Orthopedic surgery Otolaryngology Palliative care Pathology

Endocrinology/diabetes care

Plastic and reconstructive surgery

General surgery

Pulmonology

Genetics

Radiology

Hematology/oncology

Sports medicine

Hospital medicine

Urology

Infectious disease

Healthcare for life.

Nephrology


READ OUR ONLINE EXCLUSIVE ON BARTON AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.

facility. However, Saint Francis has an advantage of being one health system, incurring no debt as it has grown and having the ability to shift and focus funds. That allowed The Children’s Hospital to open five years after Saint Francis committed to the project. “Planning is a process,” Henry says. “It drives our budget and our operations. We’re the only health system in the city that’s locally owned. This allows us to be nimble. We can move quickly because we have only one board.” Dr. Phil Barton, medical director of the pediatric intensive care unit, stresses that The Children’s Hospital opened during the onset of the Great Recession. “Five other children’s hospitals closed during that time, and here we were opening ours,” he says. “The administration took the aspect that this is what’s right for kids, even though we’re going to get killed with costs. “We bucked the trend.” Barton is also proud that Saint Francis teaches resident physicians. On the most recent residents’ orientation, Barton just happened to run into them in the spacious foyer of The Children’s Hospital; he talked extemporaneously for several minutes with the group before carrying on with his schedule. “This is a unique environment: a private health system that’s also a teaching hospital,” says Barton, who relishes his role as an associate professor of pediatrics at the OU-Tulsa and the Oklahoma State University-Tulsa medical schools. “Sometimes I learn more from my residents than I do by myself.”

‘How Can You Not Do This?’

Carrie Daniels, whose daughter Laney Kate was in the neonatal ICU for many weeks because of a life-threatening congenital condition, understands the stress and emotional toll of having an ill child in the hospital.

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Laney Kate Daniels

Laney Kate Daniels, a typical 10-year-old, has multiple priorities: her dogs, books and tribal dancing – a normal mix of varying passions. But Laney Kate’s development and entry into the world were anything but normal. That’s why she and her mother, Carrie Daniels, spread the word about The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, where Laney Kate was born under traumatic circumstances. In utero, Laney Kate had a congenital diaphragmatic hernia; her mother faced the prospect of a child not viable for the world and/or one requiring many risky surgeries before and after birth. “But Saint Francis gave me hope for the possibilities of what could happen here in Tulsa,” says Daniels, who had booked a ticket and long stay at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia before remaining close to her Bartlesville home. “Saint Francis handled several cases like Laney Kate’s a year.” On June 15, 2007, at 2:52 p.m., Laney Kate entered the world “with a healthy cry,” says her mother, who had expected silence. The baby, immediately intubated, went through a series of steps (ventilation, oscillation and nitrous oxide) before the last hope, an Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation machine, allowing Laney Kate to stabilize. Laney Kate’s stomach was still in her chest; leaking in and around those cavities required a perilous three- to five-hour surgery. Laney Kate and the surgical team did so well that it was accomplished in two hours. The dynamo, now 4-foot-2 and 47 pounds, has been healthy ever since … with no follow-up surgeries. The Danielses embrace their Chickasaw heritage.

Laney Kate, since she was 5, reguarly performs the Jingle Dance, which “is for prayer and healing,” says her mother, treasuring its symbolism. Laney Kate is quick to add that she does more than just dance. “I play outside with my dogs, Koda, Lola and Ofie [the Chickasaw word for dog],” she says. “And I read books all the time. My favorites are the Wolves of the Beyond and Guardians of Ga’Hoole. Both are series by my favorite author, Kathryn Lasky. “Oh, yeah. And I like to draw pictures of animals in pencil,” particularly the wolf, her spiritual guide. Laney Kate visits The Children’s Hospital to show that a regular life can follow a dangerous beginning, but “it’s just kind of normal to do that.” Her mother, however, understands the impact and annually devotes hundreds of hours talking about her and Laney Kate’s stories. “There’s no tired in hope,” Daniels says.

PHOTO BY SHANE BEVEL, COURTESY OF SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM

DR. PHIL BARTON, MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF THE PEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, IS PROUD THAT HE IS A HOME-GROWN PRODUCT OF OKLAHOMA HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER


American Bank congratulates our friends at Saint Francis Hospital for their important work in serving our children since 2008. Sixty Sixty American Plaza | Tulsa, OK 74135 | 918.481.3000 | americanbanktulsa.com


“The doctors and nurses have to tell you all the bad stuff that can happen,” says Daniels, who does outreach for the facility as a volunteer. “But I get to tell about all the amazing stuff that happens. They are selfless servants in those hallways.” The Children’s Hospital doesn’t look like a medical facility. Natural light bathes every level because of floor-to-ceiling windows. Bright colors, soft curves and artwork much like that at a children’s museum dominate the architecture. One of the design commitments that Henry and other leaders made was making patients’ families comfortable. From fold-out couches in the “family zone” of each room to providing laundry facilities and “respite areas,” parents and loved ones get the care they need so they can bolster their children. “It’s well known that children battling disease or injury do better when they have strong family support,” Henry says. “We purposely designed rooms for families. The Children’s Hospital isn’t just a big box. Involving the family is clearly efficacious.” The professionals in the hospital also feel the heartache because of the close relationships that they develop with children and their families. Burnout, particularly with nurses, can occur; Becky Reinholz, clinical director of the pediatric ICU, is keenly aware of this. “You have to care about the nurses and everyone on the staff as much as the families,” Reinholz says. “If we’re focused on the quality and safety with the families, then that’s going to extend to the nurses and the staff.” Reinholz says that when tragic and life-altering events occur, it helps to see that “every day is a new child, a new family. There are as many rewards as there are challenges. We’re human, but you have to hope and lead people into the future. That’s mission driven. “Plus, how can you not do this?”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

Shannon Filosa juggles dozens of figurative balls as executive director of women’s and children’s services at Saint Francis. The longtime neonatal nurse, who has seen practically every medical crisis that can happen to a baby, shrugs off her daily balancing act. Her management at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis focuses on two simple goals, not on all the working parts. “We keep units financially stable and keep them up to our standards of quality,” she says. “If you keep your patients safe and maintain quality, everything falls into place.” For instance, every morning begins with a safety huddle by medical teams comprising pediatricians, nurses, resident physicians, pharmacists, respiratory therapists and childlife specialists. “We communicate. We don’t solve problems in those huddles, but we identify them,” she says. “We do it as a team. We designate who has what project and what focus. “You have to deal with the ‘right now,’ but you also have to deal with all the other things.” Filosa says she tries “to be innovative,

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

READ OUR ONLINE EXCLUSIVE ON REINHOLZ AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.

Shannon Filosa

current, open and transparent. I expect a high performance level and have high expectations.” She says her teams of medical providers achieve those results because “fighting for children is part of our culture. We’re all in. Everyone on the team is working to get the best outcome. “That defines the culture.”

Mike Barkley

Mike Barkley, a patron co-chair of the Painted Pony Ball, keeps the gala’s financial goals ($3 million this year) in mind because of the expense of running The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis. But that doesn’t mean there haven’t been some anecdotes along the way. Saint Francis, since its beginnings in 1960, is known by its signature Italian stone called pink modur. When the fundraiser for The Children’s Hospital began, The Children’s Hospital Foundation tried to call it the Pink Pony Ball. “But Ralph Lauren – you know, the guy with the polo pony logo – had already registered the name,” Barkley says. “So we switched it to the Painted Pony.” People attend in all sorts of party attire. “The first year, I wore jeans and a pink tuxedo jacket rented from a place in Fort Lauderdale, Florida,” he says. “Someone spilled red wine on it, so I ended up buying it. “The funny thing was that I got it cleaned and it came out great, so I gave it to Eric Selby,” son of Ken’s Pizza/Mazzio’s founder Ken Selby. The Children’s Hospital makes recruiting singers to the Painted Pony Ball easy. “We’ve had entertainers come for free or for just the cost of bringing the band,” Barkley

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

BECKY REINHOLZ (RIGHT) DISCUSSES A PATIENT’S CHART WITH ANOTHER HOSPITAL EMPLOYEE. REINHOLZ, CLINICAL DIRECTOR OF THE PEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE UNIT, STRESSES HOPE AT ALL TIMES WHEN TREATING CRITICALLY ILL KIDS. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

says. “It’s not a hard sell. We take care of children. Two years ago, we got The Band Perry because their dad’s a pediatrician; they used to go on house calls with him when they were kids. We worked on getting Toby Keith for five years. We made it happen, and he couldn’t have been better. “Everyone in Tulsa and the region should be proud of the facility, the doctors and the nurses. The Children’s Hospital loses money, so this makes a big difference. We take care of the sickest of the sick.”


OSU Center for Health Sciences CONGRATULATES Saint Francis Health System and the Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis on a decade of CARING. Happy 10th Anniversary to the Painted Pony Ball! And THANK YOU for partnering with OSU Center for Health Sciences to better the lives of children in Oklahoma. 1111 West 17th Street | Tulsa, OK 74107-1898 | 918-582-1972 | www.healthsciences.okstate.edu


Much of what The Children’s Hospital does comes about from the Warren Foundation and the Painted Pony Ball. A common link between those two is Suzanne Warren. “Philanthropy is the family business,” Warren says. Her husband, William K. Warren Jr., is chairman emeritus of the Warren Foundation, and her son John-Kelly Warren is chairman. “I have the background of my husband’s family, and I’m a hard worker. I’ve had a greater impact with them than as an individual.” Warren says much of The Children’s Hospital success has come because many felt “that the Tulsa community should be involved and asked to support it.” Henry asked her to chair the inaugural Painted Pony Ball, which, through consensus, quickly acquired a western theme. “You see every kind of dress and tux,” she says. “I wear a Valentino dress and my husband wears boots and jeans. It looks like we’re going to different parties.” The goal of this year’s Oct. 21 event is $3 million to buy a pediatric MRI machine “that will be kid-friendly and decorated and equipped [with $60,000 virtual reality goggles] to keep them still during the process,” she says. Warren says her involvement in The Children’s Hospital made sense because she and her husband have six children and know firsthand the challenges of having children in the hospital. She also has a master’s degree in education and was a tenured teacher. Her goal for the hospital was to make it “child-centered, non-threatening.” She recalls one critically ill boy who was there for many days. “He recovered. He had done so well,” Warren says. “But he didn’t want to go home because of how he was treated. “That says a lot.”

10TH BIENNIAL

PAINTED PONY BALL LOCATION

COX BUSINESS CENTER, 100 CIVIC CENTER, TULSA

DATE

SATURDAY, OCT. 21

TIME

COCKTAILS AND HORS D’OEUVRES AT 6 P.M. DINNER AT 7 P.M.

MORE INFORMATION

CALL 918-502-6763 OR GO TO OKMAG.COM/PAINTEDPONY

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

THE

CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS

BY THE NUMBERS 155,000

Amount of square feet of The Children’s Hospital

PHOTO COURTESY SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM

‘Child-Centered, Non-Threatening’

8

Number of floors

162

Number of beds

2016

Year when The Children’s Hospital became the eighth St. Jude Affiliate Clinic in the nation

25

Number of pediatric specialties and sub-specialties, including cardiology, child-abuse pediatrics, emergency services, endocrinology, gastroenterology, general surgery, genetics, hematology, hospice, infectious disease, neonatal care, neurology, oncology, pathology, pulmonology, reconstructive surgery and urology

LEVEL IV

The highest rating for pediatric services, with Saint Francis being the region’s only hospital attaining this ranking for neonatal intensive care, pediatric hematology/oncology and pediatric cardiac surgery

6,500

Annual average number of patients admitted

4-5 DAYS

Average length of stay for each admitted patient; however, this number varies because some patients can be in the hospital for multiple months and others can go home after a day or two

Jake Henry Jr.

The moment was one of timing and leadership. After Children’s Medical Center on East Skelly Drive closed in 2000, Tulsa was without such a stand-alone facility. When Jake Henry Jr. took over the Saint Francis Health System in 2002, he and the board fixed that. Henry met in 2003 with directors of the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa and Oklahoma State UniversityTulsa medical schools and leaders from the St. John and Hillcrest health systems. The medical schools said Tulsa needed a separate children’s facility. “It was very quiet; no one said anything,” Henry says. “We do a lot of collaboration with the other hospitals, but we also compete.” Hillcrest had absorbed Children’s Medical Center, so it and St. John didn’t commit. Henry spoke: “I said, ‘Look, I will take it back to my board.’ [In] 6-8 months, we got the green light.” Saint Francis had never reached outside the Warren Foundation to finance construction. “It was the pink place up on the hill and a bit insular,” Henry says. “John-Kelly Warren [the Warren Foundation’s CEO] and I decided to begin a fundraising foundation to let people get involved. Tulsa kind of owns The Children’s Hospital. Kids tug at our hearts.” He lauds philanthropist Henry Zarrow, whose name graces the facility’s neonatal intensive care unit. “I still love him,” says Henry, a pallbearer at Zarrow’s funeral in 2014. “The Children’s Hospital was a huge mission in his life.” The hospital was built … but not finished. “Now came recruiting specialists and subspecialists,” Henry says. “They are hard to come by; at least 50 percent of pediatric patients are on Medicaid. There is a direct correlation between childhood injury and disease with poverty.” In managing Saint Francis, Henry says: “Be deliberate. Be dependable. Be predictable. No surprises. You get buy-in with a common vision – not settling for the status quo.”


PHIL LONG

Thank You.... SainT FranciS healTh SYSTemS You bring hope To oklahoma’S children and FamilieS!

congratulates EMERITUS Saint Francis Health System, The Children’s Hospital Foundation and Suzanne Warren as they host the approaching Painted Pony Ball

“ ”

This will be a must-see, must-attend production that will delight and thrill the generous patrons of Tulsa. – Phillip Edward Long

22820 Phil Long.indd 1

2 7/25/17Untitled-4 22803 4:59 PM KKT Architects.indd 1

7/7/2017 5:21:03 PM

7/10/17 11:11 AM

Thank You to the Doctors, Nurses, Staff and Volunteers at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis for your dedication to caring for the youngest patients.

22810 Advanced Research Chemicals 2.indd 1

7/22/17 10:23 AM

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Automotive

Special Advertising Section

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Blind Zone Alert, Forward Collision Alert and Low Speed Forward Automatic Braking. The in-vehicle report shows how your teen performed so you can identify problem areas and coach your new driver on improvements.


EDUCATION

The Job Steps From ‘admission to position,’ today’s colleges provide career guidance before graduation and beyond.

W

hile career services may be thought of as a helpful tool to land a college student his or her first job, more colleges are offering a wide variety of services to help set students up for their entire careers. Savvy colleges encourage students to become aware of their options, especially in post-graduation years when alma mater support can make all the difference for an alum in job transition. “We assist students in their career development process from admission to position,” says Jessica Bradley, Oklahoma State University’s career services coordinator. “We promote our services to students when they first attend new student orientation.” Robin Huston, director of the University of Oklahoma’s career services, says: “The biggest thing is to get to them early in their college career and let them know how we can help, including encouraging them to think about post-graduation plans, from the beginning of their college career. If you wait until, say, junior year, you waste opportunities to think about all the experiences in your college career in terms of resume building, especially with internships.” Communicating with a professional in career services can be an important barometer. “Sometimes it’s an affirmation that the student is on the right course,” Huston says. “Or, it’s showing them, ‘Hey, I don’t like this path,’ so they can correct their course. It’s just really

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

good to get experience to help make informed decisions both before and after graduation.” OSU, like most colleges, provides services such as resume and cover letter development; mock interviews; job search strategies and resources (part-time and full-time positions, and internships); and specialized workshops. “We offer workshops on topics such as salary negotiation, what to do at a career fair, and mock interview day – where they can practice interviewing with an actual employer – just to name a few,” Bradley says. “This fall, we are partnering with J.C. Penney for a professional dress event, where students can purchase business professional dress at a discounted price, as an example.” In addition to the specialized appointments, workshops and career fairs, OU, OSU and other schools seek out undecided students to assist with tools such as new recruiting platforms, bigger job boards and on-campus interview portals. “We also offer career assessments [on] personality, interests, work values, and skills,” Bradley says. “This serves as a valuable tool when it comes to knowing yourself and your strengths, and how to relate that to a future career. We also have an employer relations team that specializes in attracting and retaining companies to recruit OSU students and alumni. This team is extremely valuable not only in de-

veloping new job opportunities for students, but also in keeping us updated on what employers are really looking for in a candidate, such as marketable skill sets or what is relevant to include on a resume.” Huston says internet-driven methods are a focus these days. “We’ve seen that we have to speak to students in the way they want to be spoken to today,” she says. “They want information delivered via social media, which is exemplified by the big trend right now of companies saving money and doing virtual interviews. We offer a dedicated room for such interviews so they have a quiet space with no noise or roommates and all the technologies present. As with any interview, we can do mock interviews in advance to further prepare the student. We have also gotten potential employers to do mock interviews, which is fantastic practice for our students and may lead to opportunities with these companies.” Career services no longer simply assists students with finding jobs after graduation. Bradley says the field has shifted from placing students to empowering them for their entire careers because “it is becoming more common for individuals to have several different jobs over the course of their career, rather than staying in one career for 30-40 years; thus, we want to teach … students to possess these valuable professional development skills to use throughout their lifetime.” TRACY LEGRAND


OU - Oklahoma’s Leader in Excellence

• For the second time in history, the University of Oklahoma ranks No. 1 in the nation in enrollment of freshman National Merit Scholars. • OU was recently awarded the prestigious Davis Cup for the fourth consecutive year in recognition of its record-setting enrollment of United World College international freshmen. OU is the only public university to ever be awarded the Davis Cup. • OU is the only university in the nation, public or private, whose students have won Goldwater, Mitchell, Truman, Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright and National Security Education Program scholarships in the same year. • OU has achieved an all-time record freshman-tosophomore retention rate of 90 percent, ranking OU among the top universities in the nation. OU is one of only 34 public institutions in the nation currently reporting retention rates of 90 percent or higher. • OU has the academically highest ranked student body at a public university in Oklahoma history. • OU has produced 29 Rhodes Scholars; no other university in Oklahoma has had more than three.

• The University of Oklahoma has been awarded the largest federal research grant in its history — a five-year, $166 million grant by NASA to advance understanding of Earth’s natural exchanges of carbon between the land, atmosphere and ocean. • With construction underway and move in set for this fall, OU will become one of the first public universities in the country to build residential colleges for upperclassmen and women, patterned on those at Yale, Oxford, Harvard and Cambridge in England. The living/learning communities will become the cornerstone of the undergraduate experience. • OU is the only Big 12 university to be selected as having one of America’s 25 most beautiful campuses. • The total out-of-pocket cost to obtain a degree from OU has gone down by an average of $7,200 compared to two years ago. The university has made cuts across the institution and increased scholarships to help all students, including middle income students, have the resources necessary to complete their degrees based on 125 credit hours – the required amount for most OU degree programs.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

- The Impact of Excellence


EDUCATION

Innovative Learning As the economy changes, more Oklahoma colleges offer degrees in entrepreneurship.

A

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s our economy and business landscape change, colleges and universities continually seek to respond in a variety of ways to prepare students for success despite an environment in flux. Many schools have developed curricula to create a desirable workforce ready to succeed. One way has been the emergence of entrepreneurial programs. Business colleges across Oklahoma offer a variety of degree options for students to learn about the innovative path of entrepreneurship. Most people have a basic understanding of what entrepreneurship entails. Professors at Oklahoma colleges provide the details of what happens in these programs. In basic terms, we often think of an entrepreneur as someone who is simply starting a new enterprise, says John Cragin, Ph.D, professor of social entrepreneurship and international business at Oklahoma Baptist University. But he adds that is really just a small percentage of people. “Entrepreneurship is not about money. It’s about meaning,” Cragin says. “It’s about doing something that others cannot or will not do. It’s about pointing the way.” Entrepreneurial programs explore the “why and what could be,” says Tom Lumpkin, Ph.D, director of the division of entrepreneurship and economic development at the University of Oklahoma. “We are trying to equip students to adapt to our changing world,” Lumpkin says. “We want to teach our students

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

how to evolve. We can’t really teach determination, but we can teach students skills, processes and techniques to access opportunity and viability.” The principles and methods learned through entrepreneurship programs can be utilized in a variety of ways. While the obvious path would be pursuing a degree in entrepreneurship and entering the business world, many other options exist and are encouraged by academia. Cragin and Lumpkin agree that both business majors and non-business majors benefit from entrepreneurial courses. “Any student can be successful in entrepreneurships from any degree or background,” Lumpkin says. “Students get the idea that they have to have some innovation to be successful in this type of program, but it’s more opportunity recognition and problem solving. We are teaching life skills as much as business skills that apply across many domains … a well-rounded view of business.” Cragin adds: “Success in any career is largely determined by students dedicating themselves to acquiring professional resources, insight, skills and knowledge. Successful entrepreneurs tend to be confident, determined and creative. I believe they can be engineers, accountants, scientists, marketers, teachers, ministers and artists.” Recognizing the versatility of entrepreneurship’s principles, OU is developing a four-tiered program offering graduate and undergraduate programs with minors and certification programs. The implementation of entrepreneurial concepts will not

be limited to formal classes. “We are planning opportunities all around the campus,” Lumpkin says. An example is OU’s Innovation Hub, which houses a fabrication lab, collaboration spaces and the school’s Center for Entrepreneurship, all open to the public, not just students. Academics have recognized that entrepreneurial principles can bridge gaps between business and other parts of our society. OBU offers a relatively new major called social entrepreneurship, which is not taught at many universities. “The rising population in the U.S. and Europe is less materialistic, at least in the views they say they hold,” Cragin says. “Social entrepreneurs are different from [traditional] entrepreneurs in that they want to use business to accomplish good for society … to start a sustainable, self-funding business that either directly or indirectly addresses a social need.” Myriad ways exist to teach entrepreneurship, but a common thread across the programs is the philosophy that failure and change are not bad. “One of the essentials for entrepreneurs is the acceptance of, almost relishing in, failure, which they see only as setbacks and opportunities to learn,” Cragin says. “We have examples of spectacular successes and failures, but that is true for other majors as well.” The expansion of these programs shows that entrepreneurship can be utilized in a multitude of practices as students embrace change and find innovative ways to impact our world. LINDSAY CUOMO


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EDUCATION

Paying for College From saving early to navigating student loans and work-study, students have choices.

M

“The best investment vehicle for ost parents hope their children will student’s entry into college. It must be saving for college costs is a 529 savings attend college to enhance future earncompleted every year. A high school plan, which functions similarly to a ing power, but being accepted into a senior’s fall semester is the best time to school and paying for it present different Roth IRA in that your contributions will apply for scholarships after doing dilibe taxed but the earnings will not. Set challenges. Strains on the pocketbook gent research through the summer. Most one up either right after the child’s birth and incurring debt must be considered; have Nov. 1, Dec. 1 or Jan. 1 deadlines. or even before (designating yourself the luckily, with a bit of digging, answers At OBU, work-study jobs are typically beneficiary and then changing it to your are available. posted during the summer before the fall child after he or she is born).” Oklahoma Baptist University, typical semester and as openings occur during When choosing colleges, many teens of higher learning institutions in the the academic year. do not have the luxury of long-term savstate, offers financial counseling, advice Both Forbes and Raney suggest proings plans behind them, so OBU focuses fessional financial expertise and point on the Free Application for Federal on helping students in high school or Student Aid (FAFSA) and information to how most states have easy-access community college. on scholarships, work-study programs, college savings plans. Contributions are loans and grants. usually tax deferred so it’s a good “We meet with any student “We caution about borrow- investment in the child’s future. To or family … to discuss financial maximize the gifts of, for example, ing more money than is options for paying for college,” grandparents, Forbes needed for actual costs of generous says Jonna Raney, OBU’s director suggests breaking such numbers their education.” of student financial services. “We into one-year increments given to give them information about colthe parents to avoid inflated income “Make that transition to meeting the lege savings plans and tax credits. statements scrutinized for FAFSA financial obligations of a university “We caution about borrowing more purposes. education,” Raney says. “Do not let money than is needed for actual costs of College spending goes beyond tuition the initial cost figures deter them from their education. We encourage budgetand housing, and Raney says incidental applying to their first college choice. For costs depend upon the standard of living ing as much as possible to pay as they example, 100 percent of OBU students go for any balance not covered with the student desires as well as the amount receive scholarships from the university, of debt the student brings to college, grants and scholarships.” Saving for college as early as possible so no entering student will pay the full such as a car payment or credit card costs. It’s free to apply to OBU and to is ideal. Forbes magazine, in a 2015 debt. article, writes: “Time is your greatest as- complete the FAFSA, so it costs nothing When money won’t quite stretch to get a financial aid award to see if it’s set. If you start saving from [the child’s] to cover the first year of college after affordable. Many students and families birth, a third of your college savings high school, Forbes points to the timeare pleasantly surprised.” goal will come from your earnings. If honored strategy of living at home for Timing is key when it comes to a you wait till the child enters high school, a year or two and attending community successful FAFSA, she says. Families a tenth of the goal would come from college while saving to finish up a earnings and you would have to save six should complete the FAFSA as soon degree at a four-year institution. after Oct. 1 of the year preceding the times as much per month. TRACY LEGRAND

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Mid-America Christian University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: JESSICA RIMMER, Vice President for Student Engagement and Success, 3500 SW 119th, OKC, OK 73710 , 405-692-3275


EDUCATION

Education

Deliberations Homework is necessary when choosing a private school.

P

asking lots of questions because “pririvate schooling is a big decision and vate schools are not all the same. Some many variables factor into the process. on producing well-rounded students. specialize in certain areas.” We surveyed area educators for We do not let students rest on having Cascia Hall Headmaster Roger answers to questions that parents have one subject in which they excel. We Carter agrees. when comparing schools. require all students to take all subjects “Each private school has its own “We are fortunate to have many great – including electives – in order to chalflavor,” he says. “Some private schools public and private school options availlenge them and give balance to their able to families in the United States,” says are faith-based or focus on shared education.” Kevin M. Smith, head of school at Tulsa’s values. Some schools are college Carter describes Cascia’s culture prep schools preparing the student for Monte Cassino, a Catholic, pre-K to as: “We are a sixth through 12th grade the rigors of higher education. Other eighth grade institution. “Private schools Catholic school operated by the Augusschools are based on supplying a speidentify a unique mission and philosophy, tinian friars. We are open to students of so parents should look to match their fam- cial need or focus on a specific talent. all faiths and more than half of our stuAlmost all schools – public included – ily’s values and their aspirations for their dents are not Catholic; [they’re] attendsupply a shadow day where the student children to the right school. ing the school based on our core values can spend the day at school with a “We embody the Benedictine comof truth, unity and love. Our mission is student host and get a feel for the instimitment to excellence and to prepare students for college. serve primarily to promote “We have a rigorous academic school programs that ensure curriculum that challenges our “Private schools identify a the strong have something to students each and every day. We strive for and that the weak unique mission and philosophy, take education seriously, and this have nothing to fear. Our so parents should look to match focus is evident with the requireREACH program challenges ment of blazers and ties for their family’s values and their young men and blazers for our the most highly gifted stuaspirations for their children to young women. We build leaders. dents and supports students with identified learning chalTulsa’s current mayor [G.T. the right school.” lenges.” Bynum] is a Cascia graduate and tution. Parents should also talk to other Amber Gates, assistant director of we have also had a governor and movparents, not just school officials.” communications and curriculum at ers and shakers who shape Tulsa walk Availability of financial aid, transUniversity School, on the University our halls.” portation, and other, less tangible issues of Tulsa campus, says parents should Carter emphasizes healthy competishould also be weighed, Carter says. consider the costs of private schools. tion between public and private schools Gates stresses the right fit for each “Parents need to take a serious look as social contributions. student to each school. at their financial situation,” says Gates. “I would like to say how important “University School is a school for “They should remember that often the our public school system is to our academically advanced students,” she tuition listed is not 100 percent of the community, state and nation,” he says. says. “The curriculum is at minimum money they will need to put out for “The funding of public schools must be one year ahead of other schools at a private school education. There are improved and addressed; it is crucial. I the same grade level. This is a school often technology and activity fees, funsay this selfishly because it is obvious where hard work is paramount; if your draisers, apparel, food costs and other better public schools make better pristudent is not a hard worker, this might things, depending on the school.” vate schools just from the simple word not be the best school for him or her. Gates says there is no substitute for competition.” “University School also prides itself taking a physical tour of a school and TRACY LEGRAND

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017


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EDUCATION

Rethinking the InDemand Major

Work ethic, communication skills, teamwork and problem solving often trump a specific degree plan and path.

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primary goal for a student after college and a strong work ethic. better decision-making skills to be able “The soft skills become more imporis to find a job that gets the graduate to understand the implications of their tant than the major.” out of mom and dad’s basement or choices in majors and what careers they Some students valuing employment spare bedroom. A popular notion is that lead to,” Lightsey says. security may be driven to select majors the key to success comes from picking According to OU’s Institutional that offer ample job openings. Howa major that leads to a career where Research and Reporting, the most ever, the Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs are in-demand. common majors in 2017 include busiestimates that the average worker will Maybe not, according to experts. ness, biology, pre-nursing, psychology Career specialists from the and engineering with increases in University of Oklahoma and journalism and architecture. the University of Tulsa agree on “If you are lucky enough, Huston says Oklahoma specifithe list of the top majors for this cally needs teachers, but that isn’t your strengths and interyear. However, the status of the a major in demand. She also agrees ests fall into a major with a with Lightsey in how students job market shouldn’t always be clearer career path [such should choose their degrees. a student’s focus or reason for selecting a major. “Viability in the job market is as] accounting or petroTravis Lightsey Jr., major and not as important as choosing a leum engineering.” career exploration coach at OU, major that interests you,” she says. says students should stay true “If you are lucky enough, your have at least 10 different jobs before to themselves when choosing their strengths and interests fall into a major age 40 and Generation Z graduates will majors. with a clearer career path [such as] achold 12-15 jobs in their lifetimes. “In our experience with workcounting or petroleum engineering. “We want our students to enjoy what ing with students, it is best that they “However, if you are like many they’re studying,” says Shelly Holly, have an understanding of themselves, students and you do not know what TU director of career services. “If they including their goals, interests, values you want your career to be, studying are passionate about a field, they’re and skills, and understand the differwhat interests you and focusing on your more likely to succeed in college and in strengths is a better option than simply ent options of majors and careers they the workplace regardless of what career choosing a major for its career path.” have,” he says. they end up pursuing.” Robin Huston, OU career services TU’s most common majors vary slightBoth OU and TU have processes for director, adds that no matter what stuly from OU’s; they include nursing, mehelping students decide on majors. OU dents choose, they should keep in mind dia studies, computer science, mechanical students can meet one-on-one with an that “employers say the top skills they engineering and biology. These are in line exploration coach and take a major and are looking for include: ability to work with the expected job market in coming career assessment. on a team, problem-solving skills, writyears, according to TU officials. “This also allows students to develop ten and verbal communication skills, ALAINA STEVENS

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017


OSU Medicine Taking care of children and families is our PASSION. Our pediatricians and family medicine physicians are here to take care of YOUR FAMILY’S back-to-school healthcare needs.

To find a clinic near you, please go to

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s is Here The

FuturE 16 STUDENTS

in Oklahoma redefine what it means to be an overachiever. Photography by Dan Morgan Edited by Mary Willa Allen

After receiving dozens of glowing recommendations from schools in Tulsa and OKC, the 16 students chosen for our feature have distinguished themselves in their diverse talents. The group boasts math prodigies, star athletes, socially conscious philanthropists and gifted designers – proving Oklahoma students can do it all.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

Vaishnavi Reddy

Holland Hall University of Tulsa Major Biochemistry Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My parents. My core values involve being humble and kind to others; my parents are the epitome of that. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Completing my Bharatanatyam Arangetram, the art form I study. It is an Indian classical dance style that is a combination of storytelling and intricate footwork. A Bharatanatyam dancer is fully trained once they complete their Arangetram, which all together is around 2.5 hours of dancing. I have been learning this dance style for 10 years. I successfully completed my Arangetram in October 2016 in front of an audience of approximately 500. What would people be surprised to learn about you? Starting in the ninth grade, I joined Youth Philanthropy Initiative, a three-year program where 25 students from the Tulsa community come together, find an issue among teens that needs attention, and create a social franchise that will help solve the issue. High School College


Te’a Williams

Senna Saurino

Union High School University of Oklahoma Major Health and exercise science Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My small-group leader, Jenn. She has taught me more about myself than any other being. Without her, my relationship with God would have been diminutive because she directed my path to get to where I am today with him. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? My biggest achievement in life is to hear how much I have made an impact on others’ lives, simply from me being kind and smiling every day. I feel it is an honor to know that I have changed someone’s life without me even knowing. What are your career plans? I plan to start off being a physical therapist, then work my way up to being a chiropractor. What would people be surprised to learn about you? My background. Never judge a book by its cover because it’s always the happiest people who have experienced the most pain – they just don’t allow that pain to win their life.

Metro Christian Academy College Southern Methodist University Major Pre-medicine What has led you to pursue that field of study? I had a strong draw to pediatric oncology. My dad, who is a physician, has also helped lead me to an interest in medicine. Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My mom has made the greatest impact on me. She demonstrates the selflessness, hard work and love of the woman I aspire to be one day, pushing me to live a life that consists of setting quality goals and high standards for myself. What are some of the characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? I academically and socially challenge myself. I strive for excellence and remain adventurous in trying things that are outside of my comfort zone. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I am nicknamed after the professional Formula One driver Ayrton Senna. I used to race go-karts competitively because I was raised in a home that’s passionate about auto racing.

School

High School

College

Kyler Herron

Bixby High School University of Oklahoma Major Entrepreneurship and venture management, then law school What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Being one of the valedictorians of my senior class of over 420 students. It feels like the biggest achievement because of the four years of hard work. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be and why? Mike Trout. I have always loved baseball, as I have played my whole life, and he is one of the best players in the world. Plus, California would be an amazing place to live, so he gets the best of both worlds. What are some of the characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? I am not only an exceptionally hard worker in the classroom but on the baseball field and in the gym as well. I take four Advanced Placement classes and also balance the study load with baseball practice daily, multiple games a week and tournaments on several weekends. I also work to pay for my own gas, car insurance and other expenses. High School College

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Ashtyn Fox

Jack Ryan

Riverfield Country Day School Oklahoma State University Major Early childhood education What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Going through four years of seminary, a doctrine class I take at church every morning before school. It has definitely been a challenge to wake up at 5:30 every day, but I endured it and always enjoyed it. What are some of the characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? I have a diverse set of interests. I’m involved in athletics, music, drum line and student council at school. Outside of school, I am involved in church and Emergency Infant Services. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I used to be an extremely shy kid; I had a lot of anxiety. People who have known me for a long time are always so impressed at how far I have come. It is something I am really proud of, and I know that my progress gives hope to others. Anything else that you would like to add? My favorite quote is, “We are infinitely more than our limitations or our afflictions.” I can relate to it, and I have proved to myself that this is true. It’s also a good outlook to have on other people. High School

Casady School Stanford University Major Mathematics and philosophy Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My mom. Not only has she helped me find my passions and pursue them, but she taught me how to endure the hardships and be grateful. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Managing to survive high school and continue to pursue my passions even with the struggles that my mom and I have been through these past years. Even when we were facing homelessness, I kept a positive attitude and never gave up. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be and why? Paul Erdos, if he were alive, because he is my favorite mathematician. He was one of the most renowned mathematicians of the 20th century and trekked the world to give talks and collaborate with other mathematicians. He didn’t have a home, and he lived off of the money he made from giving talks. He lived his life entirely for his passion. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I can run two miles in 9 minutes and 50 seconds. I can solve a Rubik’s cube in about 20 seconds. I have three ear lobes. High School

College

College

Jeremiah Yohannan

Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics College University of Oklahoma Major Computer science and electrical engineering Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My father. With a mere four dollars in his pocket, he began his journey in an unfamiliar land. Recently married and with the future in mind, he moved to America from India to ensure that his children would get the best educational and career opportunities in the world. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Leading a new robotics competition team to victory. When I first felt inspired to found and captain a competition robotics team, the interest level of my school’s student body was abysmal and no teachers were willing to coach the team. Using concept demonstrations to arouse interest and foster commitment, though, the team soon grew in size. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be and why? It would be fun to trade places with one of the greatest Formula One drivers of our age, Fernando Alonso. As someone who enjoys the thrills of racing, I think it would be exhilarating. High School

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inside A Benedictine School

A Benedictine School


Matthew Smith

Bishop Kelley High School University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Major Biomedical engineering and finance/investments Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My dad and mom. They did not necessarily teach me right from wrong, but instead they taught me how to decide for myself what is right and what is wrong, and I believe that made all the difference. What are your career plans? I would like to research and develop revolutionary medical technology to better lives. I would also like to assist my father, who has built his career from the ground up and continues to run his own business, and run for public office of some kind. What are some of the characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? I think my multi-faceted life experiences have given me the resources and ability to succeed. That being said, my class is full of bright-minded, skilled and capable young men and women who stand out just as much as, and most of the time more so than, me. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I would have enjoyed participating in our school’s drama department, but there was just no way I could fit it into my schedule. High School College

Hudia Jamshed

Edmond North High School University of Oklahoma Major Biology or psychology Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My parents. For any immigrant family, the most pressure is put on the parents. They had to deal with a lot when they moved to America, and throughout all the injustice they faced, they stayed optimistic. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Anytime I scroll through Twitter and see all these tweets about world crises, I never actually see ordinary people trying to do anything more than re-tweeting posts. So after I had seen the 200th Syrian refugee crisis post, I decided I couldn’t keep seeing all this horrible news without doing something. I contacted my local mosque and asked if I could host a bake sale during the Friday prayer, and I ended up raising $600. It made me realize that a big achievement doesn’t have to be something that changes the world; it can be something small that changed your world. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I have a dark secret. It is something so widely unpopular that if I utter a single statement about this topic, I could be (and have been) shunned. I absolutely, positively adore country music. High School College

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Sarah Cameron

Jenks High School Yale University Major Economics What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Definitely getting into all eight Ivy League institutions. To this day, I’m still not sure how it happened, but I am incredibly thankful for the experience. What are your career plans? Unlike many incoming college students, I’m still uncertain of what career path I would like to pursue. At the end of the day, I just want to do something that makes me happy. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be and why? Kate Middleton. I think it would be so interesting to learn how the British monarchy operates firsthand. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I am a dual citizen. My mom is from Australia, and her entire family still lives there. I love getting to visit, and my dual citizenship is something I’m very proud of. High School College


EXCELLENCE • CONFIDENCE • INTEGRITY

portrait of a charger

Congratulations to Jack Ryan ’17 Selected by Oklahoma Magazine as an Outstanding Senior! Class of 2017 by the Numbers: S

A

•C

nsda 4th and 13th places national championships

winner

heritage hall

usc round robin gonzaga university

class of 2017

"lifer"

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IT

TE

R ET FO

RT

ED

LI

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debate champion 3x policy oklahoma west district

This is CASADY.

2017 Tournament of

champions

Casady School is a PreK-12, independent, college preparatory Episcopal day school committed to deeper-level learning. Casady School seeks a diverse, inclusive student body that reflects the diversity of the world around us and therefore admits students of any race, color, creed, religion, nationality, or ethnic origin. 1800 NW 122nd St. • Oklahoma City, OK 73120

TO LEARN • TO LEAD • TO SERVE

E

D

top 25

1947

FI

•P

usc round robin univ. of texas top 10 uc berkeley gonzaga university

• 100% matriculation to 47 different colleges and universities • 100% admitted to their top P A C C RE TO SU choice college • 15 will attend public university honors colleges • 79% received a scholarship • $9,798,648 offered in total scholarships • 40% scored 30 or above on the ACT • 7 plan to participate in 7 different intercollegiate sports (baseball, basketball, field hockey, football, soccer, track, volleyball) • 2 SPC Division I Champions in Boys’ Volleyball and Boys’ Basketball • 6 National Merit Finalists • 3 Eagle Scouts est.

Photos by Cindy Ritchie Photography

top speaker

DY S C H

OL

DEBATE CHAMPION DEVAVRAT DAVE ’17 FOUND HIS EDGE AT HERITAGE HALL State policy 2x6A debate champion

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DEBATE

405.749.3002 • heritagehall.com

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7/6/17 9:18 AM

Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics

The Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics (OSSM) was created through legislative action in 1983 and graduated its first class of 44 seniors from across the state in 1992. It is designed as a two-year residential public high school for academically gifted students in mathematics and science.

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THE OSSM DIFFERENCE · World Class Faculty · College-Level Curriculum · “America’s Top Public Schools” Newsweek (2008-20012) & Washington Post (2015, 2017)

· Class of 2017 (64 students) earned more than $8 million in merit-based scholarships · Summer Science & Math camps, 8 regional centers and school outreach programs to all 77 counties

THE

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7/3/17 1:10 PM


Helen Homola

Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School College U.S. Air Force Academy Major Foreign area studies with a minor in German Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My father. He exemplifies servant leadership and his work ethic inspires me to achieve my goals. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Being able to learn from the people I’ve met every time my family moved. Sometimes it seems easier to shut down when going to a new school and starting over, but I think it was important that I took an active approach rather than passive when I set out to make friends. What are your career plans? I plan on graduating from the Air Force Academy as a second lieutenant and serving in the military. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I have moved seven times and gone to two different high schools, and I was born in Germany. I also didn’t grow up wanting to join the military; I saw that as my parents’ niche. I also once attended trapeze school when I lived in Washington, D.C. High School

Devavrat Chandresh Dave

Heritage Hall College University of California, Berkeley Major Molecular biology What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Placing fourth in the country at the NSDA National Debate Tournament my junior year. Debate is an activity I have put a lot of time into, and being from Oklahoma seems to be a disadvantage when facing off against supposedly “better” schools from “smarter” states. Knowing that we can pull off the kinds of victories we did makes me feel wonderful because I believe that I’m representing my school and state well. What are some of the characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? Too often we try to make ourselves seem better than others, but the honest truth is that I am simply lucky and have lived in different circumstances, which is why I have been afforded this opportunity. Just because I have performed differently does not make me better in any way; everyone is wonderful, just in different ways. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I hate public speaking, which is ironic because I’m a debater. High School

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

Olivia Patton

Booker T. Washington High School College Spelman College Major Economics Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My mother. I am grateful to have a supportive woman in my life who always pushes me to take the extra step. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Founding the Black Flower Society Petals, which is a nonprofit organization that fervently serves the Tulsa community. My favorite project has been mentoring at a local elementary school and building relationships with the students. What are your career plans? I plan to pursue a position in business and entrepreneurship to better the environment of my community. It is a dream of mine to create and bring businesses to underserved areas in Tulsa, and to create a sense of pride for the members of that community. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be and why? If given the opportunity to trade places with Michelle Obama for a day, I wouldn’t hesitate to accept the offer. She is a beacon of light whose affirmative action inspires me. Her class, grace and style are timeless. High School


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AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Y Quan

Abby Cha

Thomas Edison Preparatory High School College University of Tulsa Major Biochemistry What has led you to pursue that field of study? I want to become either a neuroscientist or a neurosurgeon for my grandfather, who died of brain cancer, and for my grandmother, who died of dementia. I also want to preserve a future for those who are born with mental disabilities. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Being an Academic All-Stater or the smiles and appreciation I get from the students I tutor. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be and why? Either Batman or the Wolverine (I’m not on the bandwagon; I swear I loved them both since superheroes were still deemed strictly for nerds.) The next best person is Bruce Lee. He always stays true to his core principles and that’s what has made him an everlasting image. The next person is Beyoncé. She’s successful, talented, original, has a loving family and still maintains her strong independent vibe since Destiny’s Child. Anything else that you would like to add? Some advice to younger students: Even when you’re a senior and have all your academics to tend to, I urge you to find something that speaks to you. For me, it is kung fu. High School

Broken Arrow High School University of Oklahoma Major Physical therapy Who has been the biggest influence in your life and why? My mom. She’s always there for me, despite what’s happening in either of our lives. She encourages me and allows me to be myself, which is something I will always be thankful for. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Winning the 2015 Grand National Championship with my band program, the Pride of Broken Arrow. It was an awesome reward for all of the hard work we put in during the season. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be and why? Misty Copeland, the first African-American female principal dancer for the American Ballet Theatre. My dream as a child was certainly not to become a ballerina, but now I wish I was one. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I have a black belt in tae kwon do. I was once very committed to it when I was in elementary school and even had dreams to compete in the Olympics one day. School

College

Carl Atik

Cascia Hall University of California, Berkeley Major Chemical engineering What are your career plans? I would like to work in the development of energy systems such as solar panels, microbial fuel cells or other alternate energy forms. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Making the gold honor roll for the past three years, as I still remember my freshman year when I thought this achievement was far from my grasp. To me, this serves as a reminder that anyone can achieve their goals and make changes, as long as they have motivation and perseverance. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I am heavily influenced by and infatuated with rap music. About 750 of the 800 or so songs on my phone are rap. These rappers have not only provided me with a great soundtrack to my life but have given me many diverse perspectives on various racial, political, ethical and religious situations. High School College

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THE

CHICKASAW NATION ETERNAL FLAME

C H I C K A S AW C U LT U R A L C E N T E R SULPHUR, OKLAHOMA

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Investing in New Paths Oklahoma tribes expand their services with developments in health care, education, gaming, recreation and cinema.

THE CHEROKEE NATION’S 470,000-SQUARE-FOOT OUTPATIENT FACILITY IN TAHLEQUAH WILL BE THE LARGEST HEALTH CARE FACILITY IN INDIAN COUNTRY.

By Bonnie Rucker

With new facilities to address health care needs, new educational buildings and programs, or new places and sources for recreation, Native Americans in Oklahoma are on the move. While not an exhaustive, this report highlights some recent development by five of the state’s tribes, which provide expanding benefits for their members and Oklahoma as a whole.

RENDERING COURTESY CHILDERS ARCHITECT

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Muscogee (Creek) Improvements from the Muscogee (Creek) Nation line the west side of the Arkansas River in Jenks’s RiverWalk Crossing, where shopping, eating and golf (at the Flying Tee) abound. Across the 96th Street bridge and just north on Riverside Parkway in Tulsa, luxurious lodging is found at River Spirit Casino Resort, with its Paradise Cove and Las Vegas-style pool. While all of this may sound like simple fun and games, there is a solid foundation for Muscogee investment in these venues. “Monies generated from these ventures allow the Nation to give back to the state and local governments, school, communities, businesses and most of all, the Muscogee (Creek) citizens,” says T. Geebon Gouge, the tribe’s director of public relations. The River Spirit Casino Resort has expanded in recent months. Jimmy Buffett’s

Margaritaville Casino and Restaurant opened there in 2016, effectively expanding the establishment by 50,000 square feet and creating two casinos in one. There are a variety of dining options, hundreds of hotel rooms, a convention center and a theater. The Muscogee have invested in the RiverWalk Crossing and River Spirit through Onefire Holding, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Muscogee Nation. Dividends to the tribe and Oklahoma roll in. “We are building a stronger future for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation by providing employment opportunities and creating additional revenue that empowers tribal citizens through additional funding for health services, education and governmental functions,” says Mike Payne, CEO of Onefire Holding.

Cherokee The Cherokee Nation has broken ground on a 470,000-square-foot outpatient facility in Tahlequah. The benefits to Cherokees and to Oklahoma are numerous. “It will be the largest and most advanced health care facility in all of Indian Country and will be an excellent addition to health care options in northeast Oklahoma,” Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker says. The facility will sit on the campus of W.W. Hastings Hospital, which has run over capacity for a while. The site was home to 400,000 patient visits last year in a building meant to see only 100,000 per year. The new health center will provide Cherokees with better, faster services and reduce out-of-system referrals by providing onsite specialists. The Cherokee Nation anticipates the center will bring more than 800 health care jobs

to the area and 350 construction jobs. And according to Baker, the local economy will benefit due to an increase in activity, traffic and an influx of residents and visitors. “New jobs, shorter wait times and better services will positively impact so many lives in northeast Oklahoma. This is an absolute game changer toward a better and brighter future,” he says.

Choctaw The Choctaw Nation keeps up with tribal development trends with a range of projects designed to serve its members. These include new Head Start program early learning centers, child-care centers, casino expansions, and new medical and office buildings. According to the tribe, at the beginning of 2017, 40 tribal projects were underway in southeast Oklahoma, bringing jobs and growth. Providing more easily accessed services is important to the Choctaw. Many tribal offices are spread throughout Durant, but, in a few months, they will all be brought together in a 500,000-square-foot, five-story headquarters.

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About 1,500 employees will relocate there to provide a central location for many Choctaw services. “The Choctaw Nation was looking to create synergies for our tribal members by allowing them a central location for


THE CHICKASAW RANCHER, BEING PRODUCED IN OKLAHOMA, TELLS THE STORY OF MONTFORD T. JOHNSON.

PHOTOS COURTESY CHICKASAW PRODUCTIONS

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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all service offerings within the Bryan County area. It will also bring all of our employees together to allow for better collaboration and service delivery,” says T.R. Kanuch, senior executive officer of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Division of Commerce. Earlier this year the tribe opened its Choctaw Nation Regional Medical Clinic, which includes three buildings and 174,000 square feet and sits on the same 130-acre campus as the soon-to-be headquarters. The clinic

has the capacity to serve 7,000 Choctaws per year and includes, among other improvements, an MRI machine, allowing patients to stay in Durant for testing. Choctaw Chief Gary Batton writes in a recent article: “The Choctaw Nation has more to offer than ever before. The increase in job opportunities provides incentive to live and work in our area so that our people are empowered to provide for themselves and their families.”

Chickasaw One way the Chickasaw Nation focuses on sharing its rich heritage is cinematically. The Chickasaw Rancher is the latest project for Chickasaw Nation Productions, which, according to its website, “shares the enduring legacy, culture and heritage of the Chickasaw people through documentary and feature film.” The Chickasaw Rancher focuses on Montford T. Johnson, a Chickasaw with humble beginnings who owned and ran mul-

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tiple ranches in central Oklahoma. Johnson honored his heritage by conducting business in a manner respectful to native people in the area; he was known for his charity and philanthropy toward suffering Native Americans and orphaned children. The tribe’s films tell part of the story of Native people in general and the Chickasaw in particular to audiences who might not otherwise know them. “We believe sharing this story of [John-

MORE THAN 1,500 EMPLOYEES WILL WORK IN THE CHOCTAW NATION’S NEW 500,000-SQUARE-FOOT HEADQUARTERS IN DURANT. PHOTO COURTESY THE CHOCTAW NATION


son’s] strong Chickasaw spirit will enable us to expand on his legacy and develop an even stronger sense of community,” Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby says. The Chickasaw Rancher illustrates the sto-

ry of the Chickasaw Nation, says Anoatubby, adding that Johnson overcame difficult times and adversities to achieve success. “This is a perfect story to tell about the Chickasaw Nation,” he says.

Osage The Osage Nation has projects in progress, including a $150 million improvement to its casino in north Tulsa and developing the recently purchased Bluestem Ranch, but Principal Chief Geoffrey M. Standing Bear stresses the importance of his tribe’s educational efforts. “The way of economic development is through education and health,” says Standing Bear, adding that the Osage Nation focuses on what will make its members healthier, more secure and more educated. The tribe has long supported members’ post-secondary educational efforts through scholarships, and the youngest members of the nation can attend the Wah-Zha-Zhi Early Learning Academy to give them a strong educational start while their parents go to work.

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Perhaps the educational effort that most promotes the Osage people is the Language Immersion School (or Daposka Ahnkodapee, Our School, when translated from the Osage language), founded in 2015. The school provides an environment where youngsters can hear and speak the Osage language from early ages. The school serves children from six weeks to first grade with plans to expand all the way through high school. “The benefit [of the immersion school] to the Osage Nation and its members is the educational opportunities it provides for the youth of the Osage Nation, along with the school’s core mission of language preservation and revitalization,” says David Webb, the school’s headmaster.

WITH REVENUE FROM RIVERWALK CROSSING, THE MUSCOGEE (CREEK) NATION GIVES BACK TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, SCHOOLS, BUSINESSES AND THE TRIBE. PHOTO COURTESY ONE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


“HAVE YOU EVER EXPERIENCED THE TALIMENA SCENIC DRIVE IN THE FALL? IT’S MIND-BLOWING. THE COLORS ARE SO VIVID AND VARIED. IT’S LIKE DRIVING INTO ANOTHER WORLD, OR STEPPING INTO A RICHLY TEXTURED PAINTING. YOU HAVE TO SEE IT WITH YOUR OWN EYES.”

Summer’s dog days are receding. The temperature is dropping, the leaves are changing, the sunlight is softening. Choctaw Country offers a scenic retreat from the humdrum of daily routine, and there’s not a more beautiful time to visit than autumn. With abundant side stops teeming with natural beauty, a history steeped in Old West mythology, and endless lodging options—from primitive camping to RV parks to luxury cabins—you won’t want to leave this gorgeous land.

PLAN YOUR FALL ESCAPE AT CHOCTAWCOUNTRY.COM

Talimena Scenic Byway; Southeastern Oklahoma


2017-2018

Fall Arts PREVIEW Wh e t h e r yo u ’r e l o o k i n g f o r a r t sh o w s , l o c a l t h ea t e r, Br o a d way p e r f o rma n c e s o r l i v e c o n c e r t s , O k l a h o m a h a s p l e n t y t o o f f e r y o u f o r t h e 2 0 1 7- 2 0 1 8 s e a s o n .

By Mary Willa Allen

Gilcrease

Broadway Bonanza Celebrity Attractions

From Tony Award-winning musicals to beloved movies brought to life, everyone will find a show to enjoy in Celebrity Attractions’s 2017-2018 season. For those with a penchant for nostalgia, Finding Neverland and The Sound of Music are right up your alley. The more seasoned veterans of the theater will be happy to attend the snappy An American in Paris or hilarious A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. Kristin Dotson, CEO of Celebrity Attractions, has a few shows she can’t wait for Tulsans to experience. “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder is a riot – I love that outrageous, farcical

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

style of humor,” she says. “There is a moment at the end of Finding Neverland that is truly one of the most magical scenes I have ever witnessed on the stage. And the dancing in An American in Paris is breathtaking.” If there’s one thing Dotson knows for sure, it’s that Tulsans love their Broadway shows. “We have one of the most successful seasons in the country – Tulsa is definitely a Broadway town,” she says. “As a Tulsabased, family-owned business, Celebrity Attractions is proud to be involved.” Visit celebrityattractions.com for details on the season.

Celebrity Attractions


The West Comes Alive Gilcrease

Broken Arrow PAC

Honoring Our Roots Signature Symphony

Signature Symphony’s 39th season is all about commemorating the beloved city of Tulsa. “This year’s theme, From the Heartland: Tulsa Music Connections, is a year-long celebration of music with Tulsa ties,” says Andres Franco, music director and conductor of the symphony. “We return to our foundation for arts and culture by celebrating Tulsa’s musical family of current and former residents and their contributions in composing and creating music.” Along with beautifully rendered classical pieces, the symphony will have some fun with its Pops concerts. “Vocal music takes center stage as we feature the songwriting talents of British knights Sirs Elton John, Paul McCartney and Andrew Lloyd Webber and American royalty Frank Sinatra,” Franco says. “We will also help discover Tulsa’s next generation of talent with Tulsa Sings!” This competition presents an amazing opportunity for aspiring vocalists – finalists will have the chance to sing alongside Broadway’s Scott Coulter and other top vocalists during Tulsa Sings: 100 Years of Song, the final pops performance April 6-7. The winner will be chosen by the audience. For more information, visit signaturesymphony.org.

AHHA Tulsa

Dermis Through Aug. 20 Abstract Nature Through Aug. 20 FiberWorks 2017 Aug. 4 – Sept. 29 The Art of NEOWTA Sept. 1 – Oct. 22 When is a Quilt Not a Quilt? Sept. 1 – Oct. 22 ART 365 Oct. 6 - Nov. 19 We Are All Targets Dec. 1 - Jan. 21 Caral, The First Civilization in the Americas Feb. 2 - March 3

Armstrong Auditorium

OKC Ballet’s The Firebird and Rodeo Sept. 14 Two to Tango Nov. 9 Journey Across Europe Nov. 28 Night Flight Over Water Jan. 16 Moscow Festival Ballet Jan. 29-30

Stepping Out Feb. 20 An Evening with Brahms March 15 Abraham April 19 A Legend Lives On May 10

BOK Center

#iMOMSOHARD Aug. 1 Professional Bull Riders Aug. 12-13 Ed Sheeran Aug. 17 Janet Jackson Sept. 17 Kidz Bop Oct. 14 The Weeknd Oct. 21 Guns N’ Roses Nov. 14 Foo Fighters Nov. 15 Paw Patrol Live! Nov. 25-26 Katy Perry Nov. 29 Lorde March 21

Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center

Chita Rivera and Tommy Tune: Two for the Road Sept. 19 Betty Buckley Oct. 21 William Shatner: Shatner’s World Nov. 4 The Wizard of Oz Nov. 11 Christmas with the Annie Moses Band Dec. 10 Cabaret Jan. 14

PHOTO COURTESY FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART

PHOTO BY SEAN CAPSHAW COURTESY SIGNATURE SYMPHONY

PHOTO COURTESY CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS

PHOTO COURTESY ERNEST AMOROSO AND GILCREASE

Celebrate the American West at Tulsa’s Gilcrease Museum this season, which houses several new exhibitions highlighting one of the most colorful parts of Oklahoma’s past and present: the history, culture and art of Native Americans. “In late August, we open After Removal: Rebuilding the Cherokee Nation, which will tell the fascinating story of the resilience of the Cherokee people in the face of extreme adversity, and the rebirth of the Cherokee Nation,” says Melani Hamilton, communications manager at the museum. “That exhibition will give historical context and set the stage beautifully for Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist.” This exhibition, which opens Oct. 6, is organized by the American Federation of the Arts and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, showcasing the works of WalkingStick, a contemporary Cherokee artist. February brings the art of Norman Rockwell to the forefront in a new light. “This show is a different twist on the typical Norman Rockwell exhibits; it couples the photographs he used as studies side-by-side with his finished illustrations,” Hamilton says. For details on exhibitions, visit gilcrease.org

PHOTO COURTESY BROKEN ARROW PAC

108 Contemporary

Both Sides Now: Joyce Scott and Sonya Clark Aug. 4- Sept. 24 Streets: Mark Lewis Oct. 6- Nov. 19 Members Only: The State of Craft Dec. 1 - Jan. 21 Shelter: Patrick Dougherty & Rachel Hayes Feb. 2-March 25 Chris Francis April 6-May 20

Signature Symphony

Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art

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Fall Arts PREVIEW

Gobsmacked Jan. 30 Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella April 19

National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

Embrace the Cowboy Culture National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum Fall in Oklahoma City brings plenty of exciting changes to the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Tara Carr, the communications coordinator, highlights some of the museum’s happenings. “We’re opening four brand new temporary exhibitions including Vintage Black Heroes: The Chisholm Kid Exhibition; Cartoons & Comics: The Early Art of Tom Ryan; We the People: A Portrait of Early Oklahoma; and Life and Legacy: The Art of Jerome Tiger,” she says. “These temporary exhibitions offer the public an opportunity to explore and experience the West in myriad ways not previously seen at the museum.” Carr is particularly excited to see We the People: A Portrait of Early Oklahoma Aug. 19 – Oct. 22 Life and Legacy: The Art of Jerome Tiger Aug. 25 – May 13 Vintage Black Heroes: The Chisholm Kid Through Sept. 17 Cowboy Crossings Opening Weekend Oct. 5-7

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Vintage Black Heroes for a number of reasons. “The exhibition features comic strips from the Pittsburgh Courier’s first-ever comic insert in 1950-1954. The comic strips predated the Civil Rights Movement, the driving factor behind presenting a more realistic representation of black characters in illustrated and animated media,” she says. “I’m excited for this exhibition because it portrays a black superhero during a particularly trying time in history and tells a more broad story of the American West.” For more information on upcoming exhibitions, visit nationalcowboymuseum.org

Traditional Cowboy Arts Association 19th Annual Exhibition & Sale Oct. 7 – Jan. 7 Small Works, Great Wonders Nov. 10-26 Unlocking the Vault: Mysteries and Marvels of the Museum Feb. 9 – May 13

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

Do You See What I See? Painted Conversations by Theodore Waddell Feb. 9 – May 13 Cartoons & Comics: The Early Art of Tom Ryan Through April 1 In the Principles Office: Tom Ryan the Art Student April 7 – Nov. 11 The 46th annual Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition & Sale June 8 – Aug. 1

Chamber Music Tulsa

Calidore Quartet Sept. 9-10 Danish String Quartet Oct. 14-15 Meccore String Quartet Nov. 11- 12 Ensemble 4.1 Jan. 27-28 Horsowski Trio March 10-11 Takács Quartet April 21-22, 2018

Chesapeake Energy Arena

Kings of Leon Oct. 4 Lady Gaga Dec. 9

OKC MOA

Marvel Universe Live! Age of Heroes Dec. 14-17

Civic Center Music Hall

War on the Catwalk Aug. 4 Tom Segura: No Teeth No Entry Tour Sept. 8 Home Free Oct. 13, Nov. 19 The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses Dec. 29

Cox Business Center

Walker Stalker ConWalking Dead Convention Aug. 5-6

Chesapeake Energy Arena

PHOTO COURTESY VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON AND THE OKC MOA

Disney’s The Little Mermaid Aug. 29-Sept. 3 The Bodyguard Sept. 26-Oct. 1 Beautiful, the Carole King Musical Nov. 28-Dec. 3 A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder Jan. 23-28 Finding Neverland March 6-11 Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The Sound of Music April 3-8 An American in Paris June 19-24

BrickUniverse Lego Fan Convention 2017 Sept. 9-10 Spotlight on San Miguel: Dancing with the Tulsa Stars Oct. 21 Tulsa Remodel & Landscape Show Feb. 16-18

Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art

Joe Andoe: Horizons Through Sept. 10 Picher, Oklahoma: Catastrophe, Memory, and Trauma Through Sept. 10 Distinguished Visiting Artist: Robert Taylor Oct. 6-Dec. 30

PHOTO COURTESY CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA

PHOTO COURTESY NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM

Celebrity Attractions


Plains Indian Art Created in Community February 26 – August 27, 2017

TU is an EEO/AA Institution.

Exhibition season title sponsor is the Sherman E. Smith Family Charitable Foundation. Support also provided by Mervin Bovaird Foundation, C.W. Titus Foundation and M.V. Mayo Charitable Foundation.

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We are open late! Thursdays, 5 - 8pm

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to the Garden

Dog Night August 3, 5 - 8pm Wellness Night: Yoga August 17, 6pm Music Night: Grazz Trio August 24, 6pm Bonus Night: Plant Walk August 31, 6pm Just 8 miles from downtown

Don’t miss out on these fun events! Composting with Worms August 5 & 6, 1pm Astronomy Night August 12, 9-11pm National Honey Bee Appreciation Days August 19 & 20, 1pm 3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive | tulsabotanic.org | 918.289.0330

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Body Through Dec. 30

Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art

PHOTO COURTESY MABEE-GERRER MUSEUM OF ART

Gilcrease Museum

A Day at the Museum Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art

PHOTO BY SCOTT SMITH COURTESY WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

Hidden away in Shawnee is one of Oklahoma’s oldest and most diverse museums, the Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art. Founded in 1919, the museum showcases Egyptian, Roman and Greek pieces from the Renaissance through the early 20th century, plus Native American, African/Oceanic and Eastern cultural artifacts. In its permanent collections, the museum is also home to medieval and baroque paintings, plus artifacts from Greece and Babylon. Additionally, Mabee-Gerrer features the only mummy in the state. Along with luncheons, exhibitions and musical performances, the museum displays contemporary pieces by Oklahoma artists, proving that this museum offers up a wide array of art and entertainment for anyone looking to spend a day exploring the halls. For more information on upcoming events, visit mgmoa.org.

The Legend of Guthrie Woody Guthrie Center

Through a variety of mediums, the Woody Guthrie Center strives to educate and inspire creativity with the works, songs and actions of an Oklahoma folk hero. The next year brings in exciting new events that Jerry Wofford, education and public programs manager, is thrilled to spearhead. “One thing in particular that I’m excited about is our new songwriter series, featuring musicians unplugged in our theater, taking full advantage of the space and allowing the audience to hear straight from the source the stories and ideas our talented musicians want to share,” he says. The series will run the third Saturday of every month at 7 p.m. Along with other concerts, exhibitions and community events, September brings an annual award ceremony with a noteworthy guest. “We will be presenting our third Oklahoma Changing World Prize to LaDonna Harris,” says Wofford. Harris, a citizen of the Comache Nation, founded Americans for Indian Opportunity and acted as an honorary co-chair for the Women’s March on Washington in January 2017. “We’re honored to present her with this recognition, following in Guthrie’s footsteps to be a force for positive change in our world,” Wofford says. For more about the Woody Guthrie Center, visit woodyguthriecenter.org.

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Textured Portraits: The Ken Blackbird Collection Through Aug. 27 Plains Indian Art: Created in Community Through Aug. 27 After Removal: Rebuilding the Cherokee Nation Aug. 27-Jan. 21 The Essence of Place: Celebrating the Photography of David Halpern Through Dec. 31 Creating the Modern Southwest Through Dec. 31 Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist Oct. 6 - Jan. 7

Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art

The Art of Color Through Aug. 20 Women’s Point of View Sept. 2-Nov. 12 Saints and Sinners III Dec. 16-Jan. 28 Mythical Beasts Feb. 10-March 24 Arts Trek April 14 Rock the Baby May 12-July 1

Tom Manhart and Students Oct. 6-26 Contemporary Native American Exhibition Oct. 6-26 Altared Spaces Oct. 30-Nov. 4 Four Elements Dec. 1-21 The Chrysalis Project Jan. 5-25 Nature, Fashion and War Feb. 2-22 Kinetic Sculptures March 3-29 The Mother April 6-26 Social Justice Exhibit May 4-24 Juneteenth Exhibit June 1-28

Lyric Theatre

Rock of Ages Oct. 11-29 Lyric’s A Christmas Carol Nov. 29 - Dec. 23 Crowns Feb. 7 - 25 Fun Home April 11 - 29 Disney’s Freaky Friday June 26 - July 1 Hello, Dolly! July 10 - 15 Mamma Mia! July 24 - 29

Living Arts of Tulsa

Oh! Tulsa Biennial Aug. 4-24 Morphology Sept. 1-22 Perceived Contrasts Sept. 1-22 Carrie Dickason Sept. 1-22

Science Museum Oklahoma Woody Guthrie Center

Woody Guthrie Center Songwriters Evening Aug. 19 How Can I Keep From Singing: The World of Pete Seeger Through Aug. 20 Woody Guthrie Center Songwriters Evening Sept. 16 Third Annual Oklahoma Changing World Prize Sept. 24 Seth Glier in Concert Nov. 8 Ray Bonneville in Concert Nov. 11

OKC Ballet

The Firebird with Rodeo Sept. 14 Swan Lake Oct. 20-22 The Nutcracker Dec. 9-19 The Little Mermaid Feb. 16-18

PHOTO COURTESY SCIENCE MUSEUM OKLAHOMA

Fall Arts PREVIEW


Emily was abandoned by her mother.

Life and Legacy:

So were her three sisters.

They live in four different foster homes.

lunteer o V A S CA E. n HER Steps i

The Art of Jerome Tiger August 25, 2017 – May 13, 2018

And will likely never see each other again.

A LOVING FAMILY L. ADOPTS THEM AL

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Petite Mort: A Triple Bill April 13-15

Tulsa Botanic Garden

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

OKC Broadway

A City in Bloom Tulsa Botanic Garden

Tiptoe through the tulips at Tulsa Botanic Garden, a hidden gem just northwest of downtown. The 170-acre grounds offer numerous activities to try all year long, including Dog Night, when your four-legged friends can join you in the gardens, plus yoga classes, music nights and the annual fall

event Scarecrows in the Garden. This outdoor gathering brings artists, families, individuals, schools, businesses and organizations together to create scarecrows that will be placed in horticultural beds around the 7-acre lake. Visitors are also encouraged to vote for their favorites scarecrow, and one will be named the People’s Choice Winner. For more information on Tulsa Botanic Gardens, visit tulsabotanic.org.

Disney’s The Little Mermaid Sept. 5-10 Beautiful, the Carol King Musical Sept. 26-Oct. 1 Rent Nov. 7-12 The Color Purple Jan. 2-7 School of Rock Feb. 6-11 Finding Neverland March 13-18 The Book of Mormon April 24-29 An American in Paris June 5-10

OKC Philharmonic

PHOTO COURTESY CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

A Haven for Art

Davis, who utilized bold colors and strong forms in his art, was inspired by his love for jazz. The show opens Sept. 16 and runs until Jan. 1. Only a short drive away from the hustle and Crystal Bridges also hosts a wide variety of yearbustle of the Tulsa and OKC metros, Crystal Bridges, in Bentonville, Ark., is a haven for creatives round events, which Bobbitt believes makes the museum valuable to the community. and art enthusiasts. The museum utilizes its “[Our] exhibitions, permanent collection, 3.5 217,000-square-foot space, plus ample walking miles of trails and robust programs trails, for an unmatched experience. that include workshops, lectures, Beyond the otherworldly exhibiChihuly: In the Gallery as well as music, performance and tions of Chihuly: In the Gallery and In Through Aug. 14 the Forest, those visiting the museum Stuart Davis: In Full Swing culinary events provide access to art and deeper understanding of the later in the year can look forward to Sept. 16-Jan. 1 Animal Meet Human American experience,” she says. Stuart Davis: In Full Swing. Through Oct. 30 For more information on Crystal “Stuart Davis: In Full Swing is a Chihuly: In the Forest Bridges’ upcoming events, visit major retrospective of a great modThrough Nov. 13 crystalbridges.org. ern artist,” says Beth Bobbitt, public relations manager at the museum.

Crystal Bridges

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

Classics 1, Richard Goode Sept. 16 Classics 2, Jennifer Koh Oct. 7 Pops 1, The Wonderful Music of Oz Nov. 3-4 Classics 3, Yossi Arnheim Nov. 18 Pops 2, The Christmas Show Nov. 30 - Dec. 2 Classics 4, Joshua Roman Jan. 13 Pops 3, Cirque Music Presents Heroes and Villains Jan. 26-27 Classics 5, Simone Porter Feb. 3 Pops 4, Michael Cavanaugh: The Songs of Elton John Feb. 23-24 Classics 6, Joyce Yang March 3 Pops 5, Pink Martini March 30-31

Classics 7, Philippe Quint April 7 Pops 6, The Music of ABBA May 4-5 Classics 8, Joel Levine May 12

Oklahoma City Museum of Art

Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic Through Sept. 10 The Complete WPA Collection: 75th Anniversary Through Oct. 22 Master Strokes Oct. 28-Jan. 21 Apichatpong Weerasethakul: The Serenity of Madness March 31-June 10 Isabelle de Borchgrave: Fashioning Paper from Art June 23 – Sept. 16 Dale Chihuly Through July 1

Oklahoma City Town Hall

David Meinz Sept. 21 Amb. John R. Bolton Oct. 19 Col. Allen West Nov. 16 Dr. Frank Wang Feb. 15 Dr. Zuhdi Jasser March 15 Peter Zeihan April 19

Philbrook Museum of Art

Identity and Inspiration Ongoing Cheech Marin’s Chicano Art Collection Through Sept. 3

AHHA

PHOTO COURTESY AHHA TULSA

Fall Arts PREVIEW


Museum Confidential Oct. 14-May 6 HOTTEA Installation Through Nov. 12 Hope and Fear Through Nov. 12 Game On! Through Feb. 4

Sam Noble Museum

Ugly Bugs! Through Sept. 4 Comets, Asteroids, Meteors: Great Balls of Fire! Through Sept. 10 Explore Evolution Sept. 23-Jan. 1

Signature Symphony

The Roaring ‘20s and All That Jazz Sept. 8-9 Family Portraits Sept. 23 Music of the Knights Oct. 20-21 Yevtushenko and Shostakovich Nov. 4 Christmas in Tulsa with Barry Epperley Dec. 8-9 A Night at the Opera Jan. 27 Sinatra’s America Feb. 16-17 Made in America March 17 Tulsa Sings! - 100 Years of Song April 6-7 Mahler and Faingold April 21

Science Museum Oklahoma

Bodies Revealed Through Oct. 29 Ray Harryhausen – Mythical Menagerie Through Dec. 3

Theatre Tulsa Broadway Series

Ragtime Aug. 18 – Sep. 3 Amadeus Nov. 3-11 Evita Jan. 12-21

Into The Woods March 9-18 The Producers April 13-21

Theatre Tulsa Next Stage

Green Day’s American Idiot Sept. 22-Oct. 1 Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play June 2018

Theatre Tulsa Family

Aida: School Edition Dec. 7-10 The Lion King Jr. May 18-20

Theatre Pops

Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play Sept. 8-17 Assassins Feb. 9-18

Tulsa Ballet

Creations in Studio K Sept. 15-24 Don Quixote with Tulsa Ballet Nov. 3-5 The Nutcracker Dec. 9-23 Strictly Gershwin Feb. 9-11 Cinderella March 16-18 Signature Series May 3-6

Tulsa Botanic Garden

Music Night: Grazz Trio Aug. 24 Butterfly Month Sept. 2017 Music Night: Erin O’Dowd Sept. 28 Wordsmiths and Their Gardens Sept. 30 Autumn in the Garden Oct.-Nov. 2017 3rd Annual Pumpkin Patch Oct. 7 Holiday Luminaries Dec. 2017 Tulsa Botanic Blooms Spring 2018

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA SYMPHONY

OKC Broadway

Tulsa Opera

Faust Oct. 20, 22 Turandot April 27, 29

Tulsa’s Oratorio Chorus

To Honor: A Concert in Honor of American Veterans Nov. 11 Home for the Holidays Dec. 2-3 The Music of Eric Whitacre Jan. 13 Mozart’s Great Mass in C minor, K. 427 March 10

Tulsa Project Theatre

I Am My Own Wife Sept. 14-24 Falsettos Feb. 16-18, 22-25 Tick...Tick...Boom! April 27-28

Tulsa Town Hall

Captain Mark Kelly Sept. 15 Dr. Bennet Omalu Oct. 27 Laura Linney Feb. 2 Rudy Maxa March 23 Piper Kerman April 13

Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Preserve

Fall Trail Ride Sept. 9 Cow Thieves and Outlaws Reunion Sept. 30 Fall Traders Encampment Oct. 6-7 Best of the Best Retrospective Exhibit and Sale Oct. 6-Dec. 31 Wonderland of Lights Nov. 24 - Dec. 23

Symphony in the Park Sept. 1 Fridays in the Loft Chamber Series – Mozart Sept. 8 Classics I: Gala Concert Sept. 16 Fridays in the Loft Chamber Series – Beethoven and Brahms Oct. 6 Classics II: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6 Oct. 28 To Honor: A Concert in Honor of American Veterans Nov. 11 Harry Potter and the SorTulsa Symphony Acting as a cornerstone of the arts in northeast- cerer’s Stone in Concert Nov. 18-19 ern Oklahoma, Tulsa Symphony educates and Pops I: Home for the entertains residents with its yearly programming. Holidays The symphony enters into its 12th season in Dec. 2-3 Classics III: An Evening with September with a riveting lineup of pieces. Eric Whitacre For those wanting a dose of the symphony Jan. 13 on regular basis, the Friday in the Loft Chamber Fridays in the Loft Chamber Series highlights emblematic composers from Series – Bartok, Beethoven Beethoven to Ewazen. Located at Fly Loft, the and Harbison Jan. 26 series brings music of the past to the present. Classics IV: Mendelssohn’s Performances run Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Jan. 26 and Symphony No. 3 March 9. Feb. 4 Along with the regularly scheduled Pops and Link Up: The Orchestra Sings Classics pieces, special collaborations and per- Student Concert formances will take place this year. The talented Feb. 7, 12, 21-22, 28; March 1-2 Fridays in the Loft Chamber musicians of TSO will bring several Tulsa Ballet Series – Beethoven and shows to life, including Don Quixote Nov. 3-5, The Ewazen Nutcracker March 9 Classics V: Mahler’s SymDec. 9-10, 15-17, and 22-23, Strictly Gershwin Feb. 9-11, and Cinderella March 16-18. Avid fans of phony No. 4 Harry Potter will also be happy to see Harry Potter March 24 Pops II: Voyage of Disand the Sorcerer’s Stone in Concert Nov. 18-19, covery: Space, the Final when TSO will perform every note of the movie’s Frontier April 14 score. Pops III: Home Grown For more information on the season, visit May 12 tulsasymphony.org.

Enriching Tulsa through Music

Lyric Theatre

PHOTO BY KO RINEARSON COURTESY LYRIC THEATRE

PHOTO COURTESY OKC BROADWAY

Tulsa Symphony

FOR MORE EXPANDED ARTS PREVIEW CALENDAR AT OKMAG.COM/WEB. THERE’S A LOT MORE EVENTS THAN THERE IS ROOM ON THE PAGE! DISCOVER MORE ACTIVITIES IN THE ONLINE EDITION OF THIS STORY.

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS LEGAL SERVICES

HOSPICE CARE

What is an “offer of judgment”? In litigation, who pays attorneys’ fees generally is governed by the “American Rule”, which provides that each party pays their own fees unless there is a specific statute or contractual agreement providing for the losing party to pay fees. BRAD BEASLEY In Oklahoma, there are statutory provisions which provide an opportunity to shift the burden for fees. A defendant may make an “offer of judgment” to allow judgment to be taken for a fixed amount. If the plaintiff rejects the offer but obtains judgment for less, the defendant may recover its attorneys’ fees from the plaintiff. If an offer of judgment is made, the plaintiff may reject it and make a counter-offer of judgment. If rejected by the defendant and the plaintiff obtains judgment for more than the counter-offer, the defendant is liable for the plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST I have been thinking about having something done, but I am afraid of looking too overdone. Is there anything available that provides a more natural improvement? Yes, for any patient wanting a more natural looking filler, we recommend Sculptra®, the first facial injectable MALISSA SPACEK that gives you subtle results over time. Sculptra replaces collagen and gives you a more natural-looking appearance without giving you away. A full treatment of Sculptra Aesthetic can last up to two years. As you age, your body’s collagen production decreases, and you may begin to see wrinkles. Sculptra Aesthetic (injectable poly-L-lactic acid) works to correct shallow to deep facial wrinkles and folds as it replaces lost collagen, which can help provide a refined, more youthful looking appearance.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL What are some safe driving tips for back-to-school season?

My grandmother has Parkinson’s disease and she is declining quickly. Her doctor is recommending hospice care for her. My family feels like that would be giving up on her. Any advice? That is a very common misconception about providing hospice care. People often feel they are giving in or giving up. But we believe that by providing hospice care, you are improving the quality of life for the patient. Hospice care will allow your grandmother to be more comfortable. The hospice team helps manage symptoms and alleviate any pain through palliative care. By providing hospice care to your grandmother, you are allowing her to be more comfortable. In fact, we sometimes see patients improve to the point that they go off hospice care. For more information, please call us at 918-744-7223 or visit www.gracehospice.com AVA HANCOCK

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

FINANCIAL ADVISOR What are the best steps to manage my finances after a divorce? Managing finances following a divorce can be emotional and overwhelming, but the following steps may help you secure your financial future. Adjust your budget to match your current lifestyle. Calculate your new monthly income, including spousal or DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC® child support and what you expect to earn over the next year. Then look at your spending to see if you need to adjust your patterns. Consider your children’s future. It’s important to start thinking about how you’ll handle future financial milestones, including college tuition or weddings. Prioritize saving for retirement. Make it a priority to update your retirement goals and continue building your nest egg. Ensure you’re protected. All forms of insurance should be reviewed before replacing or establishing insurance as needed. Consider the tax implications of your new marital status. Review your situation with a tax professional to see if you need to revise your tax strategy. Don’t go it alone. Professional guidance from an attorney, tax professional, estate planner and financial advisor can ease the burden of managing your finances.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

RUSS IDEN

As Oklahoma students start another school year, motorists should slow down in school zones and watch out for children. The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety says 20 percent of traffic fatalities of children under age 15 are pedestrians and the deadliest time is between 3 to 4 p.m. Keep the following safety tips

in mind: Stay Alert – Watch for flashing school zone lights and pedestrians 30 minutes before & after school hours. Put Your Cell Phone Away – Remember, distracted driving (texting) is illegal in Oklahoma. Scan Parked Cars – Watch out for kids between parked cars, at playgrounds & crosswalks. Always Stop for School Buses with Red Flashing Lights – Period! Allow Extra Travel Time – Plan for delays if there’s traffic congestion, bad weather, or just consider revising your route. These tips will get everyone to where they are going safely. If you have more questions about traffic or pedestrian safety, call a AAA agent near you

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org

PERSONAL TRAINER Is High Intensity Interval Training better than steady state cardio for fat loss? HIIT training consists of high intensity bursts of cardio output followed by short recovery. Continuous cardio for 30-60 minutes at 50 to 60 percent intensity is steady state cardio. While HIIT workouts JOHN JACKSON give you better cardio respiratory fitness, steady state training reduces more total body fat in overweight people. For help with lean muscle versus fat weight, contact a certified personal trainer and nutritionist.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

A People Place Maryn’s in RiverWalk Crossing puts a premium on relationships with customers … and each dish is top-notch, too.

I

THE HOUSE TACOS ARE TOPPED WITH PRIME TENDERLOIN, FRESH PICO, RADISH, CILANTRO AND LIME.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

f you haven’t been to RiverWalk Crossing in Jenks lately, you’ll be surprised at the changes. Oh, the Arkansas River is still the same, wide and brown and lazy under the summer sun. But what seemed like a ghost town a year or two ago now has an air of brisk vitality. Almost all the storefronts are full – before, two-thirds lay vacant – and you can hear bands and laughter. Follow the laughter to a big splashy wading pool with lots of kids jumping as only kids can, and next to it is Maryn’s Taphouse and Raw Bar. Walk in and it’s spacious, highceilinged and welcoming with sea-

blue walls. Powder-blue banquettes are occupied by two middle-aged couples dining together, a guy and his date drinking beer, an older couple with daughter and son-in-law. Everyone comes to Maryn’s, it seems, and most of them make their way to the big bar in the center of the room. Chances are you’ll see one bartender who is twice as energetic as the others and who is friends with everyone around him. If you’ve been here before, he knows you. That’s Corey Crandall, the owner. He designed everything in sight. “I didn’t have an architect or designer,” he says. “I picked the shades of blue paint to echo the water. I

chose the light fixtures, the benches, everything.” But most important to Corey are the people. He’s been a bartender for 20 years. “Other bartenders are expert in mixing drinks,” he says. “I concentrate on making friends. Look at that couple by the bar. They were regulars at my old place [the wildly popular George’s Pub in Jenks], and I’ve been to the college graduations of all three of their daughters.” And he has no favorites because “we’re collective, not selective.” All are welcome (including children, by the way), and the menu has something for everyone. There are some fine-din-

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

83


Taste THE LOBSTER ROLL AT MARYN’S IS SERVED CONNECTICUT OR MAINE STYLE. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

ing options, but also much cheaper fare: street tacos bursting with flavor, po’boys made with bread from New Orleans. He’s proud of Maryn’s burger, a blend of steak and short rib. And there are some fine oysters, blue

points that were swimming (or whatever oysters do) off the Connecticut coast 48 hours before you eat them. As if on cue, a wiry man walks over with a tray of oysters. He’s Josh McClure, the chef, bearded and tattooed with an intense, intelligent stare. McClure used to be executive chef at the Chalkboard, the epitome of elegant dining, but “this is more me,” he says. “I have a lot more fun. No more pretty plates or hoity-toity. But I still have the same high standards.” While there is definitely no hoitytoity, Maryn’s has a few high-end

entrees that are as good as any you’ll find in Tulsa, and maybe better. Try the lamb chops. They are simply seared in a hot skillet with olive oil and sea salt, and artfully plated above a white bean puree and a chutney made of fresh berries reduced with onions and brown sugar. The lamb is from a small farm in Colorado. And then there’s the sesameseared tuna. This one is a pretty plate, exploding in color. There’s the bright pink tuna, the black and white sesame seeds (half are toasted), green crisp asparagus segments and orange lobster meat blended into a hash below. And each component sings. Even the simplest items are perfect. The lobster roll is pure New England. It’s made with bread from Maine and with a quarter pound of claw meat from Maine lobsters. You can’t stop eating it, and when you’re finished, you vow to return again. And when you do, Crandall will remember you. BRIAN SCHWARTZ

LO C A L F L AV O R

BRAVO, BARRIOS

The most recent feather in Good Egg’s cap brings another Tex-Mex option to Midtown OKC.

FAJITAS AT BARRIOS COME WITH GRILLED ONIONS AND POBLANOS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Since the acquisition of Cheever’s Cafe 17 years ago, the Barrios family has been a cornerstone of the Good Egg Dining Group, holding down key positions in many of the group’s restaurants. Now Good Egg Dining Group has honored the family’s culinary contributions in their latest Midtown Oklahoma City venture. A Tex-Mex destination with a fine-dining twist and modern haute decor, Barrios is one of Good Egg’s most popular concepts. Enchilada fans will be hard-pressed to choose between the short rib enchiladas with mole negro or the crab-and-lobster enchiladas with street corn and mole verde. Tamale lovers will feel right at home as well, and vegetarian options abound. That tried-and-true Tex-Mex staple of chips and queso are elevated by house-made tortilla chips and chorizo. Sopapillas are not complimentary but well worth ordering all the same. A killer bar rounds out this vibrant and tasty addition to OKC’s most popular dining neighborhood. TARA MALONE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017


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Taste

C H E F C H AT

Spicing up the State

Drawing on bold regional flavors and local ingredients, Patrick Williams creates refined Oklahoma cuisine.

T

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

“I was lucky to get in with some talented, motivated chefs who were willing to teach me.” “I wanted to make Flint’s menu about the flavors of Oklahoma,” Williams says. Masa-battered catfish with a roasted poblano and tomatillo salsa verde, served with corn and mushroom succotash, is among the new menu’s offerings. Another standout is the bourbon-braised pork shank with manchego cheese grits and sauteed kale and tomatoes. A drizzle of molasses and sherry vinegar gastric, along with a pork rind gremolata, top the pork shank. At Flint and Vast, Williams utilizes local ingredients whenever possible. He works with Oklahoma cattle ranchers for the beef, and uses area sausages and cheeses as well. “It helps the local economy, and we have a little more input on the ingredients. I can talk with the farmers, talk with the ranchers. We can work together on what we’re looking for on the products,” Williams says. “When they’re producing good products locally, I don’t see why I’d want to go somewhere else in the country.” CAMILLE TORRES

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

hough Patrick Williams, executive chef at Oklahoma City’s Vast and Flint restaurants, hails from Kansas, his food is rooted in the Sooner State. “People don’t always know what the flavors of Oklahoma are, but they draw on the Deep South, Midwest and Southwest. It all comes together in a unique way that is Oklahoma,” he says. Growing up outside Kansas City, Williams would cook with his paternal grandmother, using fresh ingredients they harvested from her garden. When attending Kansas State University, he began working as a dishwasher at a fine dining restaurant. He worked his way up while going to school, becoming the restaurant’s sous-chef. Favoring restaurant life over his banking degree, Williams decided to be a professional chef, working in some of Kansas City’s finest restaurants and training under James Beard Award-winning chefs. “I was lucky to get in with some talented, motivated chefs who were willing to teach me,” Williams says. In 2012, a recruiter lured Williams to Oklahoma City to help conceptualize Vast’s menu and serve as its executive chef. Now, he’s making his mark on the state’s culinary scene. Located on the 49th floor of the Devon Tower, Vast looms 762.2 feet above the city and offers some of the best views of the metropolis. The restaurant serves upscale American cuisine, drawing flavors from the South. In addition to his work with Vast, in April Williams took over as executive chef at its sister restaurant, Flint, and rolled out a renovated menu early this month. Sited in downtown Oklahoma City’s historic Colcord Hotel, the restaurant serves refined Oklahoma cuisine in a rustic yet modern setting.

PATRICK WILLIAMS USES THIS GREMOLATA TO TOP VAST’S PORK SHANK AFTER COOKING TO GIVE IT ADDITIONAL CRUNCH. PHOTO COURTESY VAST

PORK GREMOLATA 1 cup 1 tsp 1 pinch 1 1 tbsp

pork rinds kosher salt table ground black pepper lemon Italian parsley

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and

mix well.

Transfer to a plastic storage container.


R A N D O M F L AV O R S

EAT MORE PIE

OC OT PH RT

OU ES IE YP NK

JU

There’s a lot to be said about the simple things in life – simple things like the mouthwatering pies you’ll see lined up at Pie Junkie in Oklahoma City. These desserts are uncomplicated in the best way; straightforward ingredients like fresh fruits, butter and flour keep the taste classically delicious. Try fruity options like peach blackberry or rich slices like chocolate banana cream. And did we mention they make quiches, too? Heaven on earth. 1711 N.W. 16th St., Oklahoma City; piejunkie.com.

IE

THE CRANE CALLS

PHOTO COURTESY TOAST

PHOTO COURTESY RUSTY CRANE

The Rusty Crane in Tulsa has a little bit of everything: tacos and enchiladas, burgers and wings, hummus and veggie wraps, sundaes and cheesecakes. Whether you’re looking for a quick bite or an extended evening with friends, Rusty Crane has you covered with drink specials, craft cocktails and a bevy of beers. Patio seating also gives you the perfect view of fireworks at ONEOK Field, which makes for a perfect summer night. 109 N. Detroit Ave., Tulsa; rustycranetulsa. com.

LET’S GET TOASTY

In search of the hottest brunch spot in Broken Arrow? Try Toast for innovative and locally sourced meals with seasonal menus to keep things fresh. From sizzling southwest omelets to the sweetest caramel apple crepes, you’ll find something on the menu that will satisfy those mid-morning cravings. And not to worry – cocktail specials abound to keep brunch extra entertaining. 201 S. Main St., Broken Arrow; franklinspork.com/toast. AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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CHIEF METEOROLOGIST

MIKE COLLIER

WORKING FOR YOU EVERY WEEKNIGHT

5:00 / 6:00 / 10:00


Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Chihuly in a New Light The newest Crystal Bridges exhibition uses outdoor trails to bring art to life.

BY DALE CHIHULY COURTESY CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

S

ince June, Crystal Bridges Museum in northwestern Arkansas has celebrated the work of artist Dale Chihuly with two exhibitions, Chihuly: In the Gallery and Chihuly: In the Forest. The first exhibition showcases over 300 of his works and serves as an introduction to the artist and his individualistic style. Items include Native American-inspired trade blankets and baskets, along with pieces from several of his riveting glass series, including Cylinders, Persians and Venetians. On Aug. 14, this exhibition will close, leaving only Chihuly: In the Forest – which combines Chihuly’s art with the nature that helped inspire it. “Chihuly: In the Forest features 10 large-scale installations along a newly enhanced North Forest Trail, recognizing the beauty of his work in the context of

the Ozark landscape,” says Beth Bobbitt, public relations manager at the museum. Bobbitt says this exhibition is also revolutionary in the way it presents the artist’s work. “This is the first time Dale Chihuly’s work is displayed in a natural forest setting,” she says. “His work is inspired by the natural world, as evident in this outdoor exhibition, which features bold colors and monumental installations like the belugas, red reeds, neon tumbleweeds, a boat and a sun created especially for the exhibition at Crystal Bridges.” There is no protection that separates the art from the forest setting. The glass, however, is extremely durable, with less than a 1 percent breakage rate, Bobbitt says. The ever-changing outdoor conditions also serve to further enhance these larger-than-life pieces. “An amazing element about having

works in the forest is the way that time of day or that time of year impacts the work and the composition,” Bobbitt says. “The translucent quality of glass … provides an abundance of changing colors.” Chihuly’s maverick mindset distinguishes his work from other artists of this time – and In the Forest will help any art enthusiast gain appreciation for this American innovator. “Chihuly is a pioneer in his field, pushing the boundaries of art-making,” she says. “He’s an important figure in American art, and this collaboration has been a long time in the making.” In The Forest continues until Nov. 13. Admission is free for museum members and youth under age 18. Tickets must be reserved in advance at crystalbridges. org/exhibitions/chihuly. MARY WILLA ALLEN

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Where & When

HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO The trademark

sound of Russell Hitchcock’s soaring tenor voice and Graham Russell’s simple yet majestic songs create a unique sound known as Air Supply. airsupplymusic.com

Under the Sea

Everything’s better under the sea – at least according to Sebastian, the crustacean compatriot to Ariel in The Little Mermaid. Although the 1989 movie is always available to re-watch, you can experience the aquatic ambiance firsthand at the Broadway musical, coming to Tulsa courtesy Celebrity Attractions. Diana Huey, who plays Ariel in the show, says she’s watched the movie approximately “a hundred million times” in preparation for her role. Being so familiar with both mediums, Huey thinks the Broadway version offers more to the audience. “I do think the musical is a bit better. They dive deeper into the story,” she says – no pun intended. “They really focus on the fact that Ariel feels like she doesn’t belong under the sea with any of the people there. It’s more about self-discovery.” For the staunch movie advocates, the Broadway show stays true to the celebrated

IN TULSA PERFORMANCES CHOREGUS PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: BALLET DU GRAND THEATRE DE GENEVE: GLORY Aug. 1 PAC For its second Summer

Heat performance, the acclaimed century-old Swiss company performs to the sparkling and architectural richness of Georg Friedrich Händel. choregus.org

#IMOMSOHARD Aug. 1 BOK CENTER Kristin

Hensley and Jen Smedley have performed, taught and written comedy across the United States and internationally for a combined 42 years.

bokcenter.com

CHOREGUS PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: BRIAN BROOKS, WILDERNESS Aug. 6

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PAC Control and chaos collide in Wilderness, performed by the critically acclaimed and award-winning Brian Brooks and his New York based ensemble. choregus.org

RALPHIE MAY Aug. 17 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO AND RESORT For more than

25 years, Ralphie May has reached a level of popularity few stand-up comedians have attained. riverspirittulsa.com

THEATRE TULSA PRESENTS: RAGTIME Aug. 18-20, 25-27, 31

PAC Based on the 1975 novel by E.L. Doctorow, Ragtime focuses on three groups in New York in the early 20th century: African-Americans, upper-class suburbanites and Eastern European

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

PHOTO BY MARK KITAOKA COURTESY CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS

ED SHEERAN Aug. 17 BOK CENTER On the heels

PERFORMANCE

comical indie rock.

Alan Menken score and emblematic characters (from the nightmare fuel that is Ursula to dreamy Prince Eric), while creating a non-kitschy live version of an underwater world. This includes flight via harnesses to recreate the sense of being underwater – and for Huey, that meant plenty of extra hours rehearsing. “I’d never done anything like it before,” she says. “But I was fine with the longer days if it meant I wouldn’t make a complete idiot of myself.” Along with its broad appeal and sense of nostalgia, The Little Mermaid is special to Huey for another reason. “As an Asian-American, I never thought I would get a chance to play Ariel,” she says. “My inner child is living out her dream.” The musical runs Aug. 29-Sept. 3 at the Tulsa PAC. Visit celebrityattractions.com for tickets.

immigrants. theatretulsa.org

TBII: ON YOUR RADAR

SINBAD Aug. 19 BRADY THEATER Born

TULSA BALLET See

in 1956 in Benton Harbor, Michigan, Sinbad served in the U.S. Air Force before starting his comedy career. bradytheater.com

Aug. 25-27

tomorrow’s stars of ballet today. Tulsa Ballet II, the second company of Tulsa Ballet, features the most promising young dancers from around the globe.

music, every Thursday. This summer concert series serves up everything from jazz to country. uticasquare.com

BOB SCHNEIDER Aug. 4 CAIN’S BALLROOM Bob

Schneider is an Austin-based singer/songwriter/creative force of nature.

CASINO Clint Black is back.

The country mega-star is releasing Purpose, his first full-length album of new songs in a decade. clintblack.com

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM AND CHRISTINE MCVIE Aug. 5 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO AND RESORT Lindsey

MUSIC NIGHT: GRAZZ TRIO Aug. 24

TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

Enjoy the bluegrassy, folky and bluesy Grazz Trio as the sun sets in the garden. Music starts at 6 p.m. tulsabotanic.org

GARY ALLAN Aug. 24 HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO See Allan perform his energetic live show.

JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT Aug. 22 CAIN’S BALLROOM Jason

Isbell and the 400 Unit’s new album, The Nashville Sound, is a beautiful piece of American music-making that you can experience live. cainsballroom.com

FATHER JOHN MISTY

hardrockcasinotulsa.com

BEN FOLDS Aug. 28

CAIN’S BALLROOM Ben Folds is widely regarded as one of the major music influencers of a generation. cainsballroom.com

STEVEN TYLER AND THE LOVING MARY BAND Aug. 29

Aug. 23

CAIN’S BALLROOM Father

John Misty captivates and entertains with his introspective and often

HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO See the lead singer of Aerosmith with special guest the Loving Mary Band.

hardrockcasinotulsa.com

ART FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL

tours and scavenger hunts.

BRADY ARTS DISTRICT

THIRD THURSDAYS Aug. 17 PHILBROOK On the third

Aug. 4

This year-round, monthly event features all of the galleries, studios and museums as well as the part-time galleries in various shops opening their doors.

philbrook.org

thebradyartsdistrict.com

Thursday of each month, this popular series offers museum members and visitors a chance to mix, mingle and explore a wide range of topics.

BOTH SIDES NOW: JOYCE SCOTT AND SONYA CLARK

SUMMER ART CAMP

108 CONTEMPORARY

GILCREASE The museum

Aug. 4-Sept. 24

Through the use of glass, beadwork and fiber, 2016 MacArthur Fellow Joyce Scott and Sonya Clark highlight, challenge, uncover and discover race, representation and injustice. 108contemporary.org

FIBERWORKS 2017 Aug. 4-Sept. 29

AHHA TULSA This 39th

annual exhibit provides Oklahoma fiber artisans an opportunity to showcase their work. ahahtulsa.org

SECOND SATURDAYS Aug. 12

PHILBROOK Bring out the inner artist in each family member and experience Philbrook in a new way. The second Saturday of each month has free art activities,

tulsaballet.org

CONCERTS SUMMER’S FIFTH NIGHT Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 UTICA SQUARE Live

of his recently released album, ÷ (Divide), Sheeran is on his North American tour. bokcenter.com

cainsballroom.com

philbrook.org

Through Aug. 11

and the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education offer camp programs for students ages 5 to 12. gilcrease.org

IDENTITY AND INSPIRATION Through Aug. 31

PHILBROOK Since opening

in 1939, Philbrook has had an ongoing commitment to Native American art. See some of the museum’s permanent collection with Identity and Inspiration. philbrook.org

SOCCER UNDER THE SWASTIKA Through Sept. 3 SHERWIN MILLER MUSEUM OF JEWISH ART In Soccer Under the Swastika: Stories of Survival and Resistance during the Holocaust, Kevin E. Simpson reveals the surprisingly powerful role soccer played during World War II. jewishmuseum.net

SPORTS TULSA DRILLERS GAMES

APPALOOSA CONGRESS

ONEOK FIELD Catch the team in action for several homestands. Grab a hot dog and a beer and relax as the Drillers chase victory.

EXPO SQUARE Visit the

Aug. 1-2, 15-20, 29-31

milb.com

2017 KANSAS PAINT HORSE CONGRESS Aug. 2-6 EXPO SQUARE Come out

Aug. 3-6

Super Duty Arena to enjoy the All American Appaloosa Congress. allamericanap-

paloosacongress.com

PDRA TOUR Aug. 11-12 TULSA RACEWAY PARK Meet the stars of

and enjoy the majesty of this breed at the Paint Horse Congress.

several drag-racing categories, such as pro extreme and top dragsters, at this tour event. pdra660.com

PROFESSIONAL BULL RIDERS Aug. 12-13

cainsballroom.com

Buckingham and Christine McVie are longtime members of Fleetwood Mac.

CLINT BLACK Aug. 5 HARD ROCK HOTEL AND

riverspiritttulsa.com

kansaspainthorse.com

AIR SUPPLY Aug. 10

ALL AMERICAN


top 35 bull riders, arguably the toughest athletes, wow fans with high-flying, nail-biting action. bokcenter.com

NATIONAL SNAFFLE BIT ASSOCIATION WORLD SHOW Aug. 12-20 EXPO SQUARE NSBA will

offer all-breed classes with more than $500,000 in cash and prizes. nsba.com

TULSA REINING CLASSIC Aug. 29-Sept. 3 EXPO SQUARE Enjoy reining activities that will be sure to enthrall audiences of all ages. tulsareining.com

COMMUNITY TULSA BEAD MARKET

INDIA FEST/ UTSAV 2017

Aug. 4-5

Aug. 19

can find wholesale and retail fashion accessories, gift merchandise, lapidary and beads. thebeadmarket.net

Association of Greater Tulsa promotes strong and close communication, solidarity, unity and understanding among people of Indian origin, of all ages, living in Greater Tulsa. iagtok.com

TULSA FAIRGROUNDS You

TULSA FLEA MARKET Aug. 5, 12, 26

EXPO SQUARE This

family-owned and operated flea market is the place for a unique, enjoyable shopping experience.

tulsafleamarket.net

WALKER STALKER CON: WALKING DEAD CONVENTION Aug. 5-6 COX BUSINESS CENTER

Walker Stalker Con is by fans and for fans of the Walking Dead. The focus is on authentic interactions with actors, free family-friendly activities and a relaxed environment where the actors can be themselves. coxcentertulsa.com

KENDALL WHITTIER MERCADO Aug. 5, 12, 19. 26 KENDALL WHITTIER DISTRICT The district’s

vision is to create a place that reminds visitors of the famous Mercado de Coyoacán, a vibrant arts market near the Frida Kahlo Museum in Mexico City. historickwms.com

WILD BREW Aug. 12 COX BUSINESS CENTER

This one-of-a-kind event combines fare by Tulsa’s best restaurants with first-rate beers by artisan brewers from the United States and around the world. wildbrew.org

EXPO SQUARE The India

GREEN COUNTRY ROOTS FESTIVAL Aug. 25-26 NORRIS PARK, TAHLEQUAH

Featuring Green Country artists of all types, last year’s inaugural event drew more than 5,200 people. gcrfestival. com

CONQUER THE GAUNTLET OBSTACLE RACE Aug. 26 POST OAK LODGE Conquer

the Gauntlet is a grueling 4 mile race with over 25 obstacles and challenging terrain to maneuver over and though.

local community volunteers as they perform original pieces of theater to benefit the Arts and Humanities Council of Oklahoma. ahhatulsa.org

OPERATION AWARE GOLF TOURNAMENT Aug. 4 CEDAR RIDGE COUNTY CLUB This 11th annual

tournament helps educational programs for kids from kindergarten to high school.

operationaware.org

MIX 2017 Aug. 19 CAIN’S BALLROOM Tulsa’s

If you turn your eyes to the skies this August, you’ll see an Oklahoma horizon painted with dozens of hot air balloons. The Oklahoma City Balloon Festival, a fourday event, features dozens of these wonders – and you even have the chance to fly high in a balloon yourself. Visitors can enjoy tethered rides or full flights with commercial balloon pilots, meticulously screened and chosen for the safety of patrons. Morning and afternoon full flights are available to book online, and tethered flights can be purchased on site. If heights aren’t your thing, there are several other activities to try out. Carnival rides provide an option for those wishing to keep their feet on the ground, plus a wine garden and food vendors – meaning you can stay all day. Pop-up shops will offer plenty of merchandise for purchase, or you can act as a spectator for jousting displays and dazzling performances by a parachute team. Each night will end with a bewitching balloon glow and fireworks. The festival runs Aug. 24-27 at Chisholm Creek. Visit okcbf.com for a full schedule of events.

OKLAHOMA FALL HUNTING AND FISHING SHOW Aug. 26-27

CLAREMORE EXPO

CENTER This trade show includes guns, guides, tackle, clothing, video production, game calls, guest speakers and other items for hunting, fishing and the outdoors. okhuntandfishshow.com

TULSA MAKER FAIRE Aug. 26

EXPO SQUARE From

engineers and artists to scientists to crafters, Maker Faire highlights hobbies, experiments and projects. tulsa.makerfaire.com

hottest bartenders compete to be named the best “MIX-ologist.” philbrook.org

CYSTIC FIBROSIS CYCLE FOR LIFE Aug. 25 GUTHRIE GREEN The is a

fully supported ride with a 20-mile route option to benefit the Tulsa Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

cff.org/tulsa

16TH ANNUAL JA CLASSIC Aug. 29 PATRIOT GOLF CLUB The

Junior Achievement Classic golf tournament will benefit more than 56,000 students in the next school year. jaok.org

IN OKC PERFORMANCES WAR ON THE CATWALK Aug. 4

UP, UP AND AWAY

conquerthegauntlet.com

CHARITABLE EVENTS HARWELDEN MURDER MYSTERY Aug. 3-5, 10-12 HARWELDEN MANSION Join

COMMUNIT Y

HUDIBERG CHEVROLET CENTER The queens are

ART

After Removal

Gilcrease is shining a spotlight on the turbulent yet triumphant history of the Cherokee Nation in its newest exhibition, After Removal: Rebuilding the Cherokee Nation. Through various artworks, from paintings to sculptures to anthropological materials, visitors will navigate through a redefining era for the tribe – from the lowest of lows to the highest of highs. “This exhibition explores the development of the powerful Cherokee republic, the Indian Removal Act and the various routes along which the different detachments traveled, the factionalism and internal violence that erupted as a result of the Treaty of New Echota and Cherokee removal, and finally, the ‘Golden Age’ in Cherokee history,” says Natalie Panther, project manager for the exhibition. Panther has one goal for guests: leave the exhibition enlightened. “My hope is the visitors gain a deeper understanding of the complexity of 19th-century Cherokee

history, including the myriad forces at work in the period leading to Cherokee removal,” she says. “We also hope to dispel some misconceptions and romantic notions people still have about American Indians and Cherokee people.” The exhibition runs Aug. 27-Jan. 21. Visit gilcrease.org for more information.

GEORGE LOWERY; PHOTO COURTESY GILCREASE MUSEUM

BOK CENTER The world’s

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Casino Country

Things are heating up at Choctaw Casino in Durant with a full roster of country stars in August. Little Big Town, the wildly popular group with hits like “Girl Crush” and “Better Man,” will visit the Grand Theater on Aug. 11. The Alabama-based quartet has racked up a slew of nominations and awards for its music, including two Grammys. Along with La Maquinara Nortena on Aug. 12 and Clint Black with Sawyer Brown on Aug. 26, Darius Rucker will bring down the house Aug. 18. An original member and lead singer of Hootie and the Blowfish, Rucker performed for decades before starting his solo career in country music nearly 10 years ago. He also has a few tricks up his sleeve for the performance,

FEEL THE ENERGY

PHOTO BY STEVEN CHRISTY COURTESY OKC ENERGY FC

The loud rumblings of college football and the NBA often overshadow other sports in the state, but soccer is still kickin’ in

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

okcciviccenter.com

LYRIC THEATRE PRESENTS: IN THE HEIGHTS Aug. 8-12 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL This spirited show

says Jodi Pestka, marketing director at Choctaw Casino and Resort. “Darius Rucker will have a special surprise for a military veteran [at the concert],” she says. Pestka finds that the concerts at Choctaw Casino are a perfect antidote to the Oklahoma heat. “We are ecstatic to bring these top acts to town for our guests to enjoy in the middle of this hot summer,” she says. “What better way to cool down?” Visit choctawcasino.com for tickets.

SPORTS

ready to rock the catwalk. Murray & Peter present contestants from season nine of RuPaul’s Drag Race.

from the creator of Hamilton, Lin-Manuel Miranda, features a contemporary Latin-flavored score and Tony Awardwinning hip-hop dancing.

lyrictheatreokc.com

OKLAHOMA SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK PRESENTS: PRIVATE LIVES Aug. 17-27 THE PASEO Glamorous,

OKC. At Taft Stadium, the players of the Oklahoma City Energy give meaning to their name with tireless athletic performances. This professional team was founded in 2013 and boasts two owners with Oklahoma roots. “Energy FC is co-owned by Oklahoma businessmen Bob Funk Jr. and Tim McLaughlin,” says Josh Evans, the vice president of communications for Prodigal, which operates Energy FC. “Both are proud to call Oklahoma City home and are proud to help Energy FC improve the quality of life in OKC.” Evans highlights the perks of the spectator experience and the importance of fan participations at games. “At an Energy FC match, fans can be treated to amazing soccer by some of the best athletes in the world,” he says. “The best thing for fans to do is to be present at the matches and use your voice to support the club.” The Energy plays at home on Aug. 2, 5 and 19. Visit energyfc.com for tickets and times.

rich and reckless, Elyot and Amanda have been divorced for five years. When by chance they meet across adjoining hotel balconies, their romantic feelings rekindle. oklahomashakespeare.com

SINBAD Aug. 18 HUDSON PERFORMANCE HALL Enjoy a night of comedy with celebrated comedian Sinbad.

hudsonperformancehall.com

AMP FESTIVAL Aug. 26 AUTOMOBILE ALLEY The

Art, Music, Power Festival is an all-ages, free event celebrating the work of powerful women.

ampfestokc.com

CONCERTS

supplies. artscouncilokc.com

CASEY DONAHEW Aug. 4 DIAMOND BALLROOM

Burleson, Texas, native Casey Donahew has painstakingly carved out an impressive niche for himself on the country music scene over the past decade.

PHOTO COURTESY CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT

Where & When

CONCERT

caseydonahew.com

SAMMY KERSHAW Aug. 5 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Since his debut

in the early ‘90s, Kershaw has remained one of the most consistent power hitters in country music with major hit records and sold-out touring schedules. riverwind.com

Oklahoma’s best theme parks and see Alter Bridge on the lawn. frontiercity.com

MATCHBOX TWENTY AND COUNTING CROWS Aug. 6 ZOO AMPHITHEATRE Enjoy the outdoors as you listen to the tunes of Matchbox Twenty and Counting Crows.

zooamphitheatre.com

ARTS COUNCIL OF OKC’S TWILIGHT CONCERT

jrbartgallery.com

JORDAN VINYARD AND KYLE LARSON Aug. 17-Sept. 22

IAO GALLERY Individual

HellYeah with special guests Cane Hill and Left to Die.

MARTY FRIEDMAN Aug. 19 TOWER THEATRE Guitar

virtuoso Marty Friedman hits the historic stage in support of his new album, Wall of Sound. towertheatreokc.com

YESTIVAL Aug. 22 ZOO AMPHITHEATRE For

these 2017 Yestival shows, Yes plays one track from each studio album from Yes to Drama, chronologically, with a few surprises thrown in.

THE CRITERION Enjoy the

ever-popular Josh Abbott Band with special guest Read Southall. criterionokc.com

ART than 80 artists in more than 25 businesses participate, all within walking distance. Art opening receptions showcase the new work of the gallery/ studio owners or the work of guest artists. thepaseo.org

August features abstract painter Larry Hefner and popular figurative painter Behnaz Sohrabian.

HELLYEAH Aug. 18 DIAMOND BALLROOM See

Aug. 25

take place from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Attendees are encouraged to bring blankets, chairs and picnic

JRB ART AT THE ELMS

Newsboys. frontiercity.com

JOSH ABBOTT BAND

MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS The concerts

Aug. 4-27

towertheatreokc.com

NEWSBOYS Aug. 12 FRONTIER CITY THEME PARK Take in the tunes of the

yesworld.com

Aug. 6, 13, 20, 27

LARRY HEFNER AND BEHNAZ SOHRABIAN

City’s Jabee celebrates his birthday with a special concert featuring Boston disc jockey, producer and ShowOff record label founder Statik Selektah.

diamondballroom.net

ALTER BRIDGE Aug. 5 FRONTIER CITY THEME PARK Enjoy one of

FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK Aug. 4 PASEO DISTRICT More

JABEE IN CONCERT Aug. 11 TOWER THEATRE Oklahoma

Artists of Oklahoma is a statewide organization that promotes progressive arts programming and education. individualartists.org

WE THE PEOPLE: A PORTRAIT OF EARLY OKLAHOMA Aug. 19-Oct. 22 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM Visitors meet

small-town characters such as Fern Lowry and the Sanford West family, enjoy an early example of Photoshop and experience the fun of a 19th-century carnival.

nationalcowboymuseum.org

LIFE AND LEGACY: THE ART OF JEROME TIGER Aug. 25-May 13, 2018

NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE


produced a wealth of artworks and won numerous awards. Today, his pieces are housed in museums across the nation.

nationalcowboymuseum.org

UGLY BUGS Through Sept. 4 SAM NOBLE MUSEUM, NORMAN The Oklahoma

Microscopy Society celebrates 20 years of the Ugly Bug competition with an exhibit of 2016’s ugliest bugs. samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

COMETS, ASTEROIDS, METEORS: GREAT BALLS OF FIRE! Through Sept. 10 SAM NOBLE MUSEUM, NORMAN The Space Science

Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning, with funding from the National Science Foundation and NASA, has developed a national traveling exhibition program for all to enjoy. samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

KEHINDE WILEY: A NEW REPUBLIC Through Sept. 10 OKC MOA The exhibition

highlights the range of Wiley’s production, starting with examples of early paintings executed around the time of his 2001 residency at the Studio Museum in Harlem.

okcmoa.com

JOE ANDOE: HORIZONS Through Sept. 10

FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART Contemporary artist

Joe Andoe was born and came of age in Tulsa, surrounded by churches, trees, highways and horses, now motifs in his paintings and prints. ou.edu/fjjma

PICHER, OKLAHOMA: CATASTROPHE, MEMORY, AND TRAUMA Through Sept. 10

FRED JONES FR. MUSEUM OF ART Todd Stewart’s

photo essay Picher, Oklahoma: Catastrophe, Memory, and Trauma explores the otherworldly ghost town and reveals how memory can be dislocated and reframed through trauma. ou.edu/fjjma

VINTAGE BLACK HEROES: THE CHISHOLM KID

Through Sept. 17

NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM Commemorating the Chisholm Trail’s 150th anniversary, the exhibition pays homage to the thousands of black cowboys who drove cattle along the Chisholm Trail from Texas to Kansas after the Civil War.

nationalcowboymuseum.org

SPORTS OKC DODGERS GAMES Aug. 1, 11-14, 24-31

CHICKASAW BRICKTOWN BALLPARK Watch at the OKC

Dodgers take on other teams in the Pacifc Coast League. milb.com

WHEELER CRITERIUM Aug. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

WHEELER DISTRICT The

Wheeler Crit is Oklahoma City’s premiere cycling festival, every Tuesday, March through September.

wheelerdistrict.com

FULL MOON BIKE RIDE AND

RUN Aug. 7 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Your favorite

SUMMER SHOOTOUT BARREL RACING Aug. 17-20 OKLAHOMA STATE FAIR PARK The original

shootout format combines the handicapping of a 4D format with the excitement of a sweepstakes style finals. shootoutbarrels.com

Find everything you need to improve and enhance your home landscape at this all-inclusive show. coxconventioncetner.com

CAT VIDEO FEST 2017

OKLAHOMA CRAFT BEER SUMMIT Aug. 5 TOWER THEATRE This is

back – a raucous, 75-minute romp through the Internet’s finest cat video offerings.

myriadbotanicalgardens.com

towertheatreokc.com

OKCLIPSE PARTY Aug. 21 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS The free

the only local conference that serves professional brewers, home brewers and the general public alike.

OKLAHOMA CITY PET EXPO Aug. 5-6 OKLAHOMA STATE FAIRGROUNDS Come out

for adoptions, discounted vaccinations and prize giveaways. okcpetexpo.com

L&L HOME AND LANDSCAPE SHOW Aug. 11-13

COX CONVENTION CENTER

ROLLIN’ ON THE RIVER Summer fun abounds at the River Rumba Regatta in Muskogee. Daring and innovative participants will construct and decorate their own cardboard boats and race down the river to see if their creations sink or swim. The event is run by the Muskogee Exchange Club, which started the annual regatta to further its compassionate initiative. “In 2007, we decided to add another major fundraising event to help raise money

to support local children’s charities that assist in our mission: the prevention of child abuse,” says Robert Smith, a senior member of the club. If that isn’t enough cause to join in, you can also witness a parade of boats, plus music and food vendors. Smith believes the event will be a great time for all ages, whether you’re racing on the water or sitting back as a spectator. “We will have the world’s largest inflatable water slide in our new and improved Kid’s Zone,” he says. Plus, you’ll get to see “tons of boats sinking and some of the most creative ideas made into boats.” The event runs Aug. 25-26 at Three Forks Harbor. Head to exchangeclubmuskogee. org/regatta for more information.

myriadbotanicalgardens.com

great, all-levels class led by Lisa Woodard. Class participants should bring a yoga mat and water.

myriadbotanicalgardens.com

FA M I LY / K I D S

health and wellness activity is back. Join other runners in a 5K through scenic downtown as the sun sets.

COMMUNITY YOGA TUESDAYS IN THE GARDENS Aug. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS This is a

PHOTO COURTESY MUSKOGEE EXCHANGE CLUB

MUSEUM In five years, Tiger

Aug. 12

MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS The festival is

OKClipse 2017 viewing party is on the Great Lawn from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Enjoy “space” music, food and educational activities on this rare occurrence for all ages.

myriadbotanicalgardens.com

SPIRIT, MIND AND BODY EXPO Aug. 19-20 BILTMORE HOTEL Engage

your mind, body and spirit with metaphysical subjects at this expo. operaok.org

WESTFEST Aug. 19 WESTERN AVENUE

Presented by the Western Avenue Association, WestFest is a free, family-friendly daytime event leading into

an evening of concerts.

westfestok.com

PLAZA BEER WALK Aug. 30 PLAZA DISTRICT Sip tasty

and local brew and enjoy the Plaza District. plazadistrict.org

CHARITABLE EVENTS POP! CHAMPAGNE AND SPIRIT TASTING Aug. 18 MERECEDES-BENZ OF OKC SHOWROOM This

event features small bites, live music, a raffle and an array of Champagnes and sparkling wines. It benefits the St. Anthony Foundation. givetosaints.com/POP

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS MOVEABLE FEAST Aug. 19 SAM NOBLE OKLAHOMA MUSEUM, NORMAN Join

BBBSOK to experience a perfect adieu to summer and impact the life of a child. bbbsok.org

13TH ANNUAL TEEN EMPOWER! TRIVIA EVENT Aug. 19 CHEVY BRICKTOWN EVENT CENTER Along

with a great evening of trivia fun, enjoy raffles, silent auction, door prizes and pizza.

teenempower.org

10TH ANNUAL DANCING FOR A MIRACLE Aug. 19 EMBASSY SUITES, NORMAN

Enjoy 10 breathtaking performances from local celebrities as they dance to raise money for pediatric research and education, all benefiting Children’s Hospital Foundation. chfkids.com

THE MONOPOLY BALL: 21ST ANNUAL MELODY LANE Aug. 26 OKLAHOMA CITY GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Join

Parent Promise for an evening dedicated to building stronger families, healthier children and brighter futures.

parentpromise.org

GLORUN OKC 2017: GLOW BRIGHT FOR RECOVERY Aug. 26 MITCH PARK, EDMOND The

Recovery Center hosts the sixth annual GloRun 2017: Glow Bright for Recovery 5K and 1 mile fun run, supporting critical addiction treatment programs devoted to helping people in their recovery.

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AROUND THE STATE PERFORMANCES AN EVENING WITH ELVIS Aug. 12 MAIN STREET, FAIRMONT

Celebrate the life of Elvis Presley with a commemorative tribute. Artist Marshall Matthews performs at a street dance before guests show off their knowledge of The King in an Elvis-themed trivia contest.

travelok.com

AN ACCORDION AFFAIR

Aug. 13

205 N. CZECH HALL ROAD, YUKON Enjoy this

all-ages concert featuring 23 accordionists. travelok.com

SEMINOLE GOSPEL SING

Aug. 17-19

SEMINOLE MUSIC PARK All

are welcome to hear bands like The Hoppers, Dove Brothers and Southern Raised Band.

thegospelstation.com

CONCERTS THE OAK RIDGE BOYS Aug. 4

RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Food and music

CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK CENTER, ENID Fans of

– what more can you ask for? Come out and enjoy. All ages welcome. riverwind.com

cnbcenter.com

JAKE JAM 2017 Aug. 19 GRAND CASINO HOTEL AND RESORT, SHAWNEE Enjoy

gospel and country will love the popular Oak Ridge Boys.

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM AND CHRISTINE MCVIE Aug. 6

WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Catch

Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham and Christine McVie as they perform at the Global Event Center. winstarworldcasino.com

BEATS AND BITES FESTIVAL Aug. 12

artists like Frankie Ballard, Granger Smith and Michael Ray. grandboxoffice.com

STEVEN TYLER AND THE LOVING MARY BAND Aug. 25

WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Steven Tyler

and the Loving Mary Band perform in the Colosseum. winstarworldcasino.com

AUGUST 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

93


Where & When

KEITH URBAN Aug. 27 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE See

this country legend – you won’t be disappointed. winstarworldcasino.com

SPORTS SEILING IPRA AND KPRA RODEO Aug. 3-5 FLYING W ARENA Come

Aug. 19

FREEDOM RODEO & OLD COWHAND REUNION Aug. 17-19 FREEDOM FAIRGROUNDS

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for the rodeo and community events like a dance and live music. travelok.com

Freedom’s pride and joy is its rodeo, held the third weekend of August each year. freedomrodeo.com

HENNESSEY ROUND-UP CLUB RODEO Aug. 18-19 HENNESSEY RODEO ARENA Spectators can enjoy calf roping and saddle bronc riding. hennesseyok.org

LEFLORE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, POTEAU

Wear a costume and try your hand at a fun, muddy obstacle course 5k to benefit the Women’s Crisis Shelter.

WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL RODEO Aug. 23-26 AMERICAN LEGION RODEO GROUNDS, VINITA This annual event

kicks off downtown with the Will Rogers Memorial Rodeo Parade.

willrogersmemorialrodeo.com

RIVER RUMBA AND REGATTA Aug. 25-26 THREE FORKS HARBOR, MUSKOGEE Create a

TOUR DE TRYKES AND TWILIGHT CRITERIUM

cardboard boat with plenty of decorations and float down the river with friends and family.

Aug. 19

DAVID ALLEN MEMORIAL BALLPARK, ENID The

Tour de Trykes is a bicycle tour leaving downtown Enid with routes of two miles, 14 miles, 26 miles, 42 miles and 100K. tourdetrykes.com

BRAVE THE MUD RUN

exchangeclubmuskogee.org

SPIRIT SPRINT 5K RUN Aug. 26

CHISHOLM TRAIL PARK, YUKON Run or walk the 3.1

miles at the scenic Chisholm Trail Park. gcrfestival.com

ART SECOND FRIDAY NORMAN ART WALK Aug. 14 NORMAN ARTS DISTRICT This is a monthly celebration of arts and creativity in the Walker Arts District. 2ndfridaynorman.com

CHIHULY: IN THE GALLERY Through Aug. 16 CRYSTAL BRIDGES, BENTONVILLE, ARKANSAS

Dale Chihuly has been an

innovator for more than 40 years, working in many media including glass, paint and neon. crystalbridges.org

CHISHOLM TRAIL 150TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBIT

Through Sept. 16

CHEROKEE STRIP REGIONAL HERITAGE CENTER, ENID Celebrate

the greatest cattle trail with a fascinating exhibit. csrhc.org

COMMUNITY OLD SETTLERS’ PICNIC Aug. 2-6

HUMPHREY PARK, VELMA

enjoy an evening of live music, great shopping and delicious food. mainstreetenid.org

The Old Settlers’ Picnic has brought summer fun to small-town Oklahoma for more than 100 years. travelok.

FLY FILM FESTIVAL Aug. 4-6 DOWNTOWN ENID

MOUNTAIN VIEW FREE FAIR Aug. 3-5 TOLBERT PARK, MOUNTAIN VIEW Enjoy fun events like

PAWNEE OLD TIME SATURDAY NIGHT CRUZE-IN

com

carnival games, arts and crafts and a tractor pull at this free fair. mountainviewok.com

KAW NATION POWWOW Aug. 4 WASHUNGA BAY POWWOW GROUNDS, KAW CITY Dance contests, traditional regalia and exhibitions are featured. kawnation.com

FIRST FRIDAY ENID Aug. 4 MAIN STREET Come

downtown from 6 to 9 p.m. and

Attendees enjoy venues, unique awards and entertainment at this annual festival. flyfilmfestival.org Aug. 5

COURTHOUSE SQUARE Anything with wheels is

welcome to this show with antique vehicles. cityofpawnee.com

U.S.S. BATFISH LIVING HISTORY DAYS Aug. 5 WAR MEMORIAL PARK, MUSKOGEE Step inside

the U.S.S. Batfish, a World War II submarine responsible for sinking 14 enemies, including three submarines. warmemorialpark.org

FOR EVEN MORE EXCITING EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM.

94

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

FILM AND CINEMA

The Dark Tower Looms

THE DARK TOWER

PHOTO COURTESY ILZE KITSHOFF AND SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT

The newest adaptation of a Stephen King novel lends hope to closing out the blockbuster season with a bang.

Around Town

Who says only Oklahoma City and Tulsa are big enough to host film festivals? Enid is out to prove the naysayers wrong with another iteration of its FLY Film Festival. An acronym for Films Like Yours (while also paying tribute to Vance Air Force Base), the festival emphasizes a more open approach than many showcases and attracts under-the-radar films that wouldn’t get the time of day at more mainstream venues. FLY also features many short films, which are hard to catch outside festival circuits because of their lack of commercial potential. Passes are cheap by festival standards – $25 for all three days or $40 for that, plus after-parties and extras – and proceeds benefit Downtown Enid.

At Home

Though they’ve spawned many favorite films over their 30-year career, the Coen brothers’ signature film remains the icy neo-noir Fargo. The 1996 film brought them national recognition and left enough cultural legacy that it inspired a TV show of the same name two decades after it premiered. Inspired by the hardboiled detective stories of days gone by, the Coens had the inspired stroke to move their twisty, violent action to an incongruous setting, the “aww, shucks” Minnesota of their youth. The strange hybrid of politeness and bloodshed makes for a dark comedy that explores the underbelly of the wholesome Midwest. If you’ve somehow avoided Fargo, by equal turns hilarious and chilling, it’s time to rectify that with Shout! Factory’s 20thanniversary deluxe DVD in a classy looking SteelBook case. Apart from the movie

itself, with unforgettable performances by Frances McDormand, William H. Macy and Steve Buscemi, the film comes with noteworthy special features, most notably audio commentary from Roger Deakins, the longtime cinematographer for the Coen brothers and one of the great visual stylists of our time. As a bonus, those ordering from the Shout! Factory website will receive a specially designed film poster.

In Theaters

Stephen King’s novels have had a spotty track record when it comes to film adaptations, with movies ranging from all-time classics (The Shining, Carrie), to embarrassing duds (Thinner, anyone?). Given how many books he’s written, it’s inevitable that the attempts will keep coming, and August sees the release of one of the biggest, The Dark Tower, based on his multipart saga about the battle between good and evil. Danish director Nikolaj Arcel is largely unknown in the States, but the real draw – even for non-King fans like myself – is the star-studded combo of Idris Elba as gunslinger Roland Deschain and Matthew McConaughey as the sinister Man in Black. Their combined charisma should be more than enough to keep the film rolling at an enjoyable pace. Like all summers, this blockbuster season has been uneven, and given that August is traditionally the month when the also-rans get dumped unceremoniously into theaters, it’s worth hoping that The Dark Tower will elevate the action movie offerings of 2017. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS


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… the achievements of which he’s most proud.

The major accomplishments that OETA has made on the technical side have made me most proud. To move from one analog channel to four digital channels, providing a vast amount of quality programming, was a major accomplishment. We connected all the sites via fiber, which saved money and improved the reliability and quality of our service. The change to a digital multi-channel facility was the first major change in OETA and all television stations in the United States since television broadcasting began in the United States in the 1950s, so it was a major accomplishment.

… the importance of public broadcasting.

C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

Mark Norman

M

ark Norman, Oklahoma Educational Television Authority’s vice president of technology and interim executive director, will retire once a new executive director for the agency is chosen this fall after more than 40 years of working in broadcasting in the state. The native of Fargo, North Dakota, has a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern Oklahoma State University and a master’s degree from Oklahoma State University. He was hired as OETA’s vice president of technology in 2007. We recently talked to Norman and got his thoughts on …

… his favorite memories at OETA.

“THE PRESENTATION OF THE EMMY WAS ONE OF THE HIGHLIGHTS OF MY TIME AT OETA,” NORMAN SAYS.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

96

When I was hired at OETA, my main job … was to help plan and implement the change … from an analog one-channel facility to a four-channel digital facility serving the entire state. By 2009, we had four digital channels broadcasting on 18 transmitters around the state. We [have] one main [high-definition] channel and three [standard-definition] channels providing thousands of hours of programming each year to Oklahoma residents. During my time, we were also able to build a new Tulsa studio, which had been planned for over 20 years. One project I was involved

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2017

with outside the technology area [was] the OETA and Ken Burns Dust Bowl series. OETA took this program on the road around the state to include the Panhandle, where much of the old video and new video segments were recorded for this national series. The interviews, which made up a majority of the story, were with older lifelong citizens from the Panhandle of Oklahoma and Texas. OETA staff like myself worked with the soil and conservation districts across Oklahoma to tell the Dust Bowl story and for that work we won a regional Emmy. The presentation of the Emmy was one of the highlights of my time at OETA.

Public broadcast in the United States is the only source for free overthe-air noncommercial television [that] citizens have. Most countries started with public broadcasting from the 1950s. In the United States, the decision was made in 1969 that we needed [the Corporation for Public Broadcasting] and a formal noncommercial service that would provide quality programming to the American people. Since that time, PBS was created, and the quality programs you see today are the result of a joint effort between PBS and all the members stations.

... the challenges faced by public broadcasting.

Public broadcast is still the only noncommercial, quality, free television service. That sets public television apart. Viewers donate to keep us on the air, and state government and the federal government have helped keep this valuable service alive. We deserve a free, over-the-air public television service in the United States that is tax supported and donor supported. My concern is that without the tax support, both federal and state, the quality of the service will not be what it needs to be and what viewers want. We are doing our best to get more viewers to donate and that will be helpful, but we still need that federal and state support for the infrastructure.


THE

CHICKASAW NATION WA R R I O R S TAT U E ADA, OKLAHOMA

EXHIBIT C ART GALLERY O K L A H O M A C I T Y, O K L A H O M A

B E D R É F I N E C H O C O L AT E D AV I S , O K L A H O M A

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Oklahoma Magazine August 2017  
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