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APRIL 2015

20 YEARS AFTER THE BOMBING

The 2015 crop of the state’s young professionals

DOWN TOWN HOUSING BOOM

+A ROCK ‘N’ ROLL RENO

The state’s city hubs continue to grow

TOM COBURN’S LEGACY


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uticasquare.com


VOL. XIX, NO. 4

FEATURES

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40 Under 40

March 2 015 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

Oklahoma Magazine celebrates the state’s young professionals with the annual 40 Under 40, a survey of the state’s brightest young minds. This year’s class includes physicians, attorneys, bakers, business owners and more.

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Rock ‘n’ Roll Renovation

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20 Years Later

Two decades after the domestic terror attack that left 168 dead and hundreds more injured, feature writer Megan Morgan talks to survivors, first responders and city leaders about the Oklahoma City bombing.

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The Doctor is Out

After retiring from the U.S. Senate earlier this year, Dr. Tom Coburn reflects upon his time in office and his cynicism for how government runs itself.

DOWN TOWN HOUSING BOOM

+A ROCK ‘N’ ROLL RENO

2

The state’s city hubs continue to grow

TOM COBURN’S LEGACY

Housing Boom

Oklahoma’s two largest downtown areas are teeming with new developments, both commercial and residential. Writer Sharon McBride takes us through the hottest housing spots in both Oklahoma City and Tulsa and discusses what you get for your money.

OKMAG.COM

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

APRIL 2015

April 2015

The newest crop of the state’s young professionals

88

ON THE COVER: STUART ASHWORTH, ATTORNEY WITH CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES, IS ONE OF 40 YOUNG PROFESSIONALS IN OUR ANNUAL 40 UNDER 40 CLASS OF 2015. PHOTO BY SCOTT MILLER.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries. MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!

PHOTO COURTESY CHRIS PARDO DESIGN ELEMENTAL ARCHITECTURE.

Country star Miranda Lambert brings her style to a recently renovated bed and breakfast in downtown Tishomingo. Tour the rooms and hear from the builder and designer who made the project happen.


IN THE FIGHT TO ELIMINATE CANCER. St. John Medical Center and MD Anderson Cancer Network® are teaming up in the battle against cancer. With combined cancer-fighting research and expertise, we are providing Oklahomans with a higher level of cancer care. To schedule an appointment with a St. John physician certified by MD Anderson Cancer Network, please call the St. John PulseLine at 918-744-0123 or visit www.stjohncancercenter.com.


Contents

DEPARTMENTS The State

13

In this heartbreaking but triumphant telling, Holocaust survivor Eva Unterman recounts her childhood experiences in Nazi-occupied Poland and hopes her story will educate generations far removed from the atrocities she and countless others faced.

16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30

People Culture Smart Move The Insider Oklahoma Business Scene Spotlight Living Spaces

34 36 38 44

Style Trend Fitness Destination

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30

These homeowners may have downsized, but their new home offers a different sense of space with the bright, open and transitional style that Zoller Designs achieves.

Taste

99

STG Pizzeria and Gelateria gives Oklahomans a true taste of one of Italy’s best creations: pizza. Through countless trips to Naples, owner Mike Bausch has skillfully perfected the Italian pie.

34

102 On Wheels 103 What We’re Eating

105

Entertainment

The Phantom of the Opera’s spectacular score, stage and costume designs and riveting cast arrives in Tulsa to captivate lucky audience members with haunting mystery and romance.

106 Calendar of Events

112

4

In Person

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

105

99


MORE LOCATIONS. MORE CONVENIENT. It’s always good news when high quality healthcare moves closer to where you live. Warren Clinic has opened three new locations to make healthcare more convenient. With more primary care physicians, providers and urgent care clinics, you can find the healthcare you need at a familiar place.

Tulsa Hills

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OKLAHOMA

JUNE 2015

Adventure Around Oklahoma and the Region Plan your travel destination with our special travel guide.

OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX EDITORIAL ASSISTANT BRITTANY ANICETTI CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER BEN ALBRECHT

DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY ADVERTISING/OFFICE ASSISTANT ALYSSA HALL CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM

For advertising opportunities, please call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com. Summer travel 1/3.indd 1

ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM

3/19/15 2:39 PM

LOVE IN BLOOM

Let Oklahoma Magazine help you plan your special day! Look for our summer wedding guide in the June issue.

The Oklahoma Wedding Show and issue returning 2016. Booth spaces now available.

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2015 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily TM represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2013

Member

440 0 UNDER

For more information, call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com.

Wedding.indd 1

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

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THE VOTES ARE IN!! LAHOMA OK

A TRIBUTE TO THE LIVES LOST, AT THE OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL & MUSEUM.

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BEST of the BEST 2015

MA

GAZINE

LOOK FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST OF OKLAHOMA. COMING IN JULY. Don’t miss this exciting issue. Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL3/17/15 2015 1:01 PM

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Where were you on April 19, 1995? I was in the office of my junior high school. It was our second period, and I was an eighth-grade office assistant. I ran errands for the principal and secretary, delivering notes, relaying messages. Our school secretary, Martha Herman, received a call a little after 9 a.m. from a class that was on a field trip in downtown Oklahoma City. The teacher said that there had been an explosion downtown, but that he and the students were okay. This was before the Internet was available on cell phones, before Facebook and Twitter, before email was widely used as a communication tool between friends and family. Not too many minutes later, word came via breaking news that the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City had been the target of a large bomb. There were 168 casualties. Hundreds were injured. Thousands’ lives were forever changed. The Oklahoma landscape was forever changed. Later that month, the bus carrying my class on a school field trip to Oklahoma City drove by the bombing site. National news platforms were still set up. There was yellow police “caution” tape rimming hundreds of feet. And the makeshift memorial of notes, flowers and stuffed animals had taken over the chain-link fence that separated the crime scene from the public. It was surreal then, and 20 years later, visiting the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, the events of April 19, 1995, are still surreal, as unbelievable as ever. The photos taken of the carnage and aftermath of the bombing are still difficult to view. It’s hard to believe that evil could strike our state in such a swift and powerful manner. But good came from the bad. The Oklahoma Standard was born. The state’s reputation for standing behind its citizens in a time of tragedy was put on an international stage. It has been seen many times since in the aftermath of natural disaster and tragedy. Oklahomans stick together. Despite our differences, true Oklahomans take care of each other. To celebrate this commitment to others, the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum has launched the Oklahoma Standard, an initiative to empower the state’s residents to commit one act of service, one act of honor and one act of kindness during the month of April. Just like my parents will always recall where they were when JFK was assassinated, and my grandparents remembered the moment they found out that Pearl Harbor was attacked, I will always remember sitting in the office of Bristow Junior High and learning about an explosion in the state’s capital. On this 20th anniversary, remember the tragedy. Remember the lost lives. Remember the triumph over evil. Remember. Jami Mattox Managing Editor


OKMAG.COM

S TAY CONNECTED

The State

What’s HOT At

OK Sit down with 40 of Oklahoma’s most esteemed young professionals as they discuss their key roles in the community, the impact they’ve had on the people around them and what keeps them living and working in Oklahoma. This year’s class is packed with community leaders, artists, doctors, architects, volunteer workers, DJs, bakers, television personalities and more. Get to know your neighbors who go above and beyond for their communities, citizens who know first-hand the true value of paying it forward. In this WEB EXCLUSIVE VIDEO SERIES, shake hands with the brightest under-40 Oklahoma has to offer.

Luxury Homes You’re cordially invited to join us for an insider's tour of some of Oklahoma’s most innovative and fabulous homes.

Advertising opportunities available Contact advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

LOOK ONLINE TO FIND FIVE OF O U R G R E AT S TAT E ’S GARDEN G E TAWAYS . Spring is finally here, and Oklahoma is home to a number a of beautiful botanical gardens. Let OKMAG guide you to our state’s most breathtaking blooms.

JULY 2015


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The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

The Survivor’s Tale Seventy years after the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, one Tulsa woman continues to share her story.

E

Onlin e

va Unterman’s childhood in Lodz, Poland, before World War II was what some would call idyllic. The only child of a middle-class Jewish businessman and a housewife, Unterman enjoyed a large extended family, summers in the countryside and was looking forward to beginning school. But in the winter of 1940, her childhood was shattered. Unterman was only 6 years old when she and her family were ordered to assemble with only what they could carry – Unterman took one of her dolls – and march miles to the Lodz ghetto. She never saw her home again. “Life in the ghetto was terrible,” Unterman recalls. “Hunger, disease and fear of deportation were constant. People were afraid we would be sent to Chelmno because it was nearby. We never heard the word Auschwitz.” Yet, that very word, a name that has since become a symbol of the most appalling atrocities of the Nazi regime, was shortly to become a horrifying reality for Unterman and her family. Now, as the world approaches the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, Unterman recalls how after four years of desperation and disease in the Lodz ghetto, she, along with her father, mother

siv clu e Ex

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE and grandmother, were forced to make the now-infamous journey to Auschwitz-Birkenau that many never survived. “We were told to assemble at the train station,” Unterman says. “My father lifted me up into the cattle car. We

EVA UNTERMAN WAS A CHILD WHEN SHE WAS CAPTURED BY NAZIS AND LED TO A CONCENTRATION CAMP. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

RIGHT: UNTERMAN AND HER HUSBAND, HERB. PHOTO COURTESY EVA UNTERMAN.

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

were crammed into the car for several days. We didn’t know where we were going, and there was no food or water.” Unterman remembers the men and women of her family being torn apart before their clothing was confiscated, their heads shaved and they were forced into the showers. Unlike many who entered the camp and those notorious showers, Unterman and her family lived to leave again. Unfortunately for them, their nightmare had only just begun. After a few dark days in Auschwitz, Unterman and her female family members (and later, she learned, her father) were transported to Stuthoff concentration camp, where her grandmother was eventually murdered. “Stuthoff was the worst experience,” Unterman recalls. “I was very sick, and conditions were extremely harsh.” Although Unterman and her surviving family members were united safely in 1945 – despite a forced, deadly march to Terezin – her story did not end with the liberation of the Nazi camps. Since 1961, when she moved to Oklahoma with her husband, Unterman has called Tulsa home and has gone on to share her tale of hope and survival with the next generation of Tulsans. “I never spoke about my experience during the Shoah (the Hebrew word for Holocaust) until a teacher asked me to come speak to his students,” she says. “Then I realized I have a moral obligation

to speak for those that did not survive, to tell their story. I began to speak more often and realized that if you tell one person, it ends with them, but if you tell a teacher, it reaches hundreds of young people, who will hopefully carry the story with them into the future. There are many people in our community who also saw the need for Holocaust education and commemoration. With their help, I set up the Council for Holocaust Education.” This month, Unterman will once more share her story as she addresses the topic “The Last Transport: My Childhood During the Holocaust” for the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education’s 18th Annual Yom HaShoah/Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration. The commemoration is sponsored by the council, a committee comprised of the Jewish Federation of Tulsa and the Tulsa City-County Library, as well as numerous interfaith organizations. After the event, Unterman will sign copies of her memoir, Through Eva’s Eyes. The book is written and illustrated by her granddaughter, Phoebe Eloise Unterman. In addition to Unterman’s talk and book signing, the commemoration program includes an exhibit of projects created by Tulsaarea students. There will also be a musical performance and a candlelight vigil in memory of the Jewish children of Lodz who were killed during the Holocaust. Staff from the Tulsa City-County Library will have available for checkout many Holocaust books and media. For generations CHILDHOOD PHOTOS who did not experiREFLECT HAPPY TIMES ence the horrors IN UNTERMAN’S LIFE. PHOTOS COURTESY EVA of the Holocaust UNTERMAN. first-hand, Unterman cautions, “In everyday life, we have choices about what we say and do. Our words can be weapons. Choose your words carefully. Respect one another. Learn about people who are different from you. You might find that you have more in common than you realize.” Unterman will speak on April 16 at Congregation B’nai Emunah, 1719 S. Owasso, in Tulsa. The event is free and open to the public. Parking is limited at B’nai Emunah, but overflow parking will be available at Temple Israel, 2004 E. 22nd Place. A free shuttle service from Temple Israel to B’nai will begin at 6 p.m. and resume for an hour following the event. TARA MALONE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015


©2015 The Williams Companies, Inc.

HOME SWEET OKLAHOMA Oklahoma is the heart of America’s drive for energy independence. At Williams, that heart beats stronger than ever. For almost a century, we’ve called Tulsa our home. And now we’ve added a major presence in Oklahoma City. From one end of the turnpike to the other, every day we’re creating the infrastructure critical to our nation’s energy future. And along the way, we find time to give back, supporting worthy community causes across our great state. At Williams, it’s a tradition that goes back to our founders. And it’s a tradition you can count on.


The State

PEOPLE

Budding Business An Oklahoma City 10-year-old tackles a new market.

A

rtisan shops are popping up everywhere, online and in traditional brick and mortar businesses, catering to eager customers looking for products that offer a bit more. Buzzwords like “organic,” “local” and “handcrafted” have moved to the top of consumer wish lists. A budding business called The Little Bubble is right on trend, marketing handmade soaps, scrubs and bath treats using locally sourced, organic and sustainable ingredients.

At the helm of The Little Bubble is owner Bella Corrente, an imaginative 10-year-old who began the business more than two years ago. A self-described typical pre-teen, Bella has always been very creative and playful, says mother Tawnya Corrente. Channeling that creativity and enthusiasm into a pint-size entrepreneur was an easy transition. “Bella had fallen in love with some lip gloss we found,” recalls Corrente. “It was all natural and organic. I loved that she took notice to the fact that it was good for her and the environment, that it had a good story with it.” But, then, there was a problem. Bella ran out of her new favorite lip balm. “We weren’t able to find it anywhere,” explains Corrente. “Being the littlest in a family of makers, Bella researched how to make it.” Homeschooled at the time, Bella’s mom got the idea to use the project as a way to learn fractions. “As she began to learn fractions, I came up with the idea to bake, but she didn’t want to,” says Corrente. “She wanted to make lip balm. I took it a bit further and decided to bring science into it and make soap.” Bella used her first products as Christmas gifts; they were huge hits. “Then, people asked if we had more,” says Corrente. As demand continued to grow, a family friend connected Bella to a local kid’s event, Wiggle Out Loud. “Bella made 80 bars to sell at a table at Wiggle Out Loud,” explains Corrente. “She sold all but a dozen bars.” They totaled the profits, and Bella was hooked. As any wise investor would do, she bought more supplies. With a working business model, Bella expanded to Etsy, an online marketplace where people around the world connect to make, sell and buy unique goods. “We set up an Etsy account so she could use her writing skills and learn about starting a business,” says Corrente. “What started out as a lesson on fractions has become so much more.” Her staff has grown, as well. The whole family helps Bella, even her three older brothers. From the beginning, Bella decided that 10 percent of her profits would go to charity. She has donated to Pets and People, an animal rescue; Positive Tomorrows, a school for homeless kids; and the Oklahoma Humane Society. “Our motto is you don’t have to be big to make a big impact. She is a regular girl that has decided to tackle something big,” says Corrente. The Little Bubble offers an ever-growing lineup of products: soap by the bar, body polishes and scrubs, lip polish and gloss, bubble bath and a men’s line. “Bella is always researching new recipes and ingredients,” shares Corrente. “We shop our local farmers market for local, seasonal ingredients. THE LITTLE BUBBLE OWNER, 10-YEAR OLD BELLA CORRENTE, We use goat milk from a family friend HOLDS UP ONE OF HER POPULAR when we can get it. Our oils are all orSOAPS – UNICORN FARTS. ganic, sustainable and phthalate free.” PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. LINDSAY CUOMO

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015


In recognition appreciation of 50 years of dedication to the Firm.


The State

CULTURE

Tracing Roots

T

People search records to find where they came from.

oday, social media dominates the landscape of human connection. People take to Facebook, Twitter and other platforms to get updates on their growing family trees. Everyone’s life events and daily moments are chronicled on the Web, allowing current and future generations to easily stay connected to loved ones. Feeding the same desire for information, it is becoming increasingly common for people to use the Web to connect to a more unexpected familial group: their ancestors. “I think there is a hunger in our country for our past, before it is lost forever,” says genealogist Michael McCoy. “We want to know our true origins. It’s no longer a matter that we are all Americans – it’s now a matter of regaining our original heritage that brought us to America in the first place.” Ancestry.com is perhaps the most wellknown genealogy website, but the monthly membership fees may be a deterrent for some. McCoy suggests checking out free sites, including familysearch. org, genealogycenter.org and heritagequestonline.com. “Most of the information that will come to you will be public information, already available as a public record,” he says. “Slowly, you can proceed backwards in time.” McCoy also suggests joining a genealogical society and subscribing to genealogy magazines to learn more about how to trace one’s lineage. These resources can provide

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

valuable tips when digging through the archives becomes troublesome. McCoy says poor record keeping, secretive relatives, pandemics and closed adoption records can all contribute to a difficult search. There is also a chance the records have been destroyed, as was the case in 1921 when much of the 1890 federal census burned in a fire. “You will run into gaps in information, where you will be stymied with either too much information – such as too many Smiths – or too little information,” explains McCoy. “So you must be willing to be patient, a good sleuth and ask for help when necessary.” McCoy says to approach the search with an open mind. As the secrets of the past get unveiled, surprising and even upsetting information could surface. “Family history is full of stories, twists and turns,” he says. “Such things as natural disasters, murders, multiple marriages, illegitimate children, land grants, court records, wills, probate records, et cetera, are all parts and parcels of family history that become buried with time.” The unanticipated information, though, may be what helps people get a clear picture of how they came to be. “Gaining knowledge about our familial past helps us to understand our way of thinking and even helps us to understand others who may have opposing views,” he says. BETH WEESE

NED CHRISTIE WAS FEATURED IN A SEGMENT ON THE FIRST EPISODE OF OSIYO. PHOTO COURTESY OSIYO.

OSIYO

It’s the Cherokee word for “hello,” and now, it’s also the title of a television show. Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People is a monthly, 30-minute, magazine-style television show that tells the stories of the Cherokee Nation and its people, culture and heritage. Longtime news anchor Jennifer Loren, formerly of KOTV 6, hosts the show. “Our people have been asking for this kind of storytelling for so long,” Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker said in a statement about the show’s premiere. “I often hear people say, ‘We have a great story to tell. Our people are doing great things. Why aren’t there more stories about what we’re doing?’ This program is the answer to that question. We’re so proud to share with the world stories about our culture and about Cherokees who are excelling and bettering their communities.” The show is produced by Cherokee photographer and filmmaker Jeremy Charles and Muscogee Creek filmmaker Sterlin Harjo. For showtimes in your area, visit www.osiyo.tv. – Jami Mattox


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The State

S M A R T M OV E

Toasting Oklahoma

Oklahoma State University’s biennial Wine Forum promises excellence in wine, food.

STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF HOTEL AND RESTAURANT ADMINISTRATION AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY PARTICIPATED IN 2013’S WINE FORUM OF OKLAHOMA. PHOTO COURTESY OSU.

S

ave the date and mark the calendar for one of the best wine and food events in the area. The biennial Wine Forum of Oklahoma 2015 is scheduled for April 10-11, at the Oklahoma State University campus in Stillwater. This forum is two days of innovative, educational wine seminars, extraordinary wine tastings and exceptional food, says Lyn Putnam, the manager of marketing and communication for the School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration at OSU. More than 30 vintners will be on hand to share their world-class wines, and culinary creations from 16 of Oklahoma’s top chefs will be available. The event is also a chance to recognize Oklahoma-connected wine producers and purveyors. This year, Girouard Vines, a family-owned urban winery located

in downtown Tulsa, will be featured. George Girouard began the task of growing wine grapes in Oklahoma more than 50 years ago, says Putnam. He worked tirelessly to crosspollinate traditional wine-grape vines with indigenous grapevine species. His son, Chris, is now growing those grapes in a small vineyard in south Tulsa and in California. “We will also have a seminar of Oklahoma wines and Made in Oklahoma food products,” says Putnam. Food and wine pairings, a gala dinner, auctions, as well as educational seminars are all part of the fun, she says. “This year, there are 13 educational wine seminars focused on an array of topics, including worldwide whites, bold reds and everything in between,” says Putnam. There will also be ample opportunities to learn about viticulture – the science, production and study of grapes – plus the art of making wine. “Understanding viticulture helps one determine his or her preference with wines,” says Putnam. Funds raised through the forum’s events provide student scholarships and funding for professional development. The Wine Forum began in 2009 as the idea of Marilynn and Carl Thoma, dedicated OSU alumni and owners of Van Duzer Vineyards. The event provides students the opportunity to plan, implement and manage a major event as part of the School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration curriculum. The program has now grown to more than 150 students in multiple majors. For a full schedule of events and admission prices, visit www.wineforumofoklahoma.com. SHARON MCBRIDE

SHOUT OUT

FOURSTAR ACHIEVEMENT

A local nonprofit dedicated to helping Oklahoma students learn about the business world through hands-on learning experiences has been recognized with a national award. Junior Achievement of Oklahoma was recently awarded the organization’s Four Star Award, which recognizes the staffs and boards across the country that meet Junior Achievement’s standards in operations and strong representation of the organization’s mission. “We are thrilled to receive the Four Star Award,” Shannan

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

Beeler, president of Junior Achievement of Oklahoma, said recently. “We thank our more than 4,000 classroom volunteers and corporate partners who joined with our board of directors and staff to empower thousands of young people to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices.” Junior Achievement brings business education – everything from economics to financial literacy – to students in grades kindergarten through 12th. – Jami Mattox


Mabrey Bank: New Name, Same Great Community Partner As banks throughout Oklahoma are bought, take on new names and struggle to keep their local focus, one community bank has changed its name for all the right reasons. In March, Citizens Security Bank changed its name to Mabrey Bank. The reason is simple – to emphasize the value the bank places on being involved in the communities it has served, some for more than a century. The Mabrey family has been involved with the bank for four generations, providing steady leadership to this well-known independent community bank. Though the bank’s name has changed, the Mabreys continue to own, manage and be involved in the bank’s growing daily operations. With 13 locations throughout Oklahoma (in Tulsa, Broken Arrow, Glenpool, Bixby, Haskell, Jenks, Muskogee, Okmulgee, Wetumka,

Weleetka and most recently Oklahoma City), the bank is staffed by more than 200 professionals, provides financial services to more than 25,000 customers and maintains assets totaling more than $750 million. A commitment to giving back to the community has been an important part of the bank’s mission for four generations. The culture of a friendly, family bank – combined with the fact that customers receive financial offerings rivaling those of the largest national banks – helps makes Mabrey Bank unique in today’s bank environment. Building loyal customer relationships through a professional, positive culture is at the heart of Mabrey Bank creating “Solutions for Life” for its customers, a majority of whom are small to mid-sized companies. “We know the importance of having history in a community, we’ve been in the communities we serve for decades,” said Scott Mabrey, President. “Our customers have said they like our personal service and the feeling of ‘family.’ We’re not a ‘pressure you’ bank – we’re a bank with a sense of family that supports our community.”

Third and Fourth Generation Mabrey Family Members Involved in Daily Operations.

Member FDIC

mabreybank.com • 888.272.8866


The State THE INSIDER

The Guitar Guy Tulsa’s Tommy Crook helped define the Tulsa Sound.

O

TOMMY CROOK HAS BEEN A VITAL PART OF THE TULSA MUSIC SCENE SINCE THE 1950S. IMAGES COURTESY JOHN WOOLEY.

22

ne of the things I’ve learned in my decades of writing about Oklahoma’s great rock ‘n’ roll-era musicians is that they are, with a couple of exceptions, not at all interested in hyping themselves or their achievements, even when those achievements are hall-of-fame caliber. Take Tommy Crook for instance: Known among his peers to be one of the greatest guitarists the state has ever produced, right up there with the likes of Barney Kessel, Charlie Christian, Eldon Shamblin and Jesse Ed Davis. One of Crook’s early influences, Chet Atkins, said as much one evening on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, after having been exposed to Crook’s solo-guitar wizardry during a stopover at Tulsa International Airport. (Crook, at the time, had a longstanding gig at the Inkwell Club in the nearby Sheraton hotel.) Even though many musicians would wear that nationally televised endorsement like a badge, Crook doesn’t even like for people to bring it up.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

“No,” he says. “That wore me out years ago.” However, as is the case with many of his old comrades who came out of the Tulsa clubs in the ‘50s to craft what’s become known as the classic Tulsa Sound, Crook does enjoy talking about a few of the more memorable things he’s experienced in his musical life. For him, that stretches all the way back to the early years of the Eisenhower administration. “It all started at a Saturday morning talent contest,” he recalls. “All these little movie theaters around town, especially the neighborhood theaters, would have live stuff on the stage on Saturday mornings – yo-yo contests, things like that. The Rialto, downtown on Third Street, had a talent contest, and the first prize was $10. Well, in 1953, 1954, $10 was about how much my dad brought home from work every day, after taxes. “So we went down there. Back in those days, kids tap-danced a lot. Kids played accordion. So there were a lot of accordion players and tap dancers, and one kid by the name of Don Willis. He and I were the same age. His folks had one of the first restaurants on 11th Street, out by Wilson Junior High School, called the Chili Bowl. He was a handsome young man, and I remember he sang like an angel, with his mother accompanying him on piano. I remember what he sang, too, because I had just seen the movie, Calamity Jane. It was ‘Secret Love,’ from that movie. I’m getting chills right now just remembering it.” As good as young Willis was, however, a cowboy-garbed Crook got the most applause from the audience, winning the top prize for his singing and guitar playing. “I remember when it was all over, and I was so proud of myself, my dad said, ‘You ought to go give the money to the kid who sang that song,’” laughs Crook. “He really was an incredible singer.” Crook, however, was the one who landed a regular gig at the Rialto, performing live every Saturday night. “It was just a copy of the Grand Ole Opry,” explains Crook. “About an hour show, between a double feature. The first feature was, like, at seven, then our show, and then the second feature. All for 50 cents. There’d be a dozen of us on bales of hay taking our turns and doing stuff, and [producer] Art LaMan would always bring in a headliner. Porter Wagoner, who had a big tune out, ‘Satisfied Mind,’ was one of them. I can’t remember any of the others. A lot of them were tap dancers.” He laughs again. “This one guy came in, and he was tap-dancing, and then he jumped up on this xylophone and started playing ‘Lady of Spain’ with his feet. It was like The Ed Sullivan Show. “They had a standing deal down there at the Rialto,” he adds. “They would give $1,000 to any kid my age who could outplay me. And there wasn’t anybody, because I had been raised up around adults who played good, and I didn’t have to wait until I was 10 or 12 to play guitar. I had one when I was 4 years old. So I’d been after that thing all my life. All my heroes – Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, my dad – they all played guitar, and that was what I wanted to do.” That’s what he did, too. And while he chose, for the most part, to stay close to home to play his trade, Crook did participate in


AMERICAN MASTERWORKS dis

Marsden Hartley, Mont Sainte-Victoire, c. 1927. Oil on canvas. Collection of Jan T. and Marica Vilcek, Promised Gift to The Vilcek Foundation

some USO tours during the Vietnam era – including one with a young woman the Stillwater News-Press dubbed, in a 1967 feature story, “Oklahoma’s one-legged dynamo of energy.” “Roberta Scott had graduated from [Tulsa’s] Will Rogers High School in 1958, the same year as David Gates and Anita Bryant,” Crook says. “She was a Miss Tulsa. Later on, she was involved in an automobile accident, nothing too serious. But when they were X-raying her, making sure there were no broken bones or anything, they found cancer in her leg and had to amputate it at her hip. “She contacted me in the first part of 1967. She’d gotten herself an agent, and they had convinced the USO people it would be a real good thing for her to go over there to Southeast Asia, where all those hospitals were, and show the troops there could be life after losing a limb, that kind of deal. We went to Japan, Okinawa, the Philippines, Guam, Hawaii – I think we were gone six weeks, entertaining those people. At that particular time, the frug was a real popular dance, and that was her specialty. “Traveling overseas with a one-legged dancer,” Crook muses. “How can you top that?” Although his playing has taken him across the world, one of the places he didn’t go was southern California, which set him apart from many of his fellow Tulsa rock ‘n’ rollers in the late ‘50s and early ‘60s. That’s when the exodus West began, with the likes of Leon Russell, David Gates and Jumpin’ Jack Dunham blazing the trail for their fellow musicians back home. In Tulsa, Crook had been in David Gates and the Accents, a popular band that included Jim Karstein on drums and Carl Radle on bass. Both of them, like Gates, would find plenty of musical work in L.A. But, according to Crook, a dispute over how much Gates was paying the rest of the musicians led to Crook’s leaving the group. It happened in an Oklahoma City motel room, as they were getting ready to play a fraternity job at the University of Oklahoma. “I went through his wallet and found the check they’d given him [for the job],” remembers Crook. “I got it out and left it lying, open, on the bed. He came out of the shower, brushing his hair with his hairbrush, and when he saw that check, he knew it was me who’d exposed him. So we started wrestling around, and he broke the handle off his hairbrush and went back in the bathroom.” Although they played the gig together, Crook says, they didn’t talk again for decades, until Gates returned to town in 2002 to perform at Utica Square’s 50th anniversary celebration and came out to see Crook at a local venue. Crook insists he was planning to go West with the others before that altercation, but adds that staying around town may have been a blessing. “As it turns out, everybody was gone to California except me, so I had my pick of all the girls and all the clubs,” he says with another laugh. “I was the big fish in the pond.”

cov

er

FEB. 8 – MAY 3, 2015

JOHN WOOLEY

20671 Philbrook.indd 1

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

23 3/9/15

2:40 PM


The State OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Must It Bust?

A downturn in demand for oil has caused layoffs, but Oklahoma industry experts remain hopeful.

W

hen wondering if the U.S. is in the midst of an oil bust, one must ponder what brought the boom, especially in light of recession riddling the economic landscape. Many published reports say the oil boom was in part due to technological advances in both hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling as well as to an uptick in shale oil and shale gas production – a finite resource. With drilling operators complaining of excess production and energy companies statewide laying off workers, the argument for officially forecasting a bust gains momentum. While consumers enjoy lower pump prices, oilfield worker numbers are reduced. There are reasons to believe that Oklahoma will survive the ups and downs better than

24

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

most other states, says Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association (OIPA) Vice President of Communications Cody Bannister. “Anyone who claims they know what will happen one, two or six months from now, is speculating,” says Bannister. “When we look at numbers recently, we are down about 18 percent in Oklahoma from the high in 2014 of drilling rigs, and also jobs associated with it. But Texas is down 28 percent, and North Dakota is down by 25 percent. Oklahoma has insulated itself from the impending downturn for now because of the good regulatory and tax environment that encourages drilling in Oklahoma.” A recently published report by geoscientist Dr. David Hughes, Geological Survey of Canada, forecasts that production from the Bakken and Eagle Ford (one of the largest North American shale oil fields) will peak in approximately 2016. He says it is clear to those in the industry to not expect “decades of cheap and abundant domestic oil supply” and says this is likely why drilling companies are pulling back on production and reducing related jobs. Hughes’ report also quotes several analysts who do not believe this short-term U.S. shale revolution can be replicated throughout the world. “Supply has been outstripping demand, not because demand has been particularly weak, but because there was too much supply,” Stephen Briggs, a commodities analyst at BNP Paribas SA, told The Wall Street Journal. “It looks like this won’t change anytime soon.” Ups and downs are always expected in commodities trading, Bannister says, “the ebbs and flows of commodity prices are a part of doing business in the oil and gas industry. This downturn is a good example of the importance of having a tax policy that encourages oil and gas investment in Oklahoma. It is just that important for our state. Lower commodity prices reduce profit margins, and as it thins, producers will look to states where they will see greater return on their investment. The regulatory and tax environment, as set by regulatory authorities and legislators, benefits us in times like this because it encourages investments in Oklahoma oil fields.” TRACY LEGRAND


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IN TULSA

The 2015 Icons for Oklahoma State University in Tulsa have made a huge impact on the lives of people in Oklahoma and across the nation. Through their generosity and selfless devotion to helping others, these honorees have helped create a brighter future for our state. The 2015 Icons for OSU in Tulsa will be honored at A Stately Affair in Tulsa on May 18. Proceeds from the black-tie event will support student scholarships at OSU-Tulsa and OSU Center for Health Sciences.

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The State MIKE BROSE, PAT CHERNICKY, BARRY SWITZER AND CHEENA AND STEPHEN PAZZO ENJOYED THE PATRON PARTY PRIOR TO CARNIVALE, AN EVENT BENEFITING MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF OKLAHOMA.

TAMRA SHEEHAN, JUDY CLAUDETTE WILLIAMS, LAURA PARROTT AND VIDA SCHUMAN ENJOYED THE CARNIVALE PATRON PARTY.

JOSEPH HARROZ JR. STANDS WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF LAW HALL OF FAME 2015 INDUCTEES ANDREW COATS, ROBIN CAUTHRON AND REGGIE WHITTEN. FRANK AND NIKKI RHOADES AND STAN AND MARCI JOHNSON ENJOYED THE FESTIVITIES OF THE OPERA BALL, WHICH BENEFITS TULSA OPERA.

PAM RICHARDSON, BILL SHELL, LINDA SHELL, MARY BRINKLEY AND SHELLEY HOLMES ATTENDED A RECENT DOCUMENTARY SCREENING AT THE OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART PRESENTED BY VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA.

SHARON BISHOP-BALDWIN, MARY BISHOP-BALDWIN, CONNIE CRONLEY, MEREDITH SIEGFRIED AND ALISON ANTHONY WILL BE HONORED AT THE ASSOCIATION FOR WOMEN IN COMMUNICATION’S 2015 NEWSMAKERS ON MAY 6 AT SOUTHERN HILLS COUNTRY CLUB.

RAY DRISKELL, EARL BLEVINS AND RHONDA DANIEL ENJOYED THE ROTARY CLUB’S ABOVE AND BEYOND AS IT HONORED TULSA’S FIREFIGHTER AND POLICE OFFICER OF THE YEAR.

CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT: TYRA PALMER, AMANDA MCCONNELL, BARBARA FINDEISS AND KEVIN GROSS PREPARE FOR THE FOURTH ANNUAL CANDLELIGHT BALL, WHICH WILL BE HELD APRIL 25 AT THE MAYO HOTEL.

JACK ALLEN, STEPHANIE ENG AND BILLIE AND HOWARD BARNETT ENJOYED THE TULSA MEMORY GALA, A BENEFIT FOR THE ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

WAYNE PACELLE, ROBIN SUAREZ, JAMEE SUAREZ-HOWARD AND KAREN KEITH ENJOYED THE FUR BALL, AN ANNUAL EVENT FOR OKLAHOMA ANIMAL ALLIANCE.

CAROLINE AND GREG SHAW AND CYNTHIA WOLF ATTENDED THE TULSA MEMORY GALA, AN EVENT BENEFITING THE ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION.

RICK AND PAULA HUCK AND TED AND SHEILA HAYNES WERE ALL SMILES AT THE ANNUAL TULSA MEMORY GALA, WHICH BENEFITS THE ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION.


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The State

SP OTLIGHT

RED RIBBON GALA

The Red Ribbon Gala, the largest annual fundraiser for Tulsa CARES, brought some of Tulsa’s most philanthropic individuals, couples and organizations to the Cox Business Center to benefit the organization’s mission to help individuals and families affected by HIV and AIDS. An incredible night, the gala raised roughly $580,000. Guests and sponsors, including Oklahoma Magazine, enjoyed celebrating Tulsa CARES and another great year.

CHASE DELOZIER, MARTHA GRINNER, TONI GARNER AND MICHAEL BROTHERS.

DANIEL AND VIDA SCHUMAN.

STEVE AND MARLA BRADSHAW.

SHELIA BUCK, TODD PYLAND AND MANDI TOMASI.

LANE STENBERRY AND RANDY BARTON.

JAY KROTTINGER, RYAN TANNER, BOBBY PARKER AND MARK GAVIN.

SHANNON HALL AND CINDY HULSEY.

CORBIN HOPKINS, TY KASZUBOWSKI, MIKE KEYS, JARED BOYD AND MICHAEL BALP.

JEANETTTE AND TERRY KERN.

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DEDE SIEGFRIED, SUZANNE WARREN, SHEILA GOLDEN AND MARY ANN DORAN..

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

PALMER JOHNSON AND CHRISTINA SMITH.

PAT CHERNICKY AND ZACHARY BARNETT.

SCOTT AND KAYLA VAUGHN.


DAVID AND TAMRA SHEEHAN.

JILL SEDLACEK, JIM SCHOLL, SUZIE KERN, CONOR CLEARY AND JENIFER QUEEN.

BRAD AND CAT LENHART. DOYLE AND JUDY CLAUDETTE WILLIAMS AND GEORGENIA AND RON VAN

BRIAN HUGHES AND JASON GLASS.

DAN BURNSTEIN, TERRY BURNSTEIN AND MARTIN MARTINEZ.

ROB AND MELISSA KEY.

JOHN AND JULIE NICKEL.

CHERA KIMIKO AND CHUCK ZOELLNER.

MATTHEW WALLACE AND GREG HOLT.

REBEKAH TENNIS AND RAJ BASU.

CHASE DELOZIER, ROSEMARY HARRIS, TRACY SPEARS AND MICHAEL BROTHERS.

BILL THOMAS AND CHRIS MURPHY. JARED ALEXANDER, SEAN CONNER, MOLLIE CRAFT AND MANDI TOMASI.

MISS OKLAHOMA USA, OLIVIA JORDAN, AND MISS TEEN OKLAHOMA USA, CHEROKEE PEARCE.

ROBERT SACHSE AND BETH HUGHES SACHSE.

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

TAUPE LEATHER WINGBACK CHAIRS, A SOFA AND BLUE LEATHER LOUNGE CHAIR CREATE A COZY SEATING AREA AROUND THE ROOM’S FIREPLACE. LEFT: MATCHING CHAIRS COVERED IN BLUE AND CREAM FABRIC INTRODUCE THE HOME’S THEME IN THE ENTRYWAY. PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICK STILLER.

L I V I N G S PA C E S

Light And Bright

Looking to downsize, a couple calls upon a trusted Tulsa designer.

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hen designer Debbie Zoller, owner of Zoller Designs & Antiques located along Tulsa’s Cherry Street, began working with this Tulsa couple, she had an advantage. “This was the second home I’d worked with them on,” says Zoller. With their two children grown, the couple was ready to downsize from their 7,500-square-foot home in south Tulsa, so they chose to build a new, 5,500-square-foot home in the Southern Hills area. “Their previous home was Country French and had a heavier, dark feel,” says Zoller. So, as they began the planning process for their new home, the goal was to have an open floor plan and a light, bright, transitional design. “Because they wanted a completely different style, we worked from the floor up selecting new furnishings, art and accessories, using just a few pieces from the other house,” Zoller explains. The first floor blends an open living room, dining room and kitchen, all with large views of the outdoor space in their backyard. The ceiling ranges from 12 to 14 feet, and wood floors with a black walnut finish

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015


APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

run throughout the space. Stone used on the exterior is brought indoors, defining the fireplace and as a unique feature in the dining room, used on one wall. In the bar area, Zoller uplit the stone wall, adding a warm, interesting detail. A wall of windows in the living room is kept open with draperies fabricated from a light-patterned sheer. “Because the length of the window is so long, getting the custom metal drapery rod of that size delivered was really a challenge,” says Zoller. “Working with the [homeowners], we decided early on to use blue and cream as the predominant tones.” Fabric selected for the entry chairs introduces the blue hues. The entry commode is one of the few existing pieces of furniture used, although it was refinished. The blue and cream patterned living room sofa is accented with a blue leather lounge chair nearby. Taupe leather was selected for the matching wing chairs that are separated by a table with custom silver leaf finish with blonde undertones. A small, custom ottoman can be easily moved throughout the room. Situated behind the sofa is a bistro table with additional chairs for guests. Adjacent is the kitchen with painted cabinets to keep with the light feeling of the design style and includes a large island with additional bar seating along one side. “Working in the kitchen doesn’t isolate anyone from being part of entertaining or family get-togethers,” says Zoller. The four-bedroom, five-and-a-half-bath home features the master bedroom and guest bedroom downstairs in addition to an office. Upstairs are two additional bedrooms and a large media room with a bar and seating for 12 guests. Zoller created the master bedroom keeping the overall design theme of being light and open. The two wing chairs were reupholstered in terra cotta floral fabric. The nightstands blend with the new headboard upholstered in the same fabric as the bedskirt. An arrangement of unique Italian glassware is featured above the bed. The master bath flooring is tiled in limestone and accented with a patterned area rug between the his-and-her vanities on opposite walls. Zoller chose a contemporary blend of the bisque finish freestanding bathtub and vessel sinks. “Having worked with Debbie from the start on our previous house, we knew we could trust her to know exactly how we would want our new house to look. We love how the house turned out,” says one of the homeowners. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

CLOCKWISE FROM THE TOP: LIMESTONE FLOORING AND THE FREESTANDING TUB KEEP THE SPACE FEELING LIGHT AND AIRY. THE STONE ON THE EXTERIOR OF THIS SOUTHERN HILLS HOME WAS BROUGHT INSIDE FOR AN ACCENT WALL IN THE DINING ROOM. A BEAUTIFUL ITALIAN GLASS COLLECTION HANGS OVER THE HEADBOARD IN THE MASTER. ONE OF THREE GUEST BEDROOMS FOUND THROUGHOUT THE HOME.


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4:50 PM


The State

STYLE

Gypsy Queen

TOM FORD SOLANGE SUNGLASSES, $395, HICKS BRUNSON

’70s-inspired fashion continues to influence spring looks. THEORY TEXTURED DRESS, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALEXIS BIT NECKLA TAR CRYSTAL CE COLLAR AVENU , $295, SAKS FIFTH E.

ALICE + OLIVIA GRAPHIC PRINT DRESS, $298, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MILLY FRINGED BUCKET BAG, $435, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

OLIVER PEOPLES BLUE TINTED AVIATOR SUNGLASSES, $459, VISIONS.

ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL OPEN CUFF BRACELET, $245, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STEPHANIE KANTIS QUARTZ AND TURQUOISE RING, $685, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JIMMY CHOO LEOPARD CORK WEDGE SANDALS, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MICHAEL KORS PLATFORM SANDALS, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

MARC BY MARC JACOBS TOTE, $438, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


LEISURE SOCIETY 24-KARAT GLACIER GOLD, $1,010, HICKS BRUNSON

, $395, -TOE SLIDES VINCE OPEN AVENUE. H SAKS FIFT

STUART WEITZMAN CRACKED LEATHER CORK WEDGE SANDALS, $398, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALICE + OLIVIA CROP TOP, $155, LAMARQUE FRINGED VEST, $255, AND SKIRT, $325, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STEPHANIE KANTIS FRINGE EARRINGS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALEXIS BITTAR HINGED GOLD CUFF, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SONIA RYKIEL

THEORY OPEN-KNIT SWEATER, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

GYPSY 05 DRESS, $237, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO CORK WEDGE SANDALS WITH GOLD CHAIN DETAIL, $625, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

CLOVER CANYON FLORAL CROP TOP, $176, AND PAIGE HIGH-WAIST JEANS, $189, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SONIA RYKIEL

NIC & ZOE TUNIC, $148, WITH COLE HAAN SKINNY BELT, $48, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

JIMMY CHOO CORK AND BUCKLE SANDALS, $550, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

TREND

MANOLO BLAHNIK FLORAL SLINGBACK PUMPS, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

Like A Lady

JOSEPH RIBKOFF MULTIMEDIA DRESS, $212, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

MICHAEL KORS SHOULDER BAG, $895, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. MAJORICA PEARL AND CRYSTAL BRACELET, $325, SAKS FIFTH

June Cleaver had it right: Flared skirts, modest shoes and classic accessories are always in style.

MAJROICA PEARL HOOP EARRINGS, $105, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MAJORICA PEARL NECKLACE, $265, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

REBECCA MINKOFF MINI CROSSBODY BAG, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LAFONT ROUND OPTICAL FRAMES, $349, VISIONS.

MANOLO BLAHNIK SATIN FLATS, $955, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TOM FORD OVERSIZED WHITE SUNGLASSES, $360, HICKS BRUNSON.

JOSEPH RIBKOFF BELTED DRESS WITH LACE OVERLAY, $258, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ARMANI FIT AND FLARE DRESS, $1,695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

AKRIS PUNTO FIT AND FLARE SKIRT, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TORY BURCH STACKED HEEL PUMPS, $285, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

36

TORY BURCH TOTE, $245, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

FENDI

MANOLO BLAHNIK SNAKESKIN SANDALS, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALTUZARRA

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG GARDEN DRESS, $598, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO LEATHER CHAIN LINK SANDALS, $725, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


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APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

FITNESS

Step Up The Game

D

Consistency is key to maximizing workouts.

o you exercise enough? A daily stroll through the neighborhood may feel refreshing, but it may not be shrinking your waistline. If you want to lose weight or meet a personal fitness goal, consider the following expert advice on how to make the most of your workout.

The Talk Test

Brooke Rusher, an exercise physiologist and aquatics coordinator with St. John Siegfried Health Club in Tulsa, says people often confuse being active with true cardiovascular exercise. To understand the difference, she recommends the “talk test.” “If you’re able to have a long-winded conversation while exercising, then you’re not working hard enough,” she says. “You should be breathless but not to the point where you can’t talk at all. We cheat ourselves if we’re not pushing ourselves.” To maximize her workouts, Rusher uses a heart rate monitor – a device that helps her track her intensity and stay within her target heart rate zone.

Customize Routine

“As with most things, an exercise regime must be individualized. If you want to make a change in your weight, you need to adapt your program to achieve those results,” says Nancy J. Shidler, administrative director for Oklahoma City’s INTEGRIS PACER Health Services, an initiative focused on supporting healthy and productive lifestyles through exercise, rehabilitation and education. For a general guideline to follow, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends (for the average adult) 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity, along with strength training twice a week. However, Shidler explains that for those beginning an exercise program, these recom

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

mendations may be an ambitious goal to work toward. While for others, if they have been working out regularly at this level and aren’t losing weight, then they will need to increase their amount of activity or decrease their caloric intake. “Everyone has a threshold of tolerance – stay just below this threshold for the longer, slower workouts, but tap that threshold (interval training) a couple times a week to improve your fitness level,” says Shidler. “Performing the same exercise every workout means you’ll only be good and efficient at that one type of exercise, so mix it up with a variety of exercises.”

“It’s pretty simple: If the calories you take in are not used as energy or fuel, they are stored as fat.” Calories Matter

“It’s pretty simple: If the calories you take in are not used as energy or fuel, they are stored as fat,” says Shidler. “In the ‘calories out’ calculation, you must take into consideration the energy it takes to breathe, move, metabolize food and simply function throughout the day. The type of movement you have through the day affects the calories burned. Exercising frequently and consistently throughout the seven days each week not only benefits your heart and lungs, your bones and muscles, it also gives you

the latitude to take in the additional calories needed to fuel that activity. Regardless, the fuel needs to be the right kind of fuel, and exercise needs to be consistent.” Rusher reminds her clients to pay attention to the snacks they may eat and encourages individuals to use an app or other tool to help track calories and stay accountable to an exercise plan. “Be aware of the extra calories you are eating throughout the day; they can make a huge difference when trying to lose that pound a week,” says Rusher. “We want to try and reinvent the wheel, but it comes down to calories consumed versus calories expended.”

Consistency Counts

Shidler says the most important thing to remember is that exercise and nutrition are fluid – they will evolve over time as you become more fit and change your nutritional habits. “You have to remember you cannot change everything all in one day. You won’t be fit overnight, and you won’t eat perfectly starting tomorrow,” she says. “When you make slow changes, focusing on just a couple things at a time, you will be more successful. Create short- and long-term goals that are measurable, and check in with yourself frequently to see how you’re doing. Consistency is more important than anything else.” REBECCA FAST


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A DIVER EXPLORES THE DECK OF THE THUNDERBOLT – A 188FOOT SHIP SUNK IN 1986 TO CREATE THIS DIVE SPOT 120 FEET BENEATH THE SURFACE. PHOTOS BY VIUF PHOTOGRAPHY.

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Its Waters are Waiting Find 24.750° N, 80.988° W, and relax in oceanside charm.

W

e’ve all heard of the wild parties and boisterous beaches of Key West. Its seductive summer sun, crowded bars and streets and well-known festivals make it a top destination for getaways, pre-wedding festivities, birthday bashes and allaround good fun. But next time a vacation takes route to the Florida Keys, stop short of the Seven Mile Bridge and explore a quieter island, whose waters are teeming with adventure and restaurants are hidden treasures. Marathon, Fla., welcomes its visitors with an open sea of possibility.

SAILBOATS FIND REFUGE IN MARATHON’S BOOT KEY HARBOR AND EXPLORATION ON ITS CALM, OPEN WATERS.

Steering the Waters

Start your motor, and tour Marathon’s waters and coastlines by boat. Toss the anchor overboard at any number of these locations, where excitement awaits just below the surface.

Gas Up

Gassing up is critical to enjoying a full day out on the water. A fun way to fill the tank is at one of Marathon’s marinas. While the pump does all the work, hop off the boat and onto the deck, and gather any essentials needed for sea survival: Snacks, drinks, ice, sunscreen, hats and other attire, snorkeling, diving and fishing gear.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

PACK A BAG

70 SPF sunscreen Lip balm Sunglasses A hat A cover-up or T-shirt Sandals

A hoodie (shifting temperatures aren’t uncommon on the water) Towels Sandwiches Drinks Lots of ice


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THE SOMBRERO LIGHTHOUSE MARKS THE SPOT OF A MOSTLY SUBMERGED REEF ABOUT FIVE MILES OFF MARATHON’S COAST.

Burdines Waterfront 24.703° N, 81.109° W

The Thunderbolt 24.658° N, 80.965° W Finding and tying off at this dive spot includes spotting the two white buoys about 10 feet underneath the water. Next, descend 100 feet down the steel cables connecting the buoys to the bow and stern of a 188-foot ship, intentionally sunk in 1986 to create this dive spot. Nearly 30 years of stagnation has created a colorful habitat to brighten these dark depths. Don’t be surprised if you spot a 600-pound grouper lurking around. Many divers claim to have seen this Volkswagen Beetle-sized beast, nicknamed Bubba.

Snorkeling and Diving

Fishing

A TASTE OF DRY LAND

Fish Tales 11711 Overseas Highway, Marathon, Fla. Don’t leave Marathon without trying Fish Tales’ blackened fish sandwiches. This family-owned and run eatery knows seafood. Captain Hook’s Marina & Dive Center 24.730° N, 81.030° W

Dive in and explore Marathon’s flourishing underwater habitats. Reefs, coral canyons, lighthouses and shipwrecks in this area give way to amazing swims for divers and snorkelers. Sombrero Lighthouse 24.628° N, 81.111° W Travel roughly five miles off the coast of Marathon, and tie the boat to a buoy surrounding the 140-foot Sombrero Lighthouse, the marking of a mostly submerged reef in five- to 30-foot waters. Swim from the boat to the base of the lighthouse and uncover the abundant underwater community of grunt, snapper and barracuda along the way. THE SEVEN MILE BRIDGE CONNECTS MARATHON’S KNIGHT’S KEY TO LITTLE DUCK KEY IN THE LOWER KEYS. IT RUNS PARALLEL TO ITS IDLE PREDECESSOR, WHICH WAS PART OF THE FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY’S KEY WEST EXTENSION. FISHING UNDERNEATH AND BETWEEN THESE STRUCTURES BRINGS EXCITEMENT TO THE SURFACE.

Cast a line and reel in some fun. The Seven Mile Bridge 24.702° N, 81.155° W Steer the boat between the bridge’s columns and throw the anchor overboard, along with some live-wire fishing line, and reel in good times and fun catches. Be cautious jumping into these waters; many times it’s sharks that get hooked here. The Hump 24-25.528° N, 80-45.328° W If you’re an avid or adventurous deep-sea fisher, plug these coordinates into your GPS and travel more than 20 miles into the Atlan-

tic Ocean. Specifically called the Marathon Hump or West Hump, this area, among three off the coast of the Florida Keys, is located on the edge of the continental shelf. Look out for flocks of birds feeding – a good sign of underwater activity. Trolling these waters will almost always guarantee good cooking and full stomachs. Tuna and dolphin fish are most sought-after here.

Dockside Dining

Tie up the boat at one of these waterside destinations for some of Marathon’s top tastes. Dockside Tropical Café 24.708° N, 81.084° W Here, the view is just as gratifying as the grub. While dining, enjoy the view of Boot Key Harbor, a blanket of sailboats that call these waters home, at least for the season. Dockside’s Street Tacos are unforgettable. Sunset Grille & Raw Bar 24.706° N, 81.124° W This favorite is located at the start of the Seven Mile Bridge. Relax inside its tiki-style dining area or outdoors by its pool. Either way, enjoy great tastes – the Conch Fritters and Ceviche are delectable – and enjoy a serene sunset reflect its beauty on the water. BRITTANY ANICETTI

VISIT ONLINE www.floridakeysmarathon.com

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Television personalities, doctors, home builders and attorneys are just a few of the many careers and walks of life represented by the 40 Under 40 Class of 2015. Forty personalities and 40 unique stories share one common bond: Each of these 40 has worked hard to be successful at a lusiveyoung age. xc

Onlin e

E

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

By Jami Mattox Photography by Scott Miller Special thanks to Fifteenth and Home for providing The Queen of Love chairs.


CHAD MARISKA, 39 TULSA

President, APS Fire and FireCo In 1988, Mariska was awarded the outstanding news carrier for the Journal-Star in Lincoln, Neb. It’s the same work ethic that earned Mariska the award that has gotten him where he is in his career. “Treat others as you would like to be treated,” he says. Under Mariska’s leadership, APS Fire has been named to Engineering News-Record’s Top 600 Specialty Contractors in the United States. He sits on the American Red Cross of Eastern Oklahoma’s Board of Directors and is a member of the Tulsa Area United Way Alexis de Tocqueville Society Steering Committee; Integration Officer for the Young Presidents’ Organization of Tulsa Board of Directors; Oklahoma State University Fire Protection and Safety Technology Industrial Advisory Board; the University of Nebraska College of Business Young Alumni Advisory Board; the Reliable Fire Equipment Company Advisory Board and is a sports coach for the YMCA.

SARAH BEDNARZ, 32

YUKON Capture Manager, Chickasaw Nation Industries A capture manager is respon-

sible for winning a business opportunity. For Bednarz, that means bringing business to the thriving Chickasaw Nation. “I will get involved as a dedicated resource once a company decides to pursue a lead. I will then oversee the opportunity pursuit through award, unless a decision is made to no-bid it somewhere along the line,” she says. “Typically, I work on selected opportunities and oversee bid strategies, pricing, teaming and proposal strategies.” To relieve stress, Bednarz enjoys doing research on the future of the industry and doing math games with her daughter. She believes in continuing education and working on things that will expand knowledge and corporate value. “The minimum requirement should never be enough,” she says. “Always choose to assist others and work on additional assignments that benefit the company.”

DAMON LANE, 35 OKLAHOMA CITY

Chief Meteorologist, KOCO-TV Lane was born in northern Virginia

and graduated from Old Dominion University in less than four years. He then attended The University of North Carolina and received a second bachelor’s degree. From mowing lawns as a 14-year-old to working as Chief Meteorologist in Texas and Oklahoma, Lane advises, “Don’t ever let distance get in the way of chasing your dream.” As Chief Meteorologist, Lane oversees all weather decisions for KOCO-TV both on air and online, providing evening forecasts Sunday through Thursday. Volunteering with the American Cancer Society and enjoying the outdoors keep him busy when he’s not predicting the weather. For the future, he hopes, “to continue to grow by keeping up with all the changes that the media faces.” APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

47


PRESTON HARBUCK, 38 ATOKA Associate District Judge,

Atoka County, State of Oklahoma Har-

buck’s first job was working on his grandparents’ farm, helping them raise watermelons, peas, sugarcane, corn and cattle. It’s this humble beginning that influences Harbuck’s view of success. “It does not matter where you come from, or from how much money,” he says. “Be determined, accept wisdom and instruction, never give up, and you can accomplish your goals.” He credits his family and the people of Atoka County with what he has been able to accomplish. “This community has embraced me and my family, and my family has instilled within me the morals, values and work ethic that has guided me throughout my life,” says Harbuck. He is a member of the Atoka Volunteer Fire Department, and he and his family attend Cornerstone Church in Atoka.

BONITA JAMES, 34

OKLAHOMA CITY Marketing and Communications Associate, Oklahoma City Museum of Art James grew up in a small Oklahoma town with

her grandparents. After high school, she knew she needed to escape the small-town life, so she moved to the state’s capital and began working her way through college. She earned a degree in public relations and has since graduated with a master’s degree from MidAmerica Christian University. In her capacity at OKCMOA, James serves as marketing support for the film program, education and outreach programs and events, membership and development. She is also in charge of the museum’s social media content and platforms. Off the clock, James enjoys volunteering for Other Options, Inc., Creative Oklahoma and other organizations that need help. “Whenever I hear of something going on that I think I want to get into, I look to see if they need volunteers. I’ve had all sorts of experiences just by showing up and saying, ‘Hey, I can help.’”

CHRISTY PISARRA, R.N., 35

TULSA

Clinical Nurse Manager, Neuroscience ICU, Saint Francis Hospital Pisarra began her career at the hospital as an emergency

room admissions clerk in 1998 and returned to the hospital during her last year of nursing school. She has fulfilled several roles in the hospital, and she now leads a team of nurses who specialize in the care of the critically ill, brain-injured patient requiring life-supportive treatments or monitoring. She says that her first job as a server at a local restaurant is what taught her to have excellent bedside manner for patients. “Learning how to deal directly with the customers, providing them timely outstanding service, consolidation of tasks, anticipating needs before asked, working as a team and asking for help when ‘in the weeds’ – all helped make me a better nurse and even now nurse leader,” she says. Pisarra is passionate about educating the public on signs and symptoms of stroke and attends the Oklahoma State Stroke Systems advisory committee and participates in workgroups related to the care of the stroke patient in Oklahoma.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015


WELDON BOWMAN, 37

TULSA Architect/Owner, W Design Architecture and Interiors Bowman launched his own architecture and design firm, W Design, in 2010. The firm is currently expanding to a second location in Tulsa. Bowman serves as president of the Home Builders Association’s Remodelers Council and is president-elect of 40Below, a young professionals organization that is part of the Greater Tulsa Home Builders Association. He also takes time to assist in developing the concepts for buildings for nonprofit organizations like Lindsey House, which provides transitional housing for women. Bowman is a member of the Tulsa Regional Chamber, the United States Green Builders Council, National Council and Registration Board and the American Institute of Architects, among others.

SGT. THOMAS COOPER, 32

TULSA Sergeant, Broken Arrow Police Department With the depart-

ment for 10 years, Cooper is a sergeant that currently works the evening patrol shift. He is also a crisis negotiator, staff instructor and aids the city’s emergency department. He was recently named one of the department’s public information officers. He also serves as president of the police union. Cooper’s many jobs in the Broken Arrow Police Department are part of his plan for success. “Do not be afraid to get involved,” he says. “Do not be afraid to surround yourself by people who are smarter then you. Be confident but realistic.” In addition to his career, Cooper also serves as president of the Broken Arrow Neighbors’ board of directors. He was part of a recent capital campaign for the organization that helped raise funds for a new headquarters. “The support from the community and foundations were overwhelming during this capital project,” he says. “I am continuingly humbled to be part of this organization.”

RUSS PEEVY, 39 BIXBY

Project Director, Commercial Construction, Flintco Working in

construction is a way of life for Peevy’s family. “Construction is in my blood,” he says. His grandfather, father and brother have all been in the industry one way or another. Peevy’s first job was as a construction laborer for a family business, and he worked construction all during high school and college. “It taught me the value of hard working and working together with coworkers to build something,” he says. Today, as project director, Peevy oversees multiple projects and client accounts as well as 15 employees, providing leadership, employee development and company direction. He credits much of his talents to the humble environment he grew up in. When he’s not at work, Peevy spends time with his wife and three children, who are 5, 8 and 12. He volunteers as a youth coach for his son’s sports teams and plays tennis with his daughter. Peevy loves his job and what he does and believes, “one’s success is usually a product of a collective effort involving other.” APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

49


JOE ABSHERE, 33

LAWTON Vice President, Wayne’s Drive Inn After graduating from Oklahoma State University in 2003,

Abshere tried living outside of Oklahoma, but after only a year, he knew his heart belonged here. He returned to Lawton to join his family’s business, and two years later, he was named vice president of operations and helped open a second location of Lawton’s famous drive-in. In addition to running a business, Abshere is a member of the Oklahoma Restaurant Association, sits on the Leadership Lawton/Ft. Sill Board of Directors and the Comanche County Memorial Foundation Board. His goals for the future are to sustain his family business that has operated since 1950 while finding avenues to grow the business and have more locations in the future. “I would tell someone who is trying to achieve success that it is not always about who is the most talented, but if you work hard and never give up you can achieve anything in life and in business,” he says.

CHRISTOPHER M. STAINE, 29 OKLAHOMA

CITY Attorney, Crowe & Dunlevy Staine grew up with hard work and perseverance instilled in him. As a senior litigation associate at Crowe & Dunlevy, Staine focuses on the areas of energy, natural resources, creditor’s rights, bankruptcy and commercial litigation. He enjoys volunteering for First Tee of Metropolitan Oklahoma City, a nonprofit organization that teaches life lessons to teens through the game of golf, as well as for Oklahoma Lawyers For Children, a nonprofit that provides legal services to abused, neglected and deprived children in Oklahoma County. His future goals are to remain humble and to make a difference, and he says that to be successful in life, “stay hungry, remain humble and pray.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

JEROMEE SCOT, 30 TULSA Executive Producer, 6 in the

Morning Scot begins most mornings before any of us have even thought of getting out of bed. As the executive producer for 6 in the Morning, he is in charge of producing KOTV’s morning programming, and his good work has been noticed. He’s been nominated twice for Emmy awards and, this year, 6 in the Morning was awarded the Best Morning Show from the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters. He has enjoyed producing three Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure specials as part of KOTV and has volunteered for the annual race. He also volunteers at events for the Tulsa City-County Library and the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center.


SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM CONGRATULATES

CHRISTY PISARRA, R.N.

CLINICAL MANAGER, NEUROSCIENCE ICU, SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL AND

DUSTIN D. FRAVEL, M.D. HOSPITALIST, SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL

ON BEING NAMED AMONG OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE’S 40 UNDER 40.

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Congratulations to Trey Cooper on being named to Oklahoma Magazine’s 2015 Class of 40 Under 40 3/12/15 12:08 PM

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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CASSIE NIEMANN, 34 EDMOND

Supervisor, Employee Performance, Chesapeake Energy Niemann leads

the employee performance team within the talent management group at Chesapeake. She manages the company’s performance management program, including identifying the professional development needs of the company’s employees. Her first job was a hospital volunteer; Neimann says it’s where she learned the importance of serving others. She hopes to one day lead a human resources department and spend her retirement years “rocking babies in the NICU or PICU at Children’s Hospital.” She relishes spending time with her family and loves enjoying amenities that city living offers: Eating out, going to events and cheering on Oklahoma City’s sports teams.

SHUBHAM PANT, M.D., 39 OKLAHOMA CITY

HematologyOncology Physician, Associate Director of Oklahoma TSET Phase I Program, Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma As an associate

director of clinical trials at the Stephenson Cancer Center, Pant is involved in drug development for clinical trials. “I absolutely love what I do,” he says. “Cancer patients are very special, and I learn something new every day. They are in a very tough point in their life, and they make us realize that our problems are very small compared to what they are going through. They serve as a constant source of inspiration, and they are a driver for what I do everyday in clinical trials, research and patient care.” Pant is also an advocate for cancer prevention and healthy living. He is the host of educational radio shows, such as Your Health Matters, in the state, and he sometimes contributes to Huffington Post India and has appeared on Living It Up, which airs on the India affiliate of CNN.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015


®

Congratulations, Jennifer Loren Cherokee N at ion Businesses cele b ra tes y o ur bein g named one of Oklahoma M a g a z i ne’s 4 0 Under 40. Thank you f or your ex tra o rd i na ry work as t he host and execut ive p ro d uc er o f “Osiyo, Voices of t he Cherokee Peo p l e. ”

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APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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KASEY ST. JOHN, 29 TULSA

Marketing and Special Projects Manager, City of Sand Springs Working in municipal

CHRIS SHILLING, 28 OKLAHOMA CITY Direc-

tor of Marketing and Operations, Stephenson Cancer Center; COO of Appable, Inc. A first-

generation college student, Shilling made his family proud by graduating from the University of Oklahoma and later from Harvard Business School with his MBA. At Oklahoma’s only academic cancer center, it is Shilling’s job to tell the story of the Stephenson Cancer Center outside of the building. “I want to let people know regardless of income, geography or status that cancer is a tremendous struggle,” he says. “At the Stephenson Cancer Center we have built a world-class team to treat the whole person.” In his free time, Shilling works with Appable to build mobile apps for Oklahoma nonprofits. He also enjoys running and traveling with his wife.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

government, St. John wears lots of hats. In addition to managing media and communications for the city, St. John also manages several city-operated special events, like the Sand Springs Herbal Affair and Festival; builds relationships in the community, markets the city’s key hallmarks and also works on general economic development. Working in small government has driven St. John to help change the apathy that many have for their representatives. “Why aren’t young people voting?” she asks. “I think there is a gap in how citizens relate to government agencies across the board. As someone who communicates for a local government, it’s my job to show value in our functions so we have informed and engaged citizens.”

SHEENA KARAMI, 31

OKLAHOMA CITY Vice President, Office of the Chief Operating Officer, Ackerman McQueen Karami

is a busy woman, and that’s exactly the way she likes it. “I am truly at my best when my plate is full…having numerous irons in the fire is how I keep going both personally and professionally. Multi-tasking isn’t just a quality I possess, but a way of life for me,” she says. In addition to her duties at Ackerman McQueen, Karami also volunteers for Junior League of Oklahoma City, United Way of Central Oklahoma, Leadership Oklahoma City, Allied Arts and Avant Gardeners. She believes that a positive outlook can impact every aspect of one’s life and lead to success. “Things that are outside of your control are not things to stress about, so don’t give them your focus,” she says. “Instead, know that your attitude and outlook are yours to control. Make a conscious decision to be present in the moment each and every day. Be positive. Work hard and know that as long as you dedicate yourself to your goals, good thing will come your way.”


Congratulations, Stuart Ashworth Cherokee Nation Businesses celebrates your being named one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40. Thank you for your work in matters of contract law.

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© 2015, Cherokee Nation Businesses. All rights reserved.

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1:42 PM


TAYLOR ADLER, 34 ANDY LANGSTON, 38 TULSA

Chief Operating Officer, Muscogee Creek Nation Casinos After a suc-

cessful career in banking and serving on the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Gaming Operation Authority Board, Langston went into the casino management industry. In 2014, he was selected to become the COO for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Casinos. As such, he is responsible, for operational functions of all gaming operations managed by the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. He also represents the Creek Nation gaming properties and the Gaming Operations Authority Board to the community, customers, employees, governmental agencies, tribal members and leadership and the public. Langston says to be prepared for the ups and downs in order to be successful. “During one’s life or career there will be good times and bad times. Stay even keeled on your approach to life, and chaos will not be let in letting one achieve with a clear mind,” he says.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

TULSA

Salon Owner, Sterling Salon; Aesthetician, Taylor Adler Skin Care It has always

been important to Adler to help women take care of themselves. It was with this in mind that Adler purchased Sterling and Co., and later converted it to Sterling Salon, which provides space for 17 women to run their businesses. “Coming from a tough childhood and raised by a single mom, it has always been important for me to help make a way for women,” she says, “whether by making them look and feel beautiful or building a gorgeous space for them to have the type of career they want and on their own terms.” Adler also spends time with her husband and son, Morgan, who has Dravet Syndrome. It was his diagnosis that led Adler and her husband to purchase propety in the South Boston neighborhood in downtown Tulsa. “We just really started thinking about how we were spending our time, and were we giving back or making things better around us?” She hopes to continue to beautify and attract business to the area.


HUNTER MATTOCKS, 30

ALLISON C. DAKE, 38

Director of Operations Development, AAON Inc. Mattocks took a job as

Owner/Operator, Brown Egg Bakery; Co-owner, Dake Morgan: A Modern Wedding Collaboration “Start-

TULSA

an engineer with AAON right out of college and settled in Tulsa after growing up in the northern U.S. Mattocks has been with the company since, working his way up to his current position. He also serves as president of the Rotaract Club, an organization committed to the principle of “service above self,” and aims to exemplify the values advocated by Rotary International. He also serves on the board for Rebuilding Together Tulsa, an affiliate of the nation’s largest volunteer organization preserving and revitalizing lowincome homes and communities. “In Tulsa, that means that our lowincome neighbors who are aging or living with a disability have help to refurbish and restore their homes to warmth and security,” Mattocks says. In the future, he hopes to continue the good work he’s doing, both professionally and personally. “I would like to continue to grow in my position at AAON and advance to a higher level within the organization,” he says.

OKLAHOMA CITY

ing a business and keeping it running and successful is not for the faint of heart,” Dake says. As the owner and operator of two small businesses, she is well aware of the challenges and drawbacks that business owners face. However, for Dake, the rewards far outweigh the missed holidays, birthdays, vacations and social events. “I work when most people are off, and that’s just a part of the job. If you want it bad enough, and you are able to grow accustomed to the workload, the benefits will be far more rewarding than the disadvantages,” she says. Dake also uses her baking and design skills to provide birthday cakes to children in the foster care system in the Oklahoma City area. “Many of them have never had the opportunity to celebrate their birthday, let alone have their own birthday cake,” she says. “I hear stories of 18-year-old young adults crying when the children and staff sing happy birthday to them because it just has never happened to them before.”

DANIEL T. MILLER, 36

MUSKOGEE Financial Advisor, Edward Jones Miller moved to Muskogee shortly

after he graduated from college. He has enjoyed living in this small community and being involved with great causes. He is a member of the Rotary Club and was the youngest president in the Muskogee club’s 100-year history. He also sits on the board of the Muskogee Foundation, which seeks to make positive changes in the city; as well as on the board of CASA, which advocates for abused and neglected children. He also serves as vice chair of the Muskogee Chamber of Commerce. Miller says that helping others can help one feel successful in both professional and personal lives. “Find a career that you truly enjoy, can be passionate about and have the ability to help other people,” he says. “Be excited about what you’re doing, and I think that type of fulfillment is success.”

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MANA TAHAIE, 32

TULSA Director of Mission Impact, YWCA Tulsa In her capacity at the YWCA, Tahaie leads the organi-

zation’s work in racial justice, women’s empowerment, public policy and advocacy, and research and evaluation. “The YWCA has a bold mission to eliminate racism, empower women and promote peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all,” she says. “I’m incredibly lucky to be responsible for helping advance that mission in Tulsa through training and consulting, dialogue programs, initiatives to help women through transitional points in their lives, community collaborations and grassroots and legislative advocacy.” Tahaie says her volunteerism looks a lot like the work she does. She currently chairs the board of the Center for New Community, a national racial justice organization headquartered in Chicago; and supports campus groups at The University of Tulsa, including the United Campus Ministry, the Women’s & Gender Studies and Sociology departments and multicultural student programs.

DR. JOHN ROGERS, D.D.S., 37 TULSA

Dentist, Refresh – Dentistry by John Rogers

Rogers’ first career was as a high school band director, but after several years, he returned to the University of Oklahoma to pursue a degree in dentistry. He now owns a successful dental practice in west Tulsa, focusing on fullmouth cosmetics and complex restorative dentistry. But that doesn’t mean he has left music behind. “I still play the baritone in the Sapulpa Community Band,” he says. Rogers serves on the board for Tulsa CARES, an organization dedicated to delivering social services to those with HIV and AIDS. He advises others wishing to achieve success to be open to new opportunities. “Don’t be afraid to let ‘success’ change its definition as you grow,” he says.

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EVAN TIPTON, 31 TULSA

Commercial Risk Management, Producing Manager, Scott McCoy Agency Aside from his busy career in

insurance, Tipton also serves as the chairman for Tulsa’s Young Professionals, the largest professionals organization in the country; he is also a partner in For the Love of Tulsa, a company that creates Tulsa-centric artwork and clothing. Through his work with TYPros, Tipton has seen success in the newly formed TYPros Foundation, which benefits quality of life projects for the region. An avid skateboarder since he was 5, Tipton still enjoys the sport today, along with drawing, painting and gardening. He encourages others that hard work does pay off. “Pay attention and learn from your mistakes, but try to learn from others’ mistakes first,” he says.

HEATHER VAN HOOSER, 39

TULSA Senior Vice President; Director of Private Banking, Mabrey Bank Growing up in rural

Stillwater, Van Hooser learned the importance of working hard and giving back to the community. “With a collaborative effort from the bank’s management team, I have had the good fortune of starting Mabrey Bank’s Private Banking division from the ground up,” says Van Hooser. “Our Private Banking team provides a boutique banking relationship for higher net worth individuals.” Van Hooser is very active in the community; she is currently the chair-elect for Oklahoma Project Woman as well as a big sister in the Big Brothers and Big Sisters program. She was paired with her little sister, Antwanette, in 1999, and today, Antwanette is in nursing school at the University of Oklahoma. They are still close. Van Hooser has shown quarter horses since the age of 8, and they continue to play a large part in her life.

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DARREN H. LUNOW, AT, 34

ARROW

BROKEN

Athletic Trainer, Director of Sports Medicine, Central States Orthopedics Lunow oversees one of the

largest school and community outreach sports medicine programs in Green Country. “Through the work of so many outstanding orthopedic physicians and athletic trainers, we participate in more than 2,000 athletic physicals, publish a free monthly sports medicine newsletter and provide the highest quality medical staffing for more than 100 high school athletic events each year,” says Lunow. He adds that achievements occur over time rather than immediately. “Success, though often sought overnight rarely comes in such a manner. By choosing to associate yourself with those who are more intelligent than you and those who are more skilled than you, you can most assuredly elevate you own abilities. These people bring new ideas, new skills and new gifts into your life.”


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BROOKE ESTEVES, D.O., 32 TULSA Medical Oncology Fellow/

Internal Medicine Physician, Cancer Treatment Centers of America in conjunction with Oklahoma State University Medical Center Dreamer, believer, goal-setter and

achiever aptly describe Esteves. She began working at age 11, mowing her neighbors’ yards. Today, she works as a fellow at CTCA overseeing patients’ care at the renowned facility. “Each day involves seeing and examining patients, discussing recent medical test results and making decisions as to whether or not a patient is stable enough to undergo therapy,” she says. In her free time, Esteves enjoys volunteering for numerous organizations, exercising, hunting and gardening.

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TREY COOPER, 33

TULSA Senior Vice President and Shareholder, Adams Hall Wealth Advisors Cooper joined Adams

Hall almost 11 years ago. “It was my first job out of college, and I plan for it to be my last,” he says. As a financial advisor, it’s Cooper’s job to think of the things that his clients don’t. “I make my clients’ lives better by changing the way they interact with money,” he says. In addition to his career, Cooper is chairman of the board for Meals on Wheels of Metro Tulsa, co-founder of Luz’s Lunch Club, an outreach mission through his church; and a Certified Barbeque Judge through Kansas City Barbeque Society. He says that the key to success is to test yourself daily. “Challenge yourself mentally, physically and spiritually every day,” he says.


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MOISES ECHEVERRIA, 29

TULSA Program Coordinator, Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice From an early age, Echever-

ria looked up to individuals who gave of themselves to improve their communities. He attended Camp Anytown – sponsored by the Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice – while still in high school. His love for social justice sparked during this week-long leadership camp. Today, Echeverria is director of Camp Anytown, which focuses on diversity and inclusion. As a program coordinator for OCCJ, he is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the interfaith and adult programs. These programs include bringing people of different faith traditions, or no-faith traditions, together to have open, honest and respectful dialogue for understanding. “Figure out what you’re passionate about and gain the most knowledge and skills to carry out your passion,” he says. “Also, always help out people around you.”

CHRISTINA GOOD VOICE, 33

GLENPOOL

Director of Mvskoke Media, Muscogee (Creek) Nation A full-time working mother and

citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Good Voice is a born and raised Oklahoman. She grew up and now currently lives in Glenpool and is glad to live in the community with her husband and four children. At work, Good Voice oversees the Muscogee (Creek) Nation’s Mvskoke (pronounced like Muscogee) Media department, which encompasses four departments. She says that the key to success is to be vigilant. “Work hard, be punctual, stay late when possible to finish assignments and be the person who volunteers for jobs or assignments at work, especially when no one else is jumping in there,” she says. When not at work, Good Voice is at ball practices, games or fundraisers. She also enjoys taking her family to stompdances, which is a traditional dance of the Muscogee (Creek) people.

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AMBER M. FITEMORGAN, 35 FORT GIBSON General Counsel, Northeastern State University As the chief legal

officer for NSU, FiteMorgan provides advice and representation to the university and is responsible for providing advice and consultation on legal issues. Working in higher education has been rewarding for her, and Fite-Morgan believes that it is a field that she will continue working in. “I enjoy my job and am very passionate about higher education,” she says. “Given all of the federal laws, regulations, requirements and compliance, I think there is a growing need to hire attorneys or those with legal expertise in higher education. My career path may change course or go off route in the future from that of General Counsel, but ultimately, I see myself in higher education for the remainder of my career.”

WESLEY W. COX, 35 NORMAN CEO,

Winston Media Cox is a marketing professional who focuses on internet marketing and brand development. He has worked as an outside business consultant through his advertising agency, Winston Media, since 2005. As a lifelong vegetarian, he is passionate about serving as a spokesperson for health, wellness and sustainable business models. Wesley also founded The White Party in 2004, which is an annual dance party gala and fundraiser benefiting Family & Children’s Services. In addition to his professional and philanthropic endeavors, Cox is also an emcee and deejay who produces music in a variety of genres.

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STUART P. ASHWORTH, 27 TULSA Staff Attorney, Cherokee Nation

Businesses A proud member of the Cherokee

Nation of Oklahoma, Ashworth helps ensure the success of the more-than-40 companies that are operated by the Cherokee Nation by handling complex legal and analytical questions that may arise. He also handles some of the issues relating to tribal sovereignty. “Part of my job is to advise on the risks and benefits of some of our business transactions and advise on how it may positively or negatively affect our tribal sovereignty,” he says. In addition to his passion to promote Native American human rights, quality of life and traditions, Ashworth also serves on the board of directors for Oaks Indian Mission, a Native American children’s home in Oaks, Okla.; and is an active volunteer with Oklahomans for Equality, the Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice and with TYPros’ Diversity Crew.


HAROLD LEE, JR., 32

OKLAHOMA CITY Recreation Supervisor, City of Norman Parks & Recreation Department Lee

believes that success comes when one finds their true purpose. His genuine passion and purpose is helping enrich the lives of youth, teens and families. As a Recreation Supervisor for the City of Norman Parks & Recreation Department, he gets the privilege to facilitate the daily operations of a recreation center while designing and implementing programs that meet the needs of the community. Lee says the best part of his job is building positive relationships with youth and teens and helping them to become better individuals. He also takes pride in leading his staff and watching them have success in their positions. “I would like to continue to make a positive impact in the lives of the youth, teens and families I work with each day,” he says.

ADAM LEAMING, 34 NEWKIRK CEO, University Center at Ponca City Leaming

began his professional career as a middle school math teacher, and eventually transitioned into administration, serving as assistant principal and building principal for Ponca City Public Schools. As the University Center’s CEO, Leaming oversees providing higher education opportunities and services necessary for UC’s students to make a positive economic impact for northern Oklahoma. He is also tasked with building relationships with Oklahoma’s public colleges and universities and making their degree programs and services accessible to the students and businesses in northern Oklahoma through the University Center. He advises others who wish to achieve success to be a lifelong learner. “Never pass up an opportunity to meet and learn something from someone,” he says. “Everyone knows at least one thing you don’t.”

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JENNIFER LOREN, 36

DUSTIN FRAVEL, M.D., 37

Executive Producer and Host of Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People Loren

Hospitalist Physician, Saint Francis Hospital “In the past, all doctors saw their

TULSA

is well known to Tulsans, who likely recognize her from her previous career anchoring the 9 p.m. newscast on Tulsa CW. After nearly nine years in that position, Loren recently took a job with the Cherokee Nation creating Osiyo, a show that tells the stories of members, history and culture of the Cherokee Nation. “I helped create a 30-minute TV show about the Cherokee Nation from scratch,” she says. “We select story ideas, film them and put them together as mini-documentaries.” Loren has been interested in video production for most of her life. “I started doing video projects when I was about 10 years old,” she says. “My siblings and I would put together pretend news stories and commercials and even magic shows, using my dad’s video camera and some really fancy editing.”

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TULSA

own patients in the hospital or their office, wherever the patient went the doctor followed. Very few do this now,” says Fravel. As a hospitalist, he is a primary care physician to patients who are admitted to the hospital. “We work alongside the specialist physicians to take care of our patients and carry out the mission of the hospital,” he says. In addition to his physician duties, Fravel was recently elected to work with administration to provide the best patient care possible. He hopes to continue to improve as a physician and “embrace the difference between battling disease and death versus taking the best care of the person in front of me,” he says. “This sometimes means just listening to your patient and their family and translating their goals into quality care.”


BRENT COLLINS, 38 NORMAN Senior Superin-

tendent, Manhattan Construction Company His grandfather gifted him

CAHN D. WIGGS, 34

BIXBY

Custom Home Builder, Vice President, Brian D. Wiggs Homes Wiggs grew up in

the home-building industry doing odd jobs for his father, Brian, and learned about the business first-hand. Now, as vice president of Brian D. Wiggs Homes, he manages the operations of the custom home-building business. He volunteers with the Greater Tulsa Home Builders Association and serves as the president of the Association’s 40Below Council, which gives him the opportunity to be an active member of the Board of Directors. Wiggs believes in giving back, which is why has has supported the mission of Habitat for Humanity for more than 20 years. He has worked on projects and helped build homes for families in need.

a toolbox at age 5, and Collins has been building things ever since. He began working construction in high school, and now he is responsible for field operations on a construction project, including the schedule, safety, quality control and client and architect relationships. Collins says that the key to success is working harder than anyone else. “Success is more about determination and hard work than natural ability,” he says. In his free time, Collins enjoys spending time with his family and building furniture.

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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THE LOSA LOUNGE FEATURES A REPLICA OF MARILYN MONROE’S INFAMOUS SCENE FROM THE SEVEN YEAR ITCH. THE LIKENESS WAS SALVAGED FROM A STOREFRONT IN WICHITA, KAN. INSET: THE HISTORICAL BUILDING THAT HOUSES THE LADYSMITH WAS BUILT IN 1901.

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ROCK ‘n’ ROLL RENOVATION A historical building in southern Oklahoma is transformed into a memorable bed and breakfast. By Jami Mattox Photography by John Jernigan

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Tucked away in tiny Tishomingo, Okla., is the bed and breakfast that Southern Living magazine called the best new hotel of 2015. The Ladysmith Bed & Breakfast is an eightroom boutique B&B located in Tishomingo’s historical downtown district. Country star Miranda Lambert, who also owns the Pink Pistol – located across the street from The Ladysmith – owns the space. The building, which was constructed in 1901, was sorely in need of a renovation when Lambert purchased the property. It had hosted everything from a beauty shop to a grocery store in its more-than-100-year history. Anthony Pate of Pate Construction, based in Durant, was tapped to give the building a facelift. “The building had been occupied some said 50, some said 60 years ago,” Pate says. “It was a pretty big, dusty mess when we first got in there.” Pate says the goal of the renovation was to bring the building back to life while keeping as much of the original millwork and plaster walls as possible. “We tried to save as much as was original to the building as we could,” he says. That meant hanging sheetrock where plaster walls had originally been and filling out walls with wood. A tin ceiling was salvaged from another downtown Tishomingo building and reshaped to use in The Ladysmith. In addition to cosmetic and structural changes, Pate’s team had to rewire the entire building as well as install central heat and air. To preserve as much of the building as possible, this work had to be done in the building’s attic as well as crawl spaces between each floor. Oklahoma City-based interior designer Phara Queen oversaw the interior design of the project. “The first point of order was making [the space] cohesive,” Queen says. “It is one building, and you do have to approach it as a home, even though the rooms are separate. They still need a cohesive theme.” Queen consulted with Lambert, and the two decided to give the B&B a design that Queen says is shabby chic meets rock ‘n’ roll. “It is a good mix between the two, and that’s very representative of Miranda,” Queen says. The building underwent an extensive renovation to bring it up to code. Queen says that the upstairs portion of the building has exposed brick walls, and that due to age, the brick – original to the building – was very soft. This posed challenges in how to address the décor for the rooms. “How do we hang the drapes so that they stay up? How do we hang the wallpaper on

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: YELLOW WOOD SALVAGED FROM ONE OF THE OLDEST HOMES IN TISHOMINGO LINES THE WALLS OF THE 4:02 TEA TIME ROOM. TIN CEILINGS INSTALLED IN THE LADYSMITH WERE SALVAGED FROM ANOTHER DOWNTOWN TISHOMINGO BUILDING. LANTERNS LIGHT UP THE ECLECTIC WALL COVERING IN THE SUN NEVER SETS ROOM. THE FRENCH QUARTER BAR AND LOUNGE IS PANELED WITH RECLAIMED WOOD. THE AFTER MIDNIGHT ROOM.


celebrating

27Years!


LEFT: LAMBERT COLLECTED PIECES PICKED UP AT SALES AND MARKETS TO FURNISH THE LADYSMITH. ABOVE: THE KNAUGHTY PINE ROOM IS A CREATIVE INTERPRETATION OF A FOREST. BELOW: THE SHABBY CHIC MEETS ROCK ‘N’ ROLL VIBE IS FELT IN THE LOSA LOUNGE.

a concrete wall that has been there since the building was built and make it look okay? Those kind of things,” she says. Queen had much to work with to see The Ladysmith’s design through. Lambert regularly visits a popular antique fair in Texas, and she had amassed a huge collection of eclectic furniture and objects for the B&B. They were in storage the first time Queen saw them. “[Lambert was] just putting them in stor

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

age, not knowing she would open a bed and breakfast. When I got brought on, actually, a lot of the furniture was purchased and in storage,” Queen says. Wall coverings play a large part in the design of The Ladysmith. Metallic wallpaper covers the walls in the lobby, which also features a vintage confessional and tin ceiling. The Losa Lounge features a large replica of Marilyn Monroe that originally came from a storefront in Wichita, Kan. A tearoom and a

bar featuring Texas and Oklahoma wines and a ballroom for private parties are all part of The Ladysmith. The breakfast room features three tables and mismatched vintage china on which homemade breakfast is served promptly at 9 a.m. The eight rooms – two king rooms with en suite baths and six queen rooms with private and shared baths – are themed according to décor and feature outrageous wall coverings, from a metallic tree print in the Knaughty


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Pine to the exotic print in The Sun Never Sets. “I love the wallpaper,” Queen says. “I’m most proud of the way that the rooms did come together, from a building that was pretty much ignored and falling apart to what it is now.” The B&B has enjoyed immense success and solid business since its recent opening. “It’s a very unique space, and it really has to be experienced to know how unique it is,” Queen says.

FROM TOP LEFT: CURTAIN CALL, KNAUGHTY PINE, THE JUDGE AND 4:02 TEA TIME ROOMS. BELOW: THE 2NDS PLEASE ROOM ACCOMMODATES LADYSMITH GUESTS FOR BREAKFAST.

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By Megan Morgan Photography by Brent Fuchs

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Survivors, first responders and city officials discuss how Oklahoma City grew from the terrible tragedy that occurred two decades ago this month.

On April 19, 1995, at 9:02 a.m., Oklahoma City was forever changed when a bomb exploded in the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building downtown. The north side of the building was completely destroyed, and 168 people were killed. With the tragedy, the state capital became the center of worldwide news, and according to first responders, leaders and survivors, Oklahoma City stepped up to the plate and made its citizens proud. On this 20th anniversary of the event, we honor memories, pay tribute to those who lost their lives and remember to keep hope alive.

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“Be the Victim or Go Forward”

MELISSA HOUSTON WAS IN THE JOURNAL RECORD BUILDING, LOCATED NEXT TO THE MURRAH BUILDING, WHEN THE BOMB DETONATED.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

At the time of the bombing, Susan Winchester was at Leadership Oklahoma, about five blocks south of the Murrah building. She says that being a child of the 1950s and ‘60s, she thought at first that the blast had been a sonic boom. Rumors circulated that the courthouse had been bombed before her office found out the correct location. “My sister had just started working in the Murrah building,” Winchester says. “I called, and the phone actually rang, but of course, no one answered. I called my husband and told him I was okay. Then I called my brother-in-law to check on my sister, and he told me that she had been on her way to Stillwater for a presentation that day, so we thought she was far from the scene.” But then at around noon, Winchester’s sister, veterinarian Dr. Peggy Clark, did not show up at her presentation in Stillwater, and her family began to get anxious. “But, we also thought that if she had heard about what happened, she would be there trying to help, because that’s the kind of person she was. We became more and more worried when it became the time she should have been home from work and she didn’t show up. Then we really started panicking about what might or might not have happened,” Winchester recalls. In what Winchester calls a “long reveal,” her sister was one of the last bodies recovered from the building. She had stopped by her office before heading to Stillwater. “A loss in the family is a huge loss no matter how it happens, and there is so much emotion there,” Winchester says. “She had three little girls, but now the girls have all grown up and accomplished so much. One of them even followed in the steps of her mother and now has the same position. I had the opportunity to be the victim or to go forward and be strong and make a difference.” Winchester served as a member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives from 1998 to 2008. Today, she

is the chairwoman of the Foundation Executive Committee for the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. She describes a movement called the Oklahoma Standard, which the group will implement in April. “The Oklahoma Standard is free, easy, simple, and it’s something everyone can participate in. The idea is that in the month of April, everyone should do three things: an act of kindness, such as taking the newspaper to the front door of an elderly neighbor; an act of service, such as a volunteer opportunity; and an act of honor, such as remembering someone lost in the tragedy, participating in the marathon or visiting the museum,” Winchester says.

“I am Mindful to Be Grateful” Melissa Houston didn’t hear an explosion, but her hair stood on end. At the time of the bombing, Houston was in the Journal Record building on the south side of the third floor. She was reading criminal statutes, which she describes as “horribly boring. “I made a deal with myself that I would keep working until nine [a.m.], and then I would get up from my desk and take a walk or something. But a guy in the office behind me started talking to me at nine, and I remember being annoyed, because it was past the time when I wanted to get up,” Houston says. “That’s a lesson I’ve tried to carry with me: Don’t let interruptions and distractions annoy you so much, because maybe there’s a reason for them.” A couple short minutes later, Houston was on the floor, with the ceilings, walls and bookshelf from across the room forming a lean-to around her. She was uninjured. “I had a difficult time getting out of the building. I thought all of downtown had been bombed. Some people talked about a gas line exploding, but I always thought that something evil had happened,” Houston says. With no concept of time in the face of disaster, Houston says she has no idea how long it took her to get out of the building, but she does remember


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DENNIS PURIFOY, WHO SURVIVED THE BLAST, STANDS NEXT TO THE SURVIVOR TREE, LOCATED ON THE GROUNDS OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL & MUSEUM.

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waiting with some of her coworkers, one of whom was hurt pretty badly on her face from glass, to find a way out. “I went into shock for about two days. Later, I saw footage on TV, and from where the cameraman was, I must have been standing right next to him. That’s the first time I remember feeling something, and that was days after it happened. I felt horror and fear and sadness and guilt, and I went through a time of darkness for a while,” Houston says. Although she says she had completely lost her faith at this time in her life, after talking with a priest, she was set on a positive path. “That opened my heart enough to listen,” Houston says. “My mother had gotten me a gratitude journal. In the beginning I was not grateful for anything, but I loved my mother, so I agreed. Over time, I started to look at the world that way, and it changed my attitude.” Now, Houston’s faith is her foundation, and she tries to appreciate the little things of everyday life. “Even now, when overwhelmed by laundry, I am mindful to be grateful for the dryer and for the people who wear those clothes,” she says. Houston allows herself to be sad on the anniversary of the bombing and remember those who lost their lives, but April 20 is a day of hope and strength. “That’s the day of moving forward. I got married in 2002 on April 20, and we purposely picked that day,” Houston says. Today, Houston and her husband have two sons, one in third and the other in fourth grade. She took them to the memorial for the first time last year and says even though it is hard to explain to children what happened, she tries to focus on how people responded. “I try to teach them the importance of what happened that day and never forget the lives lost, people hurt and the evil committed. But to also learn the lessons of that day and that good does overcome evil,” Houston says. Houston is the chief of staff at the Oklahoma Attorney General’s Office.

“I Was Never Tempted To Find Another Job” About 115 feet away from where the bomb exploded on the first floor of the Murrah building, Dennis Purifoy says he thinks he survived because he was on the backside of the office with many rows of cubicles between him and the bomb. Purifoy was the assistant manager of the Social Security Administration office at the time. “I started yelling for help after it went off, and I couldn’t figure out why no one came for me. The lights went out, and on the bottom floor, the natural light was blocked by rubble and dust. It was very dark, and the ceiling panels had come down and draped over me like a tent,” Purifoy says. A coworker pulled him from the rubble, and it took them more than an hour to get out of the building. Purifoy says he doesn’t remember feeling much until later. “I was on sensory overload because I know I saw things that I don’t remember. Some people remember hearing the floors collapse, but I don’t remember that. There’s only so much your mind can process. Sometimes, it was just literally about putting one foot in front of the other to keep going and keep moving,” Purifoy says. After making it outside the building, Purifoy found a group of supervisors and leaders, and together they worked on making lists of those employees they had seen and those who were still missing. After the second bomb scare at around 10:30 a.m., Purifoy and some of his coworkers took shelter in a safety glass business, of all places. “They had a working phone that I was able to use to call my wife. What I remember I kept telling people that day when they called to check on me was, ‘I’m alive.’ I just kept saying that,” Purifoy says. As an office leader, the first few days and weeks were extremely busy for Purifoy. He worked with others to finalize lists of those found and missing, spent time at the First Christian Church where families waited to hear about loved ones and made sure that


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everyone knew about the funerals. Purifoy attended all but one funeral, which was out of state. Forty of his coworkers died in the tragedy. “I’m not sure how anyone without a spouse could have gotten through something like that happening. She helped me in so many ways,” Purifoy says of his wife. About a month after the bombing, with employees desperately seeking a sense of normalcy, the Social Security Administration reopened in what used to be Shepherd Mall. “After the office opened, it was easily the hardest work I’ve ever done,” he recalls. “That went on for months and months before we were eventually fully staffed again. I was never tempted to find another job. I had worked for Social Security for more than 20 years at the time and enjoyed the work. It’s rewarding and a service that people need. The people we served also understood what we had gone through. We also handled survivor claims, so we knew we were providing a needed service. The administration gave everyone the option to transfer to another office, but most people were comfortable staying. We had a special bond.” Purifoy says he is very proud of the way his office handled the tragedy and moved forward. He says he hopes that he is a better person today because of what happened 20 years ago. “It’s like you hear all the time: You’re not guaranteed tomorrow. Most people theoretically agree with that, but after what we went through, it becomes a reality,” Purifoy says. “I really do appreciate the everyday joys of sunrises and sunsets and birds singing. I hope I’m more empathetic.” Purifoy retired from the Social Security Administration in late 2013.

“The Kindness Has Stayed With Me” OKLAHOMA CITY POLICE CHIEF BILL CITTY WAS A CAPTAIN AND PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER AT THE TIME OF THE ATTACK AND HELPED ORGANIZE A RESPONSE EFFORT AS A FIRST RESPONDER.

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At the time of the bombing, Oklahoma City Police Chief Bill Citty had been a captain for about four years and the public information officer for about two. The blast was strong enough that

he initially thought the bomb had been in the police headquarters five blocks away from the Murrah building, but he says they soon discovered the true location. “I went to the scene pretty quickly. My responsibility was media, but as an officer, I also helped set up a command post to start organizing a response effort. It was very, very hectic, and there was lots of smoke and dust, and it almost felt like you were choking. I looked at the building and it felt surreal. I’ve never seen anything like it,” Citty says. As an emergency responder, the full impact of the event didn’t hit until after he left the scene, Citty says. “The first thing I thought when I walked down was how overwhelming it was, and I thought, ‘How are we going to deal with this?’” he recalls. “But you kick in doing things that you would normally do – those same things still apply even in a much larger situation. It was also a crime scene, unlike a tornado, so we had to get people out and find survivors, but also secure the area.” Citty says although it was chaotic, communication between the various groups and agencies was impressive, and over the next few days, the community provided an outpouring of support. “All were willing to help, and people came out of the woodwork, whether they were first responders or people just protecting the scene. The kindness was overwhelming. I witnessed the worst things I’ve ever seen and the best things,” Citty says. “On that second day, I remember going down to the food station and finally getting something to eat. Some little lady came around and started rubbing my shoulders and thanking me, and it was the sweetest thing. The kindness has stayed with me.” The hardest part to deal with for him, Citty says, was the children who lost their lives. But during the recovery process, one woman brought her child down to the scene to thank the first responders. “All the first responders just wanted to touch this child. The child had one arm and one leg in a cast, but this was


an example of one child who survived,” Citty says. “I think that’s why the mother brought the child down, because she knew we needed to see that. To see a life that had been saved makes you feel good, and it was powerful. It was probably the most emotional part of my career.”

“I Would Have Expected Nothing Less” Firefighter Keith Bryant, who is now the Oklahoma City fire chief, was called in from off-duty on April 19, 1995, and first arrived on the scene downtown at noon. Bryant says that although he had a million questions about what was going on, he had to focus on the work at hand. “In Oklahoma, we’re used to responding to large-scale events with natural disasters. We’re trained to respond to these types of events, but this was obviously different since it was a domestic act of terrorism. Your mind is prepared to respond, but the twist was that it was terrorism,” he says. “But still, you had a job to do.” Bryant says he did everything from transporting needed tools and equipment to the scene to performing searches with groups in different parts of the destruction. Like Citty and many of the survivors, Bryant says he got through the initial drama and terror by taking one step at a time. “First responders aren’t robotic – we’re human, of course – but we’re focused on the job. After the first day or so, it became a recovery process, and we felt bad about that. Everybody I talked to out there wished we could have saved more people,” Bryant says. The attention the Oklahoma City Fire Department received after the event still makes Bryant feel a little uncomfortable – to him, the firefighters risking their lives and performing grueling and emotional work were just doing what they were supposed to do. “That event did not define the Oklahoma City community or the fire department. I am proud of the way the department responded, but I would

have expected nothing less from the department,” Bryant says. Bryant echoed a common sentiment that Oklahoma City is blossoming now in some part due to the effects of its response to the attack 20 years ago. “Where we are now as a city is incredible. As a lifelong citizen of the city, I have to be proud of that. We have the ability to rally around each other and move forward in a better way, and that’s incredible. It’s one of the best untold stories of Oklahoma City. We’re seeing the physical results now,” Bryant says.

“In Life, You Never Know” Ron Norick served as Oklahoma City mayor from 1987 to 1999. When he first heard about the attack and devastation downtown, Norick says he had to wonder why. “The first feeling was disbelief of why someone would put a bomb in Oklahoma City. It was a nice, quiet city. There were questions of why and wondering about the possible motives, but at first, of course, we were all more interested in the rescue. Those questions were there in the background, however,” Norick says. The police didn’t want the mayor on the scene right away, since no one was yet quite sure about what had happened; later, around 10 a.m., detectives picked up Norick, an hour after the bombing. “My first official action as mayor was when Chief Gary Marrs [Fire Department Chief at the time] called about a command center meeting at about 11:30 [a.m.] with the police department, the DEA, FBI, fire department and other agencies. It was just north of the site. My responsibility was to get ahold of the governor and ask for the National Guard,” Norick says. At the time, Gov. Frank Keating was in a secure shelter, but the National Guard was secured early in the proceedings. Norick served as the public spokesperson for the city. “I got on the air and asked the citizens not to come down, because the space was needed for emergency ef-

KEITH BRYANT WAS A FIRST RESPONDER TO THE MURRAH BOMBING. HE IS NOW THE CHIEF OF THE OKLAHOMA CITY FIRE DEPARTMENT.

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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forts. And people obeyed that. It was heartwarming. They had understood that the mayor had gone on TV and asked them not to do something, and they didn’t do it,” Norick says. Throughout the long recovery process, Norick says he was continually proud of the way Oklahoma City citizens reacted and pitched in to help. “By Thursday afternoon (April 20) it got cold and rainy, in one of our surprise Oklahoma spring cold fronts, and there were things that the different teams needed,” Norick says. “The news media released the information about what was needed, and immediately people came to the perimeter gates and left things. Flashlights, booties for the dogs on the scene, homemade cookies and cakes and pizzas. It was just heartwarming. We finally had enough that we had to tell people it was enough. People just walked up to the gate and handed things to the National Guard, thanked them for their service and turned around and walked away. It was amazing.” On a personal level, Norick says the bombing made him realize how valuable life is. “It brought light to me obviously that in life, you never know. You better live as if every day could be your last. I think about how precious life is,” Norick says.

“We Have A New Generation”

OKLAHOMA CITY MAYOR MICK CORNETT ANCHORED THE 10 P.M. NEWS THE EVENING BEFORE THE ATTACK AND FELT THE BLAST THE NEXT MORNING, 10 MILES AWAY.

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Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett anchored the 10 p.m. news the night before the attack and was home the next morning when the bomb exploded. He says he felt the blast concussion hit his house, which was 10 miles away from the site downtown. Today, the blast that shook the city, and the world, continues to have a major impact, Cornett says. “With time, it’s apparent that it created a sense of community and togetherness that continues to this day. The degrees of separation

between most people who lived here and someone directly affected by the bombing are few. If you lived here during the bombing, you probably knew someone who was killed, injured or lost a loved one. So it created a bond in our community that was – and continues to be – rock solid,” Cornett says. In the long run, Cornett says he believes the attack, the 168 lives lost and the way city officials and the community responded has brought everyone together. “It was as if the entire community took each other by the hand, raised ourselves up and dared anyone to try to separate us,” Cornett says. “Much of what we now call the Oklahoma City Renaissance – the remarkable growth and community investment in our city over the past 20 years – was certainly enhanced by this unshakeable community spirit. For two decades, most everyone in Oklahoma City has been pulling on the same rope and the results have been amazing.” With all of the city’s recent growth, however, it is even more important to honor the anniversary of the bombing because many people who now live in the city were not there 20 years ago. “More than half of the people in the city today did not live here in 1995, and we have a new generation that has no memory of 1995. This is a generation that believes the ballpark has always been downtown, that the river has always had water and that we’ve always had an NBA team. Because that’s the city in which they have grown up. That’s the city our residents have created for them,” Cornett says. Cornett reiterates the idea that the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum board of directors conceived to honor the 20th anniversary. Citizens can exemplify the Oklahoma Standard by performing one act of kindness, one act of service and one act of honor during the month of April. “Imagine how powerful that can be when we all participate,” Cornett says.


“History Fades Away if You Don’t Keep It at the Forefront” In 1996, Kari Watkins was hired as the communications director for the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum and two years later was named executive director. Watkins has worked at the museum ever since. The Memorial Museum was officially opened in 2001 by President George W. Bush. “It’s a part of my life,” Watkins says of the bombing. “Rebuilding has been a large part of my life, and I deal with it every day. I’m very in tune to the loss and impact it had on the nation, state and city.” In the memorial and museum’s beginnings, the organization had a small staff and a large pool of volunteers, Watkins says, and the process involved the entire city. With a background in journalism and coming from a family of politicians, Watkins says she knew

the importance of grassroots movements. “The museum is now renowned around the world ... it honors those who were killed and the survivors and has kept the story alive, most importantly. History fades away if you don’t keep it at the forefront,” Watkins says. The museum is not static, either; it evolves constantly. The staff is currently working on new, interactive programs that will be unveiled later this year. “We’re developing a hands-on, interactive education exhibit to be released in fall 2015 at the start of the next school year,” Watkins says. “It will be a top way to learn the story through science, technology and math – through the STEM lens – and it allows us to teach the story with more than just the aspect of history,” Watkins says. The technology that has been added to the museum over the years is something she is very proud of, Watkins says. “It doesn’t change the story, but it enhances it,” she says. “The 36 interactives are about as powerful as they come. This way,

you can explore all of the lessons that were learned through the bombing because there were all kinds of remarkable elements.” The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum will have a ceremony on the 20th anniversary of the bombing, Watkins says, in addition to the annual Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon on April 26. The Reflections of Hope Award, given every year to honor a living person or active organization that exemplifies hope amongst tragedy, will honor the justice team in the bombing trial. Watkins urges those who have never been to the memorial and museum to visit. “Give the museum a chance. You’ll never be prouder of the state for the response and for bringing hope and justice,” Watkins says. “People of Oklahoma have been very important in showing others how to keep hope. We learned as a community not to take a day for granted. The community came together and was stronger. We’re a different city and state today, and I’m proud that Oklahoma City is thriving.”

KARI WATKINS IS THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AT THE OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL & MUSEUM AND BELIEVES IT’S AN IMPORTANT WAY TO REMEMBER THE EVENTS OF THAT DAY AND THE LIVES LOST.

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HOUSING Boom Downtown Oklahoma City and Tulsa offer an excitement of choices in urban living, food and entertainment. By Sharon McBride

D

owntown Oklahoma City is rapidly developing to keep up with the demands of its citizens. It’s an exciting place that delivers a combination of historic charm, excellent shopping, fine dining and great entertainment, says A.J. Kirkpatrick, director of planning and operations at Downtown OKC, Inc. Over the past few years, downtown has seen a lot of growth, both in residential communities and businesses, says Kirkpatrick. “All of this growth definitely makes it easier for our developers to attract retail and restaurants into ground floor spaces,” says Kirkpatrick. “Dating as far back as the early 1980s, we have done a good job of attracting restaurants downtown, but the growth in residents has increased this over the past couple of years; we are actually starting to make the transition to attracting true soft goods retailers (like home goods, clothing, etc.). “Our best example of this has been the Automobile Alley district, which is centered along Broadway between Fourth and 10th streets,” Kirk-

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patrick continues. “In recent years, we have seen retailers like Schlegel Bikes, Urbane, Plenty and Rawhide willing to take the leap on downtown locations with great success.” When it comes to residential living, downtown Oklahoma City offers a lot of variety. Here is a sampling of what the area has to offer broken down by development name.

The Hill at Bricktown The Hill design team has created 26 floor plans to complement any lifestyle. The Town Hall, located on the grounds, provides residents with exclusive amenities designed to make downtown Oklahoma City living at The Hill both easy and convenient. There are postal and package services, a fitness center, indoor and outdoor pools, a concierge service and large entertainment spaces connected to terraces overlooking the downtown skyline. This $75 million development features townhomes varying in height from two to four stories and ranging in size from 1,600 square feet to 2,200 square feet and begin at $350,000.

Level & Mosaic Urban Apartments Level Urban Apartments is a modern, affordable and livable mixed-use community. Level is set in a contemporary four-story building, complete with 228 apartment units, an internal parking garage and retail spaces on the ground level. Mosaic Urban Apartments is located just across the street from Level in the Deep Deuce district of downtown Oklahoma City. Mosaic is the newest extension of the Level brand and community. It’s a contemporary, four-story building complete with 97 units, an internal parking garage and retail space on the ground level. Mosaic offers its tenants a distinctly elegant, downtown living experience. To help fuel community spirit, access to amenities are shared from one community to the next. This includes a 24/7 fitness center, club house with projector TV and a lap-length swimming pool. Both Level and Mosaic are a five-minute walk from Bricktown and a 10-minute walk to Chesapeake Energy Arena.


OTHERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION Civic Center Flats is a $6 million, 32unit housing complex that is being built in an old parking lot immediately north of the Civic Center Music Hall. The Metropolitan is a 330-unit, $45 million apartment complex that will be the largest single housing development announced yet for downtown Oklahoma City. Its location will be at Northeast Sixth Street and Oklahoma Avenue. Lisbon Lofts is a seven-unit, two- to three-story multifamily project composed of two buildings and a garage building around a central common courtyard. This complex is slated to be built on the corner of Northwest Ninth Street and North Shartel Avenue.

Civic Center Flats

PHOTO COURTESY BUTZER GARDNER ARCHITECTS.

Lisbon Lofts

THE EDGE AT MIDTOWN INCLUDES ONE- AND TWO-BEDROOM APARTMENTS AND AMENITIES FOR ITS OCCUPANTS, INCLUDING A PRIVATE ROOFTOP DOG PARK. PHOTO COURTESY THE EDGE AT MIDTOWN.

Lisbon Lofts (Interior)

PHOTOS COURTESY CHRIS PARDO DESIGN ELEMENTAL ARCHITECTURE.

The Edge at Midtown Located on North Walker Avenue, this apartment complex has one-bedroom and onebathroom apartments starting around $1,100 per month and two-bedroom and two-bathroom apartments starting at around $1,479 per month. Uniqueness is not only in location, but also in its amenities: gated gardens, decorative railings, metal canopies, parking garage, five strategically placed elevators, virtual fitness training room, private rooftop dog park, open air fireplaces and kitchen for entertaining, and magnificent rooftop views of the Oklahoma City skyline.

Block 42 Block 42 is a downtown residential community consisting of 20 townhomes and 22 elevatoraccessed flats. Each condo has a private balcony or rooftop deck as well as a private garage. Block 42 is the first official “green” project in downtown Oklahoma City. By attaining LEED certification (for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), Block 42 has met

the sustainability standards of the U.S. Green Building Council. This attention to eco-friendly design translates to a better quality of life for all residents, better indoor air quality and lower monthly utility expenses. Block 42 has twoand three-bedroom apartments and townhomes ranging from 1,300 square feet to 2,880 square feet with prices beginning at $295,000.

The Brownstones at Maywood Park The Brownstones at Maywood Park is still under construction and will consist of classic Brownstones, or row houses, and will be designed and constructed as individual homes. There are no shared stairwells or parking areas. Each unit will have its own garage and entrance. Instead of sprawling outward in typical suburban style, each home is constructed vertically, up to three-and-a-half stories tall and up to 3,550 square feet. The Brownstones will offer amenities like the option of a private elevator, materials such as slate and copper and the latest technology in construction, insulating concrete forms (ICF).

In addition to forming an incredibly durable structure, ICF also inhibits the travel of sound. Maywood Park is bordered by Walnut on the east and Broadway Avenue on the west and extends from Second to Fourth streets. This fourblock area will have a town square feel. These unique urban dwellings are an investment in a new chapter of the heritage of Oklahoma City. The three- and four-story brownstones are 2,380-3,600 square feet with prices beginning at $500,000.

Tulsa Like downtown Oklahoma City, downtown Tulsa is also rapidly developing to keep up with the demands of its citizens. “We are seeing almost unbelievable growth in our downtown area,” says Chad Oliverson, the marketing and promotions manager for the Downtown Coordinating Council. “So much of this growth is based on mixed use building, both repurposing and some new developments. The idea that you can live, work and entertain all in one place is where we are headed.” APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THE ORIGINAL UNIVERSAL FORD MOTOR COMPANY BUILDING IN THE BRADY ARTS DISTRICT. A RENDERING OF THE FORD BUILDING’S HISTORIC RENOVATION. PHOTOS COURTESY LILLY ARCHITECTS.

THE GREENARCH COMPLEX IN THE GREENWOOD DISTRICT OFFERS RETAIL OPPORTUNITIES AT THE STREET LEVEL. PHOTO COURTESY GREENARCH APARTMENTS.

In downtown Tulsa, each district is unique, and each is a hospitable and diverse community with a strong economy and high quality of life, says Oliverson. When it comes to residential living, downtown Tulsa also offers a lot of variety. Here is a sampling of what the area has to offer broken down by districts.

Blue Dome District The Blue Dome District is named for its historic Blue Dome Building, which was built in 1924 as a Gulf Oil gas station. It is a must-see for visitors following the historic and famous Route 66 trail. “This district led the redevelopment and reuse of existing structures and architecture into new services and facilities, providing a wide variety of opportunities and unique experiences for visitors,” says Oliverson. In recent years, growth in the number of retail shops and restaurants in the area has been impressive. Tallgrass Prairie Table, White Flag and 52 Fitness are a few of the new additions that stand alongside businesses like Lyon’s

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Indian Store and Lee’s Bicycles, both of which are hovering at the century mark in Tulsa. Perhaps one of the most inclusive projects in Blue Dome is the introduction of The Blue Dome Market in 2014. The market is home to a healthy mix of shops, restaurants and even a unique gym. The Tulsa Performing Arts Center, located on the edge of the district, continues to provide tremendous opportunities and impact to downtown and the Tulsa region. The much-anticipated First Street Lofts project should be completed sometime in the early spring of 2015 with apartment leasing to begin shortly after. The 40,000-square-foot building has five floors, with apartments planned for the second through fifth floors.

utilized as warehouses. Over the past 20 years, the area has morphed into an eclectic collection of bars, restaurants and arts establishments. There has been much revitalization with buildings renovated into new office space and museums while still remaining true to their historic past. Historic renovation of the Universal Ford Motor Company building at 223 N. Main St. will bring more apartments and ground floor commercial space to the Brady District when it opens in late 2015. Historic renovation of the Hotel Fox and Fox Building (201-207 N. Main St.) will include apartments and office spaces with ground floor commercial space. It is also expected to open in 2015.

Brady Arts District

The Downtown Deco District Association was formed in 2010 by a group of downtown business owners. The goal of the association is to celebrate Tulsa’s historic Deco District while promoting today’s downtown living, shopping, working and entertainment.

The Brady Arts District is one of the oldest sections of Tulsa. It is rich with cultural icons, such as the Cain’s Ballroom and the Brady Theater. The buildings in the area that are still standing are primarily red brick and were

Deco District


The Vandever Lofts boasts 40 new apartments in the Deco District as the demand for more residential space in the area is very high. Prospective plans for 2015 include the launch of three other residential projects, the 111 West 5th Building Lofts, the TransOK Building and The Denver Y, located in the former YMCA building.

East Village The East Village, centered at Third Street and Kenosha Avenue, a long-time area of redevelopment efforts, has emerged with a variety of new opportunities, including residential and commercial, as well as dining experiences. The American Theatre Company has established its home and headquarters in the district and will soon be neighbors with Theatre Tulsa, the oldest community theatre west of the Mississippi, after its pending move. A variety of design and professional services – such as GuRuStu Group, Pardee Construction, Hogan Assessments and Folsom & Associates – are a few who are building their futures in the district. Personal services, such

as Colourblind Organic Salon, Cole Photography, Technical Institute of Cosmetology, Arts and Sciences and Crossfit T-Town, can also be found in the district. Like many other districts, East Village expects a boom in residential living opportunities in 2015. Currently under construction is the mixed-use development on the former Bill White Chevrolet site as well as eight new townhomes in a development called Urban8. An apartment complex, developed by Nelson Stowe Development LLC, and American Residential Group, called the Hartford Commons, is scheduled to join soon.

Greenwood District Dubbed America’s “Black Wall Street” by Booker T. Washington, the 35-block Greenwood District surrounded the corner of Greenwood Avenue and Archer Street and became a prosperous center for black commerce in the early 1900s. It was also a hotbed for jazz and blues and the site where Count Basie first encountered big-band jazz. When the tragic and

devastating Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 destroyed much of the district, the black community rebuilt. Today, the Greenwood Historical District showcases its heritage through the Greenwood Cultural Center, the Mabel B. Little Heritage House and the John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Park. The new GreenArch residential development offers retail opportunities at street level of their buildings, a popular trend of downtown. ONEOK Field, home to the Tulsa Drillers baseball team, is located in the Greenwood District and attracts visitors from all areas of the region. “The vision of a vibrant urban core conveyed by the Downtown Area Master Plan and PlaniTulsa are being realized through the continued growth in all aspects of our city,” says Oliverson. “The much-maligned surface parking lots are being replaced with hotels, museums, and residential and commercial developments as a new generation of Tulsans is continuing the renaissance of downtown for their future.” APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The docto Former Sen. Tom Coburn returns to Oklahoma with a cynical view of Washington politics.

FORMER SEN. TOM COBURN SERVED IN THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FROM 1995-2001, AND IN THE U.S. SENATE FROM 2005 TO JANUARY 2015. PHOTO COURTESY CBS.

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or is out

W

By M.J. Van Deventer

When U.S. Sen. Dr. Tom Coburn left Washington, D.C., in January, he didn’t look back with longing or regrets. He retired with two years left on his term in Congress to return home to Muskogee, his wife, Carolyn, and his career as a family medical doctor. Regret is a word seldom spoken in Coburn’s vocabulary. He’s an informed straight shooter when he talks about the nation’s Capitol and his time spent there, astutely observing the political climate. What he did bring back to Oklahoma is a heavy burden about the future of America. “Washington is a very sick place,” he says. So ill, in fact, he suggests there’s no real remedy that might turn the country around. For a man who never intended to be involved in politics, Coburn achieved legendary status, in the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1995 to 2001, and in the U.S. Senate, from 2005 to January 2015. “I had no early motivation to run for office,” he says. “I just fell into it in the mid1990s. I had no plans for being a politician or ever being in politics.” He did hope to make a difference, however. A Republican fiscal conservative, Coburn was quickly recognized as an elected official who was well aware of how Congress works when he arrived in D.C. He wasn’t interested in getting acclimated to the prevailing climate. “You can learn the system in Washington in three or four months,” Coburn confides. “That’s not what the politicians want the public to think. I don’t think I ever got comfortable with politics. How do you not speak the truth in such a way that people don’t know it is a lie? In Washington, we chisel the truth, instead of speaking it plainly.”

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Family Values

For Coburn, life has always been about living by the old-fashioned values his parents instilled in him – truth, honesty, dependability, accountability. Born March 14, 1948, in Casper, Wyo., to Anita and Orin Coburn, the family moved to Muskogee when Coburn was 2 years old. When Coburn talks about his growing-up years, he remembers an idyllic youth. “I grew up in a wonderful time,” he remembers. “It was the 1940s and 1950s. We walked to school. We went home for lunch. Our parents were not worried about us. Other parents were always watching us.” He recalls no mentor or older person he admired beyond his parents and their friends. “I was busy staying out of trouble and trying not to get caught when I was mischievous,” he says. “We tend to call ‘mischievous’ an attention deficit syndrome today. Really those kids just have a Y chromosome. All of us have been mischievous at some time in our life, when we have gone way past normal. Children a little out of control need behavior modification more than they need medicine,” he says. As an obstetrician, Coburn knows something about children. In his practice, he has delivered more than 4,000 babies. It troubles Coburn that almost 60 percent of today’s children are born out of wedlock. “Look at what we’re doing,” he says. “We are destroying our families. Government has destroyed the family. Government should make us strong and healthy. But it hasn’t.” “There’s no shame in this country now. Since Presidents Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson, what we’ve done is unwind personal responsibility. Accountability has to be restored and with that public shame,” he insists. “We’ve lost the concept of being humiliated because you decided you don’t want to be responsible. That’s cultural, not political.”

Congressional Record

During his tenure in the U.S. House of Representatives, Coburn wrote and passed far-reaching legislation. These included laws expanding seniors’ health care options, protecting access to home health care in rural areas and allowing Americans access to cheaper medications from Canada and other nations. He also wrote a law intended to prevent the spread of AIDS to infants. The Wall Street Journal said of that law, “In 10 long years of AIDS politics and funding, this is actually the first legislation to pass in this country that will rescue babies.” Early in his time in the Senate, Coburn, one of the most conservative members of

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Congress, became recognized as an irritant – sand in the oyster, chalk screeching on a blackboard. He made colleagues angry or frustrated. His greatest political tool was not in creating cost-cutting legislation or staging a filibuster. Instead, he found loopholes, built roadblocks and put holds on thousands of bills. He was called a “political maverick.” “I was called ‘Dr. No’ after my first couple of years in the Senate because I would block both Republican and Democrat bills because they were either unconstitutional or duplicative,” Coburn says. If that created any political paralysis, Coburn says that came not from him, but from the leader of the Senate not allowing any amendments on bills brought to the Senate floor. “We thought the 200-year history of being able to offer amendments in the greatest deliberative body in the world actually should continue. The Senate leader did not think so because he did not want his members to have to vote on our amendments. The only person I truly upset was Harry Reid. I did a significant amount of bipartisan work with other senators – Chuck Schumer, Joe Lieberman, Barbara Boxer. “The Senate was never brought to an absolute halt, as the Majority Leader determines what comes to the floor. Most of the time that cloture was not invoked because he would not allow amendments to be offered,” Coburn says. “I did put holds on thousands of bills, but only because I believed they needed to be debated, or modified, and at least voted on instead of passed in the middle of the night without objections being publicly put forth,” he states. “I put objections publicly written and stopped bills that would not be allowed to be modified or amended. Many bills passed when the authors worked with us on our constitutional concerns.” Every branch of government was fair game for his frequent calls for conservative reform, especially on rampant, wasteful spending. “My faith has allowed me to be criticized and not worry about it,” he says. “I get my identity from unearned grace so I can be bold and take criticism and go right on down the road. That is my greatest strength. “Congress is out of control,” he says. “It spends twice as much money as it needs to. There’s no real accountability in government. When the Internal Revenue Service, the President and the judicial system can do things that are extra judicial, then the bureaucracy and members of Congress aren’t accountable. That’s not a republic. It’s an attempt, but the republic has lost its way.” In a probing interview on CBS 60 Minutes, which aired Dec. 21, 2014, Coburn called his Senate colleagues “cowards” and told interviewer Lesley Stahl, “Anybody off the streets could do a better job than the senators there now. They make decisions that benefit their career, rather than the country. That’s what makes me sick.” For all the unflattering names labeling Coburn during his Congressional service, he returned home with an enviable collection of accolades. In 2013, he received the U.S. Senator John Heinz Award for Greatest Public Service by an Elected or Appointed Official, an honor given annually by Jefferson Awards. Also in 2013, Time Magazine named him one of 100 most influential people in the world. Coburn is still friends with President Barack Obama. Although their philosophies are poles apart, they met as freshmen senators in 2005, wrote legislation together and got it passed. Obama wrote the Time tribute to Coburn and prayed for him at a 2014 prayer breakfast.


In April 2011, Coburn spoke to Bloomberg TV about Obama, saying, “I love the man. I think he’s a neat man. I don’t want him to be President, but I still love him. He is our President. He’s my President. And I disagree with him adamantly on 95 percent of the issues, but that doesn’t mean I can’t have a great relationship. And that’s a model people ought to follow.” One of Coburn’s greatest worries is “young people today have no idea what the founding principles of this country are. They are not taught this in schools any more.” He also believes any young person who aspires to be elected to public office “should have a career before they enter politics so they will know how life works.”

Cancer Diagnosis and Return Home

After serving more than four years of his second term in the U.S. Senate, Coburn announced on Jan. 16, 2014, he was resigning his office at the end of the year for health reasons. Having survived prostate cancer surgery, colon cancer and melanoma, his prostate cancer has returned. He is currently undergoing chemotherapy treatments. With his political career behind him, Coburn says his life now “is pretty good when I’m not working. I’m not getting on airplanes very often now. And I’m working my way back into my wife Carolyn’s life.” Coburn met his wife, Carolyn Denton, in the first grade. Both are Oklahoma State University graduates. Carolyn was Miss Oklahoma 1967 and married Coburn in 1968. When he graduated from OSU in 1970, he went to work for his father, who owned Coburn Optical Industries, based in Colonial Heights, Va. When the company sold in 1978, Coburn used the opportunity to change his career focus from business to medicine, graduating from the University of Oklahoma Medical School in 1983. The Coburns have three daughters, ages 37, 41 and 44, and seven grandchildren. They live on a 40-acre farm in Muskogee, and he says a perfect day, now, goes something like this: “I get up, study the Bible, have coffee with Carolyn, play golf if the weather is good, read, study, write. I work in my yard, trim trees and mow grass.” Some days are devoted to chemotherapy treatments for his prostate cancer. For the past 15 years, Coburn has taught a men’s Sunday School class at Muskogee’s First Baptist Church. He came home from D.C., every weekend to be with his family and teach the class.

“I’ve had a wonderful group of 75- and 80-year-old men. I’ve learned a lot from them through the years. They have taught me patience and that I’m never too old to grow and learn. What I’ve seen more than anything is how their lives have been totally changed through their faith,” Coburn reflects. “In the past 15 years, we have jumped around in the New Testament. We are almost completing it.”

His Legacy

“I shouldn’t be remembered,” he says. “No politician should ever be remembered. We should remember the founding principles of our country. We should not remember politicians. “In my opinion, there’s only been one great president, in my lifetime. That was Ronald Reagan. He actually knew what he believed. He wasn’t afraid to speak it. If it wasn’t politically correct, he didn’t care. It was real leadership.” While Coburn is bold in his political viewpoints, he’s humble about his achievements. LEFT: COBURN REPRESENTED OKLAHOMA IN THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND IN THE U.S. SENATE. BELOW: COBURN TALKS WITH LESLEY STAHL ON 60 MINUTES IN DECEMBER 2014. PHOTO COURTESY CBS.

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR What is Compulsive Love? Compulsive love is a state in which one person feels an overwhelming obsessive desire to possess another person toward whom they feel a strong attraction, with an inability to accept failure or rejection. They have unrealistic emotional and COURTNEY LINSENMEYERphysical expectations of those of O’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR whom they become involved with and do not have healthy relationship boundaries. These individuals may feel entirely unable to prevent themselves from extreme behaviors such as acts of violence toward themselves or others. They may be entirely convinced that their feelings are love and may reject the idea that their emotional state is not love. Personal and social histories vary, but most have experienced physical or psychological trauma that have prevented them from forming trusting relationships. Patterns of compulsive, controlling behaviors provide the person with a sense of “perceived” control to cope with these feelings of helplessness. Overwhelming feelings of anxiety and fear of abandonment often overwhelm the person, ultimately preventing them from developing healthy, intimate relationships. Fear is the driving force of the compulsive behavior and control is its anchor. Therapy can be beneficial for both people in the relationship.

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VETERINARIAN How do I get my pets ready for spring and summer? Spring brings along lots of possible health issues for your pet. If you have any concerns make an appointment with your veterinarian. Twice-yearly exams are important because pets age more quickly than people. Also, for DR. RODNEY ROBARDS some pets, weight gain might be a problem after several relatively inactive months. Keep your pets on heartworm and flea and tick products year round. Even with the extreme cold we have seen this winter, this is Oklahoma and we will have to deal with our pesky friends called fleas and ticks. Instead of relying on store-bought flea and tick products, consult with a veterinarian about what best suits your pets and their habits. A flea, tick and heartworm free pet is a happy one!

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PERSONAL TRAINER I’m happy with my weight; can I change my diet now? Yes, you can now start moving towards your maintenance phase, which will help you stay at your target weight. Start allowing yourself 100 more calories a day until you stop losing weight. For JOHN JACKSON example, if your caloric intake was 1,500 a day while you were in your slim-down phase, you should increase it to 1,600 a day for the next week. As long as your weight stays the same, continue with the same amount of calories. You will also need to stick with at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (jogging, zumba, spin) five days a week. Moreover, if you are fit enough to participate, do 30 minutes of vigorous exercise like basketball, tennis or BOOTCAMP offered at St. John’s Health Plaza. Ballistic exercise should not be done more than three times a week and rarely in back-to-back workouts.

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL Is my home covered for earthquakes? According to the US Geological Society, Oklahoma had nearly 300 earthquakes in 2013. 222 of these were 2.5 magnitude or greater. “Am I covered?” is the most common question after a tremor makes the news. Unless you’ve JARED PETERSON specifically asked for earthquake coverage, you are likely not covered. Earthquake coverage is a special endorsement to most homeowners' policies. The earthquake endorsement can also cover damage to homes from other ground movement except settling. Rates can range from less than $100 to several hundred dollars, depending on the value and construction of your home. Deductibles range from 2 to 20 percent. This means a $200,000 home could have a $10,000 deductible or more for earthquake. It’s catastrophe insurance, and with more and more earthquakes happening in our state, it could be a wise investment. If you have questions on earthquake coverage or other insurance questions, call a AAA agent near you.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

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PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT What is one quick way that I can make my website mobile friendly without having to rebuild the entire site? Mobile search has replaced that big yellow book. At an absolute minimum, you should put your phone number prominently at JESSICA DYER the top of your page if you want customers to be able to reach you easily. Do make sure your number is clickable. It’s best that your website doesn’t require scrolling and searching for your contact info. Let your customers contact you quickly from their smart phone with a simple push of a button.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539.777.6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

PHYSICAL THERAPY I work at a desk all day and have headaches, neck pain and tension in my shoulders. Can physical therapy help? Jobs that do not require routine position changes can contribute to soft tissue tightness in the upper traps and neck muscles known as trigger TIM MINNICK, PT points, which then may result in headaches. Trigger points are what most people know as tender “knots” in their muscles. It is important to take a five-minute stretch break every 1-2 hours if possible. Getting up and moving around for a few minutes may also be beneficial. If doing this doesn’t decrease or resolve your symptoms then your condition may have progressed to a level where visiting a physical therapist is necessary. A good physical therapist can teach you more specific exercises to help resolve your pain, show you neuromobilization techniques that may reduce your headaches and perform various manual skills on your neck and upper traps including dry needling, soft tissue mobilization and joint mobilization, which may eliminate the trigger points and associated pain.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


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I have been working for the same company for a year now. I use my hands a lot, and I am having a lot of pain from the work. I didn’t have a particular injury. Is it covered by workers compensation insurance?

Yes, if it has resulted in an actual injury. A “cumulative trauma” injury is caused by the combined effect of repetitive physical activities extending over a period of time in the course and scope of employment. The cumulative trauma must be a direct result of the work performed during at least 180 days of continuous active employment. A cumulative trauma injury does not mean fatigue, soreness or general aches and pain that may have been caused, aggravated, exacerbated or accelerated by the employee’s course and scope of employment with the employer. You should seek medical care to determine whether you have an injury.

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 918.745.0575 Facsimile 800.745.2006 Toll Free

DEVELOPMENTAL OPTOMETRIST What is Vision Therapy? Vision Therapy is a series of prescribed exercises performed in-office for visual problems that cannot be helped with glasses or contact lenses alone. Vision therapy is similar to physical therapy for the eyes, during which vision disorders MEGAN KIRKPATRICK, OD are corrected to improve patients’ visual function and performance. Vision therapy strengthens the connection between the eyes and the brain, creating permanent lifelong changes. Vision therapy treats problems children have when using their eyes for up-close vision tasks, such as those required in school. Eye tracking, eye teaming, and eye focusing challenges make it impossible for children to read, learn, and remain on task. Vision therapy also corrects lazy, crossed, and wandering eyes. Eighty percent of what we see, comprehend, and remember depends on the visual system. Therefore, in addition to benefiting school performance, vision therapy affects every aspect of life.

Megan Kirkpatrick, OD South Tulsa Vision Development Center 8988- D1 S Sheridan Tulsa, OK 74133 918.992.2343 www.tulsavisiondevelopment.com

HOSPICE CARE My wife’s father is suffering from Parkinson’s disease and lives with us. She is his main caregiver. I worry that she is doing too much and not taking care of herself, yet I can’t convince her to take a break. Any advice? AVA HANCOCK

We often say caregiving is one of the toughest jobs out there. While it can be rewarding and meaningful to care for someone, especially a parent, it is also very stressful. My advice is to find someone to provide care for your father-in-law a few times a week to give your wife some time to herself. There are professional services available that offer respite care once or twice a week so she can run errands or get some much needed “me time.” At Grace Hospice, we provide free respite care for our hospice patients and we have seen firsthand the benefits. If you would like more information on caregiver stress as well as our free support groups, call Grace Hospice at 918.744.7223.

Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST I am looking for a more permanent solution for dermal fillers. What would you recommend? Bellafill®, the only FDA approved filler with lasting results for 5 to 8 years, would be a great option in this case. Bellafill® offers a new MALISSA SPACEK level of filler rejuvenation. In addition to immediately adding volume to smooth away facial wrinkles, it also helps your skin recreate it’s own firmer structure for beautiful, youngerlooking skin and lasting results. It restores rather than just fills for natural enduring improvement. There is also no down time with Bellafill®, so you can return to your normal day activities immediately. If you would like to learn more about Bellafill® or schedule a complimentary consultation, please call us at 918.872.9999.

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MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT Don’t get hung up on the word “Bespoke”. I can’t begin to tell you how many times I see the word Bespoke in a magazine or tagged to some great celebrity. And now in the fashion industry I’m hearing the word and it’s being widely misunderstood. What does that word really imply? AUTUMN POHL Bespoke means: Made to an individual's order, Custom-made (Dictionary.com). GQ Magazine describes it as “Made from scratch to your (client’s) specifications.” I had a gentlemen ask me if we offered Bespoke clothing and my question back to him was... “what does that word mean to you?” Unfortunately for him, he passed up one of the leading customized luxury Italian Brands in the world just because of the word Bespoke. J.Hilburn works one on one with their clients designing their shirts & suits based off of individual body measurements, fabrics, style and details of cuff, collar, placket, pocket, stitching, venting etc. There may be a small difference of having someone sew you into the jackets as opposed to sending off your measurements to be made for your jackets. So does that small difference mean that you should have to pay double the price? J.Hilburn says NO!!! Let J.Hilburn and their personal stylist help create your customized wardrobe.

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I am a single mom trying to raise a teenager. I have friends and family but sometimes I still feel lonely and struggle with my confidence in parenting. Do you have any suggestions? Parenting is a very tough job when you approach it as a team. Doing it alone can be even more challenging. Support can come in a variety of ways. Everyone needs to feel heard and validated. Often that validation comes from people who understand, have empathy and can relate to what another person is going through. At my practice we offer a service called Smart Chat. Smart Chat involves a small group of individuals that are dealing with similar issues or circumstance. The professional in the room is there to provide information and guidance of discussion while the participants make connections and share stories, concerns and support to one another. We started this service as we found that many individual clients needed an opportunity to vent about their fears, frustration etc, while also finding the humor and ability to laugh at some of life’s twists and turns with others who are in similar situations. Finding a group of people that is supportive and validating can help by providing an outlet to vent, cope and swap ideas and experiences of parenting a teenager. AMY KESNER, PHD, LPC, LADC

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

THE SCAMORZA FEATURES CHERRY TOMATOES, SMOKED MOZZARELLA AND ARUGULA. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

FOOD, DRINK, AND OTHER PLEASURES

A Taste Of Italy

“Finally!

STG brings Naples’ flavors to Tulsa.

I’ve been waiting six months for this to arrive!” exclaims Mike

Bausch, lugging a large box. Late-afternoon sunlight streams through floor-to-ceiling windows as Bausch unwraps the bundle, revealing a long, tripod-like metal stand. “It’s a palo holder,” he says. The holder helps position the pizza in the oven, though Bausch’s experience makes it almost unnecessary. “I got videos of the world’s greatest pizzaioli using the oven, and I spent three months watching them, over and over. Then I started to practice,” he says. Bausch has advanced so far in the science of pizza that sometimes you need an interpreter to understand what he’s saying. “Most people think the grade of flour is important,” he says. “But what’s most important is the ‘W’ factor. That measures the elasticity of the matrix formed when the proteins in the dough bond together.” Bausch’s family grew up on the hardscrabble streets of Manhattan’s lower west side. His father, like so many in his family – including Bausch himself – joined the Marines. Home from deployment, he’d

take the 9-year-old Bausch to local pizza joints. The shop that sold the biggest pizzas fascinated him, but his dad taught him to appreciate the place that sold the best pizza: the ancient, coal-fired ovens of Lombardi’s on Spring Street. “I never thought I’d be doing this for a living,” he says. “I just loved it.” Bausch joined the Marines, did a tour of duty, moved to California and was accepted to law school. His life was set, and he got a job at a local pizza shop to pay the bills. Soon, pizza became more fascinating than a potential law career. A few months later, his brother Jim phoned him: “Mike, I found this town called Owasso, and there are no pizza shops at all!” Andolini’s would be its first, and a year later, a branch on Cherry Street in Tulsa welcomed diners. Meanwhile, Bausch continued his pizza education. He went back to California to learn from his friend Tony Gemignani, who runs what Forbes magazine calls “the best pizzeria in America.” Bausch also competes in pizza contests around the world, and throughout his travels, he does a lot of tasting. “My idea of sightseeing is to go to a city and hit the four best pizza places, one after the other, starting at 11 a.m.,” Bausch says. From trips to Naples, Italy, the idea for STG Pizzeria and Gelateria was born. APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

FAV E

OLD SCHOOL BAGEL CAFÉ

EVERYTHING CREATED BY MIKE BAUSCH AT STG IS AS YOU WOULD FIND IT IN ITALY.

“Andolini’s is our spin on pizza. But STG, it’s not ‘kind of like Italy,’ it is Italy. What you find here is exactly what you’d find in Naples,” he says. “Some of our pizzas – the Margherita, for example – you’ll find all over Naples. We do others that you’d see only if you go way off the beaten track. That Scamorza, with its smoky cheese and plump, fresh tomatoes, that was invented in one Naples shop. We chose pizzas with personality. But everything here is what you’d see in Italy.” Moving to a counter, Bausch carefully flattens a ball of dough. “I touch the dough as little as possible, so as not to disturb the gases from the yeast,” he says, reaching for a spoon of tomato sauce. “I tasted 30 brands of San Marzano tomatoes before I found one that has the earthy taste of Vesuvius.” By now, the pizza is in the oven. The 900-degree flames cook fast but not always in the same way. Bausch makes split-second, instinctual decisions when and whether to rotate the pie or move it to a cooler spot. Today, he gives two quick spins, and soon the pie emerges. It is rough, puffy, slightly charred and beautiful. “Look at that leoparding!” Bausch boasts, referring to the tiny black char spots on the crust. It has an ineffably rich flavor and a gooey blend of sin and reverence. Like the pizzas, the richly flavored gelato made here is just what you’d find in a lazy cafe on a Naples side street. The Carpigiani pasteurizer, imported, like the oven, from Italy, heats and blends all the ingredients, and that, says Bausch, makes the gelato “silky, creamy and smooth.” Like the pizza, it’s perfect. He won’t settle for less. 114 S. Detroit Ave., Tulsa. www. stgpizza.com BRIAN SCHWARTZ 100

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

Bright and early, at 6 a.m. six days a week – 7 a.m. on the seventh – sleepy Oklahomans make their way to a café that serves breakfast and lunch on that most perfect round, chewy, starchy breakfast pastry: the bagel. Old School Bagel Cafe, based in Oklahoma City, operates 11 shops statewide – with two more slated to open this year – and serves thousands of bagels daily. Whether topped simply with cream cheese or sandwiching breakfast or lunch favorites, these traditional, New York-style bagels are a hot commodity. Bagels are boiled to create a chewy outside and a tender crumb inside. Enjoy a breakfast bagel with bacon, egg and cheese and a cup of coffee in the mornings, then come back for lunch. Try a traditional sandwich, like a Reuben on rye, or opt for the tangy egg salad, served with lettuce and tomatoes, on THE ITALIAN INCLUDES PASTRAMI, HAM, BANANA a bagel. Eleven locaPEPPERS, ITALIAN DRESSING, LETTUCE AND TOMATO PILED HIGH ON AN EVERYTHING BAGEL. tions statewide. www. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN. oldschoolbagelcafe.com – Jami Mattox T H E B UZ Z

BASIL MEDITERRANEAN CAFÉ

For Mediterranean food fans, Basil should be at the top of the list of restaurants to try. From gyros, kabobs and pasta dishes to full pitas, soups, salads and dips, Basil takes taste buds on a trip to the Mediterranean with its authentic cuisine. It’s easy to find something that satisfies on this menu. Some favorite, must-try items every customers should indulge in are the Chicken Bandarri, Gyros, Veggie Kabob and Falafel Pita. Hot and fresh, two extremely important words at a Mediterranean WESTERN GYRO IS A POPULAR LUNCH ITEM AT BASIL MEDITERRANEAN CAFE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

restaurant to describe good pita bread, are staple adjectives at Basil, where they’re always served right out of the oven. Dolma, grape leaves stuffed with a blend of rice, herbs and seasonings – a classic dish found at most Mediterranean restaurants – has a unique, flavorful story to tell. Enjoy veggies and meat marinated, slid onto a kabob and kissed by an open flame; or Basil’s famous Hummus. For an all-around treat, try the Gyros Platter that includes savory gyros meats with pita, French fries, Tzatziki and fresh veggies. Choosing what to feast on is the hard part; cleaning the plate, not so much. After ordering at the counter, relax in the dining room while the chef prepares these healthy and scrumptious platefuls. Basil Mediterranean Café cooks every dish with happiness – a small, but important, detail that is reflected in its creations and its tastes. A colorful spread of fresh flavors will arrive at the table after every ingredient has been tended to. 211 NW 23rd St., Oklahoma City, and 6620 E. Reno, Midwest City. www. basilmediterraneanrestaurant. com – Brittany Anicetti


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Taste

ON WHEELS

SUPER JUICE A juicing craze is pouring across the country, and now, Oklahoma City has its own juice truck rolling around its streets: Super Juice. Juicing has many purported health benefits, including reducing risk of disease, helping with weight management, raising energy and more, but juicing at home takes a lot of effort and money and, frankly, uses up way too much space in the fridge. CODY WARD AND Cody Ward and Chadd Hook, the men CHADD HOOK, THE MEN BEHIND SUPER steering Super Juice, have created a way JUICE. for their community to juice without the PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. downside. And it gets better: They use local, organic produce in their creations whenever possible. Super Juice combines two growing fads – food trucks and shopping local – into one healthy sip after another. All around town, the bright blue truck is pressing down and serving up some great juice selections. Kale, spinach, pineapple, carrots, beets, ginger, cilantro, apples and plenty more fill 100 percent plant-based, compostable cups with nutritious juices, full of essential vitamins, minerals and enzymes. And juice isn’t the only thing this super truck is mixing up. Smoothies are blended, as well. www.superjuiceokc.com – Brittany Anicetti

T O YO U R H E A L T H

INCREDIBLE AND EDIBLE The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, a panel that provides guidance to the U.S. on diet and nutrition, announced in February that it has eased restrictions on saturated fat and cholesterol. This is great news for egg lovers, as the small, shelled wonders contain 1.6 grams of saturated fat and 187 milligrams of cholesterol. One egg provides six grams of protein and a mere 78 calories. Fried, scrambled, poached or boiled, eggs are as versatile as any protein. Try the recipe below for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Feel free to substitute your favorite herbs for ones listed in the recipe. – Jami Mattox

Herb-baked Eggs Serves 2 Recipe courtesy Ina Garten, The Barefoot Contessa. 1/4 tsp. minced garlic 1/4 tsp. minced fresh thyme leaves 1/4 tsp. minced fresh rosemary leaves 1 tbsp. minced fresh parsley 1 tbsp. freshly grated Parmesan 6 extra-large eggs 2 tbsp. heavy cream 1 tbsp. unsalted butter kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper toasted French bread or brioche, for serving

Preheat the broiler for five minutes, and place the oven rack six inches below the heat. Combine the garlic, thyme, rosemary, parsley and Parmesan and set aside. Crack three eggs into each of two small bowls or teacups without breaking the yolks. Place two individual gratin dishes or ramekins on a baking sheet.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

Place one tablespoon of cream and a half-tablespoon of butter in each dish and place under the broiler for about three minutes, until hot and bubbly. Quickly pour three eggs into each gratin dish and sprinkle evenly with the herb mixture, salt and pepper. Place back under the broiler for five to six minutes, until the whites of the eggs are almost cooked. Allow to set for 60 seconds, and serve with toasted bread.

THE PLA SONG KRAUNG BOASTS A CRISPY FRIED WHOLE TROUT FILLED AND TOPPED WITH SHREDDED GREEN APPLE, RED ONION, CARROTS, LETTUCE AND PEANUTS. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.


SIP

ALL ABOUT CHA STYLISH COFFEE & TEA

Through All About Cha Tulsa’s large windows, you’ll find bright colors, sharp lines and interesting light fixtures and furnishings on display. Purple, yellow and red chairs surrounding modern wood tables invite customers to relax and enjoy coffee and tea selections, among other delights. Tulsa’s location, the third in Oklahoma, draws a large crowd because of its warm atmosphere and variety of tastes. Enjoy soft background music while sipping one of All About Cha’s more than 60 drink selections. Whatever you’re in the mood for – coffee, tea, steamed, iced, frothy, blended, sweet, nutty – you’ll find what you’re craving at All About Cha; you’ll be able to taste the freshness of ingredients in every sip. Interested in trying something a little different? The Goguma Latte is a combination of sweet potato and steamed milk, topped with toasted pecans. Also enjoy an espresso or cappuccino – both true to their Italian origins. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, All About Cha’s customers roll over for some of its tasty sushi selections. 202 S. Cheyenne Ave., Tulsa. www.allaboutcha. net – B.A. W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

LANNA THAI

Lanna Thai in Tulsa is a family-owned, authentic Thai restaurant that not only allows customers to choose how spicy they want their food on a “spice range” from zero to five, but also offers selections that are non-spicy. The eatery’s extensive menu allows patrons to experience an all-encompassing tour of Thai flavors, as long as they don’t get hooked on just one. Curry, seafood and stir-fry dishes – where you can pair amazing recipes with your choice of chicken, beef, pork or seafood – make up the bulk of the menu. And there’s more good news; almost all dishes can be made vegetarian. The dumplings and spring and summer rolls are favorites on the appetizer list, and Lanna Thai offers a range of soups and salads, as well. 7227 S. Memorial Drive, Tulsa. www. lannathaitulsa.com – Brittany Anicetti

THE SAUSAGE OMELET IS PACKED FULL WITH GRILLED VEGETABLES AND CHEESE AND SERVED WITH FRESH FRUIT AND SALSA ON THE SIDE. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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YO U R G R E E N C O U N T R Y

W E AT H E R T E A M

TA F T P R I C E

B R I T TA N Y R A I N E Y

BRETT ANTHONY

GEORGE FLICKINGER

C H I E F M E T E O R O LO G I ST

K E E P I N G YO U S A F E

CERTIFIED MOST ACCURATE FOR A DECADE


Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

The Masked Man Returns

PHOTO COURTESY CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS.

T

The Phantom of the Opera is ready to wow Tulsa with its legendary score and astounding performances.

he Phantom and Christine will arrive in Tulsa with the 50 other cast and orchestra members who will bring to life the musical genius of composer Andrew Lloyd Webber and the storyline of Gaston Leroux’s 1910 horror novel. As the curtains pull back, audience members travel to the dimlylit stage of the Paris Opera House, in 1911, where an auctioneer sells off pieces of the past. When Lot 666 takes the spotlight, the musical’s famed chandelier: a haunting light fixture whose history illuminates the mysteries of The Phantom of the Opera, the story takes flight. This world-renowned musical, after selling out its tour of the United Kingdom, kicked off a North American tour in November 2013, bringing new stage and costume designs, new choreography and stunning new special effects to an already powerful performance. The Phantom of the Opera’s spectacular and suspenseful score will fill Tulsa Performing Arts Center’s Chapman Music Hall, for two unforgettable weeks, April 15-25. Travel back to the late 19th century with fantastic depictions of fashion from the era and get lost in the time’s fascination with

the supernatural and spiritual world. Uncover Christine’s desires for the romantic and lonely Phantom, who haunts the opera house, and seduces her soul. The famous Labyrinth Underground, Beyond the Lake and The Staircase of the Opera House scenes project the famous scores of “The Phantom of the Opera,” “The Music of the Night” and “Masquerade.” See the man who wears the mask and haunts the theater, played by Chris Mann, and the woman whose heart falls weak to his ways, played by Katie Travis. Experience a one-of-a-kind performance that uses the talents of Paul Brown, scenic design; Maria Bjornson, costume design; Paule Constable, lighting design; and Scott Ambler, choreography to captivate audiences and assist a stellar cast in the unraveling of The Phantom of the Opera. Secure the opportunity to see this phenomenal production, presented by Celebrity Attractions, at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, 110 E. Second St., Tulsa. Tickets start at $50. For more information, visit www.tulsapac.com. BRITTANY ANICETTI APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

Performance

MURDER FOR TWO

PHOTO COURTESY LYRIC THEATRE OF OKLAHOMA.

Entertainment

Calendar

It only takes two actors and a grand piano to command the stage for this big musical comedy. After a writer is killed, small-town Officer Marcus Moscowicz, who has high hopes of becoming detective one day, throws himself into the case, hoping it will land him his dream job. Everyone he runs into, the writer’s wife, a prima ballerina and a psychiatrist, are suspects, and even better, all the suspects are played by the same actor. While music and madness intertwine with the investigation, Moscowicz will race the clock, trying to uncover the killer before the real detective he’s standing in for gets back. This award-winning production, a fun, dead-on portrayal of the murder mysteries of the old days, will be killing audiences with laughter in Oklahoma City through April 12. Lyric Theatre’s stage, 1725 NW 16th St., will become the scene of the crime, and WhoDunit? will be the leading question the next 90 minutes. Tickets start at $25. For more information, visit www. lyrictheatreokc.com.

A Devil Inside April 30, May 1 Gene’s on a

mission to avenge her father’s death in this dark comedy, after finding out he was murdered 14 years prior. www.tulsapac.com

The Drunkard and The Olio Ongoing The

melodrama continues with heroes, damsels in distress and over-the-top characters most Saturdays of the year at the Spotlight Theatre. www. spotlighttheatre.org

IN CONCERT Bad Religion April 1 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

cainsballroom.com

Downlink & Dieselboy April 2 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Ariana Grande April 3 Chesapeake Energy

Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

Aaron Watson April 3 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Tedeschi Trucks Band April 3 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Willie Nelson and Family April 3 7 Clans

F i r s t C o u n c i l C a s i n o & H o t e l . w w w. firstcouncilcasinohotel.com

Merle Haggard April 3 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. www.grandresortok.com

Sworn In April 3 The Conservatory. www. conservatoryokc.com

Ratatat April 4 Brady Theater. www.

bradytheater.com

Red Wood Rising April 4 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Kris Kristofferson April 4 Winstar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com

Bloodgeon With Locals April 4 The Conservatory. www.conservatoryokc.com The War on Drugs April 5 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Dr. Dog: Flamingo Hotel Tour April 6 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Nickelback April 7 BOK Center www.

PERFORMANCES Corpus Christi Thru April 4 Paralleling the

birth, death and resurrection of Jesus, this story follows Joshua, a young gay man born and raised in Corpus Christi, Texas. www. okctheatrecompany.org

Murder for Two Thru April 12 Everyone is a

suspect in this hilarious musical murder mystery. www.lyrictheatreokc.com

Soledad Barrio & Noche Flamenca April 1 Martín Santangelo and Soledad Barrio bring to the stage one of the world’s most complex and mysterious art forms. www.tulsapac.com

Alton Brown Live! The Edible Inevitable Tour April 2 Enjoy science, music, food

and Alton Brown in this two hour extravaganza. www.okcciviccenter.com

Godspell April 3-11 Experience kindness,

tolerance and love through a small group of people who help to tell different parables. www. tulsapac.com

Down Memory Lane April 4 As a couple celebrates their 40th anniversary, they remember the music that made them fall in love. www. coxcentertulsa.com Of Mice and Men April 10, 12 Enjoy an in-

timate saga of two Depression-era workers’ struggle for survival and their dream of owning their own farm. www.tulsapac.com

The Amish Project April 10-12 A fictional

telling of the Nickel Mines schoolhouse shooting in an Amish community, explore the path of forgiveness and compassion forged in its wake. www.okcciviccenter.com

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Modigliani Quartet April 12 The Modigliani Quartet brings their distinctively French attitude to the stage. www.tulsapac.com

Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezin April 12 This concert tells the story of the courageous Jewish prisoners in the Theresienstadt Concentration Camp during World War II. www. okcciviccenter.com

The Phantom of the Opera April 1525 Enjoy this “bigger and better than ever before” production with exciting special effects, new scenic and lighting designs and new staging and choreography. www.tulspac.com

Bard Fiction April 16-19 Shakespeare and

Tarantino collide in this Elizabethan retelling of the cult classic film Pulp Fiction. www.tulsapac. com

The Midtown Men April 17 This sensa-

tional production reunites four stars from the original cast of Broadway’s Jersey Boys. www. brokenarrowpac.com

Charlotte’s Web April 17-18 Enjoy the

classic favorite with Wilbur and Charlotte and a variety of colorful characters. www.tulsapac. com Nine Sinatra Songs April 17-19 An exciting and eclectic mixed bill of three different works. www.okcciviccenter.com

Verdi Requiem-The Defiant Requiem April 18 This masterful program honors a group of Jewish prisoners who learned and sung the Verdi Requiem, a Catholic Mass. Murry Sidlin’s research of their story led to the creation of The Defiant Requiem. www.signaturesymphony. org

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

Young Composers Concert April 19 A

celebration of original compositions by students age 5 through college will include a new music concert by the Tulsa Honors Chamber Orchestra. www.livingarts.org

StepCrew April 23 StepCrew presents a

high-energy show, bringing together Irish Stepdance, Ottawa Valley Stepdance and Tap. www.armstrongauditorium.org

Penn & Teller April 24 This comedic duo

continues to defy labels by redefining the genres of magic and comedy. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Treasure Island April 24-26 The young actors of Broadway Bootcamp stage a fresh take on the classic Robert Louis Stevenson tale about buccaneers and buried gold. www.tulsapac. com An Evening with David Sedaris

Gabriel Inglesias: Unity Through Laughter April 25 Don’t miss one of America’s

bokcenter.com

Lions Lions April 7 The Conservatory. www. conservatoryokc.com

most successful stand-up comedians with his mixture of storytelling, parodies, characters and sound effects. www.bokcenter.com

Tech N9ne’s Special Effects Tour April

A Night at the Cotton Club April 24,

Yonder Mountain String Band April

25 Smoky, sultry and swingin’. Your table is reserved for a salute to the “Hi De Ho” swing of Cab Calloway, the elegant “Satin Doll” sheen of Duke Ellington and the blistering blast of Satchmo. www.okccivccenter.com

An Evening with David Sedaris April 29 The celebrated NPR humorist comes to Hudiburg Chevrolet Center for an evening of cutting wit, social satire and riveting conversation. www.okcciviccenter.com

8 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com 9 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Jason Aldean April 10 BOK Center. www.

bokcenter.com

Hottest Chicks Tour April 10 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com Randy Rogers Band and Josh Abbott Band April 10 Winstar World Casino. www. winstarworldcasino.com

Matthew West April 11 Mabee Center. www.mabeecenter.com

Emerson Hart of Tonic April 11 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com Texas Hippie Coalition April 11 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Nora Jan Struthers & The Party Line April 13 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Bryan Adams April 14 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors April 15 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Ewan Dobson April 15 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Givers April 15 The Conservatory. www. conservatoryokc.com

Robert Earl Keen April 16 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com


Smallpools April 17 Vanguard Music Hall.

In Concert

www.thevanguardtulsa.com

ARIANA GR ANDE

17 Cox Business Center www.coxcentertulsa. com

John Moreland April 18 Woody Guthrie Center. www.woodyguthriecenter.org Toni Braxton April 18 Winstar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com

Sean Watkins April 18 The Blue Door. www.

bluedoorokc.com

The Delta Saints and Lionize April 18 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa. com

One Eyed Doll April 19 The Conservatory. www.conservatoryokc.com

Stone Temple Pilots April 20 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

OK Go April 21 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net

SoMo April 22 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

cainsballroom.com

The Bright Light Social Hour April 23 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa. com Brand New April 23 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Death Cab for Cutie April 24 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Modest Mouse April 24 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Shakey Graves April 24 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Pitbull April 24 Winstar World Casino. www. winstarworldcasino.com Air Supply April 24 Riverwind Casino. www.

riverwind.com

And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead April 24 The Conservatory. www. conservatoryokc.com Air Supply April 25 Winstar World Casino.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL SIMON.

The 21-year-old Ariana Grande is known more today for her young musical career than she is for the six years she spent acting, both on Broadway and television. Grande became an artist to watch in August 2013 when her debut studio album, Yours Truly, earned the No. 1 one spot on the U.S. Billboard 200. Almost exactly one year later, she released her second album, My Everything, that includes hit singles “One Last Time,” “Problem,” featuring Iggy Azalea, and “Break Free.” In her short stint in the pop music industry, Grande has worked with many top artists, including Iggy Azela, Jessie J, Nicki Minaj, Zedd and Big Sean. She has also racked up some noteworthy honors including two nominations at this year’s 57th Grammys for Best Pop Vocal Album for My Everything and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance for “Bang Bang,” with Jessie J and Nicki Minaj. She has recently performed on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon and is now touring the country on her Honeymoon Tour, set to stop at Oklahoma City’s Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 W. Reno Ave., on April 3. So young in her career, there’s a lot fans haven’t seen from this rising star. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. For more information visit www. chesapeakearena.com.

Life in Color Big Bang World Tour April

www.winstarworldcasino.com

Albert & Gage April 25 The Blue Door. www.

bluedoorokc.com

FAMILY

Thomas Rhett April 25 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. www.grandresortok.com

Legacy Fighting Championship April

Hozier April 26 Brady Theater. www.

3 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com

bradytheater.com

Amy Speace & Tim Easton April 26 The

MDA Muscle Walk of Oklahoma City April 4 Join others at the Cox Convention

Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Billy Bob Thornton & THE BOXMASTERS April 26 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

Center to raise money and awareness for those fighting life-threatening muscle diseases. www. coxconventioncenter.com OKC Outlaws Roller Derby April 4 Watch this all-female team skate faster and hit harder at the Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okcoutlawsrollerderby.com

cainsballroom.com

Zappa Plays Zappa April 28 ACM@UCO. www.acm.uco.edu

Krokus April 28 Vanguard Music Hall. www.

thevanguardtulsa.com

Iron & Wine April 29 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Run/Walk for the Thin Blue Line April 11 Enjoy a 5k run/walk in Stillwater that benefits the OK Chapter of Concerns of Police Survivors. 405.612.2335

Marilyn Manson April 29 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Blue October April 29 Diamond Ballroom.

Of Mice and Men

Redbud Classic April 11, 12 Mile bike tours

www.diamondballroom.net

John Fullbright April 30 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Home Free April 30 Oklahoma City Civic

Center Music Hall. www.okcciviccenter.com

SPORTS Oklahoma City Thunder www.nba.com/ thunder v. Dallas v. Houston v. San Antonio v. Sacramento v. Portland

April 1 April 5 April 7 April 10 April 13 Oklahoma City Blue www.nba.com/ dleague/oklahomacity v. Idaho

April 3 Oklahoma City Barons www.okcbarons.com v. San Antonio v. Hamilton v. Iowa v. Iowa

April 7 April 14 April 17 April 18

Oklahoma City Dodgers www.okcdodgers.com v. Round Rock v. Nashville v. Omaha

April 9-12 April 13-16 April 25-28 Oklahoma City Energy www.energyfc.com v. Seattle v. Saint Louis

April 18 April 25 Tulsa Oilers www.tulsaoilers.com v. Missouri

April 3, 4 Tulsa Drillers www.tulsadrillers.com v. San Antonio v. Corpus Christi v. NW Arkansas

April 9-11 April 12-14 April 23-26 OSU Men’s Baseball www.okstate.com v. Texas April 3-5 v. Oklahoma April 7 v. Oral Roberts April 14 v. Baylor April 17-19 v. Dallas Baptist April 21 v. Arkansas-Little Rock April 28

OU Men’s Baseball www.soonersports.com v. Kansas v. Dallas Baptist v. Alcorn State v. Sam Houston State

April 2-4 April 14 April 21, 22 April 24-26 OSU Women’s Softball www.okstate.com v. Kansas v. Texas Tech v. Oklahoma v. North Texas

April 2-4 April 17-19 April 22 April 29 OU Women’s Softball www.soonersports.com v. Iowa State v. Arkansas v. Baylor v. North Texas

April 3, 4 April 8 April 16-18 April 20 TU Women’s Softball www.tulsahurricane.com v. UCF v. Oklahoma State v. Kansas v. Houston v. Missouri State

April 3, 4 April 15 April 18, 19 April 25, 26 April 29

kick off the classic on Saturday, followed by a 10k and 5k on Sunday, bringing together fun, fitness and philanthropy. www.redbud.org

Cinderella Confidential Thru April 9 Two

investigative reporters compete for the scoop of the century, interviewing everybody from a fairy godmother to mice in witness protection. www. oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

Jackie and Me April 1-11 A 10-year-old with

the special talent of time travel will go back in time to meet one of baseball’s greatest players, Jackie Robinson. www.oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

Puzzle Piece Palooza April 11 Take the

whole family to Chisholm Trail South Park in Broken Arrow and help foster support and awareness for the autism community. www.puzzlepiecepalooza. com

Disney’s The Jungle Book KIDS April 17-25 Performed at the Henthorne Performing Arts Center, this musical follows the famed Disney film and is filled with all the memorable characters. www.cityoftulsa.org

By Your Side 5k April 18 Promote physical

Kids Fest 2015 April 18 The Cox Convention Center will fill with booths, art, creativity, learning, inflatables, entertainment and roaming characters. www.coxconventioncenter.com

Jenks Foodie 5k-10k April 18 Enjoy races

The Emperor’s New Clothes April 24-May 8 Enjoy a Caribbean musical adaptation of the classic Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale where the emperor of the Little Iguana Island sets all the fashion standards. www.oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

fitness while raising funds for Parkside, which provides quality mental health services to its community. www.parksideinc.org

that benefit the Jenks Food Bank. www. jenksfoodie.com

Tails on the Trail April 18 Run a 5k alongside your pup and help reduce pet homelessness and overpopulation in Oklahoma City. www. bestfriendsokc.org 2015 Better Barrel Races World Final April 22-26 Oklahoma City State Fair Park. www. betterbarrelraces.com Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon April 26 A Boston qualifying USATF sanctioned race, this annual event helps raise funds for the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum. www.okcmarathon.com

Big 12 Men’s Golf Championship April 27-29 Southern Hills Golf Club. www.big12sports. com

ART Whistler and the British Etching Revival Thru April 5 This exhibition, drawn from

Philbrook’s permanent collection, presents a selection of prints by Whistler and Haden, along with other artists of the next generation, highlighting the wide range of subjects and visual effects captured by the etcher’s needle. www.philbrook. org

Drought: A Landscape Within Thru April 23 This installation depicts the loneliness of the life “as seen as a string of stimulations that emulate an experience we will never be able to have

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo.com

First Friday Art Crawl Ongoing Stroll the Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at the Guthrie Green and other venues. www.thebradyartsdistrict. com.

Art

R E N D E Z V O U S ARTISTS’ RETROSPECTIVE EXHIBITION AND ART SALE It’s that time of year

2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman. com

again: Gilcrease Museum pulls out all the stops for its annual exhibition and art sale, Rendezvous Artists’ Retrospective. Sculptor Walter Matia and painter Andy Thomas are this year’s featured artists and will offer new works for buyers and collectors, alongside artworks spanning their artistic careers. Both artists will be inducted into the Rendezvous Hall of Fame during this year’s festivities. The art sale, honoring Matia and Thomas, will take place Friday, April 17. Audiences are asked to join the museum at 6 p.m. for a preview and hor d’oeuvre buffet, with a 7:30 p.m. art sale draw to follow. Other events included in this exhibition are the Rendezvous Master Class, April 1316, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; two artist talks on Friday, April 17 – Thomas will speak at 10:30 a.m. and Matia at 1:30 p.m.; and Brunch with the Artists on Saturday, April 18, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information about Matia and Thomas or the Rendezvous Artists’ Retrospective, visit www.gilcrease.utulsa. edu. Modigliani Quartet

American Indian leaders and ordinary people provide the inspiration for works by contemporary American Indian artists, who translate images and portraits of old into modern media and works in an exhibit at Philbrook Downtown. www.philbrook.org Stories and Art: Beyond Illustration Thru April Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahhatulsa.org Center for Poets & Writers Exhibition Thru April Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahhatulsa. org

Sweet Pea’s Gestation & Day in the Park April 3-23 Living Arts of Tulsa. www.

livingarts.org

Sacred Mascots: Matthew Bearden April 3-25 Tulsa Artists’ Coalition Gallery. www. tacgallery.org

Husbands, Wives, Lovers April 3-25 A

solo exhibit by Mary James Ketch. www. theprojectboxokc.com or simply an apparition to divert our emotions.” www.livingarts.org

Wundrain-JP Morrison Lans Thru April 23 Reflect with this exhibit as it explores what the symbol of a house truly represents. www. livingarts.org

The You and the I-Micaela De Vivero Thru April 23 Enjoy this new room instal-

lation made from glass rods, dyed sisal and painted urethane. www.livingarts.org Thuy & Rice Thru April 23 A multi-media installation by Anh-Thuy Ngyuyen consists of two piles of rice on the floor and explores her Vietnamese identity, the imposition of her cultural heritage and her artistic rebellion. www.livingarts.org

The First Fifty Years of Oklahoma Art Thru April 25 Enjoy artwork from artists who

were the “firsts” to share their lifestyles, culture, art and traditions to a state and nation. www. oklahomaof.com

Shifting Focus: Historical Photos, Contemporary Art Thru April 26 Historical

photos, by Edward S. Curtis and others, of

108

Act III: Harolyn Long, Paul Medina and Sue Moss Sullivan April 3-May 17 Act

Three brings together three established Oklahoma City artists whose work shares a soft and muted tone evoking calmness, quiet reflection and curiosity through fiber and ceramics. www.108contemporary.org

Fish Stories April 4-Sept. 21 This exhibit features 20 gorgeous color plates based on the original watercolor paintings by well-known sporting artist Samuel Kilbourne. www. crystalbridges.org Rendezvous Artists’ Retrospective and Art Sale April 16-July 12 Contemporary

Western art will take center stage at this annual exhibition and art sale. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

Warhol: the Athletes April 16-July 12 This

exhibit is a series of 10 portraits of famous athletes commissioned by Andy Warhol’s friend and collector Richard Weisman. www.okcmoa.com

Small Town: Portraits of a Disappearing America Thru May 2 Alex Leme explores

the continuing disappearance of rural towns in America. www.oklahomacontemporary.org

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015

CHARITABLE EVENTS Tulsa’s New Leaders April 2 The Cystic

Fibrosis Foundation will honor Tulsa’s New Leaders at the Hyatt Regency Downtown Tulsa. www.cff.org/chapters/tulsa

Different Strokes: The Difference is Extraordinary April 2 Enjoy live and silent

auctions of one-of-a-kind art created by local and nationally known artists, as well as Town & Country School students, alongside catering and entertainment. www.tandcschool.org

March for Babies April 4 Help fund research, support families and help women with March of Dimes at Oral Roberts University. www. marchforbabies.org WALTER MATIA – TALL COVER (2015) 43” X 30” X 12”

Entertainment

First Friday Gallery Walk Ongoing The

From New York to Mexico Thru May 3 This exhibit explores the period that resulted in America’s first truly home-grown, avant-garde movement. www.philbrook.org

Coyote Songs-Desperado Dreams: The Art of Robby McMurtry Thru May 10 Remember the artist, illustrator, writer and mentor to countless youth, the late Robby McMurtry. The exhibition looks across his career with 35 pieces spanning 1973 to 2012. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org

Ansel Adams: Masterworks from the Collection of the Turtle Bay Exploration Park Thru May 10 Ansel Adams’ best-loved

and most famous photographs, which he called “The Museum Set,” go on display at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum and reveals the artist’s elegant eye for nature. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Madonnas of the Prairie: Depictions of Women in the American West Thru May 10 This exhibit features more than 100 works focusing on women in the late 19th century who helped build the nation. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org

Beyond the Battlefield: Depictions of War Thru May 10 An exhibition at Fred

Jones Jr. Museum of Art examines war through the eyes of artists. Beyond the Battlefield focuses on conflicts of the 20th century with paintings, prints and photography. www.ou. edu/fjjma

Intent to Deceive: Fakes and Forgeries in the Art World Thru May 10 See the

works of some of the most notorious and accomplished art frauds and forgers alongside original works of art by modern masters such as Charles Courtney Curran, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Paul Signac and others. www.okmoa.com

Changing Perspectives of Native Americans Thru Aug. 3 This artwork reflects

shifting attitudes toward Native Americans over the course of the 19th century. www. crystalbridges.org

Identity & Inspiration Ongoing See pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s extensive collection of American Indian artwork and artifacts. www.philbrook.org Opening Abstraction Ongoing Philbrook Downtown exhibits abstract work in all its manifestations. www.philbrook.org

Conflict Cast in Bronze Ongoing This

exhibit centers on art that remembers the fallen and honors those who served in war. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Van Gogh to Rothko: Masterworks from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Ongoing Enjoy masterpieces by some of the most prominent names in art history including Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, Salvador Dali, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol and Mark Rothko. www.crystalbridges.org

Focus on Favorites Ongoing This exhibit

highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

On Common Ground Ongoing Through the mixing of these works of art and cultural items depicting a great variety of people, one is reminded that all human beings have similar needs that bring us to a common ground. www. gilcrease.utulsa.edu Orly Genger: Terra Ongoing This massive

outdoor art installation made of more than a million feet of lobster-fishing rope creates a unique experience. www.oklahomacontemporary .org

Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the Okla-

homa City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa.com

A World Unconquered: The Art of Oscar Brousse Jacobson Ongoing Ja-

cobson arrived at the University of Oklahoma in 1915 and greatly influenced their School of Art. His career includes more than 600 works of art with inspiration from the landscapes of Colorado, New Mexico and Oklahoma. www. ou.edu/fjjma

The Linen Runway Show April 7 In this

runway show, models are wrapped in tablecloths, runners and chair ties that are tucked, tied, taped and pinned into fashionable looks. Proceeds will go to Children’s Miracle Network hospitals and Miss Oklahoma. www.mariannesrentals. com

TU Newman Center Society Dinner April 9 Dinner and honors benefit the students and programs of The University of Tulsa center, which prepares students for a life of leadership in the Catholic Church. This year’s honorees are Tony and Phyllis Lauinger. www.tu-newman. org

2015 Rescue Gala April 9 Spend the evening honoring everyday heroes in our community for their extraordinary service to others, benefiting the American Red Cross. www.coxcentertulsa.com Women of the Year Luncheon April 10 Sorority sisters unite as the Tulsa Panhellenic Council holds its honors at the annual luncheon, taking place at Tulsa Country Club. www.tulsapanhellenic.org FTS Showcase Gala April 10 Support students of Tulsa Public Schools at this special gala with dinner, wine and more at Southern Hills Country Club. www.foundationfortulsaschools. org Relay For Life-TU April 10 Run with the

American Cancer Society to fund research to cure cancer and educate communities about preventing it at the University of Tulsa. www. relayforlife.org

Wine, Women and Shoes April 11 Enjoy

shopping, wine tastings, fashion and more at this event that offers both charity and corporate clients the opportunity to leverage a platform to achieve a variety of goals from charity fundraising and cause awareness to team building and client networking. www.wwstulsa.org

Aquarium Run April 11 The annual run – which

includes a half-marathon, 10k, 5k and one-mile event – takes place in Jenks and benefits educational programs at the aquarium. www. okaquarium.org

Bowl for Kid’s Sake April 11-June 13 Teams raise money for the youth mentoring organization and enjoy fun at the lanes with pizza and prizes. www.bbbsok.org Heart of Holland Hall Auction April 18 This auction offers great stuff and features a night of fun under the theme “Rock and Red” at Cain’s Ballroom. www.hollandhall.org

Garden Party April 18 This year’s party, “Bloom,”

will be held at the Cox Business Center and supports the school for children with disabilities. The event includes brunch and auctions. www.littlelighthouse. org

Tulsa Heart Walk April 18 Make an outward commitment to heart health, and join the walk at ONEOK Field in support of the American Heart Association’s mission and work. www.heart.org


Celebrate Cascia April 18 The school celebrates accomplishments of students, alumni, faculty and staff at this annual event. www.casciahall.org

Garden Fest April 18 This annual festival includes

arts and craft vendors as well as seeds and plants for spring gardening. The event benefits A New Leaf, helping individuals with disabilities gain work experience. www.anewleaf.org.

A Walk in the Park April 19 Help fight Par-

kinson’s disease during this sanctioned 5k and one-mile fun run/walk on ORU’s campus. www. tulsawalk.kintera.org

Spring Into Jazz Gala April 23 A long-

standing local charity organization will honor outstanding individuals and organizations in the community at its annual gala. www.tulsalinksinc. org

The Magic of Mentorship Luncheon April 24 The luncheon aimed at helping women develop their maximum potential will be at Southern Hills Country Club. The keynote speaker is Tory Johnson, entrepreneurial and small business expert. www.jltulsa.org

10th Brown & Brown Charity Golf Tournament April 24 This special tournament

at Pryor Creek Golf course benefits the Special Olympics of Oklahoma athletes and programming. www.sook.org

Tanzanite Nights: Discover the Beauty April 24 A dinner, along with a presentation, silent and live auctions and entertainment, at downtown Tulsa’s Jazz Hall of Fame will benefit The Janada L. Batchelor Foundation for Children (JBFC). www. jbfc-online.org

Designer Showcase 2015 April 24-May 17 The Anne and Henry Zarrow House gets a special makeover for the public to see at this “open house” of style and design supporting Foundation for Tulsa Schools. www.foundationfortulsaschools. org

2015 Equality Gala April 25 Join Oklahomans

for Equality at its gala filled with dining, cocktails, dancing and music at the Cox Business Center. www.okeq.org

Fourth Annual CANdlelight Ball April 25 Dine by candlelight in the historic Mayo Hotel for one unforgettable night that begins with champagne and cocktails and moves on to dining and dancing. www.childabusenetwork.org

Aviator Ball 2015 April 25 Get ready for another spectacular evening of fine dining with wine and entertainment with an aviation theme and supporting the Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium. www.tulsairandspacemuseum.org

11, 12 Stop by Tulsa’s Expo Square for the original Tulsa gun show and the largest gun show in the world. www.tulsaarmsshow.com

The Last Transport: My Childhood

11th Annual Chefs for the Cure April

During the Holocaust April 16 Hear from Eva Unterman, a survivor of the Holocaust and author of Through Eva’s Eyes, during the Tulsa Council for Holocaust Education’s 18th Annual Yom HaShoah/Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration at Congregation B’nai Emunah. A book signing will follow the event. www.jewishtulsa.org

25 The annual taste of style and great food is hosted at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa. www.komentulsa.org

18th Annual Rebuild Day April 25 Join the

effort and work in teams to repair and make homes safe and secure for low-income individuals and families in Tulsa. www.rebuildingtogethertulsa.org

ONE Awards April 25 The Oklahoma Center

for Nonprofits will honor outstanding nonprofit groups and individuals in fundraising and philanthropy at Southern Hills Country Club. www. oklahomacenterfornonprofits.org

Open Up the World Awards April 25 Enjoy

this Academy Awards-themed event that recognizes individuals who consistently perform selfless acts for the sake of others at Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.gatesway.org

Artscape April 26 Art and festivities highlight Artscape at Camp Loughridge to benefit grief advocacy programs in Tulsa. www.thegriefcenter. org

Tree-Via April 28 Up With Trees, committed to

growing and tending Tulsa’s urban forests, celebrates Earth Day with a trivia event for teams. www. upwithtrees.org

Empty Bowls April 28 Savory soups and

salads are just the beginning of the night that includes silent and live auctions and a raffle to benefit the food bank and the community. www. okfoodbank.org

Russell Bennett Award Presentation Dinner April 30 Join the interfaith organization

for a night honoring the spirit of courage at the All Souls Unitarian church. The celebration will include heavy hor d’oeuvres, silent auctions, entertainment and more. www.interfaithalliance.org Dining Out for Life April 30 Great dining awaits at more than 30 participating Tulsa restaurants, donating a portion of sales for the night to Health Outreach Prevention Education and the prevention of HIV and AIDS. www.hopetesting.org

Shine April 30 Come dressed in black and gold

for a glamorous evening at the Civic Center Music

Nickelback Hall with Sunbeam Family Services. 405.609.2311 www.sunbeamfamilyservices.org

COMMUNITY Tulip Extravaganza Thru April 10 Walk a

path surrounded by 135,000 beautiful tulips at Garvan Woodland Gardens in Hot Springs, Ark. www.garvangardens.org Nude 11 April 3, 4 This art show gives local and regional artists the chance to bare it all. www.idlballroom.com Green Country Spring Fling April 3-5 Green Country Arabian Horse Association hosts this Region 9 and Region 8 qualifier. www.gcha.org

Oklahoma Health & Wellness Expo April 4 Meet with health care professionals to learn how they can help your family be healthier. Engage in fun activities to be healthy and fit. The expo will provide screenings, information, resources and more. www.okhealthexpo.com

Schmoozapalooza Trade Show April 7 Join Oklahoma City business professionals as they gather at Oklahoma State Fair Park to preview the latest products and services from Chamber member exhibitors in a fun and casual networking experience. www.okcchamber.com

Questions and Answers with Steve Wozniak April 7 Wozniak, an American

computer scientist, best known as one of the founders of Apple, will speak as part of the OSU Tulsa Business Form. www.mabeecenter.com

Booker T. Washington High School Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony April

into the BTWHS Hall of Fame, dinner attendees have the opportunity to contribute to the Hall of Fame Foundation’s scholarship fund. www.btw. tulsaschools.org

27th Annual Oklahoma Centennial Horse Show April 9-12 This show features

American Saddlebreds, Morgans, Roadster Horses and Ponies, Hackney/Harness Ponies and Shetland Ponies. www.okcentennial.com

Wine Forum of Oklahoma April 10,

Oklahoma City Farm Show April 1618 Exhibits will include all of the latest in agriculture with a full line of displays, including tractor, sprayer, tillage, harvest equipment, cattle management products and more. Also enjoy seminars, demonstrations, competitions and prize drawings. www.oklahomacityfarmshow.com 20th Anniversary Oklahoma City Bombing Project April 19 Presented by TheatreOCU, this theatrical production explores the Oklahoma City bombing through interviews and historical records from people who experienced the tragedy. 405.208.5227

11 Enjoy two days of wine seminars and tastings a l o n g s i d e e x c e p t i o n a l f o o d . w w w. wineforumofoklahoma.com SpringFest Garden Market & Festival April 10, 11 Celebrate gardening with experts who will help you create a great garden at this annual event at the Tulsa Garden Center. 918.746.5125

tor of the New York Times, Will Shortz, will share how crosswords are created, their curious history and how his lifelong passion for puzzles began. www.tulsapac.com

Oklahoma Urban Cinema Festival April

Tulsa Roots Music Bash April 18 Enjoy

Will Shortz: A Morning with the Puzzle Master April 17 The crossword edi-

10-12 Enjoy 30-35 diverse films from all over the world in categories including feature, short, documentary, international and international short. The films will be playing in 10 different venues across the Oklahoma City metro area. www.okurbancinema.com

free music at Guthrie Green. www.tulsarootsmusic. org

Southwest Street Rod Nationals April

Western Heritage Awards April 18 These awards honor and encourage the legacy of those whose works in literature, music, film and television reflect the significant stories of the American west. www.nationalcowboymuseum. org

10-12 Oklahoma City State Fair Park. www. nsra-usa.com Herb Day at Brookside April 11 Celebrate spring at the annual outdoor garden market event in Brookside. www.brooksidetheplacetobe.com

‘80s Prom April 11 Three clubs, three stages

three dance floors and 9 DJs put on one great prom. www.idlballroom.com Wanenmacher’s Tulsa Arms Show April

9, 10 Along with recognizing the 2016 inductees

Poetry Slam April 18 Listen to some of the Southwest’s most powerful poets engage with hard-hitting, thought-provoking ideas. www. livingart.org

Festival of the Arts April 21-26 The Festival Plaza in downtown Oklahoma City will transform into a celebration of visual, performing and culinary arts. www.oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com Industrial & Tool Show April 22, 23 Meet

current suppliers, ask for product information, compare similar products featured, get price quotes and more at this event at Expo Square. www.expoindustrialshows.com

Joel Osteen: Night of Hope April 24 Join Joel and others from different backgrounds for an exciting time of praise and worship where lives are changed and hope is restored. www. bokcenter.com OKC Memorial Marathon Health and Fitness Expo April 24, 25 Presented by OU

PHOTO COURTESY GUTHRIE GREEN.

Physicians and the Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau, this expo, held two days before the Marathon, draws runners, friends, family and supporters. www.coxconventioncenter. com

Community

TULSA ROOTS MUSIC BASH

A second year running, Tulsa Roots Music Bash is officially an annual event. This year, the seven hours of music and fun that echoes from downtown Tulsa’s Guthrie Green will take place on Saturday, April 18. From 2:30 until 9:30 p.m., music from all over the world, including Latin, R&B, Reggae, West African, Middle Eastern and other rocking genres, will entertain audiences alongside activities, community booths and local food and brews. Featured artists include the Los Lonely Boys, latin rock; The English Beat, British ska; Rocky Dawuni, African reggae and rhythms; Joe Driscoll & Sekou Kouyate, hip hop meets African polyrhythm; Calliope Circus performance art; and Perizad of Elysium Bellydance. There will be a kids arts and crafts tent hosted by Zarrow Center from 2:30 until 4:30 p.m., and Oklahoma craft beers will be flowing at Lucky’s on the Green. Enjoy good music in good company at one of Tulsa’s newest happenings. The bash is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.tulsarootsmusic.org or www.guthriegreen.com.

2015 Oklahoma Dental Association Annual Meeting April 24, 25 Learn from

some of the leading experts, develop relationships with various companies vital to the dental profession and catch up with colleagues. www. coxcentertulsa.com

R.K. Gun Show April 25, 26 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com

A Children’s Clothing & Toy Consignment Sale April 25-May 1 Oklahoma State Fair

Park. www.okc.jbfsale.com

To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR

APRIL 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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IN PERSON

Curtain Call A revered event designer chooses to stop and smell the roses.

A

PHIL LONG PLANS TO ENJOY A SIMPLER, BUT NONETHELESS BUSY, LIFE OUTSIDE OF EVENT PLANNING. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

legendary designer has decided to step back from his profession and reflect on a lustrous career. Phil Long, who has designed and coordinated many events in Tulsa the past 20-plus years, turned 65 years old in September. Long has wowed patrons at events throughout the world during his career. His work has helped current Tulsa events sustain and continue to remain beneficial to nonprofits in the city. “Phil’s unparalleled creativity transitioned LeMasquerade into Carnivale, a spectacular party for many, many years,” says Suzanne Warren, first co-chair of LeMasquerade, which now benefits Mental Health Association of Oklahoma. “He created the vision for the inaugural Painted Pony Ball (benefiting The Children’s Hospital Foundation at Saint Francis), launched the Mirror Ball to support Domestic Violence Intervention Services and designed the Opera Ball for more than seven years. His team’s work never disappoints.” Long has designed events in New York City and San Francisco, ranging from prestigious affairs for such celebrities as Elizabeth Taylor, Karl Lagerfeld, Cher, Donna Karan, Brook Astor, Wolfgang Puck and the Bush family. “I was proud to bring that experience to Tulsa and help make event planning a real career,” Long says. “Today, apprentices jump at the chance to understudy and ask me questions.” Long believes that it takes spending money to make money, and fundraising for marquee events in Tulsa has been a passion of his. “Guests pay top dollars for their seats and appreciate feeling good about getting dressed up and supporting an organization and a great cause,” he says. “Designing an event is more than setting up a few video screens and hoping the technicians know how to control the sound.” Mollie Williford has financially supported, chaired and served as honorary chair for many events benefiting various causes in Tulsa. “Phil’s events take my breath away and cause goose bumps time after time after time,” she says. “I love him dearly.” Long worked for almost 15 years with administrators at The University of Tulsa to plan events, receptions and galas for donors and patrons. Jan Zink, former senior vice president of institutional advancement at TU, recently sang Long’s praise for his years of hard work and dedication to the university. “Before I die, I pray to have just one more grand event with Phil Long’s magic touch. He is magnificent,” she says. Long has been recognized by readers of this publication as The Best of the Best event planner for several years running. Though he plans to take a step back from his business, “The term semi-retirement may be an exaggeration,” he admits. “My days of setting tables, climbing ladders and pressing imperfections are in the past,” Long says. “Depending on who it is, I may consult while sitting by the fireplace, roll in occasionally and sit from afar to critique the details, attend when I can and proudly cry in my handkerchief with admiration and gratitude.” Long has recently set his focus on interior design projects for longtime clients, both in the country and internationally, including the Kenneally estates in Ireland and Bermuda. JAMI MATTOX

112

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2015


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