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APRIL 2017

Forty Young PROFESSIONALS

Making a

DIFFERENCE TM

Downtown

Living More people are joining the downtown lifestyle

Making A

Dream Home Renovating homes to create a perfect fit

Life After

Release Two wrongfully convicted

Tulsans reflect on their first year of freedom


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Features April

46 Life After Release

2017 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXI, No. 4

After being wrongfully convicted, De’Marchoe Carpenter and Malcolm Scott were released from prison thanks to help from The Innocence Project. The two Tulsans reflect on their first year of freedom.

Each year, Oklahoma Magazine selects 40 young Oklahomans who represent the best the state has to offer. Meet this year’s class of 40 Under 40.

73

PHOTO COURTESY AMERICAN RESIDENTIAL GROUP

51 40 Under 40

Downtown Renaissance

Tulsa and Oklahoma City continue to grow in their downtown areas – in the first of our three-part look at downtown living, we focus on the flourishing resident populations.

WANT SOME MORE? APRIL 2017

April 2017

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

78 Creating a Dream Home

Remodeling and renovation projects allow Oklahomans to create exactly the homes they want.

Making a

DIFFERENCE TM

Downtown

Living More people are joining the april 17 cvr.indd 1

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

MORE PHOTOS

Forty Young PROFESSIONALS

downtown lifestyle

Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES

Making A

Dream Home Renovating homes to create a perfect fit

Life After

Release

Two wrongfully convicted Tulsans reflect on their first year of freedom

3/24/17 8:56 AM

ON THE COVER: OUR STATE IS TEEMING WITH YOUNG PROFESSIONALS WHO STRIVE TO MAKE A MARK ON OKLAHOMA. MEET THIS YEAR’S IMPRESSIVE CLASS OF 40 UNDER 40. PHOTOS BY SCOTT MILLER

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes even more great Oklahoma events.


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Departments

11

11 State 14 16 18 20 22 24

Community theaters are the heart of Oklahoma’s arts scene.

People Culture History Community Sports Insider

27 Life and Style 28 32 34 36 38 40 43 44

Interiors

A once forlorn building now serves as a gateway to downtown OKC.

40

Denim, white and military-inspired fashion pieces define April style.

Scene Spotlight

The 20th anniversary of Tulsa CARES’ Red Ribbon Gala proves to be an enormous success.

89

A Route 66 business lets food trucks sell at its venue with indoor-outdoor dining ... and a bar, too.

Local Flavor Random Flavors

89 Where and When 90 94

28

FYI City Life Health Destinations Style

83 Taste 84 86

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Gilcrease Museum presents two thought-provoking poster collections this month.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

44

96 Closing Thoughts

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

83


Dr. Larson celebrates the routine deliveries and is ready for the ones that need extra help. Lora Larson, M.D. OB/GYN HOSPITALIST

“That moment of birth never gets old,” said Dr. Lora Larson, who has delivered more than 10,000 babies throughout her medical career. After years in private practice, she is now a Saint Francis Hospital OB/GYN hospitalist. As part of a team on duty 24/7, she cares for emergency deliveries and provides support for patients until their regular OB/GYN arrives at the hospital. Because of resources that include physician specialists, nurses and the area’s only Level IV neonatal intensive care unit, Saint Francis Hospital also serves as a regional referral center for women with high-risk pregnancies. “We train for every possible situation to keep moms and babies safe,” Dr. Larson said. For more information about Saint Francis Women’s and Children’s Services, call 918-488-6688 or visit saintfrancis.com.

Healthcare for life.


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™ OKLAHOMA

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Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2017 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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LET TER FROM THE EDITOR Oklahoma has made a major effort lately to retain its talented young professionals as well as attract young people from across the country. Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2017 is proof the effort is paying off. While the members of this year’s class work in diverse fields, they all have one thing in common: a desire to make their communities better. This shows not only in the growing businesses they work for that form the backbone of the state’s economy, but also the volunteerism and philanthropic work they perform.We enjoyed meeting this year’s class of 40 Under 40 and look forward to their continued achievements. This month is also our annual Downtown Living feature, which we’ve expanded into a three-part series. Oklahoma’s downtowns, formerly the home of mostly businesses, have become thriving areas where people are flocking to live, work and play. In our first installment, we focus on the residential boom in downtown areas. Also this issue, Oklahoma Magazine talks to De’Marchoe Carpenter and Malcolm Scott. These two Oklahomans were recently exonerated after serving more than 20 years in prison; both men were released with the help of The Innocence Project. While many people would be bitter over their lost time, the two men talk about how they chose to leave any anger behind as they reflect on their first year of freedom. Finally, our remodeling and renovation feature looks at two different projects where people were truly able to create the home of their dreams. As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com. Sincerely,

FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES EMAIL ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

2017

OKLAHOMA

Justin Martino Justin Martino Managing editor

LOOK FOR THE RESULTS IN THE UPCOMING JULY EDITION.

What’s HOT At

Socialites

MASON COOK

@masoncook 638k @OfficialMasonCook 24k @masoncook 78k @masoncook

THE

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

Each year, Oklahoma Magazine shines the spotlight on 40 of Oklahoma’s top-tier business and community leaders under the age of 40. Whether it be through volunteerism, business leadership or activism, these select individuals have dedicated a portion of their lives to setting positive examples for those around them, and have made it a priority to improve their local communities. At okmag.com, see one-on-one interviews with 20 of our participants, and get to know what fuels them every day, both personally and professionally.

PHOTO BY ADAM TAYLOR/ABC - © 2016 AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANIES, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Votes 8

40 UNDER 40 WEB EXCLUSIVE VIDEO INTERVIEWS

Mason Cook is an Emmy-nominated actor most famous for playing Ray DiMeo on the ABC comedy Speechless. Originally from Oklahoma City, Cook has been working on the big and small screen since his debut on Grey’s Anatomy at age 9. He has since made a name for himself, making regular appearances on popular television shows and blockbuster films like Desperate Housewives and The Lone Ranger. On social media, Cook shares his on-set antics with fans and uses Twitter and Facebook to raise awareness about various charitable causes.

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State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Casting Calls for All

I

OKLAHOMA HAS A VAST COLLECTION OF COMMUNITY THEATERS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Community theaters are the heart of the Oklahoma’s arts scene.

t’s a popular notion in American history that the Puritans fled England to escape religious persecution. While the story has a grain of truth, the full reasons they were driven from their country are much more sinister. While in power, they murdered a king, outlawed dancing, canceled Christmas and – most dastardly of all – closed the theaters. Lucky for us today, theater is alive and well in the New World. And few places have more dedication to the arts than Oklahoma’s collection of community theaters. “In my opinion, community theater is our national theater,” says Sara Phoenix, artistic director of Theatre Tulsa. “It really doesn’t exist in the same varied forms in any other place in the world. It is an American treasure. And in the American spirit, community theater is all sorts of things. It’s small clubs of all-volunteer groups producing in theaters or community centers in towns across the country, all the way to large civic

theaters doing work that rivals anything you see on Broadway. It’s the heart in it that makes the difference.” Since 1969, the Oklahoma Community Theatre Association has served amateurs, students, theaters and professionals with resources, educational events and opportunities to connect with others in Oklahoma’s flourishing theatre community. Over the decades, the organization has grown from 16 theaters and 30 individuals to 32 theaters and more than 100 members, as well as youth members and university theaters. The work of OCTA and Oklahoma’s theaters is invaluable to the state, says Sally Barnes, the association’s treasurer and past president. “Research has shown that communities that invest in the arts reap the additional benefits of jobs, economic growth and a quality of life that positions those communities to compete in a 21st-century creative economy,” she says. Chuck Tweed, production director of Oklahoma City’s Jewel Box Theatre since the 1970s, calls himself

“a perfect example of the old adage ‘Find a job you like, and you’ll never work a day in your life.’” Tweed agrees with Barnes that theater and the arts are essential to communities. “Oklahoma needs the arts – badly,” he says. “We entertain, teach life lessons, make you laugh and cry, and let you come into the lives of characters who affect you.… It is only my opinion, but, without the arts, we cannot grow to our full capacity. They feed us.” Tweed says one of the best parts about participating in community theater is the connection forged with others. “The actors form a family bond with other actors that last forever,” he says. “You work with them again at other theaters, see their shows and support each other through good and bad times.” Joanie Elmore, managing director of Theatre Bartlesville, says the importance of community theater cannot be overstated. “Community theater has a huge impact on all the actors and APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State

volunteers that participate, and the impact on the audiences is almost immeasurable,” she says. “Creative skills are learned and performed, new skills are acquired, camaraderie and community spirit are experienced, and large opportunities for personal and community growth are facilitated. The show themes deeply affect the audiences and the participants and can change the fabric of the society that they are presented in. Some communities are never the same after certain shows because, with community theater, new heights and depths within the community itself can be reached with theatrical expressions of culture.” Elmore says those who want to become involved in community theater need the “heart of a volunteer”– a true commitment of time and spirit. Tweed has a different warning for aspiring thespians.

“It is addicting! You will never fall out of love with theater,” he says. “To give to an audience every performance is so rewarding. Not from an ego experience, but that you made a group of people laugh/cry/think/ reflect on themselves and life. “I would just like to encourage people to take the risk of getting involved. It could change your life!” And as William Shakespeare wrote, “Nothing will come of nothing.”

ACTORS FROM JEWEL BOX THEATRE IN OKC REHEARSE FOR A PRODUCTION OF BUS STOP. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

TARA MALONE

PERCHANCE TO DREAM

For many who fantasize of treading the boards, just the thought of taking steps toward the stage can be daunting. In addition to spending decades nurturing the confidence and skills of young artists as a debate and drama teacher at Norman High School, Betsy Ballard has been involved in every aspect of Norman’s community theater scene since the 1980s. If you’re nervous about getting involved, she says, go slow. “Get on the lowest levels you can bear,” Ballard says. “Go sell tickets. Work the concession stand. Get in on the edges.” And if you’re not scared? Ballard encourages neophytes to find every audition and just go. “There is a group someplace that needs what you’ve got,” she says. “You’ve just go to find them. There are all types of productions, all types of gifts.” And if you can’t find it? “Make it,” Ballard says. “Make it and they will come.”

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The State

PEOPLE

Channeling The Bard

Haley Grace Clark’s love-hate combo qualifies her for the National Shakespeare Competition.

H

aley Grace Clark has a trait that many – especially The Bard – would extol but that worked against her in an important competition a

year ago. Instead of rejecting this “problem” – looking too young to depict older characters – Clark embraced it and earned a spot in this month’s National Shakespeare Competition at New York’s Lincoln Center. Clark, a 17-year-old senior at Tulsa Edison High School, represents Oklahoma when she performs a monologue from The Tempest at the April 30-May 2 contest. (The event usually happens around April 23, the probable birthday/definite death date of William Shakespeare, but scheduling conflicts arose.) With Miranda, a teen who awkwardly, excitedly, red-facedly falls in love with Ferdinand, Clark has a role that matches her youth. Amber Harrington, Clark’s drama teacher and mentor, picked the part shortly after the 2016 state competition, where Clark didn’t finish as highly as she wanted. “She played Lady Anne from Richard III last year,” Harrington says. “That’s an old lady, which is difficult for one so young to pull off.” Clark trusted Harrington; she has been in the Edison drama program since she was a freshman and knows Harrington challenges her for all the right reasons. “I have to let my ego go all the time with her,” Clark says. “She wants the best out of me. Her feedback is very honest. My goal is to get to the point where she just smiles and nods.” For Clark and Harrington, victory was especially sweet but for different reasons. In her 17th year of teaching drama – all at Edison – Harrington takes her third state winner to nationals (Cara Cox in 2007 and Anna Richards in 2011), a remarkable feat considering “that I didn’t know what I was doing my first couple of years.” Clark’s best friend, Chris Millham, finished second, and she was still celebrating

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

HALEY GRACE CLARK ENACTS MIRANDA FROM A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM FOR HER SHAKESPEAREAN MONOLOGUE. BELOW: CLARK RECEIVES COACHING FROM HER DRAMA TEACHER, AMBER HARRINGTON.

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

with him when her name was called as the winner. “It was surreal,” Clark says. “He’s not into Shakespeare as much as I am, so he was really happy that I won, and I was ecstatic with how well he did.” Competitors also have to enact one of Shakespeare’s 154 sonnets; Clark’s is No. 90 (“Then hate me when thou wilt”), 14 iambic pentameter lines of breakup hell. “I wanted something to counter my comic monologue,” Clark says. “In doing it, you have to be miserable, but not mopey or whiney because that doesn’t work. At the end, it switches from sadness to anger. I try to make the other person feel bad. I really bring out the guilt.” Both Harrington and Clark draw inspiration from The Bard. “You can read Shakespeare and not get it,” Clark says, “but performing it gives meaning and understanding.” Harrington has obviously had an influence: “I have students doing 20-line monologues by the time they’re sophomores,” she says. “I get Shakespeare’s words in their mouths and they learn to love it because they’re standing up and acting it out. That’s what Shakespeare meant with his plays. He didn’t write them to just be read.” BRIAN WILSON

A DIFFICULT ACT

Performing a Shakespearean monologue, under rules by the English-Speaking Union of the United States, is difficult. A monologue, as opposed to a soliloquy, is spoken to characters onstage, but the lone contestant has to create the illusion of having others there with her or him. Plus, rules dictate zero costumes, props and British accents. In essence, it’s pure acting: the performer and Shakespeare’s words.


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The State

CLOCKWISE: MANY HISTORIC BUILDINGS IN CLAREMORE HAVE BEEN RENOVATED WHILE RECOVERING AND RESTORING HISTORIC FEATURES.

PHOTO BY ROBERT MELTON

THE GAZEBO PARK IN CLAREMORE PROVIDES A PUBLIC MEETING PLACE.

PHOTO BY JESSICA JACKSON

THE ORPHEUM THEATRE IN OKMULGEE IS LOCATED IN THE FORMER COOK OPERA HOUSE.

PHOTO BY KRISTIN BRANHAM

C U LT U R E

The New Cool

The Oklahoma Main Street program boosts small cities’ economic renewal and downtown lifestyles.

A

ll the cool kids are doing it: living downtown in small cities or gathering in urban sectors in need of revitalization – and participating in community renewal thanks to the continuing successes of the Oklahoma Main Street program. OMS is a volunteer-driven, public-private partnership that uses a proven organizational structure. The program concentrates on revitalizing historic commercial districts and neighborhoods and emphasizes historic preservation, says Buffy Hughes, director of Oklahoma Main Street, which is part of the state Department of Commerce. Since its inception in 1985, OMS efforts have resulted in $1.5 billion reinvestments in more than 60 Oklahoma communities with more than 1.4 million hours of labor donated by volunteers. Efforts can be as simple as a community cleanup day of raking, painting and sprucing up to as ambitious as raising funds to renovate eye-sore buildings into multipurpose assets. “Entrepreneurs in Oklahoma have done a great job setting up businesses that are located

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

on the first floors of multi-story buildings, but now we are seeing a push for upper floor housing,” Hughes says. “People want to live again where they work, shop, dine and play. From millennials to baby boomers, they say all the time they don’t want long commutes; they want to feel a part of a vibrant community, and that includes living in those historic commercial districts again.” Heather Sumner leads Okmulgee’s OMS and points to a slew of awards and accolades earned over the last three decades. But perhaps dearest to her heart is the successful launch of #OkmulgeeRising, a downtown residential project. “Seeing our community come back to life one building at a time – we have sold 28 buildings in our district in the last three years – has been both humbling and invigorating,” Sumner says. “The #OkmulgeeRising effort we started to re-

For example, Stockyards City in Oklahoma City is building an equestrian park to bring new life to that historic district, and hopefully, eventually, a new arena and stables. In addition, Claremore’s Main Street was named a National Historic District in 2016, says Hughes. “Claremore Main Street has seen nearly $20 million reinvested into the downtown community, including $7 million in the last year alone,” says “Private citizens didn’t Jessica Jackson, wait for someone else director of that city’s program. to ‘Be the Change.’” “We’ve welcomed 80 businesses and floor with second floor residential created 175 new jobs. Additionlofts,” she says. ally, sales tax dollars downtown From Stroud, the most have gone up by more than 50 recent community receiving a percent in the last three years. designation, to longer-running We can do that through dedicatOMS programs in Bartlesville, ed volunteers who’ve invested Duncan, Tahlequah, Oklahoma nearly 23,000 volunteer hours, City and Tulsa, Hughes says each about 3,000 of which were in project has its own success story. 2016.” vitalize the downtown buildings for modern day use for loft living and new businesses has turned into a citywide effort.” Hughes praises Okmulgee’s success. “Private citizens didn’t wait for someone else to ‘Be the Change.’ They purchased buildings around the square, such as the McBrayer and Parkinson buildings, and are turning these spaces into a mix use of businesses-retail on the ground

TRACY LEGRAND

2016 IMPACT The Oklahoma Main Street program began in 1985 and shows no signs of slowing down. In 2016, the program:

$77 million in total

• Received

investments from public and private donors • Created 414 •

new jobs Racked up 71,802 hours from volunteers


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The State

HISTORY

The Manse of Timelessness Little has changed since Henry Overholser, the “Father of Oklahoma City,” built his stately home.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

a giant house with nothing around. The Overholsers had the latest in luxuries: radiator heat, indoor plumbing, electricity, hand-stenciled and painted canvas covered walls, imported wood and an early intercom system. This mansion on the prairie became The mansion is one of the center of Oklaonly a few house museums homa City social life Anna Overholser in the country containing as hosted parties and 90 percent of the charitable events and founded women’s original furnishings. clubs. Today, the Overholser Mansion is a peephole back Overholser could be referred to in time. The mansion was sold to as the Father of Oklahoma City due to his involvement in virtually every the Oklahoma Historical Society by the Overholsers’ son-in-law in 1972 part of developing the city after his after their daughter died with no arrival, Escalon says. According to children. The mansion is one of only the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma Hisa few house museums in the country tory and Culture, he built an opera containing 90 percent of the original house and a theater and was instrufurnishing, where rooms can be seen mental in starting the State Fair. He the way the Overholsers saw them organized a railroad and promoted more than 100 years ago, Escalon a streetcar line. He was elected to says. the Oklahoma County Commission “It becomes apparent after glancafter running unsuccessfully for ing at some photos taken in 1915 of mayor twice. the downstairs rooms that little has Overholser found the queen been changed since the house was of his castle in Anna Ione built in 1903,” she says. Murphy shortly after movGet a behind-the-scenes glimpse ing to Oklahoma Territory. at the personal lives of the OverholThey married in October sers during the monthly Myster1889. The couple had one ies of the Mansion tours. View daughter, Henry Ione, such items as Anna Overholser’s born in 1905. scrapbook, Henry Ione’s baby book Once Overholser and clothing still hanging in closets. had a family, he needed Participants also get the opportunity a permanent home in to walk through some of the rooms this rough new land. that are off limits during daily tours. Overholser began work The mansion holds many memoon his mansion before ries from this prominent family that statehood in 1907 helped shape early Oklahoma City. and photos from BONNIE RUCKER the time show arrived in what would become Oklahoma just days after the Land Run of 1889. Almost immediately, he erected six business buildings along Grand (now Sheridan) Avenue and thus began his influential drive to build a city.

PHOTO COURTESY OVERHOLSER MANSION

A

n ultra-rich entrepreneur marries a young woman with the personality to become the center of social life in their city. They build a state-of-the-art, 20room mansion outside the city. She hosts parties for the elite. He continues to grow his wealth by being one of the first to build downtown. This is the story of Henry and Anna Ione Overholser in turn-ofthe-20th-century Oklahoma City. After making his fortune in Kansas, Colorado and Wisconsin, Henry Overholser heard about another business prospect. “Mr. Overholser saw a one-ofa-kind business opportunity and packed seven to 10 railroad cars full of building supplies and lumber, as well as some pre-fab buildings, after learning of the opening of the Unassigned Lands and Land Run in Indian Territory,” says Lisa Escalon, museum coordinator of the Overholser Mansion. The Ohio-born Overholser


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The State

Nutrition and Freshness at their Best

“I always tell people it’s the best place to be on Saturday morning,” says Kristin Hutto, talking about the Tulsa Farmers Market, where she is market administrator. “When you shop at the Tulsa Farmers Market, you are going to get the freshest food available, and when it’s fresh, it’s more nutrient dense.” “The produce that you buy from the [farmers] market is fresher, and will have a better shelf life than the food that you buy at a grocery store,” adds Cody Yount, OSU-OKC Farmers Market manager. Oklahoma City has a thriving trade on Saturdays at the Historic Farmers Public Market, but starting at the end of April there is also an opportunity to get fresh produce at the nearby Delmar Sunday Market in Delmar Gardens. Andrea Koester, market coordinator for Delmar Sunday Market, offers another reason for shopping at markets. “Eating with the seasons is extremely beneficial to the taste and nutrition [of food] because that is when the produce is at its peak,” she says.

Economic and Environmental Impact

Farmers markets also directly affect the economy of our state. The money that farmers market shoppers spend stays in the local economy and helps fellow Oklahomans. Tulsa Farmers Market is certified with the state Department of Agriculture as an Oklahoma Grown Market and Delmar Sunday Market has applied for this distinction, which verifies that all produce sold at the markets is grown in-state. The environment can also benefit from food sold locally. “Our food also has a smaller carbon footprint because it didn’t have to travel far,” Hutto says. Farmers markets can help mitigate the problem of food deserts, areas with little or no access to affordable fresh foods. “I describe the OSU-OKC Farmers Market as a hub for local food and goods. Our market is located in a food desert, so the market allows people who live in and around OSU-OKC access to fruits and vegetables,” Yount says. COMMUNIT Y

Springtime Produce Local farmers markets have nutritional, economic and environmental benefits.

BUYING YOUR PRODUCE AT LOCAL MARKETS OFFERS MYRAID HEALTH AND ECONOMIC BENEFITS.

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

20

S

pringtime has a special smell that adds a note of hope and excitement to the air. The weather has warmed, the days are longer, the sunshine is brighter. Cue the sound of songbirds and the setup of seasonal farmers markets, which embody spring, early summertime and happiness. Other than reveling in being outside after winter’s dreary end, what draws shoppers to farmers markets? Why should consumers add a trip to a local market to their weekly to-do lists? Here are several reasons.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

Connection with Food

In most cases, a consumer buys directly from a farmer who has grown the crops being sold at a farmers market. This provides the opportunity to discuss the food with farmers, to know exactly where the food came from and to understand the practices used in cultivation. Sellers often suggest ways to prepare the produce and recipes to try. “You’re buying fresh from the source, so not only do you know exactly where your food is coming from, you are getting the freshest food possible,” Koester says. So, if you’re feeling a little sluggish after winter and want to truly relish that spring has arrived, pack up the family and get out to a local farmers market to enjoy the tastes of spring and summer. BONNIE RUCKER


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The State

SPORTS

A Coz Fore Celebration

Cary Cozby, the golf pro at Southern Hills, devotes much of his time to helping others.

COZBY BELIEVES SOUTHERN HILLS IS AN OASIS FROM THE DAY-TO-DAY STRUGGLES OF LIFE.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

C

ary Cozby, director of golf at Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, is grateful to have won a top award in his profession, but service to others is what drives his way through fairways and life itself.

“Growing up with the PGA, you meet a lot of the people who hold the title, and it’s a great honor.”

Cozby became the 63rd recipient of the PGA Golf Professional of the Year Award in November. Considered by many as the most prestigious honor from the Professional Golfers’ Association, the award is sought by hundreds in the sport, but Cozby’s esteemed resume and hard work secured him the distinction. Regardless of the awards and recognition, Cozby’s passion lies in helping others. A survivor of colon cancer, he cites his work in the Swingin’ Fore a Coz golf marathon as his crowning achievement. The event ran for the last 10 of the 15 years that Cozby was at Wichita (Kansas) Country Club and earned $750,000. All of the money went straight to Victory in the Valley, a nonprofit organization helping those suffering from cancer and their caregivers. The charity paid for transportation and lodging for those affected by cancer, and even bought two cars for those who did not have reliable sources of transportation. Cozby says proceeds were used solely for helping others. “The money went straight to the people who needed it most,” he says. “That’s why I think we were successful.” But Cozby’s work isn’t done; he wants to start another charity golf marathon in or around Tulsa or other parts of Green Country. Participants in golf marathons play from dawn until dusk as quickly as possible, with sponsors contributing money for each hole played. Cozby’s family is deeply rooted in golf, as his brothers and father have also held positions in the PGA. Cozby’s father, Jerry Cozby, won the PGA Golf Professional of the Year Award in 1985, making them the only father-son duo to hold this highly respected title. “It’s cool to share something like this with your dad,” Cozby says. “Growing up with the PGA, you meet a lot of the people who hold the title, and it’s a great honor.” Noting who has inspired him, Cozby says his father provided him with the business sense to succeed, while his mother mentored him and his brothers on being successful and happy in life. He and his brothers grew up in the world of golf and played for the University of Oklahoma before pursuing careers in the sport after graduating. Golf taught them how to be patient and to swing for their goals, he says. Cozby, who became the Southern Hills club professional a litte more than two years ago after being head pro at Wichita Country Club, wants to stay on for 25 years. He also sees the legacy of Southern Hills as a “welcoming, relaxing and genuine” oasis from the dayto-day struggles of life. “Whenever you drive up that long road for the first time in the spring or fall, it just takes your breath away,” he says, “I alway want to preserve that feeling.” GAGE FRONCZAK

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


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23


The State

INSIDER

From Country to Crooning

I

t’s been 27 years since I first wrote about Oklahoma’s Tim Rushlow, who was then the lead singer for a spirited young group called Little Texas. Little Texas had come to what was then the biggest country-music venue in town, Tulsa City Limits, as the opening act for the hit band Shenandoah. I concluded my June 30, 1990, Tulsa World review of the show by saying, re: Little Texas, “Watch these guys. They should make it, and big.” I certainly wasn’t always right with my predictions, but I was on the money with that one. A year later, the group’s members were watching their first single, “Some Guys Have All the Love,” soar into the Top 10 of the national country charts, beginning a near-decade run that took Little Texas from opening in clubs to headlining in arenas. As the band’s primary vocalist as well as a guitarist and mandolinist, Rushlow was right there in the middle of it all, and after the group disbanded, he continued to record hits like the Top 10 country ballad “She Misses Him,” an affecting story of the emotional toll of Alzheimer’s disease. Even then, however, there were indications that Rushlow might eventually find his way down a different musical path. “I remember a comment my wife made to me 25 years ago,” he says. “She said, ‘You know, I’m really happy you’re a country star, but I see you in a suit, singing in front of a big-band orchestra.’ That was just a vision she had.”

24

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

As it turns out, that vision would ultimately become reality. These days, Rushlow is making waves as a big-band vocalist in the Rat Pack and Great American Songbook tradition, recording and touring with a 20-piece orchestra – and having a swell time doing it. “I’m very proud of what I accomplished in country music,” he says. “I’m very proud of Little Texas and I’m proud of my solo hits as Tim Rushlow. But I’ve evolved as an artist to a place where I think there’s more for me somewhere else right now. And it’s the big-band world, the jazz world, singing classics, being a curator of the Great American Songbook, and getting to bring that to a new generation of fans who don’t even know they know it.

“You know, I could take the big band to Japan and do a show, and those people would know every word to every song.” “I’ve watched 25-year-olds at my shows singing every word, and after the show I’ll do an autograph thing and they’ll come by and say, ‘I don’t know how I know all of these songs.’ And my answer always is, ‘Well, you saw the Lincoln commercial with Matthew McConaughey with “Ain’t That a Kick in the Head” playing in the background. And you heard “I Get A Kick Out of You” behind the Toyota commercial.’ And you can just go

on down the road. These songs are making a serious comeback.” While Rushlow discusses the classic tunes with all the zeal of a recent convert, his affinity for the likes of Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra and Bobby Darin goes back to his childhood and his dad’s record collection. Tim was born at Tinker Air Force Base, where his father, Tom Rushlow, was stationed. Tom worked as an aircraft mechanic, but he made himself known to baby boomers throughout Oklahoma and surrounding states as the lead vocalist for Moby Dick and the Whalers, a hugely popular regional rock ’n’ roll band of the ’60s that ended up appearing nationally on Dick Clark’s Happening ’68 television show. “Both my parents sang, so I was in a singing family,” Rushlow says. “We just sang all the time. I got asked the other day, ‘How does it feel to be singing these songs for the first time?’ And I said, ‘Well, I’ve been singing them in my pajamas, with a toothbrush in front of the bathroom mirror, since I was 10.’” On the DVD of his new two-disc concert release, Tim Rushlow & His Big Band – LIVE (ROW Entertainment), Rushlow mentions his reluctance to continue chasing “the country dream” as a factor in his new direction. But there’s a lot more to it than that. For instance, about a decade ago, he became the final artist to record with famed Nashville producer Buddy Killen, who was then doing what would turn out to be his last recording project. Killen asked Rushlow to come in and

PHOTO COURTESY TIM RUSHLOW

Tim Rushlow’s performing the Great American Songbook was foreshadowed decades ago.


his concerts looked and sounded like, the cut a version of “Little Drummer Boy.” big-band show Rushlow recorded a couple of “Buddy, who was just iconic, thought I was an old soul,” Rushlow says. “One day, he said, years later at a Nashville venue turned out so well that it not only led to the Tim Rushlow ‘You know, I’m not sure if you’ve met your & His Big Band – LIVE release, but also to a match yet, buddy. You may still have somedeal with American Public Television, which thing ahead of you with this crooner thing.’ has offered the concert since September 2016 “So there were these little hints along as a pledge-drive presentation for affiliated the way, and then it finally got to the point stations across the country. Coordinating where I was like, ‘OK, I want to cut a bighis appearances with the showing of the TV band Christmas album. How can I do that? I special, Rushlow has appeared with his band don’t want to go get on a record label and be in the cities where the program airs, where controlled by somebody. I want to do it on he gives each station 100 tickets to use as my own.’ So I hired a couple of great friends fundraisers. [Jimmy Ritchey and Steve Mauldin] and basiRushlow and his band were also asked by cally brought in an entire big band, and the producer Mark Burnett to play for President Nashville Symphony string players, and we Trump’s inaugural ball, which he says he was recorded a live Christmas album.” honored to do. Released in 2014, the disc soared into the “I’ve been going overseas every year with Top 20 of Billboard’s Holiday Albums chart, Larry Stewart from Restless Heart and Richie paving the way for his new CD and DVD McDonald from Lonestar,” says Rushlow, package. naming two other front men from hit-making “After the Christmas thing was recorded, country bands. “We go over there with our my phone started ringing,” says Rushlow. guitars, and we’ll hop in a helicopter and go to “I’ll be honest: I think a lot of people thought, these forward operating bases in Afghanistan ‘OK, here’s another country artist trying to be or an aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf, and a crooner.’ But when they started hearing the it’s just a blast. So whether I’m asked to go album, then they started going, ‘Wow. This guy’s authentic. He means it. He’s not kidding play for the troops overseas or to perform at an inaugural ball, I look at it as the same. It’s around here.’” serving12:42 my country. I don’t go as a RepubliInitially conceived as a way to show 1 2/20/17 April 2017 SCI_Ok Mag (CS).pdf PM can or Democrat. I go as an American.” prospective talent buyers and producers what

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And when he does, he takes that Great American Songbook with him. “You know, I could take the big band to Japan and do a show, and those people would know every word to every song,” he says. “I know because I’ve been to Tokyo and gone into a karaoke bar where a bunch of people were singing ‘Mack the Knife.’ You go to Dubai, or Milan, or Berlin or London, anywhere you go around the world, that music is revered. And for me to get the opportunity to carry it on – that’s an amazing thing.” JOHN WOOLEY

TIM RUSHLOW DISCOGRAPHY Little Texas First Time for Everything (1992) Big Time (1993) Kick a Little (1994) Little Texas (1997) Tim Rushlow Tim Rushlow (2001) Unfinished Symphony (2011) Tim Rushlow & His Big Band Classic Christmas (2014) Tim Rushlow & His Big Band – LIVE (2017)

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Research the Rabbit Before surprising your kids with a pet bunny this spring, do your homework.

W

LIONHEAD RABBITS LIKE REN AND IROH REQUIRE REGULAR GROOMING. PHOTO BY SCOTT MILLER

hile baby rabbits may be a tempting gift at Easter time, make sure you do your research before making a commitment to a new family pet. Around 80 percent of rabbits purchased for Easter are later abandoned – a problem that Christina Womack, vice president of the Heartland Rabbit Rescue in Blanchard, deals with on a daily basis. The no-kill sanctuary opened in 1997 and filled up quickly. It is at its capacity of around 85 rabbits. “Yes, they’re cute when they’re babies,” Womack says. “All animals are adorable when they’re babies, but once a rabbit hits four months old, the hormones kick in, and the rabbits start showing behavior people find undesirable. And then they abandon them.”

Rabbits generally do not make good pets for children, she says, because they do not like to be picked up. Many people do not realize the commitment a rabbit requires and choose to set them free. “That is a big problem,” Womack says. “It’s also illegal. House rabbits do not have the same instincts for survival that wild rabbits do. If they’re not hit by cars or killed by predators, usually they’ll starve to death in short order.” While rabbits, which are the thirdmost popular mammalian pet, can be great additions to your family, Womack says the decision-making process used for adopting a cat or dog should also apply for a pet rabbit. These furry friends can live up to 10 years and need the same yearly veterinary checkups, regular grooming and other care a cat or dog requires. They also need to be spayed or neutered.

Rabbits are social creatures and require interaction. They should also be treated as indoor pets; a rabbit kept in a hutch outdoors may only live one or two years, Womack says. They are easily litter trained, but owners need to take steps to make their homes safe. Rabbits can get bored easily and chew on electrical cords and baseboards. Although they require supervision, an indoor rabbit can be given free run in a rabbitproofed home. Despite the work, Womack says rabbits are rewarding pets – her own rabbit will greet her at the door. “They’re curious, intelligent, social creatures,” she says. So before you adopt a rabbit this Easter, make sure you’re ready for the commitment. Otherwise, stuffed or chocolate rabbits make great gifts and require much less effort – or make a gift to sponsor a rabbit at heartlandrabbitrescue.org. APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

27


Life & Style

LEFT: THE BLONDE BRICK BUILDING IS A FLATIRON STRUCTURE, AN ARCHITECTURAL STYLE CREATED AROUND 1740 THAT WAS INSPIRED BY A CAST IRON CLOTHING IRON. BY THE MID-19TH CENTURY, THE TERM HAD BEEN ASCRIBED TO WEDGESHAPED SITES AND BUILDINGS. INSET: WHAT WAS ONCE A DERELICT BUILDING – A SHAMBLES IN THE MIDDLE OF DOWNTOWN – NOW HOUSES PLICO, A MAJOR MEDICAL INSURANCE COMPANY. THE BUILDING’S CLEAN LINES ARE ENHANCED BY SIMPLE LANDSCAPING. THE FLATIRON PROFILE IS EVIDENT IN THIS PHOTO. ELLIOTT + ASSOCIATES ADDED A PROTECTED OUTDOOR DECK ON THE TOP OF THE BUILDING. LIGHTING IS A SPECIAL ILLUMINATION FEATURE THAT MAKES THE GOLD GLASS SHIMMER.

INTERIORS

A Historic Renovation A once forlorn building now serves as a gateway to downtown OKC.

F

By M. J. Van Deventer Photos by Scott McDonald, Gray City Studios

or 20 years, architect Rand Elliott gazed out a window from his office in the Heierding Flatiron Building and wished he could renovate the boarded-up structure across the street. To say it was a neighborhood eyesore is kind. The Oklahoma City building had history, which Elliott reveres. It also had admirable architectural features and an interior bone structure of bricks stamped with 1924 by the Acme Brick Co. It was The Como Hotel, a vintage flatiron building anchoring a neighborhood in early day downtown. It had a barber shop, a cafe, high ceilings, transom windows and doors, and no air conditioning. Workers building downtown OKC could rent a room there, but they had to pay extra using the bathroom down the hall. The Como Hotel, built by C.F. Meadors, eventually outlived its purpose and was abandoned – forgotten for 27 years. Two years ago, Elliott changed the face of his business neighborhood and purchased the derelict building. “We took a building that had been unloved for a long time,” he says. “We transformed it and found the right owner who was willing

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29


Life & Style

TOP: THE OFFICE WAS DESIGNED WITH NO DOORS TO CREATE A MORE COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT. MIDDLE: ORIGINALLY A TWO-STORY BUILDING, PLICO ADDED A COMMUNITY SPACE FOR ITS TEAM MEMBERS WITH THE ARCHITECTS TO CREATE A THIRD FLOOR. THIS ADDITION PROVIDES SPECTACULAR VIEWS OF DOWNTOWN.

to put money and effort into a building that would pay tribute to OKC’s pioneer families.” Today, a once-forlorn building that might have been razed is home to PLICO, a firm specializing in insurance for physicians. Located at the convergence of Northeast Fifth Street and Harrison and North Oklahoma avenues, the renovated flatiron building is “an iconic gateway – a lantern – to downtown Oklahoma City,” Elliott says. Elliott’s response on his first visit to examine the interior of this neighborhood eyesore was exhilarating and inspiring. Others might have found it instantly depressing and called for the wrecking ball. Instead he assessed what materials he could salvage that represented the history of The Como Hotel. “I saw the opportunity to do a signature restoration project for downtown Oklahoma City,” he says. Working with Sherry Haworth, PLICO’s CEO, he listened closely to her hopes for the firm’s new home. Windows were a must. PLICO team members had been working in a windowless building and yearned for light and sunshine.

BELOW: BLUE CARBONITE PANELS DEFINE THE OFFICE SPACE AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE PLICO BUILDING IN DOWNTOWN OKLAHOMA CITY. THE ENTRY REVEALS THE MASTERY OF BLENDING REMNANTS FROM AN OLD, ABANDONED BUILDING WITH TODAY’S HIGH-TECH CONTEMPORARY MATERIALS.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

REFLECTIVE PANELS LINE THE STAIRWAY TO THE SECOND STORY, PROVIDING PRIVACY AND PROTECTION, WHILE ADDING A SENSE OF ILLUMINATION TO THE STAIRWAY.

“Now they are thrilled with the amount of natural light that moves in and out of the space,” Elliott says. Interior lighting casts an evening glow that Elliott finds exciting, especially on nights when the NBA’s Oklahoma City Thunder plays home games and crowds are abundant. Elliott created an office space with no doors, providing a more collaborative environment for PLICO team members. Doors can be added if an occupant eventually prefers more privacy. Elliott and Bill Yen, both certified by the American Institute of Architects, also created room for PLICO to grow with the addition of a third level on the roof. The third floor actually sits on top of a series of columns independent from the original building – “an engineering feat,” Elliott notes. The Ainsworth Company and Lingo Construction Services were also involved in the renovation. The third floor has become a community center for PLICO’s team members and their special events. Yoga classes are held there as well as birthday and holiday celebrations. “The lighting and the views from this area are wonderful,” Elliott says. “This space is a refreshing point of view for the PLICO team.” Visitors to the building are surprised when they enter the front door and see how historic details merge gracefully with contemporary materials. “They get a history lesson when they walk through the front door,” he says. Having completed more than 300 renovation projects in his career, Elliott says, “It’s a big deal to do a construction project with a twist. Finally, we got to make a difference in our neighborhood.”


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Life & Style

F YI

Decluering:

The 20-Something Purge Taking responsibility of your stuff begins by getting it out of your parents’ house.

C

lutter is a mix of treasures, paraphernalia, multiples of identical/ similar objects and junk from and in our lives. Most of us have clutter in some form and we’re often stuck wondering how to get rid of it. Getting rid of clutter is time-consuming and frequently emotional because of memories tied to particular objects. Over the next three issues, Oklahoma Magazine talks to experts about decluttering for everyone, no matter what stage of life.

The Post-College Cleanout

Throughout middle school, high school and college, we accumulate mementos, from trophies and T-shirts to ticket stubs and tacky furniture. These objects may hold sentimental value, but once you are on your own in an apartment or house, it’s time to sort out what’s worth keeping. Becky Marple, a professional organizer and owner of BeeNeat in

Edmond, says it’s OK to keep some items, but one must set limits. “I usually suggest a big tub, like the size that can hold a Christmas tree, to store items from throughout your life,” she says. “Anything more than that is probably too much.” Marple notes that this stage in life is when 20-somethings should take their belongings from their parents’ houses. “This age group needs to take ownership of their stuff,” she says. “Your mom and dad’s house is not a storage unit. Keep what is important to you, what you use and what you have to have.” Anne Spero, a certified professional organizer and owner of Organized Living in Tulsa, has been featured on The Learning Channel’s documentary show Hoarding: Buried Alive and is also a chronic disorganization and hoarding specialist. “The reality is that post-college

young adults are forward thinkers,” Spero says. “They are starting their careers and families. They’re not thinking about the pictures and memorabilia left in mom’s attic. Scrapbooks are great ideas for the sentimental person. The key is to keep the volume to a reasonable number – five albums versus 15.” Other ideas for managing keepsakes include using favorite T-shirts to create a quilt, making a display out of ticket stubs, and taking photos of trophies and medals to keep digital copies of the awards but throwing the physical objects away. Marple says she understands that people often have a hard time letting go of objects with emotional value. “We make a physical connection with things when we touch things,” she says, “so when I’m consulting with a client, I tell them if they’re going to work with someone, then have that person hold the item and hold it out in front of them so that way they’re not touching it while deciding what to do with it.” Through this exercise, people are more likely to make progress by donating an item or tossing it in the trash. Spero explains that organization is more than sorting items into labeled containers. If you stop there, you’ve probably kept the clutter and have only moved it around. “True organization comes when we have learned to simplify,” she says. “We first subtract what is unnecessary, unused and unloved. You know you are truly organized when you can find things in five minutes or less and you and your family know where to return the items, and do! “The key ingredient is that every item in the home that has a useful purpose has a ‘home.’” REBECCA FAST

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


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APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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2/20/17 9:58 AM


Life & Style

DOWNTOWN GUTHRIE HOSTS GHOST WALKS AND RED BRICK NIGHTS.

FUN FACTS P O P U L AT I O N

10,908

10,000 NEW RESIDENTS after the 1889 LAND RUN. The Historic District includes 2,169 BUILDINGS over 1,400 acres and is the LARGEST CONTIGUOUS URBAN HISTORIC DISTRICT Guthrie gained

CIT Y LIFE

G

Guthrie’s Greatness The original state capital bustles ‘89er Week.

uthrie could slide into historic footnotes as Oklahoma’s first capital, but it uses the past to draw people to its Victorian downtown, Western heritage and entertainment options. April is big for Guthrie because of the 1889 Land Run, which turned a small train stop into a bustling burg. Guthrie’s ’89ers Day parade April 22 is the largest in the state and is part of a five-day celebration. But Guthrie is not defined by this annual commemoration. The Oklahoma Territorial Museum has archives from the Unassigned Lands, Oklahoma and Indian territories, and government documents from those eras, while the city holds art walks, bicycle races, car shows and wine festivals. Guthrie, the capital of Oklahoma Territory, logically held the state seal in 1907, when Oklahoma entered the union. But after a statewide vote engineered by Oklahoma City powerbrokers, Guthrie lost its capital, literally and financially, overnight. “Property values dropped 80 percent immediately,” says Nathan Turner, a director with the Territorial Museum. “It was an emotional time.” Lloyd Lentz, author of Guthrie: A History of the Capital City, 1889-1910, says property values were stagnant by the time the capital switched to Oklahoma City in 1910. “Guthrie languished before the vote,” he says. “Oklahoma City by that time was six

times larger than Guthrie, probably because of its stockyards, progressive leadership and political influence.” Some old-timers held grudges against OKC for, as some say, stealing the state seal, but they have died and “it’s more of a bittersweet anecdote that we can joke about now,” Lentz says. “We’re over the bitterness.” Many residents see their city as fun and quirky … none more than Stacy Frazier, the self-styled “duly designated park ranger of the smallest national park in the country.” The “park” has a large elm on a 100square-foot plot commemorating the office that recorded Land Run deeds; it’s part of the National Parks Service. Frazier, not an official ranger, looks the part with a pied uniform and a badge from a 1972 Cadillac. Frazier happily jokes that she was picked for the unpaid position because she missed a Chamber of Commerce meeting. “It’s an on-call situation,” she says. “They usually trot me out around the Territorial Christmas events and 89ers week.” Frazier also hosts the Guthrie Ghost Walk through the downtown historic district, “a sneaky way of teaching history to people.” From May through September, downtown has Red Brick Nights the first Saturday of each month, featuring food trucks and live music. The rodeo grounds hum in the spring and summer, and the Berline Band Concerts and Music Hall has shows twice a month. BRIAN WILSON

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE ’89ers Week schedule @ OKmag.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

on the national Register of Historic Places.

THE ’89ER DAY CELEBRATION was formally ORGANIZED IN 1911 and received official sanction from the state legislature in 1935. Guthrie was named after

JUDGE JOHN GUTHRIE, an AT&SF railroad attorney. THE 46TH STAR: A History of Oklahoma’s Constitutional Convention and Early Statehood by IRVIN HURST offers firsthand accounts of the sociopolitical climate during that time. THE SANTA FE DEPOT is supposedly

by HOWARD WELLSTON, a World HAUNTED War I veteran who searched for the a Harvey Hotel girl LOVEnamed OF Evelyn, HIS LIFE, but never found her. The TERRITORIAL MUSEUM is part of the

CARNEGIE LIBRARY,

where Miss Indian Territory and Mr. Oklahoma Territory wed as part of the original statehood celebration.

CHARLES HASKELL, Oklahoma’s first governor,

resided in the ROYAL HOTEL (no longer standing), the Logan County courthouse kept the state seal, and legislators stayed in hotels or rented rooms.


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Life & Style

H E A LT H

Defining the Headache

H

Knowing the types and triggers helps to keep pain at bay.

eadaches can vary from being a minor nuisance to a debilitating condition. Understanding the type of headache you have and its potential triggers can lead to more pain-free days as well as help you recognize when head pain could be something more serious. Dr. Yoon-Hee Cha, a neurologist with Warren Clinic in Tulsa and an assistant professor for the University of Tulsa, serves as the principal investigator for the Laureate Institute for Brain Research. “The most common headaches are tension type headaches that are mild to moderate in severity, bilateral, and of a pressing or pressure quality,” Cha says. “Even though they are not usually severe, they can last enough to impair concentration. If they occur more than 15 days of the month, they are considered to be chronic.” Migraines are moderate to severe in intensity, typically one-sided with a throbbing or pulsating quality, and associated with either nausea or light and sound sensitivity. “This type can last from four to 72 hours in adults and as short as two hours in children,” Cha says. “They may be associated with visual auras, which are defined as periods of five minutes to an hour of visual phenomena such as flashing lights, pulsating shapes or colors, zig-zagging lines, holes in vision or even loss of vision.” She adds that a less common kind of headache is a cluster headache. These headaches are strictly onesided and usually focused around the eye with autonomic symptoms such as tearing, eye redness, eyelid drooping or nasal congestion. Cluster headaches can last from 15 minutes to three hours and exhibit strong circadian or seasonal cycling. “Each of these headache

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

types is treated differently so it is important to diagnose them correctly the first time,” Cha says. “One important reason for early diagnosis is to avoid the development of medication overuse headache [MOH]. Chronic uses of over-the-counter medications such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen or combination pills that contain caffeine are frequent causes of MOH. If headaches require more than one treatment per week, it is time to consider preventative treatment, of which there are many options.” Dr. Ashish Masih, a vascular neurologist with Integris in Oklahoma City, says migraines are commonly underdiagnosed and patients should seek medical attention if headaches interfere with enjoying activities. “If someone is having more than three headaches per week, they should be evaluated,” says Masih, adding that it’s important to discover what causes headaches and suggesting that patients keep a headache diary to identify triggers.

Cha says stress, the “let-down” period from stress, certain foods and changes in weather are common associated factors in people getting headaches. “Caffeine can both be a treatment and a trigger for headaches, though the more frequent problem tends to be overuse of caffeine, which then triggers caffeine-withdrawal headaches,” she says. There are several options for helping with common headaches. “The most effective over-the-counter treatments for headaches are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen or naproxen,” Cha says. “Staying well hydrated, getting enough sleep and avoiding overstimulating environments where there is too much light or sound can be helpful.” Her tips for preventing headaches are similar: get regular sleep, stay hydrated, eat foods low in preservatives and do aerobic exercise several times a week. REBECCA FAST

WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR

Some headaches could be a sign of worse health issues. If you have any of the following symptoms, seek medical attention immediately: • Positional headaches that are worse lying flat and improved when you sit up • Headaches that wake you up from sleep • Headaches with neurological symptoms such as numbness, weakness or tingling


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Life & Style D E S T I N AT I O N S

Meet Me in St. Louis The Gateway Arch, Cardinals baseball, brewery tours and City Museum are among many worthy stops.

S

TOP TO BOTTOM: THE GATEWAY ARCH DISTINGUISHES THE ST. LOUIS SKYLINE.

PHOTO COURTESY ST. LOUIS CONVENTION & VISITORS COMMISSION

A SEA LION BRINGS SMILES AT THE ST. LOUIS ZOO. PHOTO BY ROBIN WINKELMAN

THE FOREST PARK FOUNTAIN ANCHORS THE WORLD’S FAIR PAVILION.

PHOTO BY MCELROY FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY

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plendid St. Louis is one of those cities that has everything for singles, couples and families. With its proximity to Oklahoma (by car, it’s 6 hours from Tulsa and 7.5 hours from Oklahoma City), you can enjoy your stay, regardless of duration. St. Louis appeals to any phase of life. Young adults can enjoy brewery tours and casinos, but will find themselves going back later in life to visit museums, Cardinals baseball games, the zoo and the planetarium with their families. Older tourists might like the slow pace of the botanical garden, historic neighborhoods and grand churches. Regardless of age, here are some attractions special to everyone. The Gateway Arch, as most know, represents the “gateway to the west,” but this icon has an intriguing history. For instance, it’s a perfect half-circle – 630 feet tall by 630

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


TOP TO BOTTOM: GRANT’S FARM FEATURES BISON AND THE BUDWEISER CLYDESDALES. PHOTO COURTESY GRANT’S FARM

BUSCH STADIUM SITS IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN. PHOTO BY DAN DONOVAN

A RIVERBOAT PADDLES PAST THE ARCH ON THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER.

PHOTO COURTESY ST. LOUIS CONVENTION & VISITORS COMMISSION

CITY MUSEUM IS 10 STORIES OF UNIQUE ADVENTURES.

PHOTO BY MCELROY FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY

feet wide – designed to sway with the wind. It’s the tallest man-made monument in the Western Hemisphere and the world’s tallest arch. If you take the daily one-hour sightseeing cruise on one of the Arch Riverboats (March 5-Nov. 30; $20/adults, $10/kids), you’ll learn about the Mississippi River, the Arch and the history of St. Louis. City Museum, a highlight of St. Louis, is a place you’ll visit repeatedly because it’s nostalgic for families and just plain fun. Thrilling and stimulating with a lot to process, this converted 600,000-square-foot shoe factory is full of whimsy and creativity. Where else can you go inside a whale sculpture, enjoy a rooftop playground or ride down a 10-story slide? City Museum is the brainchild of Bob Casilly, a classically trained sculptor. The St. Louis Zoo was recently voted one of America’s top free attractions by USA Today. You pay to park but can enjoy the zoo for free. It’s in the same complex as the St. Louis Art Museum and the Missouri History Museum, just across Skinker Boulevard from prestigious Washington University in St. Louis. Grant’s Farm, on 281 acres, is free, too, and the former home of the Busch family (of beer fame). Named after President Ulysses S. Grant, who farmed the land in the 1800s, Grant’s Farm houses the famous Budweiser Clydesdales and other animals from around the world. Soulard, within two miles south of downtown, is an enchanting, historic French neighborhood named for Antoine Soulard, who developed the area in the early 1800s. Old churches, restaurants, bars and stately architecture convey the attractive area’s feel. Live jazz and blues pulse in surrounding bars. Soulard is most famous for its Farmers Market, reportedly the oldest west of the Mississippi. Second French Empire architecture of this area is impressively picturesque. The Anheuser Busch Brewery, near Soulard, and Brewery Tours of St. Louis offer 3.5-hour excursions on luxury buses. LaClede’s Landing, named for the fur trader (Pierre LaClede) who formed the first settlement in what became St. Louis, is a historic district near downtown and within walking distance of the Arch. The Mississippi’s waters lap against cobblestone streets hundreds of years old. Plus, there are some trendy bars and restaurants. A quintessential tradition (besides seeing a St. Louis Cardinals game) is Ted Drewes Frozen Custard. Locals drive to stands and wait in line for this gastronomic delight. Other sightseeing or tour spots include the Missouri Botanical Garden, the Cathedral Basilica, the St. Louis Science Center (and planetarium) and the Ameristar Casino Resort Spa in suburban St. Charles For dining, try Sidney Street Cafe, Twisted Tree Steakhouse, Aya Sofia and Olive + Oak. Fine lodging can be found at Beall Mansion (billing itself as “an elegant bed-and-breakfast inn”), the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch or the Hilton St. Louis at the Ballpark. It’s no wonder this city is named after a French king who became a saint. Its regal vibe remains today in the city’s pride and atmosphere. GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

39


Life & Style

CHANEL BLUE CATEYE SUNGLASSES, $349, VISIONS

J BRAND LIGHT DENIM SHRUNKEN JACKET, $228, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF TASSEL CROSSBODY MINIBAG, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALEXIS BITTAR GOLD FRINGE NECKLACE, $210, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF APPLIQUES CLUTCH, $95, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

KAREN KANE BLAZER, $148, DONNA’S FASHIONS

JOE’S HIGH-RISE DISTRESSED CROPPED SKINNY JEANS, $198, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

TOMM Y

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ALICE AND OLIVIA ONESHOULDER RUFFLE TOP, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF EMERY FLAT SLINGBACKS, $110, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO LACEUP ESPADRILLE FLATS, $475, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO MARGO CORK-HEEL LACE-UP SANDALS, $750, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

I Dream of Jeanie

Mix and match denim shirts, dresses, jeans, shoes and handbags to give a unique texture and flair to any outfit.

REBECCA MINKOFF LIGHT BLUE FRAYED SLIDES, $130, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

PRODUCT SHOTS BY NATALIE GREEN

ST YLE


KAREN KANE LACE TRIM TOP, $118, DONNA’S FASHIONS

TOMMY BAHAMA LINEN SHIRT, $128, DONNA’S FASHIONS

LOEFFLER RANDALL CLASP SATCHEL, $525, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MAUI JIM LARGE ROUND PLASTIC SUNGLASSES, $229, HICKS BRUNSON

BCBG MAX AZRIA KNIT FIT AND FLARE SKIRT, $158, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE OSCAR DE LA RENTA

ALICE AND OLIVIA RUFFLE CROPPED TOP, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALICE AND OLIVIA EMBROIDERED LEATHER SHORTS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE LOEFFLER RANDALL LEATHER CLUTCH, $275, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

TORY BURCH JEWELED LEATHER SLIDES, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MANOLO BLAHNIK LEATHER POINT TOE PUMPS, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

VINCE BLAIR 5 SLIP-ON SNEAKER, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

White Out Crisp, clean and classic: white clothes and accessories create an elegant edge.

JIMMY CHOO STUDDED LEATHER BLOCK HEEL SANDALS, $850, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

41


Life & Style

Militant Disposition Military-inspired fashion pieces deserve a crisp salute this spring.

VELVET BY GRAHAM & SPENCER PATCH ARMY JACKET, $170, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

THEORY COTTON ARMY JACKET, $455, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

RAILS PATCH JACKET, $198, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

THEORY OFF-THE-SHOULDER STRETCH COTTON DRESS, $325, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MIU M

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RAILS PATCH JACKET, $198, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

PAIGE DRAWSTRING SHIRT DRESS, $199, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JOE’S ANKLE SKINNY DISTRESSED JEANS, $189, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

PAIGE SLIM CROPPED BOYFRIEND JEANS, $209, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE MASUNGA ROUND TORTOISE AND GOLD PLASTIC SUNGLASSES, $500, HICKS BRUNSON

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

PRODUCT SHOTS BY NATALIE GREEN

FURLA CAMO PRINT LEATHER SATCHEL, $578, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE


SCENE

PAULA LOVE, CHER GOLDING, GOV. MARY FALLIN; RED TIE NIGHT GALA, OKLAHOMA AIDS CARE FUND, OKC

POLLY NICHOLS, LEE WOODRUFF; JULIETTE LOW LEADERSHIP SOCIETY LUNCHEON, GIRL SCOUTS OF WESTERN OKLAHOMA, OKC

DREW & LISA CRAWFORD, JANELL & SCOTT CYRUS; WINTERSET, OSTEOPATHIC FOUNDERS FOUNDATION, TULSA

LYNN TAYLOR, JUSTIN EDWARDS, ERIN FITZGERALD, FREDERICK REDWINE; OMELETTE PARTY, OKCMOA, OKC

SHARMILA RANGANATHAN, VINODH JEEVANANTHAM, DEBBIE HITE; CENTRAL OKLAHOMA HEART BALL, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, OKC

SEAN OLMSTEAD, MOLLY ROSS; RED TIE NIGHT GALA, OKLAHOMA AIDS CARE FUND, OKC

BILL KNIGHT, KATHRYN BELLER, ROZANN KNIGHT; MONARCH BALL, DVIS, TULSA

GENTER & WENDY DRUMMOND, JILL & BOB THOMAS; MEMORY GALA, ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION, TULSA

GARY PAXTON, JACKIE KOURI, DOUG STARK, FE VORDERLANDWEHR; MEMORY GALA, ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION, TULSA

KATI CHRIST, DANIEL ADAMS, DINKY HAMMAM, RON RICHARDSON; PATRON APPRECIATION PARTY, ARTS COUNCIL OKLAHOMA CITY

STEVE BRADSHAW, LIBBY JOHNSON, DAVE HENTSCHEL, SUSAN CRENSHAW, MARLA BRADSHAW; LIVE UNITED AWARDS AND LUNCHEON, TULSA AREA UNITED WAY, TULSA

CHIP MCELROY, GERARD CLANCY, JUDY KISHNER; HEART OF HENRY, TULSA DAY CENTER FOR THE HOMELESS, TULSA

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Bonus photo gallery @ OKmag.com APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

SPOTLIGHT

RED RIBBON GALA

The 20th anniversary of Tulsa CARES’ largest annual fundraiser, the Red Ribbon Gala, proved to be an enormous success. Donned in various shades of red to mark the occasion, the gala’s 500+ guests spent the evening raising money for those individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS. Patrons raised $856,000 for the cause – 14 percent above the goal of $750,000 – cementing the gala’s theme that “when we become untied from the myths of the past, we become united in our mission of HIV/AIDS education, treatment and prevention.”

LISA & STEVE ANTRY

BEN STEWART, CHRIS MURPHY

RAJ BASU, REBEKAH TENNIS

WENDY & GENTNER DRUMMOND

TAMRA & DAVID SHEEHAN

DAN & JEAN-MARIA LANGLEY

DAN BURSTEIN, MARTIN MARTINEZ

BECKY & MIKE HINKLE

CHUCK ZOELLNER, CHERA KIMIKO

DON & SUSIE WELLENDORF JW, JAKE AND MOLLIE CRAFT

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


JESSICA FARMER, ANN SHANNON CASSIDY, BEVERLY ANDERSON, PERRY FARMER TONI GARNER, FRANCIE FAUDREE, MARY ANNE DORAN

BETSY JACKSON, LAURA PARROTT, JAYSON STROUD

MADHURI & CHANDAN LAD

MATT WALLACE, GREG HOLT

PAT CHERNICKY, RICHARD & CHERYL GROENENDYKE

JAY KROTTINGER, RYAN TANNER

J.J. TRAD, NADIA LUNA

PATTI SHAW & BRIAN CHALKIN

STEVE & MARLA BRADSHAW

PHIL LONG, CHRIS MURPHY

BOB & JILL THOMAS, CHERYL & RICHARD GROENENDYKE

MONA BURNS, SCOT STINTON

APRIL 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


Lifeafter

RELEASE By Beth Weese Photo by Chris Humphrey Photographer

DE’MARCHOE CARPENTER AND MALCOLM SCOTT REFLECT ON A YEAR OF FREEDOM AFTER THEIR WRONGFUL CONVICTIONS.

INTERESTING. Fun. Extraordinary. De’Marchoe Carpenter and Malcolm Scott use these words to describe their first year of freedom in more than two decades. “It’s such a rare situation that it’s really hard to define the type of feelings that you get when you are finally exonerated after that many years,” Scott says. “‘It’s amazing’ is the best I can come up with. It’s amazing; it’s extraordinary, wonderful. I look forward to today, tomorrow, the future.” The men were 18 when they were wrongfully convicted in the 1994 murder of 19-year-old Karen Summers. Last year, after the actual perpetrators of the drive-by shooting confessed, Carpenter and Scott were released. Carpenter says he had not lost faith that the truth would eventually come out. “That’s why, when I was in, I did everything I could to help my situation as a person and to help my future,” he says. “I did a lot of things; I educated myself. I read a lot of books. I recall Nelson Mandela; he said when he was

46

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

walking towards the doors of freedom he knew he had to leave all the anger, the resentment, the hate, the bitterness – he had to leave it behind. I took those words to heart. That’s why right now people see me and I’m smiling. Life is wonderful. I was bitter for 22 years; I’m not bitter now. I left all that in prison.” Five days after their release, Scott and Carpenter worked out at Tulsa’s downtown YMCA, where they had a fortunate encounter with Ronny Altman. “I don’t even know how the conversation started, but I talk to everybody – I haven’t met a stranger,” Carpenter says. “We started talking and hanging out. God’s putting people in my life, working through them. Everybody has come into my life for a reason.” When Carpenter revealed that he and Scott were the two men who were recently exonerated, Altman wanted to help. He quickly called David Oliver, president of Goodwill Industries of Tulsa, and Sabrina Ware, who oversees the Goodwill Job Connection. “If I could do something to change their lives, find them employment, get them going back after being in prison – that was my thought process,” Altman says.


MALCOLM SCOTT, LEFT, AND DE’MARCHOE CARPENTER, ENJOYING LIFE AFTER THEIR EXONERATION IN MAY OF 2016. APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

47


“That’s why I wanted to make something happen right away when I had an opportunity and I had them both there.” Carpenter and Scott set up appointments and both quickly completed forklift training. “I knew that with me not having a work history that I would need some type of credentials. They say it’s not about potential; it’s about credentials,” Carpenter says. Even with the certification, Carpenter has found the job hunt challenging. “People see this blemish on my record,” he says. “Even though it will be removed, it will always be there. They can always Google my name and it will come up.” Right now, Carpenter says he is searching for a job in construction but hopes someday he can do some acting. “I’m staying strong and having faith and believing that everything is going to be alright and persevering,” he says. “It’s funny, but I wouldn’t change a thing because life is good right now. People go through life and they don’t have any money and they’re upset. I don’t have any money either, but I’m not complaining. I’m enjoying life.” Carpenter has put his free time to good use by speaking at schools about his life. He talks to kids about peer pressure, making good decisions and the importance of education. “I was in that situation – I had no one to look up to,” Carpenter says. “I’m not saying I’m a role model, but they can relate to me because I come from where they come from. I just want to get them on the right path, and I don’t want to see them go down the path I went down.” Carpenter says he got shot when he was 16 because he hung out with the wrong crowd, and that if he had not gone to prison he may not be alive now. “There’s a lot of people that I knew from way back that I had to stop hanging with because you got guys that are out here that are

doing the same thing that they were doing 22 years ago, negative stuff,” he says. “You have to separate yourself.” Carpenter did not have to separate himself from everyone from his past, however. A woman he knew before his incarceration became his wife shortly after his release. “She was my childhood sweetheart,” Carpenter says. “I got my time. We corresponded for a little bit; we lost contact. Thirteen and a half years, I did not hear from her. Thirteen and a half years later, she came back. The last six years of my incarceration, her and her five kids were coming to visit me every weekend and that really helped to keep my spirits high. So 13 days after I was released, I married her.” Meanwhile, Scott works 12-hour night shifts at a beverage blending company. During the day, he attends Connors State College and is in his second semester toward earning an associate’s degree in health.

My father, the same thing: cancer. It’s just something that I’ve feel like I’ve taken home to heart.” Scott says he also wants to see the world and experience different cultures. “Traveling has always been a big dream of mine when I was incarcerated,” he says. “When the world is taken away from you, when your freedom is taken away like that, it makes you yearn for all the things that you never got the opportunity to experience in life. I know I will reach it. My biggest surprises will probably come when I get to experience life outside of my backyard where I’ve grown up.” Both men say they are thankful for the Oklahoma Innocence Project for helping them with their case. “They helped give me my life back, and I feel like I will forever be in debt to them,” Scott says. “Everybody that came together to help us and they didn’t even know us, but they did it. They worked hard to help save our lives. To me, that’s an honor.” Scott and Carpenter say that the time they spent inside prison will always be a part of who they are. They say it is not about forgetting it happened but using it as a motivator for their lives. “I utilize that now to keep me pushing forward in life, knowing where I’ve been and what I’ve seen and what I’ve been through,” Scott says. “I don’t look at it like something I want to push out of my head because the best way to face anything that may be tough in your life is to face it head-on. You don’t try to run from it; you don’t try to hide from it. You face it head-on. “I want to not only accomplish good things for myself, but I want to connect with others and maybe give them hope, be that vessel of inspiration for others. Maybe it will help them overcome those things that they may be going through in life that seem impossible to overcome.”

“I WAS BITTER FOR 22 YEARS; I’M NOT BITTER NOW. I LEFT ALL THAT IN PRISON.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

“It can be a little overwhelming at times,” Scott says. “I feel like education is most important, but I also have to survive, so I got to work. As far as being in school – love it. Love it. I’m enjoying it. I always wanted to go to college. I didn’t get that opportunity, but I’m taking it now. Every day I take it all in. It just feels good sometimes when I just grab my backpack and I’m headed out to class.” Scott wants to be a personal trainer when he finishes school. While fitness has always been part of his life, he says prison exercise was a crucial stress reliever. Now that he is free, he hopes that it will help him live a long, full life. “Heart problems and things like that have been a little too common in my family background, and I just felt like a lot of those things could be prevented by taking care of our health, taking care of our well-being,” he says. “For me, it was a very serious thing. My grandmother – I ended up losing her to cancer from smoking cigarettes and obesity.


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KL

AH O

MA MA GA

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By Mary Willa Allen and Justin Martino

2017

XC LU SIV E

TM

THERE’S AN ENERGY IN OKLAHOMA – an energy that convinces many of the state’s

natives to stay and invest in their communities. This powerful energy also drives young Oklahomans, who leave temporarily, to return and make a lasting mark in their home state. Oklahoma is no longer synonymous with the oil and gas industry – this great state is now known for everything from medical achievements to technological advancements that are paving the way for the rest of the country. These advancements are largely made possible by the young achievers who have a common goal: to improve and enhance the land they love. All over the state, from the Black Mesa to Beavers Bend, Oklahomans are changing the world. Oklahoma Magazine is proud to present the 11th annual class of 40 Under 40. Principal photography by Scott Miller ALL OTHER PHOTOGRAPHY CONTRIBUTED BY INDIVIDUALS

To see online exclusive interviews with more than 20 members of the 2017 40 UNDER 40 CLASS, visit okmag.com. APRIL 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

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40 Under 40 honorees are unranked and presented in no particular order. Dr. Ryan Patrick Conley Rosslyn S. Biggs Stephanie Cameron Dr. Paul Berry David W. Davis David Hardy Angela Brenton Carter H. Cole Marshall Brandon Kyle Hackett Blake Lawrence Heather Sumner Melissa Richey Harry Ashbaugh Elizabeth “Bea” Keller-Dupree Erica Kosemund Scott Black Keith Winter Brandi Johnson Annina Collier Stephen G. Butler Kari Easson Taylor Potter Ben Elder Carlisha Williams Evan Vincent Andrea Gossard Chris Weatherl Brandon M. Watson Dr. Jason Beaman Jamey Ory Dr. Kendal Hervert Erin & Ryan Smith Mike J. Wilkinson Kimberley Worrell Carrie M. Law Ronald Timoshenko Dr. Michael Sughrue David Rothbaum Jankowsky Elizabeth “Bessy” Osburn Dr. Eva Sawheny

Dr. Ryan Patrick Conley

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Tulsa Ophthalmologist, Cornea and Refractive Surgery Specialist, Triad Eye Institute Dr. Ryan Patrick Conley of Triad Eye Institute makes a living changing people’s lives – by giving them the gift of better sight. “I love performing more common procedures like cataract surgery and LASIK, but I especially enjoy helping people that didn’t realize things could be done to improve their vision,” he says. “Advances in technology continue to allow us to better treat eye conditions that previously were without good treatment options. That never gets old!” Conley may be young, but he has already made history. “I was proud the day I was the first eye surgeon in Oklahoma to perform laser-assisted cataract surgery,” he says. Conley also volunteers his time and talent on medical missionary trips, where he restores vision to those in developing countries who don’t have access to the same medical care as those in the United States. And the best advice he’s ever received? It’s a simple but effective: “Focus,” he says. “No pun intended.”

1

WHAT’S THE BEST ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED?

2. Rosslyn S. Biggs 37

Chickasha Veterinarian and Assistant Service Center Director, U.S. Department of Agriculture Rosslyn Biggs loves animals so much that she’s made a successful career out of it. At the USDA, Biggs manages a staff that facilitates the international import/ export of animals, while also assisting animal owners, private vets and many more people and businesses. When she’s not at work or with her family, Biggs has a serious appreciation for horses – she’s the chairman of the Pony of the Americas National Congress and recently made history. “Last year I became the first breeder in the history of the Pony of the Americas organization to register foals that were the result of embryo transfer.”

3. Stephanie Cameron 33

Tulsa Community Affairs Director, APSCO; State Director, OK2Grow and Dream It Do It When Stephanie Cameron isn’t handling community and government relations at APSCO, she’s working at the OK2Grow nonprofit that focuses on youth entrepreneurship. There, she implements workforce development activities and facilitates programs, internships tours and career fairs. As if that didn’t keep her busy enough, Cameron’s list of volunteer causes is vast – and she made a conscious effort to have it that way. “Volunteerism has helped me to stretch and grow personally and professionally, and I have developed so many friendships through volunteer roles,” she says. And if she wasn’t on this career path? “My ‘out there’ and ‘if money were no object’ job would be a waterfall trail tour guide,” she says.

“Always tell the truth. You never have to worry about what you told someone.” – Rosslyn S. Biggs

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


5. David

W. Davis

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Stillwater Clinical Professor, Oklahoma State University David W. Davis molds the minds of young hospitality students at Oklahoma State University and loves conferring with, pushing and bettering them. “Higher education is about discovery, and to discover you have to take risks,” he says. “I love guiding students towards risks that may manifest joy, tears and possibly world peace.” Davis has also developed a passion for a widespread problem in our state. “I am working to promote awareness that human trafficking exists and thrives in Oklahoma,” he says. “Through training and cooperation amongst organizations we can work to save thousands of modern day slaves.” Off the clock, Davis is an encouraging, open-minded dad. “I cheer on my three boys in baseball, soccer and becoming a ninja.”

4

6. David Hardy 35

Oklahoma City President and CEO, UMB Bank – Oklahoma Region As the president and CEO of Oklahoma’s UMB Bank branch, David Hardy grows and develops the bank’s presence in Oklahoma while managing his employees. “Developing associates and the next generation of leaders in the company is a great honor,” he says. As a CEO at only 35, Hardy has a simple formula for success: “My personal mantra is to be humble and stay hungry.” At home, Hardy leaves the competing to his children. “I have three daughters who are very competitive in the dance world,” he says. “I guess you could say that I’m a proud dance dad.” To top it off, Hardy has a storybook romance. “I am married to my high school sweetheart. We started dating when we were 14 years old.”

7. Angela Brenton Carter 39

Tulsa Clarinetist and Development Director, Tulsa Symphony To call Angela Carter a skilled multitasker is a supreme understatement. By day she’s a development director at Tulsa Symphony, and by night she is a professional clarinetist for the same organization. “My day is spent raising awareness and support for the product I help create on the concert stage in the evenings,” she says. Carter – a Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada native – moved to Tulsa because she sensed the city was teeming with possibilities. “My husband and I chose to move to Tulsa because of its thriving arts scene and the energy surrounding it,” she says. “We knew there was something special going on here and wanted our family to be a part of it.”

Dr. Paul A. Berry

8. H. Cole Marshall

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Yukon Attorney/Shareholder, McAfee & Taft H. Cole Marshall’s job as a corporate attorney has him handling cases that pertain to real estate, business transactions, and entity organization and governance matters. But if he weren’t an attorney, he’d be a “real estate developer, college professor or bartender … in that order.” His favorite perk of the job? “Working on projects that have a material impact on my community,” he says. Marshall’s got a full home life, too. He spends time off the clock “playing ball with my son (Hazen, 4), dancing with my daughter (Mabry, 2) or cooking with my wife (Melanie).” His wife graced him with sage words that he abides by daily: “The best advice I’ve received is from my wife, who reminds me to take life one day at a time.”

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Tulsa Plastic Surgeon, Warren Clinic Dr. Paul Berry sums up his job as a plastic surgeon in one sentence: “I help people feel better about themselves.” The best part about his work day is sharing the delight of his patients when they achieve their goals. “I am super proud when patients share photos of themselves that reveal how much more comfortable they are in their own skin after procedures I perform,” he says. Berry received his Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of South Florida Honors College and his M.D. from Washington University School of Medicine and has also been a Medical Research Scholar with the National Institutes of Health. He participates in medical missions in underserved communities. “Volunteering helps remind me of how much fun it is to use my skill set to help people without all the extra paperwork,” he says. “We are here to help each other.” After a day at the clinic, he says his favorite stress reliever is chasing his kids around their home.

We polled the 40 Under 40 Class on... FAVORITE PIZZA TOPPINGS Pepperoni Sausage

34% 17% 5%

Canadian bacon IF YOU WEREN’T IN YOUR CURRENT PROFESSION, WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING?

Cheese Vegetables Pineapple

12% 20% 12%

“I would be running a hotel somewhere in the world. Preferably a hotel of Horst Schulze.” – David W. Davis APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Brandon Kyle Hackett

10. Blake

Lawrence

36

Tulsa Architect, KKT Architects “I think I would be a good politician, being able to work together with many diverse groups, having a vision to represent all people, solving problems and progressing toward a today that is better than tomorrow,” Brandon Hackett says. Fortunately for the clients of KKT Architects, Hackett has turned that ability into listening and helping others with their architectural needs. When explaining his job, the first thing he mentions is how he fosters relationships with individuals and organizations “to understand their needs and wishes so that we can design spaces to fit those needs perfectly.” When he’s not working, he volunteers at his son’s school and works with local nonprofit groups, including Domestic Violence Intervention Services, CAP Tulsa, Lindsey House and Tulsa CARES. “Getting to know the people on the ground in these organizations shows the real heart of Tulsa,” he says. He says he’s happiest when his day is filled with activity and accomplishment. “I would much prefer a busy day to a ‘relaxing day at the beach,’” he says.

9

Oklahoma City

30

Attorney, Hall Estill Blake Lawrence works diligently to represent his Hall Estill clients in a wide array of cases – from business disputes to corporate collections. He also confers with galleries and museums in matters pertaining to the preservation, transfer and sale of art. However, Lawrence strongly believes in fostering a fulfilling life outside of work. His stress relievers include “putting my kids to bed and watching The Office for the 12th time,” but he also spends time volunteering for various organizations. “I have seen the best sides of people by volunteering for causes,” he says. “The staffs of nonprofits are tireless individuals who are making tremendous change.” In addition, Lawrence is an advocate for a relatively screen-free existence. In fact, if his life were a movie, the title would be GET OFF YOUR PHONE: An Introspective.

12. Melissa Richey 38

APARTMENT OR HOUSE?

2% 98%

Apartment House

ARE YOU INVOLVED IN ANY SPORTS?

Choctaw Director of Communications and Marketing, Children’s Center Rehabilitation Hospital Melissa Richey is the type of person who will always share the spotlight – she adores her coworkers at the hospital and gives them plenty of credit. “They make me look good,” she says. “I couldn’t do this crazy, ever-changing job without them.” Working at a pediatric hospital has its trying days, but Richey focuses on the numerous highlights. “I get to witness miracles almost on a daily basis,” she says. “Those miracles could be as small as a baby drinking from a bottle for the first time to a teenager taking their first steps following a traumatic accident. I get to stand on the sideline watching these medical workers make miracles happen, and then I get to tell that story.”

11. Heather Sumner 35

Okmulgee Executive Director, Okmulgee Main Street, Inc. Heather Sumner works hard to promote the city in which she lives. As the executive director of Okmulgee Main Street, Sumner preserves the town’s historic district, diversifies the economic base, organizes festivals and fulfills her life’s purpose of making the world a better place. To her skeptics, whom she calls CAVE people (Citizens Against Virtually Everything), her approach is to kill with kindness and work hard to impress. “Some of our biggest CAVE people have now turned into our biggest supporters,” she says. “Seeing the mindset of people change over time makes me so proud.” Although Sumner loves her job, she was once preparing for a different career path. “People would be surprised to learn that I completed my training to become a private investigator.”

13. Harry Ashbaugh Bixby

Director of Digital Strategies, Cubic Harry Ashbaugh, a Würzburg, Germany, native, now spends his days directing online strategies for Cubic clients by striving to create the best online brand experience possible. At home, he has a happy, hectic and fulfilling life. “My wife Leah and I have 11-year-old triplets, so our days are full, but spending time with each of them brings a smile to my face.” Ashbaugh also volunteers at the American Therapeutic Riding Center and the American Heart Association – two organizations that have personally touched his life. “My daughter, Sydney, was born with a congenital heart defect and has special needs,” he says. “These organizations have provided much-needed support and guidance.”

“Not anymore, but I used to be a competitive gymnast from age 7 to 18.” – Carlisha Williams

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

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Congratulations, Ben Elder.

2017

Cherokee Nation Businesses celebrates your being named one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40. Thank you for your marketing and advertising contributions to CNB and Cherokee Nation.

777 W. Cherokee St. l Catoosa, OK 74015 918.384.7474 l cherokeenationbusinesses.com

Businesses

Š 2017 Cherokee Nation Businesses. All rights reserved.

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3/10/17 11:05 AM

2017

THE TULSA REGIONAL CHAMBER

congratulates Elizabeth Osburn & Stephanie Cameron on their selection to the

40 Under 40 Class of 2017

Elizabeth

Osburn

Stephanie Cameron TULSACHAMBER.COM

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APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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15. Erica Kosemund 33

Ada Executive Director of Corporate Marketing, Choctaw Nation Division of Commerce Within the Choctaw Nation, Erica Kosemund oversees quite a few locations – 20 gaming sites, 15 travel plazas, several restaurants and 65,000 acres of ranches and farmland, to be exact. The most rewarding bit is that she gets to see her hard work positively affect her community in real ways. “The uniqueness of working in tribal gaming is that you get to see your business successes be invested back into communities, people and programs and services,” she says. Kosemund’s passions lie beyond her work, too. She’s an advocate for breast cancer awareness – the Choctaw Nation raised more than $250,000 for Susan G. Komen in the past three years – and also spends her time at the American Heart Association and Catholic Charities. On a more personal note, she enjoys mentoring those new to the marketing world. “I have had so many mentors in my career so far, and I want to do the same for them.”

16. Scott Black 39

14

Elizabeth “Bea” Keller-Dupree

32

Tulsa Associate Professor of Psychology and Counseling, Northeastern State University; Owner/Therapist, Enrichment Counseling & Consultation As a professor of psychology and counseling at Northeastern State University as well as a licensed professional counselor, Bea Keller-Dupree says she loves that her career path encourages her to be a lifelong learner. “I have tons of interests (both personally and professionally), and in my career, the more I learn, the better equipped I am to counsel and teach a variety of people,” she says. “I often am reminded that there is a trickle-down effect to my learning: when I am engaged with my learning, my students benefit. When my students benefit, their future clients benefit. When future clients benefit, the communities we live in benefit.” Keller-Dupree’s desire to help people extends beyond her profession – she builds service learning into her courses and volunteers alongside undergraduate psychology and graduate counseling students at NSU at churches and community organizations. She has also served with Red Cross as a Disaster Mental Health Counselor. “I think the causes I support through volunteering are rooted in community – whether that community is local or abroad. I value being hands-on with specific community needs.” SURPRISE US - TELL US SOMETHING INTERESTING OR FUN WE DIDN’T ASK ABOUT.

Tulsa Managing Director, Tulsa Ballet Scott Black handles the administrative side of one of the top professional ballet companies in North America, but don’t expect him to have an ego about it. “As a manager, I think it is important for you to know how to do every job that you are asking your employees to do,” he says. “No job was too small for me if it meant that I would be gaining valuable experience for the future.” Tulsa Ballet as a whole is much more than beautiful performances, and Black is extremely proud of that. “We serve over 5,000 public elementary school students each year through our free outreach programs,” he says.

17. Keith Winter 36 Oklahoma City CEO, HomeWetBar

Keith Winter’s startup, HomeWetBar, produces and ships 350,000 personalized products a year and employs 20 people full time. Although it seems like an overnight success, Winter has worked hard for years to realize his goals; 14 years ago, the business was just beginning in his one-bedroom apartment. Now, HomeWetBar “is one of the pioneers of online business in Oklahoma,” he says. “We’ve had to engineer everything from the ground up, creating a business along with inventing processes for things that might not have even existed 10 years prior.” Off the clock, Winter spends time with his rescue pup, Oscar. “He’s the most lovable dog you’ve ever met,” he says.

18. Brandi Johnson 39 Oklahoma City

Community Relations Director/Financial Officer, Oklahoma County Commissioner, District 2 As a community relations director, Brandi Johnson serves as a liaison to the Oklahoma County commissioner, but she also facilitates financial operations for Oklahoma County District 2. Her hands may be full at work, but that doesn’t stop her from having a rounded-out life off the clock. Along with volunteering her time at Women of the South, Sharing Tree and the YMCA, she’s also a big music fanatic. “My favorite hobby is going to rock concerts. I enjoy seeing new venues and learning about new bands,” she says. “I maintain a growing collection of concert tickets, lanyards, passes and guitar picks.”

“Last year we supplied all the Christmas gifts for the Dallas Cowboys offensive lineman.” – Keith Winter

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


Congratulations, Kendal Hervert, DO

You call them Outstanding Young Professionals… We call them GableGotwals attorneys.

2017

For being honored as one of this year’s 40 Under 40. Your leadership and dedication to cancer patients is inspiring.

2017

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©2017 Rising Tide

Congratulations to Brandon Watson for being named to the 2017 Class of outstanding young professionals. Brandon joins several of his partners in receiving the honor of being named one of the 40 Under 40 by Oklahoma Magazine.

TULSA · OKLAHOMA CITY · www.gablelaw.com

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Rebellion Energy, LLC Congratulates Chief Operating Officer

Chris Weatherl On being named one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40!

2017

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Annina Collier

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Tulsa Dean and George Kaiser Family Foundation Endowed Chair, Center for Creativity, Tulsa Community College Annina Collier is all about facilitating creative experiences and cultivating new and exciting artistic endeavors in Tulsa. As the inaugural dean for the Center of Creativity, Collier organized an upcoming TEDxTulsaCC Talk and last year’s groundbreaking Please Touch the Art exhibition. “When we were young, we all instinctively sang, dance and drew, and we loved it,” she says. “But as we grow up, not only do most people stop doing these things, they often think they can’t do them.” That mindset is the reason she created the I Can’t workshop series – a free lunchtime workshop for those who don’t think of themselves as classically creative – where people can try everything from drawing to dance to digital fabrication. Bottom line: you don’t need to feel self-conscious around Collier – she’ll love what you have to say. “I work hard to foster a working environment where people aren’t afraid to tell me their ‘crazy’ ideas,” she says.

19

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE TYPE OF FOOD?

20 Stephen G. Butler

“My Italian mom would kill me if I didn’t say Italian.” – Annina Collier

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

37

Oklahoma City Assistant Dean, Oklahoma City University School of Law Stephen Butler spends his days developing relationships and securing resources for the OCU School of Law, but he believes that no matter how much you love your job, those around you are what matter most. “I enjoy the people I work with most of all,” he says. “Life has taught me that you can do really interesting work and get paid well to do it, but if you don’t enjoy the people you work with, you will be miserable in a short amount of time.” He also appreciates when his students get the return on their investments. “I love it when our students graduate, secure jobs and pass the bar exam. We’re a professional school, so people are giving us their hardearned money in order to enter the legal field or make a career transition,” he says. “We can take pride when we’ve helped them accomplish that goal.” In his time off, you can find Butler with his family. “I have a 4-month-old and an almost 4-year-old, so as soon as I leave the office, I start my real job,” he says.


21. Kari Easson 33

Stillwater Controller/Accounting Director, Stillwater Medical Center As the controller and accounting director for the Stillwater Medical Center, Kari Easson stays busy in her professional life and is proud of the work she does. “I am humbled by the work that the nurses, physicians, administration and support staff do at our medical center and clinics on a daily basis,” she says. “It makes me proud to say that I help support them.” That hasn’t stopped her from adding a heavy schedule of volunteer work, however. Easson serves as treasurer for the Oklahoma WONDERtorium, a Stillwater children’s museum that attracts more than 40,000 visitors a year. “It is a small operation, but is so important to the children in Stillwater.” Easson is also a board member and finance committee member for Stillwater CARES, an organization that works to alleviate poverty in the Stillwater area. She also coordinates Stillwater Medical Center’s bowling teams for Bowl for Kids’ Sake by Big Brothers/Big Sisters.

22. Taylor Potter 27

Bartlesville Director of Operations, The Pioneer Woman Mercantile Taylor Potter, a University of Oklahoma alumna, has helped to create over 200 jobs in her role as the director of operations at the Pioneer Woman Mercantile. Potter works under Ree Drummond, the Pioneer Woman herself, and supports the general store, warehouse and online store. If she weren’t working at the Mercantile, Potter would be “starting a company with my husband in northeast Oklahoma.” On her own time, Potter enjoys volunteering for various causes, which has led her to wonderful things. “My husband and I met volunteering together,” she says. “We both help organize the largest day of community service in Oklahoma, OU’s Big Event.” Her love for giving her time to others was fostered from a young age. “Growing up, my parents encouraged my brother and I to volunteer one afternoon a week. They engrained in us the importance of sharing blessings.”

Ben Elder

33

23

Tulsa Marketing Operations Manager, Cherokee Nation Businesses Ben Elder has hefty responsibility on his shoulders; he holds a key corporate marketing position at a business that garners over $1 billion in revenue each year. But it’s about a lot more than simple numbers – it’s about what that money can do. “Our profits are poured back into our local communities to improve the lives of Cherokee Nation citizens and all Oklahomans with things that matter, like jobs and health care,” he says. “Those are game changers for people, and I love that.” Elder believes helping people is in his DNA, and strives to do just that every day with a great attitude. “I try to stay outrageously positive and smile,” he says. “It has worked for me so far.” Whether at work or at home, Elder sets a high standard when it comes to treating other people with respect. “Selflessness, to me, is the ultimate form of volunteerism. How can you give back when no one is looking?”

SURPRISE US - TELL US SOMETHING INTERESTING OR FUN WE DIDN’T ASK ABOUT.

“Putting political partisanship aside, I look exactly like a young Bernie Sanders. It’s crazy.” – Ben Elder APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Evan Vincent

33

Oklahoma City Attorney, Crowe & Dunlevy For Evan Vincent, being an attorney isn’t about winning big or being right – he focuses more on the individuals he’s representing. In fact, what makes him happiest is “the relief you can provide to a client faced with a lawsuit by letting them know that they’ve got someone in their corner.” Vincent’s unique approach to situations is a key factor in his success. “I force myself to view everything as an opportunity to learn something and improve,” he says. When Vincent’s not assisting clients, you can find him studying up on 007. “I am a die hard fan of the James Bond character,” he says. “I’ve read nearly all the books – some more than once – and I’ve seen all the movies multiple times.”

24. Carlisha Williams 32

Tulsa Executive Director, Tulsa Legacy Charter Schools A highlight of Carlisha Williams’s day is when she takes time from her office work to connect with the children she serves. “It is a joy to hear about their dreams, celebrate their successes, and affirm them with the promises we see in their future,” she says. That unrelenting drive to serve led her to create a nonprofit called Women Empowering Nations, where “the mission is to provide exposure and mentorship for girls of color in underserved communities, to develop them into socially conscious global leaders.” Williams credits her grandfather with cultivating within her a driving sense of purpose. “He told me, ‘You can’t fight injustice with your fist. You’ve got to fight it with your mind.’” And that she does.

WHAT TYPE OF PHONE DO YOU USE? iPhone Android Blackberry

83% 15% 2%

WHAT ABOUT YOU MIGHT PEOPLE BE SURPRISED TO LEARN?

“I can salsa! (The food, not the dance.)” – Taylor Potter

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Congratulations to ANDREA GOSSARD PROJECT MANAGER and all of the 2017 40 Under 40 Honorees.

2017

Tulsa | Oklahoma City Atlanta | Dallas | Fort Myers | Houston | Naples Springdale | Tampa | Washington, D.C. www.manhattanconstruction.com

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27. Chris Weatherl 38

Tulsa Chief Operating Officer, Rebellion Energy Chris Weatherl is a beacon of positive light in an industry laden with tough times; he works as the chief operating officer at Rebellion Energy, an oil and gas business. Dodging layoffs and a steep economic downturn, Weatherl is supremely happy with the business he and his colleagues have created. “Those of us that remain [in the industry] have fought to stay here and create our destiny,” he says. “Rebellion Energy is a group of just such people, and I am proud to be a part of that.” Weatherl believes that surrounding himself with positive, forward-thinking individuals keeps him focused. “In short, I love the people I work with and I’m constantly inspired by their character and commitment to each other.” In his spare time, Weatherl volunteers with the American Heart Association, Catholic Charities and various mission groups. “Volunteerism has taught and continues to teach me that what we have is not what’s important in life,” he says. “It’s what we do with what we have that really matters.”

26. Andrea Gossard 32

Oklahoma City Project Manager, Manhattan Construction Andrea Gossard is a renovation master – her job as a project manager at Manhattan Construction has her take existing buildings in metropolitan OKC and mold them into new, dynamic, beautifully crafted spaces. Although it’s a demanding career, Gossard focuses on the positive effect her work has on tenants. “Watching the reactions of visitors and people who eventually work in the facilities we turn over is really rewarding,” she says. Outside work, Gossard volunteers with Rebuilding Together OKC and plays in a recreational kickball league. Regardless of the situation, she plays to win. “I’m incredibly competitive. Being second best at any anything has never been an option for me.” WHAT’S THE BEST ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED?

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORM? LinkedIn Facebook

5% 59%

Twitter Instagram

“No project will ever be perfect, but endure to deliver something exceptional.” – Ryan Smith

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

10% 26%


C O N G R A T U L A T I O N S

PAUL A. BERRY, M.D.

Warren Clinic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon

on being named among Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40.

Saint Francis Health System | 918-494-2200 | saintfrancis.com

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3/15/17 11:03 AM

CON GRA T UL A T ION S

2017

2017

BRA N DO N H A C K ET T , A IA

AND ALL 40 U ND E R 40 HONOR E E S

Oklahoma City University School of Law Congratulates

Stephen Butler ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ADVANCEMENT & EXTERNAL RELATIONS

40 Under 40

Young Professionals Class of 2017!

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3/8/17 4:00 PM


Brandon M. Watson

31

Tulsa Shareholder, GableGotwals A shareholder and attorney at GableGotwals in Tulsa, Brandon Watson practices in the firm’s business transaction group, where he primarily focuses on representing clients in mergers and acquisitions, securities, corporate governance and contractrelated matters. “It’s a great honor to practice at GableGotwals,” he says. “Every day, I have the opportunity to benefit, undeservedly, from the legacy of excellence in the law that generations of lawyers before me worked hard to establish and preserve at our firm. I’m proud to carry on that legacy.” Watson also volunteers in the community, with most of his work supporting the Catholic Church in the diocese of Tulsa. He serves on the Vocations Board, which assists young men discerning the priesthood and a religious life in the Diocense, and serves on the Board of Porta Caeli House, a new home for the dying in North Tulsa supported by the Catholic Church. He and his wife have four sons, and he says he enjoys hiking with them. “It’s a great stress reliever for me and agreat way for them to burn off energy!”

29. Dr. Jason Beaman 38

Tulsa Forensic Psychiatrist, Oklahoma State University Health Sciences Center Jason Beaman wears many hats – but in every scenario he’s dedicated to helping those marginalized by mental illness. “As a forensic psychiatrist, I spend my time in jails and prisons evaluating defendants for the court system,” he says. “As a general psychiatrist, I see patients at OSU Medical Center.” But that’s not all – he’s also a professor, teaching first- to fourth-year medical students, and on top of that, he’s the chair of psychiatry, advocating for mentally ill people in underserved communities. Beaman’s main goal is to improve the mental health infrastructure in the state, and he often volunteers his time at medical clinics to assist those without insurance so they get the care they deserve. “As a medical volunteer, you get a new appreciation for how relieved and happy individuals are when they have a chance to see a doctor without causing severe financial problems,” he says. “The gratitude of these individuals is incredible and a wonderful reward.”

30. Jamey Ory 38

28

WHAT ABOUT YOU MIGHT PEOPLE BE SURPRISED TO LEARN?

Tulsa Senior Vice President, Credit Concurrence Officer, BOK Financial Corporation There are a number of reasons why Jamey Ory is remarkable, but her loyalty is one character trait that really stands out. “I began working for BOK Financial as my first job out of college. Seventeen years later, I am still convinced I made the right choice and can envision my entire career with one company,” she says. Ory has a wide array of interests outside of work – she volunteers with several nonprofits, competes in local equestrian hunter jumper shows and has a husband, two kids and 17 pets. Yes, 17 – seven of which are horses. She truly believes that having a handle on your priorities is crucial to a life well lived. “Leave work at work. Give it all you’ve got in the office, but be able to walk away. Life happens at home, and this is where your presence really counts. Jobs will come and go, but you only get one family,” she says. “Make sure they know how much they mean to you.”

“Probably that my first language is Spanish and that I am a mutt: half Venezuelan, half British.” – Mike J. Wilkinson

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


CONGRATULATIONS ERICA KOSEMUND

We proudly congratulate

2017

Evan G.E. Vincent

2017 AWARD RECIPIENT Choctaw Casinos & Resorts Congratulates

for his recognition in Oklahoma Magazine 40 under 40

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2017

Your contributions to Tulsa and Tulsa Community College make a difference in people’s lives every day. We celebrate your accomplishments.

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31 Dr. Kendal Hervert

35

Tulsa Pulmonologist, Cancer Treatment Centers of America Lung cancer is a daunting diagnosis, but Kendal Hervert makes it her mission to help any and all affected. Hevert is a pulmonologist and spends her workdays treating patients suffering from the disease. And although she doesn’t meet them in favorable circumstances, Hervert says the patients are her favorite part of the job, hands down. “I love my job because of the people,” she says. “I meet patients from all over the country.” In an occupation that is often overwhelming, Hervert has a distinctive perspective that keeps her positive. “The secret to my success is knowing that God has a purpose for my life,” she says. “He opens some doors and closes others, but I am willing to work hard toward my goals.” At home, Hervert is a wife, and proud owner of two dogs. “Going for a walk with my husband and our two dogs, Sugar and Raymond, or doing yoga are my favorite ways to wind down at the end of the day,” she says. IF YOUR LIFE WERE A MOVIE, WHAT WOULD THE TITLE BE?

“Is She Still Talking?” – Angela Brenton Carter

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

Erin Smith 38 Ryan Smith 39

32

Oklahoma City Owners, Smith Design Company This husband-and-wife design duo does it all: Ryan acts as the general contractor and Erin is the architect, designer, chief financial officer and project manager for the commercial, historical and custom residences they create around OKC. They also do their part to provide ample opportunities for the next generation of creators. “We support and sponsor young people within our industry to explore and obtain their own business opportunities, to become self sufficient, and to better care for themselves and their families.” The autonomy that comes with being her own boss is a major bonus for Erin – as is “being a successful female in a male-dominated industry.” As a San Diego native, Ryan says his favorite sport is surfing, but his wife has a caveat: “I can wakeboard better than my husband,” she tells us. But Ryan has a skill that most general contractors cannot boast: “I can break dance.”


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34. Kimberley Worrell 30

33. Mike J. Wilkinson

32

Oklahoma City Assistant Vice President of Enrollment Services, Mid-America Christian University Mike Wilkinson came to the United States from Caracas, Venezuela, to play baseball at Mid-America Christian University, but after collecting his bachelor’s degree, MACU couldn’t stand to see him go. Now, years later, Wilkinson has worked his way up the ranks. He has the rewarding job of working with young people as they make some of the biggest decisions in their lives. “I am so grateful for the many opportunities Mid-America Christian University has given me because this has been the perfect place to express my creativity, love for people and passion for entrepreneurship,” he says. And after his nine years at MACU, Wilkinson believes that “‘being real before being right’ and ‘you have two ears and one mouth for a reason’” are two adages to follow. When he’s not helping to shape the future of the college, he’s spending his time with the dogs at A New Leash on Life in OKC. “Serving as a therapy dog handler has been an amazing experience,” he says.

Oklahoma City Associate Development Director, Oklahoma City Museum of Art The Oklahoma City Museum of Art continues to become a more important part of Oklahoma’s culture each year, and Kimberley Worrell, associate development director for the museum, has been able to play a part of that growth. Worrell oversees fundraising and donor relations, event planning for the museum’s three major fundraisers (Renaissance Ball, Omelette Party and ArtonTAP) and serves as the museum’s liaison to the OKCMOA Moderns young patrons board. “I love being able to look back on the work achieved through fundraising and development and see the tangible impact it has on the museum and OKC community through the visual arts, whether that is through a major exhibition to visit the museum or through our learning and engagement or outreach programming.” If she could choose another career, it would be in the arts, “either as a dance studio owner or dance teacher, sharing my love of the performing arts.”

WHAT’S THE BEST ADVICE YOU’VE EVER RECEIVED?

36. Ronald

Timoshenko

35. Carrie M. Law 38

Sulphur Executive Officer of Hospital and Clinic Excellence, Chickasaw Nation Department of Health The word “excellence” is right in Carrie Law’s job title, and she embodies that high quality standard in several ways. Along with being a licensed pharmacist, Law oversees several facets of a hospital and three satellite clinics. Writing policy and procedure and leading her team keep Law extremely busy, but her co-workers share the heavy load. “I am surrounded by a work family that is caring and thoughtful,” she says. “I wouldn’t be the person I am today without my work family.” But her real-life family is a major source of joy for Law, too. After a long day, she enjoys “spending time with my beautiful 6-year-old son and husband – we love to camp and be outdoors.” A big travel enthusiast, Law carves time out to explore new places. “Every year I have to go on a trip to the beach somewhere,” she says. “I love that my son is getting old enough to enjoy it.” And her motto? “Set the standard, raise the bar, and let excellence speak for itself.”

31

Tulsa Director and Head of Engineering, ConsumerAffairs At only 31, Ronald Timoshenko has found great success in his distinctive circumstances. “I was born in Soviet Russia and my family came over to the United States as communist refugees,” he says. “We came to realize the American dream.” As head of engineering at ConsumerAffairs, Timoshenko works day in and day out mapping the technical future for the company. “What I love most about my job is the fact that I get to come to work everyday and be a part of the team that’s revolutionizing the customer experience industry,” he says. Off the clock, Timoshenko utilizes his right-brained skills as an artist. “My favorite stress-reliever is to spend time in my paint studio with my wife,” he says. “We drink cocktails, listen to music and paint the night away.” Why Timoshenko is so successful at such a young age stems from an idea that many people overlook in today’s corporate world. “The best advice I’ve ever received is to compete with myself, not with others.”

“Being a good leader isn’t about getting people to do what you want; it’s about getting people to want what you want.” – Kimberley Worrell

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


2017

Congratulations, Eva Sawheny, MD on being named a 40 under 40 honoree.

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CONGRATULATIONS! Angela Carter Executive Musician 40 Under 40 Honoree

3/14/17 3:38 PM

Congratulations, Cole! We proudly congratulate our own Cole Marshall for being named to Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40 list of accomplished young professionals.

2017

2017

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37. Dr. Michael Sughrue 38

Oklahoma City Neurosurgeon, Stephenson Cancer Center Dr. Michael Sughrue has one of the most complicated jobs in the medical profession – he focuses exclusively on adult brain tumors, many of which are deemed inoperable by other medical centers. Performing nearly 400 operations a year, Sughrue changes the lives of people who were once given bleak diagnoses. He was a founding member of the Comprehensive Brain Tumor Center at OU and now works as the director while also co-authoring textbooks and teaching classes on minimally invasive brain tumor surgery. Sughrue spends much of his off time learning more about the brain, but traveling is a personal passion he pursues. The one place he’s always wanted to visit? “North Korea – and I have!” Sughrue’s success is inspiring, but it wasn’t without hard work, determination and a bit of advice from his uncle: “Don’t ever let finances limit your path in life.”

Dr. Eva Sawheny,

37

Edmond Pulmonary Critical Care Sleep Medicine Physician, Oklahoma Heart Hospital Along with moving across the pond from Hungary to continue her medical career, Dr. Eva Sawheny has won a slew of awards for her skills and compassion as a physician. Her normal day includes caring for patients in the ICU, providing consults and visiting with patients in the pulmonary and sleep medicine clinics. Although most people could see themselves in another career, that isn’t the case with Sawheny – since high school in Europe, Sawheny has “never looked at other career options.” She is also a proud mother of two. “I sincerely enjoy spending time with my family. They are the key to my success,” she says. “After a difficult day, having my two beautiful daughters, Kyra and Zoey, run and hug me as I walk through the door relieves me of all my stress for a moment.” If that wasn’t heartwarming enough, she also met her husband, Nitin, on their very first day of medical school.

38. David Rothbaum Jankowsky 38

Tulsa Founder, Francis Renewable Energy, LLC David Jankowsky has a passion for renewable energy, and strives to open up our state to that concept. He battles against several factors as he advocates for solar, geothermal and other off-grid technologies, but remains hopeful that progress will be made. “We at FRE love the challenge of creating a market and unlocking that potential, which we know will be transformative for the state of Oklahoma,” he says. Out of the office, Jankowsky is a frequent volunteer at Iron Gate, a food kitchen and pantry in Tulsa, and believes children should start charity work early. “There is no better education you can provide your kids than volunteering for those less fortunate,” he says. “Not only does it teach the value of hard work, but it broadens perspective.” Jankowsky believes “plain and simple hard work” led to his success – but other factors were at play, too. In fact, if his life were a movie, he says the title would be Lucky: The David Jankowsky Story - an Unauthorized Biopic by Judd Apatow.

39. Elizabeth “Bessy” Osburn 35

Tulsa Senior Vice President of Government Affairs, Tulsa Regional Chamber Tulsa born and bred, Elizabeth Osburn is the voice of the business community at the Tulsa Regional Chamber. Bottom line: she makes sure policymakers hear the concerns of local businesses. She also manages the chamber’s two political action committees, along with maintaining relationships with elected officials on every level of government. Osburn deeply appreciates the respect her coworkers have for her two jobs – as a VP and a mother. “It’s a juggle to balance work and family, but I’m incredibly proud to be part of an organization that values and encourages working mothers,” she says. Osburn takes time out of her schedule to volunteer at St. John’s Episcopal, United Way, John 3:16 Mission and several other nonprofits. Lastly, she has a heritage not many would guess. “Don’t let the red hair fool you – I’m Cherokee Indian and my middle name is Ahnawake,” she says. “It means ‘bright eyes’ in Cherokee and was my grandmother’s name.”

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LIVE WORK PL AY

POFATHRRETE 1

Downtown

Renaissance Downtown revivals in Oklahoma create an excitement that feeds off itself. It is impossible to deny the growth in downtown Tulsa and Oklahoma City. Neighborhoods that once closed down when the sun set are now busy long into the night, more businesses have moved in these areas and new residential complexes open on a regular basis. The phrase “live, work, play” is often repeated when discussing downtown for good reason – as more people work downtown, they choose to live downtown. As more people dwell downtown, more entertainment options appear for the residents. Each element causes growth in the other two and fuels the fire of development. Tulsa and Oklahoma City are no longer beginning their downtown renaissance. The renaissance is well underway. APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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LIVE WORK

THE RISE OF MIXED USE Nothing represents the “live, work, play” lifestyle in downtown better than

PL AY

CITY INNOVATORS

Judy Hatfield

Judy Hatfield has developed various properties around Oklahoma City, but Carnegie Centre, located in the site of the original Carnegie library built in the 1890s, was her first project in downtown OKC. “I had lived downtown, and I had talked with [President and CEO of The Alliance for Economic Development of Oklahoma City] Cathy O’Connor about the Carnegie library,” Hatfield says. “She asked me, ‘Why don’t you just develop it?’ and I said, “Well, I just might.” The renovated Carnegie Centre, at 131 Dean A. McGee Ave., is a mixed-use project offering residential, office and retail space.

the rise in mixed-use facilities – buildings that combine retail, entertainment, office and residential space to provide a little bit of everything for their residents. Carnegie Centre in OKC not only has residential apartments, but businesses and restaurants on the ground floor. Developer Judy Hatfield says the mix has been popular with the building’s tenants. “I think it makes it very efficient for my tenants because they love to have the opportunity to have a restaurant right downstairs where they can go have something wonderful to eat,” she says. “They also have the advantage of a fabulous spa for both men and women in the building.” More mixed-use projects in Oklahoma City are expected to open in the coming years – developers Gary Brooks and Charlie Nicholas have purchased the First National Center, ending doubt about the building’s future, and plan to convert it to a mixed-use building. Brooks is also involved in The Steelyard in Bricktown, which will combine apartments, retail space and two hotels. In Tulsa, most of the attention on mixed-use facilities is on Santa Fe Square, a project that will combine apartments, retail, restaurants and Hotel Indigo. “I definitely believe that the businesses that we will have at Santa Fe will be attractive not just to the residents of Santa Fe but all the residents downtown,” Casey Stowe of Nelson+Stowe, developers of Santa Fe Square, says. “This will be a $150 million project that will be attractive to everyone in Tulsa.”

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

live

work CREDIT

DOWNTOWN TULSA HAS ADDED

478

RESIDENTIAL HOUSING UNITS SINCE

JULY 2010

74

Nelson+Stowe recently completed The Boxyard, where tenants ranging from bars to banks do business in shipping containers, and has turned its attention to Santa Fe Square, a $150 million mixed-use development in the Blue Dome District. The company has been developing in downtown Tulsa in one way or another for about eight years, Casey Stowe says, and was also involved in the renovation of The Coliseum apartments with American Residential Group. Although many companies might find their hands full with a project as large as Santa Fe Square, Stowe says the company has several other projects in the works.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

play PHOTOS COURTESY CARNEGIE CENTRE

Nelson+Stowe Development


DOWNTOWN HOTELS

OKC

TULSA

21c Museum Hotel

Hampton Inn and Suites

900 W. Main St.

211 W. Third St.

Aloft Hotel

Best Western Plus

Ambassador Hotel Oklahoma City

The Mayo Hotel

PHOTO COURTESY SJS HOSPITALITY

209 N. Walnut Ave.

707 S. Houston Ave. 115 W. Fifth St.

1200 N. Walker Ave.

Hyatt Regency Tulsa

15 N. Robinson Ave.

Holiday Inn City Center

2 W. Reno Ave.

Fairfield Inn and Suites

300 E. Sheridan Ave.

Doubletree by Hilton

100 E. Second St.

Colcord Hotel

17 W. Seventh St.

Courtyard by Marriott

111 N. Main St.

Hampton Inn and Suites

DOWNTOWN’S HOTEL BOOM The growing number of attractions in downtown districts is increasing both the de-

mand for hotel rooms and different types of hotels. SJS Hospitality operating partner CREDIT Jeff Hartman, Ceja Corporation Chairman and Interak President Greg Oliphant, and Interak CEO David Sharp have worked to create hotels that not only provide the best accommodation available for visitors to the city, but also blend seamlessly with the neighborhood. The partners have multiple projects downtown already and will be putting Hotel Indigo, a new boutique hotel, in the Santa Fe Square development. “Hotels located within vibrant urban cores want to integrate into the neighborhood districts and attract a loyal customer base as well as provide an amazing guest experience to travelers,” Hartman says. “Part of the design concept we are doing with the Hotel Indigo follows a pattern we have done with our other two projects downtown – Fairfield Inn & Suites in the Brady Arts District and Courtyard by Marriott in the Deco District – and that is to provide street-level restaurants and retail, which promotes walkability and connectivity within the districts.” Hotels are no longer providing restaurants aimed only at guests – like their other projects, Hotel Indigo’s dining is intended for downtown residents as well as visitors. In Oklahoma City, historic hotels such as the Skirvin Hilton, which completed a $55 million renovation and restoration in 2007 and started a $4.3 renovation project last August, have been joined by other hotels such as 21c Museum Hotel – a hotel in Film Row that also has art exhibitions for both visitors and residents.

616 W. Seventh St.

Hilton Garden Inn/Homewood Suits 328 E. Sheridan Ave.

Courtyard by Marriott 415 S. Boston Ave.

Holiday Inn Express +Suites

Aloft Hotel

Renaissance Hotel

Listing from Tulsa Downtown Coordinating Council

101 E. Main St.

10 N. Broadway Ave.

200 Civic Center

Residence Inn Marriott 400 E. Reno Ave.

Sheraton Oklahoma City 1 N. Broadway Ave.

Skirvin Hilton Hotel 1 Park Ave.

The Grandison Inn 1200 N. Shartel Ave.

Listing from Downtown OKC, Inc.

Downtown Tulsa property values HAVE INCREASED

7% per year since 2008.

GREG OLIPHANT, LEFT, AND JEFF HARTMAN ARE TWO OF THE THREE OWNERS OF FAIRFIELD INN & SUITES IN TULSA. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

CITY INNOVATORS

Greg Oliphant and Jeff Hartman

SJS Hospitality operating partner Jeff Hartman, Ceja Corporation Chairman and Interak President Greg Oliphant and Interak CEO David Sharp are developing Hotel Indigo, part of the Santa Fe Square development in the Blue Dome District. Hartman, Oliphant and Sharp were project partners for Fairfield Inn & Suites, which includes 11,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, as well as a bar in the lobby. Hotel Indigo will break ground in May. “My business partners and I had such great success with the Fairfield Inn & Suites in the Brady Arts District that we sought out another opportunity in a similar area not being served by a hotel,” Hartman says. APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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LIVE WORK PL AY

THE DRAW OF DOWNTOWNtoLIVING a diverse downtown migration in OKC as well. What can someone looking to move downtown expect to find for a downtown apartment? A luxury penthouse? A small studio designed for affordability? The answer is both. Robert Leikam, president of American Residential Group, says one of the goals of ARG’s properties is to provide not only proximity to downtown attractions but an amenity-rich experience tailored to the neighborhood that includes swimming pools and courtyards – amenities that may be unexpected in the midst of a downtown area. ARG recently completed the 161-unit project The Edge at East Village and is beginning work on The View, which will have a rooftop swimming pool and clubhouse overlooking ONEOK Field. The rich variety of amenities available has led to a diverse group of tenants ranging from young professionals right out of college to empty nesters who chose to move downtown after living most of their lives in the suburbs. Leikam says the entertainment options have created an influx of residents. Many people might repeatedly come downtown for dinner and other events and decide it makes sense to live downtown as well. “It’s been the entertainment options that I think have gotten some over the hump to make that leap into this new lifestyle, this exciting lifestyle,” Leikam says. “I think there’s an option for everyone. Word has gotten out this is the place to be.” The close proximity to entertainment options is a driving force

“Living downtown is a lifestyle,” says Judy Hatfield, developer of the Carnegie Centre in Oklahoma City. Hatfield herself chose to live downtown after many years of maintaining a home. “I have lots of events at the Skirvin [Hilton Hotel], and I walk over there,” she says. “If I want to go to a Thunder game, I walk to that. If want to go to a movie, I walk to that. It’s just so convenient.” Downtown areas in Tulsa and OKC now define the “live, work, play” mentality – and each new development brings more people to the area. “People are excited about what’s happening [in downtown Tulsa], and that excitement feeds off of itself,” says Casey Stowe of Nelson+Stowe. “As more people come downtown to work or live or play, that breeds more activity downtown, which makes it more exciting, which makes more businesses open, which brings more people out.” The options in both cities continue to grow more diverse. Brickhugger, the company behind the renovation of The Mayo Hotel and The Mayo Residences, recently opened the Y Lofts, and Nelson+Stowe will have apartments available in the mixed-use Santa Fe Square project. In OKC, The Wheeler District is breaking ground this year and will be open to residents in 2018, and new residential projects are being built in Bricktown as well. Developers are working to provide a variety of apartment options, and the result is a resurgence of downtown living that affects people of all ages.

APARTMENT AND TOWNHOUSE COMPLEXES

OKLAHOMA CITY Avana Arts District Apartments

Claremont Apartments

Carnegie Centre

Commons on Classen

Central Avenue Villas

Deep Deuce at Bricktown Apartments

301 N. Walker Ave.

131 Dean A. McGee Ave. 444 N. Central Ave.

The Civic

627 Couch Drive

76

425 NW 12th St.

1320 Classen Drive 314 NE Second St.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

The Edge at Midtown

Hadden Hall

Lift Apartments

Fifth Avenue Lofts

Harvey Lofts

The Marion Hotel Apartments

The Florence

The Haven

The Mayfair

Francis Residential

The Hill at Bricktown

The Maywood Apartments

The Garage Loft Apartments

Level Urban Apartments

Memory Lane Apartments

1325 N. Walker Ave.

601 N. Broadway Ave. 429 NW 11th St.

1217 N. Francis Ave. 113 NW 13th St.

215 NW 10th St. 1209 N. Harvey Ave. 601 Robert S. Kerr Ave.

220 Russell M. Perry Ave 123 NE Second St.

801 NW 10th St. 110 NW 10th St.

1315 N. Broadway Place 425 N. Oklahoma Ave. 509 NW Seventh St.


DOWNTOWN RESIDENTS

TULSA

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

4,227 OKC 5,673 CITY INNOVATORS

Cornerstone Development

Cornerstone has already developed several major projects in OKC and is expanding its portfolio with The Steelyard, a mixed-use development center that will include retail space, apartments and hotels. In addition, Cornerstone President and CEO Gary Brooks and Texas contractor and developer Charlie Nicholas recently purchased the First National Center. Plans call for a hotel, retail space and residential spaces, and the renovations are expected to run about $200 million. The sale, announced in January 2016 and closed a year later, ends speculation about the future of the building, opened in 1931.

CITY INNOVATORS

American Residential Group

American Residential Group began developing property in downtown Tulsa in the late ’90s with Renaissance Uptown at 11th Street and Denver Avenue – “It was hard to convince lenders and investors on why that would be well received,” ARG President Robert Leikam says. The company has stayed active developing downtown projects, including Tribune Lofts, The Edge at East Village and now The View, located near ONEOK Field. “It’ll be special,” Leikam says. “We’re confident The View will be the finest multifamily project in the region.”

DOWNTOWN WORKFORCE POPULATION

TULSA

The Humphreys Co.

40,191 OKC 69,638 PHOTOCOURTESY CREDIT ARG PHOTO

After developing Carlton Landing, a mixed-use master planned community on Eufala Lake, the company is taking a more urban approach to its next project, the Wheeler District. The planned community, which made its mark on the OKC skyline when it purchased and placed the former Santa Monica Ferris Wheel on the south bank of the Oklahoma River, will combine retail and residences ranging from townhomes to “tiny homes.” The project is the first recent development to stretch south of the Oklahoma River.

The Metropolitan Apartments

Twelve Twelve Building

The Montgomery Downtown

Wesley Village Apartments

The Mosaic

TULSA

800 N. Oklahoma Ave. 500 W. Main St.

321 N. Oklahoma Ave.

Park Harvey Apartments

1212 N. Walker Ave. 300 NW 12th St.

614 S. Elwood Ave.

Harrington Lofts

Philtower Lofts

410 and 450 W. Seventh St.

Mayo 420 Apartments

Renaissance Uptown

625 S. Elgin Ave.

The Merida

Tribune Lofts

414 E. Fourth St.

Metro at Brady

Y Lofts

211 S. Greenwood Ave.

Palace Building Apartments

Central Park

Coliseum Apartments East End Village

Art Deco Lofts and Apartments

The Edge at East Village

333 NW Fifth St.

Best Tulsa Condo

GreenArch

1309 N. Hudson Ave.

The Blair Apartments

200 N. Harvey Ave.

The Regency

The Sieber Residences

2 W. Sixth St.

410 W. Seventh St.

10 N. Greenwood Ave.

724 S. Main St.

420 S. Main St.

522 S. Boston Ave. 10 E. Archer St.

427 S. Boston Ave.

1000 S. Denver Ave. 20 E. Archer St. 515 S. Denver Ave.

324 S. Main St.

APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

77


Creating a

Dream Home By M. J. Van Deventer

Remodeling and renovation projects allow Oklahomans to create exactly the homes they want.

The conventional wisdom is you can’t always get what you want when buying a home, and it still holds true. But while buying a home involves compromise, renovation does not. Renovation gives homeowners a chance to remake their homes exactly to their specifications, and many Oklahoma homeowners are choosing to do exactly that. Here are two projects where people chose to create the home they wanted rather than compromise. THE RENOVATED FIREPLACE, ACCENTED WITH A DRAMATIC CEILING BEAM, ANCHORS THE FAMILY ROOM. THE KITCHEN’S LARGE CENTER ISLAND FEATURES A VEINED CALACATTA SIENA MARBLE SLAB THAT GIVES A NATURAL, YET HIGH CONTRAST, MODERN LOOK.

Project Modern Glamour

Photos by Ryan Wells, Flow Photography

An OKC renovation mixes contemporary and traditional design for a fresh, new look. He likes contemporary. She likes traditional. Both wanted a change in the interior design of their home, located in Mulholland, an upscale gated community in North Edmond. Their renovation wish was no small challenge for their interior designer, Carlin Blythe. Originally, the home was shrouded in dark brown tones. Rooms had a claustrophobic atmosphere as if these spaces were begging for more open, light-filled spaces. Mulholland homes feature tra

78

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017

ditional architecture. “We couldn’t get too modern, so our solution was to meet in the middle with a contemporary look,” Carlin says. The transformation is worthy of superlatives – magnificent, astounding, amazing. The front door became the key to this home’s revival. “We changed it to a modern iron and glass door, compatible with the contemporary updates we made to the home’s interior,” Carlin says. The renovation went well beyond designing a new front door.

“They wanted to completely transform the entire home,” Carlin says. “We removed all the hardware, flooring and plumbing. We opened up some walls downstairs. In the living room, we took out a wet bar to create more open space in the public areas. We completely redesigned the layout of the kitchen as well as the master bedroom.” Beyond the front door, the entry was redesigned with a clean, formal look accented by a dramatic chandelier. “We changed the origi-


nal wooden banister, installing a new iron railing to give it a more sophisticated, modern look. The black iron complemented the light washed wood floors to create the modern high contrast look we were striving for,” Carlin says. “We really wanted an updated formal statement as guests walked into the home.” Throughout the home, there is an emphasis on geometric themes, especially in the kitchen, where modern updates enhanced the home’s traditional motifs. “We selected a glass mosaic backsplash tile, which combined modern glamour with a curved diamond pattern adding a tra-

ditional note,” she adds. “The kitchen window was framed with the backsplash material. That wasn’t part of the original plan, but it created a subtle, interesting focal point in the kitchen.” MetroQuartz white marble with random geometric streaks added design drama on the countertops, center island and surrounding spaces. “The veining of the Calcutta Siena slate, an engineered stone, has a natural, high contrast modern look. The same material was reprised for the butler’s pantry, laundry room and bathrooms. This stone is durable, stain resistant and awesome for longevity and family use,” Carlin says.

Extensive renovations occurred in the master suite and bathroom, which had been ultra-traditional. Now, this area has a contemporary look, with high contrast in furnishings and finishings. The transformation included adding rectangular charcoal gray bath and vanity sinks with a waterfall edge, chrome fixtures and a steam shower.

Following this impressive change from traditional to modern, Carlin suggests, “If you’re renovating a home – period makeover or otherwise – make sure you have a clear vision: your own or a designer’s. It is important to think through the functionality as well as the aesthetics of your home when remodeling.”

TOP: THE BOLD PATTERNED FLOOR IN THE MASTER BATHROOM IS AN EYE-CATCHING CONVERSATION PIECE. ORIGINALLY, TWO FRENCH DOORS LED INTO THE BATHROOM. THE FRENCH DOORS WERE UPDATED TO SLIDING BARN DOORS. A TILE RUG FEATURE CREATES THE FEEL OF ONE LARGE OPEN SPACE.

“We dreamed of expanding the chopped up living and dining room and opening up the kitchen into one grand space.” ““The interior was dilapidated beyond anyone else even offering a bid.”

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Project A Personal Design

Photos by Scott Johnson, Hawks Photography

A Tulsa family plans their own design in a historic home renovation. Dr. Mike Hinkle and his wife, Becky, often cruise the historic neighborhoods in Tulsa’s Utica Square and Florence Park. On those forays, they are not just admiring the period architecture or the beautiful landscaping. They are usually searching for homes to buy that they can renovate and sell, known as “flipping” in the real estate world. One quaint home seemed perfect for this

A CHOCOLATE AND VANILLA COLOR SCHEME MAKES THE DINING AREA FEEL COZY AND INVITING. A PATTERNED AREA RUG ANCHORS THE SETTING.

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passion shared by the Hinkles and their son, Gant, a Realtor with McGraw Realtors. “This particular home had stone walls so thick it looked like Europe to us,” Mike says. “It is quintessentially Country French in the greatest of details on the exterior. Actually, it was love at first sight 15 years before we purchased it.” On the Hinkles’ recent sighting, there was also a dumpster in the driveway – a clue to

them the home might finally be available. The owner had died several years previously, but the home was in a trust and the Hinkles were not allowed to see the property until legal procedures were completed. “Luckily, the estate’s trustee was a wonderful woman who lived next door to the house we admired,” Mike says. “We learned later that Charles Faudree, the noted Country French authority and author, had fallen in love with the home before the estate was ready to part with it.”


WHITE SUBWAY TILE AND A MARBLE LAVATORY COUNTERTOP GIVE A CLEAN, UPDATED LOOK TO THE BATHROOM.

TOP: “GANT’S SHOWER IS TO DIE FOR,” MIKE HINKLE SAYS. A CONTEMPORARY SHOWER FEATURES A ROCK-STYLE BASE AND UPDATED SURROUNDING FEATURES. LEFT: THE HINKLES CONVERTED THE HOUSE TO AN OPEN FLOOR PLAN TO CREATE A MORE SPACIOUS ENVIRONMENT.

The Hinkles’ first visit across the home’s threshold was shocking. Plaster was falling from the walls. Asbestos was in the heating system. Most prospective buyers would have fled quickly. “The interior was dilapidated beyond anyone else even offering a bid,” Mike says. He and Becky immediately placed the first offer on the home and became the proud parents of a massive renovation project. They found beauty in the wooden ceilings, circa 1929, the year the home was built. “They had covered the ceiling in the early 1950s to save on heating bills. We dreamed of expand-

ing the chopped up living and dining room and opening up the kitchen into one grand space,” Mike says. Their dream came true. What was required to fulfill their dream for a renovation on a grand scale was restructuring the entire roofline of the house – no small feat. “I knew the roofline was the key to opening up the inside to have a grand cathedral shock effect after walking up to a cute little cottage and expecting tiny, separated rooms that really don’t reflect today’s home buyer and how they want to live,” Mike says. “While we were at it, we added a second floor with two additional bedrooms and a Pullman bath to allow the home to expand from the original small three bedrooms/one bath to the

current spacious two bedrooms/two baths. “The greatest challenge was hiding a huge second floor on the back of the house without changing the character of the home. Our goal was a seamless addition that looks like the 1929 original. We hid the roofline by adding a French hat on top of that section to conceal the second floor elevation.” To make their vision come true, the Hinkles turned to the people who knew their vision best – themselves. Instead of hiring an architect for the remodel, the family chose to create the design for the renovation. Once completed, the Hinkles did not have to search too far for a buyer for this impressive project. This precious, enchanting cottage is now Gant’s home. For all the unusual quirks the Hinkles found in this treasure of a small home to renovate, they were undaunted by the project. A fifth redesign project in the Utica Square area is now in the works for this enterprising Tulsa couple. APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Park Your Hunger Here A Route 66 business lets food trucks sell at its venue with indoor-outdoor dining ... and a bar, too.

U

A PLETHORA OF FOOD OPTIONS AWAITS AT FUEL 66 IN TULSA’S PEARL DISTRICT.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

nlike the old roach coaches and gut trucks of Manhattan or Chicago, food trucks in Tulsa in 2017 are no longer strictly hot dog and ice cream stands for construction sites. They are highly polished purveyors of gourmet cuisine. Of the estimated 60 food trucks frequenting lunch parks such as Guthrie Green, 20 contract with Robert Carnoske and Chad Wilcox of Masa Kitchen for space in a per-

manent venue called Fuel 66, which provides an indoor/outdoor space specifically for Tulsa’s food trucks. Along with J.L. Lewis, formerly of Leon’s in Tulsa, this duo recently opened Fuel 66 in the Pearl District. The Pearl District is Tulsa’s newest take on swank, and Fuel 66, right on historic Route 66, is something that Wilcox and Carnoske want to make into an iconic destination. “Other than the Blue Whale [in Catoosa], there aren’t a lot of nationally recognized sites in Oklahoma

along Route 66 anymore,” Carnoske says. “We want Fuel 66 to be one of those.” Fuel 66 could certainly become a landmark. It features a full-service bar, indoor dining and an indoor/ outdoor patio and four fire pits in the yard where the food trucks will park. The business will also host at least three bands the first Saturday of each month. Visitors to metropolitan Tulsa might have the most trouble moving onto subsequent points of interest. “The park opens at 11 a.m. on

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Taste

those days,” Carnoske says, “and goes as long as people want to hang out.” Finding one’s favorite modified cargo truck-and-kitchen is now convenient because of Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, but permanent food truck venues like Fuel 66 are rare. They offer a reliable alternative to a transient concept and are also more costly than independent food trucks. Carnoske and Wilcox negotiate contracts and permits for each truck, for example. It’s important to Fuel 66’s owners, however, that customers have a fixed address to find the food trucks. “We have a calendar on our website [fuel66tulsa.com] that tells people where trucks will be and when they will be at Fuel 66,” he says. Customers often find a wide variety of food trucks docked at Fuel 66: Pie in the Sky, Mr. Nice Guy’s, Curb Side Comfort and Bohemian Moveable Feast, in addition to dishes from Masa. Pie in the Sky offers not pizza but pie in a cup, complete with flaky crust. Mr. Nice Guy’s, Rub BBQ,

FUEL 66 IS ALREADY A POPULAR DESTINATION FOR THOSE LOOKING FOR A RELAXED DINING ATMOSPHERE. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

MooChewSooey BBQ and Curb Side Comfort are competitive barbecue trucks, and the Bohemian Moveable Feast features ethnic cuisine from the Philippines. Food trucks open at 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and at 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday for brunch. Fuel 66 is closed

Mondays. “There’s always going to be one truck at Fuel 66 during the week,” Carnoske says. Fuel 66 is located at 2439 E. 11th St. in Tulsa. BRANDI GENTRY

LO C A L F L AV O R

DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH

If you haven’t been to Sheesh Mahal before, it’s OK – more food for us. This easy-to-overlook eatery on North May Avenue in Oklahoma City is a treasure trove of reasonably priced halal Indian and Pakistani delicacies. While familiar dishes like chicken tikka masala and pakora are available, the restaurant also is home to a wide variety of harder-to-find (and trust us, more delicious) offerings like spicy goat curry, mutton korma with onions and garlic, and myriad selections of made-from-scratch naan. As with much of this regional fare, there are plenty of vegetarian options, like the chana palao (basmati with chickpeas) and biryani with a heap of fiery spices and veggies. The butter chicken with spicy basmati will make you wonder why you ever had a single meal anywhere else but here and pairs perfectly with the garlic naan. And forget ever ordering chai at Starbucks again; Sheesh Mahal’s homemade version is divine and comes at a mere $1.25. On nice evenings, enjoy the comfortable patio or, if you’re in a hurry, grab a meal to go. Whatever your fancy, the stellar staff will accommodate. Sheesh Mahal, at 4621 N. May Ave. in Oklahoma City, is open seven days a week. TARA MALONE

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PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

OKC’s Sheesh Mahal may not look like the Taj outside, but behind its doors lies a culinary gem.


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R A N D O M F L AV O R S

Taste

Taste of the Big Apple

THE LEGENDARY ORIGINAL IS A BIG HIT AT BARBEE COOKIES.

PHOTO COURTESY BARBEE COOKIES

For a little bit of the Big Apple in Stillwater, visit Cindy’s Pizza for its mouthwatering New York-style brick oven pies. Always fresh, Cindy’s makes the dough and sauce in-house and, as a plus, delivers. Try the supreme, veggie or cheese pizzas or completely customize to get your grub just the way you like. Add delicious toppings like green peppers, mushrooms, black olives, jalepenos and more. And don’t forget the knots – garlic and cinnamon, that is. A perfect beginning and end to any Cindy’s meal. 3507 S. Husband St., Stillwater; cindyspizzastw.com

Cookie Creators

Barbee Cookies, founded by Kat Graham and Kelli Stacy, serves original, gourmet cookies in South Tulsa. Graham had been baking her beloved cookies recreationally for years before she met Stacy, the business side of Barbee Cookies. Together, they launched their cookie joint in 2010. Their signature dessert, Hallee’s Heavenly Cinnamon Roll Cookie, was developed by Graham’s daughter, Hallee, when she was just 15. Now this delicious delight is the store’s best-seller. 8393 S. Memorial Drive, Tulsa; barbeecookies.com

YOU CAN’T GO WRONG WITH CINDY’S CLASSIC PEPPERONI PIZZA.

PHOTO COURTESY CINDY’S PIZZA

The Health Nut Hut

THE KING IS LOADED AND TOPPED WITH BRISKET, HOT LINKS AND BAKED BEANS. PHOTO COURTESY TRACTION OKC

It’s difficult to find the balance between healthy, convenient and delicious meals, but Provision Kitchen in OKC hits all the right notes. This standalone restaurant offers dine-in and to-go nutrient-rich, organic, portion-controlled meals for those looking for truly clean food. The kitchen offers breakfast, lunch and dinner options like seasonal quiche, protein omelets, quinoa fried rice, braised brisket and much more. With low calorie counts and high protein levels, Provision is healthy and appetizing rolled into one. 6443 Avondale Drive, OKC; provisionkitchen.com.

Meet the Meats

Earl’s Rib Palace in OKC has a backstory almost as delicious as the meats it serves. Earlywine “Earl” Jackson, the inspiration behind Earl’s, had an illustrious culinary career in the early 1900s, creating barbecue for celebrities, heads of state, outlaws and more. It’s even rumoured Elvis Presley was a huge fan of Jackson’s work. To honor this legend, two Oklahomans opened Earl’s in 1996 and offer just about any barbecue concoction under the sun. Any hardcore barbecue fan needs to try Earl’s slow smoked, seasoned-to-perfection delicacies. Multiple locations in the OKC metro; earlsribpalace.com.

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FOR A HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE, TRY THE QUINOA FRIED RICE AT PROVISION KITCHEN. PHOTO COURTESY MCNEESE STILLS + MOTION


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS

AVA HANCOCK

HOSPICE CARE

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

My father has Alzheimer’s disease, and my mother is his main caregiver. We try to help as much as possible, but I know that she is not taking care of herself as much as she should. I worry it will affect her health. Any advice on how I can encourage her to take some time for herself?

How can I formulate a charitable giving strategy?

I truly believe that caregiving is one of the toughest jobs. There is a special bond when you can care for a loved one – especially a spouse – but it can take its toll on the caregiver. I also believe in the old adage “You must take care of yourself first in order to take care of someone else.” There are a few options available to your mom. She could bring in a home health aide or work with one of the other professional services that can provide respite care once or twice a week. That will give your mom a chance to run errands or get some much needed “me time.” At Grace Hospice, we provide free respite care for our hospice patients, and we see firsthand how much it benefits the caregiver. For more information on caregiver stress and our free support groups, call Grace Hospice at 918-744-7223.

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

If charitable giving is an important part of your budget, these steps can help ensure your money is being used effectively and efficiently by the organizations you choose to support. Clarify your values and preferences: Before you reach for your checkbook, DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC® identify what causes are important to you and make a list of charities that will align your financial resources with your personal values Consider each organizations mission: Once you’ve made a list, research each charity to make sure their programs, mission and goals match your expectations. Investigate each organization’s financial health: Look into how donations are being used and what percentage of goes directly to the cause. While fundraising and administrative expenses help the organization do its work, you should be cautious of organizations with higher overhead costs. Make giving part of your financial plan: Consider meeting with a financial planner or tax advisor who can help you select the most appropriate donation method for your financial situation and create a strategy for ongoing contributions or to make giving part of your legacy.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL How close are we to having driverless cars and how will it impact my auto insurance? It’s astounding to think the technology for a vehicle to drive itself has arrived. This was confirmed last fall when the driverless beer truck drove itself down an interstate highway in Colorado. According to some RUSS IDEN estimates, there will be close to 10 million vehicles on the road with at least some component of autonomous operation by 2020. Some of these autonomous features are already in today’s cars, controlling acceleration, braking, and steering with limited or no driver interaction. While these modern features can reduce crashes and injuries, there are still major barriers to getting a true, self-driving car on the road. Right now, no one can really answer how it will affect your car insurance as the industry doesn't expect to see a real impact for at least a decade. As auto manufacturers continue to add automation into today’s vehicles, that technology will further assist in making the driving experience safer. The reduction in crashes and injuries should continue to lessen the cost of auto insurance over time. If you have questions about auto insurance or any other insurance needs, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.

I’m middle aged and recently had an MRI due to chronic back pain. The report mentions degenerative disc, bulging disc and facet arthropathy. Can physical therapy help these problems? What you are describing is considered spondylosis, a term that means spine arthritis. As we age, everyone has arthritic changes in different areas of their body. MRIs will show some amount of spine arthritis, which is often considered normal when taking age into account. Surgery is required at times, but when the symptoms do not include numbness or weakness due to neural compromise, a person can often realize benefit from visiting a skilled physical therapist. Even when an MRI that shows arthritic changes, it does not mean the individual’s pain is coming from the arthritis. Many people have spine arthritis and no pain at all. Pain can often be muscular in nature and can even result from diminished neural mobility. Certain manual techniques, such as dry needling and neural and joint mobilization, can dramatically help in decreasing pain associated with those issues. Additionally, certain exercises and stretches can help decrease and minimize the potential for recurrence of symptoms. TIM MINNICK, PT

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST What is new at the med spa? Big things are happening at BA Med Spa in 2017. Recently, we have added a new provider: Andrea Mitchell, P.A. We are so happy to welcome Andrea to the BA Med Spa family. Andrea has been a physician’s assistant since 1991 and has a long history in dermatology and MALISSA SPACEK the medical spa fields, and she is a wonderful asset to our team. Call to schedule your complimentary consultation with Andrea with Botox and dermal fillers, Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Therapy, skin care and laser therapy, or weight loss and find out how she can help you look and feel your best this year. Call today to schedule with one of our new providers or with old-time favorites on staff like Malissa, Monica, or Terri at 918.872.9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LEGAL SERVICES What is a “Home Solicitation Sale”? A “Home Solicitation Sale” in Oklahoma is a consumer credit sale of goods or services in which the seller solicits the sale in person at the residence of the buyer and the buyer agrees to make the purchase at such time. A sale in which prior negotiaBRAD BEASLEY tions occurred at a fixed location where goods or services are offered for sale, and the agreement of sale subsequently is made at the buyer’s residence, does not constitute a home solicitation sale. A buyer has the right to cancel a home solicitation sale until midnight of the third business day after the agreement was signed. The buyer must return to the seller, at buyer’s residence, any goods provided. If the seller fails to demand return of the goods within a reasonable time (40 days presumed to be a reasonable time), the buyer may keep the goods.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

The Power of Propaganda

PHOTOS COURTESY GILCREASE MUSEUM

G

Gilcrease Museum presents two thought-provoking poster collections this month.

ilcrease Museum hosts two stimulating poster collections in April: Black Bodies in Propaganda: The Art of the War Poster and The Power of Posters: Mobilizing the Home Front to Win The Great War, both of which focus on the potent utilization of propaganda in times of global uprising. “Black Bodies in Propaganda is based around posters that targeted African Americans and Africans to both support and enlist in wars waged by the United States and various European colonial powers,” says Mark Dolph, curator of the show. “These appeals for support were presented even as the very populations they were targeting faced oppression and injustice at home. Black Bodies in Propaganda helps guests gain an appreciation of how people of African ancestry have so often fought for the freedom of others when they themselves were treated as second-class citizens.” The posters range in time from the U.S.

Civil War to post-World War II – and as social awareness progressed over time, posters were created to shed light on the recurrent injustices faced by Africans and African-Americans. “Following World War II, as Africans began to fight for their own independence from colonial rule, propaganda was used to build international support for their cause,” Dolph says. “The exhibition also includes highly stylized posters created in the Soviet Union and China expressing both support for oppressed blacks and condemnation of their capitalist oppressors.” The adjoined show, The Power of Posters, focuses on President Woodrow Wilson’s efforts to mobilize the United States for entry into World War I. To reach this goal, Wilson began the Committee on Public Information just a week after announcing primary involvement in the war. “The CPI’s most effective medium for the many messages their propaganda efforts conceived of were posters. Guests will see posters with highly illustrated graphics that

encouraged enlistment in the military, food conservation and the purchase of Liberty Bonds,” Dolph says. “The intent of The Powers of Posters is to give museum guests an understanding of just what propaganda is – used both for good and not-so-good causes – and a sense of how the American government’s propaganda campaigns built support for the war on the homefront.” Make no mistake; Gilcrease isn’t making a charged politic statement with these collections, but rather desires to elicit thoughtful dialogue between guests. “I think most people view historical events through the lens of present events,” Dolph says. “I suspect that museum visitors will interpret both exhibitions based on their own experiences and political ideologies, both from the right and left sides of the political continuum. Neither exhibition was designed to ‘preach’ a particular point of view.” Both shows open April 7 and run until July 9. Visit gilcrease.org for details. MARY WILLA ALLEN

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Where & When

SPORTS

Drillers Begin New Campaign

PHOTO COURTESY RICH CRIMI/TULSA DRILLERS

America’s pastime is alive and well in Oklahoma, and April 6 marks Opening Day for all minor league teams, including the Tulsa Drillers. The dedicated squad will put in long hours this season. “A professional baseball player’s day is much longer and much more involved than most fans realize,” says Brian Carroll, vice president of public relations for the team. He says that, along with arriving at 1 p.m. for a night game, players often train and practice for several hours before the first pitch and “all total ... will spend anywhere from 9 to 12 hours at the stadium on most days.” Despite the grueling schedule, past and present Drillers players embody numerous points of pride. “The Drillers franchise has been fortunate in that we have seen a number of great players wear our

IN TULSA CHOREGUS PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: BLACK GRACE April 1 TULSA PAC Black Grace was founded in 1995 by Neil Ieremia, who draws from his Samoan and New Zealand roots to create innovative dance works that reach across social, cultural and generational barriers. – choregus.org LIFE IN COLOR April 1 BOK CENTER Celebrating 10 years of Life in Color comes the X Tour. Get ready to go hard in the paint with Zeds Dead, Ghastly and Solano. – bokcenter.com GREATER TUNA April 1 BROKEN ARROW PAC Greater Tuna is a hilarious and irreverent comedy about Texas’s third smallest town, where the Lions Club is too liberal and Patsy Cline never dies. – brokenarrowpac.com

uniform over the years: Sammy Sosa, Troy Tulowitzki, Matt Holliday, Corey Seager and Dexter Fowler,” Carroll says. “Even with all the great players, the one memory that really stands out is the opening of ONEOK Field in 2010. The new stadium has really transformed and improved the way fans take in a ballgame.” Whether you’re a seasoned veteran of the Drillers’ atmosphere or have never attended a game, the experience remains entertaining because the sport is rooted in tradition. “Professional baseball has been played in Tulsa since 1905, longer than Oklahoma has been a state,” Carroll says. “We take great pride in continuing to offer today’s families a fun, safe and affordable experience.” For a full schedule of Drillers’ games, visit tulsadrillers.com.

AQUARIUM RUN April 1 OKLAHOMA AQUARIUM One of the area’s premier race events expects more than 2,000 runners and spectators this year. – okaquarium.org GREEN COUNTRY SPRING FLING Through April 2 TULSA COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS This show, recognized by the U.S. Equestrian Federation and the Arabian Horse Association, displays the region’s most beautiful and skilled horses of this breed. – gcaha.org CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA PRESENTS: HERMITAGE PIANO TRIO April 2 TULSA PAC The programs are dramatic and passionate. The audience hears traditional compositions performed and be introduced to some works that display the Russian heritage of the trio. – chambermusictulsa.org PANIC! AT THE DISCO April 4 BOK CENTER The group embarks on the Death Of A Bachelor Tour in celebration of its gold-certified fifth

studio album. – bokcenter.com CHRIS ROCK April 6 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO Lauded by peers and critics alike, Chris Rock is one of our nation’s strongest comedic voices. As an actor, director, producer and writer, he creates many memorable moments. – riverspirittulsa.com PROJECT CUFFWAY FASHION SHOW April 7 COX BUSINESS CENTER The first Project Cuff way was a concept that combined fashion and packaging. The challenge was issued to Rustic Cuff fans: design fashions constructed completely out of Rustic Cuff packaging. – coxcentertulsa.com SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: SIGNATURE CELTIC April 7 VANTREASE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Helmed by award-winning flautist and whistle champion Joanie Madden, Cherish the Ladies has swept the world with a masterful combination of traditional and trend-setting

O N T H E S TA G E

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But you won’t just take in a scene-forscene remake of the film because experiencing this type of chemistry-laden dancing and acting live has a visceral effect on viewers. “I was so surprised at how the audience had such an emotional reaction to the choreography. We often see patrons have a connection to the story or to the music, but for Dirty Dancing there was a palpable reaction to the iconic dance moves from the movie,” Dotson says. “It was exciting to experience.” Dotson recommends this show for a date night or girls’ night out, but any and all fans of dance, the original movie or Broadway itself will love the show. Dirty Dancing runs April 11-16. Visit celebrityattractions.com for tickets.

PHOTO COURTESY CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS

THE RETURN OF BABY AND JOHNNY

The love story of Frances “Baby” Houseman and Johnny Castle in Dirty Dancing remains a cinematic staple in today’s culture. For those wishing to relive this story of love, life and dance, visit the PAC in April to see Oklahoma’s premiere of Dirty Dancing – the Classic Story on Stage, brought to Tulsa by Celebrity Attractions. Often, stage adaptations lose critical plot points or lines that make the movie so special, but Kristin Dotson, vice president of Celebrity Attractions, says this isn’t the case with Dirty Dancing. “I was able to preview this production in Dallas and have to say it stays very true to the movie,” she says. “The producers respected the formula and maintained the integrity of the story, the music and the dancing.”


PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY NATIONAL MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM

Irish culture and music. – signaturesymphony.org LOCASH April 7 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO The hot country duo Locash includes Baltimore native Chris Lucas and Indianapolis’s Preston Brust. – riverspirittulsa.com TULSA AUTO SHOW April 7-9 EXPO SQUARE The Tulsa Auto Show has it all: a re-creation of the first-ever auto show, test drives, exhibits and more. Car enthusiasts, this is your kind of show. – thetulsaautoshow.com BADFISH April 8 CAIN’S BALLROOM Encompassing the sense of place and purpose long associated with Sublime’s music, Badfish, a Tribute to Sublime continues to channel the spirit of the band. – cainsballroom.com TULSA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS: BRAHMS’S GERMAN REQUIEM April 8 TULSA PAC Tulsa Oratorio Chorus joins Tulsa Symphony for a work that became the central and longest work of Brahms’s career, the German Requiem. – tulsasymphony.org HERB DAY IN BROOKSIDE April 9 41ST AND PEORIA Thousands of herbs, tomato plants, pottery, Oklahoma wines, soaps and more are available for purchase on this great day in Brookside. – brooksidetheplacetobe.com THE SOUTH ASIAN PERFORMING ARTS FOUNDATION PRESENTS: BOLLYWOOD AND BEYOND April 14 TULSA PAC The foundation promotes and preserves traditional classic and folk arts of the Indian subcontinent while enhancing the awareness and understanding of the South Asian culture in Oklahoma. – tulsapac.com JEFF FOXWORTHY & LARRY THE CABLE GUY April 15 BOK CENTER Superstar comedians Jeff Foxworthy and Larry the Cable Guy reunite on the We’ve Been Thinking Tour for an unforgettable night of comedy. – bokcenter.com AARON WATSON April 15 CAIN’S BALLROOM Delivered with a warm smile and fueled by a wild spirit, Watson’s music echoes the land that made him. – cainsballroom.com DESIIGNER April 17 CAIN’S BALLROOM One song can change everything, and, after the release of his platinum debut single “Panda,” 19-year-old Sidney Royel Selby III went from a local Brooklyn hook man to a breakout rap star. – cainsballroom.com CHOREGUS PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: CHE MALAMBO April 18 TULSA PAC The Argentinian-based company Che Malambo excites audiences through precise footwork and rhythmic stomping, drumming of the bombos, singing, and whirling boleadoras. – choregus.org HERE COMES THE FUNNY April 18 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO Starring Adam Sandler, David Spade, Nick Swardson and Rob Schneider, this comedy quartet keeps you in stitches all night long. – riverspirittulsa.com THE 1975 April 19 BRADY THEATER Matty Healey, Ross MacDonald, Adam Hann and George Daniel made an album (I Like It When You Sleep...) of breathtaking scope, ambition, depth and beauty that defines 2016. – the1975.com SMOKEY ROBINSON April 20 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO Once pronounced by Bob Dylan as America’s “greatest living poet,” singer-songwriter Smokey Robinson has had hits spanning four decades. – riverspirittulsa.com SAND SPRINGS COMMUNITY THEATRE PRESENTS:

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN April 20-22, 27-29 TULSA PAC Annie Oakley is the best shot around. When she’s discovered by Col. Buffalo Bill, he persuades this novel sharpshooter to join his Wild West Show. – sandspringstheatre.com MICHAEL A. MCFAUL April 21 TULSA TOWN HALL During Michael McFaul’s distinguished career in politics and academia, he has earned a reputation as one of the most renowned experts on foreign affairs. – tulsatownhall.com TBII: EMERGING CHOREOGRAPHERS SHOWCASE April 21-23 TULSA BALLET The Emerging Choreographers Showcase features a triple bill program performed by TBII, featuring choreography by two Tulsa Ballet dancers. – tulsaballet.org MIDAMERICA CLASSIC COUGARS April 22 EXPO SQUARE Mercury Cougar fanatics bring their finest, shiniest classics for all to admire. – exposquare.com GAITHER VOCAL BAND April 22 MABEE CENTER The Gaither Vocal Band began in the early 1980s with four guys singing around a piano backstage before a Bill Gaither Trio concert. – mabeecenter.com ROUTE 66 INVITATIONAL REGATTA April 22 ROGERS POINT, CATOOSA If you’re a fan of rowing or just love scenic waterways, go just northeast of Catoosa for the Tulsa Youth Rowing Association’s annual

regatta. – okrowing.org PIPPIN April 23 BROKEN ARROW PAC Pippin is a high-flying, deathdefying hit Broadway musical full of acrobatics, magical feats and soaring songs. – brokenarrowpac.com THE FLAMING LIPS April 25 CAIN’S BALLROOM At any moment, the audience can expect puppets, video animation, confetti-filled balloons and colored smoke shows at a Flaming Lips concert. – cainsballroom.com CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA PRESENTS: LYSANDER PIANO TRIO April 30 TULSA PAC This program highlights unusual Mediterranean music, including music by Enrique Granados and Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. – chambermusictulsa.org

IN OKC WINTER JAM April 1 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA This year’s lineup has Crowder, Britt Nicole, Tenth Avenue North, Andy Mineo, Colton Dixon, NewSong, Thousand Foot Krutch and three pre-jam party artists. – chesapeakearena.com OKC BLUE VS. TEXAS LEGENDS April 1 COX CONVENTION CENTER Watch this NBA Development League game at 7 p.m. – coxconventioncetner.com

COMMUNIT Y

Remembering Those Lost April 19, 1995, is a date deeply significant to any Oklahoman. It marks the worst domestic terrorist attack in U.S. history, as 168 people died and hundreds were injured in the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City. Each year, Oklahoma residents and businesses pay their respects in their own ways, and the Oklahoma City Memorial and Museum does so with its Day of Remembrance and Memorial Marathon. The Day of Remembrance focuses on those lost, along with learning more within the museum about the fateful day. “We observe 168 seconds of silence, and family members and survivors read the names of those who were killed,” says Dustin Potter, chief technology officer at the museum. “Visitors are welcomed into the Memorial Museum for free, thanks to Cox Community Day.” For those wishing to do more, the Memorial Marathon transforms grief into joyful commemoration. “The Memorial Marathon celebrates life, honors the memories of those who were killed and helps unite the world in hope,” Potter says. “This is not just another marathon. It is a run to remember and a race to show that we can each make a difference and change the world.” Potter recalls a poignant moment at a previous marathon that reinforces the event’s goal. “Watching firemen who had just finished the race help a woman cross the finish line of the marathon was unbelievably inspiring,” he says. The Day of Remembrance will take place April 19, and the Memorial Marathon – which has a full marathon, half-marathon, relay, 5K and options for kids – will occur April 30. For more information, visit oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org.

APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Grammy Award winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member Neil Diamond celebrates an unparalleled career spanning 50 years with a world tour. – chesapeakearena.com TOM PETTY AND THE HEARTBREAKERS April 20 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers, one of America’s most iconic bands, have announced their 40th Anniversary Tour. – chesapeakearena.com OKC BALLET PRESENTS: A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM April 21-23 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Witness the mystical fantasy of Shakespeare’s classic. Using Mendelssohn’s lush score, artistic director Robert Mills brings the comedy to life. – okcballet.com BETTER BARREL RACES WORLD FINALS April 26-29 STATE FAIR PARK The competition is fierce as each rider/horse pairing attempts to be as precise and fast as possible to win prize money. – okstatefair.com EROICA TRIO April 27 ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM The women who make up Eroica Trio, a celebrated ensemble, electrify the concert stage with their passionate performances. – armstrongauditorium.org EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY April 29 THE CRITERION Explosions in the Sky is a four-part rock band based in Austin, Texas. With rising success and a deeply loyal fan base, this group continues to rise in popularity. – criterionokc.com SUPER! BITCON GAMING EXPO & CONVENTION April 29-30 STATE FAIR PARK With arcade games, modern gaming, tabletop games, vendors, exhibitors and much

more, this is Oklahoma’s largest gaming event. – superbitcon.com

AROUND THE STATE TURNPIKE TROUBADORS April 1 CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT If the Turnpike Troubadours are playing in your town, you’ll know it. Get closer and you’ll start to hear the music that’s impossible to resist. – choctawcasinos.com MADE IN OKLAHOMA FESTIVAL & CAR SHOW April 1 SEMINOLE MUNICIPAL PARK This is a great opportunity to sample food, wine, crafts and a number of other products Oklahoma grown and made. – seminoleokchamber.org DOGWOOD DAYS FESTIVAL April 1 DOWNTOWN IDABEL Celebrate the beautiful blooms of thousands of dogwood trees. – idabelchamberofcommerce.com AZALEA FESTIVAL April 1-30 HONOR HEIGHTS PARK, MUSKOGEE More than 625 varieties of azaleas burst forth with a spectrum of color in one of the most beautiful displays of flowering tress in the world. – visitmuskogee.com K101 FARM EXPO Through April 2 WOODWARD COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS This is one of the largest tri-state agriculture, farm and ranch trade shows, featuring more than 180 commercial exhibitors. – woodwardeventcenter.com MONTMARTE CHALK FESTIVAL April 6 UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND ARTS, CHICKASHA USAO’s annual judged sidewalk chalk art festival is held in conjunction with the USAO Scholastic

C U LT U R E

Gear Head Heaven

This month, the Southwest Street Rod Nationals return to Oklahoma City for a 34th consecutive year. The show will display a staggering number of vintage cars from Oklahoma and far beyond. “We have between 1,600 and 2,000 vehicles show up to this event from all the surrounding states, with some coming from as far away as North Carolina, Minnesota and Florida,” says Tom Wilkerson, special events director for the National Street Rod Association. “The average car is worth about $35,000, and goes up to $175,000.” Along with beautifully crafted vintage vehicles, there will be live entertainment, indoor/ outdoor swap meets with older car parts for sale, arts and crafts, games, food vendors and auto tech seminars. Participants also have several chances to win big. “At our awards on Sunday, we will give away four checks to the participants in the amount of $2,000 each,” Wilkerson says. “Over the whole weekend, we give away to the participants $72,000 in super prizes.” When you strip away the shiny cars and exciting prizes, at its core the participants of any Street Rod Nationals share the interest of deconstruction and reconstruction in the effort to create a new, one-of-a-kind vehicle. Wilkerson can attest to that idea. “I have been a ‘gear head’ my whole life,” he says. “I like taking things apart and putting them back together – even better than I found them.” The Southwest Street Rod Nationals runs April 7-9 at State Fair Park. Visit nsra-usa.com for details.

PHOTO COURTESY NSRA SOUTHWEST STREET ROD NATIONALS

Where & When

CANTERBURY VOICES PRESENTS: ISRAEL IN EGYPT April 2 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL This oratorio by Handel is full of “word painting,” where the sound of the music imitates the text’s imagery. – canterburyokc.com OPEN STREETS OKC April 2 PASEO ARTS DISTRICT This block party is on closed streets, where visitors can enjoy activities, food trucks and entertainment. – thepaseo.org CIRQUE DU SOLEIL PRESENTS: OVO April 6-9 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Thrilling more than 5 million people worldwide since the show premiered in Montreal in 2009, OVO embarks on a new journey. – chesapeakearena.com OKC PHIL PRESENTS: UNDER THE STREETLAMP April 7 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Prepare for an electrifying evening of classic hits from the American Radio Songbook. This group comprises recent leading cast members from the Tony Award winning sensation Jersey Boys. – okcphil.org KRIS KRISTOFFERSON April 8 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Heralded as an artist’s artist, this three-time Grammy winning artist has recorded 27 albums and spent three decades performing across the world. – riverwind.com ACM@UCO METRO MUSIC FEST April 8-9 BRICKTOWN ENTERTAINMENT DISTRICT Featuring more than 60 local musicians and bands, along with multiple headlining acts, this event is a major draw for music lovers across Oklahoma and beyond. – acm.uco.edu REDBUD CLASSIC April 8-9 NICHOLS HILLS PLAZA Mark your calendars for the 2017 Redbud Classic, an Oklahoma City tradition of fun, fitness and philanthropy, raising $500,000 for local non-profits since 1983. – redbud.org SONIC FREE FAMILY DAY April 9 OKC MOA Sonic Free Family Day is a biannual event with art activities and live performances. Free admission and all activities for the day are made possible by Sonic, America’s Drive-In. – okcmoa.com LYRIC THEATRE PRESENTS: I AM MY OWN WIFE Through April 9 LYRIC AT THE PLAZA This play is the true story of Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, Berlin’s most famous transvestite, who survived the Nazi and Communist regimes hidden in plain sight – as a woman. – lyrictheatreokc.com AN EVENING WITH BILL MAHER April 9 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL This comedian, Emmynominated talk show host and political commentator has been entertained live audiences for three decades. – okcciviccenter.com LYRIC THEATRE PRESENTS: JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH Through April 9 LYRIC AT THE PLAZA An offbeat adaptation of the classic Roald Dahl adventure, James and the Giant Peach is new musical by the Tony Award-nominated team of Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. – lyrictheatreokc.com LIVE ON THE PLAZA April 14 PLAZA DISTRICT Every second Friday is Live on the Plaza, an art walk featuring local artists, live music, deadCENTER film screenings, local retail shopping and much more. – plazadistrict.org OKC PHIL PRESENTS: A PHILHARMONIC GALA April 15 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Join maestro Joel Levine at the eighth and final classics of the season with works from Berlioz, Liszt and Tchaikovsky. – okcphil.org NEIL DIAMOND April 16


MUSIC

NORMAN MUSIC FESTIVAL ROCKS

Founded in 2008, the Norman Music Festival has transformed from a one-day event to a weekendlong festival featuring big name bands and supreme local talent. The NMF has hosted independent groups and rock behemoths like Ra Ra Riot, Cloud Nothings and the Joy Formidable. Among those scheduled this year are Levi Parham, Lincka, Kaitlin Butts, ADDverse Effects and Sammus. Since its inception, the festival has been run solely by a volunteer board of directors, who organize venues, vendors, musical acts and merchandising. Each year, attendance and the number of acts grow to accommodate mounting interest. The festival takes place April 27-29 along Main Street in Norman, with several indoor and outdoor venues branching into cross streets. The event is free to the public. For a full lineup, map and more information, visit normanmusicfestival.com.

C U LT U R E

A Weekend in the 1800s

“At our spring and fall encampments, we will have 100-125 camps, all authentic to the time period,” Fraser says. “Some will sell their goods to the public.” Fraser says this activity isn’t just for a specific type of person; those from all walks of life participate. “There is a huge interest in this pastime, and we have a wide variety of people and backgrounds,” he says. “From retirees to teachers to aerospace engineers, to them this is a serious hobby.” Fraser wants camps like these to continue the unique mission of Woolaroc. “The mission is to preserve the history of the west, educate and entertain,” he says. “The mountain man camp does each of these.” The camp opened March 15 and runs until Labor Day, and the Spring Trader’s Encampment will occur April 7-8. Visit woolaroc.org for details.

PHOTO BY A. RAY PEASTER COURTESY WOOLAROC

Take a trip back to 1840 at Woolaroc Museum and Wildlife Reserve during its Mountain Man Camp and Spring Trader’s Encampment. Wes and Roger Butcher, outdoor enthusiasts and real-life mountain men, created this camp with a focus on life as it was in times past. “About 20 years ago, Wes Butcher approached us with the concept of a mountain man camp,” says Bob Fraser, CEO of Woolaroc. “A one year trial turned into a long-term event that is now part of the fiber of Woolaroc. Wes and his brother, Roger, still run the camp today.” During the camp, visitors get a feel for life in simpler times, with a truly authentic experience containing re-enactors, tepees, tomahawk throwing lessons, rifle and bowand-arrow shootings, traditional garb and much more. Those participating set up camp on the Woolaroc grounds and, during the encampments, visitors can see these people and their products up close and personal.

PHOTO BY DYLAN JOHNSON

Meet and Droverstock Music Festival. – usao.edu SWOSU RODEO April 6-8 DON MITCHELL RODEO ARENA, WEATHERFORD Watch top collegiate cowboys and cowgirls from across the region compete. – swosuathletics.com WAURIKA RATTLESNAKE HUNT April 6-9 MAIN STREET, WAURIKA Activities at this annual event include carnival rides, food vendors, a flea market and caravan hunting of Diamondback rattlesnakes. – rattlesnakehunt.com WOMEN’S EXPO April 8 SOUTHEAST EXPO CENTER, MCALESTER Come shop at the Women’s Expo, presented by The Sophisticates of McAlester. – cityofmcalester.com CIMARRON TERRITORIAL CELEBRATION AND COW CHIP THROWING CONTEST April 8-15 BEAVER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, BEAVER Activities at this event commemorate the pioneers of the Panhandle. – beaverchamber.com ARBUCKLE MOUNTAIN SPRING BLUEGRASS JAM April 16-22 ARBUCKLE MOUNTAIN PARK, WYNEEWOOD Enjoy informal jamming, bluegrass gospel and old time country music at the jam. – arbucklemtbluegrasspark.com NATIONAL MUSTANG DAY POKER RUN April 17

MUSTANG TOWN CENTER The Poker Run has prizes for the winning hands along with four Mustang blankets as door prizes. – okmustangclub.com 89ERS DAY CELEBRATION April 18-22 DOWNTOWN GUTHRIE The celebration of the birth of Oklahoma includes a carnival, chuck wagon feed, ‘ood and craft vendors and much more. – 89erdays.com USTPA SPRING ROUNDUP April 21-23 LAZY E ARENA, GUTHRIE This event features open, amateur, incentive and youth penning and sorting classes. – ustpa.com LAND RUN BEER FEST April 22 CENTRAL NATIONAL BANK CENTER, ENID Sample some of the best craft beer from surrounding areas. – cnbcenter.com IRON THISTLE SCOTTISH FESTIVAL April 28-30 KIRKPATRICK FAMILY FARM, YUKON There’s something for everyone: athletic competitions, music, dance, food, shopping, animals, and kids’ games and crafts. – unitedscotsok.com PAUL ANKA April 29 CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT The legendary Candian-American singer, actor and songwriter stops in to perform. – choctawcasinos.com KITES OVER ENID April 29-30 AUTRY TECHNOLOGY CENTER Kites Over Enid will be a full weekend of kite flying, and all are welcome to attend. – visitenid.org GRAND LAKE RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL April 29-30 VINITA Take in the music of the shire, marvel at the royal sport of falconry and shop to your heart’s content from the Village Merchants. – therenlist.com JOE WALSH April 30 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO Multi-Grammy recipient and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Joe Walsh performs. – winstarworldcasino.com

FOR EVEN MORE EXCITING EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM. APRIL 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Where & When

FILM AND CINEMA

Building a Niche Culture

Circle Cinema will be the venue for the Architecture and Design Festival, an offshoot of a New York gathering.

Around Town

You may have noticed that I have covered a plethora of film festivals in this slot of late. Film fest culture has, over the past decade, slowly taken root in the Midwest, and Oklahoma and its neighboring states can boast between them a number of nationally recognized gatherings. One of the great boons of a thriving fest culture is that niche festivals can blossom alongside more traditional ones. Such is the case of the Architecture and Design Film Festival: Tulsa, happening at Circle Cinema from April 20 to 23. An offshoot of a similar festival based in New York that spread to multiple cities, the Architecture festival highlights films that prominently feature buildings, architects and other works of design. It’s a quirky theme for a small festival, but one that should provide plenty of gems. A few of the films that look most promising include Where Architects Live, which explores the abodes of famous architects, and The Guard, about a lifeguard tower in California. Several short films foWHERE ARCHITECTS LIVE cus on the planning and building PHOTO COURTESY TULSA ARCHITECof unique structures. TURE AND DESIGN FILM FESTIVAL

In Theaters

I try to preview a diverse range of films opening in theaters, and this month’s releases stretch that divide to the uttermost. On the one hand, the mega franchise Fast and the Furious returns with its eighth entry, The Fate of the Furious. Minus longtime anchor Paul Walker, the series leans more heavily on its other main lead, Vin Diesel, as well as a game supporting cast led by the always fun Dwayne Johnson. The Fast films are always long on over-the-top cheesiness but also feature crack stunts and an effervescent spirit that set them apart from more dour blockbusters. For something completely different, check out The Lost City of Z from indie director James Gray, whose last film, The Immigrant, was my second favorite film of 2014. Gray here relates the true story of an obsessed explorer, a setup that promisingly echoes Werner Herzog’s classic Aguirre, the Wrath of God. Given Gray’s visual acumen and sensitivity, this is sure to be a major film of 2017. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

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PHOTO BY AIDAN MONAGHAN/AMAZON STUDIOS & BLEECKER STREET

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C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

A

Tim Wigley

native Oklahoman and alumnus of Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford, Tim Wigley moved out of Oklahoma after graduating college and admits he never expected to move back. After 31 years out of state, however, Wigley returned to Oklahoma City to join the staff of the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association and will take over as president of OIPA in June. We recently caught up with Wigley and got his thoughts on…

…the role of OIPA.

OIPA has been around for 61 years, and it has consistently been a mix of small producers, family owned operators … everybody from folks who own mineral rights to folks who just drill simple vertical wells and have been doing so for many years. It’s our job at OIPA to kind of be their voice and advocate, whether it be in the Oklahoma Legislature, in Congress or with various regulatory agencies like the [Oklahoma] Corporation Commission and others.

techniques have changed the game. We have plenty of resources and the ability to get to those resources that we didn’t have very many years ago, and I have to assume that 10 years from now there will be additional technology that will make it even more efficient and productive in finding oil and natural gas out there.

…moving back to Oklahoma.

I’ve got 83-year-old parents in south Oklahoma City, where I grew up. I’m one of 16 grandkids, and they all live within 10 miles of each other. It’s a great opportunity to come back and finish my career in an industry I love. I’m also spending a lot of time up in Tulsa – what is happening in this state, in those two cities in particular, since I left is absolutely amazing. And I love being back. I’m glad to be home.

…his goals as president of OIPA.

One of the things I’ve learned with changing populations – there’s less and less connection with the land than there was just 20, 30 or 40 years ago. When I went to school, a lot of the classmates I had came from farming families, agricultural families and so forth. And a lot of people are not in the business anymore. They’ve moved to cities or they’ve moved out of state, and we’re dealing with a society that’s getting further and further away from where things come from. I think this industry will benefit greatly from reminding people energy is about healthy lifestyles. It’s about being able to go to the doctor, it’s about medicine, it’s about freedom to have vehicles to drive in or fly in, and I don’t think the industry has done a good enough job of reminding people that we make peoples’ lives better. A lot of my focus as I take over for OIPA is going to be to constantly remind the public out there that we make your lives better. Whether you work in the industry or not, we make your lives better by what we do.

…the future of the oil and gas industry in the state.

PHOTO COURTESY OIPA

The game changer has been the ability to do horizontal drilling, directional drilling. It wasn’t very long ago – 10 or15 years ago – that they were talking about peak oil, that we’re running out of oil and so forth, but those drilling

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2017


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