Page 1

APRIL 2016

Downtown

Living

THE BRICK AND MORTAR OF MODERN CITY LIFE

AN INCREDIBLE GROUP OF YOUNG INNOVATIVE MINDS

Swon

rothers B MUSICIANS FROM THE HEARTLAND


Patient-Centered Patient-Centered Cancer Cancer Care Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home. home.

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The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


DUSTIN MATER

BRENT GREENWOOD

MARGARET WHEELER

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S AT U R DAY, M AY 2 8 N A T I V E

A M E R I C A N

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A R T I S T S

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W E S T M U S KO G E E AV E . , S U L P H U R , O K • 5 8 0 - 2 7 2 - 5 5 2 0


Features April

2016 Oklahoma Magazine Vol. XX, No. 4

54 The Swon Brothers are Timeless

Oklahoma Magazine sits down with Oklahoma natives Zach and Colton Swon about their music career, performing on The Voice and opening for Carrie Underwood in front of a hometown crowd.

84 Downtown Living

58 40 under 40

All over Oklahoma, cities are focusing on their downtown areas. Oklahoma Magazine looks at what cities of different sizes are doing with downtown development.

APRIL 2016

84 Downtown Living

April 2016

Featuring one of our top 40 under 40 classes yet, Oklahoma Magazine features 40 young professionals from across the state. Each person featured in the section helps make Oklahoma the great state it is.

The cities have proven it works. It has worked so well that urban is cropping up in towns of all sizes.

expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

Downtown

Living

THE BRICK AND MORTER OF MODERN CITY LIFE

AN INCREDIBLE GROUP OF YOUNG INNOVATIVE MINDS

April 2016 Cover.indd 1

2

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read

ON THE COVER:

Swon

Brothers MUSICIANS FROM THE HEARTLAND

3/15/16 2:56 PM

ZACH AND COLTON SWON WILL BE OPENING FOR CARRIE UNDERWOOD AT THE CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA THIS MONTH. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

MORE PHOTOS:

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.


WE ARE EVERYTHING CANCER IS NOT.

St. John and Tulsa Cancer Institute have united to give Oklahomans a new level of confidence and hope. We are Oklahoma Cancer Specialists and Research Institute. We’ve fought on the front lines of cancer for decades. Our team of experts fully understands the insensitive nature of this disease. We know it’s a fight that demands excellence on every level. Together, we are honored to be the only certified member of MD Anderson Cancer Network®, a program of MD Anderson Cancer Center, in the state. We are everything cancer is not. Compassionate. Caring for the whole person. We are here for you and your entire family the moment you need us, and far beyond. We are lovers of life, and we will fight for yours the rest of ours. OCSRI.org

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Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

13 The State

A man’s hobby preserves treasures from our nation’s past.

16 18 20 22 24 26

Happenings Culture Sport OK Then The Insider Heroes

29 Life & Style 30 32 34

Guide Art Living Space

38 42 44 46 48 50 51

Destination Style Retro Men’s Your Health Scene Spotlight

A midtown Tulsa home is tranformed with elegance and glamor.

13

91 Taste 94

34

Local Flavor

Roka Bar and Asian Flavors is dedicated to becoming a local place for Tulsa.

97 Entertainment 99

At the Museum

Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s “Our City, Our Collection” puts familiar art in a new context.

102 Silver Screen 103 In OKC/In Tulsa

104 Closing Thoughts

4

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

99

94


Their specialty is preserving what makes each person unique.

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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

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IMPACTING FAMILIES AND BUSINESSES FOR 25 YEARS. CONGRATULATIONS, RAMONA! For over 25 years, Ramona has been helping Oklahoma families and businesses build financial security. Her comprehensive process will address all your financial needs and concerns.

DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY OFFICE/ADVERTISING ASSISTANT CONNOR SCHOENBERGER CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB

CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2016 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2016

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THE VOTES ARE IN!! LAHOMA K O

the

of

BEST the BEST 2016

GAZINE

LET TER FROM THE EDITOR

LOOK FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST OF OKLAHOMA. COMING IN JULY.

This year’s class covers a wide variety of professions from across the state, and we focused on finding people who work on making their communities a better place for everyone. I hope you enjoy reading the feature and getting to know a little bit about each of them as much as I did. We’ll also be posting a video interview with each person on okmag.com, so be sure to check that out as well.

Don’t miss this exciting issue. Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

Oklahoma Magazine Associate Editor Laurie Goodale had the chance to speak to two other talented Oklahomans, Zach and Colton Swon. The Swon Brothers may live in Nashville now, but they have strong ties to the state and will be playing with Carrie Underwood on Aril 27 at the BOK Center in Tulsa.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

18 1/2 TBOB.indd

O

ver the course of two days, we had 40 of Oklahoma’s top young people come through our office at Oklahoma Magazine for photo shoots and interviews. It was often busy, sometimes hectic and incredibly enjoyable as I had a chance to meet and visit with everyone selected for our 40 under 40 class of 2016.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

3/17/16 12:34 PM

As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com. Justin Martino Managing Editor

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

MA


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OKMAG.COM

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

40 Under 40

In each city there are certain individuals who serve key roles, both professionally and within their communities. Those who exceed expectations and strive to make a difference. These people have dedicated their lives toward making an impact. Every year, Oklahoma Magazine casts a spotlight on these pillars of our communities and showcases those people who put themselves second to those around them and strive to make the environment they share with friends, family and colleagues as first-rate as it can be. Visit okmag.com to meet each of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40 and find out what drives them both at work and at home. In our web-exclusive video interview, meet Oklahoma’s most essential community leaders, including top medical professionals, artists, engineers, attorneys and public figures.

OK

PATRICK GORDON

February 27 marked Red Ribbon Gala’s 25th year. It was a special night for attendees, with a ballroom spilling with dancing feet, smiling faces and generous hearts. It was also a very important night for one special attendee, artist P.S. Gordon, who for the first time publicly announced he was HIV positive. In a video interview with Pat at his home in Tulsa, we hear more about his life after the 2002 diagnosis and what living with HIV means in today’s world. See the world through Pat’s eyes at okmag.com.

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State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

A Presidential Collection

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

J

A man’s hobby preserves treasures from our nation’s past.

ohn Dunning is the Indiana Jones of political memorabilia. He’ll go to any length and brave any danger to acquire relics commemorating political campaigns. But, like Indy, he prefers his relics in a museum. A portion of his collection – 200 boxes of it – now sits in the Oklahoma Historical Society. “I just always kind of liked history, and my grandfather liked to go to auctions and antique shops,” Dunning says. “I’d travel with him, and we’d travel to little towns around

the state and stop at shops. This was the early ’60s, and Nixon was running against Kennedy. I’d pick up buttons.” He was just a kid when he started collecting, but by 1972, the year George McGovern faced off against Richard Nixon in the presidential election, Dunning was out of control. “At that point in time, I was collecting everything and anything political,” he says. “By 1972, I was going crazy collecting with McGovern and all that. A little after that, I was spending too much money. I was spending so much money. I decided to quit

collecting presidential stuff and just focus on Oklahoma stuff.” In addition to haunting antique shops, he traded with fellow collectors through the mail – and there were plenty of them. Today, the buying and selling of political memorabilia is a multimillion dollar industry. It has its own trade association, the American Political Items Collectors. Its annual conference gathers collectors from every state in the nation, all hoping to find the item that completes their collection. Dunning went to some extreme lengths, APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

including dumpster diving, to expand his own collection. “When campaigns closed an office down, I would go out and go through all the paper stuff they threw away, like solicitation letters and lots of oddball, behind-the-scenes stuff,” he says. But he topped that in an effort to lay hands on a ticket to see former President Ronald Reagan address the Oklahoma Legislature. To get it, he stalked the legislature. Not one legislator. The entire legislature. “You talk about something hard to get,” Dunning says. “I made some wanted fliers up and went to all the senators’ and House members’ offices and dropped those fliers off. One politician knew my grandfather real well. We visited and it turned out he was anti-Reagan. He reached into his trashcan and pulled out the ticket.” A few years ago, running out of space and wanting to make some costly home improvements, Dunning sold a portion of his collection to the Oklahoma Historical Society. It contains more than 20,000 items. “The Oklahoma Historical Society is honored to house the political collection that John Dunning assembled,” says Larry O’Dell, a spokesperson for the Historical Society. “It covers a century-and-a- half of Oklahoma history through campaign and political ephemera, giving historians a glimpse of important issues of several time periods.” Dunning’s collection of political memorabilia spans 150 years, featuring everything from buttons and ribbons to pens and hats. On display are several items tightly tied into Oklahoman history. “There’s a lot of Senator Kerr memorabilia,” O’Dell says. “He was one of the most dominant Oklahomans in the national political realm. We’ve always talked about why Oklahoma was so involved in NASA. That’s because Senator Kerr was involved in that, and he focused Oklahoma in its development. He was also very close to being a vice presidential nominee for President Truman.” Oklahoma’s quest for statehood was never a simple yes or no question. Would there be one state or two? Would it (or they) be controlled by Republicans or Democrats? Dunning’s statehood collection, ribbons and celluloid buttons offer a glimpse into the question’s complexity. Or take a gander at the pen used by President William McKinley for the signing of the “Free Homes Act.” The law played a significant role in opening up Oklahoma Territory for settlement. “There’s a lot of socialist memorabilia because in 1914 Oklahoma had 20 percent of voters support the Socialist Party,” O’Dell 14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY FEATURES MORE THAN 20,000 ITEMS FROM JOHN DUNNING’S COLLECTION. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

says. “It was very strong in Oklahoma at the beginning of the twentieth century. That came about because we were a populist state. We had a big socialist bloc until World War I. Then they started campaigning against the war, and that’s what broke them here in Oklahoma.” Dunning still collects and regularly contributes new pieces to the Oklahoma Historical Society. For him, it’s about fun.

“I’ve always been into history, especially Oklahoma history.” Dunning says. “I just love chasing it, finding little artifacts for events or things. I’ve got a huge archive of Oklahoma material. I don’t know how many items, but way more than what the Historical Society has in their collection. But I’d like to see all my stuff down there someday.” PAUL FAIRCHILD


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The State

HAPPENINGS

TO THE AVERAGE LEARN BE FUNNY

FOUR-YEAR-OLD

LAUGHS

DO ANIMALS LAUGH?

Evidently, humans aren’t the only animals with a sense of humor. According to mentalfloss.com, primates, dogs and rats can all express their happiness through laughter, especially if they are tickled by a human hand. In doing so, each makes a slightly different sound than the human laugh – apes and dogs laugh in the form of panting, grunts and purrs, while rats make chirps in the ultrasonic range beyond the range of human hearing. The most ticklish rats are also the most playful!

300

TIMES A DAY THE AVERAGE

Did you know that there is actually a place in Tulsa where you can take classes to be funny? Located in the heart of the Blue Dome District in downtown Tulsa, The Comedy Parlor Theater and Training Center offers classes in improvisation and stand-up comedy. Every Sunday night, they host an open mic night that showcases their students of comedy.

Humor Month 40-YEAR-OLD?

ONLY 4 :-(

Founded in 1976 by author and humorist Larry Wilde, the original idea was to raise public awareness of the healthy benefits of happiness and laughter. According to many health care professionals, laughter can actually improve our health. Not only is laughing a lot of fun and good for you, it can be very contagious. So make it a point to have a positive effect not only on your own health, but on the health of those around you. Look for the humor in your daily life and spread it around. There is an endless supply out there, you can have as much of it as you like and it often doesn’t cost a thing! Read the story on page 44.

HAPPY FOOD

In addition to food tasting good, recent studies have shown that certain foods may affect brain chemistry associated with depression and anxiety. According to prevention.com, consuming the following 10 foods may actually lift your spirits! Clams Packed with vitamin B12. Low levels of B12 can lead to depression. Walnuts & Flax Loaded with alphalinolenic acid, also a depression buster. Coffee Caffeine induces a happy brain-boost of dopamine and serotonin. Radishes The spicy crunch may stimulate the release of dopamine and norepinephrine. Oysters A rich source of zinc. Low zinc levels are linked to depression and anxiety. Pomegranate The juice of this fruit lowers blood pressure and can reduce anxiety and depression.

16

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

Yogurt Enhances your populations of probiotic bacteria and good bacteria can spread a “chill-out” message to your brain.

FUNNY TOWNS

Shiitake mushrooms These mushrooms, complete with selenium and magnesium, have an uplifting effect on your mood.

Here are a few funny town names in the state. Smile – we know you want to!

Dark chocolate Loaded with chemicals, such as polyphenols, that might boost your mood.

Loco Bushyhead Bug Tussle Hooker Slapout Bowlegs Cookietown Frogville IXL Moon Rubottom Slaughterville Slick Pumpkin Center Pink Stringtown

Apricots Packed with vitamin B6, betacarotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, which are linked to a happier mood.


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Half A Century

T

Muskogee’s Five Civilized Tribes Museum celebrates its 50th anniversary.

he Five Civilized Tribes Museum stands tall atop Agency Hill at Honor Heights Park in Muskogee. The vintage 1870s sandstone building is like a proud sentinel, overlooking this celebrated park. “It is amazing the building is still standing,” says Sean Barney, the museum’s new executive director, who, with the museum, is dedicated to sharing the culture of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole tribes during the 50th year of the museum’s history. Barney assumed the director’s post two months ago and loves reflecting on the museum’s history. Originally the Union Agency Headquarters, it was here tribal citizens received their land allotments. When trains began traveling through Muskogee, citizens walked six miles from the downtown depot to Honor Heights to conduct business. The distance caused the Agency Office to relocate, and the building sat empty for 37 years. After that time, it hosted a patchwork of colorful occupants, as varied as the rainbow hues of a Seminole ribbon dress. It was a school and Creek Freedmen orphanage. Dances were held here during World War II. The American Legion called it home for several decades. For four years, Minnie Posey, wife of noted Creek poet Alexander Posey, presided over a popular tea room. September 1951 was a turning point for the building, when the women of the DaCo-Tah Indian Club considered establishing a museum. Renovations began August 15, 1955, 80 years to the day after the first cornerstone was laid in the building. During 1964 and 1965, the women’s club raised $94,000 for its restoration. “It took an act of Congress to have the 5 1/2 acres and the Agency building’s owner-

18

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

ship given to the City of Muskogee,” Barney notes. The museum was incorporated Nov. 19, 1965. Ed Edmondson, then a U.S. House of Representatives member, authored House Bill 3867, giving the building back to the City of Muskogee from the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The museum opened April 16, 1966; Will Rogers Jr. was keynote speaker. Until then, Barney explains, “there was no place that encouraged Five Tribes citizens to preserve their heritage.” For Barney, the 50th anniversary is a year-long event. The April 16 celebration includes the annual Art Under the Oaks outdoor sale, a tribal encampment and play, storytelling, craft demonstrations and a movie, The Dawes Commission. A resident of Muskogee for 10 years, Barney has been a museum member for two years, serving on the 2015 Museum Board, before assuming the leadership position. His varied background includes spending his youth in Europe, where his father was stationed with the U.S. Air Force. In the 1970s, the family returned to the U.S., living in Washington, Montana, New Mexico and Oklahoma. As a ninth grader, he studied Oklahoma history and its Native American influence. Now Barney is discovering new facets of the Native American culture. His small, second floor office was once a superintendent’s bedroom. He remembers well his first impression of the Five Tribes Museum. “I thought it had great potential but was

M. J. VAN DEVENTER

PHOTOS COURTESY THE FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES MUSEUM.

The State CULTURE

too small,” he says. “Land and lease restrictions prohibit museum expansion, but that doesn’t keep me from thinking big. For the space we have, our private collection is amazing.” This year, Barney is focusing on the art/ culture of each tribe, drawing work from museum archives. Creek artists include Acee Blue Eagle, Joan Hill, Lee Joshua, Jon Mark Tiger, Jimmie Fife, Johnny, Jerome and Dana Tiger and Enoch Kelly Haney, known for his Oklahoma Guardian sculpture atop the Oklahoma State Capitol. A Haney painting hangs behind Barney’s desk. The central figure appears to serve as Barney’s guardian in his new role. Valjean Hessing and Gwen Lester Coleman are representing Choctaw artists. Cherokees include Troy Anderson, Joan Hill, Donald Vann and Bill Rabbit. Representing Seminoles are Mike Daniel, Lee Joshua and Benjamin Harjo. Mike Larsen’s art honors Chickasaws. While planning future public events is an integral facet of Barney’s museum management, he’s also focusing on the museum’s five-year strategic plan. It includes using the latest technological advances to be successful in the competitive museum marketplace across the nation. Digitalization is in progress for every museum item – art, artifacts, photos, documents, correspondence. “Most museums set this as a 20-year goal,” he notes. “We intend to complete it in five years.” Digitalization allows other museums and libraries to access and borrow from the museum’s holdings. Barney considers the museum a safe harbor for the five tribes’ history. He enjoys exploring the museum’s vast archives, which bulge with more treasures than can ever be displayed. “It’s a shame the public will never see many of these things,” Barney says. “But if someone suggested we build a new, larger museum I would now oppose it. I’m a sucker for old buildings and their history. “We are known statewide as a leader in Native American art and history,” he continues. “There is more here than meets the eye. I’m lucky to be doing what I am.”


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The State

SP ORT

Righting a Wrong: The Legacy of Bill Spiller

The road to athletic stardom is an uphill climb. To reach the pinnacle of their sport, athletes face challenges that test their abilities, both physically and mentally, each striving to be the best at what they do. Pioneer athletes such as Bill Spiller faced even bigger challenges that no measure of athletic ability could surmount. Born in Tishomingo in 1913, Spiller grew up in a world that was two decades from Jessie Owens in the Olympics and three decades away from Jackie Robinson’s breaking of baseball’s color line. Though a great all-around athlete at Tulsa’s Booker T. Washington High School and Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, it wasn’t until Spiller was 29 that he started playing the sport of golf. Spiller proved to be a quick study and in 1947, the same year Robinson debuted for the Brooklyn Dodgers, he started playing professionally. At the time, Spiller did not know of Spiller’s lawsuit the Proknocked down a terrible, fessional impenetrable wall. Golf –Del Lemon, author Association of America’s Caucasian clause requiring all players to be white. Spiller did not lie down and accept his fate, but rather fought against an injustice that prevented him from playing professional golf and prevented others from working as professionals at clubs around the country. Along with fellow golfer, Ted Rhodes, Spiller fought to right the injustice of the Caucasian clause through the public and through the legal system. Though Rhodes was the first and possibly best known of the African-American professional golfers at the time, Spiller had the tools to stand out: a college-degreed player, all-around athlete, teacher, caddie and club maker. “He was the real deal,” says Del Lemon, author of The Story of Golf in Oklahoma. “As an amateur competitor, his rise was meteoric. On California’s west coast, he set numerous course records and won virtually all the events on the United Golf Tour, where black golfers were allowed to compete.” Barred from the majority of PGA sponsored events, Spiller played where and when he could. He continually

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

challenged the rules of the PGA and its tournaments despite facing racism, both obvious and obscure, along the way. In 1961, Spiller’s efforts came to fruition and the Caucasian clause was removed by the PGA. But, in many ways, it was too late for the then 48-year-old. The PGA and most golf fans would never see him play at the peak of his career. “He would have made an exemplary member of the PGA and possibly a huge draw to the game, perhaps the original Tiger,” Lemon says. “All he wanted was the opportunity to prove himself and make a living in the game for his family.” With his best days behind him, Spiller would occasionally compete in tournaments and give golf lessons as he raised a family. Despite being a pioneer in the use of video as an instruction tool, Spiller’s legacy would recede into obscurity over time for many golf fans. In 2009, 21 years after Spiller’s death, the PGA bestowed a posthumous membership to Spiller. “I think the PGA did its very best, albeit much belatedly, to right an egregious injustice that denied a champion access to a career in golf because of its own institutional racism,” Lemon says. On October 25, 2015, Spiller was inducted into the inaugural class of the Oklahoma Golf Hall of Fame. He has also been nominated into the World Golf Hall of Fame. A century after he was born, the Oklahoma native is now receiving recognition for his accomplishments on and off the course. “Spiller’s lawsuit knocked down a terrible, impenetrable wall,” Lemon remembers. “Due in large measure to what Bill Spiller fought against and ultimately defeated, Tiger Woods never had to hear a PGA Tour official say, ‘Sorry Mr. Woods, but you have been disqualified. We have a whites-only membership clause on this tour.’” LINDSAY CUOMO

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE OKLAHOMA GOLF HALL OF FAME.

Oklahoma native Bill Spiller receives recognition as a pioneer of golf.


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The State

OK THEN

Memorial to Museum A Claremore museum honors Oklahoma’s favorite son.

T

BETH WEESE

PHOTOS COURTESY THE WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL MUSEUM.

he Will Rogers Museum in Claremore was originally created in 1938 as a memorial to honor its namesake, who had died three years earlier. It was funded by the Oklahoma Legislature through the Will Rogers Memorial Commission and built in nine months on 20 acres of land donated by Will’s wife, Betty. “When you think about him dying in 1935 during the Great Depression and yet Oklahoma was willing to invest and build that beautiful memorial during that time, it goes to show how big of an impact he was on our country and on our state,” says Tad Jones, the museum director. “It is probably hard for us to comprehend today how big a star he was, but he was literally the biggest star in the world. He was number one in movies and radio and the number one public speaker and the number one newspaper columnist. Most of the country was touched by Will Rogers in some way.” In 1944, his body was moved from California to a tomb at the Claremore memorial, drawing in large crowds to pay their respects. Because of the growing interest, his family also began to donate his personal belongings to be displayed there. The budding museum began to fill up with his clothes, movie posters, sculptures and saddles. The collection continues to grow today. One of their recent additions is a large Ambassador Bill movie poster donated by longtime collector Gordon Kuntz. “He has been collecting Will Rogers memorabilia for about 30 years now, and he just donated over 1,500 pieces last year to the memorial,” says Jones. “When he sees Will Rogers items up for bid, he’ll sometimes go in there and buy them and donate them.” The museum has 12 galleries filled with Will Rogers treasures from all facets of his life, including many sculptures and paintings

created in memory of him. The staff works hard to preserve the items for people to enjoy. “Fortunately, with the help of the legislature, [we’re] putting in a brand new heating and air system,” explains Jones. “We have a great curator in Jennifer Holt who meticulously goes over all the collection and makes sure it’s in good shape for future generations. She’s in the process of digitizing the whole collection, so we will eventually have it available for people to view online. We just take as much care as possible to make sure that we can have it for another hundred years.” Jones says one of the museum’s goals is to introduce Will to new audiences, show them how important he was to our culWhat ture and inspire The Will Rogers them to follow Memorial Museum the example he Where set during his lifetime. 1720 West Will Rogers “He treated people with respect, Blvd. Claremore, and that’s why he was loved by Oklahoma people from all walks of life, from When kings to common men to Republi10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday cans and Democrats,” says Jones. through Saturday “That is something for us to strive Web to – to have the spirit of Will Rogwww.willrogers.com ers where we treat people right and enjoy life and live life to the fullest. What we’re trying to do is remind people how big an impact he had on the world and also to be an example of what a good Oklahoman can be.” The museum contains a theater that plays his movies continuously throughout the day, archives that hold around 18,000 photographs and a library filled with books relating to his life. They also host a podcast called “Bacon, Beans and Limousines” – a reference to a famous Will Rogers speech – where they discuss his life and museum events. The movie schedule, podcast and more museum information can be found at willrogers.com.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016


The State INSIDER

Bird with Strings

An Oklahoma professor brings lost arrangements from a jazz legend to life.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

PHOTO COURTESY OF CLARK GIBSON.

B

ack in 1949 and 1950, the celebrated jazz saxophonist period but never recorded. Charlie “Yardbird” Parker recorded a pair of albums Most of them weren’t, anyway. As saxophonist Gibson notes, a that became the biggest sellers of his career. Done few showed up later in recordings of Parker’s live concerts. for record producer Norman Granz, these two discs – “‘Repetition’ was one that he played in concert, and the reason we both titled Charlie Parker with Strings – surrounded did it was because, historically, it was the most important piece of the bebop pioneer with a full string section, turning him loose on a that whole [Charlie Parker with Strings] project,” he explains. “It variety of pop and big-band standards like “Laura,” “April in Paris” was the first piece Charlie Parker ever recorded with strings. And it and “They Can’t Take That Away from Me.” stayed in his repertoire for live shows. He performed ‘Stardust’ live As often happens when a genre star tries something different, at his Rockland Palace concert [in New York, 1952], and there’s a many jazz critics of the time weren’t kind to Charlie Parker with bootleg recording of that, but the sound is so bad you can’t hear the Strings, considering the whole project a kind of sellout. With time, arrangement. The same goes for ‘Gold Rush,’ which he played on however, recognition has come to the discs; in 1988, they were that same concert. Other than those three, he never recorded any of admitted to the Grammy Hall of Fame, which honors “recordings the songs we put on the CD.” of lasting qualitative or historic significance,” according to the “Repetition,” written by Neal Hefti (best-known to baby-boomers Grammy website (grammy.org). and nostalgia fans for composing the theme to TV’s Batman), was one of At this point, you may be wondering “‘Repetition’ was one that he songs producer Granz wanted for why something about Charlie Parker is played in concert, and the reason the a recorded collection of what Gibson appearing in this column. After all, he we did it was because, historically, describes as “a snapshot of everything wasn’t an Oklahoman (although he was close – a Kansas City, Kansas native it was the most important piece of happening [in New York’s jazz scene] around the late ’40s.” In addition to who grew up in Kansas City, Missouri). that whole project.” Hefti, the producer hired several other I could tell you he’s here because his – Clark Gibson, NSU Director of Jazz Studies. top jazz figures of the time, including first extensive recording sessions, done Parker, to record their own tunes. just about a decade before Charlie “Norman Granz had rented out all the rooms in Carnegie Hall for Parker with Strings, came while he was with the band of pianist these recording sessions,” notes Gibson. “So Bird finished recordJay McShann, the jazz and blues legend from Muskogee. The ing his song in one room and, as he was walking out, he heard Neal real reason, though, is a brand-new Parker-related CD by Clark Hefti rehearsing ‘Repetition’ with a big band and strings. Gibson, director of jazz studies at Northeastern State University ‘Repetition’ had been written for no soloists, but when Bird went in in Tahlequah. Released on the Chicago-based Blujazz label, Bird and asked if he could play on it, Neal Hefti said, ‘Sure.’ And that’s with Strings: The Lost Arrangements features treatments of 14 how it all started.” songs arranged for Parker during his Charlie Parker with Strings


Flash forward to a year or two ago. Gibson, a longtime Parker fan, as well as a professional, working saxophonist and recording artist, was deep into his doctoral dissertation at the University of Illinois, writing about Charlie Parker with Strings. His research led him to a publishing company that owned the arrangements from those two records – and, as it turned out, quite a bit more. “While I was on the phone with them, they told me, ‘You know, we have all these arrangements that were commissioned by Charlie Parker in the early 1950s in our archives. He played some of them, he didn’t record any of them, and some of them we don’t think he even rehearsed. We’re looking for someone to do an album of all these.’ “I said, ‘Well, I’d love to do it.’” And just like that, Bird with Strings: The Lost Arrangements was born. Recorded in one day at the University of Illinois, it features Gibson in the Charlie Parker role, fronting a group of musicians that strove to recreate the original Charlie Parker with Strings sound. “We recorded it all live, in a big concert hall, and maybe my biggest challenge was being 30 feet away from the rhythm section,” he says with a chuckle. “Sometimes it’s hard to keep time when you’re that far away from the bass player and drummer, and we did it a traditional way, with no headphones or anything like that. “One thing I’m really happy with is the guy who recorded it, Kevin Bourassa, went out and researched everything they did on Charlie Parker with Strings, right down to the mikes and all equipment they used. He really tried to replicate that situation.” However, Gibson adds, he personally knew better than to try and replicate Charlie Parker. “I can’t sound like Charlie Parker,” he says, laughing. “Nobody else can, either. I don’t think there’s anyone alive today, or since Bird’s death [in 1955], who can really sound like him. Bird heavily

influenced me, and I’ve been studying him since I was 13 years old, so he’s a huge part of my own artistic voice. I played it in my voice.” The numbers on the disc fall into two categories: Great American Songbook standards, including “Stardust,” “They Didn’t Believe Me” and “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” and jazz originals like George Russell’s “Ezz-thetic” (built on the chord progression of Cole Porter’s “Love For Sale,” making it what jazz people call a contrafact) and Parker’s own “Yardbird Suite.” “I can’t say why he never recorded some of these,” Gibson says. “Norman Granz was very commercially minded, and he might’ve listened to ‘Ezz-Thetic’ and thought, ‘This is not going to sell.’ And Bird didn’t like the arrangement of ‘They Didn’t Believe Me,’ so he didn’t do it; I think he thought it was a little too campy. But some of these arrangements are beautiful, like ‘I Cover the Waterfront’ and ‘You Go to My Head.’ “It’s hard to speculate,” he adds, “especially with Bird’s health problems and his addiction issues. I think a lot of these just went by the wayside.” Thanks to Gibson, they’ve now been rescued. And in addition to the disc, he’s got several Bird with Strings concerts planned, including one in conjunction with the orchestra and jazz departments of Tulsa Community College on March 25, just about the time this issue sees print. Another is tentatively scheduled for the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame’s Jazz Depot in April. And he’s working on more. “This is a great project to be doing with colleges, because it gives the opportunity for their classical programs and jazz programs to collaborate,” he notes. “I hope we’ll see a lot more bookings, too. I’m not trying to be egotistical or anything, but the great thing about hearing this music played live is that you’ll probably never get a chance to hear it that way again.” JOHN WOOLEY

NO EXCUSES Seth wanted to earn his bachelor’s degree, but juggling two jobs and financial concerns prevented him from pursuing his dreams. With the help of an Oklahoma State University-Tulsa academic counselor, Seth was able to secure financial aid and develop a class schedule that fit his busy life. What excuses are standing in the way of your degree? Find out how an OSU-Tulsa academic counselor can help you get there from here. Hear more about Seth’s journey at osuintulsa.com.

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25


The State

HEROES

A Diagnosis of Awareness

A fight to change the stigma for future generations.

P

at Gordon’s home is decorated with an eclectic mix of unusual furniture, including a leopard-print Bombay chest and a row of welding masks. The workspace where he paints is visible immediately upon entering, and the walls are covered with his paintings. With the midafternoon light filling the room, he sits in a chair with Rochester, one of his two Norwich terriers, on his lap and talks about one of the darkest times of his life: being diagnosed with HIV. “I ran to New York,” he says. “I really thought I’d be dead pretty quickly.” It was a diagnosis Gordon shared with few people for 14 years. At Tulsa CARES’ Red Ribbon Gala in February, he publicly disclosed he was HIV positive for the first time. Although he says he thought taking the step was risky, he wanted to attempt to remove some of the stigma that is attached to the diagnosis. Despite increased – Pat Gordon, artist awareness of HIV/ AIDS, people still avoid being tested for the disease. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, around 12.8 percent of the 1.2 million people in the United States who are HIV positive are not aware they are living with HIV. Although new treatments mean it is possible for people to live with HIV, not knowing means those who need the medications are not receiving them. “The younger generations are afraid to have the test, because even going to get the test is a stigma,” Gordon says. “Not the outcome of your test, but the test itself.” Gordon points out people publicly disclosing they are HIV/AIDS positive is relatively rare, saying that in the past 25 years, there were very few public disclosures between

“The younger generations are afraid to have the test, because even going to get the test is a stigma.”

PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

Magic Johnson’s announcement in 1991 and Charlie Sheen’s disclosure last year. “But between that, there’s nobody,” he says. “Does that not tell you the kind of stigma, fear and internal hatred that comes with this diagnosis? It comes with a moral judgment.” Gordon says he believes younger generations may not take HIV as seriously because they didn’t see the effects it had on people in his generation before the disease could be managed. Memories of his friends in hospice are still deeply engrained in his brain. When Gordon first became active in the fight against HIV/AIDS, the diagnosis was considered a death sentence. As someone


who saw his friends dying of AIDS, Gordon worked with other people, including Tulsa interior designer Charles Faudree, to raise money for those who didn’t have resources and needed help. Gordon, Faudree and others worked with Catholic Charities to help build St. Joseph’s Residence, with Catholic Charities serving as the major sponsor for financing. Gordon says people did everything they could to give their residents solace. “They came in and made these hospice rooms breathtakingly beautiful,” he says. “So for the people who passed through St. Joseph’s on their way to wherever, they had a beautiful room to live in until the day they

died. They were beautiful rooms. Hospital beds that had been dressed up to be beautiful. And we couldn’t wait to close it. “It’s now closed. That’s the most important thing. It’s now closed because of the progress that has been made in the fight against AIDS and HIV. For most people, the death process has been slowed back down. No longer is it imminent if you take your meds.” The stigma still remains with HIV, though, and that stigma influenced Gordan when he was diagnosed. He wasn’t comfortable with the information being publicly disclosed, but invited 10 of his best friends to breakfast to share the results. He told them them the information wouldn’t stay private in Tulsa.

He recounts different incidents that happened after he was diagnosed, including walking through a restaurant and hearing a stranger recognize him. “I heard somebody say my name,” he says. “And then I heard, ‘And he has AIDS.’” Six months later after learning he was HIV positive, he moved to New York. It was a place he’d wanted to live since he was a child. If he was going to die, Gordon says, he wanted to die in New York. “At that time, the thing I remember from my training is, once diagnosed in this region of the country, death was likely to follow in 12 months,” he says. “Because they waited so long to get tested. I did too. It was my fault. And I just assumed it would be applicable to me 10 years after. And it’s obviously not true. I’m glad.” Around three years ago, Gordon came back to Tulsa. He says his decision was influenced by many things, including the cost of living in New York, but one of the main reasons he moved back was that he missed his friends. Although he hopes his disclosure will help raise awareness on the necessity of HIV tests, it took several personal incidents before he felt ready to take that step. One was the decision to showcase some of his paintings linked to helping people with HIV and his own diagnosis. Gordon also suffered from a near-death experience last year where he nearly bled to death. “I was lucky I didn’t die,” he says. “But it also left me with the sensation internally that there was a reason I didn’t. There is no reason I should have made it, but I did. And when I came out of it, I thought, ‘OK, you’ve really been given a second opportunity.’” Gordon is taking advantage of that second opportunity, using it to help educate people and, he hopes, provide some encouragement for people to get tested and support for those who are HIV positive. It’s also way to give back to a community that accepted him at a time when acceptance wasn’t always common. “Charles Faudree and I were both very lucky in that we were given social acceptance at a time where being gay in America was not socially accepted,” he says. “I feel very grateful for that, and I want to be able to return that if I can.” The disclosure also impacted Gordon, who said he feels like a weight has finally been lifted from him. “Oh, I feel like I could almost just dance,” he says. “I’m telling you, I feel like I used to feel before this happened. I used to think I was pretty funny, nice, an easy-going guy, with a poignant sense of humor, and I hadn’t felt that way for 14 years.” JUSTIN MARTINO

APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

I Did It My Way

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

Y

The Garden Deva celebrates 20 years.

ou’ve probably seen Lisa Regan’s whimsical garden characters all over Oklahoma. You can’t help but smile when you see them. They are child-like, whimsical and sweettempered with an air of mischief. Regan calls them her “Garden Devas.” Don’t confuse them with entertainment divas. These sturdy metal characters draw their name from an East Indian word meaning happy. “They are a positive symbol,” she says. Positive perfectly describes Regan’s journey as an artist and her outlook on her life. She has a joyful personality, overshadowing her busy life as a single parent to four children, while running a busy art business. A Tulsa native, she grew up in an entrepreneurial family. Her grandfather founded Sandco, designing printing equipment now obsolete. Her mother, once a Las Vegas showgirl, ran her father’s business until her death. Regan’s independent spirit was evident in her youth. She attended private schools, graduating from Project 12’s Alternative High School. “I hated working in my mom’s business,” she says. “I had to wear panty hose and clothes I didn’t like. I didn’t have enough money for art school so I escaped into my art – ceramics, basket-weaving and silk-screening.” A visit with a California friend 24 years ago was pivotal. “He told me about some welding equipment for metal art,” she says. “I took his advice and took my art to a Brookside show 22 years ago. Twenty years ago, I incorporated the Garden Deva. Mom helped me sell my work in the early years.” The exterior of Garden Deva at 317 S. Trenton Ave. is as delightful as the characters Lisa creates. Inside, the colorful setting is magical –

a tribute to Regan’s creativity. Now celebrating her 20th anniversary, Regan sells her art all over the country. “The first item I sold was a cat with a bird on its back,” she recalls. “Some whispered it was ugly. I didn’t care. I loved what I was doing. I’m glad I had the drive and persistence to stay with it.” Two decades ago, gardens were purely functional. Regan’s art helped change how people view gardens, making space for outdoor art. Touring the industrial area of the 10,000-square-foot building, it’s easy to see the muscle needed to create metal art. Lisa loves her plasma laser torch, which looks like a Fourth of July sparkler slicing quickly through metal. As her business grew, she became a savvy juggler. “People bring me all kinds of art/welding projects,” she says. “I’m always bidding on new projects.” She shows metal garden leaves made for a home’s windows – a beautiful safety feature. Art deco lights are in progress for a garden walkway. Snaking through the workshop are large pieces of curving metal that will mark the Children’s Garden entry at Tulsa’s Botanical Center. Her Spring Creek Spirits are new, inspired by Spring Creek rocks featuring fossils; now the unusual heads of metal characters. Also new: brightly painted Matisse-inspired serving trays. For Regan, the best part of her business is playing with and creating metal. “Who gets to play and create and get paid for it?” she asks. “The hardest part is being the boss. I live by a Chinese saying that promises ‘things will work out.’” She also shows a caring attitude for her employees. “I let my employees bring their children to work if necessary,” she says. “I had to do that. I’d like to think being around art expands their sense of wonder.” She also generously shows other artists’ work, noting, “This is a cooperative gallery.” “I’m proud I’ve lived my life my way,” she says. “I do believe art will save the world.” M. J. VAN DEVENTER

APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29


Life & Style

GUIDE

I

Taking Cover

Knowledge and preparation both play key roles in safely riding out the state’s tornado season.

layers of warning and a plan. The layers of warning can include having apps installed on a mobile phone, using a text message warning system, watching the television news and staying in close contact with friends and family. A battery-operated NOAA Weather Radio, which has a warning alarm function, is a must-have for people who Knowledge live in Tornado Alley, according to the ODEM website. For knowledge, the first thing is to be aware of myths “Make plans ahead of time so you won’t have to make involving tornadoes. Keli Cain, public information officer difficult decisions when seconds count,” Cain says. For for ODEM, says the most common myth is the idea a people that have a safe room, Cain says “that’s fantastic” person needs to get out of their house and go somewhere but also make sure people are aware you have it. else when tornado sirens sound. If your plan involves having a safe room or storm shelThe dilemma of whether a person should leave home or ter constructed and installed, Oklahoma has a variety of stay and take shelter in a closet or innermost part of their companies that do such work. Blake Lee, with F5 Storm house is one the ODEM encounters every year. Shelters in Tulsa, says that both safe rooms and storm Less than a fifth of Oklahomans have access to a safe, shelters are good investments for Oklahomans. private tornado shelter, according to Tom Bennett, past “Above ground safe rooms are a really good option for president of the National Storm elderly people or maybe people Shelter Association. who are disabled,” Lee says. Cain says the ODEM recom“Since you don’t have to go down mends, in most cases, a person steps in order to access them, they should stay at home during a are just much easier for people to • They may strike quickly, with little tornado rather than leave when get in and out of.” or no warning. the sirens are blaring. Also, Lee says, “Statistically, The ODEM website offers a the above ground models are just • They may appear nearly transparhandy three-step process in the as safe as being underground as ent until dust and debris are picked event you are unable to leave long as the company has their up or a cloud forms in the funnel. your home: Get in, get down, shelters designed to meet FEMA • The average tornado moves southcover up. guidelines and has also had their west to northeast, but tornadoes “We always recommend that, products tested at Texas Tech’s have been known to move in any number one, you identify your Wind Institute in Lubbock.” direction. safe place. Then, number two, The prices for underground • The average forward speed of a if you don’t have one, if there’s shelters range from $2,799 to tornado is 30 mph but may vary from no place safe, like if you live in $4,300, depending on the size, Lee stationary to 70 mph. an apartment complex on the top says. floor and there’s no basement “Above-ground models can • Tornadoes can accompany tropical shelter, or you live in a mobile vary just because there are so storms and hurricanes as they home, then we recommend you many different sizing options,” he move onto land. leave your home,” Cain says. adds. “Typically, you are looking • Waterspouts are tornadoes that “But do this well in advance of in the $4,000 to $4,600 range.” form over water. the storm.” Knowledge and preparation are Making tornado safety decithe keys to tornado safety. • Tornadoes are most frequently resions well in advance means a “More people are injured by ported east of the Rocky Mountains certain level of preparedness flying debris or car accidents when during spring and summer months. should be a priority for all Oklathey leave their home than they • Peak tornado season in the southhomans. are in the actual tornado, so make ern states is March through May. those decisions ahead of time and • Tornadoes are most likely to occur be prepared, have a plan and folPreparation between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. but can low steps when the need arises,” The top two things to rememoccur at any time. Cain says. ber about tornado preparedness, SHAUN PERKINS Cain says, is to have multiple

t’s that time of year when leaves and spring pollen are not the only things flying through the air: tornado season. Surviving a tornado, which the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management calls the “most violent storm on Earth,” can be done with a little knowledge and preparation.

TORNADO FACTS

-Source: www.ready.gov

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016


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31


The Art of Design

Tulsa’s Philbrook hosts an exhibit examining the creativity of everyday objects.

E

ach year, thousands of people come to the Philbrook Museum of Art to see its premiere collection of artwork. These visitors expect to see beautiful paintings and intricate sculptures as well as the beautiful architecture and landscaping that the facility itself offers. Now, the Philbrook is introducing its guests to a new type of art: the art of reduction. Philbrook partnered with the Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Germany to exclusively present The Essence of Things in the central United States. The exhibition, which runs until May 1, includes more than 160 objects, from golf balls and flip-flops to Ziploc bags and egg cartons. The Essence of Things takes everyday objects that people tend to overlook and examines the creative design that went into developing them. “So, you have the Ikea Billy bookcase, which is a popular item in college dorms everywhere and many a house, but to think about it in the context next to its carton and realize it’s not just the design of the bookcase but “Who would have thought that the design of the the single slice toaster is a shipping and packing new evolution as of the efficiency that makes it such a significant 21st century, in 2007?” – Tricia Milford-Hoyt, piece of design,” exdirector of communications for Philbrook plains Tricia MilfordHoyt, director of communications for Philbrook. The creation of the iconic Eames chair was a learning process for the Eames brothers, Charles and Ray, she says. Much trial and error led to a single-mold, fiberglass, stackable chair through a process they had to invent because the technology did not exist at the 1960s and 1970s. “It hopefully will spark some thought for our visitors on what they

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

can find appreciation in this exhibition as far as how we are all using our minds creatively, critically thinking about different things and how they work in everyday society,” she says. “Our focus is to engage our visitors in the process of creativity and critical thinking, and this is a great exhibition for that for people of all ages. We hope that everyone comes out and sees it.” BETH WEESE

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PHILBROOK.

Life & Style ART

have in their life that would have been designed, and also maybe wha the next design might be,” Milford-Hoyt says. The art of reduction is an important concept in a world focused on conservation and sustainability. It’s a reminder that the simplest way may be the best way. “The evolution of reduction is something that enables us to get better and smarter and reduce the use of energy, space and allow for more efficient lives,” Milford-Hoyt says. “My personal favorite example of this is the single slice toaster. Who would have thought that the single slice toaster is a new evolution as of the 21st century, in 2007? Prior to that, it was always two slices or four slices. By reducing it down to one, you’re eliminating waste of electricity, of physical space on your countertop, and really able to focus on the demographics of today’s society. We have a lot of millennials living alone; we have a lot of baby boomers who are living alone. The idea of a single slice toaster, I think, is a great example of reduction.” While it may be a bit foreign for people to think of design and reduction as a form of art, it can be a more accessible form. All the objects people come across each day had to be designed by someone, and many people are using the concepts of design to make better products. “I do think design is an area of art that is undervalued,” says Milford-Hoyt. “Without designers, we would What not be able The Essence of Things at to live Philbrook Museum efficient Where lives. These 2727 South Rockford are things Road Tulsa, Oklahoma that we do When in society 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday every day through Sunday; 10 a.m. and I think to 8 p.m., Thursday; whether Through May 1 you are an Web art lover www.philbrook.org or not, you


Grace Hospice of Oklahoma is the largest independent hospice in the state.

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he story of Grace Hospice begins with founder Otis Eversole striving to provide sensitive and compassionate care to people with a terminal illness. He had seen both the best and worst that hospice care had to offer. His grandmother, grandfather and father were all placed under hospice care. His grandmother had a positive experience but his grandfather and father suffered just the opposite. He decided that everyone’s hospice experience should be nothing less than excellent. He opened Grace Hospice in fall of 1999. Executive Director Ava Hancock joined Grace in 2001 and was named Executive Director in 2011. Like Eversole, Hancock had a personal experience with hospice care when her father had cancer. She says the holistic approach of hospice was very beneficial to not only her father but to her mother and their entire family. That experience led to her passion to provide the same care for others. Otis Eversole and Ava Hancock will ensure that Grace Hospice will continue to set the standard for hospice care for generations to come. For more information, please contact Grace Hospice at (918) 744-7223 or email info@gracehospice.com. OK Mag Ad 3-7-16.ai

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Life & Style L I V I N G S PA C E S

Midtown Glamour Striking contemporary designs accent vintage home.

By M. J. Van Deventer Photos by Miller Photography

W

hen Dr. Dana Davis asked Tracy Huntington to design the interiors of her Tulsa home, her mandate was simple, the designer recalls. “She wanted a contemporary, cutting-edge look for her home. She travels frequently and she’s always on the lookout for things that are new and different – things she’s never seen before,” Tracy says. Imbued with a sense of adventure, Tracy, owner of Element360 Design, embarked on this exciting design challenge. The English cottage-style home is located in one of midtown Tulsa’s historic neighborhoods. Two-story homes line the tree-laden streets, this one fronting a boulevard typical of upscale neighborhoods of the 1930s, when this home was built. “My real challenge was to not infuse a complete contemporary design into the home, because it would not coexist with the essence of the 1930s style,” Tracy says. “Dana also wanted a look that was elegant, glitzy and glamorous.” Working together, Dana and Tracy achieved the dramatic look both desired, starting with a color scheme of black, white, gray and purple hues. White walls in the main living areas were the perfect foil for the sophisticated palette. A wall of tiny black metallic tiles houses the fireplace of glass logs, anchoring the formal living room. Soft gray furnishings and a chenilletextured area rug are design complements. “I showed Dana one small piece of the black tile and that started this dramatic journey,” Tracy says Adjacent to the living room is a small music room, housing a Baldwin baby grand piano, an unusual painting, chandelier and one comfy chair. The chandelier lighting and the ceiling add a romantic aura. The lighting recalls the 1950s with a starburst chandelier resembling “Sputnik.” The ceiling is equally as dramatic. It is a high-gloss purple

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016


APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

– “Cabernet” by Benjamin Moore. It’s easy to imagine Dana’s daughter playing a concerto here while her mother and friends sip wine and enjoy a concert. Near the living room is a cozy sunroom and closet-size powder room, made noteworthy with a black and silver metallic wallpaper and a curved lavatory and mirror accenting the wallpaper design. The sunroom overlooks the elegant courtyard and pool, renovated by native Tulsan Kurt Barron. The dining room, overlooking the front lawn, reflects this enticing setting, perfect for dining by candlelight. A large round table is flanked by black leather chairs with backs covered in a bold black/white geometric upholstery. The chandelier rivals the one in the music room. It is a circle of polished nickel and black nylon cording that ripples organically through the fixture’s center. Edison bulbs enhance the period look and lead diners’ eyes to the contemporary silver sculpture candleholders resembling small tree trunks in the table’s center. A large metal wall sculpture mimics entangled tree roots and begs to be touched, as do other art works throughout the home. One wall showcases a modern painting; another hosts framed architectural prints. The dining and living room draperies enhance the color scheme with a mix of gray fabrics and black faux leather. Adjacent to the dining room is a large Tuscan-style kitchen and pantry that was renovated several years ago. The two-story ceiling adds high impact to this area, near the breezeway and outdoor entertaining area, also designed by Kurt Barron. This area of the home continues the contemporary theme Dana favors. The gallerystyle breezeway is an innovative, surprising transition with a functional locker room look opening to the courtyard. The small area includes a fountain, concrete benches around a firepit, glass rock pebbles, a basketball goal, azaleas, flowering heathers and seasonal flowers. “It’s a unique three-sided courtyard complementing the pool,” Barron says. The breezeway includes another unusual chandelier and a wall of glass doors leading to the courtyard. It also is the entrance to the cozy pool house and a circular staircase leading to the upstairs guest suite. Did Tracy and Barron achieve their client’s mission with this design project? “It was one of those ‘Wow!’ projects from day one,” Barron says. Tracy says, “Yes. I think when guests walk in the front door they feel welcomed and comfortable, maybe amazed, too. It’s feminine and glamorous but crisp. Design doesn’t have to be exclusive. I think Dana’s friends feel like they could live here, too.” 36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

TOP: THE COURTYARD AND POOL WERE RENOVATED BY NATIVE TULSAN KURT BARRON. MIDDLE: THE DINING ROOM COMBINES A MIX OF GRAY FABRICS AND BLACK FAUX LEATHER. BELOW: THE KITCHEN FEATURES A VAULTED CEILING AND CHANDELIER.


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Life & Style

D E S T I N AT I O N S

A Day in Mystical Morocco

T

A day trip to Morocco has something for everyone.

angier Port, Morocco was the most exotic location we visited as a family, and the epiphanies we encountered in 2010 spanned spiritual, historical and cultural themes. We took a ferry boat from Tariffa, Spain to Tangier Port; a mere 35-minute

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

ride. Our tour guide, supplied by our travel agent, met us with his van driver, and I recommend doing the same if you go to this wonderful country in Northwest Africa. He was able to get us to the front of the line at the restaurants, bazaars, caves and other places, and even got us in the “fast lane� on the ferry boarding

later dealing with our passports. The vocabulary, mythology, history, factoids and cultural lessons we learned that day made our heads spin. The Cave of Hercules overlooking the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea had non-stop visual details and markets inside of it. The shape of the cave happens to be the


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Life & Style

mirror image of Africa with Madagascar next to it. Our Moroccan multicourse meal at the famous restaurant, Popeye’s, was unforgettable. Popeye’s had a line around the block full of customers waiting to get in. After hours of sightseeing, this meal break was exactly what we needed and it gave our tour guide time for his afternoon prayers. Tagines of smoked almonds, salsa, shark, swordfish, figs, dessert with honey, melon and a homemade fruit drink were just some of the gastronomic extravaga! The vivid food markets with their vibrancy and pungency combine Mediterranean, Arabic, Berber and Andalusian flavors. We ate cactus pear from the food booth of Berber village women. The Berber women’s hats have pompons on them, similar to the Peruvian campesinas’ style; probably due to the traveling of explorers across the continents who bring back styles from foreign places. After the market, we went to the Old Town Bazaar. Our guide explained the architectural details. In the bazaar, we bought pottery, vases, and tablecloths, among other things, and looked at marvelously intricate rug. We rode camels on a hill overlooking a beach where the Atlantic Ocean meets the Mediterranean Sea. My youngest son’s face was euphoric just standing next to a 4-month old camel and seeing these creatures for the first time. Wherever we went, our tour guide and others greeted each other with “salam alaikum.” It translates to “peace to you.” People use it as freely as other cultures use “goodbye,” “hello,” “Shalom” or “Peace.” People respond with “Wa-alaikum salam” (“peace unto you”). We asked him his greeting meant, and he explained to us in detail about how peace is at the core of his religion. He asked us what our culture’s equivalent might be and we answered, “God be with you.” We had a personal and philosophical conversation which gave clarity to many of my questions which is always the enriching part about traveling. When we departed that day on our ferry boat and bid the guide farewell, my husband shook his hand and said, “salam alaikum,” and he responded, “God be with you.” I found this moment transformative for my family, our epiphanies, our journey and our global understanding during this year of 2010 in a time of political turmoil in the world. It was a healing moment for us and good closure to a day that had moments of uncertainty for my husband in particular. Morocco was exotic, historic, adventurous and spiritual. GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

A TRIP TO MOROCCO ALLOWS VISITORS TO TRY NEW FOOD, SHOP AT LOCAL MARKETS AND ENJOY A CULTURE WITH A RICH HISTORY.


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Life & Style

YO U R H E A L T H

L

YouTube videos as possible sources for yn Hester has been talka daily chuckle. ing about the connection “There is science to suggest that of health and humor smiling does increase one’s sense of for years. In 1989, she well-being, so I do encourage people to founded the National ‘at least half-smile,’ perhaps pretend to Clown and Laughter Hall of Fame, be Mona Lisa and smile a while as they now a division of The International do something routine and notice the Center for Humor and Health, and toeffect,” says Dr. Patterson. “So halfday she travels throughout the country smile as you get dressed, or half-smile speaking about how to manage stress as you empty the dishwasher or walk to through humor and how to incorporate get the mail, and notice that your face more humor into people’s lives. relax a little, your shoulders lower “Stress related illnesses – ulcers, miThe old adage, “laughter is the best does as stress releases.” graines, hypertension and depression – medicine,” continues to ring true Other positive activities she suggests account for 70 to 80 percent of all docinclude learning and telling jokes, tor visits,” Hester says. “And although as studies show the positive health dancing at home to your favorite mua pill may be the expected treatment, benefits from a good, hearty laugh. sic, doing creative crafts and journaling we often overlook the coping mechaabout the good things that happen to you during the day. She also nism with which we have been naturally endowed – humor! Humor notes that sometimes just telling people to have some fun is a good in Latin is the word ‘umor,’ which means flexible or fluid like water. prescription. So humor is actually a coping mechanism. It is resilience, a way to While laughter is good for you, it may also help others. Recent take what life gives you and roll with the punches.” studies have supported the thought that laughter is contagious. HowAccording to Hester, a few of the many benefits of laughter ever, it’s important to support laughter that’s positive and uplifting. include reducing stress, increasing oxygenation and circulation, Dr. Jacob Greuel, an attending physician with the In His Image boosting the immune system and Family Medicine Residency Program with St. John Health System, reducing pain. emphasizes that choosing inappropriate humor, often at the expense “Several studies have shown of others, can do you more harm than good. He notes that that exposing people to humorKing Solomon, known as the wisest man on earth ous experiences significantly increases their ability to deal with at the time, wrote “there is a time to weep, and a time to laugh; a pain. When you laugh, your brain time to mourn, and a time to releases endorphins – the body’s – Charlie Chaplin natural pain killers,” Hester says. dance.” REBECCA FAST “Humor helps us cope with difficulties and gives us perspective. It momentarily removes us from the situation and allows us to look at the world a little differently. Much of the suffering we experience is not a result of our difficulties but how we view them. It is not so much the actual event that causes us pain as how we relate to it.” She adds that time and space provides a better perspective. “A bad hair day after a little time can be a funny story,” says Hester. “Practice laughing at yourself; the more you do it the easier it gets and the less the world bothers you.” Dr. Lindsay Patterson, a clinical psychologist and mindfulness teacher with Saint Francis Health System, recommends that people watch or read something daily to really feel a good laugh. She suggests Reader’s Digest, newspaper comics, TV programs and funny

A day without laughter is a day wasted.

Can you laugh yourself to beer health?

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016


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Life & Style

Scene Jack Allen, Jr., Dr. Jim Rodgers and Mayor Dewey Bartlett, 2016 Tulsa Memory Gala, Alzheimer’s Association.

Mark Fried, Olivia Jordan, Robert Thomas, Jackie Kouri and Sen. James Lankford, 2016 Memory Gala, Alzheimer’s Association.

Catherine Armitage and Karen Delaney, Literary Voices Event, OKC Metropolitan Library System.

Marcello Angelini, Daniela Buson, Wendy and Gentner Drummond, Icons and Idols, Tulsa Ballet. Lauren Bingham, Kayla Vaughn and Rachael Hunsucker, Candlelight Ball, Child Abuse Network, Inc.

Stewart Putnam, Mollie and J. W. Craft, 2016 Tulsa Memory Gala, Alzheimer’s Association.

The 2016 Gem Gala The Junior League of Tulsa is proud to present its inaugural emerald-tie Gem Gala scheduled to take place on Friday, April 15 at The Tulsa Historical Society. The event will recognize Suzanne Warren and The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, the 2016 Gems. The evening begins with an opening reception at 6:30 p.m. followed by dinner at 7:30 p.m. and an 8:30 p.m. after party. More than 400 people are expected to be in attendance at the event that will also feature a live and unique silent auction benefiting the Junior League, a local 501(c)(3) organization of women committed to ending the cycle of poverty. For more than nine decades, JLT has prepared its members to accomplish one vital mission – to improve the Tulsa community through volunteer service. League members have contributed more than 1.6 million volunteer hours and have raised more than $5 million dollars for community projects. For more information on the event and sponsorship opportunities visit jltulsa.org.

JAKE HENRY AND SUZANNE WARREN

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016


SP OTLIGHT

Red Ribbon Resplendent Tulsa CARES’ premier event exceeded records in funds and attendance.

gallery installation depicting For a quarter century, Tulsa CARES has proan agency timeline, education vided assistance, support and social services to more than 600 low-income clients living with on the services provided and people supported by HIV/AIDS every year. This effort recently Tulsa CARES as got a record-breaking fiscal boost well as explanawhen the 19th Annual Red Ribbon tions of myths, Gala raised nearly $1 million. stigmas and Attendees – clad in sleek black facts of the tuxedos and evening attire in disease, Pyland hues of crimson, cherry, ruby, says. Much of this wine, scarlet, vermillion and informative content is available many more shades of red – in video format online by visiting were treated to a cutting edge redribbongala.org. presentation of Tulsa CARES’ past, present and future. For the past 12 years, Ryan Jude Tanner has been involved “Using interface technology with Tulsa CARES and is one of provided by Steelhouse, we provided two people to have ever served patrons with eight virtual reality as chairman of the event twice. stations where they used [virtual Jay Krottinger was Tanner’s reality] headgear to view the co-chair this year. Tanner Charles Faudree Center – set shared his excitement for to open this spring – in a the event, particularly in 360-degree environment,” recognizing gala honoree said Todd Pyland, principal Patricia Chernicky. and creative director at “Last year we broke attenTalmadge Powell Creative. “We dance and fundraising records, thought giving the guest a tour Please save the date for Red Ribbon Gala andCARES. this year we broke last year’s records,” would entertain them and provide insightbenefitting on Tulsa Tanner says. “This is due in large part to what TulsaCares offers. This technological Honoring Patricia Chernicky Patricia andKrottinger her work as a leading advocate opportunity was sponsored byEvent Patriot Bank.” Chairmen, Ryan Jude Tanner and Jay to make this such a diverse, inclusive event. The Charles Faudree Center will serve as the February 27, 2016 There new headquarters for Tulsa CARES. Cox Business Centerwas such a range there – in ages from 21 to 75, those who are HIV negative and Guests entering Cox Business Center’s Visit redribbongala.org large open lobby were led through a four-zone for more those details. who are HIV positive, the gay and the

Red Ribbon Gala

straight. Single donations ranged the smallest at $10 to the largest of $33,000. It was just a fantastically diverse group of folks. I was honored to be part of honoring her with the first Patirica Chernicky Luminary Award, which will be given every year from now on. The Luminary is a great culmination of Patricia’s 15 years of support of Tulsa CARES.” Pyland says conceptualizing next year’s gala began the day after this year’s event. “We like to stay and help the gala grow year after year as a trend,” he says. “At $952,000 raised, we almost doubled last year’s high of $500,000. We’re always thinking about next year, and we’re excited to announce the 2017 chairs will be Raj Basu and Rebekah Tennis.” The 2017 Red Ribbon Gala is already set for Saturday, March 4, 2017 and will again be held at the Cox Business Center. For more information on Tulsa CARES, visit tulsacares.org. TRACY LEGRAND APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

SP OTLIGHT

2016 RED RIBBON GALA

Tulsa CARES’ 19th annual Red Ribbon Gala fundraising event was a huge success, with over 630 dazzling attendees this year, raising $952,000 for the organization – a 63 percent increase over 2015. The event was held at The Cox Business Center, where guests and sponsors, including Oklahoma Magazine, painted the town red. Tulsa CARES is one of the city’s most valuable philanthropic organizations, providing assistance to individuals and families affected by HIV and AIDS.

Jay Leland Krottinger, Greg Holt and Ryan Jude Tanner

Patricia Chernicky

Patrick Gordon

Honey and Philip Kaiser Sean Conner and Mollie Goforth Craft

Todd Brown, Monica Basu, Cheena and Steve Pazzo

Toby Jenkins and Judy Zarrow Kishner Andy Kinslow and Russ Kirkpatrick

Scott and Kayla Vaughn

Preston Doerflinger and Misti Center

Michele Semin, Ben Stewart, Chris Murphy, Ann Shannon Cassidy and David Benjamin Wendy and Gentner Drummond

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Bailey and Kellner Siegfried


Rebekah Tennis and Raj Basu

Piper and Deacon Turner

Blane Snodgrass and Brandon Miller

Jason Martin and Ginny Albert

Alex Miller, Olivia Jordan and Taylor Gorton Lisa and Steve Antry, Lauren Carson Rodney and Kara Plaster

Alan and Shelly Armstrong, Jill and Bob Thomas

Steve Bradshaw, Nancy Van Doren, Marla Bradshaw and Blake Loveless

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The Swon

rothers B ARE TIMELESS

M U S KO G E E NATIVES AND THIRDPLACE WINNERS OF THE VOICE ARE ON TOUR WITH CARRIE UNDERWOOD, AND PERFORM FOR THE HOMETOWN CROWD AT THE BOK THIS MONTH.

By Laurie Goodale Photos by Nathan Harmon

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Oklahoma Magazine met with them at The Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame in Muskogee. Zach was immediately drawn to the black baby grand piano on the dimly-lit stage and began filling the air of the old building with music. Surrounded by the massive portraits of former inductees – many of them, in a way, mentors – he was soon joined in perfect harmony by brother Colton on some spur-of-the-moment classics from a variety of genres. It was magic, really, and genuine. The Swon Brothers were home, and it showed. We were treated to a private concert – complete with plenty of comic relief. “We’ve been chasing this dream our whole life. We started making music as soon as we started making noise,” says Colton. “I’m serious – we were rockin’ in the womb, pretty much!” “We really don’t have womb for jokes like that in this interview,” Zach, the older and seemingly quieter of the two, says. The brothers started performing as children. Colton mentions that since “day one” they were raised on a tour bus as they traveled with their parents, Kelly and Tammy Swon, and the southern gospel group Exodus. By the time Zach Swon was 9 or 10 years old, he was playing drums for the band. In 2000, when they were 12 and 15 years old, they began venturing out in venues on their own as The Swon Brothers. “We never really had a backup plan,” Zach says. “We didn’t know to what extent we wanted to do this, but since we were little this was what we wanted to do. And, luckily, we get to do it as brothers – and, hopefully, not kill each other.” When Oklahoma Magazine first interviewed the brothers in 2011, they were hanging on tight to that childhood dream and were in the process of mixing a live album, recorded at the historic Roxy Theater in Muskogee. They were also busy writing for a new studio album in Nashville. They had previously released an independent CD, Another Day, in January 2009. The singing, songwriting duo can’t help but lean towards a country genre but say they will never limit themselves to any one category. “We draw inspiration from a lot of music,” Zach says. “I know it’s kind of a cliché answer but growing up we listened to southern gospel, we listened to ’70s rock a lot – I mean our favorite band is the Eagles.” The list of greats went on with Colton chiming in: Michael Jackson, George Jones, Ray Charles, Merle Haggard, Earth Wind and Fire. “You name it, we’ve done it. But I think that’s kind of cool. It gives us a wide variety. Our dad told us when we were first starting out, ‘The way you please a crowd is you do something that everyone is going to like – at some

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point,’” Zach says with a laugh. To the worldwide audience, who met the brothers for the first time in April 2013 via their televised audition for NBC’s The Voice, it appeared as if these young lives were changing overnight. The Swon Brothers performed Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ “American Girl,” turning the chairs of judges Usher, Blake Shelton and Shakira. Not surprisingly, they chose Blake Shelton as their coach and that, combined with their talent and America’s vote, eventually led them to the finale and third place in the competition. One of the many highlights of the season was when the brothers chose to sing Steve Young’s “Seven Bridges Road” as a tribute to victims of the May 2013 tornado in Moore. “Our lives have definitely changed – I don’t know if I would say overnight because we’ve been doing this since we were little kids,” Zach says. “To most people it looks like overnight, but, you know, I think it changed us in other people’s eyes more than in our own.” “Our experience on The Voice was amazing,” Colton says. “We got to work with fellow Okie Blake Shelton and had a blast. It was like working with a big brother, really. I mean, the first thing that he said to my brother [Zach] was ‘Your brother Colton has one of those faces that you just want to punch!’” “I said ‘I agree, and we’re going to be great friends,’” Zach chimes in. Shelton still mentors the brothers and gives them advice. “He lets you spread your wings and fly and figure out stuff for yourself at the same time. But he’s always been in our corner and he’s always a text or a phone call away. He’s treated us like family,” says Colton with a genuine sense of gratitude. “The show as a whole, though – I mean, what an experience,” Colton says. “Kind of like a boot camp for what we’re doing now as a career. And I can’t say anything bad about anyone involved in that production. They really want to see people succeed – it was a big game changer for us.” Soon after appearing on The Voice, The Swon Brothers signed a recording contract with Arista Nashville and, under producer Mark Bright, released their self-titled album that included their debut Top 15 single “Later On.” In October 2015, the brothers parted ways with Arista as a result of the company’s restructuring. Now, there’s the recently released Timeless. Not only did the duo write every song on Timeless, but they also played most of the instruments on the recording. They also coproduced the tracks themselves with assistance from renowned producer/songwriter

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Derek George, and up and coming producer/band mate Joe Henderson. Did we mention talented? “We’ve put our heart and soul into this thing trying to give the record our very best,” Colton says. “I mean, fans give us their very best – they deserve it from us too. We took our time and tried to make it perfect for them.”

There’s No Place Like Home

“Muskogee and the state of Oklahoma have gone above and beyond to support us,” Zach says. “They’ve put us on radio, and they’ve downloaded our singles and bought our records,” Colton says. “All of that led to things like being nominated for a CMA and an ACM. That’s huge.” “People still show up when we come back home and play,” Zach says. “That never gets old, and there’s nothing like playing to a hometown crowd.” “We love coming home – we look for any excuse to come home and see Mom and Dad,” Colton says. “It’s especially great you can come home and actually give back to the community that has changed your life. So whether it’s a community fundraiser or, you know, someone is sick and needs to raise money to pay doctors’ bills – we’ve done a lot of that and those events always mean a little bit more to us. We’ll be there if we can. “We’ve teamed up with Salvation Army over the last few years, and that thing has grown


Colton says. “Really, the chances of making it in this business are slim to none. If you can pay rent and eat then you’re doing something right. And they definitely got us to that level. You couldn’t ask for better parents.” “Family means everything,” Tammy says. “I’m very proud of them.” “She’s more proud of him (Zach) than me,” says Colton. “He’s the favorite!” “Yes, that’s true,” Zach calmly adds in all seriousness. “I will absolutely back that up.”

100 Shows in 100 Cities

“We’ve been friends with Carrie Underwood for many years – grew up a town apart basically,” Zach says. “She’s been really supportive since we were on The Voice. She took us to dinner when we moved to Nashville and she let us pick her brain – and she sang on our first record!” The friendship with Underwood led to the brothers opening for the powerhouse headliner on her 2016 Storyteller Tour that kicked-off on January 30 in Jacksonville, Florida. “It’s going to be a big year,” Colton says. “People are so excited. She’s selling out everywhere, and I can’t believe that we’re on it [the tour]! That’s a huge, huge blessing. ZACH SWON It’s just been awesome to be part of this journey with her and that she is letting us ride on her coattail a and ticket sales have doubled every year pretty much,” he continues. “It’s just been awesome little bit in the process.” to see that flourish and do well.” “The BOK Center – that’s a bucket list The brothers were accompanied by their proud mom, Tammy Swon, who has grown to place to play,” Zach says. “I remember about cherish the days when the boys come home as they now live full time in Nashville. three years ago watching Carrie Underwood We wanted to know what it had been like raising these boys. and Hunter Hayes at the BOK on her last “Get on up here, Mom,” Colton says. “I’m going to give you an intro. So this little lady tour, and I remember telling Colton, ‘Man, I here is our mother, Tammy Swon. And she’s about as tall standing up as we are when we’re wish that we could play in here one day.’” sitting down.” “And now we’re going to,” a big-eyed “They were a lot of fun – ornery, of course,” the reluctant-to-interview Tammy says. “And Colton replies. when they did get in trouble, most of the time their punishment was to go to their room and The Swon Brothers and Carrie Underwood write songs – that was usually a good punishment for them!” will entertain the hometown crowd at Tulsa’s “One time, we got into a fight on a trip home from Nashville and my dad said, ‘Look, if you BOK Center on April 27. want to fight, go to your room and don’t come out until you write a song together!’ We did, “I hope we don’t fall or rip our pants,” and it ended up being a single,” Colton says. The whole room laughed on that one. says Colton. “[Their dad] was the one that kind of pushed them to do things right,” Tammy says. “He “I mean, I have ripped my pants plenty of just wouldn’t let them do it halfway. If they wanted to play a song, he made them listen to it times on stage so we’ll cross our fingers that and do it right.” that doesn’t happen,” Zach says. “It makes you appreciate Mom and Dad and home a lot more – being gone this much,”

“M U S KO G E E AND THE STATE OF OKL AHOMA HAVE GONE ABOVE AND BEYOND TO SUPPORT US”

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W Photos by Miller Photography

ith representatives from businesses, nonprofits and universities, among others, the 2016 40 under 40 class is one of Oklahoma Magazine’s top yet. We visit with each of our selected members and talk to them about what they do on the clock, off the clock and how they’re dedicated to

making Oklahoma great.

FURNITURE PROVIDED BY FIFTEENTH AND HOME.

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Terrie Shipley, 30 Travis Owens, 30

Tulsa Senior Manager of Planning and Development, Cherokee Nation Businesses Owens, who manages cultural resource development for the Cherokee Nation Businesses, enjoys how his job allows him to contribute to the success of the Cherokee Nation. “As a Cherokee Nation citizen, it is an honor to be able to work towards protecting and preserving some of Cherokee Nation’s most historic assets,” he says. “It gives me great pride to know that the work that I do will help preserve our history and culture for future generations.” Owens stays busy outside of his job as well – in addition to spending time with his family, he is board president of the Tulsa Children’s Museum and serves on the board of Preservation Oklahoma, American Indian Alaskan Native Tourism Association and Fab Lab Tulsa. Owens believes in giving everything he does his full attention. “When you lead a busy life, it is very easy to not fully participate in every aspect of your life,” he says. “Whether it is dinner with friends, meeting with an employee/coworker or reading your email, choosing to be fully present and invested ensures that you get the most out of every situation.”

Tulsa Owner and Educational Planner, Terrie Shipley Consulting; Associate Director, Youth Philanthropy Initiative Originally from the the San Francisco Bay area, Shipley not only runs her own consulting firm but also serves as associate director of Youth Philanthropy Initiative and is a candidate for a doctorate in educational administration, curriculum and supervision from the University of Oklahoma. She says she has two dream jobs, serving as both an educational planner who works with high school students on a one-on-one basis with the student as her client, and assisting in the positive development of teens all over Tulsa with the Youth Philanthropy Initiative. She says one of her proudest moments is getting text messages from consulting students who have just been granted admission to a school they really wanted. “They’re so excited and relieved; it’s a turning point in their confidence,” she says. “Those texts are an emojifest in the best way, and I just feel proud of them and the work they’ve put into the process.” She’s also currently acting as board president of Mental Health Association Oklahoma and served as gala chair for Up With Trees. Shipley describes her latest venture as motherhood – she and her husband recently had their first child. She adds she enjoys exploring new places and cultures and has been able to see not only the U.S., but also Europe and Asia in depth. “I’m just as Chinese as I am Caucasian and grew up with both cultures,” she says. “While I can speak and understand Cantonese, I regret not learning how to write in it.”

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Kelly Stratton, M.D., 34

Blanchard Urologic Oncologist, Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma Stratton, who grew up in Blanchard, says his family has deep roots in Oklahoma, and he chose to return to the state to practice medicine. “I love being able to help people,” he says. “I wanted to make sure that patients can stay close to home and receive care from fellow Oklahomans. We take care of our own.” As a urologic oncologist, he treats cancer of the urinary tract, including prostate cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer and testicular cancer. He volunteers for Us Too Prostate Cancer Support Group, and enjoys spending time with his family and running. “Particularly, I like to take my kids running in a jogging stroller,” he says. Jogging has helped make Myriad Gardens in Oklahoma City his favorite place in the state. “It’s fun in the wintertime and a great place to run,” he says.

Christina M. Vaughn, 36

Collinsville Attorney, Crowe & Dunlevy Vaughn focuses on Native American law at Crowe & Dunlevy. While there are many things to love about her job, one thing she enjoys is the variety of issues she faces on a daily basis. “Nearly every day I get to explore some new question or issue or look for a new way to solve a problem,” she says. Vaughn is a cancer survivor, and said she enjoys helping out different volunteer causes. She is currently vice president of the Tulsa County Bar Association and a trustee on the Tulsa County Bar Foundation Board of Trustees, and she helps coordinate TCBA’s annual golf tournament. The tournament donates its proceeds to organizations such as Disabled American Veterans, Tulsa Lawyers for Children and the South Tulsa Community House. “Volunteering keeps my life’s stresses in perspective,” she says. “There are always others dealing with more difficult situations than I.”

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Nicole Watts, 38

Bixby Director of Civil Engineering, KKT Architects Inc. Watts was born in Canada and moved to the U.S. When she was 5 years old, living first in Ohio and then moving to Tulsa her sophomore year in high school. In 2012, she had the opportunity to join KKT Architects and start a civil engineering department. She enjoys assisting people and is most proud of the work her department does with local nonprofit organizations. She has recently donated her technical skills to the Tulsa Ballet for the new Hardesty Center for Dance Education and to the Tree for All project at Chandler Park. “I believe it is the resident’s responsibility to create the community we want to live in, which is why I volunteer as much as possible and encourage my staff and peers to do so as well,” she says. “It has definitely made me more aware of the struggles that are in our city and how we can help.”

Camille Gunderson, M.D., 34

Oklahoma City Gynecologic Oncologist, Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma A native Louisianan, Gunderson moved to Oklahoma to pursue fellowship training in gynecologic oncology at Stephenson Cancer Center and joined the faculty in 2015. “When a patient has an aggressive cancer and an expected poor prognosis, occasionally she is able to defy the odds and have a good outcome,” she says. “In these rare cases where a patient does much better than anticipated, there is an immeasurable amount of happiness, relief, optimism and gratitude, which is inspiring and long lasting.” Besides working with patients, Gunderson says she enjoys watching bright people she has trained blossom into skilled professionals. “I relish in their success,” she says. She volunteers for the OK Humane Society, which is where she adopted her dog in 2012. She is also a member of the racing team for Red Coyote Running and Fitness Store.

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Kristoffer Crawford, M.D., 33

Tulsa Family Medicine Physician, In His Image Family Medicine Residency, St. John Health System Although his position with the St. John Health System allows him to provide patient care, Crawford also trains new physicians in care delivery and medicine and describes teaching and training as some of the favorite aspects of his job. “I love to watch the resident physicians I help to train blossom over their three years at In His Image,” Crawford says. “There’s also a pride about walking with patients through difficult changes in their life and seeing their health improve through better diet, lifestyle and habit choices. It’s a shared pride, between the patient and I, and it’s really wonderful.” Through his work with In His Image, Crawford has participated with several disaster relief trips, traveling to Haiti, the Philippines and Nepal, and he and his wife volunteer for a program called Hands on the Nations at their church. Crawford attributes his success to his faith, saying “following Jesus has led me through each step of my life so far and has set my path for the journey ahead.”

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Adam Doverspike, 35

Tulsa Corporate Litigator, GableGotwals Doverspike was born in Tulsa, but left the state for college, a stint in the Peace Corps and a few jobs in Washington, D.C. He returned to Tulsa in 2009, where he says he values “participating in a system that permits citizens to resolve expensive and/ or emotional disputes in a nonviolent and fair way.” His primary philanthropic cause is homelessness prevention, and he says volunteerism is a major aspect of his life. “A few days after 9/11, we ran a shuttle bus service to the Washington, D.C. Red Cross,” he says. “The sobering feeling of driving through the streets of Georgetown as almost every occupant stood on their front steps holding candles during the moment of silence is unforgettable. That was just one of many chances to see how communities coming together can bring relief to those in need. Oklahoma’s amazing commitment to volunteerism and charity was a major reason we chose to move home.” Doverspike also assists with his wife’s alternative transit company, MotherRoad Travel, which is working to bring intercity alternative transit to the Oklahoma CityTulsa corridor.


Bryan Clifton, 27

Valorie Walters, 39

Ada Executive Officer, Division of Cultural Center, The Chickasaw Nation Walters grew up in Coalgate and began working for the the Chickasaw Nation in the Office of Environmental Health while in college. “This was my first experience with the Chickasaw Nation as an employer and one I will always be thankful for,” she says. In her current position, she oversees the day-to-day operations of the Chickasaw Cultural Center, where she says she loves that she can be creative in highlighting various aspects of the Chickasaw culture through technology, exhibits or events. “Throughout my career, I’ve had the good fortune to work with great people who care about what they do and who go above and beyond to fulfill the mission of the Chickasaw Nation,” she says. Walters enjoys supporting community projects like the Ada Trail of Lights and other projects that “make people happy and give them an experience they otherwise might not have.”

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Edmond Founder and CEO, Myriad Insight; Partner, Myriad Ventures Clifton’s experience with entrepreneurship started at an early age. “I grew up working mall kiosks and trade shows with my dad,” he says. “This taught me how to market products and the basics of running a business.” He started a series of micro businesses in elementary school, and then larger businesses as he grew older. Now he gets to help other entrepreneurs by serving as an adviser and strategist. Clifton volunteers with several groups, including Edmond Young Professionals, Stand in the Gap Ministries, the Oklahoma City Zoo and the Christian Business Men’s Association. “Volunteering has allowed me to meet some amazing people who I wouldn’t have known otherwise,” he says. There is no secret to success, he adds, but “hard work and being nice to people will get you a long way in life.”

Thomas H. Landrum, 30

Tulsa Partner, The Firm on Baltimore PLLC Landrum’s law practice focuses on Oklahoma families and the businesses they own, and says he has been blessed with a stellar group of lawyers and clients. He enjoys doing adoption work and says, “It is a great feeling having a role in creating a new and loving family. It is good work to have.” Landrum describes himself as an enthusiastic supporter of Tulsa Ballet, and also works with Tulsa Lawyers for Children. “The cases in which I volunteer for them allow me to work for clients who, in the worst of times in their lives, find joy and happiness in the most unlikely places,” he says. And although Landrum enjoys his field, he has come up with an alternative just in case. “My fallback plan is to find a percheron farm somewhere in the Ozarks and convince them to hire me as a hand,” he says.


Elizabeth Windel, 37

Ardmore Principal Architect/Owner, Southern Design Group Architects While people may not think of the personal relationships architects form with their clients, that aspect is one of Windel’s favorite parts of her job. “The relationships that we develop with our clients is very fulling,” she says. “I am honored every time we get selected for a project and have that chance to be a part of their lives and their future space.” She says Girls on the Run is a huge part of her life, and she serves on the board and as a volunteer coach. She credits her success to a support system of family and friends she can always count on. “My husband is also a business owner, and we work together so it can be hard when we both have a deadline, but thanks to the support system we’ve built, both personally and professionally, we can usually get everything done without the house burning down.”

Daniel Molina, M.D., 39

Monica Neeley, 33

Tulsa Controller, Miller Truck Lines As controller of Miller Truck Lines, a family owned and operated business, Neeley has the opportunity to work side by side with three generations of her family to keep the business at the top of the industry. “I am so proud of the culture at Miller Truck Lines,” she says. “We meet at the crossroads of innovation and tradition. Our brand upholds experience and forward thinking.” Although Neeley’s job keeps her busy, she prides herself on balancing her home and professional life. She and her husband have two children, and she says one of her favorite activities is watching them play sports. She also volunteers with OK2Grow, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma and Sustainable Tulsa. “While serving others, a sense of peace and happiness overcomes me,” she says.

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Oklahoma City Family Medicine Physician and Chief Medical Officer, Oklahoma City Indian Clinic Dr. Molina, a first-generation Mexican-American, says he loves that his job allows him to make a difference in people’s lives. “I love that I can be someone who listens when a patient is at their most vulnerable,” he says. “I love laughing with patients. I love to remember patients who are no longer alive, but who have taught me lessons that cannot be forgotten.” While he enjoys seeing patients who are proud of themselves for making significant changes in their lives, he is also happy when he says how proud his parents are with what he does for a living. “They are very simple people who didn’t have formal educations, but had an incredible work ethic, still to this day,” he says. “They invested their sweat equity in me, instilling the importance of education.” Dr. Molina says. When he’s not helping patients, he enjoys training for triathlons, and has completed two full distance Ironman races with a third planned for this summer. Molina says he has been fascinated by the U.S. Mail system since a first-grade field trip, and, if he weren’t a doctor, would “probably be one of the best mail carriers of all time,” because he thinks of the importance of love letters and and letters from soldiers to their families back home that have been sent through mail. “Every piece of mail would be so important to me as a mail carrier that I’d do just about anything to deliver the goods,” he says. Molina volunteers with the Go Mitch Go Foundation, the American Diabetes Association and the Tour de Cure, Cavett Kids Foundation, Colter’s Toybox and the Regional Food Bank.


Jam Khojasteh, 32

Tulsa Assistant Professor of Research, Evaluation, Measurement and Statistics at Oklahoma State University Khojasteh teaches graduate level statistics courses at OSU and takes pride in communicating the material to students in a manner that helps them learn and give them confidence to complete the class. “Sometimes I hear students say that their friends or other faculty memberts have recommended them to take my class, and that makes me proud of the work I’m doing,” he says. “I do my best to make class enjoyable while also holding a high standard for student learning.” He has worked with his colleagues on a new education accountability framework for the state, which has been presented at several locations throughout Oklahoma. When he’s not teaching, he takes his 1968 Pontiac to the Tulsa cruise nights, drag races and road races, and he also drives to Missouri each year for a Pontiac cruise-in.

Sara Murray Naugle, M.D., 33

Norman CEO, Red River Youth Academy Dr. Murray Naugle brought her dedication and passion for helping people heal and grow to Meridian Behavioral Health Systems in July 2015, taking the position of CEO with the Red River Youth Academy. Since then, she has added outpatient services, which includes a day treatment program. She says she loves working with the dedicated professionals striving to empower the residents at the academy toward success, saying they “consistently surpass expectation.” Although she enjoys spending time with her husband and son, she is also active in volunteerism, both personally and through the activism of her husband’s band. Some of the causes she has supported include donating to and raising money for animal shelters, The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center, Nicaragua Medical Mission, Norman Regional Hospital, Health for Friends, Race for the Cure and Feed the Children. When she’s not busy with her job or volunteering, she enjoys spending time in the local music scene, supporting both her husband’s band and musical ambitions as well as other local artists. “It’s nice to transition from ‘Dr. Murray Naugle’ to ‘Naugle’s wife,’” she says.

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Stacy Eads, 36

Oklahoma City CEO, Levant Technologies LLC As CEO of Levant Technologies LLC, Eads says she loves that her company “makes a positive impact on the economy and many Oklahoma families’ livelihoods by helping local business owners, nonprofits and entrepreneurs achieve their dream online.” She says connecting local entrepreneurs with the proper technology toolset helps them tell the world about how amazing Oklahoma is each and every day. Her proudest moment, however, comes when she knows she has been able to help her team. “I only exist to support them and their continued success, so when they acknowledge me as their mentor when introducing me to clients, my inner happy-self smiles so big I think I could burst with joy.” Eads says her personal anthem is “I am a brick paver,” and she provides inspirational Yellow Brick Road speeches to Girl Scouts at Girl Tech and counsels young women in science, technology, engineering and math career groups. She encourages everyone to become involved in the mentoring process in some way: “Become a mentor or seek out a mentor – one or the other holds the key to reaching your full potential,” she says.


The Tulsa Regional Chamber and Tulsa’s Young Professionals congratulate Allison Walden, Senior Vice President; Daniel Regan, 2016 TYPros Chair; and all the other TYPros volunteers on being selected to the 40 Under 40 Class of 2016.


Jenny Thai, 31

Courtney Carter, 38

Bixby Manager, Human Resources – Recruiting, Communications and Culture, Enovation Controls Carter manages corporate recruiting and events, internal communications and community involvement with Enovation Controls and says she loves helping people any way she can, whether its career counseling internally, hiring great people externally, helping someone with his or her resume or just connecting people with others. “I am a very happy, outgoing, energetic person with a passion for helping people,” she says. Carter supports many charaties, including Community Food Bank, Toys for Tots, Habitat for Humanity and Reading Partners, but says the one closest to her heart is Komen for the Cure. “My mom is a breast cancer survivor, so supporting Komen for the Cure and raising money for future research means a lot to me and my family,” she says.

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Tulsa Project Leader, Office of Corporate Responsibility, Nordam Thai has always enjoyed helping others, which makes her job at Nordam perfect for her. “I loved working for nonprofits, but knew eventually I’d like to be ‘corporate’ and still have a job where I could make a difference for causes I believe in,” she says. “So Nordam is a great fit.” She coordinates the company’s Tulsa Area Way Day of Caring volunteers, its United Way campaign and serves as volunteer for Tulsa Flight Night among other activities. Her personal cause is animal welfare, and she is a volunteer for the Oklahoma Alliance for Animals. “If I ever won a large sum of money, the first thing I would do is set up low-cost spay/neuter clinics across Oklahoma to take care of the overpopulation problem so all pets get the chance to be loved,” she says.

Mike McInelly, 33

Jenks CEO, Spring Dental AS CEO of Spring Dental, McInelly has grown the company from one practice to eight practices in the past 18 months by being committed to the company’s customers receiving the best care possible. “Luckily, I am surrounded by a fantastic team that is committed to this very cause and passionate about serving our wonderful patients, who we consider members of the Spring Dental family.” He also volunteers about 10 hours a week as a leader of youth at his church and coaches football and other youth sports for programs in Jenks. He and his wife regularly take their children on mission trips, both domestically and in Latin America, and says volunteerism has given him experiences that have completely changed his perspective on life. “It has converted me to a life of altruistic living and putting others first and making a difference in the community by focusing on helping individuals,” he says.


C O N G R A T U L A T I O N S

TODD SCHUSTER

Executive Director of Regional Outreach

on being named among Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40.

Saint Francis Health System | 918-494-2200 | saintfrancis.com

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UNDER

40

The NGP Family is proud to congratulate Staci Taruscio, President of Rebellion Energy on this recognition.

Talented. Tenacious. Leader.

Staci Taruscio

President & CEO Rebellion Energy

5221 N. O’CONNOr Blvd. 11th FlOOr IrvINg,texas 75039 (972) 432-1440

I rv I n g

H o u s to n

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Christian D. Clark, M.D., 39

Staci Taruscio, 34

Tulsa CEO, Rebellion Energy LLC As founder and CEO of Rebellion Energy, Taruscio manages a small, flexible staff. “On any given day I may both take out the trash and sign off on a multimillion dollar acquisition offer,” she says. While the small staff requires every person take on a variety of responsibilities, it also provides a strong sense of ownership. “Every single bit of it is ours,” Taruscio says. “There is incredible ownership at a company where a very core group of people has done everything from design the business cards to purchase high-value properties.” She supports causes that focus on young people, women’s issues and the arts. “In my opinion, we need to not just allow children to explore the places their imagination takes them, but also guide them in a way but advances those creative abilities,” she says. Her favorite place in Oklahoma is an area known to her family as “the hill,” a place that has been special for several generations. “I love knowing that there is a place where so many joyful moments live, and, long after I am gone, my daughters and my daughters’ daughters will be able to feel that same joy,” she says. “It is like The Lion King, except my ancestors live on the hill instead of in the stars.”

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Jenks Gastroenterologist, Adult Gastroenterology Associates Clark says he was raised to have a strong work ethic and sense of community. He and his wife moved to Tulsa after finishing their medical training to raise their two children in an environment that supports those core values. Clark says he loves the variety of his day and the combination of procedural medicine and the close interaction he has with patients during his clinic appointments. “Medicine has allowed me to exercise a deep sense of altruism and desire to help others, and I feel fortunate to have found this calling early in my life,” he says. “Additionally, I am blessed to have my parents and two brothers here in Tulsa with us. As a family, we can always be up for a few rounds of golf and a relaxing weekend at the lake.”

Johnathan Stephens, 31

Edmond Assistant Director, Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment, University of Central Oklahoma A UCO graduate himself, Stephens now oversees the daily admission process at the university. “Every day I have the privilege of hearing the hopes and dreams of new students,” he says. “When I can help transform an overwhelmed and doubtful applicant into a confident and empowered college student, I truly feel like I’m making a difference.” Stephens also holds a master’s degree in administrative leadership from the University of Oklahoma and says he has a passion for leadership development. He volunteers with several organizations, centering most of his efforts on hunger and dividing time between working with Edmond Mobile Meals, Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma and UCO’s Central Pantry. “Whether it’s delivering food to those less fortunate or empowering my mentees to discover their voice, I believe these small gestures have a huge and lasting impact on people’s lives,” he says.


Congratulations to John Stephens, 40 Under 40 Young Professionals Class of 2016!

Thank you for all the ways you help students Connect to Central each day! UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA TM

(405) 974-2000 · www.uco.edu uco.bronchos UCOBronchos

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Congratulations, CHRISTINA! 2016

Oklahoma City • Tulsa crowedunlevy.com

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Robyn Elliott Scribner, 36 Daniel Regan, 33

Tulsa Vice President and Director of Leasing, Kanbar Property Management An Oklahoma native and fourth-generation Tulsan, Regan helps manage property for Kanbar Property Management, downtown Tulsa’s largest commercial property owner. “The thing that makes me proudest about my job is the ability to help shape the look and feel of our urban core through continued development and partnership with our tenants, which are representative of some of the best and brightest business leaders in our city,” he says. Regan is serving as the 2016 chairman for Tulsa’s Young Professionals, is a founding board member of Tulsa’s Great Raft Race, is on the boards of Foundation for Tulsa Schools, the Downtown Coordinating Council, the Tulsa Regional Chamber and serves on the advisory board of FabLab Tulsa. He is also co-owner of Garden Deva Sculpture, his family’s metal fabrication art studio.

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Ada Secretary of Communications and Community Development, The Chickasaw Nation Elliott Scribner says she enjoys the variety and energy that comes with her job, which involves overseeing a multimillion dollar budget and nearly 100 employees. As a member of the Chickasaw Nation, she is proud she is able to help preserve its legacy. “We’re getting to really contribute to the history and the legacy of the Chickasaw people and the Chickasaw Nation,” she says. She’s on the boards of Creative Oklahoma, Oklahoma City YWCA, Leadership Oklahoma and the East Central University Alumni Association and is a member of the Public Relations Society of America and the Ada Arts Council. She enjoys spending her free time with her 2-year-old son. She also played the drums in high school and says she still occasionally pulls out her drum pads.

Todd Schuster, 32

Tulsa Executive Director, Regional Outreach, Saint Francis Health System Schuster is responsible for developing professional and community relationships for the purpose of increasing referrals to Saint Francis Health System. He considers the completion of the free standing emergency department in Glenpool as his largest achievement to date, and says, “It’s very gratifying to work for a Catholic-based local organization whose mission is to serve the community.” He serves on the board of Emergency Infant Services and supports Lab Rescue of OK and Young Life, but says, since becoming a father, most of his off the clock time is devoted to his wife and daughter. He enjoys traveling, and plans to travel even more once he finally retires. “I met wife during a study abroad program in France, and we haven’t stopped traveling since that experience.”


Congratulations, Travis Owens Cherokee Nation Businesses celebrates your being named one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 Under 40. Thank you for your work in matters of cultural preservation and tourism.

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Businesses 777 W. Cherokee St. l Catoosa, OK 74015 918.384.7474 l cherokeenationbusinesses.com

Š 2016, Cherokee Nation Businesses. All rights reserved.

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Jill Mayes, 39

Yvonne Davis, 39

Tulsa Human Resources Specialist, Luxa Enterprises Yvonne Davis says she loves the endless opportunities to excel at her position at Luxa. “I also love the fact that Luxa is very involved in the community,” she says. “We have a quarterly initiative to help support an agency within our local community as a team.” Off the clock, she is the founder and CEO of Hope Community Outreach Center of Sapulpa, a startup nonprofit organization aimed at empowering youth and strengthening families. She is involved with Junior Achievement and Reading partners and supports causes including child hunger, literacy first programs, empowering youth and initiatives to strengthen familes. “Even if I just help a few or one along this journey, I consider that a job well done,” she says. “I think when you come immersed in helping those less fortunate than yourself, you tend to count your blessings a little more frequently.”

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Norman Director of Research and Grants, Integris Health Mayes began her career as a clinic director providing play therapy for children, and her passion for psychology and love of children led her into pediatric research. She now works at Integris Health, where her preeminent responsibility is protecting human subjects. Mayes believes it is important to offer patients an opportunity for other treatment when standard of care has not been beneficial and the hard work is worth it when a patient has a positive outcome. “I love working in an environment where my focus is helping patients,” she says. “I have a passion for research, and I am grateful for the opportunity where my skills are supported by a wonderful organization that shares the same goals.” Mayes supports many causes, including the Villa Teresa Catholic School, American Cancer Society, Journey Church and the Humane Society.

Dmitry Volfson, 30

Broken Arrow Assurance Senior Manager, HoganTaylor Volfson spoke both Russian and Hebrew by the time he was 6 years old. Although he was born in St. Petersburg, Russia, his family moved to Israel by the time he was 5 years old because of political and economic turmoil in Russia. Five years later, his family moved to West Des Moines, Iowa. “My dad always said, ‘Go live the American dream … this is why you’re here,’” Volfson says. He has managed to live that dream as a project manager for HoganTaylor, where he takes pride in the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of clients and coworkers. “My passion is people, and I love getting the opportunity to meet with clients and individuals from all backgrounds, understanding their challenges and helping them overcome those challenges by determining the correct path forward,” he says. Volfson is currently board president for Tulsa CARES and also supports Junior Achievement and American Cancer Society.


CONGRATULATIONS

Red River

DMITRY VOLFSON We join Oklahoma Magazine in saluting Dmitry Volfson and all of the other young leaders recognized as this year’s “40 Under 40” honorees.

YOUTH ACADEMY Residential and day treatment

Congratulates

Sara Murray-Naugle, M.D.

For being selected as one of Oklahoma Magazine’s 40 under 40. And for your continued success leading your team in providing quality mental health care for Oklahoma’s youth.

Dmitry Volfson HoganTaylor Assurance Senior Manager

Red River Youth Academy

3400 Deskin Drive • Norman, OK 73069 (405) 701-8530 www.RedRiverYA.com

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Visit US At

TULSA

OKLAHOMA CITY FAYETTEVILLE hogantaylor.com

LITTLE ROCK

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Congratulations! CDR Daniel Molina, MD

okmag.com

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Bryan Hensley, 33 Cornell Wesley, 34

Oklahoma City Economic Development Representative covering the states of Oklahoma and Texas, U.S. Department of Commerce/Economic Development Administration Although not a native Oklahoman, Wesley has embraced the state and is working to help assist industrial and commercial growth in economically-distressed areas of the state. “I am mostly proud that the impact of the projects I get to work on usually results in someone either getting access to resources or access to employment,” he says. “I know what it is like to be unemployed and in need of an opportunity.” He has a bachelor’s degree from Morehouse College, a master’s of divinity from Interdenominational Theological Center and is working on his MBA at Mercer University. He has 13 years of experience in business lending, credit analysis, government relations, economic development and management. He supports causes such as financial literacy, health and wellness, entrepreneurship and legal aid, and enjoys spending time with his family when he’s not traveling for his job. “I have learned that personal achievements cannot compare to the joy of impacting someone’s life,” he says.

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Piedmont Superintendent, Manhattan Construction Hensley grew up in Piedmont and spent four years in the U.S. Marine Corps before beginning his first job in construction in Dallas. He says getting back to roots in Oklahoma was always a goal for him and his family, and, 11 years after his first job in construction, holds his current position with Manhattan Construction. “I love how I never work on the same project more than once,” he says. “Every project is unique and has its own set of challenges and opportunities to deliver a finished product that exceeds my customer’s expectation.” He enjoys spending time at the lake fishing with his children, and he supports Construction Derby for Rebuilding Together OKC.

Wendy McConnell, D.O., 34

Mustang Otolaryngologist with rhinology focus, Integris Canadian Valley McConnell was born in Oklahoma and graduated from the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. After graduation, she moved to St. Louis for five years for residency training and then to Boston for a rhinology fellowship, but eventually was able to take a job in her hometown and move back to Oklahoma. She sees patients ranging from babies needing ear tubes to adults with sinus and throat problems. “No two patients are ever the same, so it is always a challenge,” she says. She has been on three medical mission trips, including one to Nicaragua, one to Malawi and one to Uganda with Pros for Africa. She volunteers as much as she can and recently spoke at an Upward Bound Program of high school kids. She has also worked with the Starkey Hearing Foundation, and she says her volunteerism has helped make her who she is today. “It helps me be humble and not take things for granted,” she says.


acrobatang Every team has a utility player and Angela is ours. She’s been with us since the beginning, through every name and personnel change, doing what was needed: receptionist, accountant, human resources, media director, copywriter, digital marketer, researcher, strategist. Now she’s managing director and co-owner, and to remind us that her flexibility is otherworldly, she does hot yoga four times a week. Nobody represents the responsive, determined attitude of AcrobatAnt better than our own Angela Harless. Congratulations on this well-deserved recognition, Angela. 1336 East 15th Street Tulsa, OK 918-938-7901 AcrobatAnt.com

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Andrew Silvestri, 30

Oklahoma City Head of Public Policy and External Affairs, U.S. Central Region, Google Inc. Silvestri leads state and local government, public and community relations for Google across the central states, where he says he builds bridges for people, issues and products. “I love being part of a company whose mission is to impact billions of people’s lives for the better, today and for generations to come,” he says. “Every single day, we’re working to help solve some of the world’s greatest and most complex challenges.” His previous jobs include serving as deputy policy director for Gov. Mary Fallin and political action coordinator for Chesapeake Energy, but he has also had more unusual jobs like training parakeets, decorating Christmas trees and braiding hair for tourists on the beaches of Portugal. He supports raising awareness of the global water crisis and helping to increase access to clean water across the globe. He enjoys CrossFit and, if he weren’t working for Google, says he would “probably be walking dogs in Hawaii. That’s still the dream!”

Jas Athwal, 32 Michelle Prine, 38

Langley President, Grand Splash Marketing LLC, 360GrandLake. com and NativeKnot. com Prine specializes in digital marketing in the Grand Lake area of Oklahoma and throughout Indian Country. Her website 360GrandLake.com helps showcase Grand Lake area businesses, promotions and events, and OneKnot.com was launched as the original Native American directory for tribes, businesses and events throughout Indian Country. She says she loves “helping business be successful now and in the future,” and can’t imagine doing anything else. She is also a Rotarian and says she frequently volunteers consulting time with new entrepreneurs. “Giving back is an important part of building a foundation for our future, and it allows me to pay it forward in hopes the next person will do the same,” she says.

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Tulsa Chief Operating Officer, Praetoria Security Athwal was born in the United Kingdom and moved to Tulsa in 2010 when he was serving as senior vice president for a U.K. company and expanded the company into the U.S., selecting Tulsa to serve as the corporate head office over Dallas or Houston. The company was acquired by an Oklahoma consortium in 2013. “Security is such a critical and key component of our clients’ operations, and it is great to offer a superior service in an often stagnant arena and genuinely make a telling difference and contribution to our clients’ success stories,” he says. Athwal says he is proud to help create “meaningful, long-lasting and secure employment for U.S. veterans.” Outside of the office, he is the project manager for Focus Sammipur Village, a humanitarian project in his parents’ native India focused on poverty alleviation. He enjoys riding his mountain bike, boxing and walking with his German Shepherd. Athwal is also a dedicated soccer fan – besides playing, he also served on the advisory board for the Tulsa Roughnecks Soccer Team and says you can find him tweeting most Saturday mornings about his hometown soccer team, Leicester City.


Congratulations

to Manhattan’s Bryan Hensley on being named a 40 under 40 honoree by Oklahoma Magazine!

2016

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JUNE 2016

Congratulations, Yvonne Davis!

2016

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Physicians who are the best at what they do.

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Angela Harless, 36

Jenks Managing Director, AcrobatAnt Harless started working for the company that would become AcrobatAnt as a senior in high school, choosing to earn her bachelor’s degree in finance and her MBA locally so she could continue to work while attending college. Now, she’s one of the five owner/ partners in the firm, overseeing finances while also leading agency client relationships, and can’t imagine working anywhere except for an advertising agency. “I love spending days, weeks and months on a project and then seeing a final campaign or design hit the market and start to get results for our clients,” she says. “I’m proud of the work that our agency creates and the outcomes we achieve for our clients.” Harless has also had two articles published on Forbes online and supports Meals on Wheels, Women in Recovery and her local church. “To impact the world, I have to get out of my comfort zone and experience more joy, hope, opportunities, struggles and great people than I could ever know sitting at my desk,” she says.

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Dana Haynie, 34

Tulsa Assistant Vice President of Growth and Marketing, Cancer Treatment Centers of America As part of her job, Haynie and her team work to build awareness of Cancer Treatment Centers of America, highlighting what the center offers for patients. “The fact that I have the privilege of seeing the amazing impact we have on patients’ lives every single day is incomparable,” she says. “Knowing the difference we can make in someone’s life is extremely rewarding.” Haynie is also on the board of directors of the American Heart Association and is on the Tulsa Area United Way Women’s Leadership Council Steering Committee, recently accepting the role to co-chair their marketing committee. She volunteers at Light Lighthouse and has participated as a Junior Achievement classroom volunteer in the past. Through CTCA, she works regularly with organizations like Susan G. Komen, American Cancer Society, American Lung Association and many others. “Personally, I have seen the amazing results the efforts of volunteers make, and it drives me to continue to give back,” she says.


Holly Becker, 39

Tulsa Executive Director, Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa A native of Kansas, Becker moved to Tulsa to attend the University of Tulsa and has lived in the city ever since. As executive director of the Tulsa Arts and Humanities Council, she works to cultivate a more creative Tulsa through advocacy, education and innovative partnerships. “I love being in the Brady Arts District, surrounded by creative people and a rebirth of downtown,” she says. Off the clock, she enjoys spending time with her family exploring nature and working on creative projects. She volunteers often at her children’s school and also volunteers for the University of Tulsa Alumni Association. “When you volunteer, you get the opportunity to learn more about others,” she says. “It has made me a more aware and well-rounded person.”

Allison B. Walden, 35

Tulsa Senior Vice President of Resource Development, Tulsa Regional Chamber Walden says she has the “best fund raising job in town” with the Tulsa Regional Chamber, where her department raises 75 percent of the Chamber’s revenue annually. She is so passionate about her job that she says her favorite place in Oklahoma is a Tulsa Regional Chamber Board of Directors meeting. “Some of the most intelligent and influential men and women in one place volunteering their time to enhance our region is humbling and inspiring,” she says. Although Walden loves her job, she admits she would love to cut an album and tour with Beyoncé. “My ideal self sings in a band, has an asymmetrical haircut, purple highlights and a sleeve of tattoos,” she says.

Levi May, 37

Broken Arrow Director of Branding and Programming, NEWS102.3 and AM740 KRMG KRMG had a banner year last year, winning multiple awards for both the station and individuals, and May says the results were because of the great team at the station. “The culture Cox Media Group provides is unquestionably the best in the country,” he says. “Great teams perform at this kind of level; I have a great team.” In his position, May helped build that team – the team the audience hears on air as well as the behind-the-scenes team. He is also active in the community and joined the board of directors for the American Red Cross after partnering with the organization when Moore was hit by tornadoes in 2013. He also serves on the Cox Media Group Diversity and Inclusion Committee, Cox Media Group Mentoring Edge and says, through KRMG, he has a passion for Make-A-Wish Oklahoma and Habitat for Humanity Tulsa.

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Downtown

Living

Urban is chic. It’s the buzzword of city planning committees across the state. It wasn’t that long ago that Oklahomans were accustomed to following “urban” with “decay.” But Oklahoma City and Tulsa are adding “renewal” to the vocabularies of those city planners. The cities have proven it works. It has worked so well that urban is cropping up in some unlikely places, as well. By Paul Fairchild

OKLAHOMA CITY

Oklahoma City’s wildly successful MAPS program entered its third iteration in 2009. MAPS 3 will bring a new convention center, a downtown streetcar system, a new public park downtown and a host of other goodies. MAPS was the brainchild of Mayor Ron Norick, but the city’s current mayor, Mick Cornett, is a big fan as well. He doesn’t just talk about MAPS. He lives it. “We love living downtown,” Cornett says. “We’re able to walk to the movies, restaurants

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and events at the Bricktown Ballpark, Chesapeake Arena, Myriad Botanical Gardens, Oklahoma City Museum of Arts and the Civic Center. Soon we’ll be able to see live music at the Criterion or go whitewater kayaking at the Boathouse District.” He’s not the only one loving the downtown life. Nathan Fisher lives near downtown in the Deep Deuce neighborhood. For him, downtown’s new walkability was a critical factor in his decision to make Deep Deuce his home.

“I work downtown,” Fisher says. “I like being able to walk to work and walk to many of the places where I hang out. There are a lot of entertainment options, cultural activities, the park, the museums, the bars and the restaurants. Having all of that within walking distance, as well as my job, made everything pretty attractive to me.” Fisher recently took a part-time teaching position in Norman, but other than that, he doesn’t feel like he needs his car much. If it


PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

weren’t for the occasional commute to Norman, he says, his car would go unused for two to three weeks at a time. Most of what he needs and wants is within walking distance. For things a bit farther away, he prefers his bike. Fisher also values community and variety. His downtown neighborhood offers both and shows that the appeal of downtown isn’t limited to one kind of person. “In my neighborhood, there’s definitely a community feel,” Fisher says. “In our develop-

ment, there’s a wide variety of people, from young professionals to empty-nesters. One of the cool things about it is that it’s a really wide variety of people in different stages of life.” The incoming streetcars mean that Fisher might be using his bike less. His neighbors will appreciate them as well. A rough guesstimate suggests that about half of the people in his community work downtown. An essential ingredient for a successful downtown is culture. Where the arts go,

people will follow. It’s something Mayor Cornett loves to brag about when he gets the opportunity. “The growth of the arts in Oklahoma City has taken downtown living to a new level,” he says. “There are galleries, museums, music, theater, dance and an increasing amount of public art that really enhances the quality of life throughout the city. From the Skydance Bridge to sculptures to murals, public art is really making our city a great place to live.” APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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“It’s a pretty unique place,” says Kyle Johnston, marketing and promotions manager for Tulsa’s Downtown Coordinating Council. Downtown Tulsa residents enjoy a host of amenities, including easy access to the BOK Center, a premier event venue, and the OneOK Field, home of the Drillers baseball team. The only thing lacking is a supermarket, but Johnston says that’s about to change. “There’s not a whole lot in the immediate downtown section for groceries,” he says. “That’s something on the horizon. There are two units that were announced last week that have an opportunity for a marketplace. That’s

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what we want to hear.” Downtown Tulsa has undergone a transition over the last decade, starting primarily with the renovation of the Mayo Hotel. There’s a lot of shopping to be done downtown, and there’s more on the way. There are plenty of bars and restaurants. It’s also home to a handful of museums. Who wouldn’t want all that in their backyard? Downtown Tulsa is becoming a less expensive place to live, as proven by the large amount of millennials moving into the area. Depending on location and size, $600 to $700 per month can snag a decent apartment

in the area. “The market for downtown housing is the millennials, where you have these young professionals that want the urban lifestyle in the downtown with all the energy and activity,” says Joe Westervelt of Mapleview Associates. “About 50 percent of the market is those millennials. They’re filling up most of the apartments there and contributing to the vibrancy.” By 2017, the number of new apartments and condos in Tulsa’s downtown will number in the hundreds. Waiting lists will be the norm. On the high end, expect to pay about $1,800 for a 1,200-square-foot apartment.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

TULSA


PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

GUTHRIE

With a population of 11,000, Guthrie epitomizes small town America. Guthrie may seem like an unlikely place to find urban, but it’s there. Like many small towns, Guthrie is making an effort to revitalize its downtown area. Unlike many small towns, the effort is succeeding. The stately, old Victorian buildings that line the town’s main drag, Oklahoma Avenue, are being restored one by one. Many of them are now homes for restaurants, antique shops, fitness centers and bars. It may also be the most walkable town in Oklahoma. “You can bank downtown. We have a grocery store in downtown Guthrie. There are retail shops and restaurants. There are businesses and a post office. There are bars downtown. There’s just a good little mix,” says Gregory “Heady” Coleman, president of the Guthrie Chamber of Commerce. Cherie Gordon owns the building she lives in and the art gallery, Aunt Gertrude’s House, on the first floor. She moved from Oklahoma City to Guthrie in 1997 and has never regretted the decision. “You can walk everywhere,” she says. “I hardly ever take my car out of the garage. I walk to the post office, the grocery store, the vet and the pharmacy. There are just a lot of advantages to living downtown, and there’s a lot to do here if you choose to do it.” “You can’t find a downtown like this in a lot of places. It has a rich history. Some of the downtown buildings are amazing,” Coleman says. Downtown Guthrie is in demand. Rents range from $400 for smaller spaces to $1,500 for much larger apartments. There are roughly 60 apartments and condos in the downtown area, and keeping them filled isn’t hard. “It can be challenging to find a place to live in downtown Guthrie,” Coleman says. “People are looking to live here more and more. As time goes on, there’s going to be more opportunities for that, so we should be able to grow. But right now space is maxed out.” “Apartments stay rented pretty well,” realtor Sylvia Ochs says. “There’s rarely a vacancy. If somebody moves out, it’s rented pretty quickly to somebody else. There’s a lot of people that want to be downtown where the action is.” “I think there’s a certain culture that the downtown area has that’s very encouraging,” Guthrie Mayor Steve Gentling says. “It’s a sub-community of a larger community. Everybody kind of knows everybody, you might say, but especially those people that live downtown.” Those stately Victorian buildings qualify Guthrie’s downtown as a historical district, one of the largest in the United States. “It’s just a wonderful, small city,” Gentling says. “It’s got a lot of really good things going for it. The people who live downtown get excited when we have festivals or parades. They’re right there and they get caught up in it.” The cost of living is certainly cheaper. “Taxes are cheaper here than in a large urban area or even suburbia,” Gentling says. “You’ve got convenience and don’t have to get in your car for every single errand. There’s economic value to living in downtown Guthrie versus some of the other suburban areas around.” There are lots of commuters, Coleman says. The thirty-minute drive to downtown Oklahoma City is an easy one. The only con to living in downtown Guthrie, Gentling says, is a lack of green space, but he says the city is moving to address that. Currently, there’s a community garden within walking distance from downtown. Guthrie citizens want to see the renaissance keep rolling. They recently passed a sales tax to fund an even more Victorian look to the downtown. The tax will pay for projects like replacing light fixtures, creating more seating areas and laying down more cobblestone on the streets. “But we also want to be moving forward,” Gentling says. “We have to keep those two things in balance. I think we have a good vision to make it happen and create more enthusiasm and excitement about our downtown, as well as making it more livable. From my perspective, it’s a wonderful feeling to drive downtown and see all the lights that are on on the second floors. It says, ‘Here’s a city that’s not going to sleep.’ It’s alive. It’s vibrant. There are things going on.” APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Broken Arrow is another unlikely place to find urban, but the city aggressively started to revitalize its downtown a few years ago. Residents were sick and tired of the unused Main Street that typifies so many small, American towns. Its Rose District is a prizewinning project that brings an urban feel to a small town. “Over the past couple of years, the area’s become quite vibrant from morning until nine or ten at night. Later on the weekends,” says Wes Smithwick, President of the Broken Arrow Chamber of Commerce. “All the parking places on Main Street are full. It’s a very different environment than what it was just a few years ago.” Resident Ted Cundiff and his wife fell in love with the Rose District’s culture. “It’s a mix of new and old,” resident Ted Cundiff says. “There are a lot of longtime Broken Arrow residents that remember the town as it was a long time ago. There’s a lot of that same feel and culture of a vibrant downtown community again, but now you’ve got the interest of millennials and younger kids wanting to hang out at the restaurants and do some shopping. It’s really a mix of the old and new and keeping some of the same historical culture from the past of a

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vibrant downtown.” Like Guthrie’s downtown residents, Cundiff likes the walkability of the Rose District and the close proximity of home to everything he needs and wants. “We wanted a residence close to where I work on Main Street,” Cundiff says. “I’m one block away from work now. We can walk downtown, have a drink, have some dinner and do a little shopping. Everything’s within walking distance.” “It’s a new phenomenon for us because prior to the creation of the Rose District, we just had a dead Main Street,” Smithwick says. “Broken Arrow’s a community of 108,000 now. Our Main Street stopped growing 30 years ago when the town had 20,000 people in it. Main Street was dead.” “People are moving downtown because there’s just so much going on there as far as all the entertainment and art things that are starting down there,” Broken Arrow Mayor Craig Thurmond says. “It’s really got an urban feel to it. People are looking for that, but it’s actually part of a suburban, safe community.” Thurmond admits that the Rose District is still small, but has developed an urban, hip feel that he compares to Tulsa’s Brady

District and areas in other large cities. “It’s hard for me to describe the vibe but it does remind me of a lot of major cities that you go to, like a New York or Portland or Seattle. Cities that are vibrant and have a lot going on,” he says. Unlike those large cities, rents are still reasonable. And, like Guthrie, Broken Arrow will be adding more living space to the Rose District. Broken Arrow wants to see more people living where they shop. “We have empty-nesters. We have younger millennials wanting to be downtown. We have families living in the areas surrounding downtown,” Thurmond says. “I think downtown living is for everyone.” “What has happened is there’s been this transformation back to people wanting that opportunity to shop, to eat, to have fun and to live, in the downtown area. We’re actually, in many ways, going back to where were back in the 1950s, where people want to be downtown. They still want opportunities to shop at the bigger box stores, but they’re looking for that downtown experience,” says Michael Spurgeon, Broken Arrow’s city manager. Whether your taste runs “small town” or “big city”, you can find urban living all over the state. Even in some unlikely spots.

PHOTOS BY MARY BETH EDE.

BROKEN ARROW


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS ROOFER

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

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2. Can I use staples to install my roof? No. Shingle manufacturers recommend the use of roofing nails. 3. Does the clear plastic file have to be removed from the back of the shingle? No. Clear plastic film is applied for shipping purposes only. 4. Do I really need attic ventilation? Yes. Proper attic ventilation is vital to the performance of any roof system. 5. Can I install my shingles on a flat roof? No. 2:12 is the lowest slope on which most shingles may be applied.

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Legacy questions are tough and estate planning can be complex. Consider the following six basic steps: A will. Your will is a legal document that spells out your wishes about who will inherit specific assets after your DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC® death. Owned property. If you own property you intend to gift, check state laws to see how regulations may affect your estate. Beneficiary statements. Review your beneficiary designations on retirement plans, bank accounts and insurance policies. The beneficiaries on these accounts take precedence over those named in a will. Health care directive. Provides guidance on the extent of the medical treatment you wish to receive based on your condition. Power of attorney. Consider empowering an individual to make decisions on your behalf should you become incapable of doing so. Digital accounts. Make sure loved ones know how to find all required information, including passwords, to access your online accounts. Consult with your attorney and financial advisor for assistance in creating your estate plan.

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If you have questions on automobile insurance or other insurance questions, call a AAA agent near you.

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What’s the difference between BHRT and other hormone therapies? For starters, BHRT (bio-identical hormone replacement therapy) is customizable. In other words, it can be adjusted to fit your needs – unlike conventional HRT, which has a few standard dosage strengths. Unlike MALISSA SPACEK typical oral and transdermal forms of BHRT, which produce “roller coaster” hormone levels resulting in mood and energy fluctuations for the patient, Hormone Pellet Therapy is the only method of hormone therapy that provides sustained hormone levels throughout the day for up to 4 to 6 months without any “roller coaster” effect. Pellet implants, placed under the skin, consistently release small, physiologic doses of hormones providing optimal therapy. Most people experience increased energy levels and sexual drive, consistency in mood, relief from anxiety and depression, decreased body fat, increased mental clarity and many other immediate benefits from being pelleted with BHRT. For more information on how BHRT may be right for you, call us at (918) 872-9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

BUSINESS COACH

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, American motor vehicle travel was up 3.5 percent in 2015, reaching just more than 2.88 billion miles driven. This increase is attributed to affordable gas prices, and RUSS IDEN while we all enjoy the decrease in the price of gas at the pump, there are unintended consequences. More drivers on the road mean there are more accidents, which translates to an increased cost to insure your vehicles. Your first instinct may be to shop your insurance carrier or eliminate certain coverages. Whatever you do, don’t sacrifice your policy coverages to save money. Making those changes could have consequences that may take years to recover from if you’re ever involved in an accident.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

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PHYSICAL THERAPY

I took the leap and started my own business, but now I feel stuck. How do I grow my business? 1. Find and follow people who have what you want. When I was first starting out, I spent quite a bit of time observing the business AMANDA FRANCES models, marketing strategies and branding of those in my industry who were expanding their audience and their income quickly. 2. Eliminate unnecessary noise. Your parents, pastor, neighbor and uncle all mean well when they give you advice, but unless they currently own a successful business, do not talk to them about your business. 3. Hire a coach or mentor. When you hire a business coach, you are able to bypass common mistakes, glean from their successes, and grow your business more rapidly than you could have on your own.

Amanda Frances Business Coach for Women Entrepreneurs amandafrances.com amanda@amandafrances.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.

For several years I have always felt tightness and soreness in my right hamstring. I don’t remember hurting myself so what could be causing my problem? Based on your description, it seems we can rule out an actual hamstring injury. There are several other possible sources of your pain and they all involve referral of pain 1) A lumbar facet joint with restricted mobility can result in tightness in the hamstring. 2) Decreased neural mobility of certain lumbar nerve roots, or the sciatic nerve, may result in hamstring pain. 3) Trigger points in certain hip muscles may refer pain to various areas of the leg. 4) Spine arthritic changes can result in inflammation, which then may refer pain into the leg. This list is only a few possibilities. Consultation with a physical therapist to determine the cause of your pain would be beneficial. Techniques I often use for these problems include neural mobilization, dry needling, joint mobilization, and various stretching and strengthening exercises. TIM MINNICK, PT

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

MAY 2016 To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. HOSPICE CARE

ATTORNEY AT LAW My car was wrecked. The insurance company says it is totaled and they don’t have to pay to repair the vehicle, they only pay “fair market value”. How do I know whether it is totaled and what is “fair market value”? AVA HANCOCK

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Title 47 Section 1111 (2) & (3) of the Oklahoma Statutes sets forth the method to determine each. “Total Loss” means a loss (amount to repair it) which is equal to the fair market value of the vehicle immediately prior to the loss. “Fair Market Value” is the amount listed “in the current National Auto Dealers Association (NADA) guidebook or other similar guidebook or the actual cash value, whichever is greater. Therefore, the Blue Book is not the correct book to use, unless the value is greater than the NADA.

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PERSONAL TRAINER I’m happy with my weight; can I change my diet now? Yes, you can now start moving towards your maintenance phase, which will help you stay at your target weight. Start allowing yourself 100 more calories a day until you stop losing weight. For JOHN JACKSON example, if your caloric intake was 1,500 a day while you were in your slim-down phase, you should increase it to 1,600 a day for the next week. As long as your weight stays the same, continue with the same amount of calories. You will also need to stick with at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (jogging, zumba, spin) five days a week. Moreover, if you are fit enough to participate, do 30 minutes of vigorous exercise like basketball, tennis or BOOTCAMP offered at St. John’s Health Plaza. Ballistic exercise should not be done more than three times a week and rarely in back-to-back workouts.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

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My wife’s mother has cancer and is currently living with us. My wife is her main caregiver. I worry that she is doing too much and not taking care of herself yet, I can’t convince her to take a break or allow me to bring in some help. Any advice?

WE COVER ALL THE BASES

Caregiving is one of the toughest jobs out there. While it can be rewarding to care for a loved one – especially a parent – it can also take its toll on the caregiver. The advice I give caregivers is that old adage, “You must take care of yourself first in order to take care of someone else.” In addition to bringing in a home health aide, there are other professional services that can provide respite care once or twice a week so she can get errands done or get some much needed “me time”. At Grace Hospice, we provide free respite care for our hospice patients, support groups and information on caregiver stress.

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT I am one of those guys who is very comfortable wearing bold colors and patterns, but what is acceptable for the professional atmosphere? Please don’t be afraid to let out your personal style; this is one of the greatest components of dressing AUTUMN POHL successfully. I steer fashionably adventurous men away from the basic color box (blue and white) and open their eyes to pink, yellow, lavender, jade, etc. The key with colors like these is to choose one that complements skin-tone and goes with a softer shade so it doesn’t stand out. The subtler, the more respect is earned. Guys are looking at other men, sizing them up, and the last thing you want a business associate to think is that you are completely consumed with yourself. So keep it low key and focus in on one detail. Whether it’s the color or pattern, make sure that it fits your personality flawlessly. And if you ever hesitate or doubt your color/ pattern choice, mix it with something more classic and familiar so your extreme confidence is what is noticed only second to your impeccable personal style.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

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3/15/16 8:55 AM


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Introducing Chef Kent

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Tulsa’s science nerd and molecular gastronomical chef extraordinaire delights Tulsa diners.

F

eb. 14 can be a draggy and depressing day for those without special plans, but this year a select and happy group of Tulsans walked with a spring in their step. That’s because they had been treated, the night before, to a four-hour, ten-course dinner that, though wine was not provided, left them laughing and as bubbly as champagne. “I’m a firm regular,” one young diner says before the meal begins. Though he’s the sort of elegant hipster who would far prefer to dish out stinging, witty critiques, he has nothing but praise for Kent Monroe, the chef whose monthly dinners, semi-clandestine and spread by word of mouth, drew this crowd together. “I got tickets before I saw the menu. He’s a genius.” To cheers and applause, Chef Kent comes out. He looks about the same age as Beaver Cleaver’s older brother, and, as he describes the courses to the rapt attentive crowd, you can see the same boyish exuber-

ance. He’s a science nerd. A few amuse-bouches have been shared, including a “salad” whose entire flavor has been compressed into a greenish sorbet (yes, Kent is fascinated by molecular gastronomy), and now the diners can see, in the kitchen beyond, chefs strewing mounds of rare, expensive wild mushrooms into big soup bowls. There’s black trumpet, hedgehog mushrooms and even shavings of white truffles. They then put little mounds of powders beside the mushrooms. Kent made the powders from a stock of button, shiitake, portobello and porcini mushrooms. The bowls are brought before each diner, and a rich creamy broth is carefully poured on. Then you stir. The flavors are sharp, decadently rich, unforgettable. “Just as you wonder why it’s taking so long,” the hipster says, “you see that beautiful plate and you say, ‘Oh, yeah. That’s why!’” “At first I thought I’d serve straight mushroom soup,” Chef Kent says a few days later. “Then I got the idea of serving heaps of mush-

APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

rooms on top of a thick mushroom stock. Then I tried to make the mushroom stock thick and shiny like colored glass, but that didn’t work so I settled for making each stock into a powder.” He’s eating at Mandarin Taste, a small Chinese restaurant on south Sheridan Road whose dedication to providing rigorously authentic and carefully prepared dishes from all regions of China rivals Kent’s own. He tries a spoonful of spicy pig brains with tofu, and he loves it – “it’s like pork butter!” he exclaims – but he’s so wrapped up in his discussion of food concepts and theory that the food he’s eating takes second place. He once studied astrophysics at Rice University in Houston, and someone asks him how he feels about abandoning science. “Abandoning science? Never!” Kent exclaims with passion. “Cooking stands at the intersection of all sciences! How can you understand the structure of meat without biology and chemistry? How can you understand cooking without understanding thermodynamics, heat transfer, osmosis, equalization of pressures – and that’s all physics!” He goes on to provide a long description of how he tried to develop little flavor pearls that would float in liquid. “It set at 90 degrees, and it wouldn’t float, so I used foam from an aquarium pump, loaded it into a syringe, injected it into each sphere and put it into an ice bath,” he says. “Too much work! Now I’m hoping to buy a chamber vacuum sealer secondhand; maybe I can use that.” For Kent, planning an entree means solving a succession of science problems, and he loves it even more than eating the entree. Amazingly, Kent has no formal culinary training whatsoever except for a short stint at Bodean Market. “Except for my childhood,” Kent corrects. “In a way, I’m a product of World War II.” His mother is German, his father Japanese. Both his grandmothers remarried, and both of the new husbands were American soldiers. His parents met in California, fell in love and moved to Tulsa where Kent was raised in a house with a huge garden. “We grew up cooking,” Kent says, “and not typically American food either. We had steak and potatoes once a year. The rest of the time, it was tabouli, sukiyaki, things from all over.” Perhaps that’s why Kent is fascinated by every method of cooking. “I’m self-taught, 100 percent self-taught,” he says. “My long-term goal is to learn about every method of cooking and try it at least once.” You’ll find quite a few of them at the dinners. “Nothing you taste,” counsels one diner, “is what you expect.” You might find a nest of lurid green sea beans, a salty, smoky coastal delicacy, with a big, bright yellow duck egg yolk in the center, accented by a dollop of bubbly pomelo foam and a yellow scoop of chive gel. You’ve never tasted anything like it and suddenly it’s your favorite dish. Then out comes duck with two sauces, one a shiny white, smoked grapefruit, the other a smoky dark fenugreek. This is followed by steelhead trout swimming amidst two bubbling and flavorful foams, one blood orange and the other pine. A piece of crispy skin shaped like a sail completes the nautical image. Just before dessert there’s a straight steak and potatoes. “I wanted to serve the steak with cold chawanmushia [Japanese custard flavored with seaweed],” Kent says, “but I had to balance the preferences of my guests against my whims, so I gave them a straight meat course.” These courses are not easy to plate, and several chefs toil more or less nonstop during the four-hour meal. Joel Bein has volunteered to help. He’s an expert in smoking, and his barbecue truck Rub has deservedly garnered rave reviews and a loyal following. Then there’s Josh Vitt. He doesn’t look much older than Kent, but he’s been in the restaurant business for 22 years after graduating from Florida Culinary Institute. Though today he follows Kent’s lead, Vitt holds pop-up dinners of his own from time to time, and foodies know to reserve a place the moment they hear of them. Josh runs a catering company, and that’s where Kent works during the 28 days each month that the Un-Restaurant is closed. 92

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It’s also the location of the Un-Restaurant, but Kent told me that he will be moving these events to Kitchen 66. “It’s an incubator for food entrepreneurs,” Kent says. Founded, fostered and funded by the Lobeck-Taylor Family Foundation, Kitchen 66 gives would-be restaurateurs what they need to cross the bridge between pipe dreams and a real restaurant: access to a professional kitchen, help with licensing and assistance with planning and pricing. It’s located in the Sun Building, the tall, golden downtown tower built by Sunoco 60 years ago. But all that’s in the future as the Valentine’s dinner draws to a close. “That chef’s an up-and-comer!” gushes one satisfied customer. She works for oil companies and has tried every Michelin-starred restaurant located in a city with oil, so she knows. Pretty much everyone is gushing and happy by now. “This is a family reunion with family you’ve never met,” says the hipster. BRIAN SCHWARTZ

CHEF KENT USES HIS BACKGROUND IN SCIENCE TO CREATE NEW DISHES. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER


MAY 2016

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9:28 AM


Taste

A Local Place for Tulsa

Roka Bar and Asian Flavors is focused on Oklahoma.

C

ozy, comfortable and local. These three words formed the basis of the concept of Roka Bar and Asian Flavors, which recently opened at 1615 S. Utica Ave. in Tulsa. While the idea sounds simple, the care and dedication to the concept shows through the restaurant. Chad Stanger, operating partner for Roka, says almost a year passed between the forming of the idea for Roka and the restaurant’s opening on Feb. 4. The interior of the building was completely torn out and remodeled – the actual construction on the restaurant took four months. The restaurant features a variety of seating options, including high-backed booths with walls for privacy. The building is dividing into different areas, including two main dining rooms, a bar and two banquet rooms. Every aspect of the restaurant’s design was carefully thought out, including the music being played through 36 speakers divided into 10 different zones. The system allows for a high degree of volume control through the restaurant, Stanger says. “We wanted clear, crisp music that doesn’t affect conversation,” he says. The concept used for the design of the building helped inspire Damon Holdeman, executive chef for Roka, when creating the menu. “We wanted to do a menu that matched the building,” he says. “We wanted a menu that was a chef’s menu and had a lot of skill put into it. The menu features a large selection of Asian dishes pulled from

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every Asian culture, Stanger says. Holdeman talked to chefs who specialize in all the styles used to guarantee the authenticity of the menu. Staying with the idea of being a restaurant that focused on being local, many of the dishes are made with ingredients from Oklahoma farms and markets. The menu includes dishes like rice paper salmon, fire grilled duck breast and bulgogi beef. Everything in the dishes – including the hoisin citrus sauce used in the rice paper salmon and the sweet potato noodles in the

bulgogi beef – is made from scratch in the restaurant. “We spent a lot of time and effort on this menu,” Stanger says. “It was a long process.” They also spent time and effort on the restaurant’s bar area, named Sami’s Bar in honor of the large sculpture of a samurai that immediately draws a visitor’s attention when entering. The bar has a menu of lighter fare and features specialty craft cocktails created by the Roka staff, including a maple bourbon martini. “It’s what people are looking for right now,” Holdeman says. “Craft cocktails are on the rise, and people like a little more skill put into their drinks. The bar also features more than 40 wines and 24 types of beer, with 10 types of beer on tap. The same focus on using local ingredients in the menu was brought to the bar – bartenders make drinks using Prairie Wolf vodka, produced in Guthrie, and Maehs gin, produced in Moore, and eight of the beers served are Oklahoma beers. Even Sami, the samurai statue, is a local product created by Oklahoma chainsaw artist Clayton Coss. No matter how full the bar is, noise-reducing panels prevent the sound from traveling into the restaurant. Stanger says despite a lively crowd during the Super Bowl, it was possible to step into the restaurant and not hear any of the bar noise. Whether you’re looking for lunch, dinner or a drink or two for happy hour, the staff of Roka have worked hard to create an atmosphere that matches their concept: cozy, comfortably and local. JUSTIN MARTINO

What Roka Bar and Asian Flavors Where 1616 S Utica Ave., Tulsa When 11 a.m. to 11 p.m, Monday through Saturday; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sunday Web www.rokatulsa.com

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

L O C A L F L AV O R


Vaginal Health

Dr. Melanie R. Blackstock, M.D. 6465 South Yale Ave. Suite 310 918.236.3064 www.monalisatulsa.com

Look who’s talking about it.

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Dr. Blackstock and her staff cordially invite you to attend an open house on Tuesday, April 26th at 5:30 p.m. Please RSVP by calling our office at 918.236.3064. This is a great way to learn about the Mona Lisa Touch.

MonaLisa Touch is a trademark of DEKA M.E.L.A. Srl – Calenzano - Italy.

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A FRESH NEW START

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DANIEL WINN

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Entertainment

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

The Different Sides of P.S. Gordon’s Art Gordon’s two art shows in April feature very different subjects.

PHOTOS COURTESY P.S. GORDON.

H

olding two art shows at the same time might seem redundant, but for painter P.S. Gordon it was a necessity. While the two shows, which open April 1, both showcase Gordon’s familiar style, they feature very different subjects. Mrs. Lennox and the Gift of Falling Snow, held at Living Arts in Tulsa, features portraits of male performance artists dressed in women’s clothing and a series of paintings Gordon painted shortly after being diagnosed as HIV positive. Recent Works, at the Hardesty Arts Center in Tulsa, will showcase paintings with Gordon’s more traditional subjects. Mrs. Lennox and the Falling Snow would not have been possible without Gordon’s recent public disclosure of being HIV positive because of how closely the subjects are linked to his experience with the disease, he says. Gordon painted the first Mrs. Lennox painting 20 years ago, though some of the paintings are more recent.. “When I met Mrs. Lennox, we were at a fundraiser [for people with AIDS],” he says. We had friends who were dying. Bankers and realtors and artists, musicians … they were all dying. So we were doing all we could as a group to try to make as much money as we could for those who didn’t have anything. We didn’t know what was going on. We just had no idea, except that part of our friends were dying, and they were young.”

The Gift of Falling Snow series was painted after he was diagnosed as HIV positive. “I couldn’t talk about these paintings without disclosing,” he says. “I don’t know how to talk about them without being able to discuss the force behind them, and that was a really strong, powerful voice in my head that kept screaming at me: ‘You’re going to die. How are you going to deal with this?’” He ended up relating his diagnosis to the idea of falling snow, saying he knew the snow was coming, but not when it was coming, how bad it was going to be or what effect it would have on him. APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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JUSTIN MARTINO

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

ARCHIVES

Bringing

it All to Tulsa Tulsa will be the permanent home of The Bob Dylan Archive.

M

ore than 50 years after Bob Dylan moved to New York in hopes of meeting and learning from Oklahoma native Woody Guthrie, a new connection is being formed between two historic musicians. The George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa have acquired The Bob Dylan Archive, which will be permanently housed in Tulsa and cared for by TU’s Helmerich Center for American Research, which also houses the Gilcrease Library and Archive. The announcement was made last month by George Kaiser Family Foundation Executive Director Ken Levit and TU President Steadman Upham. “I think it’s a really exciting opportunity for Tulsa,” Levit says. “I think Tulsa has a great music history and a great current music scene.” The George Kaiser Family Foundation previously purchased the Woody Guthrie Col-

lection in 2011 and established the Woody Guthrie Center to display the collection in 2013. Levit says Dylan’s representatives were familiar with what the foundation had done with the Woody Guthrie Collection. Conversations about The Bob Dylan Archive had been ongoing for about a year before it was acquired. “We just got to know each other over the course of the year,” he says. “They spent some time in Tulsa and liked the community. I think they were very impressed by our partners, by the University of Tulsa and by the Gilcrease connection.” The collection is made of more than 6,000 items from the entirety of Dylan’s career. It includes items such as notebooks containing handwritten lyrics, master tapes of Dylan’s entire music catalog, hundreds of hours of film and video materials and the leather jacket he wore onstage at his historic 1965 Newport Folk Festival performance when he played with a band and electric instruments. Although some items from the collection have already been moved to Tulsa, where they are being digitized and preserved by a digital curation team, physically acquiring the complete archive is expected to take around two years. Levit says the foundation hopes to open parts of the archive to scholars in 2016 and create a public exhibit within 18 months. While the collection will be important for Dylan scholars and researchers, the collection should also attract the attention of tourists who are Dylan fans, Levit says. The city already receives visitors for the Woody Guthrie Collection, and he considers that to be “the tip of the iceberg” for future visitors. “There’s going to be a real treasure trove for scholars, but also for music fans who will come in from all over,” he says. The foundation is continuing to search for archive materials for other musicians, he adds. The Woody Guthrie Center is also home to the personal documents of Phil Ochs, a topical songwriter who was part of the 1960s U.S. folk music scene. “We’re looking at collecting writers who are important in American culture, have an interest in social change and have made an impact on American society,” Levit says. “There’s an ongoing interest from our foundation to continue to bring that to Tulsa.” PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE BOB DYLAN ARCHIVE.

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The idea of the snow being a gift is related to the clarity that can come with being diagnosed as HIV positive, he says. “Never did anything in my life confuse me as greatly as did this and in the same time clarified that which was important,” he says. “In the HIV community, it’s often referred to as the gift, because all of us who have it are aware of the potential of good and bad. It has taught me to really be appreciative of what this very moment is bringing.” The show is an opportunity for Gordon to see not only some friends – three of the performance artists who served as models will be attending opening night – but also some of the paintings themselves. The Gift of Falling Snow paintings have never been publicly displayed, and, except for one that he gave to a close friend, have been wrapped in plastic in Gordon’s basement. The Mrs. Lennox paintings are owned by various people, although Gordon does still have a few of them. “It doesn’t happen very often,” he says. “I make a painting, and it leaves, and I sometimes see them and oftentimes never see them again, never know where they are, where they hang – let alone bring them back together. It’s almost like I’ve never seen them, other than the ones I personally own.” With the display of Mrs. Lennox and the Gift of Falling Snow, though, Gordon thought it was important to hold a second show. While Recent Works only features paintings created in the past few years, Gordon, who paints 12 to 14 hours each day, will have 10 different works in the exhibit. The paintings are more traditional subjects for people familiar with Gordon’s art. “I didn’t want everybody to think I’d given up my love of painting flowers and still lives and interiors,” he says. The two shows also mark the 50th anniversary of Gordon’s first art show, held in a 900-square-feet office building in Claremore when he was 12 years old. “50 years ago, I sold my first painting,” he says. “And from that point on, I knew exactly what I was supposed to do.”


AT T H E M U S E U M

CLOCKWISE: ROBERT HENRI (AMERICAN, 1865–1929). TESUQUE BUCK, CA. 1916. CHARLES WILLSON PEALE (AMERICAN, 1741–1827). GEORGE WASHINGTON, AFTER 1779. ACEE BLUE EAGLE (AMERICAN, 1907–1959). BUFFALO MEDICINE MAN, 1939.

A New Context for a Collection The latest exhibit at the OKCMOA focuses on acquisitions.

“Our City, Our Collection: Building the Museum’s Lasting Collection” is more than a chance to see the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s most famous exhibits. The exhibit, which tells the story of the museum’s history as a series of gifts, bequests and acquisitions, also gives visitors a chance to see pieces that aren’t displayed as often. “When I was first conceptualizing the exhibition, part of what I had in mind was getting out works of art that

are important in our collection we don’t normally get out,” says Michael Anderson, curator for the exhibition. Those pieces range from a portfolio of pop artists Anderson says is difficult to display because of how the museum’s collection is laid out to a small collection of Native American art, including work by Acee Blue Eagle. Anderson says the museum does not collect Native American art because the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum is also in Oklahoma City, APRIL 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment but the OKCMOA has acquired some pieces over time. One of the pieces, a sculpture by Philip Pavia, has never been displayed in the museum before, and Anderson says even he was surprised at the presence the piece has in the museum. “Seeing it in person, it’s a really striking piece,” he says. “It’s a modernist sculpture, and it’s something I didn’t even really know we had, let alone that it would be as striking in the exhibition as it is.” Anderson says 90 pieces in the exhibition also includes the OKCMOA’s most popular works of art people normally associate with the museum, including a portrait of George Washington by Charles Wilson Peale. The combination of the well-known art with the less-exhibited pieces, along with the theme of the exhibition, helps visitors see the art in a new light, Anderson says. “The exhibition reveals the personalities of the collectors and the aesthetics of the people who are in the collection,” he says. “It really puts them in a different context, and I think that’s one of the exciting things about the collection.” Although the exhibition features a fair number of pieces of art for the size of the space, the open-floor plan allows for people to see contrasts between the different art styles being collected at the same time. Anderson says that allows visitors to get a 100

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

perspective on “different attitudes toward art – what art was, what art could be” at the time the collections were acquired. “Really, this is telling the What history of our “Our City, Our Collection” at the museum through Oklahoma City Museum of Art the major gifts Where and big collec415 Couch Drive, Oklahoma City tors that helped When build it,” Ander10 a.m. to 5 p.m, Tuesday-Saturson says. day; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday; The exhibition noon to 5 p.m. Sunday; through starts with the Aug. 28 Works Projects Web Administration’s www.okcmoa.com donation of 28 works of art to Oklahoma City in 1942, three years before the museum transitioned from a federallyfunded gallery to a private institution in 1945. Since then, other notable acquisitions have included the purchase of 158 works of art when the Washington Gallery of Modern art in Washington, D.C. closed in 1968 and the purchase of “Chihuly: An Inaugural exhibition,” a collection of Chihuly glass that was first presented as a temporary exhibit when the museum opened its new building in downtown Oklahoma City in 2002. The exhibition runs through Aug. 28. JUSTIN MARTINO

CLOCKWISE: OSCAR BROUSSE JACOBSON (AMERICAN, BORN SWEDEN, 1882–1966). LIGHT SOIL, 1949. DON EDDY (AMERICAN, B. 1944). PRIVATE PARKING V, 1971. FRITZ SCHOLDER (AMERICAN, 1937–2005). LAUGHING INDIAN, CA. 1976. GUSTAVE COURBET (FRENCH, 1819–1877). GORGE IN A FOREST (THE BLACK WELL), CA. 1865.


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April’s Best Bets in Cinema

E

ach month Oklahoma Magazine highlights exciting Oklahoma film events and gives some guidance on films coming out on home video and those currently playing in theaters. April looks to be a good one for Oklahoma cinephiles, especially if you know where to look.

About Town

This month marks the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, and several Oklahoma film venues are commemorating his passing by featuring special screenings of Shakespeare-related films. If you live in the Tulsa area, be sure to check out Circle Cinema’s series of filmed stage adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays. All these films come courtesy of the BBC, so the craftsmanship and acting are top notch. Every Wednesday in April (and also April 25, a Monday) Circle Cinema will show a different play – of special note are As You Like It with Vanessa Redgrave and King Lear with Ian Holm as the doomed monarch. Oklahoma City film lovers have the chance to catch one of the most bizarre, electrifying Shakespeare adaptations ever put on film, Orson Welles’ Chimes at Midnight, playing April 15-17 at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. Shakespeare finds his match in Welles’ crammed adaptation of the plays with Falstaff’s character, as Shakespeare’s classic rogue gets brought to life by Welles’ virtuoso performance.

AT HOME

The biggest DVD/BluRay release of the month is Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Presumably, though, you have already seen it in theaters, where it’s best experienced, so allow us to recommend two smaller films that came out on home video in mid-March. Brooklyn and Carol offer differing, though complementary, visions of New York City in the 1950s. Though Brooklyn presents a more positive spin on the girl-comingof-age story than does Carol, both offer tender, generous assessments of finding oneself in the midst of an isolating location. It helps that both achieve a simple grandeur through precise camerawork and set design.

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S I LV E R S C R E E N

ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | APRIL 2016

PHOTO COURTESY OF DISNEY.

IN THEATERS

Although Pixar has helped raise the quality of children’s movies, it’s still rare to see one as earnest and sincerely optimistic as Disney’s new animated film Zootopia. An extended exploration of racial prejudice and its effects on social harmony, the film takes place in a future where all animals, predator and prey alike, live in peace in the metropolis of Zootopia. When predators begin to lose control and turn savage, it’s up to a rookie rabbit cop and a con man fox to crack the mystery of what threatens Zootopia’s harmony. The film has a few really great gags in it, but goes light on jokes in favor of its social message. Putting it that way makes it sound like a bit of a chore, but it absolutely is not, both because it delivers that message with subtlety and hope and because the world it builds bristles with energy. It’s a great bet for children and adults alike.


IN OKC BALLET PRESENTS PETER PAN

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Everyone world-over has grown up with the story of Peter Pan’s adventures in Neverland – a classic tale that been presented in a variety of formats including books, films, animation and musical theatre through the years. In April, The OKC Ballet brings the story of Peter Pan to Oklahoma audiences in the elegant form of ballet. Joined by the OKC Philharmonic, enjoy the timeless tale of Peter, Wendy, The Lost Boys and Captain Hook presented in a way you’ve never seen before. Experience beautifully choreographed dance complete with onstage flight by Paul Vasterling, who reinterprets the beloved tale through his own special lens of dance. This is the perfect show for children and big kids of all ages. Tickets for the April 15-17 22018 Salt Yoga.indd performances are available at okcballet.com.

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Do you have a Barry Manilow show on your bucket list? If so, this may be your last chance! On Thursday, April 14 Barry Manilow brings his ONE LAST TIME! tour to Chesapeake Energy Arena for a one-show-only performance in OKC. Fall in love all over again and join the Grammy, Tony and Emmy award winner as he performs his most cherished hits, including “Can’t Smile Without You,” “Could It Be Magic,” and “Mandy.” Tickets for the event range from $17 $170 and are available at ticketmaster.com or manilow. com.

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Comedian, actress, writer and director Amy Schumer has steadily been gaining fans over the last few years with her no-holds-barred approach to comedy that treads the line between charming and debaucherous. Recently, Schumer hit it big with the Judd Apatow romantic comedy Trainwreck, starring Tulsa’s own Bill Hader, which received positive reviews from critics and moviegoers alike. Since the film’s release, the comedian has continued her climb to the top while managing to hold on to her stand-up comedy roots. In April, Amy Schumer will make her Oklahoma debut with two performances in Green Country. On April 16, Schumer brings her hilarious new show to Tulsa’s BOK Center. With its nearly 20,000 seat capacity, this one-night-only performance will surely be welcome to comedy fans, who rarely are treated to stand-up shows at this scale in Oklahoma. If you can’t make Tulsa’s Saturday performance, the comedian will also be performing on Friday, April 15 at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City. For additional information and tickets, visit amyschumer.com.

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CLOSING THOUGHTS

with Josh Fadem

…moving to Los Angeles.

I moved away from here in 2000, and I was 20. The only thing I was doing around then was hanging at the Central Library and renting videos from a fellow named David Nofire, who programs the midnight movies at the Circle Cinema. So I spent a lot of time walking around the Central Library and checking out video selections. I had a friend or two in Los Angeles, and I had a large interest in movies and maybe wasn’t ready to admit I had a large interest in comedy. Because, you know, when you’re 20 also you’re like, “I don’t want anyone to know what I really want to do.”

…getting into entertainment. I started doing a lot of comedy theater, improv and stuff, then I eventually found my way into

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stand up, and then I found my way into more acting. And then the business kept moving along, and there were different comedy booms, and Upright Citizens Brigade came into town and I found myself there on day one and part of a scene.

…his preference toward different types of comedy.

I like acting, but I also like doing my own stuff. I like sketch comedy a lot and stand up a lot. I don’t know, it’s all kind of the same thing. It’s using different muscles but working toward the same goal.

…staying creative.

You got to look at it like it’s a workout. I think, other people might have a different answer, in order to maintain your sanity, you have to find a way to do it even when someone’s not asking you to do it. If you are an actor, and you’re like, “No one wants me to act,” you got to find a thing to act in, whether that’s writing your own thing to act in or coming up with a character to act or bugging people, saying, “I’d love to be in your thing, I’d love to work with you, I love what you make.” Some days you don’t have as much motivation, and then the next day you get it back. You have to really want to do it. I got all these little mantras that say, “Keep going, keep going, don’t stop, keep making the stuff.”

…social media.

I’m trying to get off Facebook. I hate that place. I hate the stuff on my feed, everyone fighting about politics. I don’t want to hear about that. Everyone posting about their dead relative or animal. It’s sad. It’s a bummer. And you get hooked on it. You say, “There’s got to be something else underneath here.” Isn’t it awful? Get me off of there. I got to get out of there, but I’m stuck.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

T

ulsa native Josh Fadem has stayed busy in Los Angeles doing a variety of stand up, sketch comedy, video shorts and movies. He has been a regular performer with the Upright Citizens Brigade since the Los Angeles theater opened in 2005 and has appeared at the Blue Whale Comedy Festival in Tulsa for the past two years. He has also written for Adult Swim, is a regular contributor to Funny or Die and has appeared in television shows including 30 Rock, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and Better Call Saul. He was recently in Tulsa for a showing of his movie Freaks of Nature at Circle Cinema, and Oklahoma Magazine sat down with him at Chimera Café in downtown Tulsa to get his thoughts on…


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