Page 1

OCTOBER 2016

How Technology is Changing

Medical care Discovering the

State’s Panhandle

10GHOST TOWNS

Plus

Kitchen and Baths


Patient-Centered Patient-Centered Cancer Cancer Care Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home. home.

800 NE 10th Street 800 NECity, 10th OK Street Oklahoma 73104 Oklahoma City, 271-1112 OK 73104 Phone (405)

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top three cancer The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top three cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-1112 Fax (405) 271-5797 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


Features October

54 A Healthy Future

2016 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XX, No. 10

Hospitals and doctors in Oklahoma are using the newest technology to improve their patients’ lives. From treating cancer to losing weight, find out how technology can help you stay healthy.

74 Gone but Not Forgoen

Oklahoma’s rich history lives on in the skeletons of its ghost towns. Whether consigned to the dust or in the slow process of decay, the tales of Oklahoma’s abandoned communities continue to resonate.

66

Style and Substance

Oklahoma Magazine takes a look at some of the state’s most beautiful, contemporary and unique kitchens and baths that have been transformed from simply functional spaces to luxurious places to relax.

WANT SOME MORE? OCTOBER 2016

October 2016

78 Geing a Grip on the Panhandle

Oklahoma is instantly recognizable thanks to the Panhandle, but this part of the state is often overlooked. However, the people, landscapes and architecture of this area are worth a second look.

2

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition. ON THE COVER: How Technology is Changing

Medical care Discovering the

State’s Panhandle

10GHOST TOWNS

Plus

Kitchen and Baths

DOCTORS AND HOSPITALS IN THE STATE ARE USING THE NEWEST TECHNOLOGY TO KEEP THEIR PATIENTS HEALTHY.

MORE PHOTOS

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes even more great Oklahoma events.


Advanced digital mammography is the most accurate and precise way to catch breast cancer at its earliest stages. And early detection can reduce mortality rates up to 40%. That’s why the physicians and

radiologists at St. John Breast Center are committed to making it as convenient as possible with same-day appointments and extended hours – so you can get screened and get on with your life. stjohnwomenscenter.com

Call 918-856-5789 to schedule a mammogram today.

E A R LY

C A N S AV E Y O U R E X T E N D E D H O U R S C A N S A V E T H E D A Y.

LIFE.


Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

11 The State 14 16 18 21 28 29 30 32

For many, costume play goes far beyond the fun of dress-up and into the realms of art, business and service.

History Culture People Insider Nature Traditions Sports Makers

35 Life & Style 36 40 44 48 50 52

A new trend blends both practicality and individuality for an irresistible winter staple: the warm and fuzzy statement coat.

36

11

83

Style Interiors Destinations FYI Health Scene

83 Taste 84 86 87 87

Downtown OKC’s latest breakfast venue, Sunnyside Diner, offers traditional fare with plenty of flair.

Local Flavor Chef Chat Random Flavors In Season

89 Where & When

90 94

Celebrating German heritage at Oktoberfest can translate into several different activities – busting out the chicken dance, donning your best lederhosen, downing some strudel or dancing atop a table to German tunes.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

96 Closing Thoughts

4

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

89


FIGHT THE FLU. Get vaccinated.

No appointment necessary. Stay healthy this season by getting a flu shot. Visit a Warren Clinic community flu vaccination location at one of the dates and times listed below or stop by your local Warren Clinic primary care office during regular business hours—no appointment necessary. Flu shots are $30, but most insurance plans cover the cost. High-dose vaccinations for people ages 65 and over are available for an additional cost at select locations. Children’s vaccinations are only available at Warren Clinic pediatric physician office locations.

For more information, please call 918-488-6688 or visit saintfrancis.com. Warren Clinic Tower

6600 South Yale, 1st floor October 3 – 7 • 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. October 10 – 14 • 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. October 17 – 21 • 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Warren Clinic Springer Bldg. 6160 South Yale Avenue October 5 • 8 a.m. – noon

Health Zone at Saint Francis

5353 East 68th Street October 3 – 8 • 8 a.m. – noon October 10 – 15 • 8 a.m. – noon October 17 – 18 • 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. October 22 • 8 a.m. – noon

Saint Francis Hospital South 10501 East 91st Street South October 4 • 8 a.m. – noon October 10 • 8 a.m. – noon October 22 • 8 a.m. – noon

Saint Francis Hospital South Bishops Building 10507 East 91st Street South October 11 • 8 a.m. – noon October 28 • 8 a.m. – noon October 31 • 8 a.m. – noon

Glenpool Conference Center 12205 South Yukon Avenue October 15 • 8 a.m. – noon


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™ OKLAHOMA

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K . SCHUMAN

Luxury Hair Treatments Advanced Skin Care Massage Airbrush Tan Laser Therapy Advanced Injectables Micro-needling Weight Loss

MANAGING EDITOR JUSTIN MARTINO

SENIOR EDITOR BRIAN WILSON

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT MARY WILLA ALLEN

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN

GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN

GRAPHIC DESIGNER GARRET T GREEN

Waxing Studio Body Waxing for Men and Women Expert Brow Care

DIGITAL EDITOR JAMES AVERY

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/OFFICE ASSISTANT JANELLE AZEVEDO

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOT T MILLER, DAN MORGAN, DAVID COBB, MARC RAINS, SCOT T JOHNSON

CONTACT US

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES:

ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM

EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM

3410 S Peoria • Center 1 www.jaraherronsalon.com • 918-742-3223 22011 Jara Herron.indd 1

9168 S Yale Ave, Ste 150 Tulsa, Oklahoma 918-982-2362 www.lovewaxstudio.com 8/11/16 8:34 AM

Your Day Made Perfect Let Oklahoma Magazine help you plan your special day! The Oklahoma Wedding Show will return Saturday, January 14.

The Oklahoma Wedding Show and issue are returning January 2017. Booth spaces are now available.

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM

ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2016 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

440 0

2016

UNDER

TM

918 ™

MAGAZINE

IN

OKC

IN

TULSA

Member

For more information, call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

Wedding.indd 1

6

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

5/18/16 2:56 PM


ARE YOU A CANDIDATE?

Do you occasionally dribble or leak when you sneeze, cough or exercise? Do you feel dry during intercourse? Do you have trouble reaching orgasm? Do you feel your vaginal health has changed after childbirth or menopause? If you answered yes to any of these questions, call today for your free consult!

918-392-7900


LET TER FROM THE EDITOR One of the best parts of working at Oklahoma Magazine is the many new things I learn each month. Let me give you an example: Did you know Oklahoma has a memorial for a town that was bombed by airplanes during World War II? I didn’t, and while I won’t spoil the story behind it, you can find that – and many other stories about overlooked Oklahoma towns – as we look into the people, education and history of the Panhandle (pg. 78). If you’re already a Panhandle expert and are looking for other places in the state to explore, check out our fascinating feature on Oklahoma ghost towns (pg. 74). I’ve passed within a few miles of several of these locations without knowing the history, and it’s possible you have too. While I can’t recommend exploring a building that is crumbling into disrepair, it is possible to safely visit the remains of some of the places we discuss. We also give you the history of the towns – and why they’re no longer towns. And since we at Oklahoma Magazine are all about health, we look at some advancements in medical technology this issue (pg. 54). Cutting-edge medical treatments such as robotic surgery and immunotherapy treatment for cancer are all available right here in the state, so make sure to take a look. After all, learning about your health options could save your life. As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com. Sincerely,

Justin Martino Justin Martino Managing Editor

What’s HOT At

OKMAG.COM

S TAY CONNECTED

Oklahoma

Socialites RON HOWARD

Square 1 Theatrics is a Tulsa-based production company helmed by Tony Award winning producers Jay Krottinger and Ryan Tanner. Waitress, their latest Broadway production, received critical praise after opening in April 2016 and went on to receive Tony Award nominations for Best Musical, Best Original Score, Best Actress and Best Actor. Oklahoma Magazine visits with Jay and Ryan to discuss their love of theatre and past productions, as well as to give readers an exclusive preview of their next exciting project on the stage. Watch the web-exclusive interview with Square 1 Theatrics today at okmag.com.

8

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

FEATUREFLASH PHOTO AGENCY / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

GOING BACK TO SQUARE ONE

@RealRonHoward @RealRonHoward 1.3m @ReaLRonHoward 614k @ReaLRonHoward 79k Ron Howard moved from Duncan, Oklahoma to Hollywood at a young age, landing his first major role in the 1960s TV series The Andy Griffith Show. He later continued his career on the beloved Happy Days. Howard then shifted to directing and received an Academy Award for his work in A Beautiful Mind. The Oklahoma native continues working in film and television today. On social media, fans get a behindthe-scenes look at his process with regular updates on Facebook and Twitter.

OK


GlobalHealth is Changing Health Insurance as You Know It We make it simple, easy and helpful. Our members feel confident knowing our health plan is protecting their family and their wallet with real savings, quality coverage and fast, friendly service.

GlobalHealth.com


Our focus is expert cancer care. Every stage. Every day.

Bradley Mons, DO Otolaryngologist & Head, Neck and Microvascular Reconstructive Surgeon

At Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA), treating cancer isn’t one thing we do—it’s the only thing we do. With state-of-the-art technologies and precision cancer treatment, our experts diagnose patients and develop a thorough treatment plan. A plan that not only attacks the cancer, but also offers evidence-based therapies to help reduce side effects. If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, or are already undergoing treatment, and are unsure about your options, talk to the experts at CTCA® in Tulsa. Our team can recommend a treatment plan customized to fight your specific cancer and help you get back to living your life.

cancercenter.com/experts • 888.568.1571 10Rising OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016 ©2016 Tide

Now A Network Provider For


State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Cosplay Transcendence PHOTO BY GREG SHIPMAN PHOTOGRAPHY

For many, costume play goes far beyond the fun of dress-up and into the realms of art, business and service.

W

hen you were a child, you may have dressed up and imagined that you were a princess, superhero, fairy, warrior or your favorite cartoon character. Sometimes it was for Halloween, other times it was fun with friends, or merely because you wanted to be that character. The idea of being something you aren’t in everyday life – like a specific crime-fighting icon – was exciting. But for some, that enjoyment didn’t end with childhood.

While costume play, commonly known as cosplay, is usually inspired by those feelings that some had as children, or a love of a particular character or fandom, it is more than just dressing up. For Heathery Hebert and many others, cosplay is a way to be creative and cultivate a sense of community. “The main reason I cosplay is for the creative outlet,” says Hebert, a project coordinator in Tulsa who uses the cosplay name of Hikaruhime. “Sitting in front of my sewing machine and zoning out is a form of stress relief for me. I also love the community;

meeting new people and getting to discuss aspects of costuming with them and seeing all of the friends I’ve made over the years is a bonus.” Hikaruhime’s earliest brush with cosplay came in 2005, when she prepared to attend her first convention, Anime Weekend Atlanta. She went as Sailor Star Healer from Sailor Moon, a series of Japanese comics aimed at teenage and young adult readers. “I’m a type-A person, so I research things very thoroughly,” she says. “While researching what [the Atlanta convention] was like OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State

and what people did, I saw several photos of people in costumes and decided I definitely had to do it too.” The amount of time Hikaruhime puts into creating a costume depends upon what character she chooses, its purpose and where she plans on wearing it. She might spend anywhere from one to five hours making a simple costume and several more on an intricate one. “If I am making a costume to compete in or wear at a big convention on a highly visible day (Saturday),” she says, “I might select a very complicated costume, and it would not be unusual for me to spend fifty to a hundred hours on the costume.” For first-time cosplayers, assess the purpose of your costume, Hikaruhime advises. Knowing its purpose will help you decide how hardcore you want to go. “Learning to create your own cosplay can seem a bit overwhelming at first, but it’s a very rewarding hobby that is sure to boost your self-esteem when you see what you are capable of creating,” she says. Kathleen McDonald had a firm foundation of “nerd-dom” that she was willing to grow, which led to her involvement in cosplay. “My whole life, I have been a nerd,” says McDonald, a sales support representative at AT&T in Tulsa. “I can thank my brother for that. At a young age, he got me into comics, superheroes, supervillains and Star Wars. I also always liked to play dress up, especially for Halloween. Then one year, Comic Con came to where I lived, and it just hit me. It was a natural transition and one I quickly fell in love with.” McDonald has dressed up as everything from the Pokémon Pikachu to Harley Quinn from the Batman comics to her latest persona, Maria, the main character from Ruined My Rhythm, a new graphic novel written by SIMPLE COSTUME Tulsa author Robert UNDERGARMENTS MAY Soul and illustrated TAKE KAREN RENEE ONLY by Luna Cooper. A FEW HOURS, BUT MORE EXTRAVAGANT ENSEMBLES She enjoys cosplay CAN TAKE AS MANY AS 100 for fun, but her real HOURS TO COMPLETE. passion is the charity work that she does while costuming. “I cosplay because I love the charity work I do,” McDonald says. “Seeing little kids smile when I visit the Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis. Having little kids run up to you and tackle hug you when you’re sponsoring an event or a charity is 12

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

pretty amazing. I live for that happiness that I can create for someone else.” Cosplay is not limited to a book, a television show, or movie characters. Cosplay can also include time periods, like the Middle Ages or the Renaissance, and you can be short, tall, blue, round or square to participate in the performance art. It is about being the character of your choosing. An experienced cosplayer, like Apple Davies, advises new cosplayers to start small and practice. “You aren’t going to be perfect right off the bat; I’m still not perfect,” she says. “Always lean towards learning, and never give up.”

“You aren’t going to be perfect right off the bat; I’m still not perfect. Always lean towards learning, and never give up.” Davies, an Oklahoma City marketing assistant, found her calling in cosplay as a teenager but waited until attending the University of Oklahoma to spread her wings. “I was terrified of being an open geek, so closet geek me waited until college to start making and wearing costumes to events and conventions,” she says. “When I started at OU, I had a few friends that were into the cosplay scene, so I just hung out with them and got sucked in.” From Pokémon Trainer to Power Girl, Davies has cosplayed a variety of characters. “At first, I did it because my friends were doing it and I thought it was cool,” she says. “Six years deep now, I do it because I love making and creating things, original and replicas. My favorite part is volunteering with Jedi OKC

and the DC Marvel League,” which are a Star Wars fan club and a Facebook community, respectively. Cosplay doesn’t mean you have to be a character that already exists. Karen Renee, a professional designer since 1972, started making elaborate Halloween costumes in 1976. In 2000, she was introduced to a Renaissance festival that took her costume interest to a whole new level. It wasn’t until 2001 that the Tulsan went as an original character with a background in nobility to the Oklahoma Renaissance Festival in Muskogee. She has also portrayed historical figures like Celtic Chieftess Boudicca. Renee then made clothing and costumes her business. In addition to K. Renee Fairewear, her studio has been actively involved in the school uniform industry for 30 years. “The cosplay community ... is only one aspect of the design work we do at K. Renee’s Design Studio,” she says. Simple costume undergarments may take Renee only a few hours, but more extravagant ensembles can take as many as 100 hours to complete. The cosplayer chooses how complicated he or she wants the ensemble to be, but accuracy is vital. “My biggest piece of advice to people interested in creating their outfits is to do your research,” Renee says. “No matter if it is a historical outfit or a fandom cosplay, knowledge of the source material is key. Keep an eye out for details, as these are what make or break your outfit.” To see the elaborate array of cosplay designs this month, check out the Wizard World Comic Con Tulsa, Oct. 21-23 at the Cox Business Center. You’ll find vendors, cosplayers, artists, games, literature, music, pop culture and anime enthusiasts. If you can’t make that one, other Oklahoma conventions include Izumicon in Oklahoma City, Otaku Matsuri in Norman, the Broken Arrow Comic Con, Tokyo in Tulsa, SoCON in Bixby, SoonerCon in Midwest City, Geekinomicon OKC or Tulsa Comic Expo. If you’re not ready for a conference, get your feet wet by checking out some Oklahoma cosplay groups on Facebook: DC Marvel League, Jedi OKC, All Things Faire or Oklahoma Cosplayers. ALAINA STEVENS


EXCELLENCE IN OUR FIELD...

so you can excel on yours. At OSU we are very proud to welcome new providers to our growing Medical Staff.

JACLYN JONES, D.O.

BRITNEY ELSE, D.O.

Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine

Family Medicine & Sports Medicine

802 S. Jackson, Ste. 310 918.631.8130

96th & Riverside 918.209.5170

Exceptional health care. Every patient, Every time.

• osumc.net •


S

Specters as Symbols

In the Chickasaw tradition, ghosts offer life lessons

pirits, witches and demons creep the night, according to Chickasaw lore. Some of them want to eat you. Some of them just want to play stickball. But all of them have lessons for you. “These stories are a huge part of our belief system,” says Ladonna Brown, an anthropologist with the Chickasaw Nation’s Department of Culture and Humanities. “We believe that there are two paths a person can take. One is a good path and one is an evil path. We believe that ghosts and witches and evil beings like monsters are part of the evil path. This is very spiritually known to us and ingrained in us.” Brown’s favorite story features ghostly stickball players. Stickball was once an outlawed sport, known for broken legs and arms as well as various other injuries. Known in the tribe as the Little Brother War, it was a brutal sport, much rougher than stickball played today. According to Brown, some Chickasaw

14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

members visited Buffalo Valley, close to Ada, on a moonlit night in the late 20th century. As clouds passed the moon, they saw shadows on the prairie. When the moon reemerged, they saw a full-fledged, ancient game of stickball in progress. They watched for a while until the shadows suddenly vanished. People still say if you’re at Buffalo Valley on a moonlit night, you can see the spirits playing stickball. Brown has no idea what a person has to do to end up playing a brutal game of stickball for eternity, but she has some ideas. “I think the camaraderie that develops in life helps to understand why they’re playing stickball in the afterlife, as spirits roaming this earth,” she says. “It’s the one thing they knew how to do and in their lifetimes they were very good at it. Definitely, if you’re going to play it in the afterlife, you’re going to play like it’s the last game of your life.”

While some stories are contemporary, many others are thousands of years old. Tablets and pottery found in archaeological digs have illustrations of stories that are still told today. According to Benny Wallace, an anthropologist with the Chickasaw nation, many of these stories teach life lessons to children. “Our ancestors were trying to get some information across to their children with our stories,” he says. Wallace recalls his elders telling him the story of a big, shadowy monster that would pounce on and eat children who wandered into the woods alone. “Children just love to go and do their own thing without telling anybody where they’re going or what they’re doing,” he says. “My grandparents used this story a lot as a lesson that we shouldn’t go out alone. We should go with a friend. It was a way of trying to help and teach us.” Countless ghost stories like these pop up in the Chickasaw tradition. Whether fresh or ancient, they reward those who listen carefully for a moral. “A lot of the stories I know of are there to teach the children lessons,” Wallace adds. “That’s why I keep them alive for my children. And they’ll pass the stories on, as well.” PAUL FAIRCHILD

PHOTO COURTESY THE CHICKASAW NATION

The State

HISTORY


The Best Just Got Better

Dan Langley, D.O., F.A.O.C.O.

Kelli Dyer, D.O.

Lindsey Bull, O.D., F.A.A.O.

Brian Williams, O.D.

We’ve partnered with

to provide our patients with the best service and the most up to date technology

We provide diagnosis and treatment for: Cataracts•KAMRA•Eye Lid•Dry Eye Glaucoma•Diabetic Eye Disease Macular Degeneration

2016

918.250.2020 | www.SouthTulsaEye.com


The State

C U LT U R E

Aiming High

The Annie Oakley Society recognizes pioneering female role models while ensuring the legacy of the Old West.

S

harp shooter. Leader. Pioneer. Celebrated markswoman of the Old West Annie Oakley was all of these and more. Many female innovators today channel Oakley’s courage and spirit, inspiring the Annie Oakley Society at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City to bring together some of the state’s – and nation’s – exceptional women with a mission to preserve our history. “Following in the footsteps of one of America’s most illustrious female trailblazers, contemporary women leaders under the leadership of myself and Lynn Friess established the Annie Oakley Society,” says former Oklahoma First Lady Cathy Keating, the group’s founder and national chair. “The Annie Oakley Society comprises women leaders and philanthropists who, like Annie Oakley, play significant roles in shaping our communities and creating new horizons. Through their efforts, they demonstrate an undying determination for excellence and support for the American character preserved and promoted through the museum.” According to Keating, the society’s mission is two-fold: to ensure continued outstanding education regarding the West through programs at the museum, and to recognize women who “embody the spirit of Annie Oakley.” Past recipients of the society’s honors include retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, singers and Oklahoma natives Reba McEntire

16

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: ANNIE OAKLEY SOCIETY OKLAHOMA CHAIR JUDY HATFIELD, LEADERSHIP TEAM MEMBER MARY ELLEN ALEXANDER, DIRECTOR DIANA FIELDS, LEADERSHIP TEAM MEMBER FREDA DESKIN AND WHITNEY TATUM. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

and Kristin Chenoweth, U.S. Navy Admiral Michelle Howard and Olympic gold medalist Nadia Comaneci. The philanthropic efforts of the society have raised approximately $3.5 million for educational initiatives at the museum through its annual luncheon. “We are passionate about keeping the West alive in the hearts and souls of future generations,” Keating says, “and the luncheon is the vehicle for the Annie Oakley Society to do that.” Speaking of the Old West legend for whom the society is named, Keating greatly admires this female luminary of the past. “Annie Oakley was a female enThe Annie Oakley Society Luncheon, the annual trepreneur, pioneer, fundraiser for the organization, will take place educator and sharpOct. 13 at the National Cowboy & Western shooter who lived Heritage Museum. This year’s luncheon will by the phrase ‘Aim recognize Donna Shirley, president of Managing high,’” Keating says. Creativity and past manager of the Mars Explora“We honor women tion Program at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratowho closely model ry, with the Annie Oakley Society Award. The Lifethe legacy Annie time Achievement Award will honor Jo Rowan, Oakley left behind. chairwoman of Oklahoma City University’s Like Annie Oakley, School of American Dance and Arts Management we value education, and founder of OCU’s dance program. Tickets to and, through that the luncheon are $150 for non-members of the shared value, the Ansociety. The public is encouraged to attend, but nie Oakley Society reservations are recommended by visiting the supports educational museum’s website at www.nationalcowboymuprogramming on the seum.org/annieoakley/. For questions regarding diverse history of the membership or reservations, call the Annie OakAmerican West.” ley Society’s director at 405.478.2250, ext. 233.

THE ANNIE OAKLEY SOCIETY LUNCHEON

TARA MALONE


BUILDING HUSBANDS A WAY OUT OF THE DOGHOUSE S ICNEC 1E9 14994 9 SIN

Whether it ’s a NEW kitchen countertop, bathroom shower, or a complete kitchen or bathroom REMODEL, Hoffman Kitchen & Bath can take it from concept to completion. It all begins with a FREE In-Home Consultation. FREE INNHOME CONSULTATION

PLAN & DESIGN

BUILD OR REMODEL

ENJOY

Whether it’s a NEW countertop, shower, or a complete kitchen or bathroom REMODEL, Hoffman Kitchen & Bath can take it from concept to completion. It all begins with a FREE In-Home Consultation. F R E E I N - H O M E C O N S U LTAT I O N

PLAN & DESIGN

BUILD OR REMODEL

hoffmankb.com

2016

Thank you for making us hoffmankb.com Oklahoma’s Best of us theOklahoma’s Best. Thank you The for making Best of the Best. Edmond EdmondShowroom Showroom

NormanShowroom Showroom Norman

1204 North North Interstate InterstateDrive Drive 1204

2800 2800South SouthKelly KellyAvenue Avenue Mon-Fri 8am-5pm; Sat 9am-4pm

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm; Sat 9am-4pm

(888) 590-9072 (Appointments Welcome)

(888) 590-9072 (Appointments Welcome)

Tulsa Showroom

6031 South 12th East Avenue

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm; Sat 9am-4pm (888) 590-9072 (Appointments Welcome)

Springdale Showroom 3046 North Thompson


The State

PEOPLE

Come From Away

Tulsa-based Square 1 Theatrics will produce a Broadway musical focusing on the lives of people after 9/11

E

veryone who is old enough to remember 9/11 can tell you what they were doing that day – but what about the day after? That’s the focus of Come From Away, the newest project that Jay Krottinger and Ryan Jude Tanner of Square 1 Theatrics will help bring to Broadway. While the two admit to initially being split on whether to become involved with Waitress, their most recent Broadway production that earned four Tony nominations, there was far less doubt on Come From Away. “We took a leap, went to see it and immediately fell in love with it,” Krottinger says. “It’s relevant, it speaks to and honors 9/11 victims, and it’s a culmination of the event in a perfectly heartfelt, respectful way to relive the day after 9/11, which we all did.” The musical focuses on the true story of 38 planes carrying more than 6,500 passengers that were forced to land in the small town of Gander, in Newfoundland, Canada. The town of less than 10,000 people is the home of a large airport that was made unnecessary with the introduction of jet engine airplanes. The passengers came from more than 100 countries and found themselves stranded together for six days, and the musical follows their stories. “You have a couple that are married today that didn’t know each other before then. A woman from Texas and a man from Britain,” Krottinger says. “You have two couples that separate over the matter. You have a mother

TOP RIGHT: FROM LEFT, RYAN JUDE TANNER AND JAY KROTTINGER WILL BE HELPING BRING COME FROM AWAY TO BROADWAY. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

BOTTOM LEFT: COME FROM AWAY HAS RECEIVED CRITICAL ACCLAIM BEFORE HITTING BROADWAY. PHOTO BY CAROL PEGG

who has a son who’s a firefighter in New York, and she can’t get a hold of him … and he perished. You have American Airlines’ first female pilot – what are the chances that she’s the one who has to land the plane there?” Despite the gravity of the setting, Come From Away does not focus on the tragedy of 9/11. The show has its share of serious, heart-felt moments, but it also provides an inspiring, uplifting story that embraces humor. “This show is the counterpoint to 9/11,” Tanner says. “Everything that day stood for in terms of terror and what was bad and wrong with the world, this show is the answer. This is the response to that. This little town represents the world, and that’s because people from all over the world landed that day in this tiny little town.” The show is currently running at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C., where its run has been extended to Oct. 16 because of a high demand created by favorable reviews, including receiving four out of four stars from DC Theatre Scene. It will run at the Royal Alexan-

dra Theatre in Toronto from Nov. 15 to Jan. 8, 2017, before moving to Broadway for previews in February and a March opening. Come From Away joins a host of other projects produced by Krottinger and Tanner. The two got their start producing Flipside: The Patti Page Story before moving on to the Tonyaward winning Pippin and Waitress, which is currently on Broadway and beginning a tour soon. The two are also producers for A Very Sordid Wedding, the sequel to Del Shores’ cult classic Sordid Lives, and are producing Body Electric, a documentary about body issues in the LGBT community. While the two look for the possibility of commercial success for all their projects, they also look for projects that tell a story they feel needs telling. Come From Away fits that mold. “It’s a show I think all our investors are proud of,” Tanner says. “I know Jay and I are very proud of it, as well as the people who have been working on it for a decade now and the stories and the people it represents. And you get to laugh. It’s pretty great.” JUSTIN MARTINO

18

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


Live, Love, Lift!

You don't have to settle for loose, sagging skin on your face, neck, or chest! FDA-cleared Ultherapy utilizes non-invasive ultrasound technology for natural-looking results with no surgery or downtime. BEFORE

MODEL

UP TO

AFTER

$395 OFF ULTHERAPY

22302 OSUIT.indd 1

®

Non-Invasive Skin Tightening

Call to Schedule Your FREE Consultation: 918.948.6375 skincareinstitute.net 6565 South Yale Avenue, Lobby Level, Tulsa

2304 Skin Care Institute.indd 1

Ultherapy stimulates the deepest layers of skin to: • Lift and tighten sagging skin on the brow, face, and neck • Reduce fine lines and wrinkles on the décolletage

Special promotion valid until 10.31.16, and may not be combined. Must mention this ad to receive special. Individual results vary. Other restrictions may apply. 8/23/16 3:16 PM

8/23/16 10:18 AM

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

19


Shop Goodwill Tulsa ...

For Fall Fashions & Seasonal Décor!!!

       

OPEN HOUSE WEDNESDAYS RSVP 918.746.4238

Shop Often—Selection Changes Daily In All Stores Hours: M—S 9 am—6:30 pm ● Sunday Noon—6:00 pm Tulsa Locations: 3110 Southwest Blvd., 102 S. Garnett Rd., 19021 E. 51st St. Broken Arrow: 2210 W. Washington Glenpool: 502 West 125th Place Owasso: 8525 N. 117th East Ave. Claremore - Bartlesville - Carthage - Joplin - McAlester

www.goodwilltulsa.org

22268 Goodwill Tulsa.indd 1

8/13/16 10:12 AM

Managed by

A premier private independent school with a powerful Catholic Benedictine identity, Monte Cassino School offers dynamic and diverse co-curricular programs that foster critical thinking, spiritual formation and personal excellence.

Look inside for all the excellent reasons to attend Monte Cassino.

www.montecassino.org

20

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

22307 Monte Cassino.indd 1

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT BOKCenter.com 1-866-7-BOK-CTR Arby’s Box Office

8/26/16 22311 1:08 PM BOK Center.indd 1

8/29/16 9:57 AM


The State

INSIDER

Old School Halloween The spooky, scary fun from bygone days may soon disappear, the Zombie Elvis says.

T

AUTHOR JOHN WOOLEY WEARS THIS ELVIS MASK EACH HALLOWEEN.

he older you become, the more you get used to things around you fading into other things. So one day you turn on the oldies radio station and realize that the Beach Boys and Paul Revere and the Raiders have given way to Guns N’ Roses and U2, and that these songs aren’t “oldies” anymore, but “classic rock.” You find yourself vaguely amazed that music you thought was contemporary is actually “classic” – this is driven home to you, perhaps, when you see a high school band march onto the football field at halftime to perform a medley of Queen hits or Edgar Winter’s “Free Ride” – and you’re further befuddled when actors you thought were big stars turn up as guests at nostalgia conventions. As the sardonic old saw goes, nostalgia isn’t what it used to be. For many of us baby boomers, this time of year is likely to conjure memories of the Hal-

loween tradition of dressing up in a costume, grabbing a big sack and heading out with a parent or, later on, pals to do some trick-or-treating. When I was growing up in Chelsea, Oklahoma, during the ’50s and early ’60s, this one-night-only experience would take us to neighborhoods we might not have been in since Halloween the year before, to houses we weren’t familiar with and people we wouldn’t have known if we’d met them on the street. There was a bit of a thrill in it all, as well as a good measure of trust. We might not know ’em, and their houses might look a little spooky (whether by design or otherwise), but we’d knock on the door and hold out those bags anyway, confident that some kindly soul would smile from the doorway and drop in a treat or two. It was an act of faith that was almost biblical, the evidence of things not seen (until the door opened) but wholeheartedly believed. The celebration of Halloween by costumed kids going door-to-door has been one of those stubborn traditions that has managed to persist, despite being buffeted for decades by outside forces. I don’t remember any controversy about the holiday or its origins (which likely lie in the ancient Celtic Festival of Samhain and its costumes and bonfires that supposedly warded off ghosts) when I was growing up. However, a little later on, some churches began encouraging kids to come to “harvest

festivals” or “harvest parties” on Halloween, brightly-lit get-togethers where the weird and creepy elements were de-emphasized and implicitly shunned as representative of evil, or at least unseemliness. In the past several years, I’ve also noticed the proliferation of “trunk-or-treat” events, in which parents load up their trunks with goodies and all park next to one another, so the kids can simply stroll for a couple dozen yards and grab a ton of stuff – without even leaving the parking lot. In Chelsea, the downtown merchants have banded together to offer a Halloween experience around their stores; to the town’s credit, these folks usually come up with the kind of good scary trappings that befit America’s spookiest holiday. Yet, for all of that, there’s still nothing that gives me the Halloween feeling like the footsteps of a gaggle of costumed trick-or-treaters traveling down a street, boldly heading for the next lighted porch. Because my wife and I have always lived out in the country, we don’t get kids coming by on Halloween, so when our own boys were young, we took them into Chelsea and used my mother’s house – where I grew up – for a home base. Even before they were born, I would go in at dusk on every Oct. 31 I wasn’t working or away and hand out treats with my mom. Since her passing, I’ve continued to do my best to make sure the house would continue to be a reliable stop OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

21


December 2016

Is Your Company Great?

for the trick-or-treaters; my brother, who lives there now, joins me whenever he’s in town. Oklahoma Magazine is currently Last year, it was just me and several bags of candy bars. Beginning looking for great places to work in at dusk, I sat out on the porch with a bowl of treats and a pullover Oklahoma. If your company has Elvis mask that covered my head down to my nose. I’d fashioned what it takes, let us know. Visit a nice scar on my cheek, completing what I like to call the Zombie www.okmag.com to nominate your Elvis look. company for inclusion in Oklahoma Magazine’s Great Companies To It was slow at first; in Chelsea, most of the kids hit downtown Work For. OKLAHOMA early, and then if there’s time left, fan out into the neighborhoods. Most of them are in cars or trucks with some, like me, driving in from rural areas. As usual, I found find myself peering down to the end of OKLAHOMA the block where I could see vehicles hesitating, their drivers debating Advertising opportunities available. whether to turn down my street or pass it in favor of the next one. The Contact advertising@okmag.com • 918.744.6205 OKLAHOMA fact that many of the houses around me were dark militated against a flow of traffic, but I had a few busy times, including once when a 9/14/16 11:34 AM flatbed truck toting a good dozen kids stopped under the street light in front of my house. One little girl, costumed in gruesome walkingdead garb, asked sweetly, “Do you have something soft? I just had my tonsils out.” Another queried, in that direct way kids have, “Who are you supposed to be?”

2014

Great Companies 1/8 H.indd 1

COME SEE US.

There’s a fine line between being scared for fun and being scared for real.

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville

The Hive, Bentonville

Slaughter Pen Trail, Bentonville

ARKANSAS.COM

It’s that combination of the frightening and the trusting, the innocent and the uncanny, that continues to make celebrating Halloween such great fun for me. As I sit out in the October darkness, listening for the whispery sounds of trick-or-treaters, half-hearing the celebratory sounds of the downtown event some five or six blocks away, I’m pulled back to the time when I left that very same house as a child, trusting without knowing it in the goodness of my neighbors, part-frightened and part-exhilarated. The fright, though, was always the good kind – the same deliciously unsettling feeling I’d get when a new horror movie was coming to the town’s movie house or when I climbed into a roller-coaster car at an amusement park. It was a lifting out of the everyday that engaged and sharpened the senses. I continue to see trick-or-treating as just that, and I hope kids can continue to experience it. I don’t mean to knock “harvest celebrations” or “trunk-or-treat” gatherings, but I can’t shake the feeling that they’ve come about because we’ve gradually become more and more mistrustful of those we don’t know, a pernicious change that mirrors the rise of 24-hour news channels on radio and television, followed by the explosion of the internet – where, if one chooses, he or she can spend every waking moment in a place that quavers with rage and fear. There’s nothing new about stories of nefarious doings on Halloween; I heard plenty of ’em when I was a kid, and I’m sure some were true. Now, however, if something bad happens that night in any neighborhood in America, we’ll get it ad nauseum from the media outlets and the internet, with twists and turns and embellishments along the way, gobbling up more airtime than it’s worth – and that’s the culture in which paranoia and mistrust grow and flourish. I don’t know if trick-or-treating is dying a slow death, fading into something else like so many other things from my youth. But I do know this: There’s a fine line between being scared for fun and being scared for real, and I know some have chosen to step across that line, exchanging a little bit of excitement and adventure for a measure of security, perceived or otherwise. The only thing I can do about that is pull on my Elvis mask every Oct. 31, fill my bowl with candy, and trust there’ll always be trick-or-treaters to encounter – even if they don’t know exactly whom I’m supposed to be. JOHN WOOLEY

22

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


AUTUMN, unfiltered.

YOUR TRIP BEGINS HERE

Rickett’s Mountain near Cowell

Autumn in Northwest Arkansas is pretty magical. Crisp weather, brilliant colors, great food. OK, we actually have great food year-round. Also beautiful views like this and a million fun things to do. Come see us. ARKANSAS.COM

#VisitArkansas


ARKANSAS’ LAND OF LEGENDS*

Legendary Arkansas vacations begin in Arkansas’ Land of Legends, a tourism region comprised of Cleveland, Grant, Jefferson and Lincoln counties in the heart of Southeast Arkansas, an area steeped in history, interpreted at Civil War battle sites and museums against a backdrop of historic architecture. Outdoor enthusiasts love the area for hunting, fishing and other water sports, or for simply appreciating nature.

870-536-8742

ARLandofLegends.com

THE HEART OF HISTORIC HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK • Thermal baths and spa • A national park outside any door • Great dining choices • Twin cascading outdoor pools • Championship golf courses • Private beauty and facial salon

For Reservations:

1-800-643-1502 ArlingtonHotel.com

BENTONVILLE

Bentonville is home to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art housing the world’s largest collection of American art. The Scott Family Amazeum, the newest attraction, is a hands-on museum with a climbable tree canopy and chocolate laboratory. Celebrating its 25th anniversary, The Walmart Museum offers unique exhibits on the history of Walmart. The city’s culinary scene boasts James Beardnominated chefs. To request a travel guide, call 800-410-2535 or visit our website.

VisitBentonville.com

SILOAM SPRINGS

Siloam Springs is a vibrant, friendly, growing community with the accessible Sager Creek, Dogwood Springs walking and bike trail, Family Aquatic Center, beautiful parks, new library, unique gift shops and restaurants. Enjoy area activities and the kayak park along the Illinois River.

479-238-0940 SiloamSprings.com

www.ozarkgateway.com

MENA

A FIRST-CLASS TIME … EVERY TIME

No worries, no stress, complete relaxation … Gaston’s White River Resort is the place to achieve that. We’ve got everything you need for a family vacation, romantic getaway or group gathering, year-round. First-class accommodations and amenitites add up to a first-class time … every time.

870-431-5202 gastons@gastons.com Gastons.com

Mena is in the HEART of the Ouachita Mountains, featuring the most scenic drives and amazing fall colors in Mid-America! Drive the Talimena National Scenic Byway, explore the Wolf Pen Gap trails on your ATV, bike the EPIC-rated Ouachita National Recreation Trail, and fish our crystal-clear streams. Don’t miss our charming historic downtown district filled with antiques, art and live theater.

1-479-394-8355 VisitMena.com

NORTHWEST ARKANSAS TOURISM ASSOCIATION*

Fall is the perfect time to visit Northwest Arkansas! With glorious mountains, lakes, rivers and trails, natural beauty abounds. Savor our High South cuisine, explore our distinctive downtowns, and discover the world-class Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. From internationally recognized bike trails and the state’s largest live-music amphitheater, to minor league baseball and an ever-evolving craft brew scene – Northwest Arkansas has it all. Come discover why more than 4 million people visit each year!

NorthwestArkansas.org

Arkansas Ozark Gateway 2016

OZARK GATEWAY*

1

It’s impossible to describe the beauty of the Ozark Mountains in the fall. You truly have to see it for yourself on a scenic drive or motorcycle ride, on a float trip or zip-line excursion, while hiking or mountain biking. Choose from campsites and cabins for the full experience, or venture into cities and towns for great lodging and dining.

1-800-264-0316 OzarkGateway.com

* Ads paid for with a combination of state funds and private regional association funds.


CLINTON PRESIDENTIAL CENTER, LITTLE ROCK, AR

VISIT PRESIDENT CLINTON’S BIRTHPLACE HOME!*

Designated a National Historic Site in 2011, William Jefferson Clinton spent his early childhood in this Hope, AR, home learning many of the life lessons that later defined his presidency. Guided tours every 30 minutes daily, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 117 South Hervey Street, Hope, AR. For more information, call or visit our websites. Free admission.

870-777-4455 agsw.org nps.gov/wicl

The Clinton Center’s newest special exhibition, Ladies and Gentlemen … The Beatles!, showcases the impact The Beatles made on America with pop culture artifacts, correspondence, instruments, photos and interviews. The exhibit will be on display Oct. 8, 2016 through April 2, 2017. Curated by the GRAMMY Museum® at L.A. LIVE and Fab Four Exhibits Photo © The Bob Bonis Archive www.BobBonis.com

Take a trip to Conway this fall for football, foliage and fun! Spend a day as a fan of the University of Central Arkansas Bears or the Hendrix College Warriors. Take a drive down I-40 to see the leaves change colors. Take a stroll through our charming downtown. See for yourself why Conway was recently chosen as one of the South’s Best College Towns by Southern Living Magazine.

One of True West’s “Top 10 True Western Towns,” Fort Smith is the setting of True Grit and future home of the National U.S. Marshals Museum. Relive history through stories and re-enactments of outlaws, lawmen and the Trail of Tears. Explore the Arkansas River Valley and Ozarks by train. Discover unique exhibits, galleries, live entertainment and more. Start planning your experience on our website or download our mobile app, “Experience Fort Smith!”

501-327-7788 ConwayArk.com

1.800.637.1477 ExperienceFortSmith.com

CONWAY*

1-501-374-4242

ClintonPresidentialCenter.org

WESTERN ARKANSAS MOUNTAIN FRONTIER V I SI T O R S

G U I DE

rIDe ThE raIlrOaD

A WINDOW SEAT TO HISTORY

Arkansas wine traiL

A TOUR OF ARKANSAS WINE COUNTRY

expect the unexpecTed

MURALS POP UP IN FORT SMITH

H ATTRACTIONS H WINE COUNTRY H LAKES & RIVERS H SCENIC MOUNTAINS H DRIVING & MOTORCYCLING TOURS H OUTDOOR FUN H FESTIVALS & EVENTS H STATE & NATIONAL PARKS

ROAD TRIP: HOT SPRINGS

A road trip to Hot Springs is always a good idea, especially in the fall. The weather is perfect for strolling through Hot Springs National Park with its shops, galleries, restaurants and spas. At night, check out Oaklawn Gaming, then check into a historic hotel or B&B. Plan your trip around the Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival, October 7-16.

1-800-SPA-CITY HotSprings.org

FORT SMITH

WESTERN ARKANSAS’ MOUNTAIN FRONTIER*

Beautiful scenery will surround you in a place steeped in history and hospitality. Visit Fort Smith’s scenic riverfront and historic sites. Delight in fall splendor on a train ride through the Boston Mountains. Discover wine tastings and vineyard tours while touring the Arkansas Wine Trail. Attend bluegrass festivals in Mansfield and Waldron, the Fall Arts and Crafts Fair in Van Buren or the Old-Fashioned Square Gathering in Ozark.

1-800-332-5889 VisitWestArkansas.com

SEND FOR FREE ARKANSAS TRAVEL INFORMATION! For the fastest, most convenient way to order, visit FreeArkansasInfo.com.

Every respondant will receive a free copy of the Arkansas Vacation Planning Kit. If you prefer not to receive this free copy, please check here:

 Send me everything!  Arkansas’ Land of Legends    Arlington Resort Hotel & Spa   Visit Bentonville   City of Siloam Springs  Clinton’s Birthplace Home   Clinton Presidential Center   Conway Please print clearly  Fort Smith Name: Address: City: Email:

Gaston’s White River Resort Mena

Northwest Arkansas Tourism Association Ozark Gateway

Visit Hot Springs

Western Arkansas’ Mountain Frontier

State:

ZIP:

Your email address will only be shared with selected partners.

Mail coupon today to: Free Brochures P.O. Box 8003 Little Rock, AR 72203 3030

* Ads paid for with a combination of state funds and private regional association funds.

16 F/W


52 STATE PARKS. 52 WEEKS. COINCIDENCE?

We have a park for every week, every activity and every personality. You like history? Got it. You like music? Got that. Paddling, fishing, swimming, climbing, soaring, sunning, hiking, camping…? Yep, yep and double yep. So come take advantage of your Arkansas State Parks.

Lake Ouachita State Park #ARStateParks

ArkansasStateParks.com My park, your park, our parks

VIEWS AS GOOD AS THE REVIEWS.

We’re used to getting a lot of stars up on the highest point in Arkansas. From here, you can see your worries disappear in the mist. You can relax, or challenge yourself with hiking, biking, climbing or horseback riding. Come on up and see us.

1-877-665-6343 • MountMagazineStatePark.com

One of Arkansas’s six state park lodges.


APT 29986.2 Oklahoma Co-op_HP.indd 1

8/23/16 4:55 PM

48 Years of Medical Excellence

Don Seidel, M.D. • Mark Lehman, M.D. • George Monks, M.D. • Kelli Lovelace, M.D. • Christina Kendrick, M.D. • Ashwini Vaidya, M.D.

Diagnosis and Treatment of diseases of the skin, hair and nails • Skin Cancer • Cosmetic Procedures • Laser • Botox • Sclerotherapy • Injectable Fillers • Microdermabrasion • Facial Rejuvenation • Skin Care Products Board Certified Dermatologists

HAWKS PHOTOGRAPHY Specializing in commercial and arcthitectural photography since 1946 918.584.3351 | hawksphotography.com

22326 Hawks Photography.indd 1

918.749.2261

9/14/16 22324 3:36 PM Tulsa Dermatology Clinic.indd 1

2121 East 21st Street OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

27

9/15/16 8:34 AM


412

The State

T IN

UES

TO

H

M.K . & T. TUL SA/ SS TRA IL

244

Newblock Park

Zeigler Park

HOUSTON AVE

CO N

97 WY

25TH W AVE

41ST W AVE

51 64

Route 66 Plaza

CHARLES PAGE BLVD

A

A RK

NS

AS

RIV

Pedestrian Bridges

ER

M

K SO VE NA

W 21ST ST

C S JA

River West Festival Park T ulsa Rowing Club

W 23RD ST 75 W 25TH ST

244 SOUTHWEST BLVD

(No Thru Access)

S 49TH W AVE

S 57TH W AVE

Pedestrian Bridge & Zink Dam

Kayak Access

West Bank Sports Complex

W

N AT U R E

Expanding Beaten Paths

W 37TH PL

W 41ST ST

C H E R R Y C R E E K

S UNION AVE

244

Oklahoma’s hiking/biking trail systems continue to grow.

W

ith autumn in full swing, Oklahomans are hitting the trails to enjoy brisk mornings and cool evenings, especially as the leaves start to change colors. With more than 60 miles of trails in Tulsa and more than 80 miles in Oklahoma City, hikers and cyclists have plenty of options, and more are about to be added. Oklahoma City will break ground on the Interstate 44 trail this fall thanks to MAPS 3, a capital improvements program funded by a one-cent sales tax increase. “The Will Rogers Trail will link the Bert Cooper Trails at Lake Hefner and run along the I-44 corridor through Will Rogers Park, then down to the Oklahoma River,” says Jennifer McClintock, OKC Parks and Recreation spokeswoman. “This will provide a more direct north-south link from the northwest portion "The trails have of the city to downtown and become an integral part the river corridor. The trail is in encouraging an active slated to open in mid-2017.” In Tulsa, locals enjoy the lifestyle among city River Parks trails, which residents." stretch for miles along both sides of the Arkansas River. A 1.2-mile portion of the east bank trail is closed for construction of the Gathering Place, but Tulsans will have more trails to enjoy within the 100-acre park once that project is complete in 2017. In addition to the city paths, those wanting to get TULSA'S TURKEY MOUNoutdoors can find thousands of miles of trails within OklaTAIN OFFERS TRAILS OF homa’s 35 state parks. VARIOUS DIFFICULTY FOR “We are adding new trails all the time,” says Susan HIKERS AND CYCLISTS. Henry, who oversees federal programs for Oklahoma

28

44

66

state parks. “Currently, new trails are being constructed at Red Rock Canyon State Park, Lake Wister State Park and Great Plains State Park. We also just funded 22 new 75 trail projects throughout the state through the Recreational Trails Program.” These additions are likely to get plenty of traffic as the number of trail users grows. McClintock says estimates are in the tens of thousands each year for Oklahoma City alone. “While we’ve never been able to put a true number on our trail use, we can tell simply by general community buzz among local cycling enthusiasts, as well as social media feedback, that trail use has never been more popular,” W 71ST ST she says. “Get out on any evening when the weather is nice and you’ll find hundreds of people out using our trails and bikeways. The trails have become an integral part in encouraging an active lifestyle among city residents.” In Oklahoma City, a variety of people flock to Lake Hefner to enjoy the trails that wind around the 17 miles of shoreline. “These trails nightly see a broad scope of residents out walking and running, as well as cyclists, children on tricycles, parents with strollers and people exercising their dogs,” McClintock says. In Tulsa, one hot spot is Turkey Mountain, which offers four marked trails that weave through more than 300 acres of wilderness seven miles from downtown. Despite its popularity, it is relatively easy to find solitude even on the beaten paths. To find more trails, head to INCOG.com for Tulsa trails, okc.gov for trails in greater Oklahoma City, or travelok. W MAIN ST com for statewide information. M

BETH WEESE

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016 75

O

O S E R

E E C R


244

ST E1

ST

RD E3

ST

75 DENVER AVE

TRADITIONS Downtown

64

Maple Park

Elwood’s

51 E 15TH ST

Blue Rose Cafe

M

Veterans Park

The Tulsa Run brings together athletes from across the nation to support Oklahoma charities.

L AN

NK

MID

ZI

E 21ST ST

ALL DV

LA

N

EY

KE

TRA

Tulsa’s Gathering Place

IL

River SkatePark

either freezing temperatures nor blazing heat has stopped JD Stigall from completing the Tulsa Run every year since it started

(Opening Late 2017)

E 31ST ST

O W C R

K E E C R

Rugby Field

W 36TH ST

E 36TH ST

41st Street Plaza & Splashpad E 41ST ST S PEORIA AVE

S LEWIS AVE

S ELWOOD AVE

M M RIVERSIDE DR

66

Fitness Station & Hammock Hang-Up

K

E 56TH ST

M Johnson Park

M

E 61ST ST

E

E

K

M

O

E

C

R

BOk Plaza

J

M

M

M S ELWOOD AVE

Turkey Mountain Wilderness

E 71ST ST

Helmerich Park

River Parks City of Tulsa Parks RI ID

Parking Playground Splashpad Fishing Disc Golf

M

Monument

E MAIN ST

N ELM ST

Scale: 1 Mile Jenks

in 1978. In fact, Stigall is not alone. She is one of 16 “All Year Runners,” those who have run and completed the 15K every year since the race began. Originally started by local Tulsa running enthusiasts, the Tulsa Run is now overseen by the Tulsa Sports Commission and has had more than 149,000 runners cross the finish line over the years, and many are returning participants. People return each year because it is a tradition, and Stigall says she enjoys the activity. “The Tulsa Run is the city’s premier running event, plus I want to keep my ‘All Year Runner’ streak going as long as physically possible,” she says. Stigall states that her best time for the race was in 1985 when she completed it in 1:08. Tradition, dedication, love of running – there are many reasons why some of the more than 7,500 participants return to the race, but Heath Aucoin, vice president of operations for Tulsa Sports Commission/ Visit Tulsa, says the All Year Runners are the most loyal of them all. “We’ve had many that have competed, but our ‘All Year Runners,’ those are the folks we know year in and year out are going to show up,” he says. The commission is currently working on a project to manually enter nearly 70,000 participants’ information so that a digital catalog can be created to track racers accurately. The catalog would eventually be accessible to the E 81ST ST public, making it much easier to follow the All Year Runners, as well as the other long-term returning racers. From the devoted runners returning Eagle & Wildlife each year to its mission of providArea ing funds for local Oklahoma charities and non-profits, this is a E 91ST ST community-powered event. 96th St “The Tulsa Run just bleeds Park M the spirit of Tulsa,” Aucoin says. T TH S “People come to race from all E 96 over the nation, but it’s so spePIK ET R

Boat Ramp

R ED

Restrooms

RS

City of Tulsa Trails

VE

er Riv as ns ka Ar

River Parks Trails

Running for a Cause

L> AI

CREEKTURN

cial to see our local community rally around this race year after year.” Many of the participants also run with their children or even grandchildren, making the event a family affair. “It’s amazing to see runners become parents and start involving their kids,” Aucoin says. “It’s a big event for lots of families!” A run is never without a cause, and this one is no different. While some races raise funds to support specific causes like cancer research or a rare disease, the Tulsa Run is about giving back to Oklahoma. Each year, six different charities or nonprofits are chosen to receive the benefits. Some of the past organizations that have received donations include Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma, Boys’ Home of Tulsa, Camp Fire Green Country and Community Heath Connection Medical Services. This year’s primary beneficiary is the organization Big Brothers Big Sisters of Oklahoma. The organization will receive a $25,000 donation. There are also five other charities that will receive a $1,000 donation each, and a total of 10 Tulsa schools will be awarded $4,000. ALAINA STEVENS

TULSAN JD STIGALL HAS COMPETED IN EVERY TULSA RUN SINCE THE RACE BEGAN IN 1978.

M

S ELWOODAVE

E 101ST ST

EK

TU

RN

PI

KE

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Aquarium

29


The State

SPORTS

The Puck Stops Here

T

his month brings hockey back to the ice in Oklahoma with the state’s two professional teams, the Tulsa Oilers and the Oklahoma City Blazers, each expecting a great season. John Peterson, director of broadcasting and media relations for the Oilers, says that last season brought a number of accomplishments that they are ready to meet and exceed this year. “We took a big step last year on and off the ice,” he says. “The team finished one point shy of a playoff spot, so we’re hungry to take that next step and bring playoff hockey back to Tulsa and make a run at a championship.” Jason Christie returns for his second season as head coach in Tulsa. He brings with him the most coaching victories in East Coast Hockey League history, Peterson says. “He is recruiting a talented group of players this year that includes returning ECHL all-rookie team member Dan DeSalvo and defensive leader Dennis Brown,” Peterson says. The team renewed its affiliation with the National Hockey League’s Winnipeg Jets and the American Hockey League’s Manitoba Moose. “They will be a huge asset in putting together a competitive team consisting of players who have the ability to potentially reach the top level of pro hockey someday,” Peterson says. There will also be several theme nights and specialty jersey nights, including Military Appreciation Night, Pink Weekend,

30

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

Oklahoma hockey teams have a long history in a state known for football. Alzheimer’s Awareness Night and the Teddy Bear Toss, benefiting children in Oklahoma. Oklahoma isn’t always thought of as a hockey state, but both teams have captured the state’s interest in the sport. The Oilers have been a part of Tulsa since 1928; the first Oklahoma City professional team, the Warriors, began in 1933. The first incarnation of the Blazers began play in 1965 as part of the old Central Hockey League. The current Blazers team is part of the Western States Hockey League. “Although Oklahoma may be considered a non-traditional hockey market, the Oilers have been fortunate enough to have a fan base that has allowed sustained success,” Peterson says. The support of fans has been important for both of the teams. “Our fans are

ABOVE: OILERS DEFENSEMAN DENNIS BROWN PLAYS AGAINST THE WICHITA THUNDER. RIGHT: OILERS DEFENSEMAN NATHAN LUTZ INTERACTS WITH HIS FAMILY. PHOTOS BY KEVIN PYLE PHOTOGRAPHY

everything to us,” Peterson says. “From our season ticket holders to our corporate partners and organizations, the support we’ve received drives us to be better as an organization every day.” Hockey brings a completely different experience to its fans. “There is truly nothing that compares to a hockey game in person, especially at the professional level,” Peterson says. “The sights and sounds of the action are different than any other sport.” Both teams encourage new fans to come to a game to see what hockey is all about and to create ways their families can enjoy a sport together. Season schedules are available on the teams’ websites and tickets are on sale. To learn more about the teams, visit tulsaoilers. com and okcblazershockey.com. ANNE BOYD


NOVEMBER 2016

Food.

Bricktown - OKC

Need we say more? Promote your restaurant in this issue, 918.744.6205 advertising@okmag.com.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

Food 1/8 V.indd 1

OKC DINING AT ITS BEST! 405.272.0777

MickeyMantleSteakhouse.com

22310 Mickey Mantle's Steakhouse.indd 1

8/29/16 9:44 AM

9/12/16 11:32 AM

Q&A with Dr. Matt Griswold of 918 Chiropractic about

Sick Days, Concussions, and Proper Posture Q: A:

Q: A:

Our kids seem to have more school sick days during this time of year. Any advice for this cold and flu season? Get your kids checked by a chiropractor! Chiropractic care not only keeps your spine healthy but, studies conducted by Harvard and Princeton show that chiropractic boosts the immune system up to 200% after a spinal adjustment. Maintaining a healthy nervous system keeps your immune system strong. Kids are back on the practice fields. How can we keep our kids safe while playing sports? It’s important to get a base line concussion study performed on every child prior to them playing contact sports. I conduct these studies to see how the athlete normally functions to use as a comparison in the event of a head trauma. We use a FDA approved technology that is considered the gold standard in the US and in Europe. This same technology is changing the way the NFL performs concussion exams.

Q: A:

Is there anything else parents should pay attention to for their child’s spinal health? Take a quick look at your child’s posture when they aren’t paying attention. Are their ears aligned with their shoulders? Are their shoulders back with chest high? If your child doesn’t present this type of posture there is work to be done. Forward head posture and rounded shoulders can result from computer usage, video gaming, and even studying a book while sitting improperly. These poor postural habits can cause headaches, sinus infections, asthma, and digestive issues, just to name a few. Make sure your child practices proper posture and get them checked regularly by a chiropractor to ensure optimum spinal health.

918 Chiropractic Dr. J. Matthew Griswold

22329 918 Chiropractic.indd 1

1320 E. 15th street Tulsa, OK 74120 918.212.8688

www.918chiropractic.com

9/16/16 11:36 AM

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

31


The State

MAKERS

Tall in the Saddle Oklahoma City artisan draws customers from Oklahoma and adjacent states.

F

TOP: MIKE MARCELLUS HAS BEEN IN THE BUSINESS OF SADDLERY FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS. RIGHT: IT TAKES BETWEEN 2-4 WEEKS TO CREATE EACH SADDLE. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

32

ficial” since 1992 “with a license or as long as he in hand and permits and things can remember, … But I’ve been doing this for Mike Marcellus longer than that.” has been around His business, Mike’s Custom horses, saddles and Saddle Shop, is in the historic the art of saddlery. Stockyard District of Oklahoma “I grew up in southern Texas,” City. Marcellus has clients from he recalls. “I was a cowboy for all over Oklahoma. many years, and “We live People also come while cowboying I always was around and breathe from Kansas, Texas and other states to people who made this stuff.” visit because they saddles.” His family view Marcellus’s custom pieces has also been a part of the trade as necessary to their riding expeas far back as four generations. riences. “My father made saddles, and Marcellus’s whole business actually retired only a few years depends upon the art of paying atago. I have always been around tention to small details and craftsaddlery.” ing them into intricate, custom Marcellus has been in the pieces that are as unique as the business of saddlery for over 30 individual customers themselves. years, but he has only been “of-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

The process is far more complex than going to a store and picking out a saddle. “When a customer comes in for a custom job, they bring their horse in, then they’re measured, and we measure the horse,” Marcellus says. “Then the labor starts, which can take anywhere from 2-4 weeks.” Customers can easily tell a difference in the fit of a custom saddle. “It’s like buying a dress; you can buy one from the shop, or you can have a designer make you one with your measurements,” Marcellus says. “You’ll be able to tell a difference.” The various designs in leather vary from order to order. However, the patterns used are standard. Marcellus says that the general stamps are geometric waffle stamps, as well as “rita flowers” and “wild roses.” The patterns are put onto wet leather, then hand-tooled into the leather. Each saddle gets this custom hand treatment, and the prices reflect that: Marcellus says their average custom range is around $4,000. “You have to keep in mind that the materials are $1,700 on their own,” he says. “It’s definitely enough to make you say, ‘Wowee.’” “We live and breathe this stuff,” Marcellus says. “My father rodeoed, and I grew up watching Westerns and they had all of the influence in the world.” Marcellus and his son, Michael, recently qualified to compete in the U.S. Team Roping Championships’ National Finals, Oct. 22-30 in Oklahoma City. “We have cattle, horses, a roping arena; we train. It’s our entire lives.” Marcellus’s life goes beyond just making saddles; he’s the real deal. Right after hanging up the phone, he has plans to cut and haul hay. He loves what he does. And what does Marcellus enjoy the most about saddle making? “It’s not just about crafting saddles,” he says fondly. “It’s about making people’s dreams and wishes come true.” SAMANTHA ALEXANDER


Bringing Function & Style to the most important part of your home.

www.kitchendesign.com 21379 Kitchen Ideas.indd 1

22175 Protection 1.indd 1

Kitchen Ideas LLC 918.494.0621

5313 S. Mingo Road, Tulsa 5/16/16 4:01 PM

5/19/16 11:17 AM

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

33


Fine apparel Buy

Local

www.traversmahanapparel.com

South Lewis at 81st • The Plaza • 918-296-4100

9/10/16 11:36 AM

Heatwave Supply, Inc. 1347 S. Sheridan

22320 Travers Mahan.indd 1

Explore… …our 6,000 square foot showroom located in Tulsa at 14th and Sheridan. “Turn on a shower. Get in a steam room. Hop in a whirlpool.” It’s simply the best way to experience and evaluate our product lines.

www.nathanharmon.com

T: 918.269.6284

34

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

21926 Nathan Harmon.indd 1

918.838.9841 • heatwavesupply.com

5/19/16 21944 9:28 AM Heatwave Supply.indd 1

2/8/16 4:09 PM


Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Cozy up to Winter This fashion trend combines practicality and individuality.

A

dreary dilemma for fashionistas as the cold weather sets in is the struggle to merge the practicality of staying warm and the individuality of personal fashion. It seems like the choice lies between bulky and unattering coats with little style appeal and a not-so-practical high-fashion jacket that leaves you shivering. Luckily, a new trend blends both practicality and individuality for an irresistible winter staple: the warm and fuzzy statement coat. With pops of color and the additions of fur, shearling and funky feathers, your wardrobe gets unique textural components that will make heads turn. Bottom line: You’ll stay warm and look great doing it.

OCTOBER 2016| WWW.OKMAG.COM

35


ADRIENNE LANDAU FOX MULTICOLORED 24 INCH VEST, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

Life & Style

GENERATION LOVE FUR TRIM BOMBER, $368, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ETNIA BARCELONA ROUND PLASTIC SUNGLASSES WITH MIRROR LENSES, $319, HICKS BRUNSON

PARKER OMBRE FUR VEST, $995, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

LOEFFLER RANDALL MULTICOLORED CROSSBODY POUCH, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF ILAN FRINGE BOOTIE IN BUTTERSCOTCH, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ST YLE

SURELL SHEARED RABBIT KNIT LOOP, $250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE STUART WEITZMAN FAUX FUR WELLIES, $398, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

BURBERRY BRIT CEDARVILLE SHEARLING BLACK GILET, $2495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

Warm & Fuzzy Cozy up as the weather turns cold, but don’t let it affect your fashion fierceness. Combine warm and fuzzy jackets, shoes and accessories to keep your winter wardrobe sensational.

NIC & ZOE STUDDED JACKET, $298, DONNA’S FASHIONS

TORY BURCH SUEDE BOOT, $550, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE SURELL RABBIT KNIT LOOP, $250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALICE AND OLIVIA LEOPARD JACKET, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

UGG SELBY SWEATER, $108, DONNA’S FASHIONS

BURBERRY BRIT BAYBROOKE HEART DUFFLE WITH HEART CHECK IN NEW CAMEL, $1195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MICHAEL KORS SAPPHIRE SLIP-ONS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

ZERO G SQUARE PLASTIC SUNGLASSES, $485, HICKS BRUNSON


ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL-ENCRUSTED NECKLACE, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JOHN + JENN VELVET BOMBER JACKET, $198, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ELIZABETH AND JAMES SHOULDER BAG, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE BAILEY 44 FISHNET TOP, $128, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL-ENCRUSTED ORIGAMI PEEKS CUFF BRACELET, $275, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL-FRAMED LUCITE CUFF BRACELET IN POLISHED SILVER, $145, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MustHaves

PARKER COLD SHOULDER BLOUSE, $220, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF EMBROIDERED BOOTIE, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

So many trends, so little time... From embellished shoes to embroidered bags, pops of purple to luxurious leopard, street chic to weekend wear, Oklahoma Magazine has it all.

DIOR SUNGLASSES, $560, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO BLACK CUTOUT HEELS, $1250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTALENCRUSTED COILED ORIGAMI BRACELET, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALEXIS BITTAR POINTED PYRAMID DROP EARRINGS, $175, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

DOMA WASHED LAMB LEATHER JACKET, $499, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

BAILEY 44 COLD SHOULDER TOP, $158, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JIMMY CHOO NAVY PATENT PUMPS WITH EMBELLISHED BADGES, $1050, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

March 2007 • Oklahoma Magazine OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

373


Life & Style

Marvelous Menswear

MEYER PANT, $275, TRAVERS MAHAN

MASUNAGA AVIATORSTYLE METAL FRAME SUNGLASSES, $399, HICKS BRUNSON

Menswear is all about layers this season: cashmere sweaters atop crisp button downs are a must. Add colorful denim and some sharp headwear and you’ll looking divine.

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE NYLON VEST WITH MERINO TRIM, $398, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MARTIN DINGMAN BELT, $85, TRAVERS MAHAN

MICHAEL KORS WHITE JEANS, $145, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE MAROON JEANS, $138, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

NAVY BLUE HUNTING JACKET, $348, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE LEISURE SOCIETY IN MATTE BLACK AND SILVER, $970, HICKS BRUNSON

CITIZENS OF HUMANITY JEANS, $250, TRAVERS MAHAN

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE LEATHER-BAND FEDORA, $128, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

SAND SCARF, $195, TRAVERS MAHAN

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE IVY CAP, $98, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

BLUE AND GRAY BUTTON DOWN COLLARED SHIRT, $168; BLUE CREWNECK SWEATER, $178, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

TOMMY BAHAMA WOVEN SHIRT, $128; TOMMY BAHAMA QUARTER-ZIP SWEATER, $158, TRAVERS MAHAN

SAND SHIRT, $225; SAND CARDIGAN SWEATER, $375, TRAVERS MAHAN

MARTIN DINGMAN BELT, $95, TRAVERS MAHAN

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE PERFORATED SLIP-ON SNEAKER, $248, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

OLIVER PEOPLES TOYKO TORTOISE METAL SUNGLASSES, $399, VISIONS

38

MICHAEL KORS WHITE BUTTON DOWN, $145; MICHAEL KORS BLACK SWEATER, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE DOUBLE MONK DRESS SHOES, $328, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

MARTIN DINGMAN SHOES, $225, TRAVERS MAHAN

MARTIN DINGMAN SHOES, $235, TRAVERS MAHAN


Oklahoma Magazine is available by subscription for only $18 for 12 issues. LY JU

Bbest L 16 20

est

tem ber

AUGUST 2016

Sep 201 6

August 2016

an

6 y 201 Jul

more th

900 s TION e of inner EDISUSUCA E StatA tw the r

2016 0

hr

sS

a nushow mbe that r

YH UR UX SL PLU

E OM

is

From

Bix by

Fall Plu Art Fashs sP io rev n iew

R 20 16

the 22 ga Preservin ve Nati vibrant American culture

BE

A Y ct

ve s agOklahomea iv Natisu re e is just ans r e Trea

EM

5

15 ries go cateC

PT

22

of

SING OGY • HOU TECHNOL ORS NEW MAJ OAD STUDY ABRSTEM CLUBS • S FINANCE

SE

s museum Area art nding are expa ing and thriv

9

The

HOuatstanOR ding SENIr S ris J 13 Home-G r. ro oma’s

Oklah

to th

e Su per

Bow

lw

ith

th

Plus

eB OLYMPIC GUIDE ronc

os

Co

Ta m Thri lk A e ving bou di Comt Okl an edyahom s Scena’s e

wn

SUBSCRIBE AT

okmag.com/print-subscription

Subscription_1-16v.indd 1

9/11/16 12:20 PM

Architecture & Interior Design 918-592-1225

duvallarchitects.com 22315 Duvall Architects.indd 1

9/2/16 8:54 AM

Home or Business

October 9, 2016 through January 8, 2017

918.592.1234 410 S Peoria Ave Tulsa, OK 74120

Chocolate will engage all your senses – come explore the culture of chocolate.

Chocolate and its national tour were developed by The Field Museum, Chicago, and supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation. TU is an EEO/AA institution.

Exhibition season title sponsor is the Sherman E. Smith Family Charitable Foundation. Support also provided by Mervin Bovaird Foundation, C.W. Titus Foundation and M.V. Mayo Charitable Foundation.

GILCREASE.ORG 22318 Gilcrease.indd 1 22323 Visions Tile and Stone.indd 1

9/14/16 1:45 PM

9/7/16 4:03 PM

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

39


Life & Style

THE FULMER GROUP OPTED FOR AN OPEN DESIGN THAT WOULD LEAD TO MORE COLLABORATION, ALLOWING THE ATTORNEYS TO WORK TOGETHER WITH CLIENTS. THE OFFICES, LOCATED IN AUTOMOBILE ALLEY IN OKC, WERE DESIGNED BY FITZSIMMONS ARCHITECTS.

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


INTERIORS

Not Your Grandfather’s Law Office Fitzsimmons Architects and The Fulmer Group work together to create a new look for legal firms. By M. J. Van Deventer • Photos by Joseph Mills

G

oing to the office must be an immense pleasure for the attorneys who work at The Fulmer Group in the historic Buick Building, located in downtown Oklahoma City. Once housing a thriving automotive showroom, the building, completed in the 1920s, was used more recently as a warehouse. When Midtown Renaissance Group discovered its potential, they purchased the building and planned to bring the building back to life with modernized tenant spaces. Like The Fulmer Group’s slogan – “not your grandfather’s law firm” – the preconceived notions of a traditional law firm are changed the moment a client sets foot inside this contemporary space. In lieu of individual private offices, the law firm opted for a more collaborative and conversational layout. This design allows clients to engage with the legal team in various transparent conference rooms and break-out areas. This client-centered approach ensures spaces are active throughout the day. Fitzsimmons Architects worked with The Fulmer Group to design these fresh interiors. Now, thanks to the Fitzsimmons staff’s forward-thinking architectural and interior design expertise, clients are greeted by crisp white walls and a pleasing combination of glass, stone and wood. Leather is featured in some of the contemporary furnishings. The color scheme is white and soft cream neutrals with gray and black accents. Clients are instantly immersed into an understated but upscale, modern interior when they cross the firm’s threshold. Comfortable group seating in the reception area and white boards in the break area allow for casual collaboration throughout the day, and OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

41


Life & Style

THE OFFICES IN THE BUICK BUILDING HAVE MULTIPLE EYECATCHING FEATURES, INCLUDING VAULTED SPACES THAT HELP DISTRIBUTE NATURAL LIGHT AND A DRAMATIC STAIRWAY LEADING TO A LOFT ABOVE THE MAIN AREAS.

42

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

the conference room can be divided into two smaller meeting rooms buy a hidden folding wall. The great room on the west wall houses the kitchen and breakroom, individual work spaces and two private meeting rooms. Lockers provide room for personal items to keep the space clean and tidy. The feeling evoked upon entry is best described as uninhibited. Clients experience a dramatic setting, including vaulted ceilings and a sense of direction provided by artistic ceiling lighting. Sunlight filters through windows, located at the southernmost area of the office. Vaulted spaces intentionally help distribute natural light, creating a pleasant environment for researching precedent-setting cases and solving clients’ legal issues. Particularly eye-catching is a dramatic stairway leading to a loft above the main areas. It features wood, concrete and metals – materials and textures repeated throughout the spaces. The design of the interior suites is unique in its response to the traditional status quo of the law profession. It articulates the firm’s unique attitude and identity with vividly colored contemporary art and open spaces. Traditional law offices are characterized by rooms with closed doors, suggesting privacy, but the interior design and architectural features at The Fulmer Group reflect the best of a new strategy for serving clients in a more user-friendly environment. Harrison Lujan, a co-founder of the firm with Simone Fulmer, says, “We had a very specific vision for the layout and design of the office that would reinforce the core values of our group. It was of utmost importance to create an environment that fostered collaboration and creativity, which is not the case for most law firms.”


Since 1964 Specializing in frameless heavy glass shower doors, mirrors, framed shower doors, glass tops and insulated glass units.

Don Tracy Glass Co. 1335 S. HARVARD â—? TULSA, OK 74112 OFFICE: (918) 744-1815 FAX: (918) 744-0917

3549 South Harvard, Tulsa 918-742-9027

www.dontracyglass.com

18222 Don Tracy Glass.indd 1

12/14/14 19324 4:39 PM Tonis.indd 1

8/25/16 11:39 AM

2016 2014

Walter & associates realtors 1319 East 35th Street,Tulsa, OK 74105 918.743.2001 | walterandassociates.com

22292 Silex Interiors.indd 1

8/23/16 10403 9:10 AM Walter & Associates.indd 1

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

43

5/15/14 9:52 5/24/16 5:00 AM PM


Life & Style

D E S T I N AT I O N S

No Longer Just Music City Country and western may be the city’s main draw, but Nashville has plenty of additional offerings.

N

ashville, a pulsating slice of Americana, is a daylong car trip from Oklahoma and only a few hours away via jet. However you get there, here are some places to visit.

Tunes, Food and Moods

NASHVILLE SITS ALONG THE CUMBERLAND RIVER AND IS HOME TO A REPLICA OF THE PARTHENON.

44

While not centrally located, Bluebird Cafe, featured on the TV show Nashville, requires reservations because it’s a hot spot for live music and good pub grub. The historic Grand Ole Opry has nightly concerts, so reserve tickets online after choosing a night based on the performers. Martina McBride, the Oak Ridge Boys, Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers, and Rascal Flats are among those playing the Opry this month. Broadway Street is famous for leisurely strolls and live performances. Pedal taverns and carriage rides are fun options on this picturesque boulevard. Music Row,

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

with its celebrity residential recording studios, is full of charming Southern architecture. The Nashville trolley/tour buses and tour guides offer convenient ways to see the city’s landmarks. Leave plenty of time to just experience the city and meander through the Gulch District. The Johnny Cash Museum is excellent and interactive. The famous Hattie B’s is considered one of the top fried chicken restaurants in America. People line up before the doors open at 11 a.m. The Tavern in Midtown has delicious, reasonably priced food and a great ambiance. Bob’s Steak and Chops in the Omni Hotel is a deluxe steakhouse


MUSIC ROW AND THE GRAND OLE OPRY HELP TO DEFINE NASHVILLE.

TRAVEL TIPS • Bluebird Cafe requires reservaF11PHOTO / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

tions and, while it’s not centrally located, it draws many visitors.

• Build in afternoon rest time to gear up for the lively nightlife.

appropriate for an extended stay. A home or apartment also provides more space, bedrooms, bathrooms and a refrigerator to store delicious leftovers. Rocking chairs on the front porch seal the deal for those wanting authentic Nashville living. Bring a guitar, but don’t be surprised if you already find one inside any bed-and-breakfast. With this location, you can use Uber to go to the hot spots four miles away. Observe the ambiance on morning walks to the neighborhood coffee shop or bakery. Omni Hotel is downtown, attractive and close to tour buses. Hilton Garden Inn Nashville Vanderbilt is also a good choice for convenience’s sake.

ACESHOT1 / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

downtown and a personal favorite. The rack of lamb is divine and the steaks are superb. Other highlights include dining in authentic Nashville pubs. Acme Feed and Seed on Broadway Street is a personal favorite with varied musicians, ranging from rock ’n’ roll cover bands to blues or jazz ensembles. That’s right. It’s not all country western music in Nashville. Nashville is referred to as the Athens of the South for its emphasis on the academics and architecture of classical Greece, so visit the Parthenon (a replica of the actual site) and its museum. Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage is a fascinating historical landmark. It and other museums in Nashville are impressive with their collections and attention to detail.

• A fall or spring trip is a good time to go to avoid the summer heat.

GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

Shopping

CREATIVE JEN DESIGNS / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Two Old Hippies in the Gulch District, an upscale lifestyle boutique, offers impressive clothing, items, jewelry and shoes. Broadway Boots, with its enormous selection, is in the heart of the Broadway Street district. Savannah’s Candy Kitchen, also on Broadway Street, is a wonderland of oldfashioned fun and confections, perfect for souvenirs.

Lodging

Airbnb is to hotels as Uber has become to taxis: convenient. For instance, we found a writer’s bungalow in hip East Nashville, OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


MEET YOUR OKLAHOMA RANCHER

Terry Stuart Forst

Waurika, Oklahoma

Tell us a little bit about yourself, your family and your ranch: Terry: Stuart Ranch is the oldest ranch in Oklahoma under continuous family ownership. We have been in business since 1868, and my grandson is the seventh generation on this four-county ranch. We have a cow/calf and yearling cattle operation. We graze a little over 3,000 acres of wheat pasture. We also have a wildlife and outfitting division plus we raise, train, show and use Quarter Horses in everyday ranch work. What is the most important thing that you do on your ranch every day to make sure you are raising safe beef for the consumer? Terry: I feed my family the same beef the consumer buys. My reputation and my livelihood depend on my integrity as a cattle rancher. It’s my responsibility to my animals and to the consumer to use the best animal health practices and feeding programs available. I’m going to utilize everything I can to make sure the animal grows to its potential whether it goes back into the herd as a breeding animal or reaches the consumer’s table. Our family has not succeeded this far by being irresponsible. We take care of what we have and I’m proud of the way we handle our cattle and our resources.

“My reputation and my livelihood depend on

my integrity as a cattle rancher.”

How has your family spent so many generations caring for cattle and natural resources? Terry: God chose us to be good, responsible stewards of his creation. My family has survived all that weather and markets can throw at us. We have adapted to conditions. We have changed our plans, learning through mistakes and failures, how to best manage what God has entrusted us with. If we hadn’t managed well, we would not be celebrating


51 150 years of continuous family involvement in 2018. To quote my grandmother Carrie Ida Freeny Stuart, in reference to our forefathers, “These beloved pioneers have left a great heritage for us. Many years of hardship and devotion to their country and family have produced hardy men of strong character. From this background came our great state of Oklahoma in which there is much pride among her people.” If you could describe in one word the life of a rancher, what would it be? Terry: Commitment.

2 3 4

What is your favorite cut of beef and how do you like to prepare it? Terry: A rib eye on the grill.

5

FAST FACTS

ABOUT THE BEEF COMMUNITY The Oklahoma beef community has 51,000 farming and ranching families and of that there are 42,000 farms and ranches with less than 100 head. 97 percent of beef farms or ranches are family-owned. Fifty-four percent of these farms and ranches have been in the same family for three generations or more. It’s important to note, beef ’s environmental footprint is shrinking. Each pound of beef raised in 2007 (compared to 1977) used 19 percent less feed, 33 percent less land, 12 percent less water and 9 percent less fossil fuel energy. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), beef production accounts

for only 1.5 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions in the US. All beef cattle are raised on grass, although mature cattle are often moved to feedyards for four to six months during which time they have constant access to water, a carefully balanced diet made up of roughage (such as hay, grass and fiber) and grain (such as corn, wheat and soybean meal) and room to move around. Veterinarians, cattle

nutritionists and cattlemen work together to look after each animal.

The beef lifecycle is perhaps one of the most unique and complex lifecycles of any food. It

takes anywhere from 2-3 years to bring beef from the farm to your dinner table. Producing the best beef in the world is an artisan process not a factory one.

Learn more about the farmers and ranchers behind your beef and other beef questions at www.oklabeef.org

Don’t forget to visit www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com for great beef recipes and cooking tips.


Life & Style

F YI

Add Safety to Your Holiday List

A

Awareness, common sense and active responses help when danger arises during the shopping season.

s summer days fade and crisp autumn days take over, the sun sets earlier. When darkness falls, it is important to keep personal safety tips in mind, especially when the holiday shopping season gets into full swing. Christmas, after all, is only a few months away. Officer Jeanne MacKenzie, Crime Stoppers coordinator and public information officer for the Tulsa Police department, advises evening shoppers to park in a welllit area. “Also, make sure to lock your car,” she says. That might sound simple, but most people would be surprised to know many people leave their cars unlocked, making it easy for thieves to get in, she says. Another tip is to not leave valuables in plain view. “When you approach your car, have your key ready and check the inside before entering,” MacKenzie says. “If you notice anything that is not right, notify police or security.” Officer Leland Ashley, also with Crime Stoppers and the Tulsa Police Department, stresses being alert and aware of your surroundings. “Avoid displaying or carrying large sums of money,” he says. “If you must use an ATM, choose one that is located inside a business or a well-lighted location, and beware of strangers approaching you. We always advise

48

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

people to call police or go to a well-populated, lit area if they feel like they are being followed or feel unsafe.” Since the Aurora, Colorado, movie theater massacre in July 2012, the number of active-shooter incidents in our country has increased and made the basic rules of personal safety change quite a bit, MacKenzie says. When faced with an armed aggressor, some people’s first instincts may be to freeze and hide, but, if possible, you should fight that response and get yourself and others out. Also, when trying to escape, your last worry should be grabbing your mobile phone. “Leave it and just get out,” MacKenzie says. If you can’t exit, and you know your threat is in between you and the exit, you need to hide. Then, do all you can to prevent the shooter from entering the room and causing injury. Lock the door. Turn the lights off. This not only makes it harder for the shooter to fire at you, but it lets time be your ally. “Two or three minutes in an active-shooter [situation] is a lot of time,” says McKenzie. “That time allows the police to come in and do their job.” It’s also important to use a landline to call for help because the address of your location is going to be accessible at the police dispatch center. “Lastly, you have to fight for your life,” McKenzie says. “Statistics show that most people who are shot by a gun survive. Just keep fighting. Fighting buys time.” SHARON MCBRIDE


We know what’s most important to you.

C

M

Y

CM

6

MY

CY

CMY

K

TOYOTA OKLAHOMA

JIM NORTON 9809 South Memorial Drive, Tulsa 918-250-6888 • JimNortonToyota.com 22295 Jim Norton Toyota.indd 1

D O NALD W. REY NO LD S VI SUAL ART S CENT ER | 4 1 5 CO UCH D RI VE | ( 405 ) 23 6- 310 0 | o kcm o a.co m

8/23/16 22296 9:28 AM OKC MOA.indd 1

8/23/16 9:36 AM

Be...A Scholar Be...A Cascian • 2016 United States Presidential Scholar • Cornelius Vanderbilt Scholarship Recipient • National Merit Finalist • Oklahoma Academic Scholar • International Science & Engineering Fair Finalist • Lead Cellist, Tulsa Honors Orchestra

Gracie rule class of 2016

• Key Club Lieutenant Governor • Camp Anytown Delegate and Counselor

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, November 6, 2016, 1:00 - 3:00 pm Register for an Entrance Exam or Shadow Day at casciahall.com/admissions. 22303 Cascia Hall.indd 1

2520 S. Yorktown Ave. Tulsa, OK 918-746-2604

www.casciahall.com admissions@casciahall.com 8/23/16 10:24 AM

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

49


Life & Style

H E A LT H

F

Catching Zzz’s

Sleep disorders hinder rest and lead to health problems for millions of Americans.

or many Americans, attaining a good night’s sleep is merely a daydream. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of adults in the United States aren’t getting enough sleep on a regular basis. Insufficient sleep has been cited as a public health problem. While social factors and poor sleep habits play a role in these numbers, many individuals suffer directly from sleep disorders. Dr. Richard Bregman serves as medical director for the Sleep Disorders Center at Saint Francis Hospital in Tulsa. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine and sleep medicine. “A sleep disorder is any condition that can affect sleep in terms of sleep onset or sleep maintenance and can affect one’s well-being,” Bregman says. “Symptoms that can alert a patient to a sleep disturbance can include difficulty initiating sleep, maintaining sleep and waking up unrefreshed or tired after a night’s sleep. One of the more common sleep disorders is sleep apnea syndrome in which one generally has loud snoring, witnessed pauses during sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness.” Symptoms can also include irritability upon awakening and problems concentrating. Bregman encourages anyone with these symptoms to seek medical attention. Bregman says patients with sleep apnea syndrome may fall asleep inappropriately throughout the day and, while generally patients with this disorder are overweight, it can also occur in individuals of normal weight.

50

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

“Sleep apnea can lead to serious medical conditions, such as heart attacks, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and automobile accidents,” says Bregman, adding that sleep apnea syndrome can also occur in children.

Other common sleep disorders include restless leg syndrome, narcolepsy and insomnia. Restless leg syndrome is often characterized by uncomfortable sensations in the legs and the often irresistible urge to keep moving the legs to relieve the sensations.

Bregman explains that restless leg syndrome can prevent sleep onset and cause unrefreshed sleep and daytime fatigue or sleepiness. The condition occurs more frequently in family members and can affect women during the last trimester of pregnancy as well as individuals with kidney disease and anemia. Both medical and nonmedical treatments are available that can provide some relief. “The symptoms of restless leg syndrome are worse in the evening, such as when riding in the car, sitting watching television or lying in bed trying to go to sleep,” he says. “An associated sleep disturbance is periodic limb movement disorder, where one constantly moves their arms or legs during sleep and can hit or kick their bed partner and cause not only fragmentation of the patient’s sleep but also of the bed partner.” Narcolepsy, known for causing excessive sleepiness, generally develops in people’s teens or 20s. “Narcolepsy shows up as marked daytime sleepiness to the point that the patient will fall asleep inappropriately during the day and has vivid dreaming; this can be treated successfully with medication,” Bregman says. Traits of insomnia include difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, resulting in daytime fatigue, tiredness or sleepiness. Practicing good sleep habits can often significantly improve these symptoms. REBECCA FAST


Permanent hair for only $3 per graft!

22297 OSU Center for Health Sciences.indd 1

8/23/16 9:44 AM

We Take Care of 18,000 People A Night. Medical Staffing • Home-Care Services • Emergency Medical Services Hospital Resource Staffing • Therapy Staffing • Home Health Coding & QA As the exclusive emergency medical services provider to the Chesapeake Energy Arena and Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, Sooner Medical is responsible for the safety and care of thousands of people at a time. As you would expect, it requires great attention to detail, a high level of skill, and consistent delivery with a caring personal touch. We can do the same for you - whether it’s personal care or nursing in the home, temporary staffing in a healthcare facility, specialized hospital support services, or of course emergency medical services.

2016

Oklahoma Owned. Oklahoma Trusted. Oklahoma City 405.735.8383 • Tulsa 918.878.8166 22177 Sooner Medical.indd 1

405.751.LOVE

Member, Int. Society of Hair Restoration Surgery Certified, American Board of Plastic Surgery Fellow, American College of Surgeons Member, American Society of Plastic Surgeons American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery CareCredit, Prosper Healthcare Lending & Alphaeon Credit welcome

5/19/16 2:38 PM 22293OCTOBER Dr. Tim Love, 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM M.D.indd 1

51 8/23/16 9:14 AM


Life & Style

SCENE

DAN & WHITNEY ESLICKER, KAYLA & SCOTT VAUGHN; KALEIDOSCOPE BALL, EMERGENCY INFANT SERVICES, TULSA

STAN & IRENE BURNSTEIN ARE GALA HONOREES FOR THE RED RIBBON GALA BENEFITTING TULSA CARES. THE EVENT WILL TAKE PLACE MARCH 4, 2017 AT THE COX BUSINESS CENTER IN TULSA.

DEAN ORFORD, JEANETTE KERN, MICHELLE HOLDGRAFER; BRUCE G. WEBER TENNIS CLASSIC SUPPORTING THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS, TULSA

WENDY & GENTNER DRUMMOND; KALEIDOSCOPE BALL, EMERGENCY INFANT SERVICES, TULSA

SYDNEY WALKER, GINA KINGSLEY, AMANDA DUENNER, VIDA SCHUMAN; SANTORINI VIP NIGHT, GREEK FESTIVAL, TULSA

ROGER HARDESTY, MARY BETH COLPITTS, CONNOR HARDESTY, MICHELLE HARDESTY; GRAND OPENING FOR TULSA BALLET HARDESTY CENTER FOR DANCE EDUCATION, BROKEN ARROW

AMBER VALLETTA, LIBBY BILLINGS, REP. REGINA GOODWIN; GIRLS ON THE RUN 5K, YWCA, TULSA

52

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

DR. RON SUTOR, TAMI MURPHY; DANCING FOR A MIRACLE, CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, OKC

ASHLEY GRIFFIN, LYNN JONES, TAMMY HERN, JEAN ANN HANKINS; MCDAZZLE FUN BALL 2016, RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE CHARITIES, TULSA

GARY PAXTON, JACKIE KOURI, MARCELLO ANGELINI; GRAND OPENING FOR TULSA BALLET HARDESTY CENTER FOR DANCE EDUCATION, BROKEN ARROW

SHERRY & LEE BEASLEY; POP! CHAMPAGNE AND SPIRIT TASTING, ST. ANTHONY FOUNDATION, OKC

AMANDA & BRENT ADAMS, 2016 CATTLE BARON’S BALL, AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY, TULSA

JENNIFER & DR. GREG BLAIR, LORI MCLARTY; POP! CHAMPAGNE AND SPIRIT TASTING, ST. ANTHONY FOUNDATION, OKC


Transform your dreams inTo realiTy

WOOD-STONE, INC. KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN STUDIO

DREAM. DESIGN. INDULGE.

2016

"Celebrating our 21st year” Thank you Tulsa!

General conTracTors inc.

Russ Pippin, CKD Certified Kitchen Designer

1303 East 15th Street • Tulsa, Ok 74120 918.584.3710 woodstone@tulsacoxmail.com • www.wood-stone.com

Mommy Maids

22211 Wood-Stone Design Studio.indd 1

1424 south Harvard Tulsa, oklahoma 918-749-7904 www.barronandmcclary.com

6/1/16 10824 12:22 PM Barron & McClary.indd 1

2/4/14 3:08 PM

2016

Thank you Oklahoma for voting us 'The Best of the Best'

• Residential or Commercial • Call for FREE Estimates

Gift Certificates Available! $75 for 2 hours of Basic Cleaning Expires 10/31/16

918.938.8222

www.mommy-maids.com “It’s hard to compete with a Mom’s touch.” 2016

Work Featured on 18651 Caviness Landscape.indd 1 18405 Mommy Maids 1-8v.indd 1

9/8/16 10:33 AM

"POOL KINGS" 8/30/16 8:56 AM

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

53


A Healthy Future Technology is helping Oklahomans receive better health care.

Technology is constantly advancing, and hospitals and doctors are taking advantage of the new innovations that allow for better health care for their patients. Robotic surgery is allowing Oklahomans to recovery from surgery faster and with less pain, and techniques from robotic surgery are also being used to train tomorrow’s doctors. The internet is also changing the way we look at health care – televisits allow 24-hour access to care for minor illnesses and accesses from your phone or computer, and patient portals are giving people more information than ever to help them manage their own health. Many items used for other purposes, including smart phones, are also being used to help manage people’s health and wellness, whether through tracking their weight and diet, monitoring their heart rate or even checking blood pressure. By looking at what technology can offer you in terms of managing your health, you can live a better life than ever.

THE FUTURE OF HOUSE CALLS Telemedicine allows easier access to health care. By Bonnie Rucker

The days of the home visit from your friendly local doctor are practically over. But what if they weren’t over, but had merely gone virtual? What if, through the use of technology, the sick and injured could be in almost immediate contact with a doctor at any time without leaving home or the office? Telemedicine and technology grant this kind of access. The American Telemedicine Association defines telemedicine as “the use of medical information exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications to improve a patient’s clinical health status.” The organization uses this term to describe a variety of remote types of health care. These can include everything from electronic health records to patient portals to rolling clinics on buses. But the overall goals and mission behind telemedicine remain the same: an

54

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

effort to increase the accessibility and quality of health care for people who face barriers and challenges to receiving this care. “Historically there were little to no options after hours and/or [across] geographic barriers, which are a very real challenge for many people, but now, through the use of technology, we’re able to come to them at a time and place that they need,” says Dr. Jason Lepak, lead physician for virtual care in the St. John Health System. The ubiquity of smartphones and access to the internet have paved the way for new options when visiting the doctor. Just this summer, St. John Health System in Tulsa introduced its OnDemand virtual doctor’s office visits. Through this program, patients with minor illnesses and injuries can address their needs day or night on any date. The process typically takes 30 minutes


“The consumer

or less, and patients don’t have to leave the comfort of their homes or the convenience of their offices. “Why [St. John OnDemand] is beneficial for the patient is that they can have a doctor’s visit in real time, wherever and whenever they need it. So, it increases access 24/7/365 days a year,” Lepak says. This convenience can have major results, as INTEGRIS Health in Oklahoma City has seen. INTEGRIS launched a Virtual Visit option in February 2015. Since then, more than 2,600 online visits have been conducted and have received a customer satisfaction rating of 94 percent, according to Dr. Pamela Forducey, system director at INTEGRIS eHealth. The Virtual Visit allows anyone to access a primary-care health professional from anywhere. “The consumer is connected to this

professional, on averis connected age, within 14 minto this utes of requesting the service,” Forducey professional, on says. average, within Both the St. John and INTEGRIS proof grams are intended requesting the for patients with minor illnesses or service.” injuries, not major medical emergencies. During the online visit, the health care provider will tor for INTEGRIS Health Partners, and mandetermine if the patient should be aging director and chief physician executive seen in person. “St. John Clinic at INTEGRIS Medical Group. OnDemand providers will determine For many at home or work, being treated within the first three minutes of a by an online health care provider goes bevirtual medical visit if the patient’s yond simple convenience. condition would be better treated Telemedicine can serve populations with at a nearby medical facility,” barriers to receiving health care, such as says Joy McGill, a St. John those who live in rural areas far from doctors Health System spokesand hospitals, those who lack transportation, woman. and those who need to spend as little time The benefits to paas possible away from work and school. tients of these types “Telemedicine solutions enable consumers of programs include to receive more timely access to care in their an increased level of own community versus having to drive long convenience. “Patients distances for medical specialists,” Forducey wouldn’t have to leave says. work and wait on the As with anything new, these options are doctor and therefore may not without challenges. Some may quesbe more productive,” says Dr. tion the validity of a telemedical exam and Jeffrey Cruzan, medical direcfeel there is a lack of a personal touch to a doctor’s office that they visit online, Cruzan says. Also, some doctors have been slower to adopt these new methods of sharing information and communicating with patients over the last decade due to a lack of awareness and understanding, Forducey says.

14 minutes

OCTOBER 2016| WWW.OKMAG.COM

55


Health Tech

Visits to virtual doctors’ offices aren’t the only way that Oklahoma health providers use technology to provide patients with improved service. INTEGRIS uses telemedicine to serve individuals with complex medical issues and save those patients from longdistance travel. INTEGRIS has established a Mayo Clinic Care Network affiliation to allow for “a physician-to-physician eConsult, where INTEGRIS Health physicians can access an electronic consultation, referred to as eConsult, with a Mayo subject matter expert,” Forducey says.

“Telemedicine solutions enable consumers to receive more timely access to care in their own community.” INTEGRIS has also established the TeleStroke Network of Oklahoma to make the most of vital moments in potential stroke situations. This network allows rural hospitals access to consultations from expert neurologists when patients come to emergency rooms with stroke-like symptoms. St. John Health System has introduced several options with technology in recent months. The St. John smart phone application allows patients to have access to medical information at their fingertips – literally. App users can get onto the St. John patient portal, look up symptoms for common health and injury concerns, find resources in their area and book a reservation at St. John Urgent Care centers, says Joy McGill, St. John Health System spokeswoman. This allows patients to wait at home instead of at the clinic. They can trade the waiting room for the living room, Lepak says. No matter what form it comes in, the mission of telemedicine is to break down the barriers to quality health care that exist for many people. Whether the challenge involves time, place or people, many Oklahoma health providers are finding ways to use technology to provide the best possible care to everyone.

56

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

DR. JASON LEPAK, PHYSICIAN LEAD FOR VIRTUAL CARE IN THE ST. JOHN HEALTH SYSTEM, SAYS THE SYSTEM WILL INCREASE MEDICAL ACCESS BY ALLOWING APPOINTMENTS AT ANY TIME.


OTHER

INNOVATIONS

AROUND THE GLOBE

Advanced technology is so ubiquitous that astronauts may soon have their own “repair shop” on the International Space Station, while surgeons put custom-fit replacement parts into and on your body. With three-dimensional printers that use human cells in the process, doctors at Wake Forest University have manufactured tissue, muscles, ears and bones in 2016. The school’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine says its even close to spitting out hearts for transplants. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers, meanwhile, has rated as its top five medical-tech advancements for the year: a handheld optical scanner that can detect whether a mole may be cancerous; electronic asprin, a tiny implant that blocks neurotransmitters when a migraine headache begins; a skin patch that helps to read glucose levels in the blood and reduces the number of needle sticks that a diabetic would need; a robot that makes hospital rounds to check on patients, manage charts and record vital signs; and an aortic valve that can be threaded into place via an arterial catheter in the way stents have been installed for years. Across the pond at the Imperial College London, Zoltan Takats developed the iKnife, a scalpel that provides instantaneous diagnostics of an organ, tissue or mass, while making an incision so small that blood loss is minimal or zero.

BETTER HEALTH IN YOUR POCKET Smartphones and wearable technology make tracking your health easier than ever before. By Bonnie Rucker

For many of us, our mobile devices have surpassed the designation of tool and become an extension of ourselves. The frequency of times we check our smartphones can often be measured in seconds rather than minutes or hours. There are many smartphone applications and smartphone compatible devices that work with our tendency to be connected all the time and use it to help improve our health. Diet and fitness apps such as MyFitnessPal and Sworkit can assist with keeping track of what you’re putting in your body and how much (or how little) you are moving. Want to get in shape and have a strong competitive drive? Try out DietBet, which rewards you monetarily through fitness challenges with other people. Another exercise app, Charity Miles, appeals to the philanthropist by rewarding the charity of your choice when you log miles. Activity trackers are wearable technology devices that keep track of how much you move as well as other statistics such as heart rate, sleep quality and exercise sessions. These devices are separate from a smartphone but often link with an app to track data. They are made by companies such as FitBit, Garmin, Jawbone and Polar.

If you’re needing a little more encouragement to strive toward your fitness goals, consider goal-setting apps. The Couch to 5K app can take a user from a sedentary lifestyle to the ability to run a race. Need even more personalized encouragement? Check out FitStar or PEAR, which provide personal trainers in a phone. There are other devices that can be synced with smartphones that can help you monitor vital signs. Whether you need to monitor your heart, blood pressure or your weight, your phone can help you out. Technology company iHealth makes a wireless blood pressure monitoring cuff that syncs to your phone via Bluetooth. Many activity trackers also record heart rate, but AliveCor makes a mobile EKG that uses two electrodes to record heart rhythms. And if you’re looking to record body measurements, including weight, Withings makes an electronic scale that will sync to an app on your smartphone. Although sometimes our phones can be an excuse not to get off the coach, they can also help us track data that will ultimately help us stay healthier. They are like many tools that can, when used correctly, make us better, happier and stronger. OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

57


Health Tech ROBOTIC OPERATIONS

Today’s surgeons employ state-of-the-art robotic technology to offer more minimally invasive procedures. By Rebecca Fast

DR. PETER BAIK, A THORACIC SURGEON WITH CTCA SITTING IN A SURGERY SUITE WITH THE DA VINCI XI SYSTEM.

PHOTO COURTESY STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER

58

regular activities. Those are general advantages,” CookIn 1983, the “Arthrobot” made its mark on the medison says. “Specific advantages to individual procedures cal community by becoming the world’s first robot to may also be of benefit to the patient and the health care assist in surgery. Developed by a team of physicians and system. For example, compared to open prostate surgery, engineers in Vancouver, British Columbia, the Arthrobot robotic surgery allows for less blood loss and reduced introduced robotic technologies into the surgical suite. internal scarring at the ‘hook up’ or anastomosis.” In 2000, another milestone was made when the da Cookson explains that robotic prostatectomy is, by Vinci Surgical System became the first robotic platform definition, laparoscopic but includes the robotic arms and to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration for equipment to allow for enhanced general laparoscopic surgery. surgical movement with actions Today, robotic technology “The advantages of mimic those achievable with continues its forward progress and robotic surgery include that your own wrist. offers surgeons sophistication and smaller incisions with “In simple terms, laparoscopy precision in performing a variety of minimally invasive procedures. reduced pain (so less is ‘straight sticks’ and can be Dr. Michael S. Cookson is an pain medication, too), quite useful for removal of small organs, like the gallbladder, or uro-oncologist at the Stephenson a shorter hospital stay, hernia repairs,” he says. “HowCancer Center and the director of faster recovery.” ever, in more complex situations, robotics surgery at the OU Medithe robotic technology allows the cal Center in Oklahoma City. He surgeon to offer many of the same operations that were also serves as professor and chairman of the department previously performed open with the minimally invasive of urology at the University of Oklahoma College of approach – procedures that require not only removal of Medicine. an organ but also reconstruction. The latter is the part “The advantages of robotic surgery include smaller incisions with reduced pain (so less pain medication, too), a where robotics really allows the surgeon the ability to ‘put things back together.’ shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, and earlier return to “For example, when you remove a cancerous prostate there is a reconstruction required to put the urethra back to the bladder neck. The prostate previously bridged that space, and once removed the two areas must be reattached to allow for proper healing. With the robotic technology, this is usually easily accomplished with 10 [times] power magnification and a watertight closure.” Cookson says to accomplish this, the abdomen is inflated with carbon dioxide, then laparoscopic ports are placed in the abdomen under direct vision. “In addition to a camera, three to five additional access ports, or trochars, are placed,” he says. “Through these trochars, the robotic arms and instruments are loaded by the bedside assistant. The surgeon, sitting ... beside the patient, can then control the movements of these arms and instruments with precision under clear vision that magnifies10X over regular vision. Once the surgery has been completed, the prostate is removed in a small bag through the camera port. The small incisions are then closed.” According to Cookson, robotic surgery has been particularly beneficial for urologic cancer surgery. “For prostate cancer, about 85 percent of all surgeries (radical prostatectomies) in the United States this year will be performed robotically,” he says. “The reasons include the

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


Our Services MRI

Osteoporosis Clinic Pain Management

Pediatric Orthopaedic Care

Orthopaedic Excellence, Compassionate Care.

Physical Therapy Radiology

Our diversified physicians and expert staff will work to customize advanced treatments that meet your individual bone and joint needs. With premier industry skills and cutting edge technology, we have the finest team to restore your mobility so you can get back to doing what you love.

Worker’s Compensation

Our Treatments Foot & Ankle

Hand & Wrist

Visit Any of Our Locations

Knee & Hip

Midtown Tulsa

South Tulsa

Hospital Affiliations:

Hillcrest Medical Center Campus

Hillcrest South Medical Plaza

1809 E. 13th St., Floors 1, 2, 3 Tulsa, OK 74104

8803 S.101st E. Ave., Suite 100 Tulsa, OK 74133

Center for Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Excellence (CORE)

Shoulder & Elbow Sports Medicine

Trauma & Fractures

Hillcrest HealthCare System

P (918) 301-3134, option 3 • F (918) 582-6060 • www.toctulsa.com 22124 The Orthopedic Center.indd 1

4/29/16 4:43 PM

Tattoo Removal The Premier Alternative to Traditional Laser Tattoo Removal

Oklahoma’s only source for PicoWaytm Laser Tattoo Removal *

The PicoWay® Difference • Minimal discomfort • Few treatments • Fast clearance • Treats a broad range of tattoo colors & types

$50 off

• Can be used on different skin types

YOUR FIRST TREATMENT IN OCTOBER just mention this ad

SCHEDULE A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION TODAY! Before PicoWay®

Post 3 treatments Photos: Eric Bernstein, MD

After 5 treatments Photos: Eric Bernstein, MD

Before PicoWay®

918.293.1287 www.skinrenewaloftulsa.com Before PicoWay®

After 2 treatments Photos: Arielle Kauvar, MD

After 5 treatments Photos: Eric Bernstein, MD

Before PicoWay®

Please call today for a free consultation 22301 Cook Myosite.indd 1

8/23/16 10:12 Skin Renewal.indd Doctor / Practice Name22308 Here AM Address Line 1 · Address Line 2 · City, State 123.456.7890 · www.webaddress.com

1

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

59

8/29/16 9:09 AM


Health Tech

decreased blood loss, reduced pain, shorter hospital stay and more rapid convalescence. In addition, removals of small renal masses (partial nephrectomies) are being performed increasingly via a minimally invasive and robotic approach. The robotic technology allows for the complex reconstruction of the kidney after the cancerous mass has been excised.” He adds that radical cystectomy, the removal of the bladder, and urinary reconstruction are also being performed with robotic use. Another medical field benefiting from robotic technology is thoracic surgery. Dr. Subrato J. Deb, director of thoracic surgical oncology at the Stephenson Cancer Center, is an associate professor of cardiothoracic surgery at the OU College of Medicine. “Robotic technology is one approach to minimally invasive surgery,” Deb says. “The benefits are in places where a small space requires dissection and where robotic technology offers advantages [when] other minimally invasive approaches are limited. One place is the mediastinum. Another is the superior sulcus, where neurogenic tumors often arise.” Deb says robotic surgery offers advantages in a few specific areas where current thorascopic approaches are limited. He also notes that robotic technology continues to evolve and its applications may broaden in the future. Dr. Peter Baik, a thoracic surgeon with Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa, says video-assisted thoracic surgery (or VATS) has influenced how physicians approach a patient’s treatment plan. “Prior to ... VATS, many referring physicians may not have considered surgery as an option due to the morbidities associated with thoracotomies,” Baik says. “[F]or example, any small suspicious enlarging nodules that could not be needle biopsied were just followed with repeat imaging (CT scan, chest X-ray, etc.) until the nodules became larger. If the suspected nodule is found to be cancer, it had time to spread to other areas. Now, a patient can get a resection of the nodule robotically, then be discharged ... the next day. This allows even greater ability to diagnose, stage and treat patients earlier in their disease.” He says robotic surgery has been especially useful in the resection of tumors, such as thymomas, in the cavity that separates the lungs from the rest of the chest. “Thymomas were traditionally resected through median sternotomy, the same incision used during open-heart surgeries,” Baik says. “In addition to possible wound complications, the recovery is prolonged after sternotomy due to significant pain. The usual

60

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

INNOVATIVE SIMULATIONS

hospital stay after a median sternotomy is about five days. However, with robotic approach, several small incisions are made, along with a slightly larger incision, to remove the specimen. And the usual hospital stay after robotic resection of thymoma is around one to three days.” However, Baik emphasizes that technological advancements are only useful when a patient is correctly diagnosed and given an accurate stage of a cancer’s progress, and alternatives are explored. “For example, if a lung cancer patient is not correctly staged, the approach used for the surgery is less valuable,” Baik says. “[A] lthough the surgeries being performed are minimally invasive, the major portion of the procedure (i.e. removal of lung and lymph nodes) is the same as thoracotomy. Therefore, minimally invasive does not mean less risky surgery.” THE A.R. AND MARYLOUISE TANDY MEDICAL ACADEMIC BUILDING IS EXPECTED TO BE COMPLETED IN 2017.

PHOTO COURTESY OSU CENTER FOR HEALTH SCIENCES

While robotics is transforming health care, it’s also shaping medical training. The Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa recently began construction on a state-ofthe-art training facility that will utilize the latest innovations in robotic training technology. The A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Medical Academic Building will feature a four-unit hospital simulation center with an emergency room, operating room, intensive-care unit, birthing suite and ambulance bay. Completion is expected in 2017. “The medical simulation exercises that will take place in the Tandy Medical Academic Building are ultimately about providing better care for patients and their families,” says Dr. Kayse Shrum, president of the OSU Center for Health Sciences and dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine. “Students will have a safe environment to apply what they have learned in the classroom into clinical practice. By working with human-like, state-of-the-art mannequins, our students will be able to acquire valuable clinical skills and become better physicians without having to put human patients at risk.” David Knight, a simulation specialist for the OSU Center for Health Sciences, says the programmable mannequins can simulate any scenario, from a premature baby to an ill or injured adult. “These ‘patients’ will be cared for in a two-bed emergency room, intensive-care unit, labor and delivery, and surgery simulation suites,” Knight says. “The most life-like simulation may be the human wearable surgery suit, where a person can strap on a torso that can be operated on.” The 84,000-square-foot facility will include an expanded clinical skills lab, an osteopathic manipulative medicine lab, classrooms, two lecture halls and conference facilities. To accommodate a growing student population, the building will include more than 20 breakout rooms, 55 study carrels, a student kitchen and additional faculty and staff office space.


Are You

AT RISK

For Gynecologic Cancer?

While breast cancer is a hot topic in the national media, it’s important to be informed on other women’s cancers that don’t get as much media attention. Gynecologic cancers are cancers that affect the female reproductive organs, including the ovaries, endometrium, uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, peritoneum, vagina and vulva. And, just as women have become more aware of the warning signs of breast cancer, it’s equally important for women to understand the facts about gynecologic cancer. Roughly 71,500 women in the United States each year are diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer,1 and the risk increases with age. The most common gynecologic cancer is endometrial/uterine cancer, which affects more than 52,000 women annually in the U.S.2 The key to lowering the risk for these cancers is preventive care and early diagnosis. And for many women, that may mean taking time out from busy family and work schedules to put their health first.

Cassandra Foy Patient at Cancer Treatment Centers of America®

“Understand your own risk factors—and your family history—and have an open dialog with your primary care physician.” DR. MAURIE MARKMAN, PRESIDENT OF MEDICINE & SCIENCE, CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS OF AMERICA®

TAKE PREVENTIVE ACTION You can play an active role in reducing your chance of developing gynecologic cancers. A key factor for survival of these cancers is early diagnosis. Make healthy choices for yourself, such as a wellbalanced diet, an active lifestyle, quitting or avoiding smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and safe sex practices. Make time for an annual physical. A Pap test is an important check for abnormal cells in the cervix, because in most cases of cervical cancer there are no noticeable symptoms. Routine pelvic exams may also improve the likelihood of early detection for endometrial cancer. For women over 30, the HPV test screens for high-risk HPV strains that may lead to cervical cancer.

5% 50 Cervical cancer

tends to occur during midlife. Most cases are found in women under the age of 50, and it is linked to human papillomaviruses.

Endometrial cancer

is rare for women under the age of 45; most cases are found in women over 50.

Ovarian cancer

affects up to 5% of women who have it in their family histories. It has the highest mortality of the gynecologic cancers, killing more than 14,000 women annually in the United States.3

Educate yourself on your health history and your family’s health history. Having close relatives on either side of the family who have had ovarian cancer increases a woman’s chance of getting ovarian cancer herself. Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) is a national network of five hospitals in the U.S. with expertise in treating patients who are fighting complex or advanced-stage cancer, although many patients with an early-stage diagnosis seek treatment at CTCA® as well. We combine world-class treatment with an integrative approach to care to reduce side effects and maintain quality of life during cancer treatment. If you or someone you love has advanced-stage or complex cancer, call 888-568-1571 or go to cancercenter.com. References: 1. Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer, CDC http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/knowledge/pdf/CDC_GYN_Comprehensive_Brochure.pdf 2. National Cancer Institute, 2014. www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/endometrial 3. National Cancer Institute, 2014. www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/ovarian

Atlanta Chicago Philadelphia Phoenix Tulsa

© 2016 Rising Tide


Health Tech

DR. STEVE SANDERS OF SAINT FRANCIS SAYS ONLINE PORTALS PROVIDE A WAY FOR PATIENTS TO HAVE ACCESS TO CRITICAL INFORMATION AT ANY TIME.

GIVING POWER TO THE PATIENT

Online medical portals allow patients to access critical health information. By Bonnie Rucker

With access to the internet, we have a wealth of instant information. But when it comes to health-related topics, sometimes it is hard to know who to trust. When we start investigating a medical question online, we often end up with more questions than answers and more fear than reassurance. However, many health systems and doctors’ offices have found a way to empower their patients through use of the internet. Many have begun to employ the use of online patient portals to provide information directly from a health care team to their patients. Saint Francis Health System uses a secure, online portal to allow “patients to have at their fingertips critical information regarding their health status, medications and previous history,” says Dr. Steve Sanders, vice president of medical affairs at Warren Clinic. This provides access to an individual’s records and necessary medical information at any time of day or night. But what about patients with questions? These portals include ways to communicate directly with a doctor or other member of

62

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

have a level of convenience for patients, the healthcare team. Portal users can get beyond just receiving medical information clarification on health topics from someone that they can trust. “We want [patients] to be familiar with their particular cases. “Often able to ask their provider questions using sewe’re able to identify problems that should cure electronic communications, schedule an be addressed quickly or alleviate a patient’s appointment, pay their bill online and other fears about a minor problem,” Sanders says. conveniences that give INTEGRIS Health With the vast them authority and peace has adopted a singleamounts of inforof mind even outside of patient portal to synthetraditional doctor’s office size information from mation available hours,” Watkins says. throughout the system, through the web, Health-care providers according to Hardy the average person experience benefits from Watkins, vice president of communication, can easily become using the portals as well. marketing and sales. overwhelmed and They are better able to communicate with their The INTEGRIS system possibly misinpatients and ensure they also facilitates provider/ formed when it have access to useful patient communication, allowing people comes to important medical information. portals can eliminate to update their doctors health information. These the need for patients to after appointments, get remember everything their prescription instructions doctors or nurses tell them, as they have acclarified and, in some cases, request referrals cess to notes and additional resources when to specialists, Watkins says. they log on. “For providers, it provides anThe portals used by Saint Francis, INTEother means of getting hold of patients about GRIS and many other health-care providers


their lab results, remind them of upcoming appointments and provide topical information to keep them healthy,” Sanders says. As with anything new, limitations exist. Watkins stresses the importance of doctors reminding their patients that online portals “do not replace the need for regularly scheduled visits.” Sanders cautions that if patients are in doubt about whether their conditions or symptoms can be handled via a portal, they should make appointments to be seen in person. With the vast amounts of information available through the web, the average person can easily become overwhelmed and possibly misinformed when it comes to important health information. But patient portals, while not a replacement for visits to a doctor, can empower patients with valuable and trustworthy information.

OPERATING

FROM A DISTANCE Making an appointment with a doctor that is in another city, state or even country is now possible through televisits, but doctors have also performed surgery remotely. While not in widespread practice, the first transatlantic robotic surgery was on a patient in France by surgeons in New York in 2001. According to the BBC, the concept of remote surgery began in the 1970s when NASA suggested researches look into the option of remote-controlled robots to operate on astronauts, and the technology has slowly been

moving into civilian medical treatment. Although the lag between the human-controlled input and the robot carrying out the actions on the patient could be concerning, better internet connections have made that lag less of an issue. There are many hurdles to be cleared before remote surgery becomes mainstream, but many of the benefits of allowing the world’s best surgeon to operate on critically ill or injured patients around the world are clear.

Grace Hospice of Oklahoma HOSPICE CARE

6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000, Tulsa OK 74136 www.gracehospice.com • 918.744.7223

ADs W

hat is hospice care? Many believe hospice is a “place” where people go to transition from life to death. Actually hospice is a method of caring for a patient in any place he or she chooses: their home, a hospital or a skilled

AVA HANCOCK, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

1000 Health Care Grace Hospice.indd 1

nursing facility. To protect patients and their families, there are Medicare regulations in place to determine if a patient qualifies for hospice care. First, a person must have a life-limiting illness with a prognosis of six months or less to live. Second, two physicians must make this determination and certify it in writing. At Grace Hospice, we diligently follow Medicare guidelines to evaluate all patients. Once the regulations are met, the patient and the patient’s family can choose to use the hospice benefit. At Grace, our team provides specialized, individualized care during the course of the disease focusing on physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs. 8/25/16 2:21 PM

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

63


Health Tech DR. DANIEL NADER OF CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS OF AMERICA SAYS CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY CAN CHANGE THE WAY CANCER IS TREATED. PHOTO COURTESY CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS OF AMERICA

A PERSONALIZED APPROACH TO FIGHTING CANCER

Immune-directed and genetics-based cancer treatment is revolutionizing cancer care. By Rebecca Fast

of cancer, the patient’s underlying health and prior canThe American Society of Clinical Oncology has named cer treatments. The benefits of these treatments include cancer immunotherapy as its 2016 Advance of the Year directed immune therapy, not cytotoxic [damaging to and cites cancer treatment as a transformative and promcells] or indiscriminate treatments.” ising strategy. Dr. Daniel Nader, chief of staff and director of the Lung Another advancement in genetic-based cancer treatment Center at Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa, is falls under the canopy of precision medicine. The National chief of CTCA’s national Division of Pulmonary Services. Institutes of Health defines precision medicine as “an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that “Immunotherapy is a revolutionary treatment ... takes into account ... variability in genes, environment, and which modifies signals between the cancer cells and the lifestyle for each person.” patient’s own ... defense mechanism,” Nader says. “This treatment allows the patient’s own immune system to atAn example of genetic-based medicine in action is getack the cancer. There has been an explosion of drugs we nomic tumor assessments. Nader explains that tumor tissue are able to employ just in the is tested for mutations or altera“This is precision medi- tions in the tumor’s DNA. last two years.” According to the American “There are several mutations cine and individualized Cancer Society, immunotherapy which are drivers of cancer cancer care. Knowing primarily works in two ways. growth,” he says. “Many ... now the genomic nature of a have specific drugs which will One stimulates a patient’s imspecific cancer allows for inhibit their ability to grow the mune system to “work harder or smarter to attack cancer specific drug therapy, if cancer. This allows targeted cells”; the other gives a patient for that cancer’s spethere are targeted drugs therapy “immune system components, cific mutations. This is precision such as man-made immune sys- for that specific mutation medicine and individualized cantem proteins.” To date, immucer care. Knowing the genomic or genetic alteration.” notherapy, also called biologic nature of a specific cancer allows therapy or biotherapy, treats a variety of cancers. for specific drug therapy, if there are targeted drugs for that “Immunotherapy may be an option for specific paspecific mutation or genetic alteration.” tients with lung cancer, melanoma, certain lymphomas, Nader adds that targeted therapy will probably be comkidney and bladder cancer,” Nader says. “Therapy is bined with chemotherapy, immunotherapy and adjuvant chosen based on the specific type of cancer, the stage use to surgery and radiation therapy.

64

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


CORE continues the mission of improving our patients’ quality of life. The Center for Orthopaedic Reconstruction and Excellence is the essential place for our guests to receive treatment from the latest technology in equipment and infrastructure. The state-of-the-art facility provides an inviting atmosphere focused on patients and their caregivers, complete with Wi-Fi service. CORE’s medical team is dedicated to offering excellent service and the most effective, cutting-edge treatments available in orthopaedics.

Named “Best Orthopaedic Surgeons” by their patients and peers, Dr. Holt and Dr. Mittal offer the most effective cutting edge treatments available in orthopaedics!

Gregory Holt, M.D.

Yogesh Mittal, M.D.

3029 W. Main St., Jenks, OK 74037 (Highway 75 & 96th St) // (918) 367-2215 22146 CORE Hospital.indd 1

5/16/16 8:57 AM

yea Cele r w bra ith ting Tul m sa y 29 th Eye Cli nic

Love the way you look

Lynn A. Anderson, MD Lori Rule, PA-C Lindsay Dilbeck, PA-C

918.728.3100

1725 E 19th Street Suite 702 Tulsa, OK 74104

22137 Midtown Dermatology.indd 1

5/12/16 Karen Weidner, R.N. and Kristen Rice, M.D.

Advanced skin treatments and cosmetic dermatology. USSC welcomes Kesha Buster, M.D. and Tracy Adams, L.E.

1:43 PM

Thank you to my loyal patients and great staff. Dr. Blane Snodgrass, O.D.

918-712-3223

1325 E 35th Street Suite B

21389 Utica Square Skin Care.indd 1

Tulsa Eye Clinic 7171 S. Yale • Tulsa, OK 74136 918.492.2702 • doctorsnodgrass.com

7/5/16 13517 5:26 PM Dr. Blane Snodgrass.indd 1

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

2016

65

8/23/16 11:37 AM


Style and Substance LUXURY IN NECESSITIES By M. J. Van Deventer

Today’s kitchen is so much more than a functional place to cook. It’s truly the heart of the home and a favorite gathering place for friends and family. Appliances are technological marvels. Increasingly, the kitchen opens to the dining and living areas. Likewise, master baths have gone beyond the basic designs and are now luxurious places to relax, taking on spa characteristics with gleaming marble, glass and tile accents. Enjoy our look at the best in kitchen and bath design.

Renovation Creates Inviting New Kitchen

Photos by Scott Johnson, Hawks Photography When a young couple moved to Tulsa from New Orleans, they found a Utica Square home ideal for updating in stages. Working with interior designer Carolyn Fielder Nierenberg and contractor Kurt Barron of Barron & McClary, the 1920s traditional

66

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

home was remodeled to turn the original dining room into an inviting great room and kitchen. Walls were demolished. The back porch became level with the new great room. An L-shape space was created; the kitchen is now where the back porch was originally. “The kitchen was originally many small rooms,” says Nierenberg, a member of the American Society of Interior Designers. “Now, the new space features an amazing kosher

kitchen. A utility and mud room were added.” The transformation created a lighter, open space with a garden view. A Sub-Zero refrigerator was faced with painted wood panels matching kitchen cabinets so the appliance wouldn’t dominate the space. Original oak floors now have an espresso finish. The color palette is comprised of warm grays and whites. “The owners’ expectations were exceeded,” Nierenberg notes. “The renovation made the house current, livable and very welcoming.”


THE UTICA SQUARE HOME HAD WALLS DEMOLISHED IN ORDER TO CREATE NEW SPACES WITH A LIGHTER, OPEN FEEL. THE ORIGINAL OAK FLOORS WERE GIVEN AN ESPRESSO FINISH, AND A WARM GRAY AND WHITE COLOR PALETTE HELPS EMPHASIZE THE FLOOR PLAN.

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

67


Style and Substance

ROGER SHOLLMIER OF KITCHEN IDEAS OPTED FOR A MODERN LOOK FOR HIS HOME NEAR JENKS. THE HOME HAS AN OPEN FLOOR DESIGN AND INCLUDES AN OUTDOOR KITCHEN.

The Heart of a Home Photos by Nathan Harmon

Cooking and entertaining are passions for the Roger Shollmier family. So it’s no surprise that he and his daughter, Lesley, would create state of the art kitchens in their new homes. Roger calls his new modern home in Jenks “a tree house by a creek,” complete with an outdoor kitchen. Lesley’s home in Tulsa’s Gillette Historical District honors the traditional Craftsman

68

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

style, with a clean, updated, transitional look. Both Shollmiers savor the ease of working in their highly functional new kitchens. Creating the perfect kitchen was of utmost importance to Roger and Lesley. Roger owns Kitchen Ideas, an innovative, 40-year-old Tulsa design firm involving family and a team of expert designers. Roger and Lesley used the newest kitchen equipment: Wolf induction cooktops and steam ovens, Sub-Zero refrigerators, Thermidor rangetops and pro-vent hoods. For Lesley, the

steam oven almost eclipses her microwave. “Our goal is to design kitchens based on how people live, work and entertain,” Lesley says. “In earlier decades, kitchen design was based on a work triangle. That style was created by architects who believed women were the only ones working in the kitchen.” Not so today, she says. Even though her home and her father’s feature different architectural styles, their kitchens reveal the ultimate in efficiency while honoring their personal tastes in


LESLEY SHOLLMIER CHOSE A MORE TRADITIONAL LOOK FOR HER KITCHEN, BUT INCLUDED THE NEWEST IN APPLIANCES, INCLUDING A WOLF INDUCTION COOKTOP, STEAM OVEN AND SUB-ZERO REFRIGERATOR. PEOPLE OFTEN GATHER IN THE KITCHEN, AND FAMILY AND GUESTS SOMETIMES HELP COOK MEALS.

cooking, dining and entertaining. Lesley loves the large, 10-foot island that anchors her kitchen with a 6-foot Galley Workstation, next to a double induction Wolf cooktop. Her father invented the Galley, which has re-invented kitchens across the nation. “At my island, I can do prep work and cook while visiting with family and guests,” she notes. Other zones are available: the clean-up sink for doing dishes and a gas rangetop for cooking that requires venilation.

Both of their homes have an open floor plan so guests can move easily from the living and dining areas to the kitchen, where everyone loves to gather. At both Roger and Lesley’s homes, family and sometimes guests help to cook. Of course, there’s a television in both kitchens. Roger and Lesley know the interests of their friends and accommodate that love for watching sports or listening to music. “Part of what I enjoy about our work is that we are

creating spaces where family and friends gather to make memories,” Lesley says. In both, the kitchen is truly the heart of the home. Lesley’s kitchen also has a special meaning for her. Recently married to Dustin Taylor, she treasures the memory of walking into her new kitchen and having a sweet, private conversation with her father before he walked her out into her garden to exchange wedding vows. It is a kitchen memory that she will treasure for many years to come. OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

69


Style and Substance THE TULSA HOME WAS REDESIGNED WITH A GRAY AND WHITE COLOR PALLETE AND INCLUDES CALCUTTA MARBLE COUNTERTOPS AND A BEVELED TILE BACKSPLASH.

Updating Gives Home Dramatic New Look Photos by Brian McMurtry, Focus B Studio

Sherri and John Duvall took a 1930s historic home in Tulsa’s Terwilliger Heights and worked a design miracle by rejuvenating the kitchen and powder bath. What greeted the architects was a dismal scene. “The walls were chopped up. The kitchen was closed off from the dining room. It had low ceilings, fluorescent lights, linoleum flooring, formica counters and a very dark feeling,” Sherri recalls. It also had a tiny half bath at the back of the kitchen and a small back door and window. The kitchen and adjacent dining room now feature a gray and white palette. Gleaming Calcutta marble countertops and a beveled tile backsplash are handsome additions. Brushed brass hardware accents crisp white cabinets by Sullivan’s Cabinetry. Sherri calls the new powder room “a little room with a lot of pizzaz.” Located at the back of an existing sunroom, it has a dramatic wall of onyx tile, laid in a herringbone pattern. Marble counters highlight the custom sea pearl marble vanity, and mahogany legs surround a lower Lucite shelf. “The home has a graceful flow now and the homeowners have the show kitchen of their dreams,” Sherri says.

70

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


DESPITE FACING DIFFICULTIES CAUSED BY THE BUILDING’S STRUCTURE, THE BATHROOM OF THIS PENTHOUSE WAS REDONE IN A CONTEMPORARY DESIGN FEATURING COPENHAGEN GRANITE COUNTERTOPS, HANSGROHE CHROME FIXTURES AND SILHOUETTE GLOSS GLASS TILE.

Custom Cabinetry by the River Photos by Scott Johnson, Hawks Photography

A beautiful new bathroom in a Riverside Drive penthouse has all the hallmarks of contemporary design. The look was created by interior designer Laurel S. Wilson. Certified kitchen and bath designer Ralph Lackner, president and owner of Jay Rambo Co., designed the cabinetry for a bathroom that is sleek, upscale and dramatic. “The project was challenging. There are areas of the building that impede the ease of plumbing installations or making structural changes,” says Jenny Harris, assistant to Lackner. The bathroom’s beauty outweighs those difficulties.

“The cabinetry is European frameless style with a vertical grain high-gloss lacquer finish,” Jenny says. “It’s beautiful and easy to clean.” Twin vanities feature smooth Copenhagen granite countertops. Hansgrohe chrome fixtures enhance the modern theme. The corner shower walls and the tub’s front are covered with 4-inch by 16-inch silhouette gloss glass tile from Visions Tile & Stone. The shower includes body sprays and a large rainhead. A towel warmer is a muchappreciated accessory. The vanities are enhanced with contemporary light fixtures, mounted in the mirrors, which extend to the ceiling. Bathroom functions are relaxing and enjoyable in this luxurious setting. OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

71


Style and Substance

THE OKLAHOMA CITY HOME WAS REDESIGNED WITH A MOROCCAN DESIGN TO PRESERVE THE HOME’S SPANISH HISTORY WHILE ADDING THE NEWEST FEATURES AND AN UPDATED LOOK.

Moroccan Flavor Spices Renovation Project Photos by David Cobb

A Moroccan wedding inspired the renovation of a historic home in Oklahoma City’s Edgemere area by designer Jennifer Welch. “The challenge was to preserve the home’s Spanish history while blending new features with old,” Jennifer says. “We tore out the old kitchen and took two bathrooms down to the studs,” she notes. In the kitchen, Welch left the original Spanish espresso beams and added white lacquer modern cabinets. A striped marble slab in shades of white, gray and ochre extends to the ceiling. The slab has a 3-inch mitered waterfall edge. The client, restaurateur Brian Bogert, entertains, so Welch added a bar and full wine refrigerator to accommodate his parties. Leather bar stools and two antique mirrored pendant lanterns, found in Morocco, accent the kitchen island. Welch used marble flooring and added updated wallpapers. Bogert’s bathroom has a gray and blue theme with gold accents. A blue koi fish wallpaper adds interest. The powder bath has a black, white and gold Moroccan color scheme. The home, built in the early 1900s, now has a fresh new look with an international Moroccan feel.

72

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


Downtown Home Features Upscale Amenities Photos by Scott Johnson, Hawks Photography

Susan Eddings Perez has used her design and artistic talents to create the interior for a home in the Urban 8 four-story lofts in downtown Tulsa. Each home has its own garage and entry on the lower level. The second-floor kitchen opens to the living and dining areas, including a fireplace and custom wood finishes. “The kitchen is great for entertaining,” Susan says. “It has a 10-

foot island, European-style cabinets, built-in appliances, a French door refrigerator/freezer, a galley-style sink, prep sink, microwave convection oven and induction cooktop on the island.” The third floor houses the master suite, guest bedrooms and baths. A crisp all-white theme dominates the master bath. The top level has an enclosed penthouse. Susan used a modern design style. Her color palette was inspired by a granite slab for kitchen counters, featuring gray-green, cream and white hues. She chose unique light fixtures throughout. Hardwood floors grace the main living areas, with tile for bathrooms and carpeting in bedrooms.

THE KITCHEN OF THE DOWNTOWN TOWNHOME IS DESIGNED FOR ENTERTAINING AND FEATURES A 10-FOOT ISLAND, EUROPEAN STYLE CABINETS, BUILT-IN APPLIANCES, A FRENCH DOOR REFRIGERATOR AND AN INDUCTION COOKTOP ON THE ISLAND. THE COLOR PALETTE FOR THE HOME WAS INSPIRED BY A GRANITE SLAB FOR KITCHEN COUNTERS.

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

73


Gone but Not By Tara Malone

Forgotten Oklahoma’s rich history lives on in the skeletons of its ghost towns.

Picher TAYLOR

Poisoned earth. Lumber communities that vanished with the forest, boom towns that dried up when the oil ran out. Railroads that never came, mines that failed in their promise of riches. Whether consigned to the dust or in the slow process of decay, Oklahoma’s abandoned communities and their tales continue to resonate. Some are still home to a few dedicated holdouts, waiting for a turnaround that never comes. Others have faded into memory and myth. All of them tell the story of our state. There are estimated to be thousands of towns that have come and gone over Oklahoma’s long history. Here are some of their stories.

Picher

TION, TOGRAPH COLLEC ICAL SOCIETY PHO 355.3 OKL AHOMA HISTOR ICAL SOCIETY, #22 OKL AHOMA HISTOR COURTESY OF THE

74

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

Picher wasn’t always known as Oklahoma’s toxic city. Nestled in the northeast corner of the state near the Kansas-Oklahoma line, it was once a flourishing town of 20,000 people, called the zinc and lead capital of the world. Residents used the massive chat hills surrounding the city as a recreational area, holding picnics and sled races, unaware they were frolicking on piles of poison. People joked about the orange water, polluted with the runoff of heavy metals from the mines, shrugged

and swam in it anyway. Slowly, however, people in Picher began to realize something was very wrong. While mining closed down in the 1960s, people in the town showed alarming rates of cancer and learning disabilities. Infant mortality was high, and children tested with shocking levels of lead in their blood. Today, Picher is known as one of the most polluted locations in the country. As part of the Tar Creek Superfund Site, STURMS MAGAZINE COLLECTION, COURTESY OF THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, #144

PHOTO COURTESY DON TAYLOR

DON PHOTO COURTESY


Beer City

If you think things get crazy in the small towns of the Oklahoma Panhandle now, you’ve obviously never heard of Beer City. This den of outlaws and reprobates lurked in the No Man’s Land of what would become Beaver County, between the Texas Panhandle and Kansas. Sobriety-weary Kansans would flee prohibition in their state for the saloons and cathouses of Beer City, indulge in a Wild West show or boxing match, then sneak back home to Liberal, Kansas, with nobody the wiser. What happened in Beer City stayed in Beer City, and local merchants didn’t mind the town’s bad reputation; in fact, they banked on it. One man, either unfortunate or greedy depending on the tale you believe, tried to set himself up as sheriff of Beer City for a while. Whether Amos Bush had a genuine call to a law enforcement career or a less noble passion for kickbacks remains a mystery. What is known is that he met the business ends of several shotguns, and that was the end of the law in Beer City until it was officially incorporated into Indian Territory in 1890. The imposition of discipline and order took the shine off the town’s appeal.

Bromide

Once, its streets clamored with doctors, stablemen, barkeeps and school teachers. Today, the town of , #22564.2 TORICAL SOCIETY Ingalls is mostly THE OKL AHOMA HIS OF SY RTE COU , COLLECTION ALL AN STODDARD home to ruined buildings and reproductions of original structures, as well as a stone marker that reads: Beer City lived fast, died young and left no In Memory of U.S. Marshalls corpse at all. While a small unincorporated Dick Speed – Tom Houston – Lafe Shadley community still exists, nothing of the origiWho fell in the line of duty nal hedonists’ heaven remains. Sept. 1, 1893

Bromide

By Dalton and Doolin Gang

Bromide

In northeast Johnston County at the dead end of State Highway 7D lies what’s left of the town of Bromide. Known under various names before its incorporation in 1908, the town was eventually named for the high levels of bromine found in the waters of its “healing” mineral springs. Bromide built its foundations on quarrying limestone and running a brisk tourism business. Up until the 1920s, local railroads offered leisure excursions to the spa resort and its hotels, swimming pools and bathhouses. By the time the Great Depression hit, however, the taste for tourism dried up, and Bromide never became the hit that nearby Sulphur did. Today, you can still visit what remains of this town in the Arbuckle foothills: a few businesses, a church, several dilapidated residences and capped springs abound. The area is also home to several picturesquely creepy cemeteries that may be of interest to history buffs and the spook savvy alike. The ruins of a nearby Chickasaw boarding school, Wapanucka Academy, are now on the National Register of Historic Places.

The monument marks the spot of the Battle of Ingalls, a bloody brawl between U.S. Marshals and the Doolin-Dalton Gang, a.k.a. the Wild Bunch, the Oklahombres or the Long Riders. Disguised as “boomers” in covered wagons, law enforcement descended on the outlaw hideout town with plans to finally apprehend some of the West’s most violent gunslingers. It was a showdown that left five people dead within minutes. Strangely enough, the population of Ingalls today remains much the same as during its initial founding – some 150. As of last report, there was a regular schedule of activities at the Ingalls Community Center, including an annual reenactment of the battle that made the town famous. CHESTER R. COWEN COLLECTION, COURTES Y OF THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, #19687.TO.I009.60 .1.2

Picher has been the recipient of millions of government dollars in an effort to reclaim the poisoned land, to little avail. Toxic clouds of dust from the chat blow through now-deserted city streets and buildings. Mining tunnels under the town collapse to create massive sinkholes, some of which have swallowed multiple houses in one greedy gulp. As if Picher didn’t have enough problems, an EF4 tornado – the second-most destructive classification of tornados on the Enhanced Fujita scale – chewed through what was left of the town in 2008. The federal government, intent on buying out property owners to move them to safety, chose not to provide funds for rebuilding. As of a couple of years ago, fewer than 10 die-hard locals were holding out for better times in Picher.

Ingalls

Meers

At the turn of the 20th century, miners struck gold in the Wichita Mountains — or

Meers

Ingalls

The skeletons of one of the most notorious towns in Oklahoma history lie east of Stillwater in Payne County.

ALVIN RUCKER COLLECTION, COURTESY OF THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, #19589.47.1

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

75


so they thought. A local resident claimed her chicken clawed up a “yuuugge” nugget of the precious metal, which raised the hopes of prospectors. It’s also rumored that two mining companies conspired to “salt” ˜– spray the mines with just enough gold buckshot to drive up business – the Meers area. Regardless of which stories you believe, a gold rush was on in Meers, and a feisty mining camp sprang up. During its golden age, the town was home to an array of merchants, doctors, a gold smelter and even its own newspaper. But by 1905, what gold there had been vanished, and so did the town of Meers. Today, all that remains of the original structures is one building, now known as the Meers Store and Restaurant. Most travelers journey down State Highway 115 not for a glimpse of the past, but for a taste of the burgers; the Meersburger, served in a full-sized pie tin, may be the most famous burger in the state of Oklahoma. The old building also houses the Meers Observatory, a seismograph placed by the Oklahoma Geological Survey to monitor the Meers fault line. You may not be able to explore any ruins, but visitors to Meers can at least fill their bellies before exploring the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge.

, TY PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, #20932.3 COURTESY OF THE OKLAHOMA

Cooperton

Cooperton

Founded in 1899, this former Kiowa County trading post wasn’t home to any outlaw shootouts. It never rang with the rough laughter of miners, and it boasts no memorable ghosts. Cooperton’s story is iconic in that, like so many Oklahoma ghost towns, it waited in hope of an economic boom that never came, and failed to flourish when the railroad passed it by for another town. At one time the town boasted medical personnel, a church, multiple schools and general stores, and a newspaper, the Cooperton Banner. Today, nobody is sure how many people remain; no more than 20 were counted during the 2000 U.S. Census. Relics abound, however, and visitors can find the ruins of several residences, the old church building, a defunct filling station, a bank dated to 1927, an eerie gymnasium and more. Cooperton’s remains lie near the intersection of State Highways 19 and 54. No promises are made for your safety, though – Cooperton’s remaining structures are quite literally crumbling.

Bromide

CHICKASAW COUNCIL HOUSE MUSEUM COLLECTION, COURTESY OF THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, #20288.90.53

Cowboy Flats – Pleasant Valley

Once part of the Unassigned Lands – so called because it was the only land in Indian Territory not assigned to a tribe – Cowboy Flats was a vast area near the Cimarron River used to (illegally) graze massive herds of cattle. The area was rid of opportunistic cattle ranchers and settled during the Land Run of 1889 (and slightly before, by some

76

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

Pleasant Valley

J. O. WALKER COLLECTION, COURTE

SY OF THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL

SOCIET Y, #20736.SC.CO. 76.10


TAYLOR PHOTO COURTESY DON

Slick

… enterprising individuals known as Sooners), when it was rechristened as Pleasant Valley. For a while, however, there was nothing pleasant about it. The area was a popular hangout for cattle rustlers and outlaws, including the omnipresent Oklahoma bad boys, the Doolin-Dalton Gang, members of which owned unworked claims in the area. Things settled down after the turn of the century, however, and Pleasant Valley grew to include churches, several doctors, a post office and more. With the advent of the highway systems and automobile travel, however, life in Pleasant Valley slowly withered. By the 1940s, the post office there closed. Now all that remain are a few tenacious remnants of old buildings and houses in Logan County, northeast of Guthrie.

Slick

Boggy Depot N, COURTESY OF

T COLLECTIO MURIEL WRIGH

THE OKL AHOMA

IET Y, #6222.1

HISTORICAL SOC

Like so many of Oklahoma’s abandoned communities, Slick started out as an oil town in the early 20th century. The arrival of the railroad made Slick a hub of shipping and market activity. Home to saloons and cafes catering to roughnecks, the town had some 5,000 residents at its peak. None of it was meant to last, however. Within 10 years of its founding, the railroad was abandoned. Today, around 100 people remain in the community, which is about 10 miles southeast of Bristow on Highway 16. Most residents are commuters to the Tulsa area. What is left of the town includes the collapsing L’Overture Public School, where chalkboards still bear the scrawling of past students and a derelict auditorium waits for an audience that will never come, and several abandoned residences and decrepit storefronts. As far as ghost towns in Oklahoma go, there is a lot in Slick for the intrepid (and safety-conscious) urban explorer to enjoy.

Boggy Depot

PHOTO COURTESY DON TAYLOR

In 1837, resettled by the U.S. government, the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes founded the town of Boggy Depot in what would become Atoka County. Boggy Depot quickly became a center of commerce for the area, serving as a mail route between the west coast and the Midwest, and at one time was the temporary capital of the Choctaw Nation.

Oklahoma’s first Masonic lodge was founded in the town, which also included hotels, a bakery and an apothecary shop, among other merchants. As lively as the Boggy Depot was, its tale is a familiar one. When the railroad was built through the nearby town of Atoka, Boggy Depot couldn’t compete and was slowly abandoned. Remains of the historical town include the home site of Choctaw Principal Chief Allen Wright, credited with coining the state’s name, and a cemetery containing Wright’s remains along with those of missionary Rev. Cyrus Kingsbury. During the Civil War, Boggy Depot served as a Confederate headquarters, and another local cemetery is home to the Confederate casualties from the Battle of Middle Boggy, fought in the area in 1864. Nearby is the area formerly known as Boggy Depot State Park. Funding for the park was cut by the state, but the recreational area is now maintained by the Chickasaw Nation.

Bathsheba

Rumors of a long-gone Oklahoma Amazon tribe of females, located somewhere between Enid and Perry, have persisted for decades. According to legend, the town of Bathsheba (also called Bethsheba) was founded in the early 1890s by 33 women who were having none of it – no males of any sort (including animals) were allowed in the town. Almost immediately, as the story goes, a dozen residents decided maybe this lifestyle wasn’t their thing at all and abandoned the fledgling city. Another story relates how one citizen was discovered with a razor and exiled because she brought an object of male influence to the town. Soon after the town’s founding, a brave (although possibly hyperbolic) Kansas reporter claimed Bathsheba was a real place, home to at least one woman whom he recognized. When ordered to return by his editor to gather more information, he found the town vanished. Over the past century, several newspaper stories and even a novel have been written regarding Bathsheba, but nobody, including Ghost Towns of Oklahoma author John W. Morris, was able to discover any proof that it ever existed. If you’re roaming the back roads of Garfield County some fall night, let us know if you find anything. OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

77


37°

36°

GEtTInGa GRiP oN tHE By Megan Morgan

PAnhANdLE Oklahoma is instantly recognizable thanks to the Panhandle, but this part of the state is often overlooked.

78

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

NO


G N I L D N A H HISTORY

Convoluted history and politics created Oklahoma’s Panhandle. When Texas became a state in 1845, the U.S. government acquired large areas left over from the Republic of Texas. Texas joined the Union as a slave state under the conditions that its upper border would be 36 degrees, 30 seconds north latitude, the same as the southern border of Missouri, established by the Missouri Compromise of 1820. The Compromise of 1850 set both Kansas Territory’s southern border and New Mexico Territory’s northern border at 37 degrees north latitude. That left 30 seconds of latitude “stateless” or without a territory; therefore, many maps and people identified this area as No Man’s Land. Ultimately, this strip, Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory became the state of Oklahoma.

Oklahoma is one of the most distinctly shaped states in the country, and we owe it all to our Panhandle. It’s only 34 miles wide but over 160 miles long, with three counties of near-equal size and a total population of about 28,000. But what actually goes on in this remote, rural part of the state? Did you know that many Panhandle natives refer to central Oklahomans as “downstaters”? The Panhandle, although somewhat remote and spread out, still has plenty to offer in terms of sightseeing and community.

The Land

The Panhandle’s unique shape means it is closely bordered by other states: Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. And this part of Oklahoma also includes a wide range of terrain, because the Panhandle’s elevation increases the further west you travel. “Our classification is high plains, but I consider the Panhandle to be the foothills of the Rockies,” says Tucker Heglin, park manager of Black Mesa State Park. “Within the

O MANS LAND

length of the Panhandle, the elevation rises 2,500 feet. It’s hard to imagine when you’re driving along it, because it doesn’t seem like there’s much to see, but the highest point in Oklahoma is actually just about 15 miles from the nature reserve in our state park.” Black Mesa State Park is near the town of Kenton on the western edge of the Panhandle. To even just navigate to the park, visitors need to drive over four miles off the main highway. “We are way off the beaten path,” Heglin says, “but I think that’s something special about the park. It’s a great place to get away from it all. You might not get cell phone reception, but I think we all need that from time to time.” This far west, with a little luck, you can find wildlife uncommon to the rest of the

BLACK MESA STATE PARK DISPLAYS THE BEAUTY OF THE TERRAIN IN THE PANHANDLE. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA TOURISM

OCTOBER 2016| WWW.OKMAG.COM

79


state, including bighorn sheep up on the mesa that migrate to and from Colorado. “There’s a herd of about 600 of these sheep that move into the park area in the fall and early winter every year,” Heglin says. The Panhandle is also known to be a star gazer’s paradise due to its intensely dark skies. “Black Mesa State Park is known for being one of the darkest skies in the nation; there is very little ambient light,” Heglin says. “My favorite times for stargazing are especially in the early fall and late spring.” The Panhandle also hosts the Okie-Tex Star Party at “Camp Billy Joe” just southeast of the tiny town of Kenton, outside of Boise City. Over 600 people gather at this campground every year in late September, Heglin says, to watch the skies for about 10 to 12 days.

The History

If you thought the history of the Panhandle was much like the rest of the state, think again. Three different Native American tribes lived in the area until about the 1400s, according to the No Man’s Land Historical Society, and when they later moved on due to a drought, nomadic tribes moved in. When white Americans began moving out west, they also populated this area differently than the rest of Oklahoma. “We were settled long before the rest of the state. And it wasn’t from land runs; the Panhandle was settled by speculators wanting to homestead,” says Sue Weissinger of the No Man’s Land Historical Society. The No Man’s Land Historical Society runs the No Man’s Land Museum in Goodwell, where Weissinger is also a curator. Weissinger says she became interested in the museum when she started to learn more about the Panhandle’s fascinating history. “The history in this museum goes back as far as we know in paleontology,” she says. “Ancient animals have been found in the Panhandle, and the museum shows this history, too.” Since that time, the land has changed quite a bit, Weissinger says. “There are still very few trees in the Panhandle, but the ones that you do see are all planted,” she says. “When the first [white] settlers came out here, there were no trees at all. Because of that, these settlers relied on alternate forms of heat, like cow chips.”

80

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

TOP: OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY ATTRACTS MANY STUDENTS FROM OTHER STATES AND IS KNOWN FOR A TOP-NOTCH NURSING PROGRAM. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE STATE UNIVERSITY

BOTTOM RIGHT: THE WORLD COW CHIP THROWING CONTEST IN BEAVER INCLUDES MULTIPLE EVENTS, INCLUDING A PARADE. PHOTO COURTESY BEAVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The Sights

Speaking of cow chips, these historical … chunks … remain important to the Panhandle in this modern age, believe it or not. In the town of Beaver in Beaver County (the easternmost county in the Panhandle), the longstanding history of the cow chip is presented in an entirely different way with the World Cow Chip Throwing Championship. Yes, you read that correctly. Once a year, locals and participants from the surrounding region gather in Beaver to see who can throw a cow chip the farthest. Legend tells that the tradition began as a joke but then, somehow, it stuck. “The stories I have been told vary, but the one that sticks out the most is that the Chamber board members in 1969 were meeting and throwing around ideas (a few drinks were involved), and someone threw out the idea of throwing cow chips and making it a competitive event. It was said in jest but the idea stuck and the rest, as they say, is history,” says Kelsey Short, president of the Beaver Chamber of Commerce. The competition is held each April, and each participant chooses two chips to chuck from a wagon. But if you’re a novice, don’t underestimate your high-caliber competitors. “If you’re coming out to win, remember you’re going to have to throw your chip more than 188 feet and 6 inches,” Short says. “Our current world record holder is Drew Russell. He’s a hometown guy living down state, and he comes home each April to visit family and throw chips.” Short hears some surprise when outsiders learn about the competition in Beaver. “Most people think I’m joking! They usu-

ally find the name of our town amusing and when you add in throwing cow poo to the mix … people want to know more,” Short says. But if cow chips aren’t your thing, the Panhandle has other activities to offer, including the Cimarron Heritage Center in Boise City. Boise City is located in Cimarron County, the westernmost Panhandle county. The Cimarron Heritage Center encompasses much of the area’s history, but one interesting bit of trivia about the area is that Boise City was the only spot in the continental United States that was bombed during World War II. “Off a base in Texas one night, a small group from the military base was on a practice run and got off course, and then accidentally dropped some bombs in the Boise City area,” says Judy Broaddus at the Cimarron Heritage Center. During this incident, which took place in early July 1943, six bombs were dropped in and near Boise City, but fortunately there was only small property damage and no casualties. Today, one of the sites is marked with a small commemorative plaque. Established in 1994, the Cimarron Heritage Center contains exhibits that display different areas of history, including the Dust Bowl of the early 1930s, which hit the Panhandle particularly hard. The entrance to the museum is a house designed by Bruce Goff. “Goff was a student of Frank Lloyd Wright, so when you visit the museum, you can go through the house and then on to the other areas, such as our 1920s schoolhouse and the windmill exhibit,” Broaddus says. Another draw of the Panhandle is Guymon’s Pioneer Days Rodeo. Taking place during the first weekend of May every year, Pioneer Days includes a parade, carnival, 5K run, rodeo queen pageant and more. And not to mention the “mutton bustin’,” where children ride sheep and hang on for dear life as long as they can.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION Guymon is known as the Saddle Bronc Capital of the World. For those who might not know, saddle bronc riding is a rodeo event similar to bareback riding and bullriding, but requiring more technical skills. Spectators can see these skills in full force at Pioneer Days.

The School

Guymon has the largest population of all the Panhandle’s towns by far (at about 12,000; the next-largest is about 6,000), but Oklahoma Panhandle State University in Goodwell (population around 1,200) is also regarded as a hub of activity. Goodwell is in Texas County, the central county of the three in the Panhandle. Dr. Tim Faltyn, the 15th president of OPSU who hails from a long line of family ranchers, says the university is not only a nucleus for Goodwell, but also for the region in general. “We’re the biggest draw of new talent and prepared workforce,” Faltyn says. “You would be really surprised by how many people came to school here and never left because they love the area, the beauty of the landscape – yes, if you look around, it’s gorgeous, most people don’t take the time to look – and the people. It’s a truly remarkable place that is often overlooked or, truth be told, never seen because people don’t give it a chance.” The university itself is known for its Bachelor of Nursing program (which is both popular and high-quality, Faltyn says), its business program and its degrees in science and agriculture. Recently, the education and arts tracts have grown, which is great because “the world needs teachers and artists,” Faltyn says. Because the Panhandle is closer to four other states than to “mainland” Oklahoma in many places, most of its students are from out of state. This brings a lot of diversity to the region. “We have alumni in all 50 states and 26 countries. We take good people and make them great. But if you show up, be willing to work and do your part,” Faltyn says.

But in addition to the university, what else draws students to this area? A strong economy doesn’t hurt. “The Panhandle of Oklahoma has the strongest economy in the state. If you separated the five state regions from the rest of the U.S., we are among the most prosperous areas in the nation with lowest unemployment rate in the state and some of the highest per capita incomes,” Faltyn says. “There is a lot that is overlooked about the Panhandle. On a personal note, I love the landscape and the wildlife. Those two things combine for a way of life that is excellent for raising a family and riding my horse across the southern High Plains.”

The People

Maybe it has something to do with the nature of small communities, but the people of the Panhandle are especially proud of their region. Oklahoma Panhandle State University history major Anyssa Barbosa is not a native of the state, but she has learned about Panhandle people during her years at school. “I truly believe the people of the Panhandle make this part of Oklahoma unique,” Barbosa says. “The Panhandle breeds resilient individuals, and after being here the last three years, going on my fourth, I’ve met some of the most amazing, strong-willed people who’ve taught me that the Panhandle has great rewards if you’re committed enough to stay here and give it all you’ve got.” President Faltyn agrees the residents of this part of the state make the region special. “They have a genuineness and grit that you don’t find anywhere else in Oklahoma,” he says. “I’ve literally lived in all four corners of the state and in the middle as well. The people of the Panhandle are smart, tough and don’t put up with pretenders.” Weissinger of the No Man’s Land Historical Society says the people of this area have a spirit of camaraderie. “The Panhandle is all about the people,” Weissinger says. “We have a wonderful, sharing spirit of community. It’s the type of place where if someone gets sick in the community, everyone jumps in and helps.”

THE PROFESSIONALS ATTORNEY AT LAW My child was bit by the neighbor’s dog. Is the neighbor responsible for payment of the medical bills? Pursuant to Oklahoma Statutes, the owners of any dog shall be liable for damages to the full amount of any damages sustained when his ESTHER M. SANDERS dog, without provocation, bites or injures any person while such person is in or on a place where he has a lawful right to be. However, if it occurred in a rural area, this law does not apply.

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free

FLOORING EXPERT What is the best way to make selections for a remodel? Find something you love and build around that. It can be a wall color, a counter top, floor tile, or accent/fixture. Once you have something picked, you can build upon that inspiration. Another option is to find a picture online that you want to mimic for your space. This is a good way for several reasons. You have a clear idea of what you want, and it can alleviate the stress of being unsure the products will flow together. CLAUDETTE ROWAN

Whichever method you choose, we can help design your flooring. The vast number of options for flooring and accents are great, but can be overwhelming. We always recommend taking samples home and see them in your space and lighting.

Claudette Rowan Tiles & Stones 5556 S. Mingo Tulsa, OK 74146 918.270.4900 tilesandstonesclaudette@gmail.com www.tilesandstonesonline.com OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

81


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS HOSPICE CARE

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

Yes it is. Grief does not have a timetable. When you lose someone as important as a parent, it changes your life. You have faced a year of many “firsts” without your mom and that can AVA HANCOCK be difficult and painful. That can make you feel as if you are reliving the loss each time. That is one reason Grace Hospice offers grief and bereavement support to families who have lost a loved one for 13 months or longer if needed after the person passes. We also offer ongoing weekly support groups for people dealing with grief. One of our trained chaplains will lead the group and you will meet people who can truly empathize with you and help you through the grief process. To find out more, please call us at 918-744-7223.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

How can I help my employees save for retirement?

It has been a year since I lost my mom, yet at times the grief feels as strong as it did right after she died. Is that normal?

DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC®

As a small business owner, one of the greatest benefits you can provide to your employees is a way for them to save for their financial future. As an employer, you have flexibility in choosing a plan or combination of plans that work for your business. Broad categories include:

• A defined benefit enables you to make annual contributions, which can be adjusted each year. The plan pays out a specified benefit to retired employees. • Defined contribution plans, such as a 401(k), which allow the employee, the employer or both to contribute to an individual account for the employee • IRAs, such as a Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) IRA or SIMPLE IRA, which are easy to establish and administer. As a small business owner, it’s important to understand all of your options when it comes to saving for your retirement and helping your employees save for their financial future. A professional can help you make the best choice for you, your employees and your business.

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL A Safe Halloween for All While the ghosts and goblins are on the streets this month, the risk of being injured goes up. Motorists and parents must be more alert as the trick-or-treaters often forget about their own safety. Kids are four times more likely to be struck by a car on RUSS IDEN Halloween than any other day of the year, making it one of the top three days of the year for pedestrian injuries and fatalities per the NHTSA and CDC. Halloween also presents a statistically dangerous night for drunk driving as well. So, here’s some basic, simple tips to follow. Drive at least 5 mph below the posted speed limit in neighborhoods with your headlights on. Pay special attention to people crossing the street and be sure to turn in & out of streets slowly. Ensure kids’ costumes are bright and don’t obstruct their vision. Lastly, supervise all kids under age 12 to stay on sidewalks in familiar areas while using a flashlight after dark so drivers and others see you.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

82

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

The dreaded double chin affects so many of us; thankfully, Allergan has just released a new product. Kybella is a prescription medicine used in adults to improve the appearance MALISSA SPACEK and profile of moderate to severe fat below the chin (submental fat), also called “double chin.” It is the only injectable FDAapproved for the treatment of the double chin. Kybella works by attacking and destroying fat cells under the chin. Once destroyed, those cells cannot store or accumulate fat. This revolutionary new product can rid you of your bothersome submental fat over the course of 2-6 treatment sessions with no downtime in between sessions. To find out more about Kybella and to schedule your complimentary consultation please call 918.872.9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

BUSINESS COACH

PHYSICAL THERAPY

I took the leap and started my own business, but now I feel stuck. How do I grow my business? 1. Find and follow people who have what you want. When I was first starting out, I spent quite a bit of time observing the business AMANDA FRANCES models, marketing strategies and branding of those in my industry who were expanding their audience and their income quickly. 2. Eliminate unnecessary noise. Your parents, pastor, neighbor and uncle all mean well when they give you advice, but unless they currently own a successful business, do not talk to them about your business. 3. Hire a coach or mentor. When you hire a business coach, you are able to bypass common mistakes, glean from their successes, and grow your business more rapidly than you could have on your own.

Following these simple rules ensures everyone will have a safe Halloween. For more information about auto and pedestrian safety, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org

I have a double chin that I hate. Is there anything out there to get rid of it without having surgery?

Amanda Frances Business Coach for Women Entrepreneurs amandafrances.com amanda@amandafrances.com

My 14-year-old daughter has been complaining about knee pain, but she hasn’t had an injury. Typically, she has increased soreness after sports practice. What might be going on? The fact that her symptoms are aggravated with athletic activity and she denies suffering an actual injury event makes me suspect patellofemoral pain syndrome. Basically, the underside of the kneecap gets irritated and often presents as deep aching inside the knee. I see this most commonly in teenage girls and can result from many factors including, but not limited to: flat feet, hip weakness, quad weakness, and inflexibility in various muscles that control the knee. This diagnosis can be a rather complicated puzzle and will most likely require a comprehensive approach to rehabilitation including dynamic stability and hip control exercises, possibly arch supports, quad strengthening, stretching, and manual activities to help improve hip and kneecap mobility. Additionally, taping techniques and modalities such as ice and electrical stimulation may help decrease acute pain. TIM MINNICK, PT

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

83


Taste

L O C A L F L AV O R

Crafting Happiness

Roosevelt’s combines more than 70 craft beers with fine food. Take a kid who has grown up on frozen orange juice, squeeze an orange and give him a glass. Watch his eyes light up. That’s how you’ll feel the first time you try craft beer on tap. (Doesn’t sound familiar? Maybe you’ve never tried the real thing.) There are a lot of happy faces at Roosevelt’s, a definite buzz, and it’s not just caused by beer. With its high ceiling and the sun casting a ruddy glow on red brick walls, leather banquettes, worn oak floors and stained oak wall panels that have the patina of centuries of wear (but which actually were, like everything else, put in a SUNNYSIDE OFFERS BOTH SAVORY AND SWEET BREAKFAST TREATS IN OKC. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

It’s pretty difficult to pick a favorite thing about Sunnyside. Is it that the intimidating line moves so swiftly, especially when coffee is provided for your wait? Is it the always friendly but discreet tableside service? Both of these are huge pluses, but let’s be honest: It’s really about the food. Prepare to lose whatever taste you had for Chickfil-A after Sunnyside’s fried chicken biscuit with house pickles, honey butter and cheese. French toast reaches a whole new level with homemade brioche and pina colada topping. For connoisseurs of that brunch classic eggs Benedict, Sunnyside offers its own spin, including a candied smoked salmon Benedict with grilled tomato slices and sour cream over a potato cake with fried capers and hollandaise, or a chorizo Benedict with green chili hollandaise and queso fresco. (Hungry yet?) The diner could also have aptly been called Hash Heaven. Corned beef hash, long a staple of American breakfasts, is hard to find anymore; not so at Sunnyside. Even better is the Hillybilly Hash with crispy roasted potatoes topped by a more-thangenerous helping of sweet-and-spicy pulled pork and two eggs sunny side up. It’s easy to get blissfully lost in the breakfast and brunch menus at Sunnyside, but we would be remiss if we didn’t mention some of its equally appetizing lunch items, like the bacon-and-cheddar-stuffed meatloaf sandwich, the smoked salmon salad or the open-faced Turkey Day sandwich with mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and turkey gravy. Come tired. Come hungry. Come hung over. Leave sunny. Sunnyside Diner is at 916 N.W. Sixth St. in Oklahoma City. For menu and other information, visit eatatsunnyside.com. TARA MALONE

84

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

few months ago), Roosevelt’s is a happy place. “It’s the coolest bar in Tulsa!” co-owner Pauly Sorrentino says. Ebullient, excitable, energetic, like a Harpo Marx who talks 100 words a minute – that’s Sorrentino, but in this case he just could be right. He points to the 30foot bar, already almost full. Behind it are 79 taps, each with a different beer. The selection changes several times a night and is displayed at the bar or broadcast to your iPhone. “A lot of OKC beers and a lot of Tulsa,” he says. “We keep it local.” Hidden behind the bar is the secret of Roosevelt’s success: a narrow, brightly lit room, invisible to the public, chilly and filled with gleaming kegs, tubing, strange knobs and controls. Craft beer is fragile and, if it’s not given loving care, the taste spoils. This is not the sort of place you’d expect fine dining, but that’s exactly what you’ll find, prepared by chef Sean Mahaffey, formerly of Juniper. A long white trout filet is paired with a fresh green summer succotash, with a bright red swath of pepper coulis. A tender pork loin roulade is enlivened by a sour ale gastrique. There’s bar food, too: burgers with a special meat blend containing 30 percent bacon, salads, soups, sandwiches, and rich gooey grilled cheese melts. Even these are made gourmet style: The Darkwing, for example, features

duck confit, blackberry preserves, havarti and blue cheese on sourdough. There’s a dessert chef, too, so all breads and buns are made inhouse. And everything is $15 or less. Co-owner Josh Royal strolls over. He and Sorrentino designed and helped build the interior. By now the room is packed and Royal can barely squeeze by, but the servers are efficient and everyone is happy. “It’s fun,” he says. “I like it this way. We thrive on chaos.” BRIAN SCHWARTZ

ROOSEVELT’S FOOD RANGES FROM PUB GRUB TO FANCY DESSERTS.


2016

Celebrating our

53rd Year

Reserve an evening of “World Class” Caesar Salad with Steak, Lobster, Chicken or Fish. Friday & Saturday night featuring Mark Bryan.

3109 South Yale • 918.743.1800 celebritytulsa.com

22241 Celebrity Restaurant.indd 1

22312 Hideaway Pizza.indd 1

6/27/16 5:00 PM

8/30/16 1:53 PM

1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd. • Claremore, OK 74017 918-341-7333 • www.hammetthouse.com

Hungry

22306 Hammett House.indd 1

8/24/16 10:33 AM

for more? OPEN 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. DAILY

918-742-4563

Ch e ck o ut Okla h o m a Ma ga zin e’s food is s u e in N ove mb e r.

Food 1/16.indd 1

3310 E. 32nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma Across from Walmart Neighborhood Market

9/12/16 11798 9:55 AM PhillsDiner.indd 1

5/2/14 22127 12:41 PM In The Raw.indd 1

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

85

5/2/16 10:48 AM


Taste

C H E F C H AT

A Hug From the Chef

Bruce Rinehart brings fresh flavors and a love for meeting people to Rococo.

L

ess than a month after opening Rococo, his restaurant in Oklahoma City, chef Bruce Rinehart managed to form a friendship with a diner that has lasted more than 10 years. A family was dining at the restaurant and one of the guests, noticing a distinct New England touch to the menu, asked about the chef. When Rinehart went out the meet the family, he discovered he and the diner were both from New London, Connecticut. “Before you knew it, we were family,” Rinehart says. “It was awesome. And to this day, we’re very, very close, but we had never

met prior. It has been a great relationship.” That sort of interaction has helped set the tone for Rinehart, who says the people he works with and meets every day are the most interesting part of his job as a chef. He calls Rococo a chef-driven restaurant, and says his chefs are known for being in the dining room and visiting with guests. While some people may choose not to embrace that personal connection with their chefs, Rinehart says that is the minority of diners who visits his restaurant. “You have those with their eyebrows raised, and they can’t wait to engage,” he says. “And that’s more or less the majority.”

While Rinehart enjoys interacting with the diners at Rococo, he puts an equal amount of love into the food served to them. His career as a chef started when he was 15 years old, on his own and in need of a job. “I went to a big-time steak and seafood restaurant in Connecticut, landed a dish washing job, killed it, saw what the cooks were doing and said ‘I can do that, and I can do it better than you guys,’” Rinehart says. “And that’s the beginning of the story. I had a passion for it immediately.” He favors simple, fresh dishes – a result of growing up on the East Coast, where seafood comes straight from the ocean. To bring that fresh taste to Oklahoma, Rinehart has orders flown in three times a week. All of Rinehart’s work, as well as his love of meeting new people, helps him create an unpretentious atmosphere where people can get a salad, crab cakes or a veal chop along with a hug from the chef who cooked it. “Like the guests are at my house,” Rinehart says. “Literally.” JUSTIN MARTINO

CHEF BRUCE’S CHAMPAGNE VINAIGRETTE

champaign vinegar olive oil honey fresh orange juice chopped shallots chopped fresh basil

Mix in a bowl Emulsify with hand wand Salt/Pepper to taste Enjoy with salad, grilled chicken or fish

86

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

1/2 c. 1 c. 1 tbsp. 1 tbsp. 1 tbsp. 1 tbsp.


IN SEASON

Plethora of Pumpkins

F

all is the era of pumpkinspiced everything, so it’s no surprise that this unique fruit is in season during October. Whether it’s pancakes, soup, muffins, coffee or ice cream, pumpkin’s distinct flavor can be infused into nearly any type of food this season. On top of delicious eats, this fruit can provide plenty of holiday fun for Halloween activities. From carving spooky jack-o’-lanterns to strolling through a beautiful patch,

people find that pumpkins are a necessity for October entertainment. For Halloween fun in Tulsa, head to the Pumpkin Town Farms through October 31. “We are a pumpkin patch, 5-acre maze, and we offer train and slide rides, face painting, a petting zoo, a giant jumping pillow and so much more,” says Brigette Basse, the co-owner of Pumpkin Town Farms. This event will offer delicious fair food like fried Oreos and corn dogs, and local

R A N D O M F L AV O R S

BREAKFAST MADE BETTER

PHOTO COURTESY FIRST WATCH PHOTO BY CHOATE HOUSE COURTESY A GOOD EGG DINING GROUP PHOTO COURTESY THE WEDGE PIZZERIA

From breakfast favorites like seasoned potatoes, eggs Benedict and crispy bacon to healthier options like egg white omelets and hearty granola bowls, First Watch in Tulsa will be the perfect start to your morning. A menu highlight is the Floridian French Toast: sitting on a bed of sourdough, this delectable dish is covered with fresh banana, kiwi and berries and sprinkled with powdered cinnamon sugar. 8178 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 8104 E. 68th St., Tulsa; firstwatch.com.

musicians can be found playing under the tent during most days. As a family-owned business since 1999, Pumpkin Town Farms places a high priority on quality entertainment for all ages. “We specialize in creating lasting memories for our nearly 35,000 annual guests and their families, year after year,” Basse says. Pumpkin Town Farms is located at 61st Street and Garnett Road. For more information on this event, head to pumpkintownok. com.

Italian Endeavors

The Wedge Pizzeria offers delectable brick-oven pizzas with toppings like roasted chicken, pancetta, capers and more. But the menu doesn’t stop there: on top of hearty salads, unique appetizers, Italian sodas and tasty desserts, the restaurant cooks up fresh pasta and spaghetti squash with toppings like house-made meatballs, chicken or veggies with your choice of marinara or alfredo sauce. 4709 N. Western Ave, Oklahoma City, 230 N.E. First St., Oklahoma City; thewedgeokc.com.

Gastropub Glory

Republic redefines what a pub can be – sure, it might boast 250 handselected beers, a slew of unique cocktails and plenty of wine, but its menu offers more than bar snacks. Bacon wrapped meatloaf, ahi tuna tartar and jalapeno glazed salmon are among the pub’s varied menu options. A unique dish is the grilled shrimp salad – with Brussels sprouts, spaghetti squash, salami and Gouda cheese, dressed with a horseradish vinaigrette, it’s obvious this pub rebels against the typical. 5830 N. Classen Blvd., Oklahoma City; republicgastropub.com. MARY WILLA ALLEN

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

87


DANIEL WINN

STORMSHIELD METEOROLOGIST

KIRSTEN HORNE

TANIYA WRIGHT

MORNINGS

4:30 to 7:00


Where & When

YO U R G U I D E O F T H I N G S TO D O

Break out the Lederhosen Tulsa’s Linde Oktoberfest features a human glockenspiel, dachsund races and much, much more.

PHOTO BY SHANE BEVEL COURTESY LINDE OKTOBERFEST TULSA

B

ratwurst. Beer. Bavarian cheesecake. Now that I have your attention, it’s time to talk about Linde Oktoberfest. This bustling celebration waltzes into Tulsa every October and overtakes the River West Festival Park with an authentic German experience. From the 33.8 ounces of German beer per serving to its rousing step-by-step polka lessons, Linde Oktoberfest is all things German and has been for 38 years running. The original Oktoberfest took place in 1810 as a wedding celebration of King Ludwig I and Princess Therese in Munich, and what was once a fleeting yet momentous matrimonial event is now a world-famous festival. At its core, however, Ok-

toberfest remains all about honoring Deutschland. “Linde Oktoberfest Tulsa is a celebration of German heritage and culture,” says Tonja Carrigg, Oktoberfest director. And celebrating that German heritage translates into several different activities – whether it’s busting out the chicken dance, donning your best lederhosen, downing some strudel or dancing atop a table to the tunes of a band actually flown in from Germany. As an event that has been ranked in the top 10 Oktoberfests in the U.S. by USA Today, these folks aren’t kidding around when it comes to providing the highest quality entertainment, with new attractions each year that keep audiences coming back for mehr – including a new double-decker stage and bar, called Das Glockenspiel, that will serve beer and entertainment in equal measures.

“The Glockenspiel is something fans won’t want to miss,” Carrigg says. “This two-story structure is like a giant cuckoo clock with real humans coming out to perform short skits every hour, on the hour. They are sure to bring smiles and laughter to those who stop by to enjoy the action.” A Jugendzelt, or children’s tent, will offer plenty of entertainment for the youngsters, and many adults enjoy the commemorative stein, called the Maßkrug, as a keepsake of your German jamboree. Beer barrel races, dachshund races, a lederhosen lauf and Siegi’s World Championship Sausage Eating Contest are all among the various Oktoberfest activities. The festival is also teaming up with Tulsa organizations to bring a local flavor to the celebrations. “The German American Society of Tulsa, or GAST, brings dancers who perform traditional German routines while dressed in traditional dresses, called dirndls,” Carrigg says. And for the more adventurous among us, carnival rides are also a fan favorite – just make sure not to eat too much schnitzel beforehand. The Linde Oktoberfest runs Oct. 20-23 at the River West Festival Park. For details, head to tulsaoktoberfest.org. MARY WILLA ALLEN

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

89


PHOTO COURTESY TULSA OPERA

Where & When PERFORMANCES

Musical Ambrosia

As one of the oldest opera companies in the United States, Tulsa Opera brings rich history, years of experience and the unique culture of opera to the state of Oklahoma. The 2016-2017 season includes four incredible shows and will open with The Pearl Fishers on Oct. 21. “Georges Bizet’s sensual tale of forbidden love and the bonds of true friendship is musical ambrosia,” says Greg Weber, general director at Tulsa Opera. “Tuneful and exotic, The Pearl Fishers centers on an unusual love triangle in which two men, Nadir and Zurga, compete for the same woman but are also loyal friends.” The show will also feature some of the best operatic talent Tulsa has ever seen: Sarah Shafer as Leila, Aaron Blake as Nadir and Yunpeng Wang as Zurga. All three will be making their role debuts with Tulsa Opera’s rendition of The Pearl Fishers. With the promise of overflowing talent, fiery music and intriguing plot, The Pearl Fishers will be the perfect start to a tremendous season. “With the Vienna State Opera’s consummate Maestro Frédéric Chaslin on the podium and dazzling sets and costumes by Dame Zandra Rhodes, Tulsa Opera’s season opener promises to be an unforgettable night,” Weber says. The show will run for two days only – Oct. 21 and 23. For a full season schedule, head to tulsaopera.com.

IN TULSA GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS Oct. 1-2 TULSA PAC David Mamet’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play covers two days in the lives of four desperate real estate agents tasked with selling undesirable real estate to unsuspecting buyers. When the agents are given the news that all but the top two sellers will be fired at the end of the week, they prepare to engage in any number of unethical and illegal acts to keep their jobs. – tulsapac.com OKLAHOMA STATE SUGAR ART SHOW Oct. 1-2 RIVER SPIRIT EXPO BUILDING Marie Antoinette said, so they say, “Let them eat cake.” Or did she? Regardless, she did enjoy a lot of cake and would have been right at home here with us. If one cake is a feast, then the Oklahoma State Sugar Art Show is surely a banquet. October 2016 will be all the sweeter if you save the dates and compete. Here, cake royalty will stage another amazing showcase, spinning glittering sugar magic with a combination of inspired design. – oklahomasugarartists.com

90

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

BAND OF HORSES AND THE WILD FEATHERS Oct. 3 CAIN’S BALLROOM Beginning with their first LP Everything All The Time, Band of Horses has been a mainstay of indie rock for a decade with four studio albums in total, including 2010’s Grammy-nominated Infinite Arms and 2012’s Mirage Rock, produced by the legendary Glyn Johns. – cainsballroom.com M83 Oct. 5 BRADY THEATER M83, a French electronic band based in Los Angeles, consists of a sole member, Anthony Gonzalez. With hits like “Midnight City” and “I Need You,” M83 has established itself as an electronic music staple. - ilovem83.com BEN RECTOR Oct. 6 BRADY THEATER Eight years after he began touring while at the University of Arkansas and two years after his first entry into the Top 20 on the Billboard album chart, Ben Rector is back with a new album and is feeling Brand New. The singer-songwriter’s newest album marks a return to the spirit of his youth, when he was a music-crazed teenager playing guitar in his Tulsa bedroom. – benrectormusic.com

TSO CLASSICS: RACHMANINOFF’S SECOND SYMPHONY Oct. 8 TULSA PAC Tulsa Symphony welcomes Guest Conductor Philip Mann back to the podium to conduct a diverse trio of the masters. – tulsasymphony.org WILLIE NELSON Oct. 8 HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA As a country icon who started writing songs at the age of 7, Willie Nelson shows no signs of slowing down. He’ll be hitting the road for his newest tour, Willie Nelson and Family, in 2016. – www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com CAROL BURNETT Oct. 8 BROKEN ARROW PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Carol Burnett, an award-winning actress and best-selling author, is widely recognized by the public and her peers for her comedic and dramatic roles on television, film, and Broadway, most notably The Carol Burnett Show. – brokenarrowpac.com ADLEY STUMP Oct. 12 THE VANGUARD As an alum of NBC’s hit singing competition show The Voice (Season 2, Team Blake Shelton) Stump says: “I am so fortunate to be able to use the experience I gained from The Voice as a springboard to grow my career.” With her magnetic personality, contagious smile and a passionate and giving spirit, the sky’s the limit for Adley in 2016. – thevanguardtulsa.com PRYOR RENDERING Oct. 13-16 TULSA PAC It’s the world premiere of a new musical set in Oklahoma! Based on the acclaimed novel by Tulsa native Gary Reed, Pryor Rendering is the story of a young man coming of age and coming out in the 1960s in rural Oklahoma. Music and lyrics are by Frank Schiro. Shawn Churchman wrote the book for this show, which is recommended for mature audiences. – tulsapac.com TOBY KEITH Oct. 14 BOK CENTER Toby Keith is coming to Tulsa for his first ever concert at BOK Center on his Interstates & Tailgates Tour. He will be joined by special guests Casey Donahew, and Ben Haggard and The Strangers. – bokcenter.com


IN OKC OLD VOLKS SHOW Oct. 1 RENO AVE, OKC The VW Club of Oklahoma City proudly presents The Old Volks Show, back and better than ever! For more than 30 years, The Old Volks Show has been the place to see and show iconic VWs. The show has more than 20 classes of both air-cooled and

Experience the magic of Arabian horses at the U.S. National Arabian & Half-Arabian Championship Horse Show’s 50th anniversary, trotting into Tulsa Oct. 20-29. “You can expect great horses doing what they do best. The atmosphere is electric with excitement,” says Mikayla Boge, marketing specialist at the Arabian Horse Association. “Exhibitors have worked really hard to get here, and this show determines who receives the coveted red rose blanket.” water-cooled VWs and will celebrate these cars with the best trophies in the area. – whereevent.com CHRIS STAPLETON Oct. 1 ZOO AMPHITHEATRE Following a historic turn on the CMA Awards, Traveller became the first album to re-enter the Billboard 200 all-genre album chart at No. 1. Stapleton also performed a “show-stealing” (Rolling Stone) duet on the live awards show with superstar and friend Justin Timberlake, which Entertainment Weekly called “an unapologetic display of abnormal levels of talent.” – chrisstapleton.com PICTURING INDIAN TERRITORY Oct. 6–Dec. 30 FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART Picturing Indian Territory promises to be the critical exploration of the art and visual culture of Oklahoma and will encourage future study in this area. The exhibition will be accompanied by a book authored by exhibition curators Byron Price, director of the Charles M. Russell Center for the Study of Art of the American West; James Peck, director of the Old Jail Art Center; and Mark White, the Wylodean and Bill Saxon Director of the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art and published by the

SPORTS

IN RUSS WE TRUST

PHOTO BY HOWARD SCHATZBERG COURTESY ARABIAN HORSE ASSOCIATION

Arabian Nights

EQUESTRIAN

The hearts of Oklahoma City Thunder fans were broken when He-Who-Shall-Not-Be-Named dropped the news (on Independence Day, no less) that he would not resign with the team after nine glorious seasons. However, the collective sigh of relief could be heard ’round the state when Russell Westbrook announced his three-year contract extension in early August. As a consistent, determined and vicious player since the team’s relocation to Oklahoma in 2008, Westbrook has earned himself the phrase “In Russ We Trust.” Without K.D. by his side, it will be an interesting transition for Westbrook, but it’s doubtful he’ll do anything but excel. Pre-season games for the Thunder begin on Oct. 3 in Madrid, Spain, but the team will return to Oklahoma on Oct. 13 at the BOK Center in Tulsa to face off against Memphis. Find the Thunder at home at the Chesapeake Energy Arena on Oct. 16 and 18, playing Minnesota and Denver, respectively. The regular season begins for the Thunder on Oct. 26 in Philadelphia against the 76ers. For a full schedule, head to nba.com/thunder.

This rose blanket is the Arabian Horse Association’s equivalent to a gold medal. The victors receive this blanket and take a lap around the ring to celebrate. “The rose blanket symbolizes that all [their] hard work and effort has paid off.” The show also includes silent auctions, interactive tours with an up-close look at Arabian horses and a boot design contest. The competition will be back at the Tulsa Expo Square for the ninth year running. For more details, visit arabianhorses.org. University of Oklahoma Press in conjunction with the Charles M. Russell Center for the Study of Art of the American West. – ou.edu MELANIE MARTINEZ Oct. 7 DIAMOND BALLROOM Melanie Martinez wants to tell you a story. It’s fictional, but it’s also about her, in a way that’s somewhat exaggerated and darker than reality. The tale traces through Martinez’s debut album Cry Baby, a collection of pop songs that draw inspiration from singer-songwriter folk and hip-hop. – melaniemartinezmusic.com SPIRIT OF AMERICA Oct. 7 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL American culture encompasses the customs and traditions of the United States, including language, religion, food and the arts. American culture has been shaped by European immigrants, American Indians, Latin Americans, Africans and Asians. It is in this spirit that this concert is a celebration of several of these contributions: folk songs and hymns of America, African-American and, more notably, a newly commissioned work for adult chorus, children’s chorus, soloists and orchestra by Chickasaw composer and Oklahoma native, Jerod Impichchaachaaha’ Tate. – okcciviccenter.com PUMPKINVILLE Oct. 7-23 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS The Fifth Annual Pumpkinville Fall Festival is in the Children’s Garden of the Myriad Botanical Gardens. Open daily from 10 a.m.-5p.m. The cost is $6 per person. – oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com HEATHERS THE MUSICAL Oct. 7-29 POLLARD THEATRE Heathers The Musical is the darkly delicious story of Veronica Sawyer, a brainy, beautiful teenage misfit who hustles her way into the most powerful and ruthless clique at Westerberg High: the Heathers. But before she can get comfortable atop the high school food chain, Veronica falls in love with the dangerously sexy new kid, J.D. – thepollard.org ZOMBIE BOLT 5K Oct. 8 EDMOND Run, walk, skip or canter through a 5K (3.1 miles) course at Edmond’s Mitch Park. Use your amazing wit and speed to stay alive through the end of course. – hauntworld.com

PHOTO BY LAYNE MURDOCH, NBAE/GETTY IMAGES, COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER

PHOTO BY LAYNE MURDOCH, NBAE/GETTY IMAGES, COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER

LEUKEMIA & LYMPHOMA LIGHT THE WALK NIGHT Oct. 14 GUTHRIE GREEN The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Light The Night Walk funds research to find cures and ensure access to treatments for all blood cancer patients. Friends, family, children of all ages and coworkers all have the power to save lives. – guthriegreen.com CASTING CROWNS Oct. 20 MABEE CENTER Contemporary Christian band and GMA Dove Award winner Casting Crowns makes its return to the Mabee Center this fall. Joining the band is five-time Grammy nominee Matt Maher and newcomer Hannah Kerr. – mabeecenter.com TRIO SETTECENTO Oct. 23 CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA Trio Settecento’s passionate and authoritative interpretations renew the pleasures of hearing beloved music from the Age of Enlightenment while also revealing the delights of new discoveries. Imagination, vigor, technical polish and historical insight have made the Trio’s performances appealing to audiences and critics alike. – chambermusictulsa.org ONEGIN Oct. 28-30 TULSA BALLET Based on Alexander Pushkin’s verse-novel Eugene Onegin, this full-length ballet tells the love story of Tatiana and Onegin (pronounced Un-YAY-gin with a hard g). A dramatic tale of unrequited romance, your heart will be moved by this passionate ballet. – tulsaballet.org TULSA RUN Oct. 29 DOWNTOWN TULSA Since 1978, thousands of runners have convened in downtown Tulsa, Oklahoma for Tulsa’s most iconic footrace, the Tulsa Federal Credit Union Tulsa Run. Powered by the Tulsa Sports Commission, the Tulsa Run is a challenging race for any level runner with plenty of fun to be had at the finish line. – tulsasports.org GOLDEN GALA Oct. 30 SHERWIN MILLER MUSEUM OF JEWISH ART Honoring the past, celebrating the present, building the future. An evening to remember, in commemoration of 50 Years of the SMMJA, featuring James Shrader of the Palace Cafe. – jewishmuseum.net

OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

91


Where & When

MAKE PROMISES HAPPEN Oct. 9 FRONTIER CITY Central Christian Camp works to provide a fun day for special needs guests and their families. – frontiercity.com THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW Oct. 13-Nov. 5 LYRIC THEATRE OF OKLAHOMA One of Lyric’s biggest hits is back by popular demand! Get weird and rock all night with Richard O’Brien’s The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Whether it’s your first time or this musical is part of your soul, join us for “a night you will remember for a very — long— time!” – lyrictheatreokc.com 2016 LONGHORN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP Oct. 14-15 COX CONVENTION CENTER This joint event between the Texas Longhorn Marketing Alliance and International Texas Longhorn Association has become the biggest and best Longhorn experience for the industry. This year, the fun will continue on Oct. 14-15 at Cox Convention Center in OKC. The TLMA and ITLA will combine the Longhorn World Championship Sale and the ITLA’s Championship Show and Futurity. – coxconventioncenter.com THE WOMAN IN BLACK Oct. 14-19 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Journey into darkness this Halloween season for a tale of the supernatural that will leave your spine tingling and your eyes disbelieving. Based on the book of the same name, this dark and haunting ghost story is the perfect treat for a crisp autumn evening. Join us, if you dare! – okcciviccenter. com NATIONAL BEER MILE Oct. 15 CHICKASAW BRICKTOWN BALLPARK Four beers. One mile. One awesome after-party! The National Beer Mile tour rolls into Oklahoma City on Saturday, Oct. 15 at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark. National Beer Mile is a one-mile fun run for runners, social drinkers, and party-goers alike. – nationalbeermile.com CHARLES PAYNE Oct. 20 OKLAHOMA CITY TOWN HALL Payne is a Fox Business Network contributor and host of Making Money with Charles Payne. He was formerly co-host of Varney & Co. Payne is also a contributor to Fox News Channel,

frequently appearing on such shows as Cashin’ In, Cavuto on Business and Bulls and Bears. – okctownhall.com AN AFFAIR OF THE HEART Oct. 21-23 OKLAHOMA STATE FAIRGROUNDS In 1985, the first Affair of the Heart show took place in Oklahoma City, attracting 60 booths and 800 attendees. The name “An Affair of the Heart” grew out of the common love for crafting and shopping of the eight women who organized the first show and every show thereafter. Their goal was to create a fun shopping experience that has become a tradition for generations of women. – heartoftulsa.com LIFE IN COLOR Oct. 29 COX CONVENTION CENTER After multiple sold out shows across the world, we are packing up the Paint Factory and heading out for our Fall Tour! This year’s tour aims to answer the age-old questions: How did color come to be? Fans can learn about the origins of paint through the almighty Paint Factory. This year we will give our fans a new experience that will bring them through a journey on how color was created. – coxconventioncenter.com

AROUND THE STATE GUTHRIE ESCAPE: ART, WINE & MUSICAL FESTIVAL Oct. 1-2 GUTHRIE Stroll among the artists, taste fine wines from featured wineries, listen to live music at the two bandstands, watch artists demonstrations, take your children to the Children’s Art Experience and enjoy tasty festival foods! It’s historic Guthrie at its best. – guthrieescape.com DICKENS OF A RIDE BICYCLE TOUR Oct. 1 GAZEBO PARK, CLAREMORE Returning this fall, Dickens of a Ride is a must attend event for the entire family! The bicycle ride begins in downtown Claremore at Gazebo Park, located at Muskogee Avenue and Will Rogers Boulevard. – downtownclaremore.org

O N T H E S TA G E

A Booming Month for Brady

92

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016

indie and electronic powerhouse. M83 is a can’t-miss for live music lovers. Last but not least, Ben Rector, a Tulsa native, has garnered a cultfollowing turned commercial adoration over the past few years with his soulful voice, positive energy and catchy tunes. August marked the release of Rector’s new album, Brand New. He will bring his talents back to his hometown Oct. 6. For a full schedule of Brady’s concerts, go to bradytheater.com.

PHOTO OF BEN RECTOR COURTESY BRADY THEATER

October is a big month for Brady Theater. From pop to electronic to classic rock legends, Brady has it all. Since Tulsa has recently become a one-stop shop for all things Bob Dylan – from the Bob Dylan Archives finding a new home at TU’s Helmerich Center in March to Circle Cinema’s Dylan on Film experience in September – it’s the perfect time to be a Dylan fan in Tulsa. For a chance to see him live, Brady will host Dylan and his band on Oct. 23. Brady will bring additional high-profile musicians to Tulsa earlier in the month, including M83 and Ben Rector. M83, a one-man electronic band, will stop in Tulsa on Oct. 5. With hits like “Midnight City” and “Wait,” M83 has established itself as an

FOOD FEST

SAY CHEESE

When one thinks of Oklahoma, cheese isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. The citizens of Watonga tell a different story, however, as 2016 marks the 40th anniversary of the famous Watonga Cheese Festival. “Watonga has been known for its cheese as long as we have had a festival to celebrate it,” says Amy Adams, director of Watonga’s Chamber of Commerce. But what does a cheese festival entail? Activities include cheese carvings and tastings, dog shows, rat races and helicopter rides, all under the watchful eye of mascot The Big Cheese. The first ever Cheese Ball, held on Oct. 14, will be one of the highlights of the festival. “We will dance the night away at City Hall, where attendees are encouraged to dress up either formally or in their most cheesy attire,” Adams says. If you still aren’t sold on this cheesy good time, admission is 100 percent free and open to children and adults alike. “I think I’m most excited about hosting an event that you can be proud to bring your family to,” Adams says. The festival runs Oct. 14 and 15. For details, go to watongacheesefestival.com.

MUMS THE WORD FESTIVAL Oct. 1 CASHION Shop the vendor booths, grab a bite to eat, bring out a lawn chair and stay a while for the live entertainment, and take on your friends with KnockNRoll Bumper balls. Remember to take your fall flowers from the flower shop. – allevents.in OKLAHOMA CZECH FESTIVAL Oct. 1 YUKON Festival goers will get a taste of Czech culture, including food, music, dancing, costumes and imported merchandise. The Czech Festival is a way of preserving and sharing of the old Czech customs along with providing a part of the traditional Czech foods. – cgsi.org MEDICINE PARK FLUTE FESTIVAL & ART WALK Oct. 1-2 MEDICINE PARK The 2016 Eighth Annual Medicine Park Flute Festival & Art Walk is back to the first Saturday and Sunday weekend in October! Saturday, Oct. 1: Open mic live flute performance and headline concerts all on the main stage. Sunday, Oct 2: Live flute performances all day to the festival conclusion with the headline concerts. – eventsi.us ROCK ISLAND ARTS FESTIVAL Thru Oct. 2 CHICKASHA What can you expect to see at the Rock Island Arts Festival? Artisans booths, crafter booths, national and local bands, performing arts, children’s creation stations, main street merchants, exquisite food vendors, art demos on the grounds and wine and beer tastings! – rockislandartsfestival.org


C R E AT I V E

The Art of Illumination

PHOTO COURTESY INDUSTRY FLEA

SCRATCH YOUR ITCH AT THE FLEA

For the lovers of vintage finds and keepin’ it local, the Industry Flea is your dream come true. At its core, the Flea is a relaxed outdoor market smack dab in the middle of Midtown OKC that boasts a wide variety of products, from clothing and food to art and crafts. Unlike other Oklahoma markets, however, Industry Flea took its cues from major players in the flea game. “When we created the Industry Flea a few years ago, our goal was to create a new experience in Oklahoma City. We looked at bigger cities’ flea markets, like the Brooklyn Flea in NYC, and adapted that to the ‘small community’ scene we have here,” says Cleo Stavros, event manager for Industry Flea. The Flea prides itself on locality and a deep appreciation for Oklahoma talent. “The Industry Flea is a place where start-up businesses launch, where old things find new homes, where tasty treats are savored and small vendors get to know their customers,” Stavros says. “Industry Flea was inspired by the work that we see our local shops and artisans putting into their businesses. This throwback style of craftsmanship is our version of modern industry.” Industry Flea will take place Oct. 1. For details, head to industryflea.com.

S K Y WA R D

UP, UP & AWAY

How many times have you taken a ride in a hot air balloon? If the answer is zero, head to the Poteau Balloon Festival, running Oct. 14 and 15, to fulfill this adrenaline-fueled adventure. In its 11th year, the festival has experienced exponential growth, ballooning from 2,500 to 22,000 guests a year at the LeFlore County Fair Grounds. To compensate, the festival expanded its activities, adding live entertainment, arts and crafts, monster truck shows, helicopter flights and carnival rides. With visitors streaming in from all across the United States and Canada, the festival has become one of the hottest things to do in Oklahoma, and it’s all thanks to hard-working Poteau citizens. “The community has a unique, synergistic, dynamic energy that never stops. One thing that astounds visitors is that Poteau never does anything on a small scale,” says Karen Wages, president and CEO of Poteau’s Chamber of Commerce. For more info, head to poteauchamber.com. NEIL SEDAKA Oct. 7 GRAND CASINO HOTEL & RESORT Singer. Songwriter. Composer. Pianist. Author. These are just a few of the titles that can be used to describe Neil Sedaka. His impressive 60-year career ranges from being one of the first teen pop sensations of the ‘50s, a relevant songwriter for in the ‘60s, a superstar in the ‘70s, remaining a constant force in writing and performing presently. – grandboxoffice.com TOM JONES Oct. 8 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO The legendary Tom Jones will grace the stage for a show-stopping performance in the Global Event Center. Sustaining popularity as a live performer, Jones has garnered the best reviews of his career for his most recent albums, Long Lost Suitcase, Spirit In The Room and Praise & Blame. – winstarworldcasino.com CHOUTEAU DAY CELEBRATION & PARADE Oct. 8 SALINA Chouteau Day is one of Salina’s largest events. We celebrate a colorful past and progressive future. The day is chocked full of games, entertainment and parade for our citizens and attracts people from surrounding communities. – salinachamber.publishpath.com MUSIC ON THE MOUNTAIN VIKING & CELTIC FESTIVAL Oct. 8-9 HEAVENER Come to the Music on the Mountain Viking

PHOTO BY PHILIP ANSON COURTESY POTEAU CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

ON THE STREET

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART

A new exhibition entitled Sacred Words: The Saint John’s Bible and the Art of Illumination will come to the Oklahoma City Musuem of Art from Oct. 15 through Jan. 8. “Sacred Words centers around illumination: essentially decorated or illustrated manuscripts that traditionally utilized gold or silver,” says Becky Weintz, director of marketing for the OKCMOA. “The centerpiece of the exhibition is 70 folios from the Saint John’s Bible.” The exhibition will display other religious texts, with illuminated manuscripts from the Book of Hours, Quran and Torah scrolls. The manuscripts have been translated to English to remain accessible while keeping many of the characteristics of their medieval predecessors. “The rich tradition of creating illuminated manuscripts makes for a fascinating exhibition that we felt would be well received by the community here in OKC,” Weintz says. “We think people DONALD JACKSON, CREATION, COPYRIGHT will be surprised by the intricacy, depth, and beauty of these works in person.” 2003, THE SAINT JOHN’S BIBLE, SAINT JOHN’S UNIVERSITY, COLLEGEVILLE, For details on this exhibition, visit okcmoa.com. MINNESOTA, USA.

& Celtic Festival at beautiful Heavener Runestone Park for a riveting kaleidoscope of live music. This music festival will feature Celtic music, acoustic folk, rock music and more. – travelok.com ROBBERS CAVE FALL FESTIVAL Oct. 14-16 WILBURTON Annually, there are around 65,000 to 70,000 people who visit over the three days of the event. The largest day is Saturday, when the festival is joined by the Fall Foliage Cruise, which hosts between 450 and 500 pre-1981 cars. – robberscavefallfestival.com KIAMICHI INDEPENDENT BIKERS FALL RALLY & BIKE SHOW Oct. 14-16 IDABEL The Kiamichi Independent Bikers Fall Rally and Bike Show is a three-day event on 17 acres of wooded scenery. An event for the family with live music, door prizes, free barbecue, children’s area and a variety of food. – choctawcountry.com

FOR EVEN MORE EXCITING EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC, AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

93


When & Where

FILM AND CINEMA

October’s Best Bets in Cinema AROUND TOWN

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA AMER

ICAN FILM FEST

Oklahoma already has one significant film festival, deadCenter in Oklahoma City, and it hosts a few other niche festivals throughout the year, but when it comes to film festivals, the more the merrier. Enter the Tulsa American Film Festival, which will celebrate its second year in existence on Oct. 14-16. Unlike some festivals, which can overwhelm with choices, TAFF features a more streamlined, curated experience with a handful of films to offer, most with some sort of tie to Oklahoma. That local feel extends to the venues; films will be shown at the Circle Cinema, Gilcrease Museum and the Woody Guthrie Center, ensuring that the festival will feel like a real Tulsa event while still attracting national attention. Given Oklahoma’s slowly rising status as a great state in which to make films, festivals like TAFF act as fertile ground for the continued blossoming of the state’s film culture.

PHOTO COURTESY SHOUT! FACTORY

AT HOME

As Halloween approaches, it’s time to start thinking about curling up on the couch with a bowl of popcorn and a scary movie to make you jump in the dark. I tend to avoid shock-oriented horror films in favor of those that take a slow-burn approach, so I am thrilled that Shout! Factory has released a collector’s edition DVD of John Carpenter’s The Thing, one of my favorite horror films. Featuring a gruff performance by Kurt Russell, the film explores body horror and psychological deterioration among a group of men stationed in a research facility in Antarctica. With a chilling score and ace monster effects by Rob Bottin, the movie works as a suspenseful exploration of human society and a frightening piece of entertainment. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

Octob er 201 6

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2016 OC 016

TO BE R2

Season’s Readings Med

Give the gift of Oklahoma Magazine.

Ho wT

Disco

Stavering the Pan t ha e’s nd le

10GH

ech n

ica

olo

gy

is C

All Things Oklahoma

lc ar ha

ng

People • Places • Food & Drink • Entertainment Subscription just $18/year

ing

e

Overcome Anxiety, PKlus it Stress and Heartache andcBahthsen OST TOW NS

Hypnotherapy works!

BrowningHypnotherapy.com | 918.990.0144 94 Hypnotherapy OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 22325 Browning Centered.indd 1 2016

Holiday Gift Guide

OKLAHOMA

Great ideas for everyone on your list. Contact us for advertising opportunities, 918.744.6205 advertising@okmag.com.

9/14/16 Holiday 4:27 PM MP.indd 1

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 9/21/16 3:07 PM


MARKETPLACE Voted Tulsa's The Best of the

E NOW AFTER 32 YEARS, WE’R ! OPEN ON FRIDAY NIGHTS

North of Woodland Hills 6837 S. Memorial Dr. North of Utica Square 2139 E. 21st St.

HAPPY HOUR, FRIDAYS 4-6 P.M.

918.254.1611

BILLY’S ON THE SQUARE HOURS: LUNCH, MON-FRI 10:30 A.M.– 2:30 P.M., FRI 4 – 9 P.M. Located in the heart of downtown at 5th and Main St. Family-Friendly / Kid’s Menu / Outdoor Patio

22321 Billy's on the Square.indd 1

Best

www.visionsunique.com

9/10/16 22317 9:02 AM Visions.indd 1 2016

NEW Cozy 9/7/16 Loungewear & Slippers

1:06 PM

Special UGG Launch Thursday, October 13th

10 A.M. - 9 P.M.

With live music 7 - 9 P.M.

5201 South Sheridan Tulsa, Oklahoma 74145 918.622.5027 22092 PinPoint Resource.indd 1

10051 S. Yale, Suite 105 918.299.6565 DonnasFashions.com

4/29/16 22316 3:09 PM Donna's Fashion.indd 1

2016

2020 Utica Square www.hicksbrunson.com 918.743.6478

22309 Hicks Brunson.indd 1

9/6/16 1:00 PM

remember new year’s resolutions?

The Ultimate Luxury Eyewear Experience 8/29/16 22291 9:12 AM SALT Yoga.indd 1

959:06 AM OCTOBER 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM8/23/16


C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

Russ Kirkpatrick

A

s one half of Abbie The Pug Pictures, Russ Kirkpatrick has worked with his partner, Andy Kinslow, on documentaries with topics ranging from the history of Tulsa to the lives of at-risk women. The two recently received a Heartland Emmy for Boomtown: An American Journey, a documentary produced in conjunction with the Tulsa Historical Society, and are currently working on Susan’s Story, which documents the life of a woman diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal degeneration. As Oklahoma’s film scene continues to expand and grow, we sat down with Russ Kirkpatrick and got his thoughts on …

… how Kirkpatrick & Kinslow Films started making documentaries.

We started making nonprofit short films for organizations in need of direct/ specific messaging to increase awareness for their organization, ultimately leading to better fundraising. A natural fit was providing corporate training videos. One of our first short projects, turned into the feature length documentary Boomtown: An American Journey.

… his favorite projects.

Boomtown: An American Journey was an incredible journey into Tulsa’s past. It was a unique filming experience not only because of the content but because of what the Oklahoma-based film crew brought creatively to the project. The nonprofit project My Best Friend Julie was insightful into the challenges many women face in Oklahoma and the corporate film for Rustic Cuff/KKT Architects provides a view into how amazing spaces are designed.

… how Kirkpatrick & Kinslow became involved with Boomtown.

Boomtown: An American Journey started as a small promotional film called Voices of History designed to showcase a third-grade curriculum from Tulsa Historical Society & Museum. Once filming started, we realized pretty quickly it could be much more, and the idea of Boomtown was born.

… Tulsa’s recent interest in filmmaking.

Thanks to help from Abby Kurin at the Tulsa Office of Film, Music, Arts & Culture, Tava Sofsky at the Oklahoma Film Commission, Tulsa’s Circle Cinema and film festivals like deadCenter and Tulsa Overground, the film business is seeing a dramatic resurgence in the state.

… future projects for the production company.

We are headed to post-production with a documentary featuring the humor and advocacy of a woman diagnosed before age 50 with younger onset Alzheimer’s, and later with FTD (frontotemporal degeneration.) The film looks at how the diseases impact relationships, finances and end-of-life conversations. We are collaborating with Tulsa Historical Society & Museum on a follow-up to Boomtown; we are in development on a documentary focused on the impact of the stunning female incarceration rate in Oklahoma, and we are working with a screenwriter on script rewrites for a feature length horror film.

96

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2016


WELCOME TO THE With AAA Four Diamond accommodations, Vegas-style games, outstanding dining options and A-list entertainment, Choctaw Casino Resort - Durant is ready to WOW. Add in a world-class spa, our tropical pool, The Oasis, family-friendly fun at The District and our commitment to service, and it all makes for an unforgettable experience.

DURANT • POCOLA • GRANT • McALESTER • BROKEN BOW • IDABEL • STRINGTOWN • STIGLER • CASINO TOOs

Hwy 69/75 • ChoctawCasinos.com • 888.652.4628 Management reserves all rights. Gambling Problem? Call 1.800.522.4700.


Local. Personal. Professional.

www.donthorntonauto.com

October 2016 Oklahoma Magazine  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you