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AUGUST 2015


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As summer winds down, it’s time to gear up for school. Time for renewed friendships with classmates, and shopping for unique styles you’ll find only at Utica Square. Start your little ones off dressed for success — with a little help from Tulsa’s hometown treasure.


Features August

2015 Oklahoma Magazine Vol. XIX, No. 8

45 Education Special Report

Whether heading back into the familiar classrooms of high school or venturing off into the exciting and unknown experience of college, students face countless options and obstacles. Understanding what you can do now to best secure your future is beneficial. And when preparing for the next step to higher education – choosing the right college, the right major or the right funding – it’s important to know the facts. This year, we also speak to students who are the first in their family to go to college, as well as outstanding high school seniors who are motivated and passionate about their futures.

45 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62

First in the Family Learning The Language Trading Degrees Choosing The One Follow The Money Finding A Match Credits And Culture Mastering Learning Eleven Pillars of Success

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15 Museums You Have to See to Believe

Across Oklahoma, unique and unusual museums offer exploration and discovery. From pigeons, banjos, wrestling and the telephone to bones, rocks, guns and dinosaurs, there’s endless fascination to uncover. Let your curiosity loose at these 15 museums. We also let you in on Oklahoma’s underrated museums and regional museums you can visit on a tankful.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

AUGUST 2015

Oklahoma is home to 38 federally recognized tribes who have a more than $10.8 billion impact on the state’s economy each year. While tribal gambling operations take up a large portion of their contribution, money flows in from other established and growing business operations, including entertainment, health care, travel, manufacturing and information technology.

August 2015

68 Nations Fuel The State

ON THE COVER: OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE PRESENTS THE ANNUAL EDUCATION SPECIAL REPORT, INCLUDING OKLAHOMA’S OUTSTANDING HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS. PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN. ILLUSTRATIONS BY BEN ALBRECHT.

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read

expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS:

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.


Departments

13 The State

Oklahoma City’s Curbside Chronicle is working to change the way we percieve the homeless community by empowering the city’s homeless and at-risk citizens through the opportunity to contribute to and sell the publication.

16 18

Happening Culture

20 22 24

5 Qs The Insider Oklahoma Business

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

18

Two fathers wanting to send their kids to school with something special have mastered the skill of napkin art.

27 Life & Style

Christopher Mantle, the Tulsa artist known for his unique and striking buffalo paintings, credits his inspiration to his Cherokee heritage.

28

Living Space

34 38 40 42

Style Your Health Destination Scene

When this family relocated to midtown from south Tulsa, architect Brian L. Freese designed a beautiful space blending classic and modern elements.

91 Taste

Hoboken Coffee Roaster is known to its patrons as a unique experience that melds warm, memorable service with delicious, in-house roasted coffee and made-from-scratch menu items.

94 95

The Pour Important Meals

97 Entertainment

In Rush Springs, Okla., the second weekend in August means one thing: the Rush Springs Watermelon Festival. For its 71st celebration, roughly 30,000 festivalgoers from all over the state, country and world are expected to attend.

98

Calendar of Events

104 In Person

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

97

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91


Mental illness is not just something that happens to other people.

Like physical ailments, mental illness can affect any person or any family. “All of us are on a continuum of mental health throughout our lives,” said Dr. Matthew Meyer, medical director of Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital. For instance, depression is one of the most common medical problems and the leading mental health diagnosis. “Depression can be chronic or episodic— and it can be treated,” Dr. Meyer said.

Matthew E. Meyer, M.D.

“The sooner treatment begins, the greater

LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIST

the chance of a positive outcome and the less the patient suffers.” Laureate provides a wide range of mental health services including outpatient care for adults, teens and children; a nationally recognized eating disorders program; intensive outpatient treatment for drug and alcohol abuse; and inpatient care for adults and seniors. For more information about Laureate, please visit laureate.com or call 918-481-4000.

Healthcare for life.


OKLAHOMA

California Impressionism

The IrvIne MuseuM

Selections from

OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX EDITORIAL ASSISTANT BRITTANY ANICETTI CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER BEN ALBRECHT

DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY ADVERTISING/OFFICE ASSISTANT ALYSSA HALL CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB

Arthur G. Rider The Spanish Boat oil on canvas, c. 1915 35” x 41”

CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM

through September 6, 2015 1400 N. Gilcrease MuseuM rd. Tulsa, OK 918-596-2700 TU Is an EEO/aa InsTITUTIOn.

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INTERNS HANNAH HANZEL, NEHEMIAH TAYLOR

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Oklahoma Wedding Show Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 Expo Square Central Park Hall Booth spaces now available. Oklahoma Wedding Issue returning January 2016.

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2015 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. TM Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

I

n 2006, I went to work for the Sapulpa Daily Herald as an assistant editor. Having earned a journalism degree the year before, I was wet behind the ears and hungry for story ideas. One of the first tips I received was to visit the Sapulpa Historical Museum, a three-floor historical building filled with exhibits, artifacts and tiny dioramas depicting the past and present of Sapulpa, a suburb of Tulsa and the Creek County seat. The museum was located across the street from the paper’s office, and one afternoon, free of interviews, I meandered through the alley, the old downtown buildings and across Lee Street to the door of the museum. I was greeted by Doris Yocham, director of the museum and the keeper of Sapulpa’s history. Doris walked me through the museum, pointing out exhibits representing the city’s first jail, one-room schoolhouses and the Euchee Mission Boarding School, which stood where the present-day high school is. There are rooms dedicated to famous Sapulpans, to the area’s boom-and-bust oil fields and the city’s rich history in the railroad industry. Doris was the one who told me about Chief Sapulpa, the city’s namesake, who likely wasn’t a chief at all, and pointed out where he was buried. She informed me of legendary cowboy Gene Autry’s short stay in Sapulpa. She educated me on Jimmie Wilson’s Catfish String Band, a Sapulpa group that broadcast its music live on KVOO “from the shores of the Polecat Creek,” which was actually his living room.

The large building’s three stories are dedicated to the history of this small city of 20,544 in Creek County. That’s a lot of history. Each city, town and village in Oklahoma has its own unique stories, legends and myths. When we speak of museums, we often think of the ones that house world-renowned art, sculpture, bones or other relics. But there are also countless, smaller museums that tell the stories of who we are, where we live, how we got to where we are today. Last year, I had the opportunity to research the state’s museums and dig up objects that helped shape Oklahoma’s history, heritage and culture. During that research, I found some museums in the state that surprised me. A national museum dedicated to pigeons; an art museum in Idabel that boasts one of the largest Amazonian ethnographic collections in the world; a mobile weather museum; a museum dedicated to bones – all these and more exist within the state’s borders. In “15 Museums You Have to See to Believe” (p.80), we introduce you – or re-introduce you – to some of the most unusual, unique and underrated museums in the state. There are hundreds of museums in Oklahoma, and it is more than likely that there is at least one within a short drive’s distance from where you are now. Take advantage of these museums and those that help curate its exhibits and information. Learn about your city’s history and heritage. Enjoy these last wisps of summer, while learning a little. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

December 2015

Is your company a catch? Oklahoma Magazine is currently looking for great places to work in Oklahoma. If your company has what it takes, let us know. Visit www.okmag.com to nominate your company for inclusion in Oklahoma Magazine’s Great Companies To Work For. 2014

OKLAHOMA

Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com • 918.744.6205 2015 great compaines.indd 1

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 7/20/15 2:03 PM


Discover a pair of exhibitions that offers a fresh perspective on the lives and works of two of America’s celebrated artists who were friends and colleagues.

Warhol’s Nature JULY 4 – OCT 5, 2015

Jamie Wyeth JULY 25 – OCT 5, 2015

Warhol’s Nature takes a close look at an unexplored aspect of Andy Warhol’s work: his lifelong engagement with nature. The exhibition covers every decade of Warhol’s career, from his earliest drawings as a commercial illustrator through his well-known paintings of flowers and portraits of endangered animals.

Jamie Wyeth offers a retrospective of six decades of the artist’s career and the people and places that influence his life, including time spent working in Warhol’s New York studio, The Factory. The exhibition is organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The national tour is sponsored by

$8 , FREE for Members and youth ages 18 and under [Warhol’s Nature only—$4 through July 24] Reserve tickets online or call 479.657.2335

479.418.5700 CrystalBridges.org BENTONVILLE, ARK ANSAS

SP O N SO R E D BY

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Pop artist Andy Warhol, right, snaps a shot of painter Jamie Wyeth during an exhibition at New York's Coe Kerr gallery, Nov. 9, 1977, Associated Press. Warhol’s Nature was organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR, in collaboration with The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA.


OKMAG.COM

NEW LIFE In August 2013, Oklaho-

content created for the section, including the latest in Oklahoma art, music, books and media; tips from ma Magazine retired its Life section and combined the state’s most recognized interior designers and the contents with the first section of the magazine, architects and great ideas for entertaining. The State. This month, we’re bringing it back. For our launch of this section, we chose Tulsa Our newly redesigned Life & Style will once artist Christopher Mantle as the cover. His again house some of the colorful paintings and matching personalle magazine’s most-read y ity make for a powerful article and vivid t S columns, including LivLife & photography. Check out the profile on ing Space, Style, Destipage 27, and visit okmag.com to see an nation and Scene. There extended photo gallery from Mantle’s will also be additional creative photo shoot. VIN OF LI

EST THE B

INTERACTIVE MAP

L G WEL

15 MUSEUMS YOU HAVE TO uffalo

, The B

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Behold he Christop

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SEE TO BELIEVE In“Ithis issue, we feature 15 of Oklahoma’s PHOTO

BY BRAND

ON SCOTT.

most interesting museums. These collections are home to a variety of historical artifacts, including Ancient Egyptian mummies, banjos, historical guns and even pigeons. Use our interactive map at www.okmag.com/15museums for a listing of each museum, including additional photos, business hours, special events and more. Plot your next road trip at okmag.com, and spend the rest of the summer educating yourself with some of Oklahoma’s most surprising exhibitions and art galleries.

GREAT COMPANIES

TO WORK FOR

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

OK

Any successful company knows that taking care of its employees, both in the workplace and the wallet, can go a long way toward maintaining a positive workforce. Are you smiling when you arrive at the office each morning? Do you love the company you work for? Stop by www. okmag.com/gc-application and tell us about your employer. Be sure to check back in December for our list of Oklahoma’s Great Companies To Work For 2015.

Visit Us Online At www.bankofoklahoma.com

MORE PEACE OF MIND Get Mobile Alerts On Your Phone Or Tablet

© 2015 Bank of Oklahoma, a division of BOKF, NA. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

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Cancer News

Cancer

Are you making the right choices?

There’s more to cancer care than ridding the body of cancer cells. Equally important is the goal of maintaining quality of life while undergoing treatment. Staying strong enough to fight the disease and maintain work and family routines during treatment should be part of any cancer care program. That’s why patients should be offered integrative therapies to supplement conventional surgical, radiation and chemotherapy treatments.

Know your options.

The importance of nutrition.

Every cancer is different, as is every cancer patient. Both traditional and integrative oncology therapies should be customized for every treatment plan. It’s important to work with a knowledgeable oncology team to understand your options, how they work, and whether they’re offered at your treatment center.

Fully eight out of ten cancer patients show symptoms of malnutrition. This can compromise the function of the immune system and weaken the patient. Nutritional therapy is therefore crucial for restoring digestive health and helping you stay strong to maintain your prescribed cancer treatment plan.

What exactly is integrative care?

Naturopathic medicine.

Therapy The benefits of

Maintains the immune system, which can be compromised by cancer treatment

Prevents malnutrition that could weaken a patient

Manages fatigue and pain that can accompany cancer treatment

Lessens stress, anxiety and depression that can accompany cancer diagnosis

Treatments for cancer typically consist of some Naturopathic care should also be considered — therapies combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. that help manage symptoms and encourage healing. The combination of these options with therapies Naturopathic clinicians address a variety of conditions designed to maintain quality of life is known as an associated with cancer including digestive issues, nerve integrative approach to cancer care. Therapies to damage, respiratory conditions and cancer-related improve energy, maintain the immune fatigue. Your naturopathic clinician should have system, manage fatigue and guard extensive knowledge of radiation therapy Mind-Body against malnutrition are all critical. and chemotherapy, plus a comprehensive Therapy The more therapeutic choices you understanding of your treatment plan. Pain Management have, the better you’ll be able Spiritual Support Team work. to customize a treatment Meditation Surgeons, doctors, clinicians and other plan that’s right for you. oncology professionals should all be Integrative therapies may Chemotherapy Nutritional part of your care team. It’s also helpful include nutritional Therapy if all your team members are counseling, naturopathic Radiation Therapy located in the same hospital to medicine, physical Acupuncture Surgery facilitate collaboration and speed therapy, chiropractic of care. Having your care team all Diagnostic care, acupuncture, Imaging Naturopathic under one roof allows you to mind-body therapy, Medicine schedule all your appointments at Advanced meditation and Genomic one time, which reduces wait time Pet Therapy Testing spiritual support. between appointments and allows you to focus on your treatment.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) is a national network of five hospitals in the U.S. with expertise in treating patients who are fighting complex or advanced-stage cancer, although many patients with an early-stage diagnosis seek our expertise as well. We combine world-class treatment with an integrative approach to care to reduce side effects and maintain quality of life during cancer treatment. If you or someone you love has complex or advanced-stage cancer, call 888-568-1571 or go to cancercenter.com.

Philadelphia Chicago Atlanta Tulsa Phoenix


State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Taking it to the Streets

Oklahoma City’s Curbside Chronicle offers empowerment to the city’s homeless.

I

t’s a familiar sight on the streets of Oklahoma City. Homeless citizens can be spotted from one end of the metro to another at any given time or location. Some are panhandling for money. Some are collecting cans and other recyclable goods. Others are wandering, seemingly without aim, their every belonging strapped to their back or rolled in front of them. But now another vision is appearing on the street corners and sidewalks of Oklahoma City: the green vest of a Curbside Chronicle vendor. The concept is simple, but powerful: The homeless and at-risk citizens of Oklahoma City are given free copies of the publication (to which many of them also contribute writing) to sell. After the free copies are sold and a small base profit is made, vendors purchase copies for 75 cents each and sell them for $2, keeping the $1.25 profit as income. The idea, explains Ranya O’Connor, co-founder and director of the Curbside Chronicle, is to foster the learning (or often, re-learning) of basic job skills, such as professional behavior, communication skills, customer service, time management and more. O’Connor’s dream of helping the homeless through empowering them seems to be catching on. Although the publication only just finished its second year in circulation, the Curbside has already sold 26,000 copies and employed more than 160 vendors, with plans to go monthly by the end of 2015. The idea of a street paper, written and sold by the homeless as a positive option over panhandling, is a fresh take on an old problem in the state’s capitol. O’Connor and her husband, Whitley, were inspired by Whitley’s experience during his college years in Nashville, where

RANYA O’CONNOR IS CO-FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR OF OKLAHOMA CITY’S CURBSIDE CHRONICLE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

a robustly supported street paper changed the face of homelessness in that city. The Curbside is the first and only such publication in the state. With many contributors to the paper being homeless themselves, the Curbside offers a much-needed voice to the marginalized populations of Oklahoma City. “Street papers seek to eradicate panhandling and instead employ those in need through sales, helping them move forward and achieve financial stability,” O’Connor says. “There is

much more forward motion with street papers than with panhandling … [A street paper] is a new idea to our city, but it has proven itself in many cities around the world. Only together can we employ and empower the homeless and eradicate panhandling in our city.” But the mission of the publication goes far beyond eliminating panhandling and providing employment skills for the at-risk citizens of the city. One of the toughest challenges facing the homeless isn’t even money or shelter; it is AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

social isolation. The true testimony to the transformative powers of the Curbside has been its success in planting the seeds of a connection between the homeless and other members of their community. “It is often easy to ignore someone who is experiencing homelessness when you see them on the streets,” O’Connor says. “Often, our first instinct is to completely ignore this person and avoid eye contact. Act like you cannot see them. This is often because we do not know how to respond to this person’s current situation. Street papers provide a safe and empowering way for people experiencing homelessness to interact with the community at large. The magazine provides an easy start to conversation and gives people a natural reason to approach and interact with someone experiencing homelessness. Our goal is to bridge the gap between people experiencing homelessness and those who aren’t to provide both with a safe and comfortable environment for conversation.” O’Connor adds that she has seen vendors get a boost in self-confidence and community involvement after being a part of the Curbside. “Our vendors have mentioned numerous times how they feel like they are part of something bigger than themselves with the magazine,” she says. “They know that their hard work is breaking stereotypes about the homeless and that they are advocates for other people experiencing homelessness in OKC.” One locally popular vendor for the paper is Robert Hatcher, a regular fixture at Belle Isle Station. In addition to selling the Curbside, he also spends his time assisting other homeless citizens of Oklahoma City and providing paralegal services. He says at first, 14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

he was hesitant to get involved as a vendor for the paper. “Standing on a street corner felt like being a panhandler begging for money,” Hatcher says. “After taking the time to read the Curbside articles, I discovered that many homeless lives paralleled my trials and tribulations. Living in the streets isn’t easy. Time moves at a snail’s pace. Being a part of the Curbside Chronicle family has enriched my life, given me some essential benefits and helped me earn some money to meet my basic needs. Being a vendor is challenging work, but it is also rewarding for those who want to obtain housing and to take control of our lives and be able to hold your head up again.” O’Connor and Hatcher agree that the high rate of homelessness in Oklahoma A CURBSIDE CHRONICLE City stems from VENDOR SHOWS OFF THE PUBLICATION’S LATEST such issues as ISSUE. substance abuse, PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. poverty, mental illness, job losses and lack of both health care and affordable rental housing – and that the Curbside is poised to educate citizens about these pervasive causes of homelessness. “The Curbside Chronicle has educated the community about the needs of men and women experiencing homelessness and innovative approaches to meeting those needs,” Hatcher says. “We sincerely believe that homelessness is a journey, not a destination.” TARA MALONE

For more information about the Curbside Chronicle, its mission and its vendors, visit its website at www.thecurbsidechronicle.org. Reach the papers and locate vendors via the paper’s Facebook and Twitter, @CurbsideOKC.

EXPLORING JACKSONLAND

Cherokee Chief John Ross is one of the most well-known figures in American Indian history. It was during his tenure as leader of the Cherokee Nation that American Indians were forced from their homelands to settle in what is now present-day Oklahoma and the American West. Steve Inskeep, the co-host of NPR’s Morning Edition, has written a book titled Jacksonland: President Andrew Jackson, Cherokee Chief John Ross, and a Great American Land Grab, which explores the seventh president’s role in the Trail of Tears, and how Ross fought against the president for more than two decades to preserve Cherokee land. “This, to me, was one of the great undiscovered stories,” Inskeep said in a recent interview on Morning Edition. “The truth is that [Ross] and the rest of the Cherokees managed to hold out against pressure to give up their lands, using ... the tools of an emerging democracy. They started their own newspaper – no Indian nation had ever done that before. There was Cherokee in the newspaper, there were also English articles in the newspaper, and they used it as a political tool, because the articles would effectively go viral, they’d be reprinted in other newspapers and spread across the United States, and get the Cherokee viewpoints out.” It was a battle that the Cherokees and other tribes ultimately lost. The Indian Removal Act, passed in 1830, was eventually used to force tribes from their lands and into the West. Ross and his tribe settled in what is now northeast Oklahoma, with tribal headquarters in Tahlequah. – Jami Mattox


Patient-Centered Cancer Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility.

As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home.

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centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

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The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


The State

HAPPENING

STAY HYDRATED

We’ve all heard the advice for staying hydrated by drinking an eight-ounce glass of water eight times a day. The so-called 8x8 rule is popular and could be enough to keep one hydrated. However, the amount of water needed to stay hydrated, especially in the summertime, can vary depending on weight, activity level, etc. “To keep things simple, the old ‘half your body weight in ounces’ is usually fairly close to registered dietitian recommendations,” says Natalie Sanders, MS, RD, LD, of St. John Healthy Lifestyles. “During the summer months, it is important to hydrate throughout the day, especially if sweating or outdoors. Water should be consumed before, during and after activity, especially in the extreme heat.”

BIG TIGER,

LITTLE PANTHER, TINY COYOTE

THEN & NOW In August 1900, the U.S. Postal Service established the state’s first rural route in Hennessey, Okla. Albert Darrow was the carrier; his route, which he traveled by horse and wagon, was 24 miles long. His annual salary for delivering the route was $500. Today, the USPS operates 1,279 rural routes in the state.

Oklahoma is an amalgam of rich and poor, mountains and plains, metropolises and teeny-tiny towns, and nowhere can the latter be seen better than in high school enrollment. Taloga and Lone Wolf high schools each boast an enrollment of 15, making them the high schools with the lowest enrollment in the state. The largest is Broken Arrow High School, with a whopping 3,637 students enrolled, according to numbers reported in May to the State Department of Education.

AUGUST IN OSAGE COUNTY

51

Oklahoma City ranks dead last on the list of the 51 Major U.S. Cities in Energy-Efficiency, as decided by American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.

HOT SUMMER PAIR

Pair your swimsuit or outfit with Hicks Brunson’s top summer pick: Sama Bianca sunglasses in gold Japanese titanium with paradise lenses, $495, Hicks Brunson.

Sure, we all saw the tour de force performance by Meryl Streep, and it’s no wonder she was such a surly mess in August: Osage County. The heat there can be positively unbearable during the summer months: The average high in the county during August is 93 degrees.

OU STUDENTS GET DI VERSE

According to the Oklahoma Daily, the University of Oklahoma’s campus newspaper, every incoming freshman to the school will be required to complete five hours of diversity and inclusivity training and experience. Jabar Shumate, a former state senator and OU’s vice president for University Community, will oversee the new program.

FISHING FOR THE RECORD

In August 2012, angler Howard Zummer reeled in the largest longnose, or needlenose, gar ever caught in the state. The whopper weighed in at 43 pounds, 8 ounces, was 64.5 inches long and was caught at Lake Eufaula. The prehistoric fish is located in freshwater lakes throughout the central states and has been in North America for about 100 million years.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015


HONORING

SUSAN HARRIS THUR., SEPT. 24, 2015 – 6 PM COX BUSINESS CENTER

The Vision in Education Leadership Award honors exemplary leaders in the Tulsa area for their dedication to education and community betterment through education. Over the past decade, the Vision Dinner has raised over $1.9 million to support scholarships and programs for TCC students, faculty and staff. Posthumous Honoree

LARRY MOCHA

Stephen J. Jatras Award

For sponsorship information, call 918-595-7836 or email tccfoundation@tulsacc.edu.


The State

For the Love of Lunchbox CULTURE

Two fathers send children to school with unusual art.

T ABOVE: MARTY COLEMAN CREATES NAPKIN ART FOR HIS KIDS’ LUNCHES. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

RIGHT: KEVIN KIRBY’S NAPKINS HAVE BEEN FEATURED ON COMEDY CENTRAL’S SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES. PHOTOS COURTESY KEVIN KIRBY.

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o most, the small, absorbent, often-white square in a lunchbox is a practical object that helps them avoid making a mess while they chow down on their midday meals. To two Green Country dads, that square is a canvas and a portal into their children’s worlds. “I decided I needed to start making lunches for my daughters to go to school instead of buying them at school,” explains Marty Coleman. “Since I’m an artist, I started drawing little drawings on each of the napkins. I would put a quote on the napkin with the drawing.” Coleman had three daughters when he started his napkin art. He is now remarried with a fourth daughter, and all four are grown. At the time, though, his three were in junior high and high school, and he hoped the napkins reflected what they were experiencing in those preteen and teen years. “They weren’t little kids, so I was able to give them quotes that I thought would be interesting to them – individual-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

ity, racism, peer pressure,” says Coleman. “Maybe they came home and talked about how someone was made fun of at school. So the next day I may find a quote about bullying or about standing up for yourself.” The mealtime messages reached more than just his kids. Their friends also enjoyed the daily dose of wisdom and entertainment. “They would pass this napkin around the table, and it would facilitate some discussion about it,” says Coleman. “As a matter of fact, years later, I had emails from former friends of my daughters saying, ‘I used to sit next to her in lunch, and we loved getting those napkins because they were fun, they were interesting, they were thoughtprovoking.’” Despite now having an empty nest, Coleman continues to create the absorbent art to post on his blog The Napkin. Kevin Kirby’s ventures in napkin art provide his two sons with daily depictions of their favorite characters. From Futurama’s Bender to the minions of Despicable Me, the colorful creatures are reminders of their time together. “It was all based on whatever we were doing as a family, if we’re seeing a movie or something was funny or something was interesting,” Kirby says. “It’s just a neat way to remind them that we are thinking of them.” While Coleman earned the title “Napkin Dad” for his dedication to the lunch table treats, Kirby’s creations are a team effort, with his wife helping to make the illustrations pop. “A great many of them, I’ll draw the line work, and Sabrina (Kirby’s wife) will color them all in,” he explains. “So she does all the elaborate coloring. It’s not a one person thing; it is a mom-and-dad thing.” Still, napkin art can be a tricky endeavor, as it is a material designed to soak up spills not to display detailed images. “It’s really challenging,” says Kirby. “It’s


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something that tears; it’s something that’s very fragile. When you put a pen on a napkin, it soaks it up like crazy. You can’t pause to think. You’ll always get a big puddle.” The two men have had a lot of practice, however, and between them they have drawn on nearly 10,000 napkins. Both Kirby and Coleman have received national attention for their work. An assortment of Kirby’s Futurama-themed napkins were featured on Comedy Central’s Tumblr page, and Coleman got exposure in a popular publication after he posted a response to Barack Obama’s successful presidential campaign on his Flickr page in 2008. “The day after his election, I went looking through my old napkins thinking, ‘What would be a good one to put up today that would illustrate how I felt?’ And I couldn’t find one so I drew one – first one I had drawn in years,” says Coleman. “It simply said, ‘America the Beautiful is beautiful today,’ and it shared a little cartoon picture of him with a crowd behind him. Time magazine found that napkin, and they put it in their Person of the Year issue.” Coleman and Kirby both have artistic backgrounds that allow them to excel at drawing these daily delights for their kids’ lunches, but, as Coleman points out, it is not about the skill, but about the sentiment. BEFORE AFTER “The expression of your interest in them is what really matters,” he says. “If you put out something that you created, that is what they are going to remember. They’re not going to be judging whether it looks like a good piece of art or not. I tell people all time, they look at me and say, ‘Yeah, but I can’t draw a stick figure, Chris Ward, DDS you’re an artist.’ Yeah, well, that doesn’t really 918-274-4466 • owassodentalimplants.com matter. What matters is, are you expressing 21004 Chris Ward DDS.indd 1 your love and care for this person? If you are, then they are going to appreciate it.”

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The State

5 QS

Booch of the Future

B

Brewing health drinks has converted a Tulsa native into a national businesswoman.

bucha drinkers a more approachable, palatable experience. We like to call our product the “booch of the future.”

orn and raised in Tulsa, Ali Zarrow moved to the west coast to attend college at Stanford University. While living in Palo Alto, Calif., she was introduced to kombucha, a health drink that was relatively new to the U.S. market. With her intuitive, entrepreneurial spirit, Zarrow and her business partner tapped into the up-and-coming industry, creating a successful business that has moved onto the shelves of national retailers this summer. She co-founded Clearly Kombucha to offer consumers an alternative to sugar- and caffeine-laden beverages.

What is next for Clearly Kombucha?

We have big plans in the works to become a national kombucha brand. We launched our product into a couple national retailers this summer that will put us just about everywhere in the country. Oklahomans will be able to buy Clearly Kombucha at The Fresh Market chain of gourmet supermarkets, Natural Grocers locations and Sprouts Farmers Markets.

What is kombucha?

Kombucha is a fermented tea that is believed by some to boost the immune system and aid in digestive health. Clearly Kombucha is what we call a functional beverage made with a whole-leaf green tea; SCOBY, a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast; and organic sugar. After about a 30-day fermentation period, the brew is ready to be mixed with juice. The result is a light, non-alcoholic, fizzy beverage with all the benefits of tea and very little sugar. We make our kombucha in seven flavors like Asian Pear, Chia Cola and Strawberry Hibiscus.

How did you move from drinking kombucha to creating Clearly Kombucha?

ALI ZARROW IS COFOUNDER OF CLEARLY KOMBUCHA. PHOTO COURTESY CLEARLY KOMBUCHA.

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Liking how store-bought kombucha made us feel but not enamored with the flavor, my business partner and I wanted to craft a beverage that was smoother and easier to drink. Traditional kombucha can have an off-putting appearance, taste and texture. Feeling so good after drinking it, I wanted to make a product that would reach a broader audience and create something that actually tasted good. While still brewed in the traditional, ancient method, we devised a filtering system that offers kom-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

Have your Oklahoma roots impacted Clearly Kombucha’s business success?

Yes, I definitely think it has. As soon as I admit that I am from Oklahoma, the state’s reputation of trusting and genuine people, I believe, gives me an advantage, and living up to that reputation has made me a better business person, as well.

What advice would you give others trying to turn an idea into a profitable endeavor?

Starting a business from the ground up is exciting, but it commands extraordinary amounts of time, energy and responsibility. The main thing that has gotten me to where I am today is really just about seeing my vision and following it up. It took a few years to learn how to crack into the business. I knocked on the same doors until I got a yes. I had to have multiple meetings that seemed like for weeks nothing was happening, but success could be right around the corner. When one thing changes, other things tend to fall right into place. LINDSAY CUOMO


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The State

her compassionate approach and deft, gritty writing resonated with junior high and high schoolers all across the world. After all, what teen hasn’t felt like an outsider at one time or another? The Outsiders launched Hinton as a major literary force, and fans eagerly snapped up her next three books, also dealing with marginalized kids: That Was Then, This Is Now, Rumble Fish and Tex (1979). Each of these novels would, like The Outsiders, be made into theatrical films during the decade following their publication. Of this Hinton quartet, Rumble Fish, both book and movie, is the most challenging – and, maybe, the most rewarding as well. First published in 1975, it’s the story of a young, not-too-bright outsider named Rusty James, who lives with his hopelessly alcoholic father and near-mythical older brother in a squalid apartment. Both go absent for long periods of time, and while Rusty James and his dad share an unbridgeable emotional distance, Rusty James idolizes his brother, a larger-than-life figure known only as the Motorcycle Boy. The book is narrated by Rusty James, which, Hinton tells us in her author’s notes for the latest edition, was a “very hard choice” that forced her “to stay in the character of a simple person and tell a very complex story.” It was a choice worth making. By seeing all the action related in a direct, spare and sometimes uncomprehending way – some things Rusty James just doesn’t understand and can’t articulate – the reader is free to layer the basic narrative with his or her own interpretations and insights, getting at the big picture even when Rusty James does not. And there’s a lot of picture to get at. As the author’s-note excerpt atop this column suggests, Rumble Fish resonates with the qualities of myth, including dream states and flirtations with the supernatural. The Motorcycle Boy is a tragic figure right out of ancient Greek theater, done in not by pride, as those characters usually were, but because of a thwarted desire to rise above his surroundings. He and Rusty James and many of the other characters, including their dipsomaniac dad, are trapped in a kind of false freedom; for at least one of them, the ultimate realization of its inescapability leads THE INSIDER to destruction. Like the characters in Bruce Springsteen’s classic rocker Born to Run, the Motorcycle Boy can roar up and down the highway until hell freezes over, Dad can drink until he passes out, and Rusty James can defeat one challenger after another, over a pool table or out back with his fists. But when it’s all over, they still have to return to their same squalid room and forlorn lives. One of S.E. Hinton’s young-adult “As a writer, I’m most proud of Rumble Fish, because it’s very straightforward,” books turns 40 this year. Hinton told Teresa Miller for the interview thought I was using myths to write a story. Turned out that I used section of Hinton’s book Some of Tim’s a story to write a myth. – S.E. Hinton, from her author’s note for Stories (2007). “There’s no foreshadowing.” the 2013 edition of Rumble Fish Straightforward though it may be, it’s not an easy book to fully grasp. Hinton said as Forty years ago, a full-grown child arrived in this world – much when Miller asked her about Francis brilliant, but destined to be misunderstood. It was Rumble Fish, the third Ford Coppola’s film version. novel from Tulsa-based writer S.E. Hinton. Like her previous two, The “Francis,” she said, “was one of the few Outsiders (1967) and That Was Then, This Is Now (1971), the book was people I’ve ever talked to who understood aimed at teenaged readers, a group that would come to be known as the the book.” young-adult market. Coppola shot Rumble Fish in and around In fact, many say that Susan Eloise Hinton invented the young-adult Tulsa in the summer of 1982, just after he’d literary genre. Certainly, The Outsiders made her its first major star. A wrapped the Tulsa-lensed Outsiders. Midway teenager herself when she wrote it, Hinton came up with a debut novel that through that shoot, after Hinton and Coppola offered an unflinching look at young have-nots and their lifestyles (which had worked together on the Outsiders script, included alcohol and gang fights), their friendships, their often-dismal the director asked her if she had any other home lives and their conflicts with the haves – delineated by Hinton as possible source material he might look at “socs” – as opposed to the lower-class “greasers.” while he still had actors and a crew in Tulsa. Hinton’s heart lay clearly with the greasers – those kids outside the “I said, ‘Well, I’ve got this weird book prevailing socioeconomic system who will likely stay there forever – and called Rumble Fish, and nobody gets it,’”

Still Rumbling

I ABOVE: RUSTY JAMES (MATT DILLON) AND BIFF (GLEN WITHROW) FIGHT OVER CONTROL OF TERRITORY. RIGHT: RUSTY JAMES (MATT DILLON) AND GIRLFRIEND PATTY (DIANE LANE).

PHOTOS COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015


Hinton told me in a 2008 interview for my book Shot in Oklahoma (2011). “One day, he comes running in, waving a copy. He says, ‘I love this book. It’s so weird. We’ll make it weirder. You and I will write the screenplay on Sundays’ – because we were shooting six days a week on The Outsiders. So that’s what happened.” It’s exactly what happened, right down to the “make it weirder” part. Eschewing the flashback narrative of the book, the film version of Rumble Fish could be seen as the dark side of The Outsiders – which, although frequently downbeat, ends on a bright note of hope. Shot in moody black-and-white, with the only specks of color (until a brief flash at the end) belonging to the Siamese fighting fish referred to in the title, the R-rated Rumble Fish features plenty of bad language, brief nudity and sex and a performance by Matt Dillon (as Rusty James) that often seems to be channeling On the Waterfront-era Marlon Brando. Coppola had his crew watch several silent movies – also in black-andwhite, of course – to get a feel for what he wanted; one of them was the German Expressionist horror classic Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, with its tilted perspectives and painted-on shadows. Indeed, shadows – painted and otherwise – make up a major visual component of Rumble Fish. And while those familiar with Tulsa will notice lots of landmarks, Rumble Fish’s milieu is actually supposed to be an unnamed, slightly futuristic city. This not-quite-real setting is especially evident when Rusty James and his square friend Steve (Vincent Spano) travel with the Motorcycle Boy (Mickey Rourke) across a bridge to a loud and dangerous neon wilderness – which was in real life a redressed Greenwood Avenue, the African-American entertainment mecca of decades earlier. “Overall,” wrote Bruce Westbrook in the Aug. 20, 1982, Tulsa Tribune, “the crowded, garish avenue looks nothing like Tulsa, and it won’t be Tulsa on film. The street scene, which was designed by [Coppola’s production designer] Dean Tavoularis, depicts an unnamed urban area in the near future – a place where the film’s rebellious youths go for some action.” Rumble Fish radiates with other offbeat touches, including Rusty James’21129 Travers.indd out-of-body experience during a near-fatal beating in that “unnamed urban area.” Expanded from the scene in the book, it features the character literally floating through the air, past the home of his estranged girlfriend (Diane Lane) who’s now mourning for him. But, like his brother the Motorcycle Boy boomeranging back after a trip to California, Rusty James has no choice but to return. Unlike The Outsiders, the Rumble Fish movie was not a hit. It may have simply been too strange and depressing to be popular with the moviegoing masses. However, as is the case with a quirky film made by smart people, it has its defenders. I’m one of them, and so is Susie Hinton. “[P]eople either love it or hate it,” she wrote on her website. “I love it.”

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The State

DAN JOLIFF GREW UP SURROUNDED BY THE COFFEE BUSINESS. HE NOW BUILDS ROASTERS IN HIS OKLAHOMA CITY BUSINESS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

The Smell Of Success

I

A lifelong love of coffee led an Oklahoma City man into the roasting business.

n 1966, at the age of 6, Dan Joliff fell in love with coffee. He was enamored with his father’s work as district supervisor over southern Oklahoma for Cain’s Coffee, as well as the nice suitand-tie apparel his dad wore and the cool truck he drove. Fast forward nearly five decades, and Joliff owns Oklahoma Citybased US Roaster Corp, supplying roasters to businesses worldwide.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

“I just loved the smell of coffee as a kid and simply wanted to be around it,” says Joliff. “Coffee is part of our culture, always has been and probably always will be. Yes, coffee is a big deal these days with a coffee shop on every corner and many brands out there. But back in the 1920s and ‘30s, coffee was also very popular, and most high-end grocers roasted their own coffee in-house. But then the ‘30s and ‘40s


were hard times for folks. In the ‘50s, people were getting over the war, and by the ‘60s there was more prosperity and changes. By the time the ‘70s came around, gourmet coffee was starting to get really popular again, and it has just grown since then. Everything that was old is new again. I was just at my dad’s, and he made me a filtered coffee. People forget that they were also making filtered coffee using roasted, ground beans 50 years ago, too. Just like we are today.” Joliff’s parents approached him in 1979, offering to cosign loans so that he could start a coffee company – Coffee Professionals. “I learned from my father by just watching him, and he also tutored me on the making and selling of coffee,” he says. “We chose an old building and got to work setting up the grinding, roasting, packaging, silos – all of it. Friends were impressed that we were offering

roast coffee in the early ‘80s. My parents joined the company with me by 1984.” Over time, Joliff realized he preferred the process of manufacturing the equipment to produce great coffee more than simply supplying the best roast coffee around. “My parents were worried and wanted to stick with just coffee, so I gave them that business in 1996, and I started Roasters Exchange, and by 2002 I was manufacturing my own machines. That business is now what we call US Roaster Corp. My 40 employees along with my wife and I, we furnish machines to Crimson Cup, Counter Culture, Portola Coffee, Farmer’s Brothers, Sara Lee and many others – including Cain’s Coffee. We furnish machinery all over the world – most recently down to Costa Rica. And all of it manufactured right here in Oklahoma City.” US Roaster Corp is a family affair, says

Joliff, with a fabrication and engineering crew “that has just great expertise. And my mother in law, Barbara Woods, she manages the office and keeps us in line. My son, Daniel, he runs and maintains the water operations and helps with customer support.” Joliff has never really advertised, and his products always have a waiting list, with each machine customized and only about 50 in production at any one time in what he describes as a slow, meticulous process that “starts when the steel arrives” and ends with training the customer how to use it. “It’s not just coffee,” says Joliff. “We built roasters for nuts and seeds, including for some world aid operations. We work with the world’s largest chocolate manufacturers like Barry Callebaut and M&M Mars. We’re here to stay.” TRACY LEGRAND

THE TOPECA INSTRUMENTS DIVISION AIMS TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND EXPERIENCE OF DRINKING COFFEE. PHOTO COURTESY TID.

A CLASS IN COFFEE

After acquiring the building beside its coffee roastery on Admiral Boulevard and connecting the two spaces, Topeca Coffee Roasters began brewing a project that would work toward filling a gap within the specialty coffee industry. And thus, the Topeca Instruments Division (TID) was created: an industrial-style, open space with exposed brick walls and concrete floors that hosts classes and certifications for baristas, roasters and coffee tasters. “Along with classes for the nerdy home brewer,” Mitch Murry, brand strategist for Topeca Coffee Roasters, adds. “Your average Joe who wants to learn more about his cup can come in and learn how to brew better at home, or even find out what it takes to open up his own coffee shop.” Topeca Instruments Division was inspired by Topeca’s continued effort to make Tulsa and the surrounding region a leader in coffee quality and education. “The name for the lab stems from the nostalgic feeling of exploration and discovery we find through our scientific heritage,” Murry says. “We find it extremely fitting for what Topeca is achieving with the lab.” With similar certified teaching labs offered across the country, the goal of TID is to hold classes and exams more frequently and at lower costs. “Some labs provide maybe 10 classes a year, and we are looking

at doubling to tripling that number, providing two to three classes a month,” Murry says. “Topeca Instruments Division [also] aims to bring a complete class to exam solution regularly for our industry. You no longer have to wait three to four months for the next batch of classes to be offered. “ … Professional coffee training is fairly expensive,” he continues. “Food, transportation and all those accouterments add up. In order to help assist the needs of the student, we are providing free lodging downtown, lunches and coordinating transportations through shuttle services at the hotel.” TID is just one more step Topeca has taken to invest in employees and coffee training, ensuring high quality within all areas of the industry. “We implement higher quality steps at each point of the supply chain, so that when buyers demand better quality coffees, we can provide it,” Murry says.

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October 2015

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

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Life & Style

THE BEST OF LIVING WELL

Behold, The Buffalo

Tulsa artist Christopher Mantle’s colorful bison paintings have gained a following.

PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

“I

t’s Oklahoma, and everyone likes buffaloes.” That’s the short story of why Tulsa artist Christopher Mantle began painting buffaloes. The long story involves flute-playing, the Holy Spirit, a palindrome and recycling. Born in Lafayette, La., Mantle has the twang and storytelling gift associated with the southern state. “I smell like a magnolia and the sweetness of the evening,” Mantle says of his southern upbringing. Mantle’s inspiration for painting the buffalo came after learning of his Cherokee heritage. “I started thinking about them eating buffalo meat. … Is it embedded in my genetics? My DNA?” he asks. “My inspiration comes from the Holy Spirit. I want a harmonious life with everything. If it’s a crooked floor, maybe I’ll walk so as to keep it straight.” Learning that the white buffalo was a American Indian symbol meaning, “God’s grace is upon us,” according to Mantle, further

inspired his art. “When I’m painting, it’s like God saying, ‘Look what I can do through this person.’ That’s why I have the squiggle line signature on my paintings. It spells MAN frontwards and backwards. I try not to be vain. All of mankind has let me create this art. We all take part.” Mantle and his girlfriend, Lauren Rainbow Lunsford, give presentations on art and recycling at area schools. Mantle thinks of the buffalo as a recycling metaphor. “You would get a buffalo and make something out of all its parts. So I say to the kids, ‘When you get a present and it’s all wrapped up in a box with paper and a bow, that’s your buffalo. You have the meat inside, the gift, but what do you make with the hair, skin and bones around it?’” Mantle, whose colorful paintings of buffaloes sell as quickly as he paints them, will be a featured artist at the Cow Thieves and Outlaws Reunion, an annual event at Woolaroc in Bartlesville on Oct. 4. SHAUN PERKINS

AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

THE FOCAL POINT OF THE LARGE FAMILY ROOM IS THE HORIZONTAL TILED FIREPLACE FLANKED BY CUSTOMIZED SHELVES THAT HOUSE THE HOMEOWNERS’ GLASS ART COLLECTION. LEFT: THE STAIRCASES AND FORGED STEEL RAILINGS THROUGHOUT THE HOME WERE CREATED BY ROB KEY OF ROB KEY DESIGNS.

L I V I N G S PA C E

Classic Meets Modern A busy family finds retreat in midtown Tulsa.

W

Photography by Nathan Harmon

ith the goal of creating an open and casual home for this active family and their dogs, Brian L. Freese, AIA, principal of Freese Architecture, began experimenting with various designs. The family was living in south Tulsa and wanted to relocate to the midtown area. Ultimately, the homeowners were able to purchase side-by-side properties that allowed space for their expansive new home. And while the neighborhood covenants required new construction to abide by certain setbacks from the curb and minimum square footage, they were not constrained by any architectural mandates. “The ultimate style was an amalgam of ideas,” says Freese. “They wanted an exterior appearance that had classic proportions but more modern elements. And they wanted their home to convey visual strength and a feeling of uniqueness.” While there is a strong contrast from the other homes in this traditional neighborhood, the low, sloping roof and deep overhangs keep the project from appearing “shockingly modern,” Freese says. David Isaccs Jr., owner of Isaacs Custom Homes in Claremore, worked as part of the team during the three-year process. One of the homeowners – a busy

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015


AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

THE EXPANSIVE KITCHEN IS FLOODED WITH NATURAL LIGHT. BELOW: THE LARGE BACKYARD FEATURES A SWIMMING POOL AND SEVERAL SITTING AREAS.

mother, wife and former owner of a dog training business – actively researched the finishes, selected the accent colors and located and purchased all the furnishings, accessories and area rugs. “She wanted a clean, minimalist palette with punches of color and a variety of texture,” says Freese. Just inside the front door is the large and comfortable family room; there are no formal spaces. Custom display shelves highlight an ever-growing collection of glass art. Two stainless steel doors above the fireplace open and slide back to reveal the television. Porcelain tile with horizontal detail meets the 20-foot-high ceiling. The back wall of windows blends the outdoors with the indoors. The living room area opens into the dining area, which opens into the striking kitchen. Keeping in mind the space needed to accommodate the busy family and numerous pets, the cabinets are faced with sturdy laminate. The flooring is porcelain tile, and rows of glass tile that reach to ceiling create a unique backsplash. The large window, operable at the bottom, floods the room with light and provides a view into the backyard. Pantry and storage areas are camouflaged in a wall of exotic wood veneer.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015


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Life & Style

The unique round family library, designed to be welcoming to the entire family, is on the first floor, as is the master suite. The master bath looks onto a private hot tub. A fireplace opens into both the bathroom and the bedroom. The goal was to highlight natural light and employ muted tones for the finishes and furnishings. A bridge runs across the front of the house indoors and connects the two secondstory wings. At one end is the husband’s office/study, and on the opposite side of the house are the children’s bedrooms and bathrooms. The staircase on the children’s wing spans three floors and leads to the basement, which includes another rec room with a fireplace. There is also a theater, wine cellar, bar, half-bath and ample storage. A small exterior porch leads upstairs to the backyard. The fabricated forged steel railing connecting the two wings of the house as well as the dramatic staircases were crafted by metal artist Rob Key, owner of Rob Key Designs. “We worked as a team throughout the process, keeping in mind that the goal was to create a home of classic proportions with a modern, simplified style,” says Freese. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON

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Life & Style

STYLE

Back To Cool

School is in session, and it’s time to trade those summer duds for sartorial sensibility.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

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Life & Style

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015


ECOTE SHAWL, $39; SILENCE + NOISE TANK, $34; BDG JEANS, $79; SILENCE + NOISE TOTE, $59; ECOTE BOOTS, $79, AND HAT, $39; TRIBAL NECKLACE, $34; AND URBAN OUTFITTERS GOLD HOOPS, $16, URBAN OUTFITTERS. MASUNAGA SUNGLASSES, $450, HICKS BRUNSON.

SOUTHERN TIDE BUTTON DOWN, $120; CITIZENS OF HUMANITY JEANS, $190; MARTIN DINGMAN BOAT SHOES, $195, AND BELT, $75, TRAVERS MAHAN. LEISURE SOCIETY OPTICAL GLASSES, $575, HICKS BRUNSON.

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Life & Style

YO U R H E A L T H

Our Growing Children

Five years ago, First Lady Michelle Obama brought the epidemic of childhood obesity to the forefront by launching the Let’s Move campaign – a nationwide initiative promoting healthier lifestyles in children. While progress has been made at both the national and state level, there is still much to be done to ensure the health of future generations.

Overweight vs. Obese

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, children and teens with a body mass index between the 85th and 95th percentiles are considered overweight. Children with a BMI at or above the 95th percentile are considered obese.

Oklahoma’s Stats

The 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) ranked Oklahoma 26th in the nation for high school obesity. The survey estimated 11.8 percent of Oklahoma high school students were obese – revealing a five percent drop from 17 percent in 2011. While these numbers seem encouraging, there are alarming reports of childhood obesity in Oklahoma’s grade-school children. Dr. Ashley Weedn is a pediatrician and the medical director for Healthy Futures, an OU Children’s Physicians clinic in Oklahoma City that specializes in childhood fitness and healthy eating habits. “Oklahoma has limited data on childhood obesity statistics since we do not collect measured data at a state level, in contrast to several states which promote or mandate state-wide BMI screenings,” says Weedn. She points out that the YRBS percentages are estimates based on selfreports of height and weight and, as a result, may not represent the true state of childhood obesity in Oklahoma. “Obesity prevalence is more accurate – and higher than self or parental report – when based on the child’s measured height and weight,” she says. For comparison, Weedn explains that the state’s Women, Infants and Children program measures heights and weights for all low-income, preschool-aged children in Oklahoma, and elementary schools participating in the Schools for Healthy Lifestyles program collect measured height

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015


and weight for school-aged children. “Among Oklahoma preschool-aged children ages 2 to 4 years participating in the state WIC program, 31 percent were overweight and 14 percent were obese in 2009,” says Weedn. “Among children ages 9 to 11 years in Oklahoma with measured heights and weights through school programs, 25 percent were obese and 44 percent were overweight in 2010. The numbers indicate we have a more severe problem of childhood obesity in Oklahoma than reported through survey-reported data.” According to Weedn, childhood obesity is a complex condition resulting from multiple factors, including personal and family risk factors and the child’s home, school and community environment. “Established personal and family risk factors include parental obesity, race and ethnicity, formula feeding during infancy and inadequate sleep duration,” she says, adding that excess screen time, dietary behaviors and activity also play a significant role in developing childhood obesity.

A Life-long Struggle

“Obesity in childhood is progressive. Preschool-aged children who have excess weight have a five times higher risk of obesity during adolescence, and 90 percent of obese teenagers become obese adults,” says Weedn. “Adults who were obese as children have higher risks of developing early-onset heart disease and diabetes, leading to premature death. Unfortunately, we already see high blood pressure, pre-diabetes, high cholesterol and multiple other chronic conditions in children, several of whom require medical management. Additionally, obese children suffer from psychosocial problems, including weight-based teasing, low self-esteem and depression, all affecting the child’s quality of life.” Dr. Sowmya Krishnan, a pediatric endocrinologist with OU Children’s Physicians, also emphasizes that children with obesity will experience more health complications at a younger age. “There is higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure in obese children,” says Krishnan. “These diseases are increasingly being seen in children, where once these were considered adult diseases.”

Taking Action

Dr. Scott Cyrus, a pediatrician with Children and Adolescent Medical Services at Hillcrest Hospital South in Tulsa, understands that it’s difficult for children to comprehend the long-term consequences of diabetes or hypertension. That’s why he uses age-appropriate strategies to help his patients. “When we work with young children,

instead of focusing on losing weight, we work on maintaining their weight because they are continuing to grow and will catch up,” he says. “For older children, we provide free weight checks and celebrate each success. No one is going to lose 50 pounds in a month. It’s going to take time, and we want to encourage them along the way.” He shares that weight loss comes down to four things: what we eat, how much we eat, our metabolism and our amount of exercise. “It’s no surprise when someone goes on a junk food diet and still loses weight because it’s about the amount of calories you intake versus your exercise. Exercise revs your metabolism,” he says. “It’s important to get children moving. I tell my kids that for every hour of screen time they have, they need an hour of exercise.” If you have a child who is struggling with their weight, Cyrus believes success is better realized when it’s a family affair. “When a child is in need of anything, it’s always best to approach it as a family,” he says. “If a child needs to exercise, then exercise with them. Take a walk around the block. If your neighborhood isn’t safe, go to a mall or a park. Try to set an example for your children during the evenings and weekends by making good food choices. Your children will see your choices and be more likely to choose healthier foods during their day.” Cyrus recommends eliminating what he calls “sugar-and-water-calories.” These calories are found in a variety of beverages like soda, juice, sports drinks, sweet tea, lemonade and Kool-Aid. He notes that there can be more calories per ounce in juice than in a can of soda. Dr. Hamilton Le, a bariatric and weight loss surgeon for INTEGRIS Health in Oklahoma City, encourages parents to review their child’s school lunch program, try to cut out vending machine snacks and follow the 5210 Program prescribed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. “The 5210 Program recommends five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day, two hours or less of recreational screen time, with no screen time for children under two, an hour or more of physical activity and zero sugar drinks,” says Le. Weedn believes that small steps lead to big changes over time and that the focus should be on developing and maintaining healthy behaviors instead of focusing on the number on the scale and weight loss. “Calorie restriction for growing children can be unhealthy and even dangerous. Instead, slowly adopt one to two new healthy behaviors each month as a family, and work at maintaining them over time,” says Weedn. “Consistency is the key. Be sure to make your goals realistic to ensure success, and measure success by meeting the health goal for your family – for example, no sugary drinks – not by weight loss.” She also suggests that parents seek assistance from their primary care physician if they need information on what changes to make or how to make them. In addition, parents may also find activity programs and nutrition resources available in their community. REBECCA FAST

AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

D E S T I N AT I O N

ABOVE: THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN HAS A CURVILINEAR ARCHITECTURE. PHOTO COURTESY SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN.

RIGHT FROM TOP: MOON SCONCE AT THE EXIT OF THE OUR UNIVERSES EXHIBITION. PHOTO BY MAXWELL MACKENZIE, COURTESY SMITHSONIAN NMAI.

THE LANDSCAPE SURROUNDING THE MUSEUM OFFERS DEPICTIONS OF AMERICAN INDIAN ENVIRONMENTS. PHOTO BY KATHERINE FOGDEN, NMAI.

DELEGATION POSING WITH PRESIDENT ANDREW JOHNSON ON THE STEPS OF THE WHITE HOUSE, 1867. REPRESENTATIVES OF THE YANKTON, SANTEE, UPPER MISSOURI SIOUX, SAC AND FOX, OJIBWA, OTTAWA, KICKAPOO AND MIAMI NATIONS. PHOTO BY ALEXANDER GARDNER.

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Indigenous Influence

GALLERY TOURS Tour the museum’s history and collection along with a featured exhibition Tuesday and Thursday through Sunday 2-2:45 p.m.

The Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian awakens Native cultures.

T

he White House, Washington Monument, government buildings, Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson memorials, war memorials and countless museums draw visitors of Washington, D.C., to their doors every year. On the National Mall, between the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum and the U.S. Capitol Building, sits a unique structure whose curvilinear architecture and landscape nod to its purpose: housing the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.

Collections

With roughly 825,000 pieces of American Indian art and artifacts spanning 12,000 years, the museum is home to one of the largest collections in the world. Under one roof, guests can explore more than 1,200 indigenous cultures, including those from the United States, Canada, Middle and South America and the Caribbean. For an all-encompassing discovery of the American Indian, investigate the four components within the museum’s collections: the Object, Photo Archive, Media Archive and Paper Archive, as well as its many exhibitions and events.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

OKLAHOMAN TIES Kay WalkingStick: An American Artist Nov. 7, 2015 – Sept. 18, 2016

Kay WalkingStick’s father was a Cherokee from Oklahoma. WalkingStick herself is a member of the Cherokee Nation and is celebrated for her portrayals of landscapes with American Indian influences. Within this exhibit, see more than 75 of WalkingStick’s well-known works that include paintings, drawings, sculptures, notebooks and diptychs. A symposium in honor of WalkingStick, titled “Seizing the Sky: Redefining American Art,” will take place Nov. 5.


CURRENT EXHIBITIONS Commemorating Controversy: The Dakota – U.S. War of 1862

Through Dec. 29 The 12 panels within this exhibition study the origin of The U.S.Dakota War of 1862, its voices, the major events it inspired and the war’s devastating effect, including President Abraham Lincoln’s order to hang 38 Dakota men – known as the largest mass execution in the U.S., to this day.

Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World

Through December 2017 Within this exhibit, explore the eight cultural philosophies of indigenous peoples from the Western Hemisphere.

The Native Landscape

Walk the grounds that surround the National Museum of the American Indian to explore the kinds of natural environments American Indians thrived in preceding European influence. The Hardwood Forest represents the way the forest served as a habitat that provided shelter, food and medicine; the Wetlands signify the importance of biological diversity; the plants found in the Meadow can be used for medical purposes by traditional healers; the Traditional Croplands portray the agriculture of American Indians; Grandfather Rocks boast 40 large, uncarved rocks; and Cardinal Direction Markers on the northsouth and east-west axes honor Native cultures. BRITTANY ANICETTI

The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire

Through June 1, 2018 Explore how building the Great Inka Road was made possible, its impacts in the region and its legacy.

Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations Through Fall 2018 The mostly untold story of the influential Native diplomats and leaders of Indian Nations that came to treaty with the U.S. in the wake of its creation is explored within this exhibit.

Return to a Native Place: Algonquian Peoples of the Chesapeake

VISIT ONLINE www.nmai.si.edu

Ongoing This ongoing exhibit introduces guests of the museum to those native to the Chesapeake Bay region and their continued impact in Washington, D.C., Virginia and Delaware. AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

Scene AMBER HOWARD CORNELIUS, LARRY PINKERTON, DONNA DAVIS AND HEATHER HOPE-HERNANDEZ, TOP OF THE TOWN.

BECKY AND BARRY SWITZER AND SUSAN AND SCOTT MEACHAM, OMRF’S 241.

TRINA MEDLEY, BOB MEDLEY AND JOHN HARNED, GATSBY GALA. HEIDI DUCATO, AMY SYNAR, LEXI GALLOWAY AND JAMIE BRYAN, GRACE HOSPICE FOUNDATION’S ANNUAL GRACE GOES 80S AUG. 22.

CHUCK WIGGIN, RENATE WIGGIN AND CLIFF HUDSON, OMRF’S 241.

RAY VANDIVER AND JULIE CHIN, ELECTRIC LIME GALA.

CATHEY AND MIKE BARKLEY, JEANETTE KERN AND JAKE HENRY JR., PAINTED PONY BALL LUNCHEON.

MARTINA HUM, TOM NEFF, MELODY PHILLIPS AND KACIE FRAZIER, PAINTED PONY BALL LUNCHEON.

BRYAN CLOSE, PEGGY HELMERICH, GAYLE JONES, ALLYSON CAIN AND BISHOP EDWARD SLATTERY, A STATELY AFFAIR.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

ROBERT SCHAEFER, JANET SELSER AND MARCELLO ANGELINI, TULSA BALLET’S GROUNDBREAKING ON HARDESTY CENTER FOR DANCE EDUCATION.

RD BARNETT, ESIDENT HOWA OSU-TULSA PR T, ANN HARGIS AND IR. ET RN BA A STATELY AFFA LIE BIL BURNS HARGIS, OSU PRESIDENT

JOE HELM, MAYOR DEWEY BARTLETT AND VICTORIA BARTLETT, A STATELY AFFAIR.


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OU - Oklahoma’s Leader in Excellence

• OU has the academically highest ranked student body at a public university in Oklahoma history.

• OU has produced 29 Rhodes Scholars; no other university in Oklahoma has had more than three.

• OU ranks No. 1 in the nation among both public and private universities in the number of freshman National Merit Scholars, with 313 scholars in the fall 2014 class. This is the first time in American history that a public university has led the list.

• OU’s Research Campus was named the No.1 research campus in the nation, placing it among such past recipients as the Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, Purdue Research Park in Indiana and University City Center in Pennsylvania.

• OU is the only university in the nation, public or private, whose students have won Goldwater, Mitchell, Truman, Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright and National Security Education Program scholarships in the same year.

• The OU Libraries recently opened the Peggy V. Helmerich Collaborative Learning Center, which features a collaborative classroom and flexible work space areas. It includes a variety of individual and group study areas, such as seminar space, a Community Room, a Digital Scholarship Lab and group meeting and research areas.

• OU is the only Big 12 university to be selected as having one of America’s most beautiful campuses.

• The One University Digital Initiative allows OU faculty • OU is the only public university in the nation to be to develop digital alternatives to high-cost textbooks, awarded the prestigious Davis Cup two consecutive years in translating to an annual savings averaging almost $500 per recognition of its record-setting enrollment of United World student in textbook costs. College international freshmen. • OU is a leader among all American universities in international exchange and study abroad programs. One • The Princeton Review ranks OU among the best in in three OU students study abroad. OU currently offers the nation in terms of academic excellence and cost for programs in over 82 countries and 240 cities in six students. continents. Students from 140 countries are enrolled at OU. The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


Education

By Tara Malone

First in the Family First-generation college students must overcome unique challenges to pursue educational opportunities.

M

ore first-generation students are entering college. Unfortunately, almost as many end up packing their bags for home. Recent reports estimate that between 20 and 30 percent (with other estimates even higher) of undergraduates today are first-generation students whose parents have never completed a four-year college degree. Up to 50 percent of these students come from low-income backgrounds, and they often are members of racial or ethnic minority groups. Sound like a lot of statistics? Here’s the most sobering one: First-generation students drop out at nearly four times the rate of other students whose parents graduated college before them, with up to 90 percent of them never completing a degree. Why do so many first-generation students fail to acclimate and thrive in a college environment? What obstacles do these students face that define their experiences differently from those of their peers? According to Tulsa Community College freshman Rachael Surber, the challenges for

first-generation students begin long before admission. Surber recalls how stressful filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid – a task completed by most college hopefuls and their parents in an hour or so – was for her and her family. “My parents and I were completely clueless and probably filled it out too many times,” Surber recalls. “It was an overwhelming beginning to a new experience.” While both of Surber’s parents graduated high school, neither her mother nor her father had the opportunity to pursue a college career. Fortunately for Surber, this didn’t stop them from instilling a strong sense of priority in their daughter to achieve a higher education. The same was true for recent Oklahoma City University graduate Liz Ramirez. Ramirez, who majored in Spanish and mass communications with emphasis in advertising and public relations, also comes from a family that provided unwavering emotional support to her throughout her college years. Ramirez’s parents, who emigrated from Mexico before she was born, never received

a higher education. Her father was not able to attend school past the eighth grade. Her mother’s family lacked the resources to help her pursue an education past high school in Mexico, although she received her GED upon immigration to the United States. Ramirez says that despite being unable to achieve a college degree, her mother has served as a bedrock of encouragement. “My mom has definitely been a great influence for me in my academic career,” she says. “She has challenged me to be better and do better, and I know she lives vicariously through me; my accomplishments are her accomplishments. She does her best to help me in everything and anything that she can. She wants to make sure she has done all she can for me to be able to go to college. It is because of her that I am such an academic person.”

Family Support Counts

Compared to many other first-generation students, Surber and Ramirez are lucky to have the support of their families. Many students who are the first in their family to attend college bear a burden of guilt AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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for leaving home to pursue an education when family members often rely on them for emotional – and even financial – support. Leaving for college bearing this type of psychological weight ill-prepares these students for the anxieties that face them upon arriving, such as feelings of alienation, stigmatization by peers and confusion regarding where to seek help. Surber remembers being both anxious and elated at the thought of attending college. “Leading up to the beginning of college, I was so nervous about being the freshman again,” she says. “But as a first-generation college student, I was excited about being the first in my family to attend college! My hopes are that through this experience in life, I’ll take something away from it that will be helpful in my future and for the rest of my life, and open me up to new experiences.” “When beginning the process to go to college, I was very lost and scared,” Ramirez says, stating that the biggest challenge she faced was a lack of guidance about what to expect from the college experience. “Many kids have their parents’ experiences to help them, but I lacked that portion. Thankfully, I went to a great high school, Harding Charter Preparatory High School, that prepared me adequately. I was prepared academically, and I had the help and support of the staff and faculty there,” says Ramirez. “My parents also stood by my side, and together, we figured it out. I had a whole team that helped get me to college. “I was scared because I didn’t know much, and I didn’t exactly know what to expect, but I was excited. I love school, and I looked forward to the challenges that college held in store for me,” she continues. “I believe that I can do anything I set my mind to, and college was the next on the list. I had prepared myself well, and I had the support of many people; I believed I was set to succeed.” Ramirez looks forward to beginning her

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

“I promised my mom that one day I would be Dr. Ramirez, and I won’t stop until that promise is fulfilled.”

ELIZABETH RAMIREZ, THE FIRST IN HER FAMILY TO GO TO COLLEGE, RECENTLY GRADUATED FROM OKLAHOMA CITY UNIVERSITY. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

MBA at OCU this fall. “I promised my mom that one day I would be Dr. Ramirez, and I won’t stop until that promise is fulfilled,” she says.

First Experience

While the lack of inherited collegiate know-how has made the college experience for both Surber and Ramirez more challenging, their educational paths thus far have been all the richer for the obstacles. Both students say they are thankful for the opportunities and support they have received as first-generation students. Surber credits the Tulsa Achieves program as instrumental in her being able to attend college. The program, which is available to all Tulsa County high school students with a grade-


“Anything is possible. ... Find a group of friends or a great advisor to help you along the way, and just enjoy it.”

RACHAEL SURBER, A FIRSTGENERATION COLLEGE STUDENT, ATTENDS TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

point average of 2.0 or higher, pays up to 63 hours, or three years of tuition and fees, for students who agree to start at Tulsa Community College the fall after their senior high school year. “It has been beyond helpful to my parents and myself,” Surber says. “The Tulsa Achieves Program and the campus advisors have been great resources and very helpful to ensuring I have this opportunity.” “I think an advantage to being a first-generation student is the amount of help that is available for us,” adds Ramirez. “People want us to go to college, so there are many resources that we can go to in order to make that happen. There are many programs and scholarships that help students like us obtain our degrees.” Ramirez attended OCU as the recipient of the university’s Clara Luper Scholarship, a program for students who agree to enter as a full-time freshman at OCU the fall after they

graduate high school and who demonstrate a financial need. “It’s a wonderful program that has allowed me to have such a fine education and has definitely helped me through my college journey,” she says. “There are also many scholarships specifically for firstgeneration students. Scholarships are the reason I was able to attend a private institution; without them, my family could not have been able to afford sending me to OCU. “I think overall, my family, my former high school, Oklahoma City University and the Clara Luper Scholarship have been the greatest help in my journey,” Ramirez adds. “Between all of these I have formed a support group that has been cheering me on the entire time, being there to celebrate my victories and to cheer me up during the hard times. This support group is what has kept me going.” A network of support is proving to be instrumental for first-generation students across the nation, not just in Oklahoma. At colleges across the United States, social groups and conferences for first-generation students are forming, enabling them to come together to share their experiences and earned wisdom. After four years as a successful first-generation student, Ramirez plans to pursue a career in advertising or public relations that caters to the Hispanic community. “It is okay to be lost, but it’s not okay to stay lost,” she advises other first-generation students. “It’s something new to us, but many people want to help; we just have to seek them out and ask. People want to see others succeed, so you just need to ask and someone will point you in the right way. Also, seek out other students, like myself, who have been through the process and have felt what you’re feeling now. I’m always happy to help others that are in a situation that I’ve been in previously.” Surber wants other first-generation students to know that it’s easier than it seems. “Anything is possible,” Surber says. “Find a group of friends or a great advisor to help you along the way, and just enjoy it.” AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Education

Learning The Language

T

Integrating foreign languages into curriculums is becoming more common in Oklahoma schools.

he digital age has made the world more connected than ever before. With the click of a button, individuals can share a video with a friend in Norway, instantly wire money to a family member in Indonesia or Skype with a client in Ghana. But despite all these resources that have helped make the world a smaller place, there still is one last global element that remains foreign to many Americans: language. According to a recent poll conducted by the Center for Applied Linguistics, approximately 75 percent of Americans speak only one language. Despite this lack of fluency, 43 percent of the nation believes it is important to know as many languages as possible. Like most knowledge-based problems, the root goes back to the educational system. “Foreign language programs are struggling in the United States largely because we have people in a teaching position who [don’t] speak a foreign language: the end. Kids have to be involved in the learning. You can’t poke information into students,” says Dr. Clydia Forehand, English language development specialist for Tulsa Public Schools at Park Elementary and Eisenhower

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

International schools. Eisenhower International School is one of a number of schools throughout Oklahoma where an emphasis is placed on language immersion. At Eisenhower, from the first time a kindergartener enters the school they are taught, spoken to and guided in a targeted foreign language. “The immersion process is what Eisenhower is all about,” says Forehand. “Ninety percent of the time, they are learning math and reading and lining up for school in the target language.” Despite the unfamiliarity of the language, Forehand admits that students are never completely lost. Hands, facial expressions and nonverbal communication are all used to aid in the immersion process. Eventually, as a student builds confidence, they find ways to say what they need to say. “It is truly amazing to see the kids go from looking at me like a deer in the headlights to fully conversing amongst each other in Spanish,” says Rachel Smith, an elementary Spanish instructor with Jenks Public Schools. One advantage that researchers have found in individuals who learned a second language early in life is that as they’re studying a new language, they’re also using other areas of

the mind, which can aid in many cognitive learning processes. Additionally, learning a second language allows a person to cross the midline of the brain: They’re using the logical side of the brain and the artistic side. “When you start making comparisons through language, it helps make your ability to talk to people and find other words and draw from a richer lexicon of language, even in your first language,” says Forehand. Another key element of learning a foreign language is understanding the culture that comes with it. “Language without culture is deadly,” says Forehand. “You don’t want to alienate people no matter [what] you’re speaking.” With this in mind, many foreign language programs throughout Oklahoma are beginning to weave the cultural dynamics of each language into the curriculum. This degree of education goes beyond the realm of linguistics and actually helps form an appreciation of other cultures and an expansion of a child’s worldview. Ultimately, more culturally aware students leads to more culturally aware adults, and more culturally aware adults lead to a more productive society. NATHAN PORTER


Whatever is happening in your li fe,

there’s a good chance your

college exp e rie nce help e d you get to whe re you are to day. Whe n you refle c t on that time , you may b e ove r whelme d by fond me morie s — me eting your sp ouse , cele brating a big football win , pulling an all- nighte r to stu dy or laughing with p e ople who b e came your lifelong frie nds . To day ’s O kla h om a State U nive r sit y students are having the same experiences as they pur sue bright orange futures . Visit OS Ugiving.com to learn how you can b e a par t of their journey.


Education

Trading Degrees

B

Do trade and vocational schools get enough credit?

eyond the financial stability or academic rigor that a college degree provides, for most, it symbolizes an increase in social status. But as student loans pile up and job opportunities diminish, more students are beginning to realize that this status is overrated. The traditional formula to moving up the economic ladder was to perform well in school, get accepted into a good college and then graduate and land a stable, well-paying job. For many recent graduates, however, the last part of the formula is becoming a fantasy. It’s no secret that all across the nation tuition prices have risen, while jobs for college graduates have decreased. So is it time for individuals to take vocational schools more seriously? Many think it is. “For many people, trade schools have a stigma attached to them, and the stigma is not as much about the field you’re trained in but rather the status of the career in that field,” says Aimee Brown, a spokesperson for Spartan School of Aeronautics in Tulsa,

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a vocational college that provides dozens of career opportunities in the field of aviation. There are more than 60 trade and career colleges in Oklahoma that provide individuals with practical, real-world skills, and despite the stigma, every year, thousands of students finish and begin earning money in their respective careers. “Attending a school like Spartan School of Aeronautics or other technical colleges provides the fastest route to being job ready,” says Brown. While college majors like anthropology and philosophy can be academically challenging, there’s not a significant demand for these degrees in the workforce. Vocational schools, on the other hand, can boast of the opposite. “We don’t have anything that does not lead to a job currently or in the next few years,” says Jeff Knapp, communications coordinator for Francis Tuttle Technology Center in Oklahoma City. The average vocational college tuition is less than $7,000, the average length is less than two years, and the average starting sal-

ary is more than $30,000. There are still a slew of career paths that require a bachelor’s degree to enter, but Knapp believes vocational schools can serve a vital role in a college student’s road to graduation. “I know many students who graduated from vocational school and earned a job in their trade, then used that job to pay for their undergraduate tuition,” says Knapp. Males also usually dominate vocational schools, but Brown believes more females should explore the option. “Women often tend to overlook the advantages of trade schools, but they are a great opportunity for women looking to enter the workforce,” she says. Nevertheless, according to a Pew Research study conducted in 2014, most college graduates don’t regret their decision to attend college. Still, there’s no one road to success. Though universities may seem like the only option to a happy, productive life, it may be a good idea to trade that major in for a tangible skill. NATHAN PORTER


Education

Choosing The One

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Area of study and money are the driving factors behind selecting the best college for a student.

or the first 18 years of a student’s life, they are conditioned to trust and depend on their parents and other adults for their basic needs and important decisions. In the first year of a person’s life, the baby is essentially an extension of the parent – depending on the mother and father for everything necessary to survive. As the baby grows and matures into a child, they’re progressively given more autonomy. The child chooses their own clothes, their own friends and then their own interests and hobbies. Nevertheless, that adolescence is draped in a deep dependence on one’s parents for major decisions. But suddenly, that dependence takes a huge blow. For teens looking to advance their academic career beyond high school, one decision stares them in the face: Where do I go to school? When a student is sorting through multiple college acceptance letters, there are a number of questions worth pondering. One question is how much the school costs. “I always preach overall best value,” says Terrie Shipley, a college consultant in Oklahoma.

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It’s no secret that colleges and universities today are expensive. After four grueling years of academic rigor, most students come out of college gaining brainpower, but give up an arm and a leg to tuition and room and board prices. According to a 2014 report from the Institute for College Access and Success, the average amount of student loan debt increased for the class of 2013 to nearly $30,000. The study also found that graduates in Oklahoma finished school with an average of $22,174 in student loan debt. “A college degree is still the best path to a job and decent pay, and while loans are increasingly needed to get through school, graduating with burdensome debt is not a foregone conclusion,” says Lauren Asher, president of the Institute for College Access and Success, in a public statement last year. “Where you go to college matters, and the kind of loans you have matter, too. Federal student loans come with crucial consumer protections like income-based repayment plans, while private loans offer little or no relief if you hit a rough patch.” Whether a university is public or private also plays a pivotal role in the cost of the

degree. Traditionally, private schools are more expensive than public schools. Despite this difference in cost, however, a recent Pew Research Center study found that public and private school grads are equally satisfied with their college experience and return on investment. Another vital aspect of selecting the right college is to make sure that the school a student selects is academically compatible and ranked highly in the field of study the student wants to enter. Every school has certain academic fields that it is particularly strong in, and doing one’s homework on what area of strength that school has can pay off in the long run. But even if a student is unsure about what he or she wants to major in, it’s not the end of the world. Ultimately, college is an exciting time in many young adults’ lives, and the college selection process should be exciting as well. There’s certainly a lot of research that goes into finding the perfect college fit, but research is worth getting use to, because from this point forward, it doesn’t get any easier for the student. NATHAN PORTER


Education

Follow The Money

T

Get a headstart on the college scholarship and funding process to relieve future headaches.

rying to figure out how to pay for college can be an overwhelming challenge for both parents and students. Scholarships, grants, financial aid and loans are available to pay for tuition and books, and knowing how to apply for funding doesn’t have to be a headache. “The trick is to start early, early, early,” says Kerry Hornibrook, the director of school advancement at Cascia Hall Preparatory School. “Cascia students meet with the college counseling office freshman year to begin discussing the college search and the application process.” Not such an early bird? Traci Nassar, the college counselor at Jenks High School, says researching for scholarships during sophomore or junior year is okay, too. “Most scholarships are for seniors, but students should start researching for the scholarships during sophomore or junior year,” says Nassar. “This will let them know what scholarships are available and the requirements for scholarships.” This knowledge may also motivate students to get their grades up, work on ACT or SAT test preparation and get more involved in leadership or community service activities, says Nassar.

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Confused as to what type of funding to apply for? “The terms ‘scholarship’ and ‘grant’ are often used interchangeably, but there are usually differences between these two forms of aid,” says Hornibrook. “Most scholarships are merit-based, which means that they are awarded to students with certain qualities, not just proven academic or athletic ability but also those who have special talents in drama, music, debate, art and even leadership skills. “Financial aid is the amount of a student’s total cost of attendance that isn’t covered by the expected family contribution or outside grants and scholarships,” continues Hornibrook. “A student must demonstrate financial need to be eligible for need-based financial assistance programs.” Families who earn less than $50,000 per year should enroll their students in Oklahoma Promise no later than the end of sophomore year, says Nassar. Oklahoma Promise is a higher learning access program that pays tuition at Oklahoma’s state universities. Beginning January of senior year, parents and students should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). “This is how students can qualify for federal financial aid in the form of grants or free money that is not paid back or federal

student loans, which must be paid back,” says Nassar. “Federal financial aid is based on family income, number of students in college, age of the parents, et cetera.” Not all families will qualify for federal financial aid, but some colleges, especially private colleges, offer financial aid based on these same criteria, says Nassar. “The more expensive colleges may provide their own financial aid to families who didn’t qualify for federal financial aid. These colleges usually use the FAFSA to determine if families qualify for school-based financial aid, so families should complete the FAFSA even if they think they won’t qualify for aid.” All types of funding have deadlines, so it pays to be organized. “I always tell students that they have to treat the scholarship process like a job or another class,” says Nassar. “They have to do their research, write essays, complete applications and meet deadlines. “In order to be successful they have to be very organized and understand that they will submit many more applications than they are going to receive in scholarships,” she continues. “Don’t get discouraged, and be persistent.” SHARON MCBRIDE

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Education

Finding A Match Choosing a major that aligns with Oklahoma industry needs as well as the student’s interests and strengths proves beneficial when entering the job market.

D

uring the 2014-2015 school year, the average cost of tuition and fees for college was $31,231 at private colleges, $9,139 for state residents at public colleges and $22,958 for out-of-state residents attending public universities, according to the College Board, a nonprofit organization that collects data and expands access to higher education. College is a major investment, and smoothly entering the job market in Oklahoma after graduation is important to many, says Scott King, career services coordinator at OSUTulsa. So what majors align best with thriving Oklahoma industries? “Several different bachelor degrees would be very marketable in Oklahoma and across the nation,” says King. “Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) related majors are in demand in Oklahoma. Not enough U.S. citizens are choosing these majors to fill the demand in the marketplace. “At OSU-Tulsa we provide bachelor degrees that are STEM-focused in mechanical engineering, computer science and management information systems,” says King. “STEM degrees typically lead to the highest starting salaries of all the possible majors.”

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In a 2014 poll by The Washington Post, students with traditional liberal arts degrees frequently find themselves underemployed, while students with degrees in STEM-related majors have little trouble finding good jobs in their profession. In addition to STEM majors, any business degree is a marketable major, says King. STEM and business majors are very soughtafter and they also tend to have higher starting salaries than most other majors. Many businesses looking for college graduates do not have a preference for a single business major, says King. This is good news for Oklahomans, as Oklahoma City celebrated national Small Business Week in May and was named by Wallet Hub as the third best city in the country to work for a small business, and Tulsa was ranked as the second best city in the country to start a business. Other majors certainly have a market, says King. “For instance, we are in a shortage of teachers in Oklahoma,” says King. Right now, there are approximately 1,000 teacher vacancies in Oklahoma, according to the Oklahoma State School Board Association. “While these positions may have a lower salary than the other areas mentioned, these

are still good jobs and offer a very rewarding career for the person who is called to become an educator,” says King. However, he stresses, no matter what major a student chooses, it is very important to match personality type, strengths and interests to find that best major, which will ultimately create a great career. “At the end of the day if you hated every second of your work, it doesn’t matter how much you make,” says King. So he notes, it’s important to seek out help when making a decision on what to study. Four years of college often comes with a hefty price tag. “OSU offers excellent career services to our students and alumni,” says King. “We can provide students with assessments to help them find a career that fits them in personality, interests and strengths.” It’s also important to choose a college that can help with the job search in Oklahoma after earning that coveted degree, says King. “At OSU we provide resume assistance, help with cover letters, job search strategies, networking suggestions and mock interviews,” he says. “We also offer workshops to build skills and career fairs to help students and alumni meet prospective employers.” SHARON MCBRIDE


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Education

Credits And Culture

T

The benefits of studying abroad go far beyond education.

oday, college students can see the other side of the planet with just a click of a mouse, but nothing can replace the sights, smells, tastes and noises of actually visiting a destination in person. That’s what studying abroad is all about, says Dr. Laura Brunson, director of Education Abroad College of International Studies at the University of Oklahoma. Studying, researching or engaging in educational service learning programs in another country in person is an experience that cannot be replicated online, says Brunson. “Studying abroad in a country outside of the United States offers a wonderful opportunity for students to expand their horizons,” she says. “Students are encouraged to interact with local people and visit cultural sites in order to get the most out of their experience.” For example, OU students can study abroad in more than 80 countries around the world on short- or long-term programs. It can also be great for one’s career after college, says Mary Benner, the director of the Academic Services and Study Abroad Overseas Program at Oklahoma City University. Today, cultural awareness and second language proficiency are two skills that

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

companies need, she says. A study abroad program can help students hone both, which can set them apart in today’s competitive job market. “Studying abroad is considered one of the high-impact practices that greatly enhances a student’s undergraduate education and significantly improves their competitiveness in the job market or with graduate admissions,” says Benner. “Studying abroad can also increase a student’s self-confidence, problem-solving skills, adaptability and cross-cultural competence – all skills required in the 21st-century world.” It can be a challenge choosing what program to participate in and when it is the right time to go. “It is helpful for students to start thinking about their study abroad programs when they first enter college so they have plenty of time to select a program that is a good fit for them and plan their housing, finances and course schedule to minimize costs and maximize benefits,” says Brunson. Students should speak with a study abroad advisor at their university and also with their academic advisor to learn what courses may be earned abroad, says Benner. Once a choice is made, the next step is to figure out how to pay for it.

“Some universities allow their students to use all of their financial aid to study abroad, while others limit what aid may be used,” says Benner. Based on these considerations, students then need to decide if a short-term summer study abroad program might be more or less cost-effective than a semester abroad. There are several resources available so students and parents can choose the right program. “The OU study abroad website is an excellent source of information about programs for OU students, financial resources, health and safety abroad, et cetera,” says Brunson. Students are also encouraged to visit www.cdc.gov and www.state.gov to learn more about the country (or countries) they are visiting and get additional health, safety and preparation information, says Brunson. “Students in all majors can find programs abroad to fit their degree programs,” says Benner. “The timing and length of study may vary depending on major and the encouragement from the student’s academic unit may vary by major, but programs exist for all students.” SHARON MCBRIDE


GET THERE FROM HERE Students attend Oklahoma State University-Tulsa for a variety of reasons. Some want more opportunities and increased earning power that come from earning an OSU degree. Others want to make connections and create a better quality of life for themselves and their community through learning, service and research. Whatever your goal, OSU-Tulsa has the programs, resources and support to help you get there from here. Find out how at OSUinTulsa.com.

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Education

Mastering Learning

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Consider the advantages of pursuing a graduate degree.

or centuries, Americans have believed that education was the most effective way to improve one’s social and economic status. An individual matriculates from grade school to high school, then high school to college, then for some, from college to graduate school. But lately, many have been wondering whether graduate-level education is really worth it. All across the nation, graduate schools have seen a decline in enrollment, and the struggling economy and rise of higher education costs each seem to have played a part in this. Dr. Debra Stewart, president of the Council of Graduate Schools, believes that financial stress has had a huge impact on both students and academic programs alike, when it comes to graduate degrees. So, with this in mind, when is the best time to pursue a graduate degree, and what are the purpose and benefits of most programs? In 2014, Rogers State University in Claremore created a master’s degree in business administration program. “Our goal is to prepare people to com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

pete,” says Dr. Burt Tollison, Rogers State University MBA department chair. Tollison is fully aware of the immense pressure many students face upon entering the work force, and he knows that there is no one-way to make everyone in a program successful. “I’m a project coordinator in a support role at a major energy company, and I want to move forward in my career. Getting my MBA will expand my skills and knowledge in the business world and make me more competitive in the job market,” says Katrina Loy Herndon, a current MBA student at RSU. The small classes and intimate learning environment of many graduate programs compared to many undergraduate programs is a huge advantage for students. This focused learning style allows for much more collaboration and networking at the graduate level, which has a lasting effect in the classroom and post graduation. “Small class sizes allow [professors] to be more involved in teaching each student than they could be at a larger university,” Herndon says. Another advantage to enrolling in a graduate program is that it provides individuals

with the skills and knowledge to change their career path. For many dissatisfied with their professions, graduate programs allow them to explore another field of study and gain practical experience for a career in that path. “In short, the University of Oklahoma provided a tough, yet rewarding, 17 months that prepared me for my second career upon departing from the military,” says Richard Lee, who graduated with a Master of Arts degree in economics in 1998. “The rigors of the program, coupled with the exceptionally high quality of teaching, distinguished OU from its peers with similar programs.” The numbers also support the overall payoff of graduate degrees. According to a 2014 Pew Research Center study, collegeeducated adults between 25- and 34-yearsold with a bachelor’s degree earned an average monthly income of $3,836 in 2009, while those with a master’s degree averaged $4,772. There are, however, problems like high student loan debt and being overqualified for some positions, that individuals with graduate degrees must sort through; but overall, the rewards may outweigh the risks. NATHAN PORTER


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Yes, at Monte Cassino we’re known as “the saints,” but it’s not simply a moniker students instantly acquire after enrolling, it’s an honor and a tradition students have earned for 90 years. From the first day of Monte Cassino classes in 1926 to today, being a Saint is tantamount to what is important in being successful: hard work, respect for others, a passion to overachieve, a strong moral compass, and the ability to make good day-to-day decisions. So for all reasons people have been choosing Monte Cassino for 90 years (nationally recognized academics, access to team-building athletics, community representation), our unique, creative Catholic social skills programs are what sets us apart then and now from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will set your son and/or daughter apart as well. Want your child to have a better opportunity to succeed in life?

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Education

Eleven Pillars Of Success

Oklahoma’s tenacious high school graduates prepare for their journey ahead. Edited by Nehemiah Taylor Photography by Dan Morgan

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Matt Hanisch

Bishop Kelley High School Attending: University of Southern California Major: Film and television production What has led you to want to pursue that field? I have always loved telling stories and entertaining others by creating movies … Seeing the impact my short films can have, even on small audiences, encouraged me to attempt to turn my hobby into a career and my ideas into major motion pictures. Who has been the biggest influence in your life? My middle school language arts teacher, Deb Thalken, influenced me more than anyone else in my life by instilling in me an ability not only to read, but to think; not only to write, but to articulate thoughts effectively; and not only to speak English correctly, but to love the language itself. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? I have never felt more accomplished than I did while finishing the Route 66 Marathon. Accomplishments in school have always come naturally to me, but my attempts at sports were naturally disastrous. … [That] continued relentlessly until I stumbled onto my high school cross-country team. … Running cross-country gave me a sense of accomplishment because, for the first time, I could see myself improving, step by step. …The marathon itself gave me the opportunity to push myself to my limit and put my newfound skill to the test.

Anushka Raj

Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School Attending: University of Oklahoma Major: Biochemistry: pre-med with a minor in business What are your career plans? I hope to one day become a doctor. I am trying to keep an open mind on the specific field, but I am looking at ophthalmology or dermatology. What has led you to want to pursue that field? Since before I can remember, I have wanted to be a doctor because they seemed like superheroes. I personally am drawn towards the field of ophthalmology because I have always had terrible eyesight. The day I received my first pair of lenses, I was amazed, and I wanted to bring that gift to other people, more specifically to those who may not be able to afford a doctor’s visit. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be, and why? … I would be Emma Watson. Not only did she act in one of my favorite series, Harry Potter, but she is also a strong advocate for women’s rights. … I would love to spend a day in the shoes of this beautiful woman that has used her talents to make a difference in this world, and this way, I will be able to learn how to thrive like she has.


McKinleigh Lair

Diego Eleazar Luevano

Edison High School Attending: University of Chicago Major: Physics and philosophy Who has been the biggest influence in your life? Why? … At the beginning of my high school in Mexico, I would have to say it was Medel Perez, as his lessons introduced me to physics and the beauties of it and also instilled in me a way of thinking, while introducing me also to the kind of person I wanted to become: One who serves his community and tries to change it through sharing his few or many talents with others ... Later, in Edison, I would have to say Mr. Hammond. … His classes reinstilled in me the thirst for knowledge. … Finally, in the very recent weeks, while volunteering at the Catholic Charities Food Pantry, Bryan Meyers, the pantry supervisor, has become a person whose moral genius is simply impressive. Seeing him handle and interact with every single one of the volunteers and guests with a true love for every single person he comes across has made me more aware that success or happiness does not rely on any sort of external achievement but in carrying every single one of our actions with a true devotion to it and even love for it. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? 20 years? I truly have no idea. If you had asked me four years ago where would I see myself, I am certain that the words Chicago, Oklahoma, or even any English word would not have been in the answer, so by now I´ve found out that the only thing you can expect from life is the unexpected. However, I can tell you that I hope that I am doing something in which I can help improve the community around me and continue to learn about the subject I had decided to devout my life to.

Jenks High School Attending: Ithaca College Major: Documentary studies and production Who has been the biggest influence in your life? My film teacher, Clifton Raphael, has undoubtedly had the largest impact on my life. Without his class, his guidance, his patience and his support, I am confident that I wouldn’t have had nearly as many opportunities as I do right now. What are some characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? My peers at school have many times seen me lugging a camera and a tripod around campus while wearing my Jenks tennis fleece. I am known around school as the filmmaker tennis girl who often has very little free time. I have been a four-year member of my high school varsity tennis team, and I have won state alongside my teammates three times. I have also earned more than $7,000 in prize money from various filmmaking projects. Additionally, I started an afterschool film camp at Eugene Field Elementary School, for which I volunteered my time to teach kids in a low-income part of Tulsa the basics of documentary filmmaking. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be, and why? I recently read a book that mesmerized me – Life of Pi. I would like to switch places with Piscine Patel in order to understand his enduring desire for life and his understanding of the human condition.

Maxwell Musick

Riverfield Country Day School Attending: New York University Major: Music industry What are your career plans? The end goal, end being the next five to 10 years, is to be performing my own music and being in charge of as much as possible, including but not limited to the writing, performing, managing, advertising and producing. What has led you to want to pursue that field? In all honesty, I think it’s just what I’m best at. I still have a long way to go, but I feel that if I hadn’t have chosen to go into music, I would regret it deeply. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? In 10 years I hope to be traveling, performing, working, working and working. What are some characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? … For the most part, I’m idealistic and opportunistic. If I truly want to do something, I will find a way to do it. I’ve started taking ballet this past year, and one of my friends asked me once if I was going to take classes in New York City, and if so, was I nervous to be taking [classes] with people much better than me. All I could say was that it didn’t quite matter if I was nervous or not, because it is something that I want to keep pursuing. AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Education

Josh Saurino

Cascia Hall Preparatory School Attending: Southern Methodist University Major: Mechanical engineering Who has been the biggest influence in your life? Why? My dad. He supports me in all of my ventures in life. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Winning the Championship Karting International Title. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? 20 years? Working as an engineer in Formula One racing. What are some characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? I have a dry sense of humor, and I enjoy thinking on my own. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be, and why? Cristiano Ronaldo. I would like to experience the athletic ability and lifestyle the of the world’s greatest soccer player.

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Bryant Loney

Julia Parackal

Holland Hall Attending: The University of Tulsa Major: Biochemistry What has been the biggest influence in your life? Why? My mother has been my biggest influence … When I was young, she left her parents in India and moved my family to the United States to give my brother and me a better chance at education. Even though she worked, took care of the family and helped us with our homework, she went back to school, even if it meant waking up early and staying up until midnight studying and writing papers. For her, education is the most precious gift she could give … Her determination is inspiring and has made me want to go as far as I can with my dream. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? My biggest achievement was helping to revitalize the culture program at my high school. … This year, I helped to organize a week of cultural performances for the morning during our daily morning meeting. These performances ranged from ballet to a kung fu demonstrations to mariachi singing. I wanted to give my classmates the opportunity to experience something they might not have see otherwise and give them a new appreciation for the diverse cultures that help to make up the community as a whole. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be, and why? … I would like to be Florence Nightingale. I admire her courage in helping soldiers during the Crimean War … After the war, she kept pushing forward for reforms and helped along the nursing profession. … Even though her life was not easy, she never gave up and continued trying to make the world a better place.

Booker T. Washington High School Attending: The University of Tulsa Major: English What are your career plans? I’d like to continue telling stories, with the aspiration of becoming a publisher to smooth the way for writers like me. What has led you to want to pursue that field? The publication of my contemporary-realistic, coming-of-age novel, To Hear The Ocean Sigh. Who has been the biggest influence in your life? Why? There’s a good reason why I believe my high school is the highest ranked in the state of Oklahoma: the teachers. They have challenged and inspired me throughout the past four years to take my work seriously and to believe in my talents. Literary-wise, Stephen King, John Green, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Rod Serling of The Twilight Zone have all inspired my writing. What would people be surprised to learn about you? I have a 1937 Royal DeLuxe typewriter named Ernie, after the writer most famous for using that particular model. It’s probably my most prized possession. Where do you see yourself in 10 years? 20 years? In 10 years, I would like to be cranking out books at a steady pace and for kids to be skipping school to pick up their copies from their local bookstore. In 20 years, I hope to have survived the zombie apocalypse.


September 2015

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CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2015

In the class of 93 students, 33 were named Oklahoma Academic Scholars, 6 were recognized by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, and 100% will attend college. In the last four years, Commando teams earned 8 State Championships and 9 Runner-up titles. Seven senior athletes earned All State honors, and 3 will play sports at the college level. Class members performed more than 11,000 service hours in three years. OPEN HOUSE FOR PROSPECTIVE FAMILIES SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2015, 1:00 - 3:00 PM No reservation required.

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Education

Kyle Hendrix

Carly Alyse Mirabile

Heritage Hall Attending: Duke University Major: Public health or engineering What has led you to want to pursue that field? Although I am unsure of which occupation I will ultimately pursue, I believe it will encompass both problem-solving and creativity … I am happiest when I am busy working out a problem – no matter how big or small. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? My biggest achievement is my independent study project, The Fractured Figure, which I completed during my senior year. I created an art gallery of my own pieces focused on bringing awareness to distorted body image. Each piece followed extensive research, and each tells a story. Throughout the process, I recorded my findings in a blog, and I eventually opened my gallery and welcomed over 150 people – furthering the dialogue about the cultural erosion of body image. Who has been the biggest influence in your life? The biggest influence in my life has been my amazing art teacher and mentor, Mrs. Patricia Winnard. She has taught me to trust and value my instinct, as well as encouraging me to look beyond the surface and to make waves. Everything she has taught me has been tremendously applicable in every aspect of my life. Plus, she is a wonderful friend.

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Metro Christian Academy Attending: University of Oklahoma Major: Entrepreneurship and management information systems What are your career plans? I’m not certain about what I want to do, and I’m open to opportunities. However, I’d like to work in the technology field, and I want to eventually run my own company. What has led you to want to pursue that field? I’ve liked math and technology since I was young. Also, the technology field is ever-growing and full of opportunity. Who has been the biggest influence in your life? Why? My dad has been the biggest influence in my life. I have learned much of my common sense from him, and I really respect him as a person. What are some characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? I would say that the fact that I’m well rounded … I’ve been involved in many different activities, varying from football to Spanish club to National Honor Society. What would people be surprised to learn about you? People would be surprised to know that I’m also a private pilot.

Praful Vasireddy

Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics Attending: California Institute of Technology Major: Physics What are some characteristics that make you stand out from the rest of your graduating class? I often feel that not enough teenagers are interested in math and science, and I hope that this changes in the future. I want to be a part of this shift and hopefully influence others in the same way that my teachers and family members have influenced me. What do you feel is your biggest achievement? Graduating from the Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics is my biggest achievement. The school was rigorous, but it gave me a lot of opportunities and greatly helped me get accepted into Caltech. If you could trade places with one person for a day, who would it be, and why? I would trade places with [the late American theoretical physicist] Richard Feynman for a day if I could. He was one the most creative scientific minds in history and was an incredibly talented physicist. Feynman was also very good at explaining his field and its complexities to everyone, not just other physicists. I believe that this is a very useful skill, and to understand his mindset would be amazing.


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CHEROKEE CASINO & HOTEL IN WEST SILOAM SPRINGS. PHOTO COURTESY CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES.

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Nations

FUEL

THE STATE

The state’s federally recognized tribes pour billions into Oklahoma’s economy through gaming, entertainment and enterprise. BY SHARON MCBRIDE

O

klahoma’s 38 federally recognized tribes bring more than $10.8 billion of revenue to the state’s coffers every year, according to the United States Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. Up to 70 percent of that comes from tribal gambling operations. Tribal government and business operations directly employ more than 50,000 people and support a total of 87,174 full-time jobs in the state, according to an analysis by the Steven C.

AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Agee Economic Research & Policy Institute (ERPI) at Oklahoma City University. Gaming accounted for more than half of those jobs, the report added. Seven Oklahoma tribes participated in the study: the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Citizen Potawatomi Nation and Muscogee (Creek) nations as well as the Peoria and Shawnee tribes. ERPI collected business and government data from participating tribes, compiled the data and extended it to all Oklahoma tribes on a per citizen basis in order to capture total tribal spending, business revenues and employment figures. Then, study authors used this data to determine the multiplier effect of tribal economic activities – the number of non-tribal jobs and income supported by the tribes. “We have always known that the tribal operations and economic development activities of the Cherokee Nation and the other Oklahoma tribes have had a strong positive social and economic impact on our citizens and the entire state of Oklahoma,” says Principal Chief Bill John Baker. “Now, this groundbreaking study allows our contribution to the state to be quantified. Going forward, our desire is to continue to partner with the state government to achieve longterm growth for all Oklahomans.” The study found that the tribes generated $5.6 billion from business activities, including professional services, hospitality

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ABOVE: CHICKASAW VISITOR CENTER IN SULPHUR. CHICKASAW NATION MEMBERS TAKE PART IN THE CHICKASAW NATION AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ACADEMY (CNASA). PHOTOS COURTESY CHICKASAW NATION.


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and entertainment, gaming and retail operations. Tribal expenditures include $1.5 billion in direct payroll contributions and $792 million to Oklahoma entities for medical care, education, social services and economic development opportunities for tribal citizens. While gaming is the biggest source of revenue, tribes have had significant success in other business operations and continue to diversify. he Chickasaw Nation has ventured into manufacturing, information technology and administrative support services. Additionally, the tribe has opened a fine chocolate factory, several healthcare clinics, pharmacies, hotels, convenience stores, radio stations and a cultural center, says Tony Choate, media relations director for The Chickasaw Nation. “We are also investing in healthcare and bioscience industries because it will enable us to leverage our success and operational knowledge of healthcare systems to develop successful, new businesses,” he says. The Choctaw Nation has expanded its interests as well. “The Choctaw Nation is diversified in its enterprises – beyond gaming,” says Lisa Reed, the public relations officer for The Choctaw Nation. “We have travel plazas, Choctaw Defense, Global Staffing, home health, a welcome center, online store and gift shops, and we are in the process of building two Chili’s franchises … to name a few.” The Miami Nation, in the interest of continuing to provide economic development for the community, has also expanded its enterprises, says Julie Olds, public relations officer for The Miami Nation. This includes Miami Business Services, which provides personnel, information technologies and business supplies; Miami Designs, which provides graphic art and promotional materials; Miami Cineplex, a movie theater and arcade; and Service World Computer, which provides computer networking and support, as well as video surveillance. Additionally, the tribe owns one smoke shop and one casino. The Miami Nation’s estimated annual tribal economic impact is $16,700,000 to the state of Oklahoma, says Olds. Why diversify? “Diversification provides opportunities for employment of people with a variety of skills and fills voids in many rural areas,” explains Reed. That’s a goal that the Cherokee Nation shares. “We choose industries that balance out our portfolio, provide jobs and generate the most revenue so we can fund our tribal services,” says Baker. “The Cherokee people are the ultimate beneficiary to our business success, so we invest those dollars wisely and with the best intention for our people.

T

The impact of tribal business across Oklahoma is significant.

The Cherokee Nation, with more than 320,000 citizens, is the largest sovereign tribal nation in the U.S. and the economic engine that drives growth in northeast Oklahoma, says Baker. The power of tribal governments and tribally owned businesses fuel economic development in the region. “We recently released our biannual Cherokee Nation economic impact report that showed a $1.55 billion economic impact on northeast Oklahoma in 2014,” says Baker. The Cherokee Nation and its businesses directly employ more than

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ABOVE: THE MCSWAIN THEATRE, LOCATED IN ADA, IS RUN BY THE CHICKASAW NATION. A MEMBER OF THE CHICKASAW NATION LIGHTHORSE POLICE DEPARTMENT. MEMBERS ARE CROSS-DEPUTIZED WITH 47 AGENCIES WITHIN OKLAHOMA. PHOTOS COURTESY CHICKASAW NATION.


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9,000 people and an additional 5,000 indirectly, he adds. In 2014, Cherokee Nation Businesses had its most successful contracting year, winning nearly $375 million in federal and commercial contracts, contributing to an overall 9.5 percent revenue increase. “We have broken all records this year in production output, dividends and number of employees, resulting in more money to deliver services to Cherokee Nation citizens and all Oklahomans,” says Baker. Goods and services are not the only commodities that Oklahoma’s nations provide. “We are the largest employer in southeastern Oklahoma,” says Reed. “Choctaw Nation businesses not only provide jobs; they are assets to the communities where they utilize other businesses to operate.” Both state and local economies benefit from tribe activities. “A recent economic impact study demon

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strated the Chickasaw Nation has an annual economic impact on the state of more than $2.4 billion,” says Choate. “The Chickasaw Nation has nearly 13,000 employees, more than 10,000 of those in Oklahoma. A large number of those employees are located in rural areas, where unemployment had long been an issue.” iversified business ventures have also helped tribes become more independent of the federal government. “Growth of our businesses has enabled us to dramatically increase the number of services we offer to the Chickasaw people,” Choate says. “Two decades ago, a significant majority of the funding for programs and services still came from the federal government. In recent years, profits from tribal businesses have come to provide a large majority of the funding for programs and services, such as housing, health care, education and family services.” The Chickasaw Nation offers more than 280 programs and services to assist its citizens, says Choate, including 68 federal programs with budgets of more than $170 million. The nation also operates more than 210 tribal programs with an annual budget of more than $200 million, compared to 33 federal programs and just over $7 million in 1988. The Choctaw Nation is also in the business of securing a better future. “The Choctaw Nation leaders are continuously working to make sure there is hope for our future,” says Reed. “At a time when less federal services are available for our children, The Choctaw Nation is securing funding and developing specific programs to ensure the next generations have hope and pride to carry on. Many of the services and programs of the tribe, such as the education scholarships, career development, health clinics and job placement opportunities, go a long way toward helping tribal members meet this vision.” According to Reed, most programs are administered within the service area, but more are added each year to benefit tribal members living outside southeast Oklahoma. Such programs

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ABOVE: YOUTH PARTICIPATE IN CNASA. CHICKASAW GOVERNOR BILL ANOATUBBY STANDS BESIDE BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD’S CARING VAN. PHOTOS COURTESY CHICKASAW NATION.


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assist career development, emergency assistance, loan programs for housing, storm shelters and veterans’ advocacy. Tribes also have an impact on state and local communities that cannot be measured in dollars. For example, The Chickasaw Nation has helped enhance the safety and security of all Oklahomans through development of The Chickasaw Nation Lighthorse Police Department, says Choate. “Our Lighthorse Police Department works closely with state and local law enforcement agencies,” says Choate. “We were the first tribe to develop a cross-deputization agreement with a state law enforcement agency in Oklahoma when we signed our agreement with the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.” urrently, Lighthorse officers are cross-deputized with 47 agencies located within the 13 counties that make up the Chickasaw Nation. Crossdeputization agreements work to eliminate jurisdictional uncertainties and deliver more efficient law enforcement services, explains Choate. The Lighthorse officers routinely help other agencies with law enforcement matters within jurisdiction through the cross commissions. “We have also made a significant investment in our young people,” says Choate. “We are providing the tools and guidance our young people need to lead successful lives and become the leaders of tomorrow.” Ways that The Chickasaw Nation is accomplishing this is through camps and academies, such as the Chickasaw Nation Aviation and Space Academy and the Chickasaw Summer Arts Academy. These camps enable students to make that vital connection between education and a career. Camps and academies and other programs provide the opportunity for young people to learn directly from accomplished professionals. The Cherokee Nation also has programs in place to help the youth of the community. In March 2015, 16 school districts that fall outside the Cherokee Nation’s jurisdiction in Tulsa, Rogers, Mayes, Wagoner and Muskogee counties received tribal motor vehicle tag funds. Each year the tribe allocated to schools 38 percent of its revenue from car

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tags sales. Previously, the tribe disbursed funds only to schools located within the tribe’s jurisdictional area and a two-mile buffer zone along the jurisdictional boundary. In 2014, 91 schools received car tag funding from the tribe. This year that number rose to 107. Also rising is the amount of money to be disbursed. According to CN Education Services, the amount of tag revenue from the expanded five counties for fiscal year 2014 was approximately $1.5 million, which increased the total school funding to $4 million. “Oklahoma is our home, and our success is the state’s success,” says Baker. “We are proud partners with the state of Oklahoma and hundreds of county and municipal governments. We strive to continually raise the level of hope in Oklahoma – hope for a better and brighter future. The Cherokee Nation plays a critical role in ensuring Oklahoma remains a great place to live and raise a family. We proudly reinvest our business profits in people, services and facilities to build a better and brighter future for today, tomorrow and the next seven generations.”

ABOVE: CONSTRUCTION AND INDUSTRY ARE TWO MAJOR COMPONENTS OF CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES (BELOW). RIGHT: THE CHEROKEE NATIONAL SUPREME COURT MUSEUM IN TAHLEQUAH. PHOTOS COURTESY CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES.


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1 5 MUSEUMS You Have to See to Believe

The culture and heritage of Oklahoma is as diverse as its terrain. Nearly every city and small town has a historical society or museum that tells its story. Still, other museums found in Oklahoma are world-renowned in small circles despite low profiles. We take a look at some of the most unique, unusual and underrated museums in the state. By Jami Mattox

Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art Shawnee Founded: 1919 The Mabee-Gerrer Museum of Art may be the only museum in Oklahoma that was founded by a Catholic monk. It is also the only museum that houses two Egyptian mummies as part of its permanent collection. Fr. Gregory Gerrer relocated to St. Gregory’s Abbey in Shawnee from Sacred Heart after a fire in 1901. “Fr. Gerrer collected pieces from around the world,” says Delaynna

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Trim, curator of collections at the museum. “He traveled extensively during his lifetime. His main mission was to bring the world to Oklahoma, not only artwork but ethnographic and archaeological objects. He was a well-known portrait painter and would sometimes paint a portrait in exchange for a piece for the museum.” The most popular part of the collection is the Ancient Egypt exhibit. The mummies draw school children from across the state, Trim adds.

MUMMY PART OF THE ANCIENT EGYPT EXHIBIT. PHOTO COURTESY MABEE-GERRER MUSEUM OF ART.


J.M. Davis Arms and Historical Museum

Claremore Founded: 1969 Home to the world’s largest privately held arms collection, the Davis Museum houses more than 14,000 guns and more than 50,000 objects. The museum’s director, Wayne McCombs, says the collection was amassed by J.M. Davis, a Claremore hotelier and entrepreneur who began collecting arms, among other objects, in the 1930s. A big draw to the museum is its Law & Order exhibit, which showcases weapons that were used by famous outlaws, including Bonnie Parker, Pancho Villa and Pretty Boy Floyd; as well as by famous law enforcement officials, including a trooper from the first class of the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, in 1937. A PORTRAIT OF DAVIS (RIGHT) AND A PISTOL FROM THE MUSEUM’S LAW & ORDER EXHIBIT (BELOW). PHOTOS COURTESY J.M. DAVIS ARMS AND HISTORICAL MUSEUM.

WORLDRENOWNED ART & ARTIFACTS Gilcrease Museum

Tulsa One of the country’s best facilities for the preservation and study of American art and history, Gilcrease’s collections are comprised of some of the most rare and stunning art and artifacts in the country.

National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum

Oklahoma City In addition to housing the Cowboy Hall of Fame, the National Cowboy Museum boasts one of the finest collections of Western fine art in the world.

Oklahoma City Museum of Art

Oklahoma City The Oklahoma City Museum of Art boasts one of the most comprehensive Dale Chihuly glass sculpture collections in the world, as well as collections of photography and American, European and contemporary art.

The American Pigeon Museum & Library

Oklahoma City Founded: 1973 Very few, especially those in large cities, think that the pigeon is a bird that needs a museum dedicated to its preservation. However, that’s exactly what The American Pigeon Museum & Library does, to preserve the rich heritage of the domestic pigeon, in addition to serving as storage for documents and artifacts related to the bird. “Most of the collections were donated by founders of the museum and pioneers in science, racing and breeding pigeons here in the United States,” says Jessica Nguyen, director of the museum. “Some of our most important collections are those of Thelma Snyder, Charles Heitzman, E. Lang Miller, ‘Doc’ Hollander and Otto Meyer.” In addition to exhibits on pigeons’ roles in the war and pigeon artwork, the museum houses live birds on the property that guests can hold and pet. PHOTO COURTESY THE AMERICAN PIGEON MUSEUM & LIBRARY.

Philbrook Museum of Art

Tulsa Gifted to Tulsa by oilman Waite Phillips, the grounds and mansion that make up Philbrook house remarkable collections and works of art, as well as visiting exhibits that display celebrated artists from all over the world.

Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History

Norman Located on the University of Oklahoma campus, the museum houses approximately 7 million objects and specimens, including the world’s largest apatosaurus skeleton, the oldest painted object in North America and ancient artifacts from the Spiro Mounds site in eastern Oklahoma. AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Museum of the Red River

Idabel Founded: 1975 McCurtain County, the most southeastern portion of Oklahoma, is one of the poorest areas in the country. That means the Museum of the Red River has a great obligation to offer art and culture to residents in the area, says Henry Moy, the Quintus H. Herron Director of the museum. “We are the only cultural facility in a 200-mile radius,” says Moy. When the museum was founded 40 years ago, it began as a place to showcase excavations from archaeological projects going on in southeast Oklahoma at the time, as well as the American Indian art and artifact collections of Quintus and Mary Herron, prominent Idabel citizens. The museum evolved into one that now houses collections of art and artifacts from the Americas, Asia, the South Pacific, Africa and more. In addition to a cast of a dinosaur unearthed in McCurtain County – a 40-foot-long acrocanthosaurus – the museum boasts 25,000 objects, including a comprehensive collection of Southwest ceramics and a top collection of ethnographic art from tribes in the Amazon. BRIDGE-SPOUT BOTTLE; NAZCA (PERU); C. 100BC-AD 400; PAINTED CERAMIC. PHOTO COURTESY MUSEUM OF THE RED RIVER.

Rural Oklahoma       Museum of Poetry

Locust Grove Founded: 2012 ROMP for short, the Rural Oklahoma Museum of Poetry strives to bring poetry and people together, encourage wordplay and literacy and provide a space where everyone can experience poetry. Museum founder Shaun Perkins utilized her father’s old machinery shop to create ROMP, and today it is filled with donations, foraged objects and repurposed items. Visitors to the museum are encouraged to create. A block poetry table allows users to construct poems by using wooden blocks with words written on them. A poker poetry table is also an innovative and interactive way guests can create their own poetry. PHOTO COURTESY RURAL OKLAHOMA MUSEUM OF POETRY.

Cimarron Heritage Center

Boise City Founded: 1997 Life in the Oklahoma panhandle hasn’t been easy. The Dust Bowl, droughts and hard living are what the area is historically known for. Cimarron Heritage Center has exhibits that represent the agrarian life in Cimarron County. The exhibition on the Dust Bowl is popular, as are the cars, trucks, buggies, tractors, farm machinery and old-fashioned school house that are part of the museum. Cimarron also boasts a life-size sculpture of a brontosaurus, nicknamed Cimmy, similar to the one whose bones were excavated from a dinosaur quarry in nearby Kenton. Inside the museum, casts of Saurophaganax bones, also recovered from the quarry, are on display. The actual recovered bones are on display at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. PHOTO COURTESY CIMARRON HERITAGE CENTER.

Museum of Osteology

Oklahoma City Founded: 2010 Jay Villemarette’s hobby of collecting skulls and bones began when he was just 7 years old. It turned into a career when he opened Skulls Unlimited, a business that sells animal skulls and skeletons to educational institutions all over the world. Now, more than 40 years after Villemarette found his first skull, his collection is on display at the Museum of Osteology. The museum houses the largest privately held collection of osteological specimens in the world, and more than 300 skeletons are on display. The museum houses 13 exhibits that are sorted according to an animal’s origins or habitat. One exhibit is dedicated to animals found in Oklahoma; another hands-on exhibit gives visitors the chance to handle animal skulls of various North American species. A VARIETY OF SPECIMENS ON EXHIBIT. PHOTO COURTESY MUSEUM OF OSTEOLOGY.

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National Weather    Museum & Science Center

Norman Founded: 2007 If you don’t like the weather in Oklahoma, just wait 20 minutes. We all groan at this statement, but any Okie knows that it could very well be true on any given day. The National Weather Museum & Science Center hopes to educate the state and nation on Oklahoma’s unique climate and weather events. “Our mission is to preserve the rich history of our nation’s weather and climate enterprise and provide a state-of-the-art education and technology learning environment to persons of all ages,” says Doug Forsyth, CEO of the museum. With three phases planned, the ultimate to build a state-of-theart museum, the National Weather Museum & Science Center is still in Phase I as a traveling museum. A 30-foot, fifth-wheel trailer includes an old weather radar from Texas, historical photos and a touch-screen display and video of a T-28 aircraft in action.

HIDDEN GEMS Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art

Norman With nearly 16,000 pieces in its permanent collection, this museum on the University of Oklahoma campus houses works of French Impressionism, 20th-century American painting and sculpture, American Indian art, ceramics and other media.

Oklahoma History Center

Oklahoma City Operated by the Oklahoma Historical Society, the Oklahoma History Center tells the story of our state, from prehistoric day to present, through various exhibits and permanent collections found in four separate galleries.

Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame & Museum

Muskogee Recognizing Oklahomans’ achievements in the music industry, this hall of fame and museum educates Oklahomans on the innovations and achievements of the state’s residents in music.

Oklahoma Railway Museum

Oklahoma City The vision of the museum’s founders came to life in 2002 when its doors opened. It houses a piece of railroad track that hosts working locomotives and railcars owned by the museum.

OSU Museum of Art

Stillwater Serving as an art and teaching museum for students at the university, the museum’s permanent collection includes donated works by faculty and offers a look at modern art from around the world.

AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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99s Museum of Women Pilots

Oklahoma City Founded: 1999 In 1929, a group of women pilots formed an organition that would help the advancement of their cause. They became known as the 99s, because there were 99 charter members of the organization. One of those, Amelia Earhart, was instrumental in the forming of the group, whose headquarters are located in Oklahoma City, as well as the organization’s first president. Sharing a building with the headquarters is the 99s Museum of Women Pilots, a space dedicated to the preservation of artifacts, papers and documents related to female aviators. Displays at the museum include items that belonged to Earhart, as well as exhibits on the World War II-era WASPs and Night Witches and pieces of planes from female pilots who have fought in modern wars. AN EXHIBIT DEDICATED TO WORLD WAR II-ERA WASPS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

TRIPS ON A TANKFUL Arkansas Art Museum

Located in Little Rock, the museum is home to a world-renowned collection of drawings, as well as collections of contemporary crafts, fiber, glass, metal, wood and Impressionist and early Modern paintings and drawings.

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art The architecture of this museum, completed in 2011 in Bentonville, Ark., is a work of art in and of itself. Inside, the museum houses a collection of works by renowned artists that spans five centuries.

Dallas Museum of Art

The museum features a wide variety of sculptures, paintings, mixed media and artifacts that date to 1300 B.C.

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth The museum’s collection claims nearly 2,600 objects, each created in a postWorld War II world.

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Thirteen collections housed in The NelsonAtkins in Kansas City represent everything from African, European and Chinese art to photography, decorative arts and sculpture.

American          Banjo Museum Oklahoma City Founded: 1998 Many associate the banjo with recent waves of folk and bluegrass music, but the roots of this musical instrument go far beyond Flatts and Scruggs, Ralph Stanley and “Dueling Banjos.” As the American Banjo Museum exhibits, primitive versions of the instrument were developed by African slaves and used in the Minstrel age in the mid-19th century; the museum has artifacts representing these eras, as well as the modernday banjo, as part of its collection. The museum has more than 400 banjos, the largest collection of the instrument on display in the world. Located in Bricktown, it also houses the American Banjo Hall of Fame. Famed actor, comedian and banjo player Steve Martin and the late folk icon Pete Seeger will be part of the Class of 2015 inducted into the Hall of Fame in September. AN EARLY-ERA BANJO. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

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PORTIONS OF THE ROCK COLLECTION FOUND IN THE MIDGLEY MUSEUM LIGHT UP UNDER A BLACK LIGHT. BELOW: THE MIDGLEY MUSEUM.

PHOTOS COURTESY VISIT ENID.

Midgley Museum

Enid Founded: 1950s The Midgleys were a family of travelers, and everywhere they went, they collected minerals and rocks. Eventually, the Midgleys amassed a huge collection of everything from agate and pyrite to fluorescent rocks and a 7,000-pound petrified tree stump. The house itself is made from rocks and minerals from the Midgleys’ collection. The construction of the home began in 1945 and was finished in ’47. After the family patriarch’s death in 1953, the remaining family members built a home next door and turned the original into a museum. It was gifted to the City of Enid. In addition to the rock collection, stuffed wild game and other artifacts from the family’s travels can be found in the museum.

AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Oklahoma Museum        of Telephone History Oklahoma City Founded: Late 1990s Before everyone had cell phones, there were rotary phones. Before that, candlestick phones. Switchboard operators connected calls from all over the country. “We’re trying to show people the evolution of the telephone and the telegraph and how that transpired in Oklahoma,” says George Gibson, a former Bell employee and director of the Oklahoma Museum of Telephone History. The museum houses several eras of telephones, switchboards, telephone directories and other related artifacts dating back to before 1900. Gibson says that most visitors are attracted to the operating automatic switch board, which allows visitors to make phone calls from one phone to another and watch as the switch board makes the connection. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

World Organization of     China Painters Museum Oklahoma City Founded: 1989 The late Pauline Salyer began painting porcelain in the ‘40s as a hobby, and she found that she had a knack for the artistry. She began teaching the craft, and in 1967, she published the first issue of The China Painter, a publication that still exists as a quarterly. She had a vision for a headquarters and museum that would pay homage to porcelain painting, and after buying a plot of land in Oklahoma, her vision came to fruition. Today, the museum houses china from all over the nation, as well as from countries including Paraguay and Australia. Mary Early, director of operations at the museum, says that the collection has come largely from donations. One of the most impressive pieces of the collection is an Alfredo Toledano-painted 36-inch vase that has scrolling gold and European-style flowers. There is a place setting of china depicting the state’s wildflowers that is used at the governor’s mansion. An antique fish platter belonging to the late Mrs. O’Mealey of O’Mealey’s Cafeteria fame is also on display. AN ALFREDO TOLEDANO-PAINTED VASE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

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Tom Mix Museum

Dewey Founded: 1968 Tom Mix had many careers in his life, among them as one of the first Western movie stars. Mix was discovered while working in the Miller Brothers 101 Ranch Wild West Show. Before that, he held several jobs, including as the night marshal in Dewey. He was a part of nearly 300 movies, and lore surrounding his legend includes him as part of both the Rough Riders and the Texas Rangers, though neither is true. Mix was killed when an aluminum suitcase containing several of his possessions shattered his skull and broke his neck in a car accident in Arizona. That suitcase, and much more, is on display at Mix’s eponymous museum. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Museum

Stillwater Founded: 1976 Wrestling is the world’s oldest sport, and the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Museum is dedicated to preserving the sport’s history, recognizing individual achievements and inspiring future generations. The museum was built in Stillwater due to the dedication of Oklahoma State University wrestling alumni and then-president Robert Kamm, who felt the school’s proud history in the sport, along with its central location between the two coasts, made the city a perfect place for the museum. The most important piece housed at the museum is an ancient scroll that discusses wrestling instruction. It is the oldest known documentation of sports instruction and has been dated to between 100 and 200 A.D. The document was found during an archaeological dig in the late 1880s, was obtained by Columbia University in 1907 and was gifted to the Stillwater museum in 2011. PHOTO COURTESY NATIONAL WRESTLING HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM.

AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR What problems can porn cause? Solitary use of porn is a huge factor in relationship breakdown and can raise unrealistic sexual expectations in which porn becomes preferable to live sex with a loving partner. Problems may involve feelings of betrayal in which porn-assisted masturbation occurs in COURTNEY LINSENMEYERan online encounter; this often leads O’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR to riskier sexual acts, and endangering health. Men in general do not view porn as a sign of infidelity, but due to the increased availability of sexual services on the Internet captured thru porn sites, many toxic problems arise as a result. Compulsive and addictive behaviors can form as well as distorted sexual expectations. Lots of men use porn for quick masturbation; this can happen even if they are in a sexually satisfying relationship. Porn may also assist women who have arousal difficulties or an inability to climax. It is a good idea if couples discuss their attitude to porn early on in their relationship and determine what type of sexual relationship is healthy for their future and if porn should play a part. There is no doubt that some couples experiment with the use of porn as an aid to perking up their sex lives, and sex education videos are often arousing as well as informative. With all considered, setting healthy boundaries with the body is critical to overall wellness.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

PERSONAL TRAINER I’m happy with my weight; can I change my diet now? Yes, you can now start moving towards your maintenance phase, which will help you stay at your target weight. Start allowing yourself 100 more calories a day until you stop losing weight. For JOHN JACKSON example, if your caloric intake was 1,500 a day while you were in your slim-down phase, you should increase it to 1,600 a day for the next week. As long as your weight stays the same, continue with the same amount of calories. You will also need to stick with at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (jogging, zumba, spin) five days a week. Moreover, if you are fit enough to participate, do 30 minutes of vigorous exercise like basketball, tennis or BOOTCAMP offered at St. John’s Health Plaza. Ballistic exercise should not be done more than three times a week and rarely in back-to-back workouts.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

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FINANCIAL ADVISOR Does inflation still matter? Three to four decades ago, inflation and its impact on families was one of the biggest concerns for most Americans. For every dollar a person spent on standard of living costs in 1973, they paid more than double ($2.24) a decade later based on CPI. Fast forward to today. For the10-year DAVID KARIMIAN, CRPC® period through 2013, the average annual inflation rate was only 2.38 percent. An item that cost a dollar in 2003 only cost $1.26 at the end of 2013. Even if inflation remains a “non-factor” as it has been over the last two decades, your expenses will increase over time. Regardless of what stage of life you are in, you need to prepare for the impact of inflation. It is particularly crucial if you are in or near retirement, a time when you can no longer count on pay raises to cover higher living costs. Your savings have to do the work for you. For those in retirement, certain expenses, like housing and health care, may become more significant and those costs have the potential to rise faster than the overall inflation rate. Changes in essential expenses like food and automobile costs can also have a dramatic impact on living expenses for retirees.

David Karimian, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT Why should I be shifting more of my budget to content marketing, and what does my audience want to see? In the past, creating a catchy jingle or clever commercial would be enough to sell your product. Today, content is king and your prospects JESSICA DYER are seeking advice online and on social media sites. This alone is why content marketing is so crucial to your brand, and the reason why marketers should spend close to 25 percent of their resources on it. The 3 R’s for good content? Real. Relevant. Resource. For your potential customers to care, you have to say something worth hearing. Be informative when you update your websites, positioning yourself as an expert in your field. Attract and engage your readers with persuasive headlines and conversationcentered communications. Interesting content is one of the reasons people follow brands to begin with. It is important to note that being concise is as important as being informative. Include infographics and data, and use search engine optimization tools like InboundWriter. Having great photos can be the biggest bang for your buck, because a picture is still worth a thousand words.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 11063-D S. Memorial Dr. #445 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

INTERIOR DESIGNER How do you determine what size rug to buy for your living and dining room? A rug can end up looking like a postage stamp stuck in the middle of the room. To avoid this in your living room, ideally the front legs of your sofa and chair should be ROBIN SPLAWN on the rug. This helps to define the living space and also grounds the furniture pieces to the grouping. In a dining room, there is a set formula for choosing the size for your rug. The rug should be at least two feet wider and longer than your dining table. This helps to prevent the dining chairs from slipping off the rug when pushing back from the table. By following these guidelines, your new rug will create a more inviting feel to your room while offering the necessary function.

Robin Splawn Luxe Furniture 9922 Riverside Parkway Tulsa, OK 74137 918.459.8950 robin@luxetulsa.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY I have tight hamstrings, and my physician has told me I need to stretch. Is this true? There are some cases that this is true, depending on your activities at work or with a sport. Traditionally, emphasis is placed on stretching muscles that have shortened, but equal emphasis has to TIM MINNICK, PT be placed on correcting (strengthening) muscles that have lengthened. For example, during forward bending of the trunk, lumbar flexion can be a compensatory motion for limited hamstring length. This can lead to problems in the lumbar spine as we age over time. The most effective intervention is to address the length changes of all the muscles around the hip joints and spine, not only the shortened muscles. This requires the skills of a Physical Therapist to assess the entire spine and hips. Talk to your physician if you are having problems with your hamstrings or back.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. ATTORNEY AT LAW I got hurt at the casino and need medical treatment. Will the casino pay for my treatment? There are a few issues that determine the outcome of your question. The casino is governed by different laws than the State of Oklahoma. ESTHER M. SANDERS Whether you are an employee or a patron at the time of your injuries, the casino tribe may have its own tribal court as well as its own rules and regulations. You should immediately contact an attorney that is familiar with the different tribes and the rules applicable to each, including whether that particular tribe has its own court system in place or not. Once you have determined whether the tribe or the State of Oklahoma has jurisdiction, then you can determine what laws apply to see whether the casino will be responsible for your injuries or not.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

HOSPICE CARE

AVA HANCOCK

My mother is battling cancer and is not doing well. Recently, her doctor has recommended hospice care. My father is resisting because he feels like he would be giving up on my mom. What advice do you have for us as we try to help our father make this decision?

Your father’s feelings are very common. Many people do believe that when they bring in hospice they are “giving up” when in actuality they are giving comfort. Hospice care means you are improving the quality of life for the patient. By bringing in hospice you will allow your mother to be more comfortable and our team can help manage her symptoms and alleviate any pain. This could allow her to enjoy more quality time with your father, you and the rest of the family. For more information, please call us at 918.744.7223 or visit www. gracehospice.com.

I have been thinking about having something done, but I am afraid of looking too overdone. Is there anything available that provides a more natural improvement? Yes, for any patient wanting a more natural looking filler, we recommend Sculptra®, the first facial injectable that gives you subtle results over time. Replacing lost collagen, Sculptra gives you a more natural-looking appearance without giving you away. A full treatment of Sculptra Aesthetic can last up to two years. As you age, your body’s collagen production decreases, and you may begin to see wrinkles. Sculptra® Aesthetic (injectable poly-L-lactic acid) works to correct shallow to deep facial wrinkles and folds, as it replaces lost collagen, which can help provide a refined, more youthful looking appearance. MALISSA SPACEK

“Grace Hospice: Caring for patients and families in Northeastern Oklahoma for more than 15 years”

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free

DEVELOPMENTAL OPTOMETRIST What causes my or my child’s eyes to cross? Our eyes work together as a binocular system. When our binocular system is not working well, it can cause problems. One of these problems is a physical crossing of an eye, or both eyes, called MEGAN KIRKPATRICK, OD esotropia. Esotropia occurs because the connection between the brain and eye muscles is not working correctly; therefore, the binocular vision system is unable to work. Esotropia is usually caused by a misconnection with the eye focusing system in relationship to the eye teaming system. Due to this miscommunication, the eye focusing system is overengaged, which causes the linked eye-teaming (crossing) connection to over-engage as well. Since esotropia is caused by a misconnection in the binocular system, it can successfully be treated with lenses, patching and vision therapy alone. In rare occasions surgery may be needed to align the eyes and improve the binocular system.

Megan Kirkpatrick, OD South Tulsa Vision Development Center 8988- D1 S Sheridan Tulsa, OK 74133 918.992.2343 www.tulsavisiondevelopment.com

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT How do I define my personal style? Many times I end up being a style therapist to my clients when they come to me for clothing advice. Men are sometimes afraid to be the best dressed man in the room because they are nervous that somehow they AUTUMN POHL are breaking some style rule. Who wants to deal with that? I’m here to share a few tips that will help you to become a more confident dresser, no matter the occasion. One topic that almost every man asks is what color of shoes is appropriate for what color of suit. I am all about personal style, and if it works and makes you feel amazing, go for it. But a guideline that I believe in is that one glance may be the only judgment others have of you. If you want to make a statement by wearing a camel colored belt and shoes with your navy blazer or suit, then make sure that every other element is soft and perfectly fitted. Let that be the one focal point. Style is accepted when it’s respected!

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

I have found myself struggling with depression, though I do not understand why. I have a good husband, a nice home, all my children are grown and doing well but I find myself feeling very down with no motivation. I don’t know if I need therapy or medication. AMY KESNER, PHD, LPC, LADC

How long have your children been out of the home? It is possible that what you’re experiencing is a change in roles. If you have spent a lot of time taking care of family, home and children, and there is less of a need for that, you may feel displaced. Before seeking medication, work on redefining your role. Consider taking on some other projects, volunteer work or a part-time job doing something of interest. This would provide you with some extra social interaction and perhaps a purpose. It will also help fill up some time in your day so that you feel a sense of accomplishment. Please do see a therapist so that your level of depression can be properly assessed and then you can build a plan on the best intervention. Therapy may be helpful to process through some of the factors related to your current feelings.

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

FOOD, DRINK, AND OTHER PLEASURES

HOBOKEN ROASTS THEIR OWN BEANS IN HOUSE PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

S

A Warm Experience

Though off the beaten path, Hoboken Coffee Roasters’ appeal is no secret.

trolling through the doors of Hoboken Coffee Roasters in Guthrie feels like coming home, or at least visiting a dear friend’s house. The fact the coffee shop is housed in an old tire garage adds to its warm charm. M. Ward’s “A Wasteland Companion” plays lightly on the record player over the low hum of conversation. Owner Trey Woods says newcomers can expect great drinks and a pleasant environment, mentioning that roasting its own coffee makes Hoboken unique. “We bake all of our own pastries,” he adds. “Everything is baked fresh every morning. I think those two things really set us apart, for sure, in terms of our menu.” Co-owner Mallory Woods began working through recipes a year before the shop opened. “She really honed in on a muffin recipe that she loved, and the crumble bar,” says Woods. Hoboken’s food selection consists of made-from-scratch granola, boiled eggs, crumble bars, an array of muffins, varieties of cookies and biscotti. The chocolate peanut butter cookies alone are worth a repeat. “I really like our boiled egg option,” says Woods. “They’re

farm fresh, they’re really local, and it’s a great alternative from a pastry. It gives you a little protein and gets you on your way for the day. And the granola, we make that from scratch. It’s delicious, and it goes great with coffee.” The coffee selections, made from in-house roasted beans, focus on origins. Patrons can choose their favored version of coffee, from pour-over to flavored lattes or cold brew. For non-coffee fans, there are chai lattes, hot chocolate, hot tea, Italian soda and bottled soda. “A latte is our most popular drink, no matter how you like it, iced or hot or flavored or not,” he says. “We sell a lot of lattes, because it’s creamy, and it’s got caffeine in it. It’s delicious.” The roaster is off the beaten path, behind an auto repair shop near the downtown district, a location that appealed to the Woods. While living in Oregon, the couple’s favorite coffee house was tucked away – something they wanted to bring back to Oklahoma with them. Since opening in December 2012, Hoboken’s reputation for fantastic coffee and welcoming atmosphere has spread throughout Oklahoma, as well as across state lines. “I think word-of-mouth is a great way for people to find us, AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

FAR LEFT: HOBOKEN CO-OWNER TREY WOODS PREPARES A LATTE. LEFT: HOBOKEN COFFEE ROASTERS IS HOUSED BEHIND AN AUTO REPAIR SHOP NEAR DOWNTOWN GUTHRIE.

especially people within the state, but a little further away,” says Woods. “Maybe they know someone who comes in regularly and posts on social media all the time. They’ll think … ‘I gotta see what’s going on over there.’ We get that a lot. Honestly, we get a lot of people that walk in that just Google-searched ‘coffee.’ We’ve had a lot of good reviews, so they’ll come for that.” Visitors are drawn to Hoboken for its impeccable coffee reputation, and they become regulars for the unique experience provided. Whether enjoying creations on the patio or inside, the visit is always laid-back and enjoyable. That’s something Hoboken employees take pride in. Every customer who walks in is greeted warmly. Hoboken aims to make every customer’s experience as good as its coffee. “That experience, where you felt like you were acknowledged and welcomed. You weren’t just a means to an end for us,” Woods says. “We’re more interested in the people that are helping support our business than just working through a drink line.” SHAWNDRA ROBERTS T H I S B E T W E E N T H AT

P.B. JAMS

GRILLED PORK CHOP IS TOPPED WITH MUSHROOMS AND ASPARAGUS AT OFF THE CUFF.

You can never go wrong with the classic peanut butter and jelly sandwich, an ode to younger days and a bite that never gets old. A sandwich that melds salty and sweet, P.B. Jams has perfected the classic while bringing new creations to the table. Adding flair to the original PB&J and peanut butter sandwich, this eatery’s innovative snacks include Fluffy Nuts, a house favorite, which combines peanut butter, marshmallow fluff and Nutella; Raisin My Nuts, layers of peanut butter and sliced granny smith apples on cinnamon-raisin bread; and the adventurer’s choice of Nuts On Fire, which mixes peanut butter with shredded cheddar, bacon and Sriracha. You’ll have to play keep away with Donut Touch My Nuts, another house favorite, which sandwiches peanut butter, jelly and bacon between two warm Krispy Kreme doughnuts. For those not so nutty, P.B. Jams offers its guests other delicious sandwich options, including B to the L to the T, Turkey in da Club, Nacho Average Sammie and the Mac Daddy. Great tastes with a side of humor, new creations are always in the works at P.B. Jams, making it one sticky situation you’ll want to be a part of. 5912 NW 38th St., Warr Acres. www.howdoyoulikeyournuts.com – Brittany Anicetti THE DONUT TOUCH MY NUTS FEATURES PEANUT BUTTER, JELLY AND BACON, SANDWICHED BETWEEN TWO KRISPY KREME DOUGHNUTS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

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PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

T H E B UZ Z

OFF THE CUFF

The Mediterranean-inspired exterior of Off The Cuff suggests that world cuisine awaits inside. Luckily, for diners with differing tastes, Off The Cuff provides a wide variety of appetizers, salads and entrees. From the Italian-inspired antipasti cheese plate and fried manicotti to the Mandarin shrimp and lettuce wraps that provide Asian flair, Off The Cuff is a melting pot of flavors and cuisines. Chicken, pork chops and sausage, steaks, seafood, even tofu, are offered on the expansive menu. Protein is offered in various preparations and with several signature sauces. Off The Cuff also serves several gluten-free pasta options as well as lots of veggie sides and a sophisticated kids’ menu. Modern interior décor as well as a large and well-stocked bar make Off The Cuff a great destination for family night or a special date. 9999 S. Mingo Road, Tulsa. www. offthecufftulsa.com – Jami Mattox


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Taste Taste

THE POUR

URBAN WINEWORKS With a remodel that wrapped up in October 2014, Urban Wineworks’ décor is as electrifying as ever, continuing to draw a crowd; its shotgun-style building is lit by yellow hues reflecting off blue and pink bar stools and booths. Pink neon lights stretching the rim of the diner-like bar made of hammered metal energize the space. With an updated look, Chef JoAnn Stanfill brought added flavor, creating a menu that infuses staple bar foods like cheese fries, macaroni and cheese and the Heavenly Burger with equally delicious dishes one may not expect, like ceviche, crab cakes, a plate of bacon-wrapped morsels and a gourmet cheese plate. And coming as good news to its loyal fans, Urban Wineworks announced a few months after reopening that its Sunday brunch was back: a 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. slot that allows Stanfill’s finesse to shine in the preparation of hash browns, biscuits and gravy, French toast, breakfast burritos and other morning glories. With knowledgeable sommeliers and mixologists behind the full bar, Urban Wineworks has a carefully curated drink selection for diners to choose from, including 80 beers and its own wines of numerous varietals. Becoming a favorite among Oklahoma City diners, Urban Wineworks pairs great tastes with entertainment throughout the week that includes karaoke and live music. 1749 NW 16th St., Oklahoma City. www.urbanww.com – Brittany Anicetti THE HEAVENLY BURGER IS SERVED WITH A SIDE OF BRUSSELS SPROUTS AT URBAN WINEWORKS.

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ONE OF URBAN WINEWORKS’ EXPERIENCED BARTENDERS POURS A GLASS OF WINE. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.


I M P O R TA N T M E A L S

CAFÉ KACAO

A lazy weekend day calls for a luxurious breakfast, and there is none better in Oklahoma City than Café Kacao. Platters holding both sweet and savory treats are accompanied with strong coffee and a casual atmosphere. Café Kacao, a converted fast food restaurant, looks nondescript to passers-by on Classen Boulevard. However, step inside the restaurant on a weekend morning, and you’re greeted with cheerful servers, throngs of diners and the smell of sweet and spicy foods being lovingly – and expertly – prepared. Huevos rancheros are topped with spicy ranchero sauce and a dollop of sour cream. Spicy omelets come with fresh tortillas, potatoes and black beans. Pancakes and French toast smothered in sweet chocolate and topped with freshly sliced strawberries and confectioners’ sugar are a favorite. Potatoes are colored an orange-red hue from the chorizo they are fried with and make a suitable accompaniment to any breakfast entrée. Horchata smoothies and specialty coffees, including a Mexican cold brew infused with cinnamon, almond and vanilla, are popular choices to soothe the palate after a taste of Café Kacao’s spicy flavors. 3325 N. Classen Blvd., Oklahoma City. 405.602.2883 – Jami Mattox SPECIALTY COFFEE DRINKS ARE A GREAT ADDITION TO ANY BREAKFAST AT CAFÉ KACAO. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

FROZEN YOGURT TOPPED WITH FRESH FRUIT, CANDY, CEREAL AND MORE CAN BE HAD AT ONE OF THE STATE’S ORANGE LEAF FROZEN YOGURT LOCATIONS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

SWEET TOOTH

ORANGE LEAF FROZEN YOGURT

Oklahomans associate August with temperatures topping 100 degrees, and with the heat continuing to rise, Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt’s self-serve flavors will help you keep cool. Joining the fro-yo craze in 2010, Orange Leaf has garnered a loyal fan following for its commitment to every customer. With up to 16 flavors, Orange Leaf caters to all ice-cream lovers by offering no-sugar-added, glutenfree, dairy-free and vegan options. With this focus on customer service, it came as no surprise to patrons when Orange Leaf landed in the Top Three New Franchises in 2014 by Entrepreneur Magazine. Whether in a cone or a cup, Orange Leaf customers can create the perfect treat with all the toppings imaginable, including fresh fruit, candy, cookies and cereal. If you can’t choose between vanilla or chocolate, get both. Since opening, Orange Leaf has grown to more than 200 locations across the country; Oklahoma stores can be found in Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Norman, Moore, Mustang and Stillwater. To find a location, see a full flavor line-up, ingredients used and all nutritional information, visit www.orangeleafyogurt.com. – B.A. AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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WORKING FOR YOU

BRIAN SANDERS

KAREN LARSEN

WEEKNIGHTS 5:00 / 6:00 / 10:00


Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

A Tasty Tradition

PHOTO BY CHARLA GILLELAND/REDSTONE IMAGES.

A

In its 71st year, the second Saturday in August is reserved for the Rush Springs Watermelon Festival.

town of about 1,500 people, Rush Springs estimates 30,000 festivalgoers to attend this year’s Watermelon Festival, says Joe Dorman, former gubernatorial candidate and the festival’s chairman. People arrive in Rush Springs for the annual event from all over the state, nation and world. “We have regulars that come back from Asia and Europe to visit,” he says. “It’s just amazing to see so many people come back together for this event.” A tradition that dates back to 1948, the festival’s allure has not faltered: These light, sweet, refreshing and juicy slices can’t be beat, especially in the heat of summer. This year, residents and visitors will get their fix on Saturday, Aug. 8, at Jeff Davis Park, with festivities leading up to the main event kicking off Thursday. The annual Rush Springs Rodeo brings some of the state’s best animals and riders to Rusty Acres Arena on Thursday and Friday. Both nights, the festival’s carnival draws a crowd, also operating all day Saturday. Starting at 5 p.m. on Friday, a parade will make its way through downtown Rush Springs, kicking off the annual affair. With free admission into the festival, slices – about a fourth of a watermelon – are sold for only a dollar. And if there’s anything left around 4 p.m., they’ll start handing slices out for free. “[The festival] doesn’t cost a penny if you don’t want to spend

any money,” says Dorman. “You can get away without spending a dime and still have a wonderful time.” Money that is raised during the festival goes towards the Rush Springs Alliance, which is then spread out to accommodate community needs. The 5K run, which takes place on Saturday, is spearheaded by All Sports Association, which keeps all the proceeds. Other activities include a Watermelon Queen coronation, an arts and craft fair featuring more than 100 vendors, a classic car and motorcycle show, live entertainment throughout the day, local food vendors and more. And like every year, there will be a contest to unearth the largest melon. “[The melons] are broken down into size or best melon,” Dorman says. So, only two questions remain: Will the winner of largest melon beat the record of 214 pounds that weighed in three years ago? And, will this year beat the 50,000 pounds of watermelons served to festival-goers in years past? BRITTANY ANICETTI

CAST YOUR VOTE:

There will be an open booth for festival-goers to vote whether watermelon is a fruit or vegetable. AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

IN CONCERT

PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP NASHVILLE.

Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES

IN CONCERT

Wittenberg Aug. 1 Prince Hamlet returns to the University of Wittenberg for his senior year, and after finding out the sun does not rotate the earth, must figure out which teacher he believes. w w w. oklahomashakespeare.com Ron White Aug. 1 Riverwind Casino. www.riverwind.com JamesandtheGiantPeach Aug. 1 Duncan Little Theatre Teen Theatre presents this favorite tale at the Simmons Center. www. duncanlittletheatre.com Billy Elliott Aug. 4-8 See the inspirational story of Billy Elliott’s struggle against the odds to make his dreams come true. www.okcciviccenter.com Kristin Chenoweth Master Class Aug. 7 The Tony and Emmy Award-winning actress in film and theater shares her expertise during her second annual master class. www.brokenarrowpac.com Cirque Millennia Aug. 7 The circus that brings you from the past to the future arrives at Choctaw Casino Durant. www. choctawcasinos.com Spamalot Aug. 7-23 Enjoy this musical spoof of the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com The Drunkard and The Olio Ongoing The melodrama continues with heroes, damsels in distress and over-the-top characters plus a musical revue featuring celebrity drop-in guests most Saturdays of the year at the Spotlight Theatre. www. spotlighttheatre.org

Alvin Crow & the PleasantValley Boys Aug. 1 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom. com

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Alice In Chains Aug. 1 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com R5 with Jacob Whitesides Aug. 1 Frontier City. www.frontiercity.com

End of the Trail: A Centennial Celebration

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

Shania Twain There will probably be fireworks and sparkling wardrobe changes, but one thing’s for certain: Fans will definitely see the undeniable talent we know of as Shania Twain. Arriving in the music industry at full speed as a beautiful, sassy, woman-in-charge country artist, Shania Twain has mesmerized for more than two decades. Her talents debuted in 1993 with the help of Mercury Records, and within two years, her singles went from peaking at No. 55 on the Billboard country singles chart with “What Made You Say That” and “Dance With The One That Brought You” to No. 1 with “Any Man Of Mine.” With the release of The Woman In Me (1995) and Come On Over (1997) Shania Twain found international superstardom. Now, touring North America for the first time in more than a decade, her Rock This Country tour makes a stop in Oklahoma City. Concert reviews of previous performances can’t stop raving about her unwavering untouched talent; so Oklahoma fans, get excited. On Saturday, Aug. 12, Shania Twain will arrive on the Chesapeake Arena stage with her attitude and ability. For more information, visit www. chesapeakearena.com. Quaker City Night Hawks Aug. 1 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com Kraig Parker Aug. 2 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Outcry Tour 2015 Aug. 5 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com The Show Ponies Aug. 5 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com Leon Russell Aug. 6 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa. com Aaron Lewis Aug. 6 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Kenny Rogers, Wynonna & The Big Noise Aug. 6 Choctaw Casino Durant. www.choctawcasinos.com Charli XCX & Bleachers Aug. 7 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Bob Schneider Aug. 7 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com Three Dog Night Aug. 8 Choctaw Casino Durant. www.choctawcasinos.com Def Leppard Aug. 10 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena. com Shania Twain Aug. 12 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena. com Here Come The Mummies Aug. 12 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Whitesnake Aug. 13 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa. com ‘80s Reunion Concert with Hair Force Aug. 14 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom. com Mark Chesnutt Aug. 15 Riverwind Casino.

www.riverwind.com TobyMac Aug. 15 Frontier City. www. frontiercity.com Kellie Pickler Aug. 15 Choctaw Casino Grant. www.choctawcasinos.com LosTigres Del Norte Aug. 15, 16 Choctaw Casino Durant. www.choctawcasinos. com The Aristocrats Aug. 18 The Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com Gary Allan Aug. 20 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa. com Cody Johnson Band Aug. 21 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Keith Urban Aug. 21 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Gene Watson, Mo Bandy and Johnny Lee Aug. 21 Riverwind Casino. www. riverwind.com Brad Paisley Aug. 22 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Steven Curtis Chapman Aug. 22 Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center. www. brokenarrowpac.com Dirty Heads Aug. 25 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Boston Aug. 27 & 28 Choctaw Casino Durant on Aug. 27 and Grand Casino Hotel & Resort on Aug. 28. w w w. choctawcasinos.com, www.grandresortok. com Eli Young Band Aug. 29 Frontier City. www.frontiercity.com The Hooten Hallers Aug. 29 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com Punch Brothers Aug. 30 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com GWAR Aug. 31 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

SPORTS Oklahoma City Energy www.energyfc.com

v. Los Angeles Aug. 4 v. Real Monarchs Aug. 15 v. Austin Aug. 29 Tulsa Roughnecks www.tulsaroughnecksfc.com v. Arizona Aug. 2 v. Real Monarchs Aug. 13 v. Louisville City Aug. 15 Oklahoma City Dodgers www.okcdodgers.com v. New Orleans Aug. 1-4 v. Colorado Aug. 5-9 v. Tacoma Aug. 15-18 v. Reno Aug. 19-22 v. Iowa Aug. 31 Tulsa Drillers www.tulsadrillers.com v. NW Arkansas Aug. 6-9 v. Frisco Aug. 18-20 v. Midland Aug. 21-23 v. Springfield Aug. 29-31 Tulsa Shock www.wnba.com/shock v. Minnesota Aug. 1 v. Atlanta Aug. 9 v. Phoenix Aug. 18 v. Connecticut Aug. 21 v. Los Angeles Aug. 28 v. Indiana Aug. 30 2015 Spears School of Business Golf Classic Aug. 7 Due to popular demand, the OSU Spears School of Business returns to Karsten Creek for a day of golf. www.cepd.okstate.edu/golf/ Meet The Sooners Aug. 8 Meet this year’s coaches and players on Meet The Sooners Day at Owen Field. w w w. soonersports.com Victory Dolls Roller Derby Bout Aug. 8 See the Victory Dolls skate fast and hit hard at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. oklahomavictorydolls.com


FAMILY Funday Sunday at Gilcrease Aug. 16 Take the whole family to the museum, and enjoy different art making stations and an art hunt that explores the galleries. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu Art Adventures Ongoing Children 3-5 experience art every Tuesday morning at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman, with special guests. Go online for schedules and other information. www. ou.edu/fjjma

SOLOMON PHOTOG RAPHY. PHOTO COURTESY JILL

Summer Shootout Barrel Racing Aug. 13-16 The event is back and brings big prizesforthebestracers.www.shootoutbarrels. com Professional Bull Riders Aug. 14-15 The best men in bull riding arrive at the BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com Midnight Streak: 5K Run for the Arts Aug. 15 Oklahoma Contemporary’s annual USATF-certified 5K will weave through Automobile Alley, Midtown and Heritage Hills inOklahomaCity.www.oklahomacontemporary. org Ta t u r ’ s K e e p I t W i l d : H a l f Marathon/10K/5K Aug. 15 The racing begins at 7 a.m. on Turkey Mountain. www. tatur.org Conquer The Gauntlet Aug. 22 This four-mile race with more than 25 challenging obstacles returns to Tulsa to test your limits. www.conquerthegauntlet.com The Jolly Runner 5K Aug. 29 Join other runners at the Broken Arrow Farmers Market for the pirate-themed 5K and Plank Contest. Costumes are not required, but they are encouraged. www.tatur.org GloRun OKC 2015 Aug. 29 Total Resource Campaign presents its fourth annual nighttime, black-light race at Mitch Park in Edmond. www.glorunokc.com Tulsa Reining Classic Aug. 31-Sept. 6 The 2015 classic arrives at Tulsa’s Expo Square with exciting shows. www. tulsareining.com

PERFORMANCE

Kristin Chenoweth Master Class The talented Emmy and Tony Award-winning actress and singer Kristin Chenoweth returns to her hometown of Broken Arrow, where she continues to be one of the largest advocates, inspirations and supporters of its performing arts programs. For a second year, Chenoweth’s passion to aspire young performers and commitment to help them navigate the stage arrives at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center packaged as the Kristin Chenoweth Master Class. A performer who’s landed countless roles, including in shows like Glee and The West Wing, on Broadway as Glinda the Good Witch in Wicked and on the big screen for Rio 2, Chenoweth has plenty of experience to offer. Auditions for the master class were held back in February, and those chosen to perform are some of the region’s most aspiring high school and college fine arts students. On Aug. 7, they will take the stage alongside Chenoweth for a one-of-a-kind experience that combines performing with learning. An event open to the public, ticketholders will most likely see a short concert by Chenoweth, as did the audience during last year’s event. For more information, visit www. brokenarrowpac.com.

Wynonna & The Big Noise Storytime in the Garden Ongoing Enjoy this unique storytime every Thursday at 10 a.m. in August at Linnaeus Garden in Tulsa. www.tulsagardencenter.com

ART Skies That Bind Thru Aug. 1 See watercolor and oil works by Gene V. Dougherty that characterize the American West. www.museum.okstate.edu Influences and Exchanges: Leaves on the Family Tree Thru Aug. 1 This exhibition is a celebration of Linda Lou Warren’s family lineage through paintings and clay sculptures. www.museum.okstate.edu Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibit Thru Aug. 2 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum offers its acclaimed annual exhibition featuring more than 300

works by the finest contemporary Western artists. www.nationalcowboymuseum. org Changing Perspectives of Native Americans Thru Aug. 3 This artwork reflects shifting attitudes toward Native Americans over the course of the 19th century. www.crystalbridges.org Jim Keffer, Michael Hatcher Aug. 4-29 JRB Art at the Elms. www.jrbgallery. com Between Reality and Imagination: The Works of Loraine Moore Thru Aug. 7 Oklahoma State University’s Gardiner Gallery exhibits works by the underrecognized Oklahoma artist Loraine Moore. www.okstate.edu Oh, Tulsa! Aug. 7-28 Enjoy Living Arts’ biennial exhibit that features Tulsa as the star. www.livingarts.org

Stirations In Technology Aug. 7-29 The work of Timothy Varnell will be on display at TAC Gallery. www.tacgallery.org The Interpretation of an Enigma Aug. 7-29 Angela Westerman explores the struggle between man and nature. www. theprojectboxokc.com SusanTaberAvila:MattersofDis-ease Aug. 7-Sept.20 Taber creates textile artwork to enhance perception of contemporary culture. www.108contemporary.org End of the Trail: A Centennial Celebration Aug. 14-Oct. 25 Celebrating the unique history of the seminal sculpture on the 100th anniversary of its creation, the exhibition draws from the archives of the museum’s Dickinson Research Center. www.nationalcowboymuseum. org An Ode to Hands: Selections from the Permanent Collection Aug. 17-Oct. 24 This exhibit explores the theme of hands in art and life through a variety of mediums. www.museum.okstate.edu Print Beyond Pop: American Lithography After 1960 Aug. 17-Oct. 24 This exhibition explores a critical moment for American lithography using objects from the OSU Museum of Art collection. www.museum. okstate.edu Cherokee Homecoming Art Show & Sale Aug. 23-Sep. 21 The 20th annual art show featuring authentic Cherokee art returns to Tahlequah’s Cherokee Heritage Center. www.cherokeeheritage.org Navajo Weavings from the Pam Parrish Collection Aug. 28-May 8 This exhibit showcases 25 of the more than 60 major weavings donated to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum over the past three years by Pam Parrish. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org Movers and Shapers: Combines, Tractors and Swathers Thru Aug. 29 Large-scale paintings and study drawings by Karen Carson depicting the machines that work behind the scenes to keep supermarkets stocked will be on display. www.museum. okstate.edu

The Nature of Man: Paintings and Drawings by Harold Stevenson Thru Aug. 30 Harold Stevenson explores masculinity through his work. www.ou.edu/fjjma Cherokee Apprentice Art - Atrium Art Showcase Thru Aug. 31 See Cherokee artists who worked with Cherokee National Treasures to continue the legacyof traditional Cherokee art forms. www.cherokeeheritage. org Louis Davidson Synagogues360 Thru Aug. 31 Explore the interiors of Jewish places of worship by interactive, 360-degree panoramic photos. www.jewishmuseum. net Greenbelt Meridian Thru Sept. 6 Artists James and Yiren Gallagher appeal to mankind to appreciate the magical necessity of open space in this installation. www.ahhatulsa.org California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum Thru Sept. 6 Explore the style of California Impressionism and its use of light and color – ,

specifically how it was cast onto a landscape – a popular subject in California in the early 20th century. www.gilcrease.utulsa. edu The Art of Ceremony Thru Sept. 6 On display at Philbrook Downtown, this exhibit highlights contemporary carved figures that provide a window into Hopi ritual, belief and art. www.philbrook.org A World Unconquered: The Art of Oscar BrousseJacobson Thru Sept. 6 Jacobson arrived at the University of Oklahoma in 1915 and greatly influenced the School of Art. His career includes more than 600 works of art with inspiration from the landscapes of Colorado, New Mexico and Oklahoma. www.ou.edu/fjjma Holly Wilson Thru Sept. 11 Wilson’s cast bronze figures are unique and shed l i g h t o n d a i l y s u b t l e t i e s . w w w. oklahomacontemporary.org The Figure Examined Thru Sept. 13 This exhibit looks at the portrayal of the human

Alice In Chains

AUGUST 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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JASPER JOHNS, UNTITLED (SECON DARIES WITH PRIMARIES), 1991, TRIAL PROOF 2/2, INTAGLIO ON PAPER, 42 1/2” X 78” PHOTO COURTESY OSU MUSEUM OF ART.

Entertainment ART

An Ode to Hands The Oklahoma State University Museum of Art is a teaching museum that fosters its students’ art experiences through exhibitions and programs that can be incorporated into lessons related to their studies. This month, the museum offers students and the public its latest exhibit, An Ode to Hands: Selections from the Permanent Collection, which opens on Monday, Aug. 17. With a mixture of media displayed within the exhibit, all artworks unite in their exploration of the hand’s role in art and life. Three themes are uncovered within: What do hands reveal about the subject within the artwork, do they assist the subject’s facial expression or speech in communicating a message? What is the significance of an artist’s hand in producing signatures, techniques and materials? What role does the hand play in designing that which the hand holds? The Postal Plaza Gallery, where the exhibit will be on display through Oct. 24, with an opening reception on Sept. 10, is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. and on Thursdays until 8 p.m. Admission into the museum is free. For more information, visit www.museum.okstate.edu.

figure through paintings, sculpture and words on paper by European and American artists of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Auguste Rodin, Pierre-Auguste Ronoir, Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock. www.philbrook.org American Encounters: The Simple Pleasures of Still Life Thru Sept. 14 The 10 masterpieces in this exhibit explore the diversity of still-life in the U.S. www. crystalbridges.org Fish Stories Thru Sept. 21 The exhibit’s 20 color plates capture a number of distinctly American fishes in their natural surroundings while conveying the drama of sport fishing. www.crystalbridges.org Faberge: Jewelers to the Tsars Thru Sept. 27 See the fine craftsmanship of Peter Carl Faberge’s jewelry and adornments that once belonged to the Russian Imperial family. www.okcmoa.com Orly Genger: Terra Thru Oct. 2 This massive outdoor art installation made of more than a million feet of lobster-fishing rope – woven, painted and stretched across Oklahoma’s City’s Campbell Park – create a unique experience. www. oklahomacontemporary.org Jamie Wyeth Thru Oct. 5 Discover Wyeth’s distinctive approach to realism over the course of six decades. www. crystalbridges.org On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb Thru Oct.11 Tulsa and Oklahoma have a rich history and tradition of jazz music, which is celebrated in this exhibit. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu Remembering Chris LeDoux Thru Oct. 18 This small but powerful exhibit features Chris LeDoux’s (1948-2005) memorabilia and sculptures. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org Enter the Matrix: Indigenous Printmakers Ongoing This exhibit explores how printmaking has become a matrix for cultural and artistic exchange, the critical sites of engagement and key figures. www.ou.edu/fjjma

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Nir Evron Ongoing On display at Philbrook Downtown, this exhibit explores the intersections of politics, religion, culture, identity and history of Israel. www.philbrook. org Neoclassicism to Romanticism: Works on Paper in Eighteenth- and NineteenthCentury Europe Ongoing This studentcurated exhibit focuses on works on paper beginning in the mid-1700s when

new ideas emerged from the extensive political, intellectual, economic and social changes that were unfolding across the continent. www.ou.edu/fjjma FocusonFavorites Ongoing This Gilcrease Museum exhibit highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience.

www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu On Common Ground Ongoing Through the mixing of these many works of art and cultural items depicting a great variety of people, one is reminded that all human beings have similar needs that bring us to a common ground. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa. com First Friday Gallery Walk Ongoing The galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo. com First Friday Art Crawl Ongoing Stroll the Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at the Guthrie Green and other venues. www. thebradyartsdistrict.com. 2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman.com

CHARITABLE EVENTS

30th Annual National Championship Chuckwagon Races

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

Back To School Bash Aug. 1 Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City provides backpacks and school supplies, health screenings, haircuts, a community resource fair and children’s activities, all at no cost to attendees. www.urbanleagueok.org Boys & Girls Club of Metro Tulsa Charity Golf Tournament Aug. 3 The fundraiser helps support programming at six Tulsa Salvation Army Boys & Girls Clubs. www. salarmytulsa.org Operation Aware Golf Tournament Aug. 3 The annual tournament raising funds that help youth and children make good choices will tee off at Cedar Ridge Country Club. www.operationaware.org Smarty Pants Trivia Aug. 6 Join the National Multiple Sclerosis Society at its ninth annual night of trivia, food and fun

at the Oklahoma History Center. www. nationalmssociety.org Engaging Men Aug. 6 The YWCA is calling all men who want to make a difference and stop domestic violence and sexual assault against women. www.ywcaokc. org Back-To-School Style Show & Brunch Aug. 8 Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children holds its annual style show benefiting the children of their Owasso campus. This year’s show will take place at Renaiss a n c e H o te l . w w w.o b h c.o rg / BCH-Owasso Taste of Brookside Aug. 13 The fourth annual event returns to Brookside, supporting Youth Services of Tulsa. www.yst.org Marlin Oil Golf Classic Aug. 17 The 13th annual classic tees off at Twin Hills Golf and Country Club in Oklahoma City to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. www.okmarlingolf.eventscff.org Walk to End Alzheimer’s Aug. 22 Join the Tulsa walk starting at Guthrie Green to support research of Alzheimer’s disease. www.alz.org Wild Brew Aug. 22 The Cox Business Center will fill with more beer, more food and more things to see and do than ever before at Oklahoma’s premier beer tasting event that benefits The Sutton Center. www.wildbrew.org Clark Theatre Season Opening Party & Fundraiser Aug. 22 Celebrate the start of Clark Theatre’s 2015-2016 and 37th season. www.clarkyouththeatre.com Kiwanis Charity Golf Classic Aug. 24 The 23rd annual golf tournament benefiting Special Olympics Oklahoma will tee off at Meadowbrook Golf Course. www.sook. org Cycle For Life Aug. 28 Starting at Guthrie Green, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and its supporters cycle to raise funds. www.cff.org/chapters/tulsa Junior Achievement Classic Aug. 31 The 14th annual golf tournament will tee off at The Patriot Golf Club in Owasso. www. jaok.org

COMMUNITY Seventh Annual Dog Day of Summer Aug. 1 Bring your furry friend and join the Dog Parade up and down Broadway Street at 9 a.m., starting in Twin Springs Park. Then stick around for dog-themed games, snacks, vendors and contests. www. mainstreetsiloam.org Internet Cat Video Festival Aug. 1 The festival returns to the Myriad Gardens. www.oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com Buchanan’s Vintage Flea Market Aug. 1, 2 Find great antiques and collectibles from across the United States. www. buchananmarkets.com R.K. Gun Show Aug. 1, 2 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com World Wide Paint Horse Congress Thru Aug. 2 Built Ford Tough Livestock Complex, Expo Square. www.exposquare.com NorthAmericanYouthCongress2015 Aug. 5-7 Join others at Chesapeake Energy Arena for the largest gathering of apostolic students in North America. w w w. chesapeakearena.com AmericanIndianExpo Aug. 5-8 Anadarko’s annual American Indian Expo showcases the arts, crafts and traditions of 14 plains Indian tribes and one of the largest American Indian parades in Oklahoma. www.caddofair.com FlyFilmFestival Aug.7-9 Prizes,workshops, special guests, activities and films will entertain during downtown Enid’s annual three-day festival. www.flyfilmfestival.org American Quarter Horse Youth World Championship Thru Aug. 8 Free to the public, this year’s event will be held at the Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.aqha.com Rush Springs Watermelon Festival Aug. 8 Jeff Davis Park welcomes the annual festival and its festivalgoers of more than 30,000. www.chickasawcountry.com Wingapalooza Aug. 8 In its second year, Wingapalooza brings 25 Tulsa area restaurants and their chicken wing creations to the BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com


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COMMUNITY

Eli Young Band

Midsummer Nights Art Festival Aug. 21, 22 Lions Park, adjacent to the Firehouse Art Center, will welcome the 38th annual art festival, one of the largest in Norman. www.normanfirehouse.com Tulsa Cultural Festival Aug. 21, 22 Travel the world and explore different cultures through music, cuisine and art at the Glenpool Convention Center. www. tulsaculturalfestival.com Oklahoma City Pet Expo Aug. 22 Free to the public, exhibitors, discounted vaccinations and preventatives, free nail trims, agility and obedience demonstrations, live entertainment, competitions, prize giveaways and lots and lots of pets and their owners will fill the Modern Living Building at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okcpetexpo.com Cowboys of Color Rodeo Aug. 22 Head over to Expo Square to see traditional rodeo competitions by cowboys of all cultures. www.cowboysofcolorrodeook.com Good News Festival Aug. 22, 23 Franklin Graham and the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association are bringing the Good News of Christ to the Greater Oklahoma City region. www.chesapeakearena.com

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

Just Between Friends Kids Consignment Sale Aug. 23-29 Whether wanting to get rid of old toys, clothes or equipment or in search of something for a great price, Just Between Friends is ready to help. Whether in Oklahoma City or Tulsa, there’s a sale waiting. www.okc.jbfsale.com or www.tulsa.jbfsale.com StorytellingFestival Aug. 27-29 Celebrate the art of storytelling with storytellers, workshops and special performances at the Oklahoma History Center. www. artscouncilokc.com Anne V. Zarrow Young Readers’ Literature Award Ceremony Aug. 28 This year’s recipient, New York Times best-selling author Sharon Draper, will accept the award at Hardesty Regional Library’s Connor’s Cover. www.tulsalibrary.org India Fest Aug. 29 Enjoy dancing, Indian food, Henna booth, rides and shops at the 11th anniversary celebration at Expo Square. www.iagtok.org Love-OKC One-Day Outreach Aug. 29 Join the movement of people and organizations passionate about serving the needs of the Greater Oklahoma City Metro Area. www.loveokc.com

OKALHOMA CITY.

S tor y telling Festival There is an art to storytelling, and for more than 30 years, Arts Council of Oklahoma City has been celebrating and promoting it through its Storytelling Festival, a weekendlong event that brings renowned storytellers, workshops and performances to Oklahoma City. This year, the 35th annual festival will take place Thursday, Aug. 27 through Saturday, Aug. 29 at the Oklahoma History Center. Featured storytellers include Charlotte Blake Alston, an internationally known storyteller with a focus on traditional and contemporary stories from African and AfricanAmerican oral and cultural traditions; Jim Mays, an Emmy Award-winning storyteller with a knack for ghost stories; and Megan Wells, an awardwinning actress and director who lends her theatrical resume to her technique. Three evening performances, aimed at an adult audience, will take participants on “colorful, humorous and inspirational” journeys, says Arts Council of Oklahoma City. A free family-friendly matinee will also be available for story-lovers of all ages. Performance tickets are $10; workshop passes are $10 each, $25 for a whole day and $50 for Friday and Saturday; and a festival pass is $75. For more information, visit www.artscouncilokc.com.

PHOTO COURTESY ARTS COUNCIL OF

Entertainment

Harwelden Murder Mystery Thru Aug. 8 Dinner theater becomes an interactive showcase of fun at this annual comedymystery play at Harwelden Mansion. www. ahhatulsa.org OKC Gun Show Aug. 8, 9 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okcgunshow.com Spirit, Mind & Body Expo Aug. 8, 9 Explore metaphysics and paranormal science at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair. com NSBA World Championship Show & Breeders Championship Futurity Aug. 8-15 The 10th annual show will offer all-breed and NSBA Breeders Championship Futurity and States classes over seven days, and a trade show with commercial exhibitors and horse professionals will be available during the week. www.nsba. com 44th Annual Northwest Arkansas Bluegrass Festival Aug. 13-15 Bring your lawn chairs and your acoustic instruments and enjoy the fun! Gospel and bluegrass music will be playing all weekend. Some music is played around the park by impromptu groups. Those jams begin at 7 a.m. and last all day and evening. Staged performances also take place. www.harrisonarkansas.org 16th Annual Bargains Galore on 64 Aug. 13-15 160 miles of yard sales and flea markets along Highway 64 from Fort Smith to Conway and on to Beebe features antiques and collectibles and other great buys. www.bargainsgaloreon64.org Mountains Music and Motorcycles Aug. 13-16 Celebrate motorcycling in the Ozarks. The event is based at the Historic Town Square in Mountain View, Ark. Enjoy free concerts, biker night at the drive-in, biker games, bike show, car show, biker church service, vendors, food and great riding. www.mountainsmusicmotorcycles. com ThePool&SpaShow Aug.14-16 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com IICOT Powwow of Champions Aug. 14-16 The Intertribal Indian Club of Tulsa presents its 39th annual dance competitions with an Arts and Crafts Mart, traditional and contemporary jewelry, artworks, clothing, music and more. www.iicot.org WillRogers&WileyPostAnnualFly-In Aug. 15 Coinciding with the anniversary of Will and Wiley’s death in a plane crash on Aug. 15, 1935, planes will land on a 2,000-foot grass strip at Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch in Oologah. www.willrogers.com No Boundaries Expo Aug. 15 Benefiting NeuroResources Outreach Services, No Boundaries seeks to bring Oklahoma resources all under one roof at the Oklahoma State Fair Park . w w w. neuroresources1.wix.com/ no-boundaries-expo Red Dirt Kings Car & Bike Show Aug. 15 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okstatefair.com Tulsa Hispanic Chamber Expo & Career Fair Aug. 15 National, regional and local companies and organizations will fill the East Gate Event Center at Expo Square. www.tulsahispanicchamber.com Fiesta In Fuqua Aug. 15 The 11th annual festival will bring families and friends to Fuqua Park in Duncan for a day of immunizations and fun. www.duncancalendar.com I Am Yoga, Art & Music Festival Aug. 15, 16 I AM, a Tulsa-based organization, unites the yoga, art and music community through conscious events with the goal of raising awareness of light within each human being. www.iamyogafestival.com Grand American Arms Show Aug. 15, 16 Expo Square. www.exposquare.com MotorcycleSwapMeet Aug. 16 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com OKC Thoroughbred Yearlings Sale Aug. 16 Find thoroughbred yearlings and horses of racing age at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com StephensCountyFreeFair Aug 19-22 The fun is back for another year. www. stephenscountryok.com Light The Night Memorial Walk Aug. 21 The walk begins at 9 p.m. at Duncan Regional Hospital. www.drhhealthfoundation. org

Tulsa Mini Maker Faire Aug. 29 See 150 makers, and connect with people and projects in your community while celebrating invention, creativity and resourcefulness. www.makerfairetulsa.com Buchanan’s Vintage Flea Market Aug. 29, 30 Find great antiques and collectibles from across the United States. www. buchananmarkets.com 30th Annual National Championship Chuckwagon Races Aug. 29-Sept. 6 Watch as an estimated 150 teams compete in five different divisions for the title of National Champion! Roughly 20,000+ people will be on hand to watch the excitement of chuckwagon racing, bronc fanning and the Snowy River Race – a thrilling horse race that includes two downhill runs and a plunge into the river. www.chuckwagonraces.com Revival AAA Glidden Tour Aug. 30-Sept. 4 America’s oldest and largest automobile touring event will drive into Oklahoma City with more than 150 historically correct, pre-1943 cars. www.aaaok.org Sunday Twilight Concert Series Ongoing Enjoy a concert at the Myriad Botanical Gardens every Sunday night through mid-September from 7:30 to 9 p.m. www. oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com Premiere on Film Row Ongoing Film Row in Oklahoma City welcomes its community to its monthly block party every Third Friday through the year that highlights the area’s historywhile showcasing its current line-up of restaurants, galleries, studios, theaters and more. w w w. filmrowpremiere.com Dancing in the District Ongoing This summer concert series in Muskogee runs through Aug. 21. www.omhof.com Summer’s Fifth Night Ongoing Every Thursday evening through August, enjoy live music in Utica Square. www.uticasquare. com Heard on Hurd Ongoing Every third Saturday through October, enjoy local music, food and shops in downtown Edmond on Broadway between Main and Hurd. 405.341.6650

H&8th Ongoing On the last Friday of every month through October, enjoy the H&8th Night Market with gourmet food trucks and live music. www.h8thokc.com Movie in the Park Ongoing Enjoy a movie at Guthrie Green most Thursdays through October. www.guthriegreen.com Sonic Summer Movies Ongoing Most Wednesdays through August, enjoy movies at the Oklahoma City Botanical Gardens. www.oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com International Gymnastics Hall of Fame Ongoing Celebrate the athletic and artistic elements of the sport, while honoring its most accomplished athletes at Science Museum Oklahoma. www. sciencemuseumoklahoma.org Destination Space Ongoing This exhibit reveals the amazing science that allows us to travel beyond the confines of earth. www.sciencemuseumoklahoma.org Walking Tour Ongoing Take a walking tour of historic downtown Tulsa. www. tulsahistory.org Gilcrease Films Ongoing See various films through the month. www.gilcrease. org OKCMOA Films Ongoing Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com Planetarium Shows Ongoing Science Museum Oklahoma. www. sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

To s e e m o re e v e n t s h a p p e n i n g around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR


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KEN BUSBY IS DIRECTOR OF THE ROUTE 66 ALLIANCE. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

IN PERSON

The Experience of the Mother Road

A planned project will highlight Tulsa’s important role in the continuance of the legend of Route 66.

I

n the 1920s, the future Father of Route 66, Tulsan Cyrus Avery, convinced the Interstate Highway Commission to take the proposed new highway through Tulsa and Oklahoma City to avoid the Rocky Mountains. Thus, the Mother Road was born. Now, Oklahoma, a heavily traveled destination for Route 66 fans, will be home to the Route 66 Experience, a huge museum under development in Tulsa. This celebration center for Route 66 will differ from the Oklahoma Route 66 Museum in Clinton. The Experience will not be a museum, says Ken Busby, the CEO and executive director of the Route 66 Alliance, which is spearheading the project, estimated to open in 2018. “It’s much more than a museum,” he says. “In fact, we don’t even use the word museum. … It will have a 22,000-square-foot interpretive center with hands-on, interactive displays including a virtual road trip from Chicago to Santa Monica.” The facility will also have restaurants, a gift shop, a drive-in movie theater and exhibit and rental spaces. It will also serve as the home for both the Oklahoma Writers Hall of Fame and the National Route 66 Hall of Fame. Busby, the former director of the Tulsa Arts & Humanities Council, was asked to guide the Route 66 Alliance in 2014. The 104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | AUGUST 2015

Alliance began in 2008 with a mission to bring attention to the historic highway. The alliance was co-founded by Michael Wallis, who wrote the definitive book on the highway, Route 66: The Mother Road. “I’ve always known about Route 66,” Busby says. “Tulsa is truly where East meets West, as Tulsa is where the Mother Road turns west to head to California from Chicago. It’s such a great story that Tulsa really hasn’t told extensively.” Busby is uniquely qualified to run the Route 66 Experience. “My years at the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa prepared me well for this exciting opportunity,” says Busby, who led a successful capital campaign, which included building a new facility, while at the Council. “The tourism and economic development potential of Route 66 are tremendous,” he says. Busby says he is excited to work with Wallis and Stevens Avery, Cyrus Avery’s grandson, along with Selser Schaefer Architects, the designers of the Hardesty Arts Center, and Ross Construction Group. “This is an amazing team for a project that is going to make a tremendous impact on the community, and I am excited to play a role in helping make this a reality,” says Busby of the $19.5 million building project, which will be located in an area close to the Cyrus Avery Plaza at Riverside Drive and Southwest Boulevard, near the Arkansas River.

Route 66 was the first highway to be completely paved in 1938. It was a major route, because of its flatness, for truckers and travelers to the west coast and the main route for Okies escaping the Dust Bowl. When the highway was bypassed – in some cases abandoned – its continual decline seemed imminent. But in the late ‘80s, a movement to revive interest in the road began, and Route 66 associations sprang up across the road’s length. “There are many cool stops along the highway,” Busby says of today’s Route 66. “I love the fact that the road begins in Chicago, just across the street from the Art Institute. There’s a very basic street sign that says, ‘Route 66 Begins.’” The Route 66 Experience will engage visitors with the evolution of the road and its history. “It’s going to tell the story of this key highway in American history and the important players that traveled the road, like Will Rogers and Woody Guthrie,” says Busby. “It will highlight the 24 miles of Route 66 in Tulsa as well as how it connects to the other 2,400 miles of the Mother Road. This new facility will have a national and international draw that will serve as a destination from which we can send visitors to explore the myriad arts and cultural venues in the greater Tulsa area, as well as across the state.” SHAUN PERKINS


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