Page 1

MAY 2016

A STATE OF INNOVATION

See some of the great tech advancements in the state

UNDERREPRESENTED

Filling the shortage of females in STEM fields

TENNIS CITY

Tulsa is hosting the 2016 college tennis championship

Culinary

HISTORY 21 historic Oklahoma restaurants


Patient-Centered Patient-Centered Cancer Cancer Care Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility. As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home. home.

800 NE 10th Street 800 NECity, 10th OK Street Oklahoma 73104 Oklahoma City, 271-1112 OK 73104 Phone (405)

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top three cancer The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top three cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network. centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-1112 Fax (405) 271-5797 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


With just a few simple tips, the power to save is in your hands. Saving energy and money at home is easier than you think. Here are a few simple tips to help you get a handle on your monthly energy usage.

Here's a bright idea. Replace incandescent bulbs with CFLs or LEDs. They use less energy, last longer and save $30-80 over the life of each bulb.

#CleanFilter Clean or install new HVAC filters every month or two. Clean filters take the strain off your unit, saving you money and keeping you comfortable.

Home sprung a leak? Weatherize it. Protect your indoors from outdoor air. Caulk, seal and weather-strip leaks around windows and doors for year-round savings and comfort.

Empower yourself. Get more energy-saving tips at PowerForwardWithPSO.com.


Features May

50 A Taste of Culinary History

2016 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XX, No. 5

Oklahoma Magazine has compiled a listing of some of the state’s historical eating establishments complete with why they remain popular and the specialty menu items that have kept them profitable over the years.

58 A Championship Tennis Town

TU’s Michael D. Case Tennis Center will be host to the NCAA Division I Tennis Championships. Considered one of the finest tennis facilities in the country, with 12 outdoor courts, this will be the third such championship held at the university since 2004.

50

62 Oklahoma Innovation Oklahoma is full of innovative ideas and technology. Oklahoma Magazine looks at Stephenson Cancer Center, one of the nation’s top facilities for cutting edge cancer research and trial studies, and how Oklahoma companies are inspiring ideas by making 3D printing technology available to everyone.

From traditional burger joints to steakhouses dating back to 1910, tall tales and good food are in abundance across the Sooner State.

A STATE OF INNOVATION

Women are historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math fields. Fortunately, things are beginning to change on both a statewide and national level, thanks to groups such as The Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance.

See some of the great tech advancements in the state

UNDERREPRESENTED

Filling the shortage of females in STEM fields

TENNIS CITY

Tulsa is hosting the 2016 college tennis championship

Culinary

HISTORY

21 historic Oklahoma restaurants new May 2016 Cover.indd 4

2

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read

MAY 2016

May 2016

69 Underrepresented, but Rising: Women in STEM

A Taste of Culinary History

4/18/16 5:31 PM

ON THE COVER:

ROBERT HOBSON, OWNER OF CLAUD’S HAMBURGERS, WORKS THE GRILL. CLAUD’S HAMBURGERS IS ONE OF THE 21 HISTORIC RESTAURANTS WE LOOK AT IN THIS MONTH’S ISSUE. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS:

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.


WITH A STROKE, TIME IS NOT ON YOUR SIDE.

THANKFULLY, WE ARE. ST. JOHN HEYMAN STROKE CENTER, THE ONLY JOINT COMMISSION–CERTIFIED COMPREHENSIVE STROKE CENTER IN EASTERN OKLAHOMA. We’re standing by 24/7, delivering the highest level of stroke care. It’s a privilege to be recognized 4 years in a row with the Get with the Guidelines Gold Plus award from American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

P U L S E L I N E P H Y S I C I A N R E F E R R A L 918 - 744-0123 ST. JOHN MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN SAPULPA | ST. JOHN OWASSO | ST. JOHN BROKEN ARROW JANE PHILLIPS MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN CLINIC URGENT CARE | ST. JOHN CLINIC

STJOHNSTROKECENTER.COM


Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

13 The State

Projects to expand and improve public transportation options in Tulsa and Oklahoma City are currently underway to bring the states metro areas up to speed.

16 18 20 22 24 26

Happenings Culture Nature Sports Insider Business

29 Life & Style 30 32

40 42

44 46 48

13

42

Guide Living Space

This month our focus is on a beautiful, H-shaped midtown Tulsa home that was recently featured as an online house tour by Elle Décor.

Trend Accessorize

Put some spring in your wardrobe by accessorizing with this season’s selection of stunning jewelry, convenient totes and comfy sandals.

Destination Health Scene

32

83 Taste

Another new restaurant in Oklahoma City’s popular Uptown 23rd District has opened and is reeling in customers to enjoy rooftop cocktails and a variety of creative street food.

84 86

Local Flavor Food Focus

84

89 Entertainment

Explore the Paseo District Arts Festival in Oklahoma City, just one of the state’s outdoor arts and cultural extravaganzas scheduled for May.

90 94

In Tulsa/ In OKC Cinema

96 Closing Thoughts

4

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

89


When deciding on a nursing specialty, she went with her heart. Forty years ago, Susan Bonner was trying to determine her nursing specialty when she began working in the Saint Francis Hospital Cardiac Intensive Care Unit—and she found her passion. “In addition to nursing care, I have always felt strongly about educating people about their health,” she said. “Back then, I began visiting with our patients to provide information on taking better care of themselves.” Today, as a clinical manager at the Heart Hospital at Saint Francis, she oversees Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation, which includes monitored exercise, heart health education and nutrition classes. It’s a program that has significantly improved outcomes for patients. “The Heart Hospital at Saint Francis has outstanding physicians and staff, the latest technology and a

Susan Bonner, BSN, RN CLINICAL MANAGER HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS

comprehensive range of procedures,”

she said. “We have the services patients need to help maintain their heart health.”

Healthcare for life.


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

Professional Haircare Professional Skincare

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN

Introducing Dr. Karen Mitchell Medical Director

MANAGING EDITOR JUSTIN MARTINO ASSOCIATE EDITOR LAURIE GOODALE CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN

Specializing in advanced injectables and dermal fillers

GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY

Botox Parties First Tuesday of every month Give Mom the gift of beauty and relaxation

OFFICE/ADVERTISING ASSISTANT CONNOR SCHOENBERGER

Waxing Studio Body Waxing for Men and Women Expert Brow Care

3410 S Peoria • Center 1 www.jaraherronsalon.com • 918-742-3223 22011 Jara Herron.indd 1

9168 S Yale Ave, Ste 150 Tulsa, Oklahoma 918-982-2362 www.lovewaxstudio.com 4/7/16 4:49 PM

William Robinson Leigh, Walpi, Arizona, Hopi Reservation, oil, GM 0137.1074

SHOWING THE HAND OF THE ARTIST The Sketches of William R. Leigh March 6 – June 26, 2016

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB

CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2016 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2016

Member

IN

OKC

IN

TULSA

TU is an EEO/AA Institution. Exhibition season title sponsor is the Sherman E. Smith Family Charitable Foundation. Support also provided by Mervin Bovaird Foundation, C.W. Titus Foundation and M.V. Mayo Charitable Foundation.

GILCREASE.ORG 22083 Gilcrease Museum.indd 1

6

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

3/25/16 10:50 AM

440 0 UNDER

TM


Start here with an expert who treats only cancer. Every stage. Every day.

Daniel Nader, DO, FCCP Chief of Staff Interventional Pulmonology

At Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA), treating cancer isn’t one thing we do—it’s the only thing we do. With state-of-the-art technologies and precision cancer treatment, our experts diagnose patients and develop a thorough treatment plan. A plan that not only attacks the cancer, but also offers evidence-based therapies to help reduce side effects. If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, or are already undergoing treatment, and are unsure about your options, talk to the experts at CTCA® in Tulsa. Our team can recommend a treatment plan customized to fight your specific cancer and help you get back to living your life.

cancercenter.com/experts • 888.568.1571 ©2016 Rising Tide

Now A Network Provider For


THE VOTES ARE IN!! LAHOMA K O

the

So if we left out your favorite, let us know. Contact us on Facebook (facebook.com/OKMAG) or Twitter (@OklahomaMag), post a picture of it and tag us on Instagram (@Oklahoma_Mag) or just send us an email. If we included your favorite, let us know what you love about it. We’ll put together the responses and post a story on okmag. com.

of

BEST the BEST

Oklahoma City has been reaping the benefits from MAPS for years, and Tulsa will be able to enjoy similar positive changes with the passage of the Vision 2025 package. We look at how both cities are planning to provide high-quality mass transit (p. 13) and talk to Stephanie Cameron, state director of Dream It Do It Oklahoma and OK2Grow and chair-elect of TYPros, about the impact of Vision 2025 on Tulsa and the importance of education in the state (p. 96). Also in this issue, we look at how the construction of the Michael D. Case Tennis Center at the University of Tulsa has helped turn Tulsa into a tennis town (p. 58). The city is hosting its third NCAA tennis championship since 2004 this month. As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com

2016

MA

M

aking a list of historic restaurants in Oklahoma (p. 50) was more of an education than I expected it to be. I’ve been to many of the restaurants we featured and heard of others, even if I haven’t had the chance to visit yet, but some were completely new to me. One thing became clear to me as we were working on the story: creating a list of every historic restaurant in Oklahoma could take an entire issue of the magazine by itself.

Justin Martino Managing Editor

GAZINE

LOOK FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST OF OKLAHOMA. COMING IN JULY.

OKLAHOMA Don’t miss this exciting issue. Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

OKLAHOMA

18 1/2 TBOB.indd

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

3/17/16 12:34 PM

FILE PHOTO

OKLAHOMA


A NATIONAL REPUTATION FOR EXCELLENCE As one of the nation’s most comprehensive organ transplant centers, INTEGRIS Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute (NZTI) is well-known for its expertise in handling the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys and pancreas. More than 3,500 of these organs have been transplanted in 25+ years at Oklahoma’s largest multi-organ transplant facility. With their considerable experience in working with major organs, it’s no surprise that NZTI provides far more than transplant services:

Liver and pancreatic cancer surgery • Advanced Heart Failure Program • Ventricular assist devices and total artificial hearts • Intestinal Rehabilitation Program • Pulmonary hypertension management •

Hepatology (management of cirrhosis, end stage liver disease, tumors and metabolic liver disease) • Advanced gastroenterology • Pediatric gastroenterology/hepatology • Interventional ERCP & endoscopic ultrasonography • Oklahoma's only life-saving ECMO program •

Patients from all over the region are traveling to NZTI for transplant care and beyond. To see why, visit integristransplant.com.

integristransplant.com (800)991-3349


OKMAG.COM

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

INVESTING IN THE FUTURE

OK

#OKMAGPHOTO

CONTEST

PHOTO BY MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

Dream It Do It Oklahoma and OK2Grow are careerawareness and educationcompletion organizations that focus on educating, recruiting and training the young people of Oklahoma on how they can have workplace success and advance their careers in manufacturing and other industries. We talk to Tulsan Stephanie Cameron, state director of Dream It Do It and OK2Grow, about her involvement in these organizations, her work in encouraging young people to vote on Vision 2025 and to continue voting, and her ideas on how to attract and keep the younger generation in Oklahoma.

Join in on Oklahoma Magazine’s new monthly social media photo contest. Are you out and about in Oklahoma? Do you have an eye for interesting or unique snapshots? We want to see Oklahoma from your perspective. To participate, simply upload your photo and tag us on Instagram (@oklahoma_mag), on Facebook with ‘Oklahoma Magazine’ or use the hashtag #OKMAGPHOTO. We’ll feature our favorites in this section each month.

JULY 2016

Luxury Homes You’re cordially invited to join us for an insider's tour of some of Oklahoma’s most innovative and fabulous homes.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA Advertising opportunities available Contact advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205 Luxury Homes 1/2h.indd 1

10

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

OKLAHOMA 3/17/16 5:48 PM


Enhance Your Curves BRAZILIAN BUTTOCK LIFT= =Fat GRAFTING LIPOSUCTION Brazilian Buttock Lift = FAT FatGrafting Grafting&&& Liposuction Brazilian Buttock Lift Liposuction

BRAZILIAN BUTTOCK LIFT

Brazilian ButtockLift Lift Brazilian Buttock

Want to improve your backside view?

Tulsa Surgical Arts offers a complete line of surgical procedures to enhance your buttock…. ”Brazilian Butt Lift” is one of Dr. Cuzalina’s most popular surgeries! Call to schedule a free consult, 918-392-7900 Tulsa Surgical Arts offers a full line of Cosmetic Surgical and skin care procedures to help you look and feel your best this summer. Angelo Cuzalina, MD

918.392.7900 | tulsasurgicalarts.com


Your Yourfamily familycomes comes first, first, but but Mother’s Mother’sDay Dayisisall all about about you! you! Your family comes first, but Mother’s Day is all about you! YouYoulove loveyour yourkids, kids, but but struggl struggleetotoget getrid rid ofof that that post-baby post-babybump, bump, even even wiwitthhyour diet and dietkids, andbut You love exercise. struggle to get rid of that post-baby bump, even with diet and

SculpSure a breakthrough SculpSure is aisbreakthrough light-based body contouring light-based body contouring treatment designed reduce treatment designed to to reduce stubborn problem areas stubborn fatfat in in problem areas such abdomen and love such as as thethe and love SculpSure isabdomen a breakthrough handles in just minutes, handles in just 2525 minutes, light-based body contouring without surgery downtime. without surgery or or downtime. treatment designed to reduce stubborn fat in problem areas such as the abdomen and love handles in just 25 minutes, without surgery or downtime.

Give yourself a 25 minute “time out”. Schedule your SculpSure consultation today! Give yourself a 25 minute “time out”. Schedule your SculpSure consultation today! Drs. Blackstock and Howerton invite you to learn about this proven laser Dr. Melanie R. Blackstock, M.D. procedure by attending our open house on Tuesday, May 17th at 5:30 p.m. 6465 S. Yale Ave., Suite 310 Tulsa, OK 74136 918-236-3000

Please call 918-568-9905 or email SculpsureTulsa@gmail.com to RSVP or for additional information or visit www.SculpsureTulsa.com

Give yourself a 25 minute “time out”. Schedule your SculpSure consultation today!


State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

The Wheels On the Bus

As Oklahoma City and Tulsa expand and upgrade public transit routes, connections are made.

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA TRANSIT

F

irst-time visitors and new residents of Oklahoma often have the same question: How do people get around here? Light rail in Oklahoma City or Tulsa (or, ahem, between)? Not a thing. Safe, late-night bus service every day of the week? Until recently, residents could dream. The lack of public transportation in Oklahoma’s major urban areas often comes as a shock to those who may be more accustomed to cities with a robust system of mass transit. But like the wheels on the bus, public transit plans are finally coming around. Most recently, on April 5, Tulsa voters made their voices heard. As part of the Vision 2025 initiative, projects to expand and im-

prove public transportation options in the city will proceed. The package included operating funds for two rapid routes for high-speed buses, covering major north/south and east/ west corridors of the city. When complete, more than one-fifth of the city’s residents and jobs will be within a 10-minute walking distance of one of the two routes. Building on previously voted funds, one of these route transformations includes a major revival of the buses and stations that traverse Peoria Avenue. The new north/south Peoria Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) route updates 36 bus stations and adds nine new buses on Peoria Avenue from 38th Street North to 81st Street South. The route provides modern amenities and improved connections between

some of Tulsa’s most popular areas, including Downtown, Cherry Street, Brookside and more. Many stations will be improved to include ticket vending, screens displaying real-time arrival information, increased lighting for safety and more pedestrian-friendly development. Buses will run every 15 to 20 minutes, seven days a week, doubling the current frequency. The east/west route — also called the 11th Street Route or the Route 66 Bus Rapid Transit Line — will traverse 11th and 21st Streets from South Denver Avenue and the Denver Avenue Station in Downtown to 145th East Avenue. Improvements will be made to 40 stations linking destinations such as The University of Tulsa and Tulsa Community ColMAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

lege, the BOK Center, the Pearl District and Hillcrest Medical Center. The importance of the Route 66 BRT Line cannot be overstated, says Isaac Rocha, strategic outreach and inclusion officer for the Bama Companies. “The proposed bus rapid transit line on 11th Street would be transformational,” Rocha says, “not just for our team members, who would have convenient, effective transportation to and from work, but also for the growing Route 66 corridor that serves thousands of Tulsans, multiple large employers and important community hubs like The University of Tulsa and Expo Square. “Tulsa needs a fully robust transportation system that supports the entire city,” he adds. “Cities with comprehensive systems are competitive to attract new business development and millennials.” He says the next step in the development of a vital public transit infrastructure should be the implementation of options connecting Oklahoma City and Tulsa. “We believe bus rapid transit will be a game changer for public transportation in Tulsa,” says Debbie Ruggles, assistant general manager with Tulsa Transit. “With 15to 20-minute frequency and quicker travel times, we are confident riders will make the switch to transit. Similar to the experiences of other cities who have implemented BRT, we also expect the new service to spur mixed-use and higher density development near BRT stations.” Ruggles cites Kansas City’s MAX, the city’s first BRT, as an example of the potential for public transit to transform communities. “The Kansas City Max spurred $100 million in transit-oriented development for every dollar invested in the BRT,” she says. “Transit is a great investment both for riders and for the community’s economy.” In Oklahoma City, the third MAPS initiative is currently underway. The plan includes the installation of a downtown streetcar line — an appealing prospect for employees and residents of downtown OKC, as well as for the ever-increasing number of tourists. The MAPS 3 Modern Streetcar will connect several downtown neighborhoods and business districts, including Bricktown, Midtown and Automobile Alley. The route will connect businesses, condominiums and hotels, and landmarks from the Bricktown Ballpark in the east to the St. Anthony hospital complex in the west. Along the route reside some of downtown OKC’s most popular attractions, including the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, the Myriad Gardens and the Chesapeake Energy Arena. The new streetcar is also expected to connect future projects approved in the most recent MAPS initiative, including the $287 million convention center and hotel. The convention 14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

“Tulsa needs a fully robust transportation system that supports the entire city. Cities with comprehensive systems are competitive to attract new business development and millennials.” center will be located east of the proposed MAPS 3 park, a 70-acre public space with trails, a lake and a café that will occupy the space between downtown and the Oklahoma River. Construction on the streetcar route is due to commence in September and is anticipated to end in the fall of 2018. David E. Todd, program manager for MAPS OKC, hopes the streetcar is a harbinger of bigger changes to come. “I believe the streetcar will provide a new method of transportation within the Downtown area,” he says. “I believe it will be used by Oklahoma City citizens to travel between districts in the general Downtown area. I believe it will help to reduce the stress on parking facilities within Bricktown by providing an easy way to access Bricktown from other areas without a car. I believe it will allow tourists greater access to a wider area for relatively low cost. The streetcar also will be the first part of what I hope is a more compre-

ABOVE: TULSA BROUGHT IN A BUS USED IN KANSAS CITY’S BUS RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM RECENTLY. THE SYSTEM IS DESIGNED TO PROVIDE HIGH-QUALITY MASS TRANSIT WITH STATIONS UPGRADED TO RUN MORE LIKE TRAIN STATIONS. PHOTO COURTESY TULSA TRANSIT

RIGHT: CONCEPT ART FOR THE OKLAHOMA CITY STREET CAR SHOWS WHAT WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR OKLAHOMA CITY RESIDENTS IN COMING YEARS. THE PROJECT IS SCHEDULED TO START CONSTRUCTION IN SEPTEMBER AND FINISH IN THE FALL OF 2018. PHOTO COURTESY MAPS OKC


HIGH-SPEED RAIL? MAYBE.

PHOTO COURTESY ODOT

The recent reconstruction of the I-244 bridge spanning the Arkansas River in Downtown Tulsa included a tantalizing addition: double-decking to position the bridge as a passageway for both normal traffic and a high-speed passenger rail between Oklahoma City and Tulsa. The project is still under study and is contingent upon the findings (and funding) of the U.S. Department of Transportation, but hopes are high that Tulsans and OKC natives could soon easily and quickly connect, with possible expansion throughout the region. “Tulsans are always interested in passenger rail opportunities in general and highspeed rail in particular, given the prospect of connecting to the major metropolitan regions to the South,” says Viplava Putta, director of the Transportation Planning Division of the Indian Nations Council of Government (INCOG). “A competitive mode of transport such as high-speed rail that is safe will enable the region to be much more closely integrated with the rest of the mega-regional economy of Texas and Oklahoma, bringing high-speed rail possibilities to nearly 10 million people within a half-hour reach.” hensive public transportation system.” Expansions are already being proposed to the route, connecting citizens and businesses in the Classen corridor, the Oklahoma Health Center, the Deep Deuce neighborhood and the area on Walker Avenue southwest of the future downtown park. “Early in the planning process, the city, the streetcar subcommittee and others recognized the need to make sure the initial route(s) included options for expansion in numerous areas,” Todd says. “These expansion areas included areas where it was clear that there would be substantial ridership or areas where there was a definite advocacy group.” Traci Walton is the owner of Plenty Mercantile, a small shop with

big personality located in the Automobile Alley District north of downtown Oklahoma City. The MAPS Modern Streetcar route will run directly in front of her business and many other local stores on this recently energized section of Broadway Avenue. Walton describes herself and her colleagues as cautiously optimistic about the future streetcar. “In the long run, [it is] certainly a benefit for our community,” Walton says. “A viable urban district with walkability in an easily traveled city makes us a draw and broadens our tax base, benefiting schools, infrastructure and quality of life. It’s an investment in taking our amazing city to the next level. Being able to move through the city on public transportation will hopefully encourage more people to experience downtown, which will certainly help our small retail business.” She acknowledges, however, the challenges of being a small business owner in an area undergoing major construction — a sting felt by many downtown businesses over the past several years. “[In the] short term, hopefully, small businesses like ours can survive the closing of streets and reroutes during construction,” Walton says. “Ease of parking and access are always a retail issue.” As more long-spoken-of plans finally come to fruition, Oklahomans are holding their collective breath in the hopes of a public transportation renaissance. But with the state facing a billion dollar-plus budget shortfall and many everyday Oklahomans paying the price, the future of mass transit in Oklahoma, like so much else, remains a question mark. TARA MALONE

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

15


The State

HAPPENINGS

WHAT IS A MICROPOLITAN?

Site Selection Magazine recently ranked the Oklahoma cities of Durant, Enid, Bartlesville and Miami as four of the nation’s “Top 100 Micropolitans.” According to the article, a micropolitan is defined as one or more adjacent counties that have at least one urban core area with a population of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000. It must also have an adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.

MEET OKLAHOMA’S KID GOVERNOR Eight-year-old Justin Evers of Oklahoma City has recently been appointed as the state’s first Kid Governor by Sunbeam Family Services and the Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy (OICA). Justin was one of 19 children ages 7 to 11 who submitted videos for the “Vote 4 Kids” campaign. The Kid Governor’s term began in April and will end in November at the 2016 Oklahoma Kids Count Conference. Evers says he wants Oklahomans to pay attention to children’s issues in the state, specifically foster care.

MORE KICKS ON 66

A dedication ceremony was recently held for a new piece of artwork at the Route 66 West Gateway Plaza — part of the Vision 2025 Master Plan of Development. The 9-foot-tall and approximately 8-foot-wide sculpture, titled “Floating Hanger,” portrays oil field equipment with mosaic tiles representing different facets of west Tulsa history and its prominent role in oil and transportation. The artist, Eileen Gay from Sparks, Nevada, features the Tulsa sculpture on her website, mosaicsbyeileen. com.

MOTHER’S DAY FLOWER FACTS

According to aboutflowers.com, one-fourth of the nation’s holiday floral purchases are made in correlation to Mother’s Day. In 2015, approximately 35 percent of adults bought flowers or plants as gifts for Mother’s Day in 2015 — $2.3 billion worth of flora! Popular flowers in high demand include sweetheart roses and orchids.

16

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

TULSANS

VALUE

HISTORIC

PLACES

Tulsa is a Preserve America Community, focusing on cultural heritage and ways to repurpose and bring new life to old buildings. The Tulsa Preservation Commission is offering a series of free, public lectures that will feature speakers from across the country. Topics will include sustainable design and adaptive reuse, historic tax credits, entrepreneurial success in older neighborhoods with smaller buildings and the economic and cultural benefits of preserving Route 66.

BASEBALL TO BICYCLES

USA BMX has announced that they will be moving their national headquarters from Arizona to the corner of 21st Street and Yale Avenue in Tulsa — the former home of the Tulsa Drillers. The move is projected to bring more than 50 jobs and $10 million annually in additional economic impact to the Tulsa area. The $15 million project is a result of the recently approved Vision Tulsa tax extension economic development proposal.

SNEEZE SEASON

Unsurprisingly, both Tulsa and Oklahoma City rank in the top 25 worst cities in the nation for springtime allergies, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. The findings were based on three factors: pollen score, allergy medication usage and the availability of allergists. The warm weather entices Oklahomans to go outdoors where they are forced to face the season’s biggest culprit — tree pollen. Keep those tissues handy!


NEW RESORT POOL COMING SUMMER 2016 Architects’ Design Palette - actual items and finishes subject to change.

F E A T U R E S

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Book your hotel reservation today at the Hilton Anatole for a memorable summer stay!

AnatolePool.com

#JadeWaters 1.214.748.1200

4,000 sf Leisure Pool 7,000 sf Activity Pool with Kids Play Area 630-foot Lazy River Two 180-foot Winding Water Slides Seating for Over 800 Private Cabanas and Daybeds 23-seat Swim-up Bar 120-seat Bar & Grill Event Lawns 15 New Art Pieces Exclusive for Hotel Guests Opportunities for Poolside Receptions


The State

CULTURE

From Classes to Carnegie

T

his May, Sarah Thompson will make her debut at Carnegie Hall. For six months, she has spent what precious spare time she has had between classes, band gigs, teaching and working, practicing for the moment of a lifetime. Truly though, Thompson has been working towards this for 12 years – ever since she started playing the flute. “I chose the flute because I liked the way it fit in my hands, and I liked the way the vibrations are made through the tube,” she says. “I grew up as a landscaper and irrigator with my parents, and I would always blow across the couplings because they were all dif-

ferent sizes that made different sounds. I believe I picked the flute because of that.” Thompson has always excelled in music. She made the Oklahoma All-State Orchestra in high school, was principal in the Oklahoma Summer Arts Institute Orchestra in 2012 and was principal for The Tulsa Youth Symphony her junior and senior year. She is now a flute performance major at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, where she won their 2016 Concerto Competition. She also performs in a funk band called the Quahlity Vibes and plays for the Oklahoma National Guard Band. Last year, Thompson put those skills to the test by entering the American Protégé International Woodwinds and Brass Competition. The contest invites musicians from around the world to submit an audition via video or audio for a chance to play in the prestigious New York City theater. “A private teacher once told me six years ago that if I couldn’t imagine doing anything other than performing, then I was in the right place,” Thompson says. “I keep this in mind, stay calm, and I have yet to lose the passion for conveying music in any way I can. I continue to feel the music pass through me to the audience. I have moved from just loving flute and orchestra to undertaking all types of music and their varied audiences. I feel overwhelmed with joy and excitement when I think of how I will always, no matter what it takes, be an everevolving musician.” She will be playing an unaccompanied piece by Eugene Bozza, a French contemporary composer. “I had friends and loved ones take a listen and observed their reaction to the works,” Thompson says of the selection process. “After a short while, ‘Image’ was the obvious decision. I loved that it was contemporary, and when I play through the piece, it feels so natural and fun! I have never lost passion for playing ‘Image’, and I knew I wouldn’t when I met the piece.” Thompson’s upcoming trip is certain to be a memorable one. “I have never been to New York before, and I get to go with my mother, Shelly, and [fiancé] Tucker,” she says. “We have had so much help with tickets and places to stay, so the load is light enough for us to spend our four days having as much of an experience as possible – not to mention the height of my musical career happening at 1 p.m., May 1 at Carnegie Hall!” BETH WEESE

18

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

PHOTO COURTESY SARAH THOMPSON

NSU student and accomplished flautist Sarah Thompson will perform at Carnegie Hall in May.


Restore your confidence with a natural-looking, permanent hair transplant, only $3 per graft!

405.751.LOVE

Member, Int. Society of Hair Restoration Surgery Certified, American Board of Plastic Surgery Fellow, American College of Surgeons Member, American Society of Plastic Surgeons American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery CareCredit, Prosper Healthcare Lending & Alphaeon Credit welcome

22073 Dr. Love.indd 1

3/21/16 1:14 PM

22013 Crystal Bridges.indd 1

2/18/16 9:24 AM

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

19


The State

N AT U R E

Living the Wild Life Wildlife rehabilitators make a difference for Oklahoma’s sick, injured and orphaned wildlife.

W

KAREN FLUSCHE SPENDS TIME WITH GRETA THE ELK CALF CURRENTLY IN REHAB AT FLUSCHEVILLE FARM IN MUSKOGEE. PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN

20

it is not unusual to see deer, coyotes, rabbits, raccoons, hile the extensive flooding armadillos, beavers, bats, skunks and prairie dogs, but last spring caused problems also bigger wildlife like the American bison, elk and the for many Oklahomans, Karen mountain lion. There are also several endangered species Flusche of Fluscheville Farm was dealing with an issue many like the red-cockaded woodpecker and the Ozark bigeared bat that make Oklahoma their home. people may not have considered – the effect of the The wide spectrum of habitats in Oklahoma means floods on the state’s wildlife. wildlife rehabilitators like Flusche see a variety of differFlusche, a wildlife rehabilitator, is one of many people ent animals in their refuges. in Oklahoma who dedicate their time to working with animals who require assistance. Flusche runs her wildlife “The most unusual animals I’ve had are an armadillo refuge in Muskogee with the help of her family and a few and an elk,” Flusche says. “I love them all, but raccoons are trusted volunteers. my favorite, with squirrels “I had 20 skunks, 30 coming in a close second. I opossums, six raccoons, “Oklahoma has strict laws in reference do not discriminate. I think nine deer and numerous everything is worth saving. to the conservation of its wildlife, rabbits – all at the same ‘All creatures great and time,” Flusche says. small. The good Lord made and not just anyone can come to “This season has been them all.’” the assistance of a sick, injured or mild. So far so my numBeing a wildlife rehaorphaned animal.” bers are low.” bilitator requires more than The need for wildlife just a love for animals. rehabilitators may not seem obvious at first, but OklaRehabilitators are trained to take care of animals in need homa has one of the most diverse range of habitats in the of assistance, and anyone who finds an animal that needs country. With these varied environments come an large help should contact a professional. Attempting to care for selection of wildlife, according to information provided injured wildlife without training could cause additional by Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. harm to the animal and lead to legal consquences. Oklahoma’s grasslands, mesas, canyons, swamps and “Oklahoma has strict laws in reference to the conservaforests are home to a variety of mammals, birds, reptiles, tion of its wildlife, and not just anyone can come to the fish, amphibians and invertebrates, according to the assistance of a sick, injured or orphaned animal,” says ODWC. When traveling through or living in Oklahoma Annette King Tucker of Wild Heart Ranch. Wild Heart

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016


Ranch is a non-profit wildlife rescue and rehabilitation center located in Claremore. “Not just anyone can raise baby wildlife that has been abandoned by its parents,” Tucker says. “In the state of Oklahoma, it is illegal to possess wild-born native animals without a rehabilitation permit. The penalties are hefty fines and even jail time.” Additionally, if trying to raise a wild baby without proper knowledge, a person can unwittingly deprive the animal of the correct food, hydration, environment, medical care and contact with its own species that is essential to the creature’s survival. Raising a wild animal can also cause an abnormal acceptance of human contact, and, if released, an animal may place its trust in people who may not be as caring as those who raised it, the ODWC states. “In imprint cases, which can be extremely hard and costly to reverse, the animals are often destroyed,” Tucker says. “Animals or birds ‘imprint’ to something other than their own species when they are raised by people or another species of animal. It does not recognize itself as the species that it is because it has the ‘imprint’ of whatever or whomever raised it.” Whenever you find an injured animal, its chances for survival will be increased if you can quickly get it to somebody trained to help it, says Kathy Locker of WING IT (Wildlife in Need Group in Tulsa). “We rehabilitate sick and injured wildlife by medicating, treating and giving it time to heal before releasing it back into the wild,” Locker says. “We also raise orphaned wildlife until they are old enough to be released back into the wild.” Some wildlife rehabbers specialize in certain species, while others take all kinds of animals

and birds. The ODWC keeps an extensive list of wildlife rehabbers on its website at wildlifedepartment.com. Even if you are not sure what type of animal or bird you are dealing with, most wildlife rehabbers will take the extra time to get you to the right person or organization. “We can funnel the animals to the different rehabbers, matching ages and species, as well as getting the animals to some rehabbers who may specialize in a specific species,” Locker says. There are many wildlife rehabilitators permitted within the state of Oklahoma with various qualifications and preferences, but all share a love of animals, a sense of adventure and a willingness to get wildlife back to the wild. Remember, it’s common to see baby wild animals outside during spring as a new generation makes its way into the world. Baby wild animals might seem like they need help, but unless the animal is truly orphaned or injured, there is no need to rescue, according to information provided by The Humane Society of the United States. If you’re unable to locate a rehabilitator, try contacting your local animal shelter, humane society, animal control agency, nature center, state wildlife agency or veterinarian. SHARON MCBRIDE

LEFT: ALTHOUGH NOT CONSIDERED WILDLIFE, FAITH, A PUPPY WITH A CLEFTPALATE HAS BEEN IN FLUSCHE’S CARE SINCE BIRTH. BOTTOM: FLUSCHEVILLE FARM VOLUNTEER WHITNEY BALL FEEDS AN ORPHANED GREY SQUIRREL.

KNOW WHEN TO GET HELP

These tips provided by The Humane Society of the United States can help you decide whether to take action. • Has the animal been presented by a cat or dog? • Is there evidence of bleeding? • Is there an apparent or obvious broken limb? • Is it featherless or nearly featherless and on the ground? • Is it shivering? • Is there a dead parent nearby? • Is it crying and wandering all day long? If you see any of these signs, try to find help for the animal. Never handle an adult animal without first consulting a wildlife professional, HSUS states. Even small animals can injure. Once you’ve contacted someone who can help, describe the animal and its physical condition as accurately as possible. Once you’re sure the animal needs your help, call a wildlife rehabilitator for assistance, according to HSUS. MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

21


The State

SP ORTS

Whitewater Rafting Splashes into OKC

O

THE $45.2 MILLION RIVERSPORT RAPIDS WHITEWATER RAFTING AND KAYAKING CENTER FEATURES TWO CHANNELS FOR VISITORS TO ENJOY.

PHOTOS COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY BOATHOUSE FOUNDATION

22

Oklahoma City’s Boathouse District debuts Olympic-class whitewater thrills.

klahoma City’s magical metro mecca of high-flying zip lines, speed-race slides and flat-water kayak adventures has a new jewel in its crown: the $45.2 million Riversport Rapids Whitewater Rafting and Kayaking Center, which is opening May 7 in the Boathouse District. The park provides an experience straight out of Colorado and Wyoming to people in Oklahoma, whether they’re new to whitewater or an old hand at kayaking. “There are only a few of these artificial rapids in the world. This one is the newest and most up-to-date,” says Greg Newby, public relations and social media coordinator for the Boathouse District in Oklahoma City. “It’s unique with its two channels. The competition channel is built to Olympic specifications, and the recreational one is longer but easier. Anyone age 8 and above, physically fit enough to get in and out of the boat and hold a paddle, can enjoy it.” One highlight of the grand opening includes the op-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

portunity to see Team USA’s Road to Rio Tour in action and to meet Team USA athletes. Also featured are the USRowing Central District Youth Championships, comprised of 1,500 teens competing to qualify for national championships later this year. Safety is emphasized when it comes to either channel of the rapids, Newby says. Every rafter wears a life vest and helmet, and riders don’t board until after a safety briefing with a certified guide who stays with their party the entire ride, directing the action and steering the boat. The dream of a world-class whitewater experience in downtown Oklahoma City was 15 years in the making, Newby says. Civic leaders including Oklahoma City Boathouse Foundation Executive Director Mike Knopp worked for more than a decade until procuring the financial means via the MAPS 3 penny sales tax. The new addition to the district project is in the black with zero debt. Also new to the Boathouse District and debuting at SandRidge Sky Trail and Slides during the grand open-


ing are a pair of new high-speed dry-slides that are the tallest in the U.S. Hearty enthusiasts climb about 80 feet up a spiral staircase. At the top, sliders are handed a tobogganstyle mat and then soar down at about 22 miles per hour. The racing slides are tandem and “have that kind of big drop feeling, like on a whitewater ride,” Newby says. The racing sliders accelerate at 17 miles per hour. The other existing high-speed spiral slides offer even more speed and adventure. Also featured is stand-up paddle boarding (SUP). It can be done solo for those age 8 and up, and children age 5 and up can tandem kayak with an adult. If new or nervous, instructors can get participants on the water with a quick lesson. Located near all the watery wonders is the 700-foot SandRidge Sky Zip, which takes visitors across the Oklahoma River. Just steps away, adventures await on the six-story SandRidge Sky Trail and the 80-foot Rumble Drop free-fall experience off the very top of the Sky Trail. Using PowerFan technology, the Rumble Drop gives that extreme free-fall feeling much like a bungee jump but without the bounce. The adrenaline rush continues when trying out the Extreme Air Jumper — a harness that makes 20-feet high jumps safe. A harness is also used for bungee trampoline fun. In addition to possibly renting some world-class meeting and event facilities in the compound, groups can venture onto the water to try the “Challenge the Dragon” team-building experience with a dragon boat excursion and participate in dragon boat races. Small children will enjoy the many allures of the Youth Zone, including Sky Tykes,

which is a scaled down version of the SandRidge Sky Trail. Children are harnessed in for a safe exploit a few feet off the ground. Children are not left out of the zip line experience with KidsZip, a miniature zip line where adults are also welcome. And then there is the Extreme Air Jumper, a bungee experience enabling kids of all ages to jump 20 feet into the air. Finally, visitors of all ages are welcome to take off their shoes and empty their pockets for a bouncing good time in CloudBounce, a 48-foot inflatable pillow. The SandRidge Youth Pavilion provides a place to get a bite to eat or enjoy some indoor simulator games of golf, basketball, soccer, football and baseball. Newly available is the SkyTechSport Ski and Snowboard Simulator. The Pavilion is also the site to check out bikes to use at the recently expanded Momentum Pump Track. The Chesapeake Finish Line Tower is a good place to start the day and get information and passes, as well as a chance to shop for gear, shirts, gift certificates and more. Care has been taken to make pricing affordable, Newby says. All access passes range from a day pass at $49 per person to a seasonal option of $179. Family pricing of four passes or more gives visitors a $5 per person savings. The passes cover whitewater rafting, flat-water kayaking, zip line rides, the slides and other land adventures. Purchase of Riversport Adventure passes also help fund youth outreach programs as well as athletic development and training at the OKC Boathouse Foundation’s National High Performance Center, a U.S. Olympic & Paralympics Training Site for both rowing and canoeing/kayaking. The Boathouse District can be found at 800 Riversport Drive with free parking along the Oklahoma River. Free lockers are provided under the Skytrail. To learn more, visit boathousedistrict.org or call 405.552.4040. TRACY LEGRAND

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

23


The State

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: MADI METCALF, JOHN WOOLEY, JIM HALSEY AND ALASKA HOLLOWAY.

INSIDER

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

After The Voice

Alaska Holloway and Madi Metcalf are following their dreams with the help of Jim Halsey.

F

or a vocal duet that went on to entertain millions on NBC’s The Voice, Alaska Holloway and Madi Metcalf sure got off to a rocky start. “We both liked the same boy, and that was not working,” recalls Alaska, “especially since the boy didn’t like either one of us. It was kind of ridiculous, but we were fighting over him, and then they put us together to sing a Christmas song. And we were like, ‘Nope. Huh-uh.’” Adds Madi, “I said, ‘Seriously? You’re going to put me with her? No way.’ We hated each other.” Still, even in their preteen years, the two Tulsa natives were nothing if not troupers. So, they learned the song, sang it on stage together, and then adjourned to Old Navy, where Alaska bought them matching belts. “After that,” notes Alaska, “we were best friends.” “And,” says Madi, “we learned not to like the same boys.” That initial pairing happened some years ago, when they were with American Kids Inc., a performing group founded by former Bartlesville music teacher, songwriter and performer Dr. Dale Smith. Initially called Oklahoma Kids, the still-extant nonprofit organization gave young entertainers a chance to perform in front of various kid-friendly

24

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

audiences. Madi joined the Kids at the age of 11; just about a week later, 12-year-old Alaska signed on. “Basically, it was a group of kids who could sing, dance, juggle – whatever,” explains Madi. “We did shows at nursing homes, town festivals, all sorts of things. There were a bunch of different states involved, and we had a national competition every summer in Branson.” “You felt like a superstar,” adds Alaska, “because you got to perform on all those Branson stages. It was like, ‘Hello out there!’” After years of singing together, the two got their big break in 2014 on The Voice. Chosen by Blake Shelton to compete on his team (in addition to being a fellow Oklahoman, country star Shelton is also an American Kids alumnus), they were unable to survive their initial “battle round.” “When we were first on the show, we were like, ‘Oh, if we make it to the very end, we’re going to be famous, and we’re going to have a record deal, and we’re going to get to travel, and we’ll be on the Today show,’” says Alaska with a laugh. “But after getting knocked off in the first round, we were kind of worried. We thought, ‘Well, what do we do now?’ We’d had 15 minutes on a national television show that we were pretty much trying to work a career off of, and we didn’t

know what to do because we didn’t have a manager or anything like that.” So the two returned home, after having spent some three months in Los Angeles, sequestered in a hotel with the other contestants when they weren’t shuttling back and forth to the Voice studio. Then they were introduced to the Tulsa-based impresario Jim Halsey, whose vast show-business resume includes guiding the careers of such acts as Roy Clark, the Oak Ridge Boys, Hank Thompson, the Judds and Clint Black, among many others. “We really didn’t have any idea what to expect next,” Madi says. “But the fact that we met Jim a week after we got home from filming the battle round fixed everything in our brains. We had someone who wanted to help us.” For his part, Halsey says, “They do have good voices, but that didn’t interest me as much as their personalities. You’ve got to have a good voice, you’ve got to be able to write songs. They do. But beyond that, I see them in a much broader sense as personalities, a duo that could host a network television show.” With that particular goal in mind, Alaska and Madi landed a job as halftime show hosts on Coaches’ Cabana, a cable and online program that features famed Oklahoma football figures Barry Switzer and Pat Jones


commenting on college games in real time. “The halftime show is really kind of ad-lib, where they introduce videos of other performers,” Halsey explains. “It’s not them performing so much as it is them hosting the show and their clever patter back and forth.”

“The point of music is to touch people and try to make one person’s day better. I think that’s where we want to be in five years – making a lot of people’s days better.” The Coaches’ Cabana engagement is just one part of Halsey’s “building a plan and a team” for the two. Currently, he’s concentrating much of his effort on finding them the right agent and press and publicrelations representative. While they wait, Alaska and Madi stay busy performing, writing and recording. “We’ve got one CD out, and we’re working on a new demo,” Alaska says. “We have someone here [in Tulsa] who’s a fantastic producer. His name is Kendal Osborne, and he’s in a duo himself. He has Closet Studios. We’re using him right now for our upcoming project.”

Halsey has long been known for his fiveyear plans, which map out long-term strategies for an act. His vision for Alaska and Madi, he says, “is beyond Nashville” but includes a major-label record deal, original music from the two, and steadily more prestigious touring. It’s all going to take time, he cautions, but that’s what he needs to get exactly the right elements put together. In Jim Halsey’s world, plans and dreams often intersect. With Alaska and Madi, he has two performers who aren’t afraid to dream big. “Our big dream would be having someone open for us at the BOK Center,” says Alaska. “Not to be the opening act, but to be the headliner, and do arena tours and sell albums and have people hear our songs. I remember Jim saying that the point of music is to touch people and try to make one person’s day better. I think that’s where we want to be in five years – making a lot of people’s days better.” Adds Madi, “I can’t wait for the moment we’re playing a show and we can turn our mics around and listen to the audience singing our lyrics back to us.” On the other hand, the two have what a lot of other performers don’t – a grounding in reality that anchors their aspirations.

“We say we could be happy selling out the BOK Center,” notes Madi. “Sure. Anyone could be happy doing that. But we could also be happy singing in church on the weekends for the rest of our lives. It’s just the fact that we want to sing.” “I feel the same way,” Alaska says. “One day I’m going to get older and have a family and all that stuff. But I’ll always sing. I’ll always have that. It’s what I like to do, and I’m just happy I get to do it all the time now.” “I don’t become interested in very many people,” adds Halsey. “I became interested in these ladies because not only do I feel that they’re very talented, but also I think their personalities extend beyond the music. I’ve never gotten involved with somebody I didn’t like, and I like both of them. I feel that they have a great future, and they’re just starting out.” Alaska and Madi both agree that despite their exposure on a major national TV show, they’re really just beginning to, as Alaska puts it, “climb the ladder with Jim.” “We’ve realized,” concludes Madi, “that you have to work very hard for it. That’s what we’re doing now.” JOHN WOOLEY

BETTER YOUR LIFE An Oklahoma State University MBA provided Sean Kouplen with the knowledge and credibility to be successful as a young bank president. OSU-Tulsa offered Sean the ability to earn a high-quality OSU MBA while remaining in Tulsa. That’s the reason he recommends Tulsa-area business professionals pursue an MBA at OSU-Tulsa. Learn more about Sean’s OSU-Tulsa experience at OSUinTulsa.com.

Sean Kouplen, MBA, ‘02 Chairman and CEO, Regent Bank

Downtown Tulsa 22068 OSU Tulsa.indd 1

918-GET-HERE 3/17/16 11:42 AM

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

25


The State BUSINESS

S

Stepping Outside of the Box (Office)

When it comes to viewing this summer’s hit movies, consider your options.

ummer is known as the season of blockbuster movies, but for Oklahomans who are looking for a different experience – whether that comes from a wider selection of movies or watching the biggest movies in more comfort – there are multiple options available.

Art House Cinema

Both Tulsa and Oklahoma City are homes to theaters dedicated to bringing in independent films that might not be available in the state otherwise. In Tulsa, Circle Cinema, an independent and nonprofit theater, works to provide a more in-depth experience by hosting discussions or question and answer sessions with people involved with the film. “We like to make it about more than the movie,” Circle Cinema President and Co-Founder Clark Wiens says. “We can’t always do that, but we like to find someone in Tulsa who can talk about it. If we can’t do that, we’ll try to get someone to Skype in.” Wiens says the staff works constantly to find films that are interesting to people in Oklahoma, whether it be through connections with the state or by the topic. The staff goes to film festivals every

26

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

year, looking for independent films that have a Tulsa twist to them and attempt to premiere them in town. The cinema worked with a foundation to provide screenings of Bully, a 2012 documentary about how bullying affected five children and their families. Around 3,000 to 4,000 students ended up seeing the movie. Wiens says the cinema isn’t taking individual credit for the project, but is proud to have been part of it and enjoys the opportunity to bring movies that provoke thought in viewers. “We bring those films thinking people might walk away with a mind-changing idea,” he says. “We strongly encourage people to stay behind and talk about the film, and we have a lobby just for people to sit and talk.” The Oklahoma City Museum of Art Samuel Roberts Noble Theater is the only art house venue in Oklahoma City, and film curator Michael Anderson says the theater provides the community access to film and movies they wouldn’t have a chance to see anywhere else on the big screen. The museum has one screen and holds around 400 screenings a year, showing 100 to 150 new films annually. “In general, we do have a very passionate public that’s quite loyal


to us,” Anderson says. “Oklahoma City viewers in particular are actually quite adventurous and enjoy films that are more challenging in how the stories are told. We get big audiences for very difficult films.” The theater also attempts to program films that tie in with the exhibits in the theater. Anderson says the theater is programming films that will complement the museum’s Matisse in His Time exhibit that opens June 18, including French films, films about Matisse and a film which has a color palette inspired by Matisse. Visitors can also buy tickets that give them access to other parts of the museum, such as the “Art after 5” events that provide access to the rooftop bar or “Dinner and a Movie” packages that include dinner in the Museum Café. In addition, Anderson says the museum has a full bar that caters the screenings. The museum is also planning to launch a film society that will provide discussion after films and question and answer sessions with directors and filmmakers. Circle Cinema and OKCMOA have a reciprocal admission agreement, so anyone who is a member of one theater will receive the membership discount at both venues.

Cinema in Style

People who are looking for more traditional summer movies but would like to make the experience a little more special also have options in both the Tulsa and Oklahoma City areas. Warren Theatres, with locations in Moore and Broken Arrow, has built a reputation for providing luxury accommodations for filmgoers. “[Company owner Bill] Warren was very specific that he wants people to come in and, once they step into the lobby, the first thing out of their mouth is, ‘Wow,’” says Dan Gray, vice president of operations for Warren Theatres. “He feels that is exactly what his customers should expect when they step into his theaters because they’re coming in to escape reality for a while.” While the entire theater was built to be impressive, two options are also provided to create a more comfortable environment than people receive with a standard movie ticket. Balcony seating in the the largest auditoriums have loveseat-style seating and a straight ahead viewing angle of the screen, and the Director’s Suites are smaller, more intimate and more exclusive, Gray says. Both types of theaters have a full service wait staff to bring people popcorn, drinks or dinner. “They’ll take care of you so you don’t have to stand in line at the concession stand,” Gray said. For parents who would like to take their children to a movie but worry about them getting restless, the two largest auditoriums in Broken Arrow and Moore provide special rooms parents can take their children to so they can finish the movie and not have to leave the theater. The enclosed rooms have large bay windows and separate volume control knobs. Moviegoers also have options to see the latest releases without ever leaving their cars – the Admiral Twin Drive-in in Tulsa, which is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year, and Winchester Drive-in in

Oklahoma City are two of a handful of drive-in movie theaters still operating in the state. Both are open on weekends only and require an FM radio to hear the movie’s audio. The Admiral Twin Drive-in is currently open, and the Winchester Drive-in expects to be open by the beginning of this month. JUSTIN MARTINO

OPPOSITE PAGE: CLARK WIENS, PRESIDENT AND COFOUNDER OF CIRCLE CINEMA, SAYS THE THEATER ENJOYS BRINGING NEW IDEAS TO OKLAHOMA AUDIENCES.

PHOTO BY ADAM MURPHY

ABOVE: WARREN THEATRES HAS BUILT A REPUTATION FOR PROVIDING A LUXURIOUS THEATER EXPERIENCE. PHOTOS COURTESY WARREN THEATRES

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

27


AUCTION

June 13th @ 10am - 7219 S. Evanston Ave - Tulsa, OK 74136

One of America’s premier estates, “House of Four Seasons” sits on approximately 3 acres with its Gothic like flat balconied rooftops providing panoramic views of South Tulsa. Inspired by the owner's passion for 17th Century French art and architecture, construction of the nearly 20,000 sq. ft. chateau took a decade and required the input of countless craftsman, artisans and artifact purveyors to create a structure that's second to none. This property will be sold “As-Is, Where-Is” with owner’s confirmation.

For Auction Terms, Bidder Requirements or more information, call Laura Hawkins of McGraw Realtors at 918-260-7885. Listed online at: http://www.mcgrawrealtors.com/property/view/201977/

918.260.7885


Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Flavors of Summer Whether bought or grown yourself, fresh fruit is one of the best things about this time of year.

With the Oklahoma weather finally warming, it’s time to focus on the best tastes that summer has to offer: fresh fruit. Whether you visit a local farmer’s market or use our guide on container gardening to grow yourself, fresh strawberries are a welcome addition to any parfait or to top ice cream and shortcake.

PHOTO BY MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

Oklahomans have plenty of other chances to celebrate fresh fruit with area festivals. From the Stilwell Strawberry Festival this month to the Porter Peach Festival in July, there are plenty of opportunities to enjoy the weather and fresh desserts at the same time.

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29


Container Gardening

Fruits and veggies star in seasonal garden pots.

T

hink of your summer garden as a theater with a cast of colorful performers. Some of those “actors” on stage can be dramatic containers starring fruits, veggies and flowers. Container gardening is growing popular as more people downsize, living in apartments with balconies or condos with postage-stamp lawns. It also takes some of the toil out of traditional gardening. It’s as easy to grow fruits and vegetables in a pot as it is to plant a row of asparagus, which needs ample ground for growth. Paul James, of Tulsa’s Southwoods Nursery, says container gardening for fruits and vegetables blossomed as breeders created selections designed for container gardening. “The vines of a cucumber can grow 20 to 22 feet long in a traditional garden,” James says. “In a container, vines grow only 2 to 2 ½ feet. Older folks, my ‘Ben Gay gardeners,’ love container garden-

30

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

M. J. VAN DEVENTER

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN

Life & Style GUIDE

ing. Millennials also like this trend, inspired by the emphasis on fresh, locally-grown produce. You can’t get more local than your own backyard.” Among fruits James knows thrive in containers are strawberries, blueberries, raspberries and dwarf fruit trees. Perennial vegetables, especially peppers and tomatoes, also grow well in containers. “Any type of container – even old wheelbarrows – works well with adequate drainage and well-drained soil,” James suggests. “Never use garden soil. It compacts like concrete.” Brad Porter, of South Tulsa’s Hardscape Materials, says container choice is essential to success. Terra cotta pots are popular. Porter favors the Vietnamese pots Hardscape imports. “The Vietnamese have the best clay in the world for pottery,” Porter notes. “It’s extremely dense, baked at high temperatures for a long time and frost-proof. Mexican and Chinese pottery is porous, soaks up moisture, cracks or breaks in cold temperatures.” Garden centers offer pots in a colorful variety of shapes, sizes and materials. While pottery pots are favorites, concrete and fiberglass have merit. Choose the location of your pot before planting. If you like portability, save your back. Choose fiberglass. Porter says, “Container gardens dress up areas where you can’t plant. You can add color, a broader range of plants near your home, then bring them inside in winter, especially tropicals. It’s also a good way to get your feet wet about gardening if you’re a novice gardener.” Brandi Mosley, of Oklahoma City’s TLC Garden Center, suggests Smart Pots, an Oklahoma product in varied sizes. With Oklahoma’s patchwork soil conditions, Mosley says, “The Smart Pot is constructed of fabric that provides good aeration and drains well.” She also recommends a TLC potting soil, mixed with a back-to-earth compost. The cost for container gardening is minimal compared to traditional garden planting. Mosley says one pot, soil and plants is about $50 to begin container gardening. Consider compatibility when planting a container flower garden. Some plants are territorial and temperamental. They may not like their roommates. Like children, they also have brief illnesses and contract diseases. These garden experts agree a garden of any size, from a small container to a lush acreage, is well worth the effort in any season.


2014

Walter & associates realtors 1319 East 35th Street,Tulsa, OK 74105 918.743.2001 | walterandassociates.com

SPRING INTO SAVINGS!

22086 Silex.indd 1

3/29/16 10403 8:44 AM Walter & Associates.indd 1

Heating

SPRING SPECIAL

$89

Professional 26-point A/C system tune-up Call Airco for details Expires 5/31/16

$20 OFF 22075 Airco.indd 1

• Cooling • Plumbing • Electrical

$150 0FF

Hot Water Heater Installation

-------------------Save up to

$500

On A Tankless Water Heater

Call Airco for details. Expires 5/31/16

Up to

$9,150

in available incentives • $5,000 PSO Rebate • $1,700 From Lennox • $1,950 From ONG • $500 Tax Credit

Tulsa

918.252.5667 Oklahoma City

405.715.2665 Grand Lake

Call Airco for details.

918.782.2263 918.786.7171

CALL TODAY! LIMITED-TIME!

www.aircoservice.com

= BIG SAVINGS

Any Service Repair ASK ABOUT 0% FINANCING Call Airco for details

5/15/14 2/2/16 9:12 5:00 AM PM

4/11/16 11:43 AM

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

31


Life & Style

L I V I N G S PA C E

A Most Charming Home An H-shaped midtown Tulsa residence captures the attention of a major design publication.

G

By Molly Bullock • Photos by Alyssa Rosenheck

iven Tulsa’s world-renowned design legacy, naming any one home the city’s “Most Charming” seems like a precarious venture. Yet in October Elle Decor did just that, featuring the midtown residence of Sara and John Coonce as an online house tour. Bailey Austin of Austin Bean Design Studio designed the H-shaped home around axial relationships that are evident the moment you step inside. From the entry hall, your line of sight is a straight shot across the cerulean

THE LIVING SPACE FEATURES A VARIETY OF TEXTURES AND A SERENE PALETTE OF WHITES, GREYS AND BLUES. A VIEW OF THE POOL SERVES AS AN APPROPRIATE BACKDROP.

32

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016


MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

33


Life & Style

TOP: THE FORMAL DINING ROOM ALLOWS FOR ENTERTAINING WITH STYLE. MIDDLE: A SPACIOUS, OPEN-CONCEPT KITCHEN SERVES AS THE HEART OF THE H-SHAPED HOME. BOTTOM: THE HOUSE USES DURABLE INDOOR/OUTDOOR FABRICS IN HIGH-USE AREAS TO GIVE THE DESIGN LONGEVITY.

34

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

cocktail pool to the simple geometry of an open-air pool house. Perhaps no other moment in the home is quite so impactful, but a few come close – iterations of the view beckon as you move throughout the ground floor. “You have these big axial moments that set you up for a vantage point of the pool in almost all locations for entertaining,” Austin says. At the center of the H, the entry hall is the home’s main circulation point. A corridor leads to the more private west wing, which holds the master suite. The public entertaining spaces – an open kitchen and living room and a formal dining room – converge on the east side of the house. “Off the dining, we also have a courtyard on the front of the house,” Austin says. “So you have that same axial relationship when you’re looking from the pool house. Everywhere you look, you have a termination point that’s really beautiful.”

ACHIEVING THE LOOK

Classic architectural trim work throughout the home laid the groundwork for minimal but highimpact interiors. Layered textures and bold moments of contrast balance and add interest to a serene


www.nathanharmon.com

T: 918.269.6284

21926 Nathan Harmon.indd 1

3549 South Harvard, Tulsa 918-742-9027 1/25/16 18958 1:48 PM Tonis.indd 4

3/23/16 12:17 PM

Since 1964

Specializing in frameless heavy glass shower doors, mirrors, framed shower doors, glass tops and insulated glass units.

Don Tracy Glass Co. 1335 S. HARVARD ● TULSA, OK 74112 OFFICE: (918) 744-1815 FAX: (918) 744-0917

www.austin-bean.com T 918.794.7020 • 409B E. 8th St. Tulsa, OK 74120

18222 Don Tracy Glass.indd 1

www.dontracyglass.com

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

35

12/14/14 4:39 PM


Life & Style

palette of whites, greys and blues. Austin selected several more durable and indoor/outdoor fabrics to give the design longevity and accommodate the family’s two teenage children and dog. She says skimping on upholstery costs in high-use areas is a common mistake that can cost clients more in the long run. “People tend to refrain from investing in the pieces they use all the time, and that’s what causes them to look the worst,” Austin says. “When really, they should put the most money into the pieces that are in their den, so they look the best and they hold up better.”

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

TOP LEFT: A PRISTINE COURTYARD HIGHLIGHTS THE HOME’S MAIN ENTRY. MIDDLE LEFT: NEARLY ALL LOCATIONS FOR ENTERTAINING INCLUDE A VANTAGE POINT OF THE POOL. BOTTOM LEFT: THE HOUSE WAS DESIGNED WITH A NEUTRAL PALETTE OF WHITES, GREYS AND BLUES. TOP RIGHT: THE CERULEAN COCKTAIL POOL IS ACCENTED WITH AN INVITING OPEN-AIR POOL HOUSE. BOTTOM RIGHT: ATTENTION TO EVERY ASPECT OF THE DESIGN ADDS TO THE OVERALL EFFECT.


MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

37


Life & Style

THE NEW NEUTRAL

TOP: NAVY ACCENTS AND SHIPLAP PANELED WALLS HIGHLIGHT THE BEDROOM DESIGN, CREATING DEPTH AND CONTRAST. BOTTOM LEFT: THE STAIRCASE FEATURES THE SAME CLASSIC ARCHITECTURAL TRIM WORK THAT IS UNIFORM THROUGHOUT THE HOME. BOTTOM RIGHT: THE MORE PRIVATE WEST WING HOLDS THE MASTER SUITE FEATURING HIGH, BEAMED CEILINGS.

38

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

The reinvention of navy as a neutral has emerged as a designer staple over the past few years. Austin applied variations of the color to create depth and contrast in the Coonce home. The effect is exquisite in the formal dining room’s indigo crushed velvet draperies and coordinating upholstery trim. The onceconventional hue is also superbly employed in the bedroom of the Coonces’ teen daughter. Plush powder blue velvet surrounds a custom oversized lumbar pillow in hand-block-printed Galbraith & Paul. Saturated ikat draperies offset breezy shiplap paneled walls – a look that’s at once timeless and distinctively fresh. “She can be 30, and with very minor changes, that room is still going to look awesome,” Austin says. Capturing the attention of a major design publication like Elle Decor was a 2015 goal for Austin and co-owner Mel Bean, who will celebrate four years of business in November. “For Tulsa, it’s great,” Austin says. “Tulsa’s had so many great designers in the past that have been in national publications. We just hope to be the next generation of designers that are reaching a national level of exposure.” Editor’s note: A writer and editor based in Tulsa, Molly Bullock was employed by Austin Bean Design Studio from 2013 to 2014 and assisted with the Coonce project in an auxiliary capacity. She no longer has professional ties to the firm.


Mommy Maids

• Residential or Commercial • Call for FREE Estimates

Gift Certificates Available! $75 for 2 hours of Basic Cleaning Expires 5/31/16

918.938.8222

www.mommy-maids.com “It’s hard to compete with a Mom’s touch.”

22094 Hardesty Center for Dance Education.indd 1 18405 Mommy Maids 1-8v.indd 1

4/6/16 2:55 PM

4/9/16 11:20 AM

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! May 19-30, 2016 Tulsa, OK • University of Tulsa - Case Tennis Center

NCAA.com/Tickets Hosted by

NCAA and Share the Experience are trademarks owned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

22095 NCAA Tennis.indd 1

4/11/16 4:34 PM

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

39


Life & Style

TREND

Spring into Denim Dressed up or dressed down, our romance with comfortable denim never goes out of style or season. MANOLO BLAHNIK CAROLYNE LEOPARD-PRINT DENIM SLINGBACK PUMP, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

J. BRAND ASHBURY SNEAKER-FLARE JEAN, $238, ABERSONS.

REBECCA MINKOFF CADY DENIM LACEUP PLATFORM SANDAL, $250, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. BELLA DAHL DENIM LACE-UP DRESS, $196, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

EAN,

ERUL

SAMA

EC MATT ARLIE

$620,

H

EAR.

YEW

ON E

UNS

BR ICKS

BAJRA BLUE LENO WEAVE STOLE, $325, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

EAR K

EYEW

JOHNNY WAS LIVELLI SCARF, $102, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

SPLENDID MERIDIEN STRIPED LOOSE-KNIT HOODIE, $128, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JIMMY CHOO DAWN DENIM LEATHE R ESPADRILLE SNEAKER, $425, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PAIGE DENIM JIMMY-JIMMY SHORT, $129, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JIMMY CHOO ABEL DENIM POINT-TOE PUMP, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

.

NS

SO BER

8, A

J

40

NIM

D DE

AN . BR

, $23 KET

JAC

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN

JIMMY CHOO LOCKETT PETITE DENIM CROSSBODY BAG, $1,450, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


May 2016 SCI_Ok Mag (CS).pdf

1

3/21/16

10:25 AM

22097 Blue Dome.indd 1

4/14/16 22067 9:30 AM OKC MOA.indd 1

3/17/16 11:23 AM

Get ready for summer with FDA-cleared CoolSculpting the non-invasive, no-downtime treatment that can reduce unwanted fat that resists diet and exercise. CoolSculpting is FDA-cleared to reduce fat on the abs, flanks, thighs and double chin.

show more of less! before

after

$100 OFF CoolSculpting

procedure by edward becker, md

As seen on The Doctors Show, The Today Show and Good Morning America!

MODEL

Call for Your Free Consultation: 918.948.6375 www.skincareinstitute.net 6565 South Yale Avenue Lobby Level, Tulsa Special promotion valid until 5.31.16, and may not be combined. Must mention this ad to receive special. Individual results vary. Other restrictions may apply. 22072 Skin Care Institute.indd 1

5 201

4/9/16 9:43 AM

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

41


Life & Style

ACCESSORIZE

Toes and Totes

CLARE V. BACKPACK TOTE, $524, ABERSONS.

The warmer temps encourage us to set those toes free in some of the hottest sandal designs while packing everything needed for the day’s adventures in a convenient, stylish tote.

K. JACQUES CORK PLATFORM SANDAL, $283, ABERSONS.

B. MAY WHITE TOTE, $710, ABERSONS.

TORY BURCH MULTICOLOR STRIPED LEATHER TOTE, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TORY BURCH PACKABLE STRIPED TOTE, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TORY BURCH FLEMING QUILTED LEATHER ESPADRILLE SLIDE SANDAL, $275, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STUART WEITZMAN TRAILMIX JEWELED SUEDE FLAT SANDAL, $398, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LANVIN WEDGE, $695, ABERSONS.

TORY BURCH THEA WOVEN SATCHEL, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JIMMY CHOO NATE LEATHER WEDGE SANDAL, $625, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

42

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN

JIMMY CHOO NICKEL-CHAIN TRIM LEATHER SANDAL, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TORY BURCH KERRINGTON SQUARE TOTE, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


ALEXIS BITTAR ELEMENTS MYSTIC PINK TOURMALINE, LABRADORITE, BLACK MOTHER-OF-PEARL, RASBERRY CORUNDUM AND CRYSTAL CUFF BRACELET, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

REBECCA LANKFORD TURQUOISE NECKLACE, $438, ABERSONS.

ALEXIS BITTAR GOLDEN SPHERE HOWLITE TURQUOISE & LUCITE TIERED TASSEL PENDANT NECKLACE, $195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SILVER HEART TASSLE NECKLACE, $48, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

DAVID URSO BULLEYE BRACELET, $1,188, ABERSONS.

STEPHANIE KANTIS HAMMERED LINK NECKLACE, $545, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ACCESSORIZE

Bring on the Bling

EMANUELLA DUCA SILVER BRACELET, $1,875, ABERSONS.

Add some sparkle and glam to your casual spring style with the latest in silver, gold and turquoise designs.

STEPHANIE KANTIS ENAMEL CUFF BRACELET, $385, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STEPHANIE KANTIS LOVE CUFF BRACELET, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STEPHANIE KANTIS TRIO ROUND BRACELET, $385, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

REBECCA LANKFORD TURQUOISE EARRING, $388, ABERSONS.

RENE ESCOBAR SILVER HOOD AND DIAMOND EARRING, $1,850, ABERSONS.

GOLD FILIGREE EARRING, $18, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

STEPHANIE KANTIS EXPRESSWAY HAMMERED CUFF BRACELET, $245, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

43


Life & Style

D E S T I N AT I O N

Visit a National Treasure

With plenty of wildlife, natural formations and activities, Yellowstone has something for all nature lovers.

Y

ellowstone National Park is the world’s first national park. This American treasure is a geological and wildlife experience full of flora, fauna and Old West ambience. Located in Wyoming, Yellowstone also borders small areas in Montana and Idaho. Geysers, geothermal pools, waterfalls, fumaroles, mud pots, hot springs and lakes are part of the beauty of this splendid destination.

LODGING:

One of the most popular choices for lodging is Old Faithful Inn, but the pine lodge chateau known for its 85-foot stone fireplace is closed for renovations and will not reopen until 2017. Fortunately, there are multiple other options for travelers. Lake Yellowstone Hotel and Cabins, located on the lakeshore, was built in 1891 and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The hotel has been expanded and renovated multiple times. Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel and Cabins, a departure point for motor coach tours, will be undergoing renovations through during the winter seasons for the next two years but will still be available for summer lodging. The Hampton Inn West Yellowstone is another option that may appeal to families who are looking for lodging with a swimming pool.

LUXURY LODGING:

For those seeking cabins and lodging with more amenities, you can consider the following accommodations all still within driving distance to Yellowstone. Big Sky Vacation Rentals, which is located 45 minutes from Yellowstone National Park, provides loding for those who wish to experience nature without getting too rustic. Brooks Lake Lodge was a pioneer of glamorous camping, known as glamping, and features a spa.

ACTIVITIES:

No matter where you stay, the real attractions of Yellowstone are the sights and activities. Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is a 20-mile chasm that includes cascading waterfalls and alpine pastures. Kayak across Yellowstone Lake, take scenic boat cruises or rafting trips. Southwards to Teton Range, there are scenic lake cruises and float trips on Snake River.

44

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016


TIPS

• Travelers have recommended flying to Salt Lake City or nearby airports and renting SUVs from there. Driving the trails, with their children as a captive audience, is a favorite activity for many parents. • Visiting in mid to late June will allow you to see Yellowstone with snow on the ground, but the warmer weather means roads will be drivable. You also won’t miss the experience of seeing the park’s abundance of wildlife. • Day hiking is an option, but be prepared for brief but intense lightning and hail storms that may occur. • A couple of nights at a bed and breakfast in nearby Jackson Hole is worthwhile, especially to see the roaming elk.

Preserved hydrothermal vistas and wild animals are part of Yellowstone’s allure. The ongoing volcanic activity can be studied at the Canyon Visitor Education Center to learn how volcanoes, geysers and geological history influenced the area. Check out Wild West Adventures to experience Yellowstone as the pioneers did with stagecoach and horseback rides among the sagebrush, complete with a traditional cowboy-style, western cookout dinner. You can ride along Garnet Hill or ride out to Yancey’s Hole and enjoy cowboy food and coffee brewed over the campfire.

There are also motor coach and historic yellow bus tours available for visitors. A fourhour tour departs from either Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel or Canyon Lodge. EcoTour Adventures Jackson Hole offers experienced guides who point out wildlife for observation and photo opportunities. Perhaps the best part of visiting Yellowstone is that you can make it part of your route to other wonderful states and landmarks in that region of the United States. A minimum visit of two days to as long as a week is recommended depending on your preference. GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


Life & Style

HEALTH

Doula or No Doula?

The modern-day doula can be a valuable member of an obstetrical team, and their use is growing in popularity.

G

iving birth is hard work. It is exhausting for the mother, her partner and their baby. It can also be an incredible experience to cherish forever. And more women are choosing an additional member of the “birth team” – the doula. The word “doula” comes from a Greek word meaning “female helper.” For most of history, women had other women to help during labor and delivery. This is the idea behind a modern birth doula. “Our birth doulas provide continuous support during labor to help families feel safe, calm and actively involved in the birth of their baby,” says Amy Walton, owner of Better Birth Now and a birth and postpartum doula. A doula is a non-medical professional who assists an expectant mother through pregnancy and birth. The doula provides information and advice during the birth planning process and comfort, support and advocacy during labor and immediately after the birth. Doulas provide resources on the labor and delivery options available to expectant families. They also offer suggestions for techniques to help couples work together and help the mother cope both physically and emotionally with childbirth, says Amy Townsend, owner of Little Ways Birthing Services and vice president of the Doula Association of Central Oklahoma and a doula. Doulas use experience and expertise in childbirth to provide continuous care for the laboring mother and augment the support provided by a partner or other friends and family members. “She will assist in setting a comfortable atmosphere, be a calming and constant presence, use positive af

46

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

firmations for encouragement, gently remind the parents of their desires for this birth, suggest position changes conducive to the birthing situation, offer comfort techniques, as well as provide breaks for the partner and help with any siblings present,” says Michaela Ahmad of Serene Doula Services, president of the DACO and a doula who trained with DONA International, the oldest and largest doula association, according to its website. Ashley Ryder, mother of two, recounts how, when she was past her due date with her daughter, her doula was available by phone to provide encouragement and coping mechanisms. Ryder’s doula also was a source of encouragement during the birth and first hours of her son’s life. “She was completely attentive to me at all times, anticipating contractions and helping in whatever way I wanted,” Ryder says. “She had the birth experience and woman’s intuition that was an asset to us as first time parents.” Ryder’s doula helped her and her husband prepare a birth plan and worked with hospital staff to increase the chances of the unmedicated, natural and memorable birth experience the Ryders wanted. The use of doula services appears to gradually be on the rise, and doulas can be a valuable member of the “obstetrical team,” says Dr. Guy Sneed of St. John Owasso Center for Women’s Health and Medical Director of St. John Clinic. “In addition to expert care from the medical team, and the love and companionship of their partners, doulas can offer continuous reassurance, encouragement and comfort to mothers,” he says. BONNIE RUCKER


Enjoy Dinner and Drinks at Newport Grill at Bradley Fair

Experience World-Class Live Musical Performances

Feed Lemurs, Rhinos, Giraffes and More at Tanganyika Wildlife Park

Play and Learn at One of 33 Museums and Galleries

Extraordinary friendliness and convenience.

Exciting events, a surprising number of restaurant options, and can’t-miss attractions. One remarkable city for your weekend getaway. It’s time to explore all that Wichita has to offer! Plan your getaway at VisitWichita.com

VisitWichita.com 800.288.9424


Life & Style

SCENE

Drew and Linda Edmondson, Jack and Becky Frank, Michael Brose, Carnivale, Mental Health Association Oklahoma.

Lucky Lamons, Meredith Siegfried Madden, Pete Madden, MD, Jono and Jenny Helmerich, Richard Boone, Street Party Planning, St. John Medical Center.

G. T. and Susan Bynum, Broadway Bash, Theatre Tulsa. Pritee Patel, Sunayna Kumar, Aprajita Bajaj, Monica Basu, Carnivale, Mental Health Association Oklahoma.

Gale Bollinger, Roy and Bev Smith, Alice Dahlgren, OKC Memory Gala, Alzheimer’s Association.

Evan and Elizabeth Kelamis, Tadd Bogan, Casa Casino, Tulsa Casa.

Chera Kimiko and Chuck Zoellner, Casa Casino, Tulsa Casa.

Steve and Susan Prescott, Spring Dinner, Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center.

Mike and Debby Hampton, Marnie and Clayton Taylor, Celebration Of Recovery, A Chance To Change.

Heather and Todd Lasseigne, Rebekah Tennis, Raj Basu, Tip-Toe Through The Tulips, Tulsa Botanic Garden.

48

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

Randi Wightman, Chris Hartshorn and Lane Hartshorn, Create Gala, Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa.

Cara Crain, Caroline Crain, Jackson Crain, Harweldon Awards, Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa.


Karen Weidner, R.N. and Kristen Rice, M.D. Advanced skin treatments and cosmetic dermatology.

SCHEDULE A COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION TODAY!

Now welcoming Kesha Buster, M.D.

918-712-3223

1325 E 35th Street Suite B

21389 Utica Square Skin Care.indd 1

4/7/16 10:56 AM

and

NURSERY FLORIST & GIFTS

PETAL PUSHERS

NOW TOGETHER AT ONE LOCATION

3009 East 101st St Tulsa, OK 74137 918.528.3828 • www.TheGardenTrug.com

22069 Garden Trug 2.indd 1

$25 off

ALL HYDRAFACIAL TREATMENTS DURING MAY *Mention this ad to receive your discount.

918.293.1287 / www.skinrenewaloftulsa.com

3/22/16 22087 8:58 AM Skin Renewal.indd 1

3/29/16 10:27 AM

Dr. Melanie R. Blackstock, M.D. 6465 South Yale Ave. Suite 310 918.236.3000 www.monalisatulsa.com

Dr. Blackstock and her staff cordially invite you to attend an open house on Tuesday, May 24th at 5:30 p.m. Please RSVP by calling our office at 918.236.3000. This is a great way to learn about the Mona Lisa Touch.

MonaLisa Touch is a trademark of DEKA M.E.L.A. Srl – Calenzano - Italy. 22091 Dr. Melanie Blackstock (Mona Lisa).indd 1

©2015 Cynosure, Inc. 4/13/16 9:05 AM

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

49


l u C

50

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Claud’s Hamburgers

3834 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa Claud’s Hamburgers has the distinction of not only being in business for more than 60 years, but also of being owned by the same family for all that time. The restaurant was originally opened by Claud Hobson in October 1954 on Admiral Place and moved to its current location in 1965, where it has remained since. The restaurant is now run by Claud’s son Robert Hobson, who took over from his brother Cliff around two years ago. Robert Hobson says the restaurant works to keep the food at Claud’s as consistent as the ownership, working with vendors to try to keep the same ingredients in the burgers. “The consistency of the product we’ve been putting out over the years is an asset,” Robert Hobson says. “We kind of pride ourselves on the fact someone can come in here and eat something their grandparents ate, or something very similar.” That sort of consistency is important to some people whose memories of the restaurants may stretch back to when they were children and ate at the restaurant with their grandparents. “Almost daily we hear something like that,” Hobson says. “I hear a lot of conversations about it. You’ll hear a 50-year-old guy talk about how his grandpa brought him here, and you realize you’ve been here a long time.”

Claud’s Hamburgers


y r o t s i H y r il na f o e t s a T A

ts to n i o j r e al burg n o 10, tall i t 9 i 1 d o a t r t k From g bac n i t dance a n d u s b e a s u n i steakho ood food are tate. dg rS tales an oss the Soone acr

Jamil’s Steakhouse

3823 E. 51st St., Tulsa Jamil’s is one of Tulsa most legendary restaurants – and possibly its oldest steakhouse. It was opened by Jim “Jamil” Elias in 1945, and it continues on today by his son Tyrone Elias. The restaurant is best-known for its thick hickory-grilled steaks and seafood all served with their famous Lebanese hors d’oeuvres.

J. Bruner’s Haunted House

7101 Miramar Blvd., Oklahoma City The original owners, Marian and Arthur Thibault opened The Haunted House restaurant in1964 – one of the original fine dining establishments in Oklahoma City. For more than 50 years, unrivaled steaks and seafood have been served in the dimly lit 1935 mansion alleged to have been the site of three murders. Located seven miles from Downtown in the middle of the woods, the restaurant has always celebrated its spooky atmosphere.

Hank’s Hamburgers

8933 E. Admiral Pl., Tulsa This tiny restaurant has been making the exact same secretly-seasoned, grill-pressed burgers since 1949. Many of Hank’s hungry patrons enjoy their burger patties piled four high on the famous Big Okie, weighing in at a solid pound. For dessert, try one of Hank’s chocolate covered peanut butter balls.

Old Plantation Restaurant

Medicine Park Town Center Built in 1910, the Old Plantation was a popular place for the vacationing rich during the Roaring Twenties. In 1966, Rex and Ruby Leath reopened the restaurant and ran it for nearly 35 years. The restaurant was restored and again reopened in 2008 and has become known for their steaks, seafood and a great selection of sandwiches, salads and appetizers. Don’t forget to visit The Tap Room – the Old Plantation’s original bar.

Click’s Steakhouse

409 Harrison St., Pawnee In 1962, Clifton “Click” Nelson opened a bar and MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

51


52

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

Cattlemen’s Steakhouse

1309 S. Agnew Ave., OKC Oklahoma’s oldest continually-operating restaurant, Cattlemen’s Steakhouse was opened in 1910 and has been in the same location ever since. With a history spanning more than 100 years, Cattlemen’s has its share of interesting history – including a previous owner acquiring the restaurant over a throw of the dice. Although current owner Dick Stubbs purchased the restaurant in 1990 by more traditional means, he feels he has some of the same luck that helped out the previous owners. “I do feel like a winner because the restaurant has grown every single year since we got it,” he says. When Stubbs bought the restaurant, which was always known as a steakhouse, he changed the name from Cattlemen’s Café to Cattlemen’s Steakhouse and began featuring steak more than café food. The restaurant has 10 different steaks on its breakfast menu alone, and also it offers more unusual items like brains and eggs on the breakfast menu and lamb fries, which are mostly sold as appetizers. The restaurant has had its share of celebrity diners, including President George H.W. Bush, who visited while he was in office. It has also been featured on several television shows and has been mentioned in at least six different books, Stubbs says. About 27 percent of Cattlemen’s customers are from out of state, but the steakhouse’s new reputation as a destination restaurant for some people hasn’t changed Stubbs’ focus. “We still cater to the Oklahoma customer,” he says. “We have some customers who eat with us every single day. We do breakfast, lunch and dinner, so we’re pretty much satisfying all walks of life here in our restaurant.”


grill originally named Click’s Alamo Club. Besides being known for his outstanding steaks, Click was also known for his colorful language and tirades. Over the course of years, and several different owners, the building has undergone numerous changes, and the menu has expanded. However, the quality of the steaks and the unique aging and preparation technique has remained the same.

Coney I-lander

2838 E. 11th St., Tulsa The Tulsa chain dates back to 1926 when Greek immigrant Christ Economou opened the first location in Downtown Tulsa. Who can resist the Coney I-Lander’s signature dish of a slow-grilled hot dog topped with chili, onions and mustard in a steamed bun? At the Downtown restaurant rows of coneys cooking on the grill are visible to hungry sidewalk viewers – luring them in for a bite.

My Place Bar-B-Q

2021 Gibson St., Muskogee A Muskogee staple since 1927, My Place Bar-B-Q may have lost a bit of its charm when it said goodbye to its original, tiny building, but it still serves up the same mouthwatering ribs, smoked meats and tasty side items that they have been famous for since the beginning. Don’t forget to pick up a bottle of their famous sauce on your way out!

Meers Store & Restaurant

Hwy 115, Meers Once a busy mining town in the Wichita Mountains, all that remains now is the Meers Store and Restaurant, home of the Meersburger, a burger seven inches in diameter made exclusively from prizewinning Texas Longhorn beef raised on the family’s own ranch. The restaurant has served a delicious selection of steaks, barbecue, home-baked bread and desserts since 1901.

Cattlemen’s Steakhouse

Eisc he Bar n’s

Pete’s Place

120 SW 8th St., Krebs Authentic Italian cooking has been luring travelers to Pete’s Place since 1925. In addition to the family-style helpings of homemade spaghetti, meatballs, ravioli and sausage, hungry patrons will also enjoy the handcrafted Choc beer served at the onsite brewery, all made with the same recipes that have been passed down from generation to generation.

Eischen’s Bar

109 S. 2nd St., Okarche If you ever get a hankering for some great fried chicken, stop by the oldest bar in Oklahoma. Originally known as Eischen’s Saloon, the restaurant was established in 1896 by Peter Eischen and was open until statehood. Shortly after prohibition in 1906, it was reopened as Eischen’s Bar by Nick and Jack Eischen, son and grandson of Peter Eischen. The “oldest bar” recognition comes from the actual ornate bar that was carved in Spain in the 1800s. Nick “Curly” Eischen won the bar on a hunting trip in the 1940s. Although much of the building was destroyed in a 1993 fire, a piece of the antique, hand-carved back bar was preserved and remains on display today. “There’s a lot of memories here,” says Edward Eischen, one of the current owners. “Back in the day we had a grocery store, too.” Although the store eventually closed, the restaurant and bar lived on. “After the fire, the reopening was amazing,” Eischen says. “Lots of TV shows, radio stations, etc. created a lot of buzz and more and more people heard about the great chicken. We just keep on making the best chicken around, and people come from everywhere to eat it.” The fried chicken is made using George (Boog) Eischen’s 1960 recipe. It’s so popular they can go through 900 to 1,200 pieces of fried chicken just on Saturday, Eischen says. If you order the chicken, come hungry because a regular order consists of eight pieces; two breasts, two thighs, two wings and two legs. It is served with sliced white bread, sweet pickles, dill pickles and onion slices. People also come in to buy the colorful T-shirts and the chance to brag they have eaten in one of Oklahoma’s oldest, family-oriented establishments.

Waylan’s Ku-Ku Burger

915 N. Main St., Miami Waylan’s Ku-Ku Burger may be the last of its kind. Although owner Gene Waylan estimates there were as many as 200 Ku-Ku Burger restaurants around the U.S in the early-to-mid ’60s, Waylan’s restaurant is the only one still operating. “It’s the only one I can find, and I’ve looked all over,” Waylan says. Located off Route 66 in Miami, it’s hard to miss the restaurant with its large green-and-yellow neon sign and fiberglass cuckoo

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

53


Beverly’s Pancake House

bird positioned on the front wall. Although the Ku-Ku burger was part of a fast-food chain in the era of 15 cent burgers, it has become unique and distinctive. The restaurant’s reputation has given Waylan a chance to meet people he otherwise never would have. While the restaurant used to be a hangout for teenagers in Miami, it’s now a hangout for people from as far as way as Australia and Brazil. Waylan says he talks to all the people who visit the restaurant and gives out key chains to people so they have a memento of their visit – and Waylan gets to keep the stories from people from places he may never see himself. “That’s the reason I’m still here,” he says. “It’s interesting. It’s better than retiring and traveling.”

Clanton’s Café

319 E. Illinois Ave., Vinita Clanton’s Café, located off Route 66 in Vinita, is the oldest continuous family-owned restaurant on Route 66, according to Dennis Patrick, who owns the restaurant along with his wife, Melissa. The restaurant opened in 1927, and has been in its current location since 1947. Patrick says Route 66 is “the big draw,” although the restaurant has been in magazines and road books all over the world and is known for its chicken-fried steak. That reputation has helped it gain a diverse customer base from all areas of the globe. “We have a book up here where we have people sign in, and we have them from every continent and all differ-

54

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

ent areas in the world,” Patrick says. “It’s pretty amazing, and it’s a lot of fun because you get to talk to them. They’re excited about experiencing Route 66, and we’re really unique because we’re a mom and pop operation that has been around for a while. We have a personality they really enjoy, and it’s fun talking to them and hearing their stories.” Patrick and his wife took over the restaurant’s ownership from Melissa’s parents, Tom and Linda Clanton, 17 years ago. A Denver native, he says moving to Vinita was his first experience with life in a smaller town and was a nice change. “The people are just so genuine and very open and hospitable,” he says. “It was real easy for me to get attached to Vinita.”

Beverly’s Pancake House

3315 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City Founded by Beverly Osborne and his wife, Rubye, Beverly’s Pancake House has been an Oklahoma City tradition since 1936. At one time, Oklahoma City was home to as many as eight Beverly’s restaurants, however, this location is the only survivor. Beverly’s is famous for “Chicken in the Rough,” a dish of fried chicken, shoestring potatoes and a biscuit with honey. The top of the original neon sign, complete with the Chicken in the Rough logo, was saved from a previ-


TULSA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Tickets SIGNATURE SYMPHONY on sale CATHERINE RUSSELL OKC PHILHARMONIC MEMBERS NOW MIRO QUARTET BARTLESVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SIMPLY THREE CHAMBER MUSIC BRIGHTMUSIC ESPECIALLY FOR KIDS EVENTS 90+ SHOWCASE EVENTS FUN RUN & 5K OPENING AT PRAIRIE SONG OKMOZART.COM

FACES OF

ous location and is proudly displayed in the restaurant’s front window.

The Rock Café

114 W. Main St., Stroud The Rock Café opened in 1939 and is another Route 66 favorite. The restaurant gets its name from the local sandstone used on the outside walls. The Rock Café takes pride in the fact that they are still using the original 1939 kitchen grill. Betsy the grill has seared over five million burgers and chicken fries. The grill survived a 2008 fire at the restaurant that left only Betsy and the four rock walls standing.

FACES OF FACES of

Baker’s Fish House

3606 W. 90th St. N., Porter Located off highway 69, east of Porter and north of Muskogee, Baker’s Fish House opened in 1947. The restaurant has gained a loyal, word-of-mouth following despite its out-of-the-way location and is known for its famous fried catfish, fried chicken, mounds of onion rings and homemade pie.

FACESof FACESof

918-336-9800

FACES of

22074 OK Mozart Festival.indd 1

SEPTEMBER 3/21/16 2016 1:21 PM

JOIN THE

ELITE

BUSINESSES OF OKLAHOMA

FACES of

Tulsa

FACES of

OKC

OKLAHOMA

advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205 Faces 1/4.indd 1

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 55

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

4/13/16 5:00 PM


Nelson’s Buffeteria

4401 S. Memorial Dr., Tulsa Nelson’s Buffeteria was a landmark in downtown Tulsa for years after its opening in 1929, serving as a lunch hot spot for downtown employees. The restaurant closed in 2003 and reopened in its new location nearly 10 years later. While the location may be new, the owners renovated the original neon sign and moved it from the former location on South Boston Avenue. The restaurant is open for breakfast and lunch only and is closed on weekends.

Anne’s Chicken Fry House

4106 NW 39th St., Oklahoma City Ann’s Chicken Fry in Oklahoma City has served tasty, home-style food since 1948. Try what they are famous for – chicken fried steak with mashed potatoes and cream gravy, ordered with a side item of your choice. Located in a one-time gas station, the restaurant has a cozy, back-intime feel. It is also a Route 66 landmark full of nostalgia – a pink Cadillac and vintage police car adorn the front lawn.

El Rancho Grande

Ike’s Chili

1503 E. 11th St., Tulsa In 1908, Ike’s Chili opened in Tulsa and quickly became known for their top-rate chili – with or without all of the fixings. The same recipe that keeps people coming back for more has been around for a century. The landmark is the best place on Route 66 to have what Will Rogers called a “Bowl of Blessedness.”

56

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

1629 E. 11th St., Tulsa El Rancho Grande has been open since 1950. Nestled on the outskirts of Downtown Tulsa on Route 66, the historic neon sign has become a familiar landmark for locals and visitors alike looking for a great meal. John Walden says he has worked at the restaurant on and off since he was 21. He now co-owns it with his brother, Jeff. “There’s so many memories here,” Walden says. “I don’t know where to begin. I ate here for the first time when I was 13 years old.” It was his birthday, and his family had gathered at the restaurant for the celebration. “They had a Mariachi Band that wanted me to get up and lead a ‘Happy Birthday’ line dance through the restaurant. I just couldn’t do it, so I cried.” The Walden family took over the restaurant in 1984. Since then, running the restaurant has been a family affair. “I have served, I have cooked all the food, you name it,” says Walden. He says he fondly remembers the time he learned to make tamales with one of the original cooks. Back then, the tamales were made with a big, industrial piece of equipment. “All I remember was that it was big, and it spit out tamales really fast,” Walden says. “And I had trouble keeping up – tamales were everywhere. So I’ve cried, laughed and everything in between at this restaurant.” These days the customers come in for a yummy cheese enchilada and an icy margarita, or for a more substantial dish the crew calls the Night Hawk. It consists of two cheese and onion enchiladas covered with chili con carne and cheddar and one soft cheddar cheese taco topped with queso. It was named one of the “Five Greatest Mexican Meals in the U.S.” in Gustavo Arellano’s book Taco USA, Walden says.


PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

El Rancho Grande

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

57


Championship A

Tennis Town

TU and the Case Tennis Center will host the 2016 NCAA championship this month. By Shaun Perkins

“Tulsa is a great tennis city.” These are Vince Westbrook’s words, and he should know. Westbrook, head men’s tennis coach at the University of Tulsa, is the face of tennis in Tulsa, with 25 years of experience coaching at TU and a 375-263 career record. From May 16 through 30, TU will be host to the NCAA Division I Tennis Championships. This will be the third such championship held at TU’s premier facility, the Michael D. Case Tennis Center, as the university also hosted the men’s championship in 2004 and the combined men’s and women’s championships in 2008. Westbrook was part of a team instrumental in bringing the NCAA tennis championship to Tulsa for the first time in 2004. Westbrook says the process was started in 2002, and the Case Center itself was the major playing chip in getting the championship. “The reason it was built was to bring national championships to Tulsa, and since we’ve built it we’ve had more national tournaments than anyone else in the country,” Westbrook says. The Case Center, completed in late 2001, is considered one of the finest tennis facilities in the country. It has 12 outdoor courts with

58

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

abundant seating, large scoreboards and live streaming. “We also have six courts in the indoor facility in case we run into any kind of weather,” Westbrook added. Vince Trinidad, executive director of the Tulsa Sports Commission (TSC), also noted the Case Center as one of the finest athletic competition facilities in the country. “You can see matches up close and personal, and it has great seating capacity,” Trinidad says. The TSC, which is a division of the Tulsa Regional Chamber, is a founding member of the National Association of Sports Commissions and also helped bring the national championships to Tulsa. “Coach Westbrook is very knowledgeable in the tennis world. Having him and the athletic department have a great rapport with the NCAA was a dealmaker,” Trinidad says. “You want the right players to put together a successful bid, and our hard efforts were rewarded.” “We work closely with TU,” Trinidad says. “They really help us make sure the student athletes have a great experience. The championship is a great way to showcase the tennis center we have here in the community.”


VINCE WESTBROOK, HEAD MEN’S TENNIS COACH, HAS 25 YEARS OF COACHING EXPERIENCE WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF TULSA. PHOTO COURTESY THE UNIVERSITY OF TULSA

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

59


well against OSU, they made up for it with ships cannot happen without a supportive The Case Center has 69,000 square feet Tulane. OSU, ranked 17, beat both of TU’s and a capacity of 2,000 people. Its first match tennis town.” doubles teams and continued the streak in The NCAA Championship will involve 16 was held on January 19, 2002, when TU singles play, with TU either losing each men’s and women’s teams that will compete defeated Oral Roberts University in men’s match or having the match not finish. for the first six days for the team championtennis. The Center is named for Michael D. TU’s Rongrong Leenabanchong, Martha ship. After that, 64 singles players and 32 Case, a developer and philanthropist, and Matoula and Renata Kuricova all won their doubles teams in both men’s and women’s was designed by architect Larry Kester of singles matches, while doubles teams Leendivisions will compete for the remainder of Architects Collective and built by the Lowry abanchong and Matoula and Saana Saarteinthe tournament. & Hemphill Construction Company. en and Mahitha Dadireddy also won. Women’s head coach Dean Orford doesn’t “Like any athletic competition facility, Saarteinen, who entered her senior year have quite as many years at TU as Westyou want to make sure you have a high level with a 65-33 singles record and a 56-29 brook, but he also has an impressive record. quality of play, and it’s available here,” doubles record, tells Oklahoma Magazine, In his first 10 years at TU, Orford posted an Trinidad says. “We are obviously extremely excited about overall 263-66 record, and he is now in his “What can a student athlete or their family hosting the NCAA championships here at 11th year. members or fans experience at this kind of Tulsa. On a personal note, it’s my senior Orford’s teams have made it to the NCAA event?” Trinidad asked. “It should look nice, year, and I couldn’t think of a better way to tournament in each of the last nine years. have a quality feel, and so, when they go to finish my college tennis here in Tulsa.” They have won six conference championcompete, they can perform at their best.” Women’s coach Orford says that lots of ships, and Orford has more wins than any Trinidad noted that the Case Center has fortunate happenings have contributed to the other women’s tennis coach at TU. room for people to enter and leave at ease, success of his tennis team. Mainly, he says, Neither Westbrook nor Orford could “shaded areas to sit in, viewable scoreboards it’s simply the good players. comment on individual players making it to and an indoor facility right next to it. Plus, “The players make it a lot of fun and they the tournament, since that had not been deyou have the opportunity to be centrallymake the job easier,” he says. “We’re keeptermined at press time. However, Westbrook located in terms of the TU area with recreing focused on each match, one at a time, says, “There are 64 teams on each side to ational opportunities, shopping and more all and are trying not to get too excited and get get in, and that starts the tournament. Unright there.” ahead of ourselves.” less something crazy happens, we make the “These types of events we host are exWestbrook says of his team, “We’re proud tournament, and the final 16 is like the final tremely important for us overall, as citizens we have made the tournament 15 times. Both four of basketball.” of Oklahoma, to see competition but also our men’s and women’s teams have been aspire to be a part of these competitions,” Trinidad says. “You can’t be a “The NCAA just doesn’t award these nationally ranked among the best U.S. NCAA tennis champion overnight. The championships to anyone. The NCAA teams.” “This is a talented group of guys we student athlete makes the commitment, understands and acknowledges have,” Westbrook says. We play eight of along with those who support them, to Tulsa’s passion and commitment the top 10 teams day in and day out and compete, and when you have a champihave unbelievable schedules. Our whole onship like this, it highlights the great for tennis.” hope is to peak at the end of the year. things happening in our state.” Right now we have played 10 straight Nick Salis, TU’s associate athletic directennis championships and have won seven At press time, TU’s men’s team had just tor, served as the championships’ co-director of them. defeated No. 8-ranked Oklahoma State Unifor the 2008 NCAA championship and is “We are always considered one of the top versity and were playing strong overall. again in charge as the liaison between the three teams in the conference to make a run In the OSU match, TU players Dominic NCAA and TU. Because of his previous at the championship at the end of the year,” Bechard and Dylan McCloskey won their experience, Salis says, “I have a better unWestbrook adds. doubles match, as did Carlos Bautista and derstanding of what was successful and what Women’s coach Orford says of TU, Majed Kilani. Singles players Francois Kellareas need tweaking this time around. I think “Being a small university, it’s very family erman, Kilani and Daniel Santos won their the participants, coaches and fans will be oriented – from our teams to our administrasingles matches. very pleased with the championship’s setup tive people to our staff. It’s a gratifying place Two days after the OSU match, the team this year.” to work. You have the opportunity to succeed also beat Tulane, ranked 21, with impressive “The NCAA just doesn’t award these at the very highest level.” wins from Kilani and Bautista again, along championships to anyone,” Salis says. “The “It’s our job to make sure we’re connected with Bechard and McCloskey. NCAA understands and acknowledges to our community, too,” Westbrook says. In singles play, TU’s highest ranked Tulsa’s passion and commitment for tennis.” “We probably raise as much money as any player, Or Ram-Harel lost to No. 1-ranked “We are grateful to have such a supportprogram in the country. We have the support player Dominik Koepfer. Juan Matias ive and knowledgeable fan base. Is Tulsa a of the Tulsa community, which has given us Gonzales defeated one of Tulane’s ranked ‘Tennis Town’? Absolutely!” Salis says. “We the advantage to do this competition on a players, and Coach Westbrook said of him have many families already lined up and national level. Tulsa is the best place by far in a TU press release, “Gonzalez picked up a eager to serve as team hosts. Many comfor this championship.” big win for us today. Gonzalez has lost some munity partners have graciously stepped up “The neat thing about the NCAA being tough matches, but he has won sets against to provide items for our sponsorship gift here for twelve days is they’re going to fill the best players in college and today he baskets. Lastly, but equally as important, we up four or five hotels downtown, and you finished it off.” will have over 200 volunteers sign up to help can imagine the economic impact of that. While the women’s team did not fare so during the championships. These champion

60

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016


It will be huge. We will probably quadruple what businesses normally average just because of the NCAA being here,” Westbrook says. The staff at the Tulsa Sports Commission will also be working to see that the NCAA officials, players, families and fans have a great experience in Tulsa. “We have a good experience when it comes to joint meetings, where we get to create opportunities outside the courts for people to take advantage of what Tulsa has to offer,” Trinidad says. “We might have a dinner or some other function that highlights something special about Tulsa. We want to make sure they get a chance to see some of the different things that are uniquely Tulsa.” TU associate athletic director Salis also notes some things his staff is doing to entertain athletes and guests. “We will be hosting the team celebration at historic Cain’s Ballroom, an evening filled with live entertainment, local barbeque and dancing. But not too much dancing since teams need to compete early the next morning,” Salis says. Trinidad says that the TSC is continually working to bring other NCAA championships to Tulsa, and in 2017, it has worked with TU scheduled to host the first and second round NCAA tournament in men’s basketball. “We routinely bid on these kinds of championships, and with TU as an institution that is also a member, we combine its strengths with our own staff strengths to be successful,” Trinidad says. “When you get to an NCAA event of this magnitude, the competition will be great,” Trinidad says of the tennis championship. “You are going to see some really good matches when you go out there. Towards the end of the May, you can go out there, buy a ticket and watch a super tennis championship.” “That’s what I love about the Tulsa community – it’s very supportive of collegiate athletics,” Trinidad says. “You may take a grade school child somewhat interested in tennis and have them see this level of competition with this type of facility, and the hope is that it will inspire them to play at any level they want.” Westbrook noted the Tulsa Sports Commission’s help in getting major sporting events in Tulsa. “The thing about it is to go back to the whole preface for why the facility [the Case Center] was built: People put up the money to bring other people to the city.” “For the city, this is a great opportunity to watch kids who are going to go on the circuit, perhaps the pro circuit eventually,” Westbrook says. “But for the pro circuit you have to be 26 or 27, so college has become a minor league system for the pros. College is now like a semi-pro tennis league. And Tulsa is a great tennis city.” Tickets to the championship can be purchased online at tulsahurricane.com. Adult tickets for the entire 12-day event are $125 and children’s tickets are $75. Individual session tickets can be purchased on the day of the event and are $15 for adults and $8 for children.

ECONOMIC IMPACT

Hosting the 2016 NCAA championship benefits Tulsa’s economy. The 2016 event is expected to have a total economic impact of , according to Vince Trinidad of the Tulsa Sports Commission.

$5 million

Over 2,000 hotel rooms are

expected to be booked for the duration of the event, according to Trinidad. Nearby shopping centers, such as Utica Square, should expect increased sales. Restaurants and other industries will see increased business.

TU reported attendance of at the 2008 championship, and it expects that number to increase this year.

16,000 people

THE CASE TENNIS CENTER HAS HOSTED THREE NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS SINCE 2004.

PHOTO COURTESY THE UNIVERSITY OF TULSA

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

61


Innovators

Innovation is everywhere you look in Oklahoma and streches into many different areas. In medical research, Stephenson Cancer Center, which opened around five years ago, has already become one of the top cancer treatment and research facilities in the country, and Oklahoma Magazine looks at what the center is doing to help treat and improve the lives of people with cancer. In Tulsa, companies are working to provide easy access to 3D printing, a A national leader in groundbreaking cancer research and rapidly-evolving treatment is proudly located in Oklahoma. technology that By Rebecca Fast could completeof Stephenson Cancer Center. “The mission of he Stephenson Cancer Center ly change the the Stephenson Cancer Center is to reduce the is Oklahoma’s only compreway goods are heavy burden of cancer in the state and improve hensive, academic cancer manufactured. patient outcomes.” center, and it’s bringing the Dr. Mannel shares the many ways the Stelatest technologies and most While it’s diffiphenson Cancer Center is fulfilling its mission. advanced therapies to the state. Since opening cult to single out its doors in 2011, the Stephenson Cancer Center These include: 1) conducting innovative cancer specific innovaresearch and translating laboratory discoverhas earned national recognition for its patienties into better cancer therapies, 2) providing centered care and pioneering research. tions, both of patients with opportunities to participate in Located at the University of Oklahoma these deserve a clinical trials for new cancer drugs, 3) providHealth Sciences Center campus in Oklahoma closer look. ing patients with access to multidisciplinary City, the Stephenson Cancer Center supports

Miracles in the Heartland

T

research in the basic, translational, clinical, behavioral and populations-based sciences. For patients, multidisciplinary teams work together to create the most optimal and individualized treatment plans. “According to the Centers for Disease Control, Oklahoma has the fifth-highest cancer mortality rate in the nation. This is based on the number of cancer deaths per 100,000 people,” says Dr. Robert Mannel, director

62

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

specialty oncology clinics, and 4) educating the next generation of cancer health professionals. For the second year in a row, the Stephenson Cancer Center ranks third in the nation for participation in National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored treatment trials and was the top enroller in the NCI’s most prestigious medicine trial in the country – the NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH). Under the umbrella of ‘precision medicine,’ the NCI-MATCH trial “analyzes patients’ tumors to determine whether they contain genetic abnormalities for which a targeted drug exists and assigns treatment based on the abnormality.” “Precision medicine is an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes


SINCE OPENING ITS DOORS IN 2011, THE STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER HAS EARNED NATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR ITS PATIENT-CENTERED CARE AND PIONEERING RESEARCH. PHOTOS COURTESY STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

63


Innovators

into account individual variability in genes, environment and lifestyle for each person,” Dr. Mannel says. “Precision medicine is particularly relevant in cancer medicine because of the genetic variability in tumors. For example, two women may have a diagnosis of breast cancer, but their tumors might respond very differently to the same cancer therapy. This is because their cancers may have different genetic mutations that respond differently to different drugs. By using genetic analysis to detect known mutations, a doctor may be able to tailor a treatment that’s been proven effective against that particular tumor. While there is still much work to be done in the field of precision medicine, many cancer researchers and clinicians have high hopes that it will lead to better treatments and patient outcomes.” The Stephenson Cancer Center also offers the only Phase I clinical trials program in the state. Dr. Mannel adds that many of the Phase I drugs are based on a precision medicine approach. “By participating in a clinical trial that’s testing a Phase I drug, a cancer patient has the opportunity to access the very latest in promising, experimental treatments,” he says. “Most cancer patients participating in a Phase I trial have advanced, late-stage cancer and have failed the standard frontline therapies. Participating in a Phase I trial is a next step for those patients who want to continue to fight their disease.”

Advancements in Immune-Directed Treatment

LEFT: THE NCIMATCH TRIAL ANALYZES TUMORS TO DETERMINE WHETHER THEY CONTAIN GENETIC ABNORMALITIES FOR WHICH A TARGETED DRUG EXISTS.

PHOTO COURTESY STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER

RIGHT:FAB LAB TULSA ALLOWS ITS MEMBERS ACCESS TO 3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGY. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

64

Immunotherapy is another advancing cancer treatment that is personalized to a patient’s cancer. Immunotherapy takes the body’s natural defense system, the immune system, and helps it fight disease. “There are several different immunotherapies that we use to fight cancer,” says Dr. Kelly Stratton, a fellowship-trained urologic oncologist at Stephenson Cancer Center. “Some of the treatments supercharge our immune system so that it is better prepared to fight the cancer. Other drugs prevent the cancer cells from hiding from the immune system. There are several drugs that are currently being studied that hold great promise for improving treatment in cancer patients.” The Stephenson Cancer Center Urologic Oncology Clinic has been a leader in bringing immunotherapy to Oklahomans with cancer. “We have worked with researchers who developed a new treatment that pulled genetic material from cancer cells we removed and then used that sequence to teach a patient’s im-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

mune cells how to fight the cancer,” says Dr. Stratton. One form of immunotherapy is treatment (or therapeutic) vaccines such as the prostate cancer vaccine. Dr. Stratton explains how cancer vaccines differ from the public’s general understanding of how a vaccine works. “Most vaccines are used to prevent infection,” he says. “The goal is to prepare the immune system so that if the patient encounters the disease, they will be able to fight it off. However, in prostate cancer, we use therapeutic vaccines. These treatments stimulate the patient’s own immune system to fight the cancer. Prostate cancer was the first cancer to be successfully treated with a therapeutic vaccine.”

Revolutionizing Brain Cancer Surgery and Treatment

Working to improve the lives of patients with brain tumors, Stephenson Cancer Center offers the most advanced, evidenced-based approaches for diagnosis, treatment and symptom management. Dr. Michael Sughrue, a neurosurgeon with Stephenson Cancer Center, recently performed “wide awake” brain surgery on a patient with stage IV glioblastoma, an aggressive brain cancer. During the five-hour surgery to remove the tumor, the patient played the mandolin as Dr. Sughrue used electric stimulation to turn off the areas of the brain he needed to remove. By playing the mandolin, the patient helped determine which areas controlled essential functions. The Stephenson Cancer Center is also one of only a few institutions in the nation to offer electrical field therapy to target glioblastoma. This new treatment uses a device to deliver low-intensity electrical fields to the tumor site through electrical transducers positioned on the head. Because cancer cells thrive through rapid replication and division, the transducers are strategically placed to scramble the tumor cell’s internal messaging and cause it to self-destruct. The device is worn more than 18 hours a day for best results and has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of glioblastoma as a first line therapy in combination with standard surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. While not all patients may be eligible for this new therapy, it’s a promising treatment. Researchers recently found that patients using the device lived longer than those offered standard treatments alone.

Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center The Stephenson Cancer Center houses the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center (OTRC), a research initiative funded by the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust (TSET). According to the 2014 State of the State’s Health Report, smoking is Oklahoma’s leading cause of preventable death, and each year approxi-


mately 4,400 Oklahoma children become new daily smokers. “The mission of the Oklahoma Tobacco Research Center at the Stephenson Cancer Center is to reduce the burden of tobacco-related cancers and other diseases in Oklahoma’s most vulnerable and underserved populations,” says Jennifer Vidrine, PhD, director of OTRC. “We hope to accomplish this mission through conducting research that involves the development and evaluation of novel treatments, understanding mechanisms that drive tobacco dependence and disseminating our research findings to high-need communities in Oklahoma.” An example of OTRC’s work includes a study published in January 2015 that found exposure to even minimal levels of secondhand tobacco smoke causes significant DNA damage in human cells. The authors of the study developed a new and highly sensitive detection process to measure damage to human cells induced by exposure to various doses of mainstream and sidestream tobacco smoke – main components of secondhand smoke. This new method also may have other potential uses such as the prediction of cancer risk in individuals, treatment outcomes and prognoses and DNA damage in aging-related changes and neurological disorders. The study noted that while the repair of most forms of DNA damage occurs naturally in living cells, the damage from very low doses of secondhand smoke persists unrepaired for at least 16 hours. These findings suggest that the body’s natural process for DNA repair is not activated for this level of DNA damage or is not able to fully repair the damage. The study shared that although further research is needed, this may indicate a disproportionate carcinogenic effect from exposure to very low levels of secondhand smoke. The Stephenson Cancer Center and OTRC also recently welcomed Francesco Versace, PhD to their team. Versace is an experimental psychologist who specializes in the neuroscience of tobacco and other addictions. Using electroencephalography (EEG) and functional MRI, he studies the cognitive and affective processes in nicotine addiction, as well as obesity. This type of neuroscience research may be used to examine why some children are more prone to addiction. While OTRC’s research continues to break new ground, the center’s comprehensive approach affects change throughout the state. “Our mission extends beyond research in many important ways,” Vidrine says. “It includes the delivery of evidence-based tobacco cessation treatment to Oklahomans, the provision of tobacco policy expertise to help inform decision makers in Oklahoma and training the next generation of tobacco researchers through providing fellowships to students and postdoctoral fellows.”

Printing the Future 3D printing access inspires innovation.

P

By Justin Martino

rofessional Image 3D started its venture into 3D printing out of the necessity to solve a problem with packaging a chocolate sculpture. “We had a huge, hollow chocolate turkey, and the head kept breaking off in packaging,” says Rick Radford, director of operations for Professional Image 3D. “They needed a way to package that. We couldn’t do it with our software program, but we knew where we needed to get to.”

Since then, the company has expanded what it does with 3D printing, using the technology to create packaging, provide 3D scanning, blueprints and printing for customers, and even modify their own equipment.

The Science of 3D Printing

3D printing uses a variety of techniques and materials to create objects – the process may use UV light, lasers or cooling of a heated MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

65


Innovators

TECHNOLOGY FOR 3D PRINTING IS USED IN VIRTUALLY EVERY INDUSTRY. PHOTOS COURTESY PROFESSIONAL IMAGE 3D

BOTTOM RIGHT: FAB LAB TULSA HAS A WIDE VARIETY OF PEOPLE WHO USE THE WORKSHOP FOR DIFFERENT PURPOSES. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

66

material – but the basic principle remains the same. Unlike traditional manufacturing, which is subtractive manufacturing that takes a block of material and cuts away at it, 3D printing uses additive manufacturing. “Additive manufacturing is where you take that model that’s in 3D view, slice it into really thin sections and build it layer by layer,” Radford says. “You’re not cutting anything away. You’re actually adding to each layer as it builds up.” The technique allows for the manufacturing of parts that would be difficult or impossible by traditional means, such as honeycombed materials, because of the geometry inside the object. The types of 3D printers available are varied, and Radford says each has its own use depending on the item being created and the quality needed. “Some of them do some things really well, some of them can do a hybrid of things, but for the most part each one has its own niche,” he says.

Uses for 3D Printing Technology

While the techniques used in 3D printing may be varied, the applications of the technology are even more diverse. Radford says the technology is used for everything from creating castings of clay sculptures to medical purposes. Radford says the technology can be used to create models of CT scan data or MRI data,

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

and there are studies where conjoined twins have been scanned to create a 3D model surgeons can practice on before beginning surgery. The company even uses the printers to fix or upgrade its own equipment, printing and replacing knobs or fixtures for the equipment or creating new parts. “We actually created a piece for our equipment,” he says. “We modeled it, which took about 45 minutes, put it on a 3D printer and by lunchtime we had a new piece to try out on the equipment, and it worked fantastic. If you think about trying to get all that done through traditional ways, it would be a week to have it machined, bring it back, to see if it works.” In the future, Radford says he can picture people contacting a manufacturer for a replacement part for a machine and having the option of being sent a replacement or downloading a file and printing it themselves. “There’s not an industry I can think of that 3D printing has not touched in some form or fashion,” he says.

Doing it Yourself

High-end 3D printing systems may carry price tags ranging from five figures up to millions of dollars, but smaller, consumer 3D printers are available in many stores. For many people, those may be good enough for what they need to do. Another way to gain access to 3D printing is through the Hardesty Center for Fab Lab Tulsa, a nonprofit workshop that allows members to use 3D printing technology. Memberships range from $80 to $225 annually and include some training. “With about two hours of instruction, we can have you up and running,” says Nathan Pritchett, executive director of Fab Lab Tulsa. “Part of our mission is specifically access. There are other models that would charge you that each month.” Pritchett says the workshop’s members include a wide variety of people such as entrepreneurs, hobbyists, tinkerers and students, and the workshop has been used to create everything from jewelry to a prosthetic hand.


“It’s really a massive spectrum of Tulsa, and that’s what makes it interesting,” he says. “From moment to moment, we never know what’s coming in the door next.

Inspiring Innovation

By providing accessible 3D printing to Oklahoma, Fab Lab Tulsa is helping inspire new uses for the technology. Whether someone downloads a blueprint and takes it into the lab or uses software to create their own, Oklahoma has hit a point where 3D technology is available to everyone though consumer products, workshops like Fab Lab or commercial services. Radford says he constantly sees his company’s clients finding new uses for the technology or using 3D printing to create things no one has thought of previously – including one client who brought in an idea sketched on a napkin. “I’m amazed at times,” Radford says. “We get people coming in all the time, and they say, ‘I have this idea.’ And it’s something I’ve seen, and everyone just accepts it. But if we make this change, we can change everything. “People everywhere see things and think, ‘If that was just a little bit different, it would help me,’ and that’s what we try to do. Once it’s digitized, you can do just about anything you can think of with it. If you think about it, you can do it. Our motto is we want to inspire innovation.”

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

67


BLUE LEADERS Congratulations to the 2016-2017 Blue Leaders, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma’s top performing, independent, authorized agents. Thank you for helping us provide affordable health care coverage to the communities, businesses and individuals in Oklahoma for more than 75 years!

SM

PROGRAM 2016-2017

Bigbie, Hensley & Janway 405-235-0036 Bhjins.com

INSURICA 405-523-2100 Insurica.com

Caba 405-840-3033 Cabainc.com

NFP 405-359-0594 mha-ins.com

Catalyst Benefits Group 918-524-6315 catalystbenefitsgroupllc.com

Strategic Employee Benefit Services of Oklahoma 918-497-1180 ok-ar.strategicebs.com

Gallagher Benefit Services 405-471-5000 gallagherbenefits.com/ Oklahoma

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma, a Division of Health Care Service Corporation, a Mutual Legal Reserve Company, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

604106.0416


Underrepresented,

But Rising:

Women In STEM By Megan Morgan

Women are historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math fields, but several statewide initiatives are working to change that.

According to census data, women comprise more than half of Oklahoma’s workforce. But in certain fields – specifically, science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) – women are highly underrepresented. “Depending on the specific STEM career, women frequently make up less than 20 percent of STEM professionals in these critical fields,” says Xan Black, program director of Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance. Yet at the same time, our economy desperately needs workers in these fields. Black says the country is on track to produce one million STEM workers by 2018, but more than two million additional STEM professionals are needed in these industries. “If we overlook or don’t prepare half of our potential workforce by not introducing young girls to possibilities in STEM careers,

we are really seriously undermining the potential for our nation to build the robust STEM workforce that we need,” Black says. Specifically, a recent report from the American Association of University Women (AAUW) found that just 12 percent of engineers are women, and the number of women in computing has fallen from 35 percent in 1990 to 26 percent in 2013. “Women made up a majority of computer science professionals in the early ’80s, but in recent times there has been a decline in the number of women in this innovative field,” Black says. “It’s a challenge that the Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance and a host of others in Oklahoma are working hard to overcome.”

C Closing the Gap

This outlook appears grim on the surface, but, despite the current severe shortage of women in STEM fields, things are beginning to change – both on a statewide and national level – thanks to groups such as the Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance. TRSA is committed to building broad, MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

69


deep and innovative pathways for students to access high-impact STEM careers, Black says. The group works to achieve this specifically for girls and women in several different ways, including the all-girls, allday, all-math event called Sonia Kovalevsky Day and a Code of Their Own coding camp for girls. TRSA also hosted Tulsa ZooSTEM this past November for middle school and high schools girls as well as female STEM professionals. “[The event] put the participants behind the scenes working alongside Tulsa Zoo scientists in thinking through real challenges faced in various areas of the zoo,” Black says. “The girls loved solving realworld problems and having immediate feedback on their proposed solutions.” This year, the total expected targeted outreach for TRSA to women in STEM is 1,600 participants, Black says. “We are now seeing growing numbers of females enrolled in engineering, science, computer science and advanced mathematics careers,” Black says. “As we engage girls at younger ages, inspire them with all of the interesting and worldchanging problems that are out there to be solved, we are seeing lots of ‘Rosie the Riveters’ rising to the challenge.” Other organizations – and individuals – are working to close this gap as well. Saeed Sarani is deeply entrenched in this subject, serving as President and Executive Director of CASMEO (Coalition for the Advancement of Science and Mathematics Education in Oklahoma) and as the 0resident of Oklahoma Women in STEM, both nonprofit organizations. “Early on [in my career], I noticed the majority of STEM-related faculty were predominately male, as were the majority of STEM-related majors such as engineering and technology,” Sarani says. “By having daughters of my own, I made it my mission to make STEM a tangible pathway for women in Oklahoma.” This mission also manifested itself on a larger scale after Sarani attended Gov. Mary Fallin’s first STEM summit. Sarani says the event highlighted Oklahoma’s current state of potential STEM employment opportunities, but didn’t mention one of the state’s greatest potential assets: women to fill these employment opportunities. “I was aware of the tendency of academia to pass over female students in the mathematics and sciences; this was the first time I was faced with how the community at large has a tendency to do the same,” Sarani says. Soon after, Oklahoma Women in STEM began as a pilot project in early 2014 to test the interest of female middle school students in STEM degrees and professions. Then

70

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

ONE GOAL OF THE TULSA REGIONAL STEM ALLIANCE IS TO ENGAGE WITH GIRLS AT YOUNGER AGES TO ENCOURAGE INTEREST IN HIGH-IMPACT STEM FIELDS. PHOTO COURTESY TULSA REGIONAL STEM ALLIANCE

in the spring of 2014, the first Oklahoma Women in STEM conference was held in Tulsa. “The attendees were given the opportunity to hear from professional women from across the state, as well as government officials and educational personnel, to emphasize their options pertaining to STEM majors and the impact on their future job potential,” Sarani says. But why is it important to establish a “tangible pathway” for women entering STEM fields? Sarani echoes Black’s point that STEM jobs are increasing at double the rate that STEM professionals are entering the workforce. In addition, the National Association of Colleges and Employers reports that the

starting salary offered to STEM majors ranges from $35-$65K annually. Students with a STEMrelated major or certification have a better living wage and more opportunities for advancement. “Money aside, for women, working in STEM areas specifically means intellectual equity and the continuing elimination of gender barriers,” Sarani says. “That means more prosperity for the states with higher numbers of STEM-educated employees in the workforce.” Tatiana Rozzell, founder and CEO of Learn to Code Inc., was also inspired to close the gap of women in STEM careers through personal experiences. Rozzell says that she herself was already fascinated by programming from an early age while attending school in Russia, but even after moving to the United States, Rozzell wanted her children to have opportunities in STEM fields. “When my friends back in Russia started bragging about having their kids learn to code, I decided to give mine the same opportunity. And this is where I got stuck, because there weren’t any,” Rozzell says. “After some extensive research I came across Girls Who Code and found that we could set up a club of our own.” After tracking down volunteer instructors, the first classes were offered free of charge to 32 students.

R


R

“By the end of the semester I realized how big the need was for classes like ours and how big of a potential this field holds for the growing generation,” Rozzell says. “So I decided to start a nonprofit in the hopes that, with the help of some sponsors, we can offer more classes to more kids and keep them free of charge.” The Girls Who Code Tulsa club became Learn to Code Inc. while still maintaining the mission to “inspire girls to dive into computer science and become developers down the road,” Rozzell says.

Root of the Issue

But what is it, exactly, that is causing the shortage of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields? There are many different reasons, Black explains. “Some of the issues trace back to biases that are expressed to young women, some perhaps unconsciously … messages that girls aren’t as good at math and science as boys,” Black, of Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance, says. “Often times there is an inherent bias that girls are good at reading and boys are good at math. Unfortunately, until very recently this type of implicit and sometimes explicit bias spilled over even into the corporate workplace.” With the current shortage of women in STEM, the women who do follow these career paths sometimes experience what Black refers to as “imposter syndrome.” “Since young girls are typically outnumbered in STEM coursework and perhaps pick up on unspoken biases, some female students take on the belief that they don’t really belong in STEM careers,” Black says. “Young women may believe that even though they are in a STEM class and perhaps excel in math and science, they don’t really belong there. Most young women do not have a STEM mentor or role model. They see themselves as not being smart enough, technical enough, you-fillin-the-blank enough.” Among these challenges, STEM coursework is also difficult. “When young women have grown up in an environment that contends that boys are naturally good at

ABOVE: TATIANA ROZZELL, FOUNDER AND CEO OF LEARN TO CODE INC., STARTED THE ORGANIZATION WHEN SHE REALIZED THERE WERE FEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR HER CHILDREN TO LEARN COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. PHOTO COURTESY LEARN TO CODE INC.

LEFT: ASSIGNING YOUNG GIRLS WITH STEM MENTORS CAN HELP OVERCOME A BELIEF THAT THE PREDOMINANCE OF MALES IN STEM CLASSES MEANS FEMALES DO NOT BELONG, ACCORDING TO XAN BLACK OF THE TULSA REGIONAL STEM ALLIANCE. PHOTO COURTESY TULSA REGIONAL STEM ALLIANCE

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

71


math and science and girls are good at reading, when they find themselves one of one or two women in their classes, when they have an inner voice that tells them that they shouldn’t be pursuing a STEM career, and then they find the coursework extremely challenging, many of our young women look for other majors and careers to pursue,” Black says. Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics (OSSM) teacher (and OSSM alumna) Sara Bodenstein also outlined the difference in expectations for young boys and girls. “I do think it is unfortunate that many STEM programs have few girls in them. But what is more unfortunate is that girls are being led to believe that they cannot succeed in those fields or that they won’t enjoy them,” Bodenstein says. “What is sad is the fact that some girls who may possess great gifts for physics or computer science are passively or actively discouraged from studying such topics because of their gender. If she’s told, or shown, that a field is only for boys, she may miss out on what could have been a lifelong passion. “The idea that gender stereotypes may prevent a future Marie Curie, Jane Goodall or Maria Mayar is tragic. Any girl should be free to study and encouraged to pursue fields about which she is most passionate.”

L Looking Ahead

The company Ambler|Architects of Bartlesville is one of many companies and organizations that sits on TRSA’s Advisory Council. Ambler|Architects weighed in on the issue of the shortage of women in STEM fields and why the company wanted to get involved with TRSA’s mission in the first place. “The future of Ambler|Architects likely lies with the youth and with the youth involved in and around STEM programming,” says Joseph Evans of Ambler|Architects, who represents the company on the TRSA Advisory Council. “Personally, I wanted to sit as an advisory council member because I firmly believe that as an organized strategic group we should work together to make a difference in the education of our local youth and future leaders.” For anyone, male and female alike, entering a STEM career there are very clear benefits, Evans says. “Anyone working in a STEM-related field has a tremendous amount of opportunity,” he says. “These opportunities provide an abundance of flexibility to help an individual

72

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

truly find something they are happy doing for the rest of their life.” Evans adds that he has seen public perception shift around the topic of recruiting women to STEM careers. “There has definitely been a shift around the topic of recruiting women to STEM careers and programs – most of the women I have met in and around my field are typically quite inspiring, and I think that helps to serve as good role models for the younger generations,” Evans says. “Few things are more powerful in a youth than instilling the ‘I can do that’ attitude.” Bodenstein, of OSSM, says it’s important to encourage young girls to pursue STEM career paths (if their interests align) because of the way the nature of work is changing. “It’s undeniable that we are living in the technological age,” Bodenstein says. “Most professional job opportunities will be in computer science and technology development. If young women at OSSM were to choose any of their science classes and follow those to the natural culminations of each topic, they will find careers waiting for them. If they choose a subject that interests them, they will be successful and satisfied.” So that while the shortage of women in STEM fields might seem a daunting problem to overcome, the overall outlook is shifting. “I remain positive that supporting women

TATIANA ROZZELL’S GIRLS WHO CODE TULSA CLUB MAY HAVE CHANGED ITS NAME TO LEARN TO CODE INC., BUT IT HAS KEPT ITS MISSION OF INSPIRING GIRLS TO DIVE INTO COMPUTER SCIENCE.

PHOTO COURTESY LEARN TO CODE INC.

in STEM fields is going to be the greatest resource Oklahoma could provide to improve our state’s economy and outlook for our future,” says Sarani of CASMEO and Oklahoma Women in STEM. “It is no secret that STEM fields have a reputation of being unwelcoming toward women and that women are underrepresented within these career paths. However, this is slowly beginning to change.”


WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Dr. Courtney O’Brien

COURTNEY O’BRIEN

PhD, MHR, LPC

1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 • 918.794.0570 • www.drcourtneyobrien.com • drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

Dr. O’Brien has 15 years of experience in the exercise and physiology business as a business owner and health consultant within a medical setting. She spent those years successfully designing rehabilitative, training, fitness and nutrition programs. After earning a master’s degree at the University of Oklahoma and a Ph.D. specializing in the field of psychology, Dr. O’Brien continues to work in the private sector as a Licensed Professional Counselor, helping those who struggle with depression, anxiety and other challenging mental health issues within the areas of sexuality. These issues are mental health topics very difficult to find within one practitioner’s specialty. “These individual and relational concerns affect most of us at some point in our lives depending upon our experiences, desires, needs and expectations. Depression, anxiety and sexual issues all have an intimate relationship with us,

in the same way we have shared a connection with a partner. If sadness, fear, anger or other feelings create retreat from a relationship, the issue itself becomes the primary relationship,” says Dr. O’Brien. Dr. O’Brien’s success is based on understanding one’s symptoms and finding the best method of treatment. As a rule, her overall philosophy is to treat the causes as well as the symptoms. Attention is given to each individual, providing personalized growth opportunities to facilitate experiences that are holistic, trusting and genuine in nature. Many times, psychotherapy and medication are necessary; however, less traditional means of therapy, such as exercise, nutrition and behavior changes, are needed to meet the requirements of the client’s therapeutic goals. Dr. O’Brien works with all populations, individuals, families and couples.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

73


WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Keller Williams Realty

HEIDI MCMURRAY BENTS

Realtor

4745 E. 91 St, Tulsa, OK 74137 • 918.313.1786 • www.heidibents.kwrealty.com • heidibents@kw.com st

Heidi Bents received Top Individual Award in Sales GCI for Keller Williams’ South Tulsa Market Center and earned KW Realty’s “Double Gold Award” for 2015. She placed in REAL Trends 2016 as America’s Top 1000 Individual Agents for Keller Williams International. Bents also ranks as one of Metro Tulsa’s “Top 100 Realtors” highlighting 2015 sales statistics from Metro Tulsa’s MLS. Since 1991, Heidi gratefully serves Oklahomans by partnering with people as a valuable resource to achieving their dreams. Honoring each client by advocating their goals is key. For sellers, Bents offers proven target-market strategies with professional polish. She patiently plays matchmaker, connecting buyers to their dreams of “home.” Securing desirable property and streamlining the transaction are added benefits. She specializes in luxury, new construction, executive transfers, investors and farm/ranch. Bents attributes success to a solid network built on trustworthy relationships with both clients and

74

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

associates. As a Top Producer, she believes her strengths can be attributed to her business degree, the marketing tools she engages to reach the buying population and her background in residential design. With an eye for detail, she knows how to successfully sell listings. While client-financial aspects are vital, she’s not afraid to work outside the box, considering openended possibilities to maximize outcomes. Heidi thrives on negotiating and creative problem solving, resulting in a 100 percent success rate from contract to close. “To me, the most successful transactions are wrapped with prayer, the realistic need of the client is met and everyone walks away from the closing table feeling like a winner.” A mother of six, she understands the unique dynamics of the families she serves. Discovering people’s needs during a time of transition is where her knowledge of the marketplace shines. “We begin as partners in real estate,” says Bents. “I intend to end as friends.”

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


WOMEN IN BUSINESS

yogaQUEST “You teach from your experiences,” a yoga teacher once told me. Those experiences include starting my first business at age 24 and managing 60 employees for 20 years. Surviving a life-threatening illness and completing a nine-week intensive yoga teacher training. A year later, moving to Costa Rica with my husband for 6 years to build our home, running a yoga studio/retreat business, and returning to Tulsa to take over yogaQUEST, the Original Hot Yoga studio, established 17 years ago. My vision of providing one place to help others stay healthy came to fruition April 30th with the grand opening of an expanded yQ at a new location. I’ve brought caring people at the top of their profession together to offer an alternative way to heal the body from the inside out. Not just authentic hot yoga anymore? yogaQUEST offers non-heated yoga, Pilates and holistic health services in midtown. Come get healthy, Tulsa!

DEE ANNE DAY

Entrepreneur and CYT

yogaQUEST.indd 1

3325 E. 31st Street, Tulsa, OK 74135 • 918.622.5454 www.tulsayogaquest.com • tulsayogaquest@gmail.com

McGraw Realtors Rockford

3/29/16 3:45 P

For almost 10 years Catherine has consistently been bringing together buyers and sellers in Tulsa and surrounding communities. Call Catherine for her expertise in: • Midtown Tulsa • Farm and ranch properties • Family needs, whether you have athletes or mathletes When you are looking to buy or sell in the Tulsa area, call Catherine!

CATHERINE SANTEE HUGHES Realtor

4105 South Rockford, Tulsa OK, 74105 • 918.639.4199 www.mcgrawrealtors.com • chughes@mcgrawok.com SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

75


WOMEN IN BUSINESS

BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center

MALISSA SPACEK • MELODY HAWKINS 500 S. Elm Place, Broken Arrow, OK 74012 • 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com • info@baweightspa.com BA Med Spa and Weight Loss Center founder and managing partner Malissa Spacek and her daughter Melody Hawkins, practice manager, along with their expert staff and business partner Dr. James Campbell, have spent the last six years making the women and men of Oklahoma look and feel their absolute best. Their goal is to improve the lives of the patients they serve through many of their various services, such as weight loss, Botox and dermal fillers, permanent makeup, hormone replacement therapy, Coolsculpting and Ultherapy, just to name a few. If you are looking for a complete makeover, call the friendly staff at BA Med Spa today, where we will help you love the skin you are in.

McGraw Realtors Grand Lake

BA Med Spa.indd 1

4/10/16 12:47 PM

Diana Riley Patterson, top real estate associate for McGraw Realtors Grand Lake, was awarded 2015 $15 MILLION Club in Volume Sales overall at McGraw Realtors. She was also recognized for being in the top 100 Realtors in Tulsa. Having had her license for 37 years, she has only been in the business since 2006. Born and raised on Grand Lake and from a real estate family, her specialty is South Grand Lake and loves listing and selling waterfront and water view properties.

DIANA RILEY PATTERSON Realtor

76

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

1639 N 3rd St, Langley, OK 74350 • 918.629.3717 www.mcgrawrealtors.com • dpatterson@mcgrawok.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Grace Hospice When Ava Hancock’s father was dying of cancer, she saw how much hospice care made a difference for him and their family. That personal experience led her to dedicate her professional life to providing hospice care to others. As Executive Director of Grace Hospice of Oklahoma, Ava is making a difference every day. Grace Hospice is the largest independent hospice in Northeastern Oklahoma. Ava’s been with Grace Hospice for 15 years and was named Executive Director in 2010, leading a staff of more than 80 employees. Ava has a Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work and Health Care from the University of Houston. She’s a trained Executive Leader for hospice through the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO). An avid supporter of animal rescue groups, she’s a board member and treasurer of Great Plains Mastiff Rescue. One of Ava’s favorite volunteer efforts is the Ms. Senior Oklahoma (MSO) Pageant. Grace Hospice is the main sponsor of MSO which honors senior women in the Tulsa region and raises money for Grace Hospice Foundation. It is April 30 at the TCC Van Trease Center. Outside of work, her favorite roles are wife to Eric and mom to two year-old daughter, Avelain.

AVA HANCOCK Executive Director

Grace Hospice.indd 1

6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000, Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223• www.gracehospice.com

Your Day Made Perfect

4/14/16 11:14 A

Let Oklahoma Magazine help you plan your special day! Look for our summer wedding guide in the June issue. The Oklahoma Wedding Show and issue are returning January 2017. Booth Spaces are now available. For more information, call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

Wedding.indd 1

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

4/14/16 11:06 AM

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

77


of CIRCLE RED A group of women and the men who support the cause

Signature sponsor

&

Teri Aulph

Jennifer Bighorse

JoAnna Blackstock

Leah Bowles

Teresa Brockwell

Leslie Brunken

Robyn Ewing

Jay Foley

Lynn Flinn

Cathy Gates

Rocky Goins

Spring Gray

Sharon King Davis

Rita King

Barbara Knowlton

Lisa Korner

Jane Land

Lori Lassman

Tracey Lyall

Jennifer Palmer

Dr. Eleanor Payne

Kimberly Pearson

Holly Perry

Shawn Peters

James J. Proszek

Dr. David Sandler

Stacey Schmidt

Vida Schuman

Teesa Shouse

Melinda Stinnett

Jodi Trook

Join us for the Go Red For Women Luncheon on May 13, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Downtown Tulsa. Tickets at tulsagored.heart.org 918.877.8368 • #TulsaGoRed


&

THE

RED T E SOCIETY

Platform sponsor

Photos by

Leading the fight against heart disease in Tulsa

Lucia Carballo Oberle

Dr. Heather Cha

Rebecca Darrow

Caron Davis

Heidi Ducato

Tiffany Elzea

Heidi Hartman

Dana Haynie

Stephanie Heckenkemper

Nancy Hermann

Marti Jenkins

Libby Johnson

Katie Mabrey

Marcia MacLeod

Carol McGrath

Nicole Morgan

Jane Mudgett

Tara Mundell

Cyndi NixonKernan

Megan Pruitt

Frauke Quiroga

Cassie Reese

Patricia Renton

Hannah Robson

Susan Rogers

Mary Waller

Gerri Webb

Diane White

Dee Ann Wicks

Carol Winckler

Sherri Wise

Not pictured: Chuck Bassett, Charmaine Berlioux, Byron Bighorse, Lory Bryant, Carrie Clark, Suzanne Costin, Janell Cyrus, Andy Dodge, Lorinda Driskill, Gentner Drummond, Wendy Drummond, Kim Fonder, Stephanie Fullerton, Shannan Gulbis, Laura Hawkins, Brenda Hayes, Frazier Henke, Mary Ann Hille, Shari Holdman, Gabriel Horn, Joan Hunt, Jillian Ihloff, Erin Keeney, Laurie Kiser, Jackie Kouri, Ron MacLeod, Molly Mayhew, Carol McGraw, Heather McGraw, Joseph McGraw, Melissa Mirsaeidi, Sandra Moore, Linda Nelson, Belinda Posey, Jim Posey, Tascha Rinehart, Arlys Spiker, Susie Stonis, Amy Synar, Jeanine Truman, Nikki Turner, Meg Watkins, Susie Wellendorf, John Woolman


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS ROOFER

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

What are the black streaks running down my roof? Those black streaks are algae. This algae can normally be found on the north facing slopes or slopes that have minimal exposure to sunlight. The spores can be transferred from one roof to another by wind. RICKY HANKS Replacing your roof with shingles that are algae resistant will help eliminate this problem. If replacing your roof is not an option at this time, you can soft wash your slope with the proper mixture known by your roofer.

Ricky Hanks T-Town Roofing 5770 E. Skelly Drive Tulsa, OK 74135 ricky@t-townroofing.com 918.445.4400

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL What are some unusual things insurance might cover? Here’s five unusual things that your insurance policy might cover: 1. Lightning strikes: Your homeowners’ policy may provide coverage for fire caused by a lightning RUSS IDEN strike. Electronic equipment such as computers, televisions and refrigerators may also be covered. 2. Identity Theft: Expenses related to the theft of your identity may be covered by an endorsement to your homeowners’ policy. 3. Spoiled Food: In a power outage, the spoiled contents of your freezer and refrigerator may be covered. 4. Student Possessions: If your children are students living in a college dorm, their possessions may be covered. 5. Legal Representation for Car Crashes: If you are involved in a crash and are determined to be at fault and risk being sued, legal help may be covered by your auto policy.

Over the last few months, the Federal Reserve has been debating when to begin raising interest rates. The Fed has two objectives: maximize employment and keep inflation under control. Higher interest rates ease the pace of economic expansion by making loans more expensive. The slower pace of economic growth should subsequently ease inflation pressures. Conversely, lower interest rates encourage borrowing, which leads to higher spending and more jobs. Interest rates affect the economy: Some believe the economy has recovered sufficiently since the 2008 recession and the Fed can now afford to raise rates. Others are concerned that if rates rise too quickly, it will potentially have a negative impact on economic growth. What a change in rates could mean: If the economy continues to strengthen, inflation pressures could prompt higher interest rates, resulting in higher mortgage and automobile loan rates. For savers, the return on savings could remain low regardless of Federal Reserve actions. Be prepared for continued ups and downs in the market. DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC®

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

80

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

What can I do to protect my skin this summer? During the summer months it is essential to protect your skin from the sun, especially your face, neck, chest and hands. Make sure to choose a sunscreen that is formulated for your skin care needs and that blocks both UVA (accelerates aging and cause MALISSA SPACEK many types of skin cancer) and UVB (causes burn) rays – checking the SPF is not enough. SPF ratings examine only UVB rays. Circaidia® SPF 37 protects against both UVA and UVB rays and other environmental factors. It is specially formulated to last all day under makeup and through sweat, and its oil-free formula works great on all skin types, even sensitive skin. Call today to schedule a complementary consultation to discuss your summer skin needs.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

BUSINESS COACH

PHYSICAL THERAPY

I took the leap and started my own business, but now I feel stuck. How do I grow my business? 1. Find and follow people who have what you want. When I was first starting out, I spent quite a bit of time observing the business AMANDA FRANCES models, marketing strategies and branding of those in my industry who were expanding their audience and their income quickly. 2. Eliminate unnecessary noise. Your parents, pastor, neighbor and uncle all mean well when they give you advice, but unless they currently own a successful business, do not talk to them about your business. 3. Hire a coach or mentor. When you hire a business coach, you are able to bypass common mistakes, glean from their successes, and grow your business more rapidly than you could have on your own.

If you have questions about your insurance coverage, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

Why the Federal Reserve Matters to you:

Amanda Frances Business Coach for Women Entrepreneurs amandafrances.com amanda@amandafrances.com

For several years I have always felt tightness and soreness in my right hamstring. I don’t remember hurting myself so what could be causing my problem? Based on your description, it seems we can rule out an actual hamstring injury. There are several other possible sources of your pain and they all involve referral of pain 1) A lumbar facet joint with restricted mobility can result in tightness in the hamstring. 2) Decreased neural mobility of certain lumbar nerve roots, or the sciatic nerve, may result in hamstring pain. 3) Trigger points in certain hip muscles may refer pain to various areas of the leg. 4) Spine arthritic changes can result in inflammation, which then may refer pain into the leg. This list is only a few possibilities. Consultation with a physical therapist to determine the cause of your pain would be beneficial. Techniques I often use for these problems include neural mobilization, dry needling, joint mobilization, and various stretching and strengthening exercises. TIM MINNICK, PT

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. HOSPICE CARE My father has Alzheimer’s disease, and recently his doctor recommended we look at bringing in hospice care. We are concerned about the financial side of this care. Any advice on the options available? First, you should know most private insurance companies will cover hospice care, as well as Medicare. I recommend you first look at your policy and check with your insurance company. At Grace Hospice, we will help our patients and their families navigate that process. Even if you do not have coverage through your insurance, we can still help you. At Grace Hospice, we are committed to making sure each person who needs hospice care has access to it, regardless of ability to pay. In addition, The Grace Hospice Foundation is a 501 c-3 organization that subsidizes the cost of care for any individual who needs hospice care. Please call Grace Hospice any time at 744-7223 for more information. AVA HANCOCK

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

LEGAL SERVICES What is an “Abstract of Title”? An “Abstract of Title” is a compilation of all legal documents which comprise the history of a tract of real estate, to reflect the current state of title. An abstract of title commences with the “root of title”, which is the first legal document recognizing BRAD BEASLEY the tract of land, and all documents thereafter filed. An abstract of title is prepared by an abstract company which will certify that it includes all pertinent documents as of a certain date and time. Abstracts of title include conveyances (deeds), liens, mortgages, leases, assignments, judgments affecting the tract, releases, real estate taxes and assessments. After reviewing an abstract of title, an attorney will render a title opinion setting forth the state of the title, the current record owner and any exceptions to such title.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

PERSONAL TRAINER I’m happy with my weight; can I change my diet now? Yes, you can now start moving towards your maintenance phase, which will help you stay at your target weight. Start allowing yourself 100 more calories a day until you stop losing weight. For JOHN JACKSON example, if your caloric intake was 1,500 a day while you were in your slim-down phase, you should increase it to 1,600 a day for the next week. As long as your weight stays the same, continue with the same amount of calories. You will also need to stick with at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise (jogging, zumba, spin) five days a week. Moreover, if you are fit enough to participate, do 30 minutes of vigorous exercise like basketball, tennis or BOOTCAMP offered at St. John’s Health Plaza. Ballistic exercise should not be done more than three times a week and rarely in back-to-back workouts.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 1/2H Top Doctors.indd 1

OKLAHOMA

Advertising opportunities available

918.744.6205 advertising@okmag.com 4/11/16 11:16 AM

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

81


Shop Goodwill Tulsa For Spring Fashions & Seasonal Décor!!!

Managed by

       

Shop Often—Selection Changes Daily In All Stores Hours: M—S 9 am—6:30 pm ● Sunday Noon—6:00 pm Tulsa Locations: 3110 Southwest Blvd., 102 S. Garnett Rd., 19021 E. 51st St. Broken Arrow: 2210 W. Washington Glenpool: 502 West 125th Place Owasso: 8525 N. 117th East Ave. Claremore - Bartlesville - Carthage - Joplin - McAlester

www.goodwilltulsa.org

OK Mag Ad 3-7-16.ai

1

3/8/16

21920 Goodwill.indd 1

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT BOKCenter.com 1-866-7-BOK-CTR Arby’s Box Office

3:42 PM

3/7/16 22071 4:04 PM BOK Center.indd 1

Photography & Video

4/11/16 2:16 PM

918-587-2505 millerPHOTOGRAPHYinc.com

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

21627 Scott Miller.indd 1

82

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

3/8/16 4:05 PM


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Good Times at Guyutes Uptown OKC’s Guyutes reels in customers with fresh takes on old-school favorites.

A TEQUILA SUNFRYZ IS GUYUTES MOST POPULAR MENU ITEM: WAFFLE FRIES, TEQUILA PULLED PORK AND A SUNNY-SIDE EGG, TOPPED WITH CILANTRO CREMA. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

little more than a year ago, the building on the southeast corner of NW 23rd Street and Shartel Avenue in Oklahoma City was just another vacant eyesore. The renaissance that was slowly encroaching west through the increasingly popular neighborhood – even directly across the street from the abandoned structure – seemed to have passed that corner by. Now, locals can stroll to that once isolated area and enjoy a rooftop cocktail, creative street food and an atmosphere that, with weekly events like live-streamed concerts, music trivia and the upcoming Inebriated Spelling Bee, puts the “fun” in “funky.” Wayne Peroka, co-owner of Guyutes with Jarrod Friedel, says that a sense of freedom and variety is what inspired the two Phish fans to open the restaurant and bar. “I traveled for a living in my 20s and had the opportunity to experience different food, drinks and atmospheres all across the country,” Peroka says. “It gave me a fresh

perspective on the industry and I quickly developed a passion for it. When I moved back to Oklahoma City, I decided I wanted to be my own boss. One of my first serving jobs was in Colorado. I really loved the camaraderie among the entire staff. We worked together and played together and it was a great environment to work in. When Jarrod and I started talking about creating this venue, I wanted to emulate that kind of feeling and atmosphere. The idea for Guyutes just evolved naturally from who Jarrod and I are. We wanted to create a space and menu that was approachable, artistic and creative.” Creativity indeed seems to be precisely what the food at Guyutes is all about. An affordable array of choices awaits customers of all stripes, all a bit surprising (in a good way). The Traffic Light, for example, sounds like just another take on a chips-and-dip appetizer — until you taste it. A mysteriously smoky and thick salsa, queso (with flavor!) and house-made guacamole arrive top to bottom, red-yellow-green. The Disco Biscuit, a fried

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

83


Taste

L O C A L F L AV O R chicken breast served open-faced on a cheddar biscuit with honey butter and green onions, was just the right amount of elegant to make you feel fancy, and just the right amount of comfort to feel satisfying. On the upcoming spring menu, Peroka and company will be serving a yet-to-be named stack of tender, srirachasweet chicken with layers of Yukon gold mashed potatoes, as well as a new dessert menu, including a chocolate-covered disc of ice creams called a CO-OWNERS OF OKC’S tuxedo. GUYUTES JARROD We tried a lot at Guyutes, but we came FRIEDEL AND WAYNE PEROKA. away with an even larger “to-eat” list for the PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS next visit. “Our most popular menu item is the Tequila Sunfryz,” Peroka says. “I think people are really drawn to its uniqueness and eye-catching presentation.” We saw this being ordered everywhere around us – a generous order of waffle fries, tequila pulled pork and a sunny-side egg topped with cilantro crema. Peroka’s personal favorites include the Pip and the WuPlantang, two of Guyutes’s wrap options. For a cocktail on the roof, he likes the spicy margarita he calls the Fire in the Pineapple. Uptown 23rd is the perfect neighborhood for Guyutes to call home, with more and more local businesses, eateries and nightlife spots rapidly retaking this once vital area of Oklahoma City. “There are so many new and eclectic options in the neighborhood since the revitalization,” Peroka says. “We’re so fortunate to have other businesses and individuals pouring love and passion into this area. We actually purchased this building before the revitalization really took off and consider ourselves incredibly lucky to play a part in the renaissance of Uptown 23rd.” In keeping with the mindfulness that seems to characterize many of the businesses in the area, every second Tuesday of the month Guyutes holds Helping Friendly Tuesday, giving 10 percent of their earnings to a charity. “It’s really great to see Oklahoma City stepping out of the box for both restaurant owners and patrons,” he says of the blossoming OKC eating scene. “I think the culinary scene is rapidly transforming and coming into its own. There are so many different options and opportunities and that’s exciting for everyone.” When asked how he most wants diners to feel when they leave Guyutes, he says, “I want people to walk away thinking ‘I’ve never seen a staff that enjoys what they do so much.’ People are happy here. I think that kind of takeaway speaks volumes about what we’re trying to accomplish. I want people’s experience to be memorable because of our atmosphere as well as our menu offerings.” After a Violent Pimm’s – Pimm’s, ginger beer, lemon and orange mint – on the rooftop overlooking the bustling sidewalks of N.W. 23rd Street and the historic neighborhood of Mesta Park, and a meal that warm, fuzzy memories are made of, we have two words for Peroka: mission accomplished. Guyutes is located at 730 NW 23rd St. in Oklahoma City. Menu, hours and other information are available at www.guyutes.com. TARA MALONE

84

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

ALWAYS INNOVATING

Andolini’s builds on its success by continually looking for unique food to offer customers.

Andolini’s Pizzeria has continued to grow in the Tulsa metro area, and the restaurant’s newest location, which opened in Broken Arrow’s Rose District last fall, has met the same level of success as the other locations. “It has definitely exceeded all of our high expectations and all our performance numbers,” Andolini’s co-owner Mike Bausch says. “We’re very happy and proud of what we’re bringing to BA, and also thankful to the Broken Arrow Chamber of Commerce for what they facilitated in creating the Main Street Rose District we’re part of now.” Bausch and his brother, Jim Bausch, own three Andolini’s Pizzerias in the Tulsa area – besides the location in Broken Arrow, the company also has a restaurant on Cherry Street, the original location in Owasso and a food truck. The brothers also own STG Pizzeria & Gelateria in Downtown Tulsa and Gelateria – STG on South Sheridan Road. The Broken Arrow location is unique because it serves two styles of pizza. The restaurant’s locations in Owasso and on Cherry Street use RotoFlex ovens to create what Bausch describes as their take on Italian classics, while STG Pizzeria & Gelateria uses an imported wood-fired oven to create “exactly what you get in Italy,” Bausch says. The Broken Arrow location uses both types of ovens to give customers a choice of either style. “We like the idea of having both styles under one roof,” Bausch says. “We’re the only place in Oklahoma I know of that serves these two very different styles of pizza.” The Broken Arrow location is also larger than the other locations, but Bausch says the restaurants strive for consistency so people have the same experience in all locations. That includes the same innovation that drives the menu selection and variety of pizza for which Andolini’s is known. “Our mentality on food is to make the best product possible and let the cards fall,” he says. “We want to be ahead of the curve, not just to be trendsetters, but to make the best, most interesting, unique foods possible. We draw inspiration from places, but we always want to make it our own.” Bausch says they take the same approach to creating new pizzas, coming up with multiple ideas and combining the best parts of each until they find something they think is unique, special and great. The constant search for new menu selections, as well as the company’s growth strategy of placing restaurants wherever people like to walk, is likely to pay off for years to come. “From the business side, we’re set to grow,” Bausch says. “From a food and culinary side, we THE NEW BROKEN could completely not make another new pizza ARROW LOCATION OFand be OK. But that’s not we’re about. We’re FERS TWO DISTINCT PIZZA STYLES. too excited about pizza to stop.” PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY JUSTIN MARTINO

PHOTOGRAPHER


1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd. • Claremore, OK 74017 918-341-7333 • www.hammetthouse.com 21503 Hammet House.indd 1

9/17/15 10:43 AM

Celebrating our

53rd Year

Reserve an evening of “World Class” Caesar Salad with Steak, Lobster, Chicken or Fish. Friday & Saturday night featuring Mark Bryan.

3109 South Yale • 918.743.1800 • celebritytulsa.com

16340 Freddies BBQ.indd 1

3/21/16 12542 8:38 AM Celebrity Restaurant.indd 1

Visit US At

4/19/16 12:17 PM

OPEN 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. DAILY

918-742-4563

okmag.com 1/16 web.indd 1

3310 E. 32nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma Across from Walmart Neighborhood Market

11/9/14 11798 12:56 PM PhillsDiner.indd 1

5/2/14 12:41 PM

5201 South Sheridan Tulsa, Oklahoma 74145 918.622.5027

22092 PinPoint Resource.indd 1

4/6/16 22014 5:18 PM Hideaway.indd 1

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

85 2/18/16

9:28 AM


Taste FOOD FOCUS

Eggcellent Meals A simple ingredient for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

E

ggs are a grocery staple for good reason. They’re versatile, a meatless source of complete proteins and full of helpful nutrients like vitamin B12 and vitamin D. Although eggs often get a reputation as being a source of cholestorol, most people who aren’t under directions to limit their cholosterol intake feel the benefits of eggs outweigh the negatives. And while some ways to cook eggs may be healther than others – hard boiling an egg is better for you than frying an egg in butter and putting it on a burger – all methods are delicious. You can’t go wrong with the eggcellent egg.

The Perfect Omelette

Hard Boiled

Easy, simple and with a wide range of uses, a hard-boiled egg is one of the simplest ways to cook an egg. • Start by placing your eggs in a single layer in a sauce pan. • Add cold water to the pan, making sure around an inch of water covers the eggs. • Turn your stove on high until the water is boiling. • Remove the pan from the burner, cover, and let stand for about 12 minutes (less for small or medium eggs and more for extra large eggs). Once the eggs are done, serve them warm or cool under cold water and refrigerate.

86

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

While the concept is simple, a perfect omelette is an impressive looking breakfast. Here are some tips on making an omelette that looks as good as it tastes. • Prepare the filling before you start cooking – omelettes cook quickly. • Use butter or a non-stick spray to coat the bottom of the pan and push cooked portions from the edge to the center so uncooked portions reach the hottest surface. • Place the filling once the top surface has thickened, fold the omelette in half and slide or flip the omelette onto a plate and serve immediately.

Get Creative

Anyone can make a plate of scrambled eggs or slice an egg onto a salad. As far as how you use eggs, don’t be afraid to try new things. It’s your kitchen. Over-easy eggs make great, if a little messy, burger toppings. Bake some eggs together with cheese, spinach or whatever else you enjoy and scoop it onto a sandwich. Scramble eggs with potatoes, or serve a softboiled egg on top of toast with avocado. Eggs can also be used to top french fries, fried inside a piece of toast, served over noodles or even used as a pizza topping. The possibilities are endless – look for new ideas or just test your own imagination.


Cage-free, Free-range or Organic?

If you care about where your eggs come from, it’s important to know the difference between cage-free, range-free and organic. • Cage-free hens are allowed to roam freely around a facility, but often do not have access to the outdoors. • Free-range hens are cage-free and given outdoor access, but the type and duration of the access is not defined. • For eggs to be certified organic, the hen must be kept cage-free, allowed some outdoor access and fed organicallyraised feed. The hen can’t be given antiobiotics.

Alternatives to Chicken Eggs

While they may be the most common, chicken eggs aren’t the only eggs available for adventurous eaters – and there are more differences than you might expect.

• Quail eggs: Besides being much smaller than a chicken egg, quail eggs have a lighter, more delicate taste. Duck eggs: Larger than a chicken egg, a duck egg has a stonger, game-like flavor as well. They also contain more protein, but also more cholesterol and fat.

• •

Emu eggs: Much larger than a chicken egg, emu eggs are described as fluffier and lighter as well. Ostrich eggs: The largest of the bird eggs, ostrich eggs are often the most difficult to find. The flavor is described as mild, with a yolk that runs like a chicken egg. The three-pound egg takes two hours to hard boil.

Local Egg Delights

Not up to scrambling your own eggs? These restaurants will be happy to do it for you. Phill’s Diner 3310 E. 32nd St., Tulsa

Phill’s Diner is a staple in Tulsa with a loyal customer following and a tradition of friendly service and delicious, homemade tastes. Savoy Restaurant 6033 S. Sheridan Rd., Tulsa

The Savoy prides itself on its family-friendly atmosphere and menu items that are handmade using original family recipes.

Classen Grill 5124 N. Classen Blvd., Oklahoma City

Opened in 1980, this eatery is known for its homestyle breakfasts and fresh-squeezed juices. Brookside By Day 3313 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa

A Tulsa tradition serving up a hearty breakfast and lunch and offering daily chalkboard specials.

EGG SLICER BY WILLIAM-SONOMA

GADGET CORNER Sliced, chopped or diced eggs are used in dishes like potato salads or as garnish for many other foods, so make life a little easier on yourself and pick up an egg slicer. A simple one can be found at most places for just a few dollars, though prices can climb for slicers made of different materials or with more uses. Egg slicers are good for more than just eggs too. An egg slicer can be used to slice mushrooms, strawberries, avocadoes or even hot dogs. Like any good tool, an egg slicer has multiple uses and is a useful addition to any well-stocked kitchen.

Cheesy Egg-in-a-Bowl

Ingredients 6 dinner rolls (3 1/2 inch) 12 slices cooked bacon, divided 6 oz. VELVEETA®, cut into six slices 6 eggs 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh chives Make It Heat oven to 375ºF. Cut tops off rolls; set aside. Make 1-inchdeep indentation in center of bottom half of each roll. Crumble six bacon slices; sprinkle into bread bowls. Top with VELVEETA. Slip one cracked egg into each bowl; place on baking sheet. Bake 20 to 25 min. or until egg whites are completely set and yolks begin to thicken but are not set, adding tops of rolls, cut-sides up, to baking sheet for the last five min. Sprinkle eggs with chives. Replace tops of rolls. Serve with remaining bacon slices. www.kraftrecipes.com

NUTRITION FACTS

Egg, raw Amount Per 1 large (50 g) Calories 72

Total Fat 4.8 g Saturated fat 1.6 g Polyunsaturated fat 1 g Monounsaturated fat 1.8 g Trans fat 0 g Cholesterol 186 mg Sodium 71 mg Potassium 69 mg Total Carbohydrate 0.4 g Dietary fiber 0 g Sugar 0.2 g Protein 6 g Vitamin A Calcium Vitamin D Vitamin B-12

% Daily Value* 7% 8%

62% 2% 1% 0% 0% 12% 5% 2% 10% 6%

Vitamin C 0% Iron 4% Vitamin B-6 5% Magnesium 1%

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

87


Entertainment

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Spend an Artful Weekend

PHOTO COURTESY BLUE DOME ARTS FESTIVAL

O

Springtime in the city: Tulsa and Oklahoma City are both hosting outdoor arts festivals this month.

klahomans hoping to see some art, listen to live music or try new food will have plenty of opportunities this month in both Tulsa and Oklahoma City. Three different festivals will be held in the two cities during May, giving people plenty of entertainment options. The Paseo Arts Festival, held on May 28 through May 30 in the Paseo Arts District located on NW 30th Street and Dewey Avenue in Oklahoma City, will be celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. The festival will host more than 85 artists from Oklahoma and across the country and three stages of live music and dancing. In addition to the restaurants in the district, there will also be a food court with a variety of options.

“We want people to come down here and spend the day,” Paseo Arts Association Executive Director Amanda Bleakley said. “It’s a great way to let people know the district is here and invite them to come back another day.” The festival began with a group of local artists and has grown into a true fine arts festival, Bleakley says. The festival uses jurors from across Oklahoma to help select the art displayed at the festival, which includes paintings, ceramics, photography, leather goods and sculptures. “We do lean toward Oklahoma artists, but we want to have a good variety,” she says. “It’s kind of a natural progression, because we also want the best artists.” Paseo is the oldest shopping district north of downtown Oklahoma City, and people

attending the festival will not only have the opportunity to see art set up for the festival but also to shop at the art galleries and retail stores that are located in the district all year. Downtown Tulsa will also be hosting two major arts festivals this month. Mayfest will be held from May 19 to May 22, and the Blue Dome Arts Festival is running from May 20 to May 22. Mayfest will have dozens of booths showcasing artists from across the country. The artists will be displaying examples of their work, and the festival includes a Market Artist section with a selection of handmade goods. More than 100 musicians and dancers will be performing at the festival over four stages, featuring not only local musicians but headline musicians from all over the country. The festival also hosts an indoor Invita-

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

89


Entertainment

tional Gallery, which will have art from more than 100 of Tulsa’s best artists in oil, metal, photography and other specialties. All works in the Invitational Gallery are available for sale. The Blue Dome Arts Festival will be held a short walk away from Mayfest, allowing people to easily walk from one to the other. Blue Dome Arts Festival Director Jo Armstrong says there are several new additions to the Blue Dome Arts Festival this year, including a PetZone, that will feature some of Tulsa’s local pet businesses. The PetZone will be held on a fenced-in portion of the street covered with sod, giving it a “backyard feel,” Armstrong says. “Blue Dome has always been a festival where people have felt good about bringing their pets, so we thought, ‘Why not make a fun zone for them to go to?’” she says. The festival has added the Philbrook Family Zone, expanding the former Kids Zone from previous festivals with collaborative art projects children can work on with the entire family. Armstrong says the festival has also added some fun features to the handprint wall, which will continue artwork created on the same wall at last year’s festival. Armstrong says one of her goals for the Blue Dome Arts Festival is to make sure there would be something for everyone who

IN TULSA

THE PASEO ARTS

FESTIVAL FEATURES attends while still 85 ARTISTS AND LIVE keeping the focus PERFORMANCES. PHOTO COURTESY THE PASEO on local artists – the ARTS ASSOCIATION festival originally started because local artists were looking for a space to share their artwork. “I’m always just continually amazed by the talent here in Oklahoma,” she says. “I think it’s a really eye-opening experience for people to realize that.” Being held at the same time as Mayfest allows people to visit both festivals, which provides even more options for people, “I think that’s part of the fun of it,” she says. “If you’re not in downtown Tulsa that weekend, you’re missing a huge weekend.”

JUSTIN MARTINO

A R O U N D T H E S TAT E

Creedence Clearwater Revisited

RANDY MIRAMONTEZ / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

May 7 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Creedence Clearwater Revival founding members and Rock and Roll Hall of Famers Stu Cook and Doug “Cosmo” Clifford have been on quite a ride. More than 45 years ago, Creedence Clearwater Revival headlined the Saturday night slot at the legendary Woodstock Music Festival. Also that year, three Creedence Clearwater Revival albums simultaneously perched in the top 10 of the rock music charts and the group had four top three singles. The accolades keep coming. Earlier in 2014, The Recording Academy recognized Stu and Cosmo’s work in Creedence Clearwater Revival by inducting the album Cosmo’s Factory recordings into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and Creedence Clearwater Revival ’s 1969 recording “Fortunate Son” was added to the Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry. riverwind.com.

90

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

PENTATONIX May 7 BOK CENTER Grammy Award winners Pentatonix will be touring with support from Us The Duo and AJ. They will be making a stop in Tulsa at the BOK Center on May 7. bokcenter.com SIGNATURE SERIES May 6-8 & 13-15 TULSA BALLET Don’t miss this special closing program featuring three of Artistic Director Marcello Angelini’s favorite works. Serenade is the first work Balanchine created in America, and its sweeping romanticism has made it a lasting and iconic classic. Remansos is a playful and expressive contemporary ballet, with uncomplicated costumes that allow the focus to rest solely on the beauty of the dancers. Infra, meaning “below” in Latin, is a glimpse of life beneath the surface of the city. This unforgettable ballet incorporates a large LED screen to project multimedia images along with the live performance. This is the Oklahoma premiere of this haunting yet hopeful ballet. tulsaballet.org AMERICAN FANFARE May 17 TULSA SYMPHONY The concluding performance in the Classic Series presents favorite American composers and some of their most well-known works. Aaron Copland’s Symphony No. 3, which features his powerful Fanfare for the Common Man, George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue with soloist Jeffrey Biegel, and Aaron Jay Kernis’ Musica Celestis all combine to create a spectacular finale to Tulsa Symphony’s 10th anniversary season. tulsasymphony.org WAYNE BRADY May 22 TULSA HARD ROCK CASINO Enjoy an evening of laughs when the King of Improv, Wayne Brady, takes the stage at the Hard Rock Casino in Tulsa. As a young improv actor, Brady’s comedy career began when he became a regular on the both the British and American versions of Whose Line is it Anyway? From there, the hard-working comic starred in his own variety show; earned several Emmys and has made countless appearances on countless sitcoms, comedy and talk shows, including The Chappelle Show, 30 Rock and So You Think You Can Dance. travelok.com JERSEY BOYS May 24-29 TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER More than 36,000 theatergoers cheered when Jersey Boys made its sold out premiere in Tulsa in June 2012. Worldwide, more than 20 million people have seen Jersey Boys. And now the show that made critics and audiences cheer will return to Tulsa. Jersey Boys is the Tony, Grammy and Olivier Award-winning Best Musical about Rock and Roll Hall of Famers The Four Seasons: Frankie Valli, Bob Gaudio, Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi. This is the true story of how four blue-collar kids became one of the greatest successes in pop music history, featuring their biggest hits. celebrityattractions.com CADY WELLS: RUMINATIONS Continuing PHILBROOK Philbrook presents the dynamic and psychologically penetrating watercolor paintings of Cady Wells (1904-1954). This group of more than 25 works – most on loan from the New Mexico Museum of Art collection –features Wells’ uniquely modernist interpretations of Southwestern landforms and cultural-religious traditions. Born to a traditional, well-to-do New England family, Wells settled in northern New Mexico in 1932.


INTULSA

Entertainment

There, his art took on the complex layering of a spirit inspired by music, calligraphy and stained glass, but traumatized by active WWII combat, sexual intolerance, and atomic bomb experiments at Los Alamos, just 12 miles from where he lived and painted. Such mid-century influences marked his increasingly surrealist style with equal parts rapture and disquietude. philbrook.com SEEKING SHELTER May 6-May 26 LIVING ARTS OF TULSA An exhibit of these works is opening at the First Friday Art Crawl on May 6 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Living ArtSpace, Myers Galleries. Also opening will be UnHomed, an exhibit of Rogers State University students’ artwork from their Artists for Social Change curriculum taught by Anh-Thuy Nguyen and Marianna Pegno (Associate Curator of Education at the Tucson Museum of Art) at Living ArtSpace West End Gallery (continues through May 26). Imbedded Performances of Homeless Stories by David Blakely will also happen during this evening. Tulsa Public Schools Exhibit What is Home? will be on display at the Guthrie Green on First Friday in May. livingarts.org THE BEACH BOYS May 19 & 20 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO The Beach Boys are widely considered America’s finest and most significant rock ’n’ roll band. For over 50 years, they have recorded and performed the music that has become the world’s favorite soundtrack to summer. The Beach Boys’ first hit single was “Surfin,’” recorded in 1961, and over the next five decades they would release hit after hit including “Good Vibrations,” “California Girls,” “I Get Around,” “Wouldn’t It Be Nice,” “Fun, Fun, Fun,” “Help Me Rhonda” and “Kokomo.” The Beach Boys were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988 and honored at the 2001 Grammy Awards, receiving The Lifetime Achievement Award. riverspirittulsa.com

PHOTO BY TODD ROSENBERG

IN OKC

JOE BONAMASSA May 3 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL As Joe Bonamassa enters his 26th year as a professional musician, he continues to blaze a remarkably versatile artistic trail and amass an authentic, innovative and soulful body of work. Bonamassa’s career began onstage opening for B.B. King in 1989, when he was only 12 years old. Today, he is hailed worldwide as one of the greatest guitar players of his generation and is an everevolving singer-songwriter who has released 17 solo albums in the last 15 years, all on his own label, J&R Adventures. He founded and oversees the non-profit Keeping The Blues Alive Foundation to promote the heritage of the blues to the next generation, fund music scholarships, and supplement the loss of music education in public schools. In 2013, Bonamassa earned his first Grammy Award nomination for Best Blues Album, and in 2015 he released his fourteenth No. 1 Billboard Blues Album (more than any other artist), Muddy Wolf at Red Rocks. 2014’s new studio album Different Shades of Blue debuted at No. 8 on Billboard’s Top 200 and was his highest charting album, first top 10, and biggest sales week ever. In January 2016, he will complete another huge accomplishment when he headlines two shows at New York City’s legendary Carnegie Hall with an all-acoustic set. okcciviccenter.com

Jeff Dunham May 6 BOK Center, Tulsa

Comedian and ventriloquist Jeff Dunham is bringing his Perfectly Unbalanced tour to the BOK Center on May 6 at 8 p.m., performing with his well-known sidekicks Walter the Grumpy Retiree, Peanut and the rest of “The Guys in the Trunk.” Dunham handcrafts each character from conception to the final coat of paint, bringing them alive onstage as part of his comedy act. He became fascinated with ventriloquism when he was 8 years old after his parents gave him a toy Mortimer Snerd dummy and accompanying instructional album and was performing anywhere he could find an audience by the time he was 10. Most recently, his NBC primetime comedy special Jeff Dunham: Unhinged in Hollywood, which chronicles two sold-out nights at Los Angeles’ Dolby Theatre, drew more than 6 million viewers when it aired in September. Dunham has also made frequent appearances on The Tonight Show and Late Night with David Letterman among other television specials. MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

91


Entertainment

CLASSIC FM RADIO HITS May 6 - May 7 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Jack Everly is conducting this retrospect, which features five decades of America’s favorite FM Radio hits. From “Big Girls Don’t Cry” to “I Will Survive”; from “Bridge over Troubled Water” to “Surfin’ USA”; and including songs from The Beatles, ABBA and Neil Diamond. okcciviccenter.com HARRY CONNICK JR. May 8 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Harry Connick Jr.’s meteoric rise in the world of music was only a prelude to a multifaceted career. This pianist, vocalist, composer, band leader, actor and philanthropist has received awards and recognition for his live and recorded musical performances and for his achievements on screens large and small as well as the Broadway stage. Throughout his stellar career, Harry Connick Jr. has earned three Grammy Awards, two Emmy Awards and two Tony nominations and spearheaded efforts to help rebuild his hometown of New Orleans after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. okcciviccenter.com PHILHARMONIC GALA May 14 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL The Oklahoma City Philharmonic will be performing Espana by Emmanuel Chabrier, Crown Imperial Coronation March by William Walton, West Side Story Symphonic Dances by Leonard Bernstein and Pictures at an Exhibition by Modest Mussorgsky, arranged by Maurice Ravel. okcphilharmonic.org BULLETS OVER BROADWAY May 23 - May 29 OKC CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Hailed by Time Magazine as musical theater gold, Bullets Over Broadway is the hilarious musical comedy about the making of a Broadway show. Written by Woody Allen, with original direction and choreography by Susan Stroman and based upon the screenplay of the acclaimed film by Woody Allen and Douglas McGrath, Bullets Over Broadway is the story of a young playwright who, in desperate need of financial backing for his next show, accepts

an offer he can’t refuse from a mobster looking to please his showgirl girlfriend. Loaded with big laughs, colorful characters and the songs that made the ’20s roar, Bullets Over Broadway is bringing musical comedy back with a bang. okcciviccenter.com OUR CITY, OUR COLLECTION: BUILDING THE MUSEUM’S LASTING LEGACY Continuing OKCMOA In celebration of the many extraordinary acquisitions that have made the Oklahoma City Museum of Art the premier collecting institution in central Oklahoma, the exhibition Our City, Our Collection: Building the Museum’s Lasting Legacy tells the story of the museum’s history as a series of transformative gifts, bequests and acquisitions. Beginning with the Works Projects Administration’s donation of 28 works of art to Oklahoma City in 1942, Our City, Our Collection explores the museum’s rich permanent collection as one of our community’s most important cultural assets. Included in the exhibition are some of the world’s most significant artists: Georgia O’Keeffe, Rembrandt van Rijn, Gustave Courbet, Marcel Duchamp, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Alexander Calder, John Singleton Copley, Andrew Wyeth, Roy Lichtenstein, Dale Chihuly and many, many more. okcmoa.com DALE CHIHULY: MAGIC & LIGHT Continuing OKCMOA Redesigned in collaboration with Chihuly Studio, the galleries incorporate a unique design that features a three-dimensional approach to viewing some objects in the collection. The presentation allows visitors to explore the large Float Boat and Ikebana Boat installations from all sides and includes viewing slots for the Reeds. In 2002, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art inaugurated its new home in the Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center with an exhibition of glass and drawings by Dale Chihuly. Bolstered by enormous public support, the museum purchased the exhibition, which included works from Chihuly’s bestknown series and was anchored by the 55-foot Eleanor Blake Kirkpatrick Memorial Tower in the museum’s atrium. okcmoa.com

A R O U N D T H E S TAT E

May 21 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN His deep knowledge of music history seeps into his own sonic playbook, with hints of Elvis, The Everly Brothers, The Beatles and The Beach Boys, among other influences, coloring the album’s songs. Yet once Yoakam “puts his hillbilly voice on it” – as he refers to that magnificent instrument – he makes it his own. He was thinking of Brian Wilson and Pet Sounds, he says, when he envisioned the soaring harmonies on the guitar-propelled “In Another World” to complement the song’s inspirational bridge. riverwind.com FOREIGNER May 26 CHOCTAW CASINO, DURANT Head to the Choctaw Casino Resort in Durant for an exciting performance by Foreigner. Known for their songs “I Want to Know What Love Is” and “Feels Like the First Time,” Foreigner has been entertaining crowds since the 1970s. Foreigner will be playing at the Choctaw Grand Theater, a 3,000-seat multi-level entertainment venue. From travelok.com.

92

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

JOE SEER / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Dwight Yoakam

INTULSA

Following the Grain Showing the Hand of the Artist

Continuing GILCREASE MUSEUM Two exhibits at Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Following the Grain: A Centennial Celebration of Willard Stone and Showing the Hand of the Artist: The Sketches of William R. Leigh, will be continuing in May. Following the Grain opened at Gilcrease in February and celebrates the work of Oklahoma sculptor Willard Stone, who was born in February 1916. The exhibit features more than 30 woodcarvings as well as several drawings by Stone, who was named the Gilcrease Foundations first artist-in-residence in 1945 when Thomas Gilcrease recognized the sculptor’s potential. The exhibit also features correspondence between Gilcrease and Stone. The exhibit runs until Jan. 1, 2017. Gilcrease Museum owns one of the largest collections of William R. Leigh’s work and has organized his work along with guest curator Holbrook C. Lawson for Showing the Hand of the Artist: The Sketches of William R. Leigh. A successful magazine illustrator, Leigh also traveled through the American West, painting large-scale images using European techniques. His work eventually earned him the nickname “America’s Sagebrush Rembrandt.” Showing the Hand of the Artist runs through June 26.


INTULSA

May 6 & May 8 TULSA OPERA Tulsa Opera is showing a production of Samson & Delilah on May 6 at 7:30 p.m. and May 8 at 2:30 p.m., telling a story familiar to many people in a way that may be new to them. The story follows Samson, who seeks to free his Hebrew kinsmen from the bondage of their Philistine oppressors but is distracted by the seductive Delilah. When Samson spurns Delilah and chooses his God and his people, she resolves to destroy him and his legendary strength. Several Tulsa Opera favorites are returning to the stage in the production of Samson & Delilah, by Camille Saint-Saëns. Dana Beth Miller, who last appeared as Amneris in Aïda, portrays Delilah, and Frank Porretta, last seen as Pollione in Norma, is playing Samson. Legendary bass Samuel Ramey returns to Tulsa Opera as the Old Hebrew and baritone Peter Lindskoog returns as the High Priest of Dagon. Crystal Manich, who made a triumphant debut with with Tulsa Opera’s production of Romeo and Juliet this season, is retuning as stage direct. Music is provided by the Tulsa Opera Orchestra, conducted by Kostis Protopapas. Tulsa Opera is working with Tulsa Oratorio Chorus and Portico Dans Theatre to bring this grand opera to life.

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA OPERA

Samson & Delilah

Counting Crows

I N O KC

May 14 CHOCTAW CASINO RESORT

May 17 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Fans of ’90s music will have opportunities to hear two major bands from that decade this month as Counting Crows plays the Choctaw Grand Theater at Choctaw Casino on May 14 at 7 p.m. and Dave Matthews Band hits the Chesapeake Energy Arena on May 17 at 7 p.m. Counting Crows’ first album, August and Everything After, was released in 1993 and hit No. 4 on the U.S. Billboard charts. The group has toured extensively since then and continues to be active in creating new music, releasing seven studio albums, six live albums and two compilations over their career so far. Their latest album, Somewhere under Wonderland, released in late 2015. Dave Matthews Band is known not only for the band’s studio albums but for their annual summer-long tours in the U.S. and Europe. They often perform extended versions of fan favorites that feature heavy improvisation by the band, and demand for recordings of the shows has led to the band releasing around 60 live albums so far. The band’s first album, Under the Table and Dreaming, was released in 1994, and their most recent studio album, Away from the World, was released in 2012.

COUNTING CROWS; PHOTO COURTESY CHOCTAW CASINO RESORT

Dave Mahews Band

RANDY MIRAMONTEZ / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

PHOTO COURTESY GILCREASE MUSEUM

A R O U N D T H E S TAT E

Air Supply

May 20 GRAND CASINO, SHAWNEE “Lost in Love,” “All Out of Love,” “The One That You Love,” “Sweet Dreams” and “Making Love out of Nothing at All” have each achieved multimillion plays on the radio. In 1986, the group’s music was still playing endlessly on radio. Air Supply began to tour with lavish productions in places that no one had been before. In South America and Asia, they became a part of everyone’s life. In 1988, Air Supply was asked to participate in Australia’s bicentennial celebration and to play for HRH Prince Charles and HRH Princess Diana, where they learned both were already ardent fans. This engagement would be one of their most treasured moments in their career. The duo continues to play more than 150 shows a year worldwide, including stops in England, Ireland, Israel, Philippines, Korea, Japan, Canada, the U.S. and beyond. MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

93


Each month Oklahoma Magazine highlights exciting Oklahoma film events and gives some guidance on films coming out on home video and those currently playing in theaters. May traditionally marks the beginning of summer movie season, meaning that theaters will be filled to bursting with explosive spectacles: some good, some wincingly bad. To forestall the inevitable for a few more weeks, your May best bets are certified 100 percent blockbuster free.

ABOUT TOWN

As colleges around Oklahoma wrap up their school year, film students are scrambling to finish their pet projects. The Sooner State may not immediately leap to mind as a hub for film production, but in recent years strong programs have emerged across the state, working to educate students who go on to thriving careers in Hollywood and beyond. If you live near one of the state’s major universities, there’s a good chance you can get a preview of the future of film by attending a screening of student films – these usually occur at the end of the semester to give students the best chance to polish their work. Sure, there’s a roughness to the films on display, but also a vital energy that’s often missing from films with bigger budgets. There are two of special note happening in late April and early May. University of Oklahoma hosts their annual Redbud Film Festival, which showcases a wide array of student films, on Friday, April 29. The following week, on Friday, May 6, the Film Studies department at The University of Tulsa has its Senior Film Night. Here you can get the chance to see the best of the best of these student films. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

94

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

PHOTO COURTESY ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS

May’s Best Bets in Cinema

IN THEATERS

If you need a break from superheroes and explosions, consider checking out the sweet indie comedy Hello, My Name Is Doris, directed by former The State comedian Michael Showalter with wryness and sensitivity. The titular heroine (Sally Field) is painfully shy, but she dreams of a romance with a much younger coworker. In a bid to win his love, she reinvents herself as an energetic extrovert with vintage style. The film does not hold too many surprises – if you have seen an indie comedy recently (think Little Miss Sunshine and the like), you can probably guess most of the film’s plot points. It excels in two regards, however. First, its genuine love for its characters, who are funny but never mocked. Second, it gives a welcome showcase for Fields, who is absolutely electric in the title role.

AT HOME

If you’re already itching for Halloween and need a good film to drum up some scares at home this month, I highly recommend Robert Eggers’ period horror film The Witch, out on DVD May 17th. Set in Puritan New England, the film uses extreme attention to accurate detail to build a whole world around its protagonists, a family who have cut themselves off from their neighbors. The film builds with a slow burn, and the scares are more existential that primal (though you’ll never look at goats the same way again), but the film sticks with you afterwards, offering a lot to ponder.

THE WITCH; PHOTO BY RAFY, COURTESY OF A24

Entertainment

BEST CINEMA BETS


MARKETPLACE Voted Tulsa's The Best of the

Best

Top 100 Tommy Bahama location

North of Woodland Hills 6837 S. Memorial Dr. North of Utica Square 2139 E. 21st St.

Make life one long weekend with

10051 S. Yale, Suite 105 918.299.6565 DonnasFashions.com

22081 Donna's Fashion.indd 1

918.254.1611

www.visionsunique.com

3/30/16 22082 1:28 PM Visions.indd Our design team is ready to help with all of your design needs

Z

ZOLLER DESIGNS

& ANTIQUES, INC.

3/30/16 3:23 PM

Custom Window Treatments Furniture and Accessories Space Planning Extensive Showroom

1 3 4 3 E 1 5 T H S T, T U L S A • 9 1 8 - 5 8 3 - 1 9 6 6

22080 Zoller's.indd 1

1

1512 E 15TH STREET \\ TULSA, OK \\ 918.794.0071 \\ FIFTEENTHANDHOME.COM

3/2/16 4:22 PM In May, we have a popular little challenge that we like to call

3/23/16 22001 5:27 PM Fifteenth and Home.indd 1

THE THIRTY.

Thirty yoga classes in May. For the camaraderie. For the free shirt. For you.

2020 Utica Square www.hicksbrunson.com 918.743.6478

22066 Hicks Brunson.indd 1

The Ultimate Luxury Eyewear Experience 3/17/16 22070 11:40 AM Salt Yoga.indd 1

MAY 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM 95 AM 3/18/16 10:53


CLOSING THOUGHTS

with Stephanie Cameron

A

s state director for Dream It Do It Oklahoma and OK2Grow, Stephanie Cameron, community affairs director for APSCO Manufacturing, has taken a strong role in the community with helping students in Oklahoma. One of the primary goals of OK2Grow is to create connections and open doors for students, providing students with career awareness experiences and opportunities to help retain or bring them back to the Tulsa area. Cameron is also chair-elect of TYPros (Tulsa’s Young Professionals), which she says

is a “great vehicle to learn more about the community and discover where you can connect and make an impact.” We recently spoke to Cameron and talked about her thoughts on…

…getting Tulsans under 40 involved in voting on the Vision 2025 package and future initiatives and elections.

Under the astute leadership of TYPros Chair, Daniel Regan, I participated in the Get Out the Vote efforts and education on the Vision package targeted to the under 40 population. This demographic has been criticized for not participating in civic engagement, and I think we are going to see a positive impact on the under 40 voter turnout in Tulsa through this campaign.

…the impact Vision 2025 will have on Tulsa.

I think [the announcement USA BMX is moving its headquarters to Tulsa] is only the beginning of the announcements and plans we will see after this vote. With the development of The Gathering Place, The Route 66 Experience and OKPop Museum, I think we are going to see a snowball effect of great things happening in Tulsa.

…working with Oklahoma students with OK2Grow.

My hope is that students will realize that they are needed and important to Tulsa’s future. Tulsa has been ranked as one of the top cities to start a career, and there are so many leadership opportunities available for people early in their employment. I have been fortunate to have had a number of these experiences thanks to great mentors in my life, and it’s something I find very rewarding to share with others.

…attracting the younger generation to Oklahoma.

I think young people need to see our city and state continuing to grow and evolve. I think they are attracted to cities where the leaders are making bold decisions in order to stay competitive with surrounding cities, including increasing available transportation options, developing the urban core and enhancing the quality of life for citizens.

Tulsa’s future is looking incredibly bright. Working with students, I feel inspired and confident in the momentum we are building. I see the city becoming a creative hub and nationally recognized in many positive ways. We have a thriving entrepreneur community, a rapidly expanding arts community, a strong economic base and vibrant workforce.

…her favorite thing about Tulsa.

I love that people matter here. One person still has the ability to make a difference. Tulsa is a place where if someone has an idea or a dream, they can make it a reality here.

96

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2016

PHOTO BY MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

…Tulsa’s future.


Discover the wonder of Oklahoma’s AAA Four Diamond property, Choctaw Casino Resort Durant. If you’ve come to play, experience action-packed slots and table games, family friendly fun at The District and chart-topping acts at The Grand Theater. If you’ve come to stay, enjoy world-class treatments at The Spa, delicious dining options that please any palate and luxurious guest rooms and suites. Either way, you’re in for an unforgettably exciting time.

BEYOND EXPECTATIONS CHOCTAWCASINOS.COM 888.652.4628

DURANT, OK

Management reserves all rights.


Local. Personal. Professional.

www.donthorntonauto.com

Oklahoma Magazine May 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you