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COLCHESTER SCHOOL OF ART

DIPLOMA IN GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION COURSE CODE: ZH13651 STUDENT HANDBOOK

2013/2014


Contents: Welcome

1

About the Course

2

Aims Objectives Content Delivery Making the Most of the Course Materials

3

Types of Study Timetables Hours per Week Attendance ,I\RX路UHQRWVXUHZKDWWRGR Enrichment Moodle How the Programme is Managed Course Leader Progression Board Progression to the Next Course Quality Assurance

4

5

Equality and Diversity Safeguarding The Course Committee Student Representatives Assessment of Work

6

Grading Criteria Key Skills Health and Safety

7

Studios and Workshops Computer Workshops Acknowledging the Work of Others Learning Agreement

8

Art School Floor Plan

10

Year Plan In Case of Fire or Emergency

11

9

12


1. Welcome to the Colchester School of Art at Colchester Institute. We hope you'll enjoy your time with us and that you'll find it rewarding on an academic, vocational and personal level. The beginning of a new course can be a bit confusing but be patient and if you are unsure or worried about anything then please ask your tutor. Your experience in school probably means you will be used to being told what to do, how to do it and getting nagged if you don't. You might find, however, that an art & design course such as this one is a little different. You will be told what you have to do, but only up to a point. You will be given guidance on how to do it but you'll be expected to find out much more for yourself. This is all part of the learning process; finding your own ways of doing things and getting your own information. You will do this by asking questions, suggesting ideas and discussing your work with your tutors. Hopefully this will help you to become self reliant, flexible and confident in making your own decisions. Things will be new, but with the guidance of the tutors, we hope you will find it a worthwhile and rewarding experience but you will have to be responsible for your own learning. So, be brave, get involved and be committed to your own development.

Work hard, dedicate yourself and most of all have some fun.


2. Aims, Objectives & Course content: A Diploma in Graphic Communication aims to introduce learners to a diverse and exciting range of disciplines within the Graphic Design industry. You will experience a broad cross-section of practical production briefs alongside more developmental, research based academic study. You will develop the skills necessary for working within this exciting and ever evolving industry.

´Our main objective is getting you where you want to go by developing functional and vocational skills and honing your creativity to an end that suits your personal goals in education and life.¾


This programme offers you the opportunity to build your understanding and use of visual language to stimulate ideas and realise them, developing the skills, knowledge and understanding necessary to progress in your art & design education. *This programme is a UAL pre-university diploma and comprises of 9 Core units which are shown below:

Unit 1: Introduction to visual language Unit 2: Introduction to research skills Unit 3: Introduction to critical and contextual awareness Unit 4: Introduction to materials, processes and technical skills Unit 5: An integrated approach to 2D problem solving Unit 6: An integrated approach to 3D problem solving Unit 7: An integrated approach to time based problem solving Unit 8: Developing an art & design project Unit 9: Opportunities for progression

*The structure of course is designed to give you a broad understanding of a range of graphic design disciplines; we aim to be exploratory and vocational, functional as well as abstract and experimental. The briefs are written to help you learn the fundamentals of design whilst producing an exciting portfolio of work.


3.

Making the most of the course You will find that art school is different from secondary school. There are structured sessions, but it is you who must make the important connections between the different opportunities, experiences and possibilities that are offered by the teaching staff. So feel good about making visual statements that are about you; use your study time as a springboard to your future; and above all enjoy it!

Materials: You will be provided with a range of basic materials essential to particular workshops. However there are some essential items that you are expected to provide whilst on the course: A3/ A4 /A5 Blank Journals (Not lined) Black Ink Pen / Liquid Fine liners Pencils USB pen-drive or Portable Hard drive of at least 8GB Personal note book for lecture notes A3 Portfolio case (This is vital when transporting final pieces and production work, a good quality card one with fixing straps is fine) Pritt Stick or quality equivalent Scotch Tape Black Sharpie Marker Set of Colour Marker Pens Although you will have access to cameras, you will find that a good digital camera or quality camera phone will be very important as a tool for collecting visual evidence within practical workshops. If you have your own laptop, this will prove to be a very useful commodity in continuing to make use of your studies outside of class/workshop time. Mac computers are not essential but industry standard Adobe suites will allow you continue to develop work outside of studio time-tabling.


Types of study: There are two learning activities: taught and self managed studies. Taught studies are activities such as lectures, seminars, workshops, demoQVWUDWLRQVWXWRULDOVDQGœFULWV¡ (critiques: work and ideas discussed critically by staff and students in small groups). Attendance of these sessions is compulsory. Self managed study, on the other hand, is when you get all the rest of your work done, such as research, getting ideas, drawing, designing, reading, writing and so on. It allows you, to keep up or catch up with all your assignments.

Timetables: Individual timetables will vary depending on which group you are in. You need to be aware of your own timetable, to ensure that you arrive to lessons on time and use it to plan your own self-managed study. This encourages the development of self organisation, self discipline and initiative.

Hours per week: You are required to attend college for 3 full days a week. These are compulsory taught sessions for which the college requires full attendance. On top of these regulated and registered hours, we recommend that you spend at least 40 hours a week on your studies in order to achieve the required standard. This is obviously best done at college where you have access to facilities. If your really resourceful you will be DEOHWRDFFHVVDOORIWKH6FKRRORI$UW¡VIDFLOLWLHVEXWLWWDNHVWLPHDQGGHYRWLRQWRWKHFDXVHWRDOORZWKLVWR happen.


Attendance: This is a full time course and you are expected to attend all sessions, as you would in a professional environment. The college policy deems that anything below 85% attendance is deemed unacceptable. You may have commitments such as part-time jobs or caring responsibilities, but you must ensure that these do not clash with your college timetable as sessions cannot be repeated and attendance is taken into consideration for student profiles and assessment of work. Poor attendance on the register may affect your funding and your personal record for references. It is also essential for health and safety reasons that we know whether you are on the premises in the case of an emergency. Studios and workshops are usually open from 9am to 4pm and studios are sometimes open for longer in the evening but please check first if you want to work in the evening.


Procedures and Punctuality Policy: STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 1. Art School Attendance and Punctuality Policy is clearly visible on the studio wall and is written in the course handbook 2. If you are going to be late or absent they should call the ABSENCE LINE in the first instance, before 9am (Absence Line 01206 712160). 3. As lessons start at a specific time, it is expected that you turn up at least 10 minutes before the start time so that the lesson can begin as scheduled/ timetabled as this limits disruptions. 4. If you are late for a session, it is your responsibility to inform your tutor of your arrival, so that the register can be completed accurately and follow any specific guidelines for lateness agreed by yourselves during induction. 5. If you know you are going to be absent you must complete an EXPLAINED ABSENCE FORM at least one week ADVANCE, where possible. This should be given to the Course Leader who will record the absence on the register and in the student tutorial file. 6. If you are absent from college for longer than one week you or a parent/guardian must complete a SELF CERTIFICATION FORM, detailing why you were absent, or alternatively you can provide a 'RFWRU·V&HUWLILFDWH 7. The college policy on attendance deems that anything below 85% attendance is deemed unacceptable and could jeopardise progression or success on your course. 8. If your attendance falls below the required 80% you may receive a letter requesting a meeting with your Course Leader or Curriculum Manger to discuss ways of supporting the improvement of your attendance and completion of your course work ² this is called a SDP11 ² please see the Student Disciplinary Policy for further details.


If you're not sure what to do: In most cases, ask a tutor if you require advice or assistance. Please remember, that all staff have a substantial number of students as well as a fair amount of administrative duties, so they will not necessarily be able to see you immediately. So be patient and don't despair we will ALWAYS find time for you. Office doors are usually open and if a tutor is busy at that moment, make an appointment to see them later.

Enrichment: The art school is dedicated to provide you with an all-round educational experience. There will be opportunities to visit local galleries and work placements that your work will benefit greatly from. We will provide you with group tutorial enrichment sessions, which will be directly related to the course and will contribute to your overall well being and understanding of the world around you.

Moodle Another way for you to stay in touch with the program and all the students is to use our online moodle page. You will be able to access digital copies of everything you need to complete the course and your tutors will aim to keep as up to date we can, as the course evolves over the year. You will be shown how to logon to moodle at the beginning of the course and will need to check this on a daily basis to keep up to date with all that is current.


4. How the programme is is managed?

Course Leader: The Course Leader has overall responsibility for the coordination of the course. Various staff will collaborate with each other in the delivery of the programme as well as the maintenance of the course files, student records, handbook and the organisation of the course committees. You should report any and all problems to your course leader; they have your best interest at heart and will be your main port of call during the year. Your course leader is always available to listen and discuss your SURJUHVVVRGRQ¡WEHDIUDLGWRSRSLQIRUFKDWRUERRNDWLPHWRKDYHDPRUHIRFXVHGWXWRULDO

Assessment weeks & progress reviews: You will see your tutors on a regular basis to discuss your work. At the same time they will monitor your progress. In addition, there will be occasions when the Course Leader will request a review of your progress when you will have the opportunity to discuss any concerns you may have in detail. You will be asked to contribute to this by appraising your own performance and discussing your aspirations. There are set times for these throughout the year so take a note of the calendar issued to you in induction week.

Progression Boards The progression board makes decisions on conditions, if any, for progression or termination. The board meets in June and reviews individual performance and achievement. The board takes into account; attendance, attitude to learning and quality of work. Your personal life is, of course, your own affair but if your academic performance significantly falls below standard; you may wish to discuss any contributing issues with your tutor. They may be able to help you develop a strategy to improve the situation or alternatively suggest where you may be able to get specific help.


5. Quality Assurance Equality and Diversity Colchester Institute aims to ensure that all actual or potential learners are treated in an equivalent fashion regardless of: age, disability, family responsibility, marital status, race, colour, ethnicity, nationality, religion or belief, gender, sexual orientation, trade union activity and any other irrelevant criteria. At Colchester Institute we strive to make sure that all students and staff are treated with dignity and respect and that everyone is given the same chance to succeed. We are all responsible for our behaviour and should not make any other person feel uncomfortable or discriminated against. The College will not tolerate bullying or harassment in any form. For support or more information please contact Student Services at any site or email Maeve Borges the Equality and Diversity Manager at maeve.borges@colchester.ac.uk

Safeguarding The college is committed to the rights of learners within all its learning locations; it is committed to promoting their welfare, protecting their physical and psychological wellbeing and safeguarding them from all forms of abuse. The College will act in ways that best safeguard the interests of learners. If you have any issues that you think need dealing with please speak to your course tutor / student counselling or The Course Committee The course committee is responsible for defining, implementing and monitoring all matters relating to the provision and operation of the course. It meets twice a year and minutes contribute to the Self Assessment Report, which forms part of the Institute Quality Assurance procedures. Student representatives A Student rep is elected by the group is expected to attend the Course Committee. They provide a student perspective on the course and liaise with tutors on your behalf on any matters felt to be appropriate. The student liaison tutor will normally call a meeting of student representatives prior to the Course Committee to assist them in presenting the issues they wish to raise. They have an opportunity to comment on any aspect of the course through prior discussion and attendance at the course committee. The findings of the Course Committee are summarised in the Course Self Appraisal, which is then passed on to the Academic Board.


6. Assessment of Work Principles of Assessment: The aim of assessment is to determine and record the standard of learning that you have achieved at a certain stage in the course. Art and design assessment is not always a precise process because of the often individualistic and innovative approach by students to their work. Each unit requires that you submit work to be assessed. This work is then graded as a pass, or referral. A pass is awarded when all the grading criteria in a unit have been achieved. Make sure at the beginning of each you unit you familiarise yourself with the learning outcomes and the assessment criteria. Each individual unit will have a list of work need for assessment, use this like a checklist and check with your tutor before handing in any unit. Deadlines: Sticking to a deadline is vital in learning the vocational skills necessary for any Art & Design positions from an entry level copy-setter to highly successful artist in your own right, Deadline are put in place to allow the easy flow of your learning process but also life generally. Assessment points: You will be assessed at three key points over the year, with the final of the three being externally moderated by the UAL AB. There will also be a diagnostic assessment point after the first 3 weeks to try and work out how things are going, what you need to improve upon and whether this is the right course for you. At this early point we could always change or shift it around if we think it suitable for your learning. Consult your year plan to see when you will be assessed and on which units you will be assessed upon. There will be a separate assessment handbook for each part of the course. Assessment feedback: Written and oral feedback will be given for all work submitted for assessment, this will indicate what you have done well and where and how to improve your performance this is a vital part of the learning process and gives you the opportunity address the specific issues raised in latter project. You will have dedicated tutorial time to discuss your progress and regular Individual learning plans will drawn up in respect to the feedback you receive. It is very important you listen to the tutors remarks, but also you should be confident about your own feelings. Feedback will always be objective and based upon the work presented at hand in. Internal and External Verification: Internal Verifiers will ensure the validity of the assignments and moderate the assessment and grading of the work to ensure that the correct level, standard and quality is maintained. Visiting External Verifiers are also invited to report in writing to the principal on the course and its standards and procedures. Additionally the relevant Government bodies (OFSTED) responsible for quality assurance carry out inspections on the institute and the courses we deliver.


7. Health and Safety As you would expect we insist on a good level of behaviour at all times and that you respect the work, the property and the working environment of other people. No Smoking in the College except in the shelters provided. No food or drink to be consumed anywhere in the Art School other than the cafeteria. No mobile phones or MP3 players to be used at anytime in studios and workshops, unless stipulated in controlled circumstances by your tutor. No one may enter the college premises, if under the influence of drugs or alcohol At all times you are to respect college property and the work of your fellow students. As the course proceeds you will be inducted into the appropriate Health and Safety rules that are relevant to the various pieces of equipment. If you are ill or late you should let your tutor or the Faculty Office know as soon as possible as a matter of courtesy and professionalism. It is also vital that we know whether you are on site or not in the case of an emergency. You may use potentially hazardous equipment and processes during your studies, so a responsible attitude is essential at all times. It is important that you have consideration not only for your safety but the safety of your peers. Before operating machinery or tools, you will be instructed on the relevant health and safety regulations. You will also be given relevant training and you are not allowed to use any piece of equipment for which you have not received training. Studios and workshops are managed for health and safety and you will be inducted into the regulations and must abide them at all times. Students must pay attention to the suitability of their dress code in the studio particularly their footwear. Baseball caps, woolly hats and hoodies with the hood up are not permitted in a class/studio environment. You will not be permitted into workshop areas inappropriately dressed. Staff must be advised of any medical condition or religious beliefs which may affect your activities while at college any: such information would naturally be treated confidentially and not affect your acceptance on to a course as we have an equal opportunities policy. In the event of an accident you should immediately inform a teacher, Instructor or workshop supervisor. In the event of an emergency dial 999


Studios and Workshops Computer workshops At certain times, such as just before a submission deadline, it can get very hectic in the computer workshops and system of priority has to be used. You are expected to be aware of other students' needs at these busy times and the rule is that you do not use a machine for longer than one hour if others are waiting to use it. The law on copyright is very strict and the fines are very expensive so under no circumstances are you allowed to use programmes on college machines that have not been put on by the digital studies tutor; neither are you allowed to illegally copy software from the college machines. Make sure you keep backup copies of your work on a USB/Firewire Drive. If you're thinking of buying your own computer, have a chat to the Mac workshop supervisor for advice on what to get, both hardware and software, and possibly the cheapest and most reliable place to get it. Contextual Studies / Functional Skills: You will be given instructions on how reflective notes and reports are to be presented. These give you as much flexibility as possible on which machine and software you use (computers at college, at home or at friends). You must adhere to these instructions because you'll be penalised if you don't. They are there to ensure that your work is easy to read and there is space for the assessors to add comments or corrections

Art & Design 6WXGLR路V:RUNVKRSV We take a broad approach to art and design education and encourage students in different areas to relate to each other and so create a greater range of experience and opportunity. The activity of integrating with other departments will be encouraged within the structure of the course but you must also as conscientious young practitioners make use of all the faculties we offer. Below is a brief description of the physical resources in the School of Art & Design: L Block Ground floor: Print Room 虏 All your letterpress/lino/screen-printing needs Hay Gallery, in which practicing artists and designers regularly exhibit and discuss their work with students. Metal, wood and plastics workshop Ceramics and glass workshop. Outside, at the back of the building, there is a covered area for large sculpture.

The first floor (L160) mostly comprises a large studio equipped with easels and drawing equipment as well as basic tools. There are two seminar rooms (L156/8) and a visual studies studio (1-159) used primarily for life drawing.


H Block Ground floor Fashion & Textiles degree studio

H12

Photography studio and darkrooms

H42

First floor BA Graphic Media / Diploma in Graphic Communication Apple Mac Suites

H150 / H106 H102/4/5.

Students on other art & design courses also use the studios and workshops so there are times when their use is very heavy and times of access may be restricted. However, if you want to use a particular facility and are not timetabled for it, talk to the tutor and it might be possible to arrange something. Some students establish a semi-permanent base in one area and some carry out different activities in a number of studios and workshops depending on what they're doing at any particular time. However you choose to work, we hope that by working alongside and getting involved with a variety of students and tutors from different backgrounds, with different ideas, knowledge, skills and experiences you can help to create a constantly changing, lively and exciting working environment.


8. Acknowledging the work of others & critical appraisal and evaluation

Jenny Ham / Penguin Competition brief / 2011/2012 Graphic Communication Cohort

You are encouraged to look at and indeed to use as a reference the work created by other artists. This may be ideas that you write about and use in your art & design project work. You will also use research imagery and information from time to time that was produced by well known artists or designers, authors, unknown practitioners or by other students. This is an important aspect of good practice, as it extends and enhances your awareness, knowledge and creativity. When your work is assessed it is absolutely essential that the assessors are clear which aspects of your work is your own creation or analysis, and which are quoted or referred to for the purposes of the task. This will enable them to determine the extent of your own contribution, how you analyse the work of others and consequently how to provide an appropriate and fair grade for the unit. All your work must clearly identify any material, information or analysis taken from published work, including ideas from others that you have put into your own words. There are standard ways to do this and the one we use in written work is the Harvard System (introduced on the following page).


All visual references should also be annotated. This applies whether they appear in your sketchbook, logbook, preparatory work or finished work. You should add a simple note stating the source of the material and its originator if known. This would apply to a photocopy from a library book, a cutting from a magazine, a sketch of something in a museum or gallery or even a piece of discarded packaging found on the bus. This will ensure that there is no possibility of your being accused of presenting the work or ideas of others as your own (plagiarism) and it will also demonstrate the breadth of your research, critical analysis and observation. It will also prepare you for the professional world where disregard for the laws of copyright, design right, patent and other aspects of the protection of intellectual rights for artists and designers can result in extremely expensive litigation. Critical Appraisal: When considering the work of others and your own, there is a simple system of questioning that will allow you write confident annotation and evaluation. Each brief you work on will have specific learning outcomes and grading criteria, you must ensure you read this thoroughly before proceeding with any final appraisals. Most artists and designers constantly refine their work and ideas through considering: How, What, Why, and Who? There a multitude of possible questions that stem from these questions that will help you when commenting on your work or in researching a technique or looking up a particular artist or movement.

How does that colour suggest an emotion? What technique was used to create the piece of work? Why does the scale of the type affect the consumer? Who is the artwork aimed at? The system is cyclic and every answer will allow you to move into another part of your critical appreciation. You will be given exercises to help with this as it is a skill to develop over time. What you must ensure you are conscious of however, is that everything needs to evidenced, so that we assess your critical thinking and development of your own practice. Referencing Your Work:

What is referencing? Referencing is the acknowledgment of sources of information that you have cited in your written work, either directly quoted or paraphrased. The Harvard System uses the author ² date method; the references in text are given in brackets and the list of sources is given in a bibliography attached to the assignment. For example: Include a reference at the end of a sentence. (Greaves, 2004) Referencing enables you to: show you have researched your topic, for example, articles, books, reference works and electronic resources; direct your readers to the information you have used; avoid plagiarism. What is citing? Citing is a generic term, used for when you refer to any source, either to give an example or to back up an argument. For example: $FFRUGLQJWR&RZOH\  œGLVFXVVion really does play an absolutely vital part in the GHYHORSPHQWRIWKLQNLQJ¡


What is a bibliography? A bibliography is a list of all the sources you have cited in your assignment, in DOSKDEHWLFDORUGHUZLWKWKHDXWKRU¡VVXUQDPHSUHFHGLQJWKHILUVWQDme. You should also include a separate list RIVRXUFHVWKDWKDYHLQIOXHQFHG\RXUOHDUQLQJIRUWKHDVVLJQPHQWEXW\RXKDYHQ¡WFLWHGIURP7KLVFDQFRPH XQGHUWKHKHDGLQJœ)XUWKHU5HDGLQJ¡ For Example: Bibliography Berger, J. (1972) Ways of Seeing, London: BBC/Penguin Mattick, P. (2003) Art in its Time, Theories and Practices of Modern Aesthetics, London: Routledge Williams, R. (reissue, 2010) Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society, Oxford: OUP Further Reading Cottington, D. (2005) Modern Art: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: OUP Duro, P. and Greenhalgh, M. (1993) Essential Art History, London: Bloomsbury Finally 'RQ¡WSDQLFLIDOOWKLVVHHPVYHU\XQIDPLOLDU<RXUWXWRUs will guide you through the whole process and ensure that you understand it fully, and are able to reference your work correctly.


9.

The Learning Agreement COLCHESTER INSTITUTE During your time here, Colchester Institute will make every effort to provide: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

A learning environment which encourages you to develop your potential; Suitably qualified and committed staff; Appropriate learning facilities, equipment and materials; A personal tutor to provide support and guidance; Regular feedback on your progress, including the return of coursework and assignments by an agreed date; 6. Opportunities for work experience, as appropriate; 7. A range of student services, e.g. Learning Resources, Refectories, Nursery, Welfare, Careers Guidance and Recreation; flexible learning opportunities for additional studies, e.g. Numeracy, Communication and Information Technology; 9. a means of recognising, and giving credit for your previous experience and qualifications; 10. Equality of opportunity. THE STUDENT During your time here, Colchester Institute asks you to make every effort to: 1. Participate fully in your programme of study; 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

take responsibility for your own learning and personal behaviour; attend regularly and punctually; submit coursework and assignments promptly: notify staff of any absence as soon as possible; discuss your progress regularly with appropriate staff; respect the rights of other individuals; treat with due care and respect the facilities provided, and abide by the published rules and regulations; 8. consult with your personal tutor if you are considering any changes in your programme of study.


GUIDANCE AND ADVICE The Institute is committed to giving appropriate guidance and advice on -

the entry requirements and suitability of your chosen learning programme educational, educational, financial or other support required by you to support your learning

Your signature to verify you have been shown the location of this handbook is also your agreement to the terms of the learning agreement. Please ensure that you read this hand book thoroughly and carefully; making sure you access it whenever needed.


10.

Map to the School of Art:

*The Colchester School of Art is located within the Colchester Institute campus; use this map to orientate yourself with your surroundings, perhaps marking important references like the Library, TLR, Print Rooms and workshops. Use the notes section to produce your own key?


11.

Unit 4 ² Credit Value 12 Introduction to Materials Processes and Technical Skills in Art & Design

Unit 7 ² Credit Value 12 An Integrated Approach to Time-­Based Problem Solving

Unit 9 ² Credit Value 6 -­ Art & Design Opportunities for Progression in Art & Design

Unit 8 ² Credit Value 24 Final Major Project Developing and Art & Design Project Summative assessment provided with a graded end mark: P/M/D

PROGRESS BOARD

Unit 3 ² Credit Value 12 Introduction to Critical and Contextual awareness in Art & Design

Unit 6 -­ Credit Value 12 An Integrated Approach to 3D Problem Solving

Summative Assessment ² Final written feedback and grade provided for WKH\HDU$OOZRUNLV,9·G (9·GWRLQIRUPVWDQGDUGLVDWLRQ

Unit 2 ² Credit Value 12 Introduction to Research Skills in Art & Design

Unit 5 ² Credit Value 12 An Integrated Approach to 2D Problem Solving

Part C ² Summer Term Formative Assessment ² Written feedback and action points to be given to each learner

Unit 1 ² Credit Value 12 Introduction to Visual Language in Art & Design

Part B ² Spring Term Formative Assessment ² Written feedback and action points to be given to each learner

Part A ² Winter Term


12. Fire Procedure: Be prepared - find out where your nearest fire exit and fire assembly point is. For H Block (the location of our studio) it is the L Block car park. If you hear a continuous alarm bell ² you must evacuate the building immediately via the nearest fire exit; your tutor will instruct you where to go, as will the on call fire Marshall. Go to the assembly point and await further instructions. If you discover a fire - operate the nearest fire alarm immediately; call emergency services on (9 for an outside line if using an office phone) 999. If you hear an intermittent alarm bell stay where you are, as it may just be a drill.* *NOTE: intermittent alarms sound at Sheepen Rd campus only, the Braintree, Witham, Coopers Drive, Church Road and Thomas Road sites do not have intermittent alarms Your teachers is responsible for your class please ensure you remain together while evacuating the building and waiting outside.

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