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The Grapevine Newsletter

November 2014


Hear it through the Grapevine Featured Stories

Pages

GEM Fall Autocross at Minter Field

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Purpose of the Porsche, Sheer Driving Fun

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The 993 Turbo Marketplace, What’s Going On ?

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Will All 911 S be Turbos in 2015 ?

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It’s Confirmed ! God Prefers Porsche

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The Evolution of the Porsche Key

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Chopard’s PCA Watches (Ugly !)

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Social Outings & Members’ Page Miscellaneous Member Actiivity

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PCA Member only Fall Porsche Raffle

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Event Calendars & Schedules Upcoming GEM Social Events

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Our GEM Event Calendar

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Up-Coming Out of Town Events First (Last ?) Meta Mille Miglia Join Us !!

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Buttonwillow DE and Club Race

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Tech Tactic 2014, Fontana

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2014 Escape to Orlando

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El Toro Autocross Event

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The Targa Baja Rally Tour

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Porsche Club of America Golden Empire Region Board Members and Chair Persons

President

Vice President

Secretary

Treasurer

Past President

Omar Olivas

Linn Christopher

Spencer Harris

Betsy Wadman

Pat Wadman

Membership Co-Chairs & Safety Chair &

Newsletter Editor

Insurance Coordinator

Michael Thomas

Mike McGregor

gemgrapevine@gmail.com

Communication Co-Chairs

Loren Stumbaugh and Anna Stumbaugh

Autocross Co-Chairs

Greg Fullmer and Charles Rook

PCA Membership Webmaster

Social Coordinator

Anton Khatsanovich

Tammy Harris

While our cars are very exclusive, our club is not. Did you know that you can add a family member or other interested person as an affiliate member, at no additional cost? The family or affiliate member must also be 18 years of age or older.

Please join us online at our newly remodeled Website and on our Facebook Group page:

For all of the details contact our Membership Chair:

http://gem.pca.org/

Loren Stumbaugh Porsche Club of America Golden Empire Region Membership Chairman Loren7025@gmail.com (661) 747-4416

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ PCA.GoldenEmpireRegion/ And please send any Newsletter comments or content contributions to :

gemgrapevine@gmail.com

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Upcoming GEM Social and Sporting Events Something a little different is in store for our November 18th Social Meeting. Mark Manda is going to host the November Meeting, Tuesday the 18th at his family’s Party Barn The Manda’s are providing the venue and the pulled pork entree. Members are asked to bring a side dish and whatever wine or beverage they would like to drink. Location of Mark’s Party Barn is 6303 His Way, close to the corner of Fruitvale and Hageman Refer the maps below:

The Red dot marks the location of the party barn. Mark has indicated the driveway to the Party Barn is located off Hageman, about 100 feet from the corner of Fruitvale and Hageman. Driveway off the south side of Hageman.

October: 31st

Driveway

Fruitvale

Hageman

Party Barn

Click Events Hyperlinks for more event information Friday,

First day of Meta Mille drive, over Hwy 33 and ending in Solvang.

November: 1st

Saturday, Day 2 of Meta Mille drive, along Hwy 1 to Cambria. An evening tour of Hearst Castle and rest at Ragged Point Inn.

2nd

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Day 3 of Meta Mille drive up Hwy 1 to Carmel, and a drive from Hollister to home down Hwy 25.

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November Social Meeting Pot-Luck at Mark Manda’s Party Barns

The Golden Ox, every Saturday Morning at 8:am for Breakfast and Chit Chat , 3400 Wilson Rd. 4


At a Glance.

A few items of interest from within the Golden Empire Region’s Members in the Month of October

Rene Chow has discovered how to make his engine cover transparent, as seen in the photo to the Left. And when Thelma and Louise saw this it turned into a full blown GTA affair ….. At the CBCC fundraiser for Children with Cancer

Ken Keenan transformed an already beautiful 993 Cab into a work of ART with gorgeous new paint from Mike Parra and the boys at Lucky Spot auto body shop on Edison Hwy. Stunning car Ken, but stay off Rosedale Hwy ……..

Hunter

Mercedes

And it is with sadness that I mention the passing of Hunter. A GEM associate member and 15 year companion of Tammy and Spencer Harris. This beautiful Golden Retriever had a very calming and comforting presence about him. Rest well friend and bless you for the years of companionship you shared with this family.

But Wait !

Look who just wondered onto Tammy’s front porch from the orchard. A little stray female in need of a loving home. It’s almost as if Hunter is telling the Harris’s he’s doing fine, but here’s a little girl who needs all of the love and affection that you have always shown to me. Welcome Mercedes !! I can’t wait to meet you. 5


Sights from a very busy October Weekend Very Special Thank You to Chuck Anderson and Anastasia for the great Weekend Photos

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The GEM Fall 2014 Autocross on Runway 3 at Minter Field

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Porsche purpose: The sheer fun of driving

There's one word that should excite every Porsche driver — autocross. For those who may not know what I mean, allow me to explain. An autocross is a race, but it doesn't meet the usual concept of "race." Only one car goes around at a time, and drivers race the clock. There are different classes for different cars, and the fastest one with the fewest faults is the winner. Autocrosses are known to be done on different terrains in other countries. But in America autocrosses are often done on big patches of pavement — like a deserted parking lot — and there's a set course mapped out with big orange cones. Drivers who have autocrossed can tell you all about how horrible things happen when you hit a cone or two or 10. (Just kidding, but the point is to stay within the boundaries of the orange cones.) If you've never autocrossed, I'm sure you're wondering by now what the big point is. Why would I explain this bizarre type of race to you? I'll let you in on the big secret, the main reason to autocross. (Drum roll, please.) It's fun. Now, there are loads of other reasons to autocross, too. Driving through an autocross can teach you about the limits of your car and how to get yourself out of trouble in a split second. You can become a better driver in a controlled environment and, if it suits your fancy, you'll also be preparing yourself for a race track. After you tackle an autocross a couple of times, your confidence behind the wheel of your favorite Porsche can skyrocket, and when it's time for track day, those tight turns are no longer intimidating.

I realize there are some more experienced Porsche drivers out there who have no idea what I mean when I say tight turns can be intimidating, but there are also others like me who are slowly learning everything a Porsche is capable of. After all, a Porsche is a car that spans all generations and types of people. For those who aren't quite sold on my point that you should try an autocross, allow me to take you through my own experience. Let's travel back in time a few years. I was 16, ready to autocross with my Volkswagen Beetle, affectionately called "Peanut." But before I took my turn behind the wheel on the course, I hitched a ride in a Porsche Boxster. The best way I have to describe that car completing the course was like a hot knife slicing through butter. I psyched myself up for my own turn. There was no need to be nervous — I could do this, too. Right? I was halfway through my first course before I remembered I had other gears besides first. (I recommend doing an autocross with a manual transmission. I think it adds to the fun.) Everything happened so fast that in a heartbeat I was finished. Only six cones had gotten in my way, but I hadn't gone off course.

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I sat with "Peanut" waiting for my next round, and I replayed the course in my mind again. My feet had flopped all over the place, like I'd been trying to stomp a spider behind my pedals, and I'd knocked my knees on the steering wheel too many times. No matter how I demanded, it seemed like my hands could never move fast enough, and I had those cone penalties to prove it. There was plenty of room for improvement, and I was ready in the next round. My hands actually did move faster, my feet didn't freak out as much, and after gunning through the finish line, a little thrill made my hands tremble. In spite of all the madness, this was actually fun! (Just don’t forget to get those tires and brakes checked afterward.) I didn't get a chance to autocross again until my most recent Porsche Parade in Traverse City, Michigan. This time, the purpose of the autocross was to see if drivers realized a difference autocrossing Porsches with Michelin tires. Instead of my favorite little Beetle, this time I got behind the wheel of a Porsche Cayman. Saying I was excited was an understatement. I'd never gotten a chance to autocross an actual Porsche before. Everything on the interior was light brown leather, and smelled just as beautiful as it looked. The steering wheel was cool and sensitive in my hands. I waited for my guide to tell me to go, and then we were off. The Cayman surged right into my hands, and I wasn't quite sure what to think of the incredibly sensitive gas and brake pedal. It was a giant step up from Peanut.

This autocross course included a stop-and-go segment to avoid hitting an imaginary pedestrian. I mention that because it became the highlight of my second lap. I was encouraged not to be afraid of the car and to see what it could really do, so I upped the acceleration in the S-curves, and started to fishtail a little in the slaloms. I couldn't get the grin off of my face, but I think I scared my poor guide. When it was time to throw on the brakes to narrowly miss the wandering pedestrian — the imaginary one, don't worry — the ABS lit up under my braking foot and the Cayman squiggled to a stop. The car probably didn't actually look that way, but that's what it felt like. I hit the gas again to pull forward, but the Cayman didn't respond, and my guide admitted to sliding the car into neutral because she had been worried I'd spin. I laughed, not because my guide was scared, but because I would have loved that experience. Just like Porsches, autocrossing is made for everyone. Porsches are nice to look at, may be passed through generations or even be a symbol of social status, but I think autocrossing connects a driver's heart with a Porsche's true purpose. Richard Petty said it well: "We drive for the sheer fun of driving." And the reason to autocross a Porsche is for the sheer fun of driving.

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Inspired by the Italian Mille Miglia and the West Coast California Mille, The Golden Empire Region of the Porsche Club of American is hosting it’s first (and perhaps last) Meta Mille Miglia tour. This driving tour will take place over three days throughout some of California’s most beautiful countryside. And you can join us for part or all of this tour ! It’s a 500 mile tour that will take place over a three day period. From Friday though Sunday attendees will drive from Bakersfield, through the twists and turns of Hwy 33 to Ojai and Santa Barbara. Over the weekend the journey will take participants up Hwy 1 through the some of the most majestic scenery California has to offer. Ending with a thrilling drive down Hwy 25 out of Hollister. Another twisty curvy back road experience that Porsche-philes thrive on. Day One From Bakersfield to Ojai over the exciting Hwy 33. Up the lower Central Coast to Santa Barbara’s Stern’s Wharf for lunch. And into Solvang over Hwy 154 for relaxing shopping, dinner, and overnight stay. This is the heart of the movie “Sideways”. Come and track one of our favorite “fun time” movies throughout the wine vineyards of Los Olivos, just 7 miles to the north of Solvang. The sleepy community of Los Olivos is a great place for dinner and some great wine sampling. Santa Ynez, just minutes east of Solvang even host the gambling pleasures of the Chumash Indian Casino, or the “Land of the Big Winner” as the local native Americans fondly refer to it. Then settle in for a relaxing night’s sleep at one of the Solvang’s many rest spots. The Royal Copenhagen hotel still has rooms available last time I checked. Day Two Wake up early Saturday morning for breakfast or Danish pastry in Solvang. Then it’s on more scenic driving through the Santa Ynez valley’s vineyards and wineries. A 10am stop at the Firestone Winery is scheduled on our way for a private winery tour and tasting of their fine Central Coast wines. The $20 cost per person should leave a wonderful taste in your mouth of the gorgeous Santa Ynez valley. We continue on through the beautiful back roads of the Foxen Canyon which will lead us into the secluded oak forest of Tepusquet. A very well maintained country road full of wildlife. Every time I past through Tepusquet I see deer, wild turkey, tons of grey squirrels dashing from tree to tree. Tepusquet road put us out on Hwy 166 about 15 miles east of Santa Maria. From there it’s about a 20 minute drive up Hwy 101 until we reach our lunch stop at the lovely Ventana Grill, or former Shore Cliff restaurant for all of you “hipsters” who may recall the action filled evenings of great food, drink, and live music of this hotspot overlooking the cliffs of the Pacific Ocean.

After lunch we drive north to San Luis Obispo to switch from Hwy 101 to a more scenic coastal Hwy 1. Which will lead us through the marshlands of Los Osos, into Morro Bay, and up to the lovely quaint village of Cambria, where the ocean meets the pines. Shopping and sight seeing will last a couple of hours. For those of us “manly men” who can’t hang with shopping for candles and blown glass there is the 100+ year old Camozzi’s bar on Main St Cambria. A real throw back to the 1800s.

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Betsy Wadman has arranged for what I believe will be a transcendent evening tour of the Hearst Castle. I’ve been through the Castle many times but never after dark. The warm glow of the alabaster lighting fixtures will transport all who attend back into an art deco age of Downton Abby. I’m truly looking forward to this evening Castle experience.

But wait, we’re not done with our Saturday evening yet. After the evening of the Castle we drive on up Hwy 1 to the Ragged Point Inn for dinner and a night’s rest just 15 miles north of Hearst Castle. Anyone who attended the 2014 Monterey Porsche Parade may recall one of the driving tours to this magnificent hotel and restaurant which sits 600 feet above the Pacific Ocean. All night long you will be serenaded by the crashing ocean surf below.

Sunday In the morning you will awake to one of the most beautiful and majestic views that the California coastline has to offer. You will be nestled in pine, oleander, and dramatic stands of cypress trees. The aroma of this area itself is simply intoxicating.

Breakfast will be enjoyed at the elegant Ragged Point restaurant. And afterwards drive up one of the most majestic section of coast Hwy in the world. The breathtaking Highway 1. There’s a little trick that I’ve found out about other drivers on this road. If you tailgate it really annoys them and they pull over and let you drive your Porsche spiritedly up this beautiful highway. Up to Monterey for lunch at Fisherman Wharf and onto Hollister for staging of the drive down famous Hwy 25. Another twisty curvy road that Porsche was born to experience. This road takes you out to Hwy 101 around the King City area I believe. Then on home from there.

So if you and your Porsche thrive on the twisty and curvy driving experience this weekend has YOU written all over it. Please don’t feel that you are obligated to participate in the entire trip. I plan on joining the group early Saturday morning in Solvang. And bailing out of the drive somewhere around the Big Sur area and driving back down Hwy 1 and back home. This should be an amazing experience in whichever Porsche you choose to drive this weekend. Can’t wait to take my little air cooled Targa up Hwy 1 for the first time !!

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The New Reality Of The 993 Turbo Market Recently, the collector Porsche market has been going absolutely wild, and nowhere is that more evident than the valuation of particularly clean examples of the 993-generation 911 Turbo and Turbo S. These are cars that, just a few short years ago, could be purchased for a fraction of their current values, so why the sudden shift? Is this inflationary price tag here to stay, or will the 993 bubble burst? Who better to ask than the expert?

We wanted to know what there was to know about the 993 Turbo market, so we gave a call to FLATSIXES.com sponsor, Willhoit Enterprises [the place we bought our 993 that our logo is modeled after]. Just a couple of years ago, the best 993 Turbos were eighty-thousand dollar cars, in fact I saw a few sell at around 60 grand in early 2012. Today, you'd be hard pressed to find one in decent condition at double that figure. Willhoit figures that this is just the tip of the iceberg, and that these cars are only going to continue gaining in value. Nice for the people who have them. Not so nice for those of us that want one. If you are in the market, you'd better buy quickly. They say that the best of the best 993 Turbos are going to be quarter million dollar cars come next spring. Seriously?

Why is the 993 Turbo such a hot commodity all of a sudden? According to Willhoit, it's the Porsche he'd most like to own for his own collection "without question". Aside from his claims that they are gaining around twenty-thousand dollars in value per month, he states that the newer Porsche Turbo models may be faster, but lack the personality found in the 993's aircooled version. In this market of skeptical investing, it is nice to have something tangible for your money. With the market the way it is, it is possible to buy a 993 Turbo, enjoy owning it and driving it, then sell it for a tidy profit in a year or often less. There is something to that, certainly. I've been behind the wheel of a few 993 Turbos, and there is certainly nothing like that experience. It's the surge of the turbochargers. It's got that distinctive aircooled sound. It even smells a certain way, that hot smell. You know the one. That's not to mention the absolute beauty that is the curved flanks of a 993 widebody. Sure, the all wheel drive system is still a bit primitive by today's standards. Yeah, the interior is pretty familiar if you've spent your life around air cooled cars. The windshield shape dates all the way back to 1964. The switchgear is clicky and plasticky. None of that matters once you fire it up and get underway. Wait until its warmed up, then tromp on the throttle a few times and you'll forgive all its trespasses. You've got 408 horsepower under your right foot. You've got a pretty darned good Getrag G64 transaxle to row through. You've got all wheel drive spinning 18X8 front and 18X10 rear iconic 'Turbo Twist' wheels. It's an almost 20 year old car that sprints to 60 miles per hour in only 3.9 seconds. How could you go wrong? Of course this is an investment quality vehicle. 14


So back to the question at hand; Is this a bubble in the market, and is it going to burst any time soon?

Well, first, lets analyze the last couple of bubbles to burst, most notably the Muscle Car collector bubble of the early 2000s, and the Ferrari collector bubble following Enzo's death in 1988. Both of these artificial market inflations were defined by a single similarity. Neither of those bubbles were driven by scarcity, only perceived scarcity. The muscle car market rise was initially driven by a certain level of scarcity, as people started looking for rarer and rarer option packages. A perfectly kept rare option car was all of a sudden worth an astronomical sum, and we witnessed million dollar Plymouth Hemi Cuda convertibles, but only in some weird color, with air conditioning, built on a Tuesday, with original tires still fitted and only 20 miles on the odometer. This then artificially inflated the value of the more pedestrian muscle cars. When people wizened up, the bottom fell out in a big way. Similarly, following Enzo Ferrari's passing, a lot of market speculators when out and bought F-cars, this drove up prices for a little while, but then the economy took a dip, and a lot of collectors (most especially those in Japan) started dumping their cars and driving the prices back down. That bubble burst just a year or two after it rose, and by 1991 certainly, things had normalized again.

Is The 993 Market Heading For A Similar Crash? Willhoit says no, and its all down to one simple sentence. Demand is continually outpacing supply. They simply aren't making the 993 Turbo anymore, and there are new collectors wanting to buy the best 993s money can buy almost every day. People who have traditionally collected higher end cars, folks that are used to spending a million dollars for a car, are taking a serious look at the 993 Turbo as an investment now, and are unfazed by a pricetag only one quarter of that. Cars, especially ones as beautiful as Porsche's 993, are now being accepted as true objects d'art, and hoarded as such. Any good private Porsche collection has at least one 993 Turbo these days, and the really good ones are becoming ever more difficult to acquire.

So What Options Do You Look For In A 993 Turbo? Premium colors are always a solid choice. A personal favorite is the beautiful Arena Red, though Midnight Blue might be a close second. For the sake of rarity, finding a car in a paint-to-sample color seems to be the hot choice lately, especially anything in Mexico or Riviera Blue (It seems to be Seinfeld's favorite Porsche color, after all). Lighter interior colors are generally preferred, but black tends to hide its age a bit better. Most people won't be picky about the interior, though personally I'd avoid wood or carbon fiber trims if given the option, feeling them simply to be a bit dated. Willhoit says that the best one to look for is the 1997 model, as only 612 Turbos were imported to the US for that year according to PCNA. However, we also got 1297 turbos in 1996, and I certainly wouldn't kick one of those out of my garage for being too common. One thing is for certain, if the 993 Turbo is speculated to hit a quarter million next spring, what will we see 993 Turbo S models going for? That's a whole other post, don't you think?

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Register for Fall 2014 Member Only Raffle

Porsche Club of America’s Fall 2014 Member Only Raffle has begun, and there’s excellent reason to purchase at least one $50 ticket: a chance to win a Boxster or Cayman GTS plus $25,000 cash. Click here to register. Porsche’s mid-engined sports cars are the most recent models to receive GTS badging, earned through higher levels of performance than their S counterparts. A 15-horsepower bump for both cars endows the Boxster GTS with 330 hp and the Cayman GTS with 340, while Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and Sport Chrono package, which includes goodies such as dynamic transmission mounts, Sport Plus mode, and launch control, are standard. The sport exhaust system is also standard, and the GTS models maintain the option for a six-speed manual transmission or seven-speed PDK automatic. They ride on 20-inch Carrera S wheels and receive other exterior appointments to differentiate them from lesser models. Unique front and rear fascias are paired with “blacked out” Bi-Xenon headlamps with Porsche Dynamic Lighting System, which swivels the lights slightly to the inside of turns. So if you want a chance to win one of these great Porsches (plus the cash), click here to register for the raffle online. Go to the second image to read the rules in their entirety. Here’s basically how the raffle works:  Limited to 8,000 for 1st vehicle  For every 4,000 entries after 8,000 has been reached, another Grand Prize package will be added If an additional 4,000 is not reached, for every 1,000 entries after 8,000 a Germany trip will be added as a prize 16


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It’s official: Rennsport Reunion V will be held at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, in Salinas, California, on October 9-11 next year, according to Porsche Cars North America (PCNA). It will take place four years after the fourth installment of the world-renowned Porsche festival. Rennsport V is expected to attract hundreds of vintage and modern Porsche race cars, "as well as those who have designed, engineered, and driven them to victory in the world's most famous sports car races," PCNA states. Like Rennsports before it, number five will consist of three days of vintage racing, a Concours d'Elegance, and activities celebrating each of six decades of Porsche race cars — all crash courses of Porsche history. And if you just want to watch fast Porsche metal racing on a world-famous race track, then prepare to whet your appetite with race-prepped 356s, mid-engined 550 Spyders, 718 RSKs, 917s, 956/962s, GT3 RSRs, RS Spyders, and so many more. “While the Rennsport name from the beginning has become a staple fixture for international collectors and racers, choosing the Monterey Peninsula opened up this one-of-a-kind gathering to the many Porsche fans in California and beyond who were previously unable to attend,” said Detlev von Platen, President and Chief Executive Officer of Porsche Cars North America. “Approximately 40,000 spectators for the weekend, and a record number of race cars and participants, proved that our decision to come here was correct.” To put that number into context, compare it to the roughly 3,500 tickets sold for 2007's Rennsport III at Daytona International Speedway. As with Rennsport IV, which attracted around 1,300 Porsche Club of America member-owned Porsches, according to PCNA, Rennsport V is expected to have a similarly huge turnout of members and their Porsches, filling race classes, show fields, and parking lots at the race track. It's the perfect way to finish PCA's year-long 60th anniversary celebration. The first Rennsport Reunion was held in 2001 at Lime Rock Park in Connecticut, followed by the second and third at Watkins Glen International and Daytona International Speedway in 2004 and 2007, respectively, and the fourth at Laguna Seca in 2011. All the while, the festival was growing exponentially, with tens of thousands more attendees flooding Laguna Seca for Rennsport IV compared to Rennsport III, which sold 3,500 tickets. Due to the success of the last event, we would have been surprised if Rennsport V weren’t in the books — and indeed there have been rumblings about a fifth, though time and place were unknown until today. Porsche Club of America is an official Rennsport Reunion V partner, so look to our website and social media channels for official updates and information over the next year.

Click to view the video presentation

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Currently, Porsche builds two turbocharged 911s – the Turbo and the Turbo S (and their cabriolet counterparts). The rest of the 911 range, meanwhile, is motivated by either 3.4- or 3.8-liter flat-sixes of varying outputs. This clear separation could be set to change in the very near future, though, as rumors continue to swirl that Porsche's rearengined range could switch exclusively to turbocharged power. This time, it's Car projecting that the 911 range will go turbocharged as part of a mid-cycle refresh, with the base Carrera's 3.4-liter dropping to 2.9 liters and adding an iron lung, bumping the entry level 911 up to 400 horsepower. Yes, a 400-horsepower, entry level 911. The Carrera S, meanwhile, will retain its 3.8-liter engine, but will also benefit from turbocharging, increasing output to 530 horsepower and 520 pound-feet of torque. So basically, it sounds like the current, 520-hp 911 Turbo will become the next Carrera S. What does that mean for Porsche's traditional high-performance models? Well, it's a safe bet that the Turbo, Turbo S and eventual GT2 will be producing seriously huge power figures. Based on pure speculation, we wouldn't be shocked to see a 600-hp Turbo, with the S and GT2 increasing output markedly from there. What do you think? Should Porsche go turbo only, or should there remain an aspect of the 911 range that makes its power the good ole fashioned way? Have your say in Comments.

Spy Shots of the 2015 911. Turbo inside ? Maybe ‌...

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It’s official , God prefers Porsche !! Sitting in a Porsche can be a religious experience for many of us Porsche-philes. But it can’t compete with dinning and a concert within the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel. And that is what 40 devoted Porsche owners were treated to recently.

Ok, maybe suggesting Porsche is God’s ‘ride of choice’ maybe a stretch . However, on Oct 18 Vatican City rented out the Papal Conclave for the first private diner party “fund raiser” to Porsche.

Now, it's not like Pope Francis has signed off on Porsche doing do donuts in a 911 underneath Michelangelo's “The Creation of Adam”. But Porsche is now the first private company to rent the iconic Catholic Cathedral. The Vatican has actually rented out it’s home to the Porsche Travel Club, which will host a classical music concert. The event is part of a two day driving tour organized by Porsche. The Travel Club organizes events and tours across Europe for Porsche enthusiasts, with the Vatican concert just one part of a tour of Rome. “The Sistine Chapel can never be rented because it is not a commercial place," says Monsignor Paolo Nicolini, the managing director of the Vatican Museums. "Saturday will be the debut of 'Art for Charity,' an initiative to exclusively support the charitable projects of the pope. This initiative is organized directly by the Vatican Museums and is directed at big companies. With the payment of a ticket, they can contribute to financing charity projects." View this video for more information on the Porsche Travel Club.

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The Evolution of Porsche Keys For Porsche owners, the key to our beloved car is just as iconic as the car itself. If you're fortunate enough to be a multi-Porsche family (especially a family with varying of Porsches) the lookManual and shape of the key alone is67K enough toI help you3rd pick the 1995 Porsche Carrera 911 Coupe,generations 993 generation, Guardsthen Red/you Tanknow upholstery, 6 speed transmission, miles. am the ownright key for the right Porsche every time you head out for a drive. er and the cars two previous owners are also from Bakersfield. Surprisingly, this car has spent its entire life in Bakersfield yet nobody from the Porsche community has ever seen it. The guy I bought it from has owned the car for the past 13 years but rarely drove it. It is in outstanding condition and ready to represent GEM at upcoming events!

The car was not for sale when I was introduced to the owner by a mutual friend who knew he had a 993 and that I was looking for one. After lengthy negotiations we came to terms for the sale.

356: The first key from Porsche with embossed brand mark.

The first 911: The ur-key of the 356 was also used for the 911 up to 1969**

964: A purely mechanical key (without remote control) with integrated LED courtesy lighting

G model: The first key with a plastic head and integrated LED courtesy lighting

996: A classic remote- control key that also opens the hood and operates the convertible top

993: The first key with remote control (lock/unlock) from Porsche also has an integrated engine immobilizer function

A recent story in Porsche's newsroom website called "The key to it all" goes into the details and unique features of Porsche's keys. The thing is, in our mind, their features aren't that unique. Sure newer keys can open doors remotely, pop the trunk, remember how your power seat is set, etc., etc. But so can most other keys be it a Honda Accord or a Porsche 911. In my mind what makes each Porsche key unique is the shape and what that shape conveys about the driving experience you're about to embark on. It addition, it's a clear indicator as to how each successive generation of Porsche models have become more and more complex over the years. Beginning with the key that started it all to today's multi-function, shape mimicking 991 key fob here's a rundown of how Porsche keys have changed over the years*. 24


The key to it all Car keys from Porsche are high-tech marvels with the smallest-possible dimensions – and major responsibilities. They have to be dependable, and meet the highest security requirements. It’s a story of evolution. This story has teeth. That would almost have to be the case, if we’re talking about keys. Or would it? Porsche keys snuggle into your hand like little sports-car sculptures. But their old-fashioned teeth appear to be gone. No, not quite. They’re concealed inside the miniature model Porsche, and can be liberated with a deft move or two. If need be, therefore, you can open the door without the radio signals and battery behind the button. And opening the door is the most impor-tant function of all, aside from starting the engine itself.

997: This key with remote controlled lock/unlock had the latest encryption technology before Entry & Drive was introduced

991: The current key features an integrated Porsche Entry & Drive function, a series-specific button structure, and the latest encryption technology

Attention to detail It also has great symbolic value: think of the honor of being awarded the key to a city. But we are talking about Porsche drivers here, so what’s important is a key experience. Sascha Kissner’s official title alone indicates that keys are more than just door openers. He is the director of development for electric/electronic car-body security systems. A 911 key lies on his desk, and you can see that it shows a silhouette, not just of the series, but of a cabriolet. Porsche values attention to detail, as do its customers. “After all,” remarks the expert, “the key is the first part of the Porsche you have in your hand every day.” That’s why the engineers also engage in intensive dialogue with the designers when they develop a new generation of keys. After three or four years, the result is presentable on both the outside and the inside. The key should be as flat and compact as possible. The current optimum has a basic surface area of around 80 × 33 millimeters. It has to accommodate the battery, for one thing, and also take the rule for transmitting functions into account, namely, the bigger the antenna, the better.

True miniature marvels The circuits on the flexible circuit board play a decisive role in what today’s keys can do. The keys are true miniature marvels. Just the fact that you can open the roof of the cabrio or unlock the luggage compartment and doors from afar shows the smooth communications between the data storage unit in the key and the control systems in the car. The key also activates the memory functions for the seat positions. “It can be trained,” says Kissner, meaning that it is a transmitter and receiver at the same time. Transmitted by radio waves, its signals are coded by cutting-edge encryption processes. Porsche’s Entry & Drive system has further reduced active use of the key. Just leave it in your pocket, because gripping the door handle will prompt the search for an access code stored in the key, which will unlock the door. The car itself is started by a turning motion, in typical Porsche fashion, to the left of the steering wheel. The engine is turned off the same way. The car is then locked by pressing a button on the outside of the door handle (or by sensor for the Macan). The flexible board of a current Porsche key The key has to be user-friendly, which is already evident in its tactile qualities. The buttons on the surface are designed in such a way that they have to be pressed deeply to activate a function—which prevents you from opening the car by mistake when the key is in your pocket. Stability is very important as well. 25


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Chopard Celebrates the Porsche Club of America with an UltraLimited Mille Miglia Edition

Porsche Club of America has grown to great heights since its humble origins in 1955, and so it has joined with Chopard to celebrate its 60th anniversary next year with a run of 66 limited-edition PCA Mille Miglia watches for club members. Sixty of the 42-millimeter automatic chronographs are made in stainless steel, and six in 18-karat rose gold. The limited PCA watch is identified as such by its blue face with white and red accents, the blue “tire tread” straps, and, of course, the club logo printed on the sapphire crystal back in full color alongside the edition number. The self-winding mechanical movement is chronometer-certified by C.O.S.C., so it displays hours, minutes, seconds, and date with supreme accuracy. The stopwatch function can be used in conjunction with the tachymeter scale to gauge fuel consumption and average speed, a great tool for time-speed-distance rallies and other motorsport events. Order the PCA Mille Miglia chronograph now by clicking here. Members only. Stainless steel PCA Mille Miglia: $5,990 18-karat rose gold PCA Mille Miglia: $21,000 Deliveries start in November/December.

Editor’s opinion only, UGLY Watches !! I believe these will go over well with the 80 year old men I saw at Porsche Parade who wore bright green and red plaid golf pants and drove most of the brand new 2014 911 Targas that were there that week. 28


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Nov 2014 grapevine  
Nov 2014 grapevine  

The November 2014 Grapevine Newsletter from the Golden Empire Region of the Porsche Club of America, PCA

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