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The Grapevine Newsletter Golden Empire Region March 2014

Porsche Club of America


Hear it through the Grapevine

Featured Stories A Farewell Profile of Greg Fullmer’s 914/6 GT Development and Evolution of the Porsche 914

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Social Outings & Members Page GEM Social Meeting Dinners

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Farewell to ‘Doc’ Altvatter

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A New Porsche 930 in the Club ?

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Event Calendars Our GEM Event Calendar

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Porsche Parade in Monterey, Event Schedules

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Members Project Pages Anton’s Suspension Upgrade Spencer Harris, The Porsches in the Barn Story

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Out of Town Events Festival of Speed 2014

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Concours in the Canyon, Cal Inland

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Miscellaneous Out of Town Events

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Pomona Swap Meet Schedule

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Porsche Club of America Golden Empire Region Board Members and Chair Persons

President

Vice President

Secretary

Treasurer

Past President

Omar Olivas

Linn Christopher

Spencer Harris

Betsy Wadman

Pat Wadman

Membership Co-Chairs & Safety Chair &

Newsletter Editor

Insurance Coordinator

Michael Thomas

Mike McGregor

gemgrapevine@gmail.com

Communication Co-Chairs

Loren Stumbaugh and Anna Stumbaugh

Autocross Co-Chairs

Greg Fullmer and Charles Rook

PCA Membership Webmaster

Social Coordinator

Anton Khatsanovich

Tammy Harris

While our cars are very exclusive, our club is not. Did you know that you can add a family member or other interested person as an affiliate member, at no additional cost? The family or affiliate member must also be 18 years of age or older.

Please join us online at our newly remodeled Website and on our Facebook Group page.

For all of the details contact our Membership Chair:

http://gem.pca.org/

Loren Stumbaugh Porsche Club of America Golden Empire Region Membership Chairman Loren7025@gmail.com

https://www.facebook.com/groups/ PCA.GoldenEmpireRegion/

And please send any Newsletter comments or content contributions to : gemgrapevine@gmail.com

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The third Tuesday evening of each month is all about good friends and good food. Everyone is invited to come out and join us, member or not. Come be part of the Porsche lifestyle with us each month. Our next Social Meeting for the Month of March, will be Tuesday the 18th, 6:30 pm at Tony’s Pizza , 4750 Coffee Road. Check for other dates and locations online at GEM.PCA.ORG

A Good Time was had by all at the March Social Meeting at PF Changs on the Patio. Let’s do this venue again !

Loren Practices his Skateboard skills at PF Changs

Our February Social Meet at Senor Pepe’s Mexican Restaurant. This group is all about the food

Omar and Linn please sit down. There’s more tacos on the way guys !

And it is with sadness that GEM bids Robert “DOC” Altvatter farewell. Doc and his family are moving north to Bend, Oregon. Doc’s move north will allow him to breath some cleaner air and spend more time with his son who lives there as well. I hear the skiing is great up there. So Doc can put his Ski Patrol skills back to use. We all wish you the very best Doc, hope to bump into you at some of PCA events in the future. Doc is a great example of how “It’s not just the Cars, It’s the People”

Doc’s gorgeous Guards Red 911 SC

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Say Hello to the Golden Empire Region latest GEM !

Ken Keenan is the proud new owner of this magnificent 1987 930 Turbo. He says the car drives completely different from his 997 and his 944. The 930 has no power steering and has long linkage shifts. But he indicated when that turbo kicks it, “Damn” !! He states he will have to get use to the “feel” of driving it. State of the Art in it’s day, Ken says how we take for granted how easy our modern day Porsches are to drive and handle. Congratulations Ken !!

And you thought all the Golden Empire Region did was eat !

Omar finds success using the Bigger Hammer approach. He must read Spencer’s wooden sign

Anton showing us the Mods for his 911

Looks like Omar’s house has a Porsche infestation

Bang Bang Maxwell’s Silver Hammer ? 5


A Farewell Tribute to one of GEM’s most Unique Porsches The Golden Empire Region has recently lost an icon. Greg Fullmer’s 1970 Glockler 914/6 GT has found a new home. The love of Greg’s life, that he has affectionately referred to as Princess and Baby is now rumored to live somewhere in Southern California. So GEM felt that a finally tribute to the this unique Porsche is only fitting. Join us for a journey that begins in Zuffenhausen, crosses an ocean, and takes us to Bakersfield. As Greg will quickly tell you, his 914/6 GT was a truly unique Porsche born to race. Designed around a modified racing body, a modified racing engine, and a full sports suspension, this little GT could go head to head with anything in it’s class and win. There is an ever changing personnel staff within Porsche’s design departments. And there is never a shortage of fresh ideas flowing from within it. Greg’s 914 GT is the story of one such program. Much of the experimentation done in Zuffenhausen focused on the constructing race cars. Racing development programs not only produced Porsche victories at race tracks around the world, but also served as the perfect test bed for designs that were placed into Porsche’s street car. In 1969 and 1970 the Porsche racing department built 12 Porsche 914/6 GT cars for factory entered races, or better know as Werks cars.

In 1970 Porsche entered a grueling 24-hours of Le finished 6th overall and Which was a remarkable by any standard.

914/6 GT in the Mans race. It won its class. accomplishment

Auf Wiedersehen

Birth of a 914/6 GT

Our Little Car’s Birth Certificate

Some mystery surrounds the production of Greg’s 914/6 GT. Around ’69 The body and engine began to take shape in Porsche’s Zuffenhausen factory, which is located within the northern district of Stuttgart German. However, the car’s complete assembly may not have taken place at this facility. Documents show that only a total of 47 914/6 GT were produced at the factory with the M-471 racing option. And out of those only 12 factory Werks racers were produced In addition to these fully assembled, ready to race Werks cars the factory also offered a GT kit that was delivered in conjunction with a regular 914/6 car. The kit was suppose to be installed designated Porsche dealers. It is unknown exactly how many GT kits were sold, nor how many kits were fully adapted to the cars. It is estimated that around 200 to 250 kits were sold. So many of the 914/6 where sent out in pieces to the racing teams that had ordered them. They would then undergo an extensive build-up into a GT rally/racer at a dedicated dealer’s location. Why would Porsche do this? Because of a limited workforce and high production demand at Porsche’s factory during this time. (Click for Reference) It is possible that Greg’s car too may have left the factory as less than a completely assembled 914/6 GT rally/racer. 6

The original color of the car was Canary Yellow. The Glockler shop painted the car to the Light Blue Metallic that it is now. Greg has stated that the car received a very detailed repaint job at the Glockler facility. He expressed to me that he believed Glockler must have disassembled the car to repainted it as thoroughly as they did. However, after some research I believe that Greg’s 914/6 may have left the Zuffenhausen factory in pieces. And once the car was at the Glockler shop it was repainted and underwent it’s final assembly into a GT. However, I need to state that this is purely conjecture on my part.

Stuttgart to Frankfurt to Munich But we do know that Porsche filled this GT order for the German Porsche dealer, Mahag. As back then, Mahag is still located in Munich, Germany. The Mahag dealership was a pipeline that Porsche used to distribute many of it’s high performance race cars.

As suggested previously, Mahag may have had the 914/6 GT components for Greg’s car sent directly to the German auto stylist Glockler. Glockler was a VW / Porsche dealer and racing shop located in Frankfurt Germany. It was owned by race car driver Walter Glockler. Walter Glocker was one of the earliest post war VW dealers. And he is also credited with many early Porsche racing car modifications. Glockler may have been one of Porsche’s designated dealer for the finally assembly of some of these racing car.


Not only was Glockler one of the first to race Porsche automobiles, he was also one of the first of all Porsche owners to take a standard Porsche and make substantial changes to it in order to make it more competitive on track. The mid-engine GlocklerPorsche Specials that he built were the inspiration for Porsche’s mid-engine 550 sports racer. (Click here for Reference)

the far right side of the car, completely away from easy access of the driver. It was also at this time that his car received it’s beautiful new paint color. Listed as ‘light blue metallic’, this has become the color that all of us identify Greg’s car with.

Inside the Glockler VW & Porsche

1952 Glockler-Porsche Roadster To improve the 914’s air dynamics, Glockler replaced the car’s frontend and front hood with his own unique design.

Note the contrast between the two 914s above. The 914 GT was to be used to compete on many of the world’s great tracks. Often of these racing events were endurance type races that would run continuously throughout the day and into the night. These cars needed a very good head light system for the high speed night time driving. Glockler’s redesigned front-end provided better lighting for night driving. It also reduced air flow drag by the redesigned front hood with no lighting and placing a large air dam at the bottom front of the car.

Other Clockler style/performance cues included extended steel wheel arches, 6” and 7” alloy rims, larger track (wider wheelbase) limited slip differential, special adjustable left and right sports seats, sports muffler, front oil cooler, roll bars, S-brakes, and a special European am/fm radio with 8 track tape player. Greg stated that the radio and volume control knob is located on

Perhaps you may think that I’m forgetting to mention the very distinctive rear spoiler. Nope, that’s wasn’t Glockler’s idea. The tail comes later. Greg has stated there are only two other known 914 GTs with the Glockler frontend beside his. These two highly modified thoroughbreds were raced throughout Europe on such famous tracks and road courses as Sicily’s Targa Florio, Germany’s Nurburgring, and even France’s very prestigious Le Mans circuit. And as illustrated earlier, the 914 GT campaigned very effectively for Porsche.

After the Glockler restyle, the car was returned to the Mahag dealership. Where the Mahag CEO would enjoy it as his own personal toy for the next year. In July 24th 1970 the car was sold by the MAHAG dealership to someone in Germany. Records show it was serviced at the Mahag dealership for the next year

A clipping from a German newspaper listing

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Greg’s 914/6 GT Engine All of the unique body redesigns and beefed up suspension modifications are useless without something to push the car around the track. Greg stated that his 914/6 GT had Porsche’s 2.2 S engine in it. But not your standard 2.2 S engine. This engine was a real hot rod. If I remember correctly he stated the engine had all of the components of a 2.2 S but the engine used carburetors instead of fuel injection. It also had several other high performance features build into it. Including racing cams used in the 901-20 engines that powered the legendary 906. Engines have to breath and the more air that can pump into the engine, the more power it can produce. And that cam is all about pumping major air. The engine had an 11 to 1 compression ration. Greg stated that was as high he could run with gasoline. A higher comp ratio would require the use of racing fuel, which he did sometimes use.

The 914 GT crosses the Pond In 1972 the 914 GT was imported into the US by the Porsche/Audi dealership Wester in Monterey, California. A doctor, Marvin Taves from Reno, Nevada purchased the car. He raced it at various California tracks such as Sears Point and Laguna Seca. In 1977 it showed up for sale on consignment at the Beverly Hills Porsche dealership. Greg stated that several potential buyers passed on buying it because the unfamiliar Glockler frontend confused people into thinking it was not a genuine 914/6 GT. Ron Webb and his wife Barbara, who just happen to be founding members of the Golden Empire Region of the PCA, purchased the 914 GT in 1976 from the Beverly Hills dealer. Joined by Greg and his wife, Ron and Barbara trailered the car to race tracks throughout the state, Arizona and Nevada for many years to PCA and POC time trial and autocross events.


A view of the car without the distinctive rear

Above is a photo the way the car came from the factory. Note that there was no spoiler at this time. Placing the large distinctive rear tail was the idea of Ron Webb. A company at the time was producing those. Ron believed it would make for better handling at the autocross events. Greg stated that it did, however, the large rear wing also slowed the car’s speed on long open tracks such as Fontana’s, Las Vegas, and Phoenix’s Speedways.

And became very competitive in his class claiming many track victories. Greg and 914 GT became familiar figures at many well known tracks like; Laguna Seca, Sears Point, Willow Spring, and Buttonwillow. They could also be found together at many of the areas high speed tracks such as Fontana, Phoenix, and the Las Vegas speedways.

Now Aim for the 2nd tree on the Left :)

Ron and Barbara retired to Richfield, Utah in 1992, where Ron died in 1998. The GT was stored at his Utah home for five years until Greg acquired it in November of 2002.

The Greg Years Greg had been attempting to buy the car from Barbara after Ron’s death. And about four years later he was successful. Greg stated that the car was quite dirty when he picked it up. But in no time at all Greg and Rick Higdon had it all shined back to it’s original luster.

Hey Rick, you missed a spot !

Rick and Greg spent a lot of time tracking the car through PCA, POC , and SCCA sponsored races. Greg spent much time racing Autocross, Time Trials, and road courses.

Greg says Rick Higdon and he looked all over the storage units again and again. But failed to find the engine case. The engine case has never been located and Greg fears that the engine case may have accidently been switched for another, with someone driving around in a Porsche, completely unaware of how valuable the engine in their car really is.

The PCA Concours

Greg Piloting the 914/6 GT through Laguna Seca’s iconic Corkscrew turns The more familiar view of the car with the rear

this time. That’s when fear struck him. Within the boxes of parts, the original engine case was no where to be found.

Greg said the car drove wonderfully. The stiffer suspension that the car was built with help keep the car from flexing and held it tight to the road.

The Missing Engine Case The original engine that shipped with the car was removed to be protect it. Greg had found another engine that he felt more comfortable using for racing. A 911 2.7 S that was actually more powerful than the original. And it would have been a less expensive loss if it were to be damaged from racing. He also thought it would a good time to have the original 914/6 engine rebuilt.

Racing for top time and speed occupied much of Greg’s time. However, Time Speed Distance (TDS) Rallies and Concours were two other events Greg enjoyed entering his car into. And of course, anything this car was entering into it usually won. Showing a car that has just completed a race somewhere the prior weekend requires a lot of repairs, a lot of body work, and a lot repainting. Rick stated working to repair the bruised car was sometimes a 24 hour process. He said this was how he learned fiberglass and body work. With a grin, Rick says “ya, the cars get pretty messed up racing around tracks”. Rumor has it that a few well placed racing stickers can some nasty paint chips before a concours :))

Greg with Ex-Wife & Rick receiving Award

The original GT engine was taken to a shop to be rebuilt. However, Greg had other projects in the works and decided later to wait on the engine rebuild. He said he picked up the original engine from the rebuild shop. But the engine was now in pieces and contained within several boxes. The boxes were all tucked away for a few years in a storage unit.

But in 2004 all of Greg’s and Rick’s hard work paid off. Greg won the coveted Sam Wang Award. This award is presented to a PCA member who has performed the best in four PCA event categories that year. The four event categories include; Autocross, Time Trial, TDS Rallies, and Concours.

Time passed and for what ever reason he began searching through the boxes, perhaps planning to rebuild the engine at

Greg, with Rick’s help placed first in all classes except Rally, in which he placed 3rd for the entire year of 2003. Way to Go !!

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Thank you Greg for sharing your Magnificent 914/6 GT racer with all here in the Golden Empire Region of the Porsche Club of America. It will be missed by all ‌‌

An Email received by Greg from an acquaintance advertising his car for sell in late 1971. It translates the German sells ad shown on the previous pages.

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Get ready for Southern California’s biggest Porsche Event of 2014 !

Registration is now open. It can be done online

MotorSportReg.com Visit the Auto Club Speedway Website Visit PCA Zone8 / Festival of Speed Website 10


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Development and Evolution of the Porsche 914

By the late 1960s, both Volkswagen and Porsche were in need of new models; Porsche was looking for a replacement for their entry-level 912, and Volkswagen wanted a new range-topping sports coupe to replace the Karmann Ghia. At the time, the majority of Volkswagen's developmental work was handled by Porsche, part of a setup that dated back to Porsche's founding; Volkswagen needed to contract out one last project to Porsche to fulfill the contract, and decided to make this that project. Ferdinand PiĂŤch, who was in charge of research and development at Porsche, was put in charge of the 914 project. Originally intending to sell the vehicle with a flat four-cylinder engine as a Volkswagen and with a flat six-cylinder engine as a Porsche, Porsche decided during development that having Volkswagen and Porsche models sharing the same body would be risky for business in the American market, and convinced Volkswagen to allow them to sell both versions as Porsches in North America. On March 1, 1968, the first 914 prototype was presented. However, development became complicated after the death of Volkswagen's chairman, Heinz Nordhoff, on April 12, 1968. His successor, Kurt Lotz, was not connected with the Porsche dynasty and the verbal agreement between Volkswagen and Porsche fell apart. In Lotz's opinion, Volkswagen had all rights to the model, and no incentive to share it with Porsche if they would not share in tooling expenses. With this decision, the price and marketing concept for the 914 had failed before series production had begun. As a result, the price of the chassis went up

considerably, and the 914/6 ended up costing only a bit less than the 911T, Porsche's next lowest price car. The 914/6 sold quite poorly while the much less expensive 914/4 became Porsche's top seller during its model run, outselling the Porsche 911 by a wide margin with over 118,000 units sold worldwide.

The 914 was Motor Trend's Import Car of the Year for 1970. A 914/6 GT piloted by Frenchmen Claude Ballot-Lena and Guy Chasseuil won the GTS class and finished sixth overall at the 1970 24 Hours of Le Mans.[3] Brian Redman used the 914/6 to scout the course in practice runs of the 1970 Targa Florio circuit.

Volkswagen versions originally featured an 80 PS (59 kW) fuel-injected 1.7 L flat-4 engine based on the Volkswagen air-cooled engine. Porsche's 914/6 variant featured a carbureted 110 PS (81 kW) 2.0 L flat-6 engine from the 1969 911T, placed amidships in front of a version of the 1969 911's "901" gearbox configured for a mid-engine car. Karmann manufactured the rolling chassis at their plant, completing Volkswagen production in-house or delivering versions to Porsche for their final assembly.

Two prototype 914s, dubbed 914/8, were built during 1969. The orange 914/8 was the first constructed, at the instigation of Ferdinand PiĂŤch (then head of the Racing Dept), to prove the concept. Powered by the fullblown, 310 hp (222 kW) 908 [flat-8] racing engine, it was based on a surplus 914 handbuilt development prototype bodyshell hence the many differences from the standard vehicle (e.g., the quad headlights). The second, silver, road-registered car, powered by a carburetted and detuned 908 race engine making 260 hp (194 kW) was then prepared as a gift to Ferry Porsche on his 60th birthday. Also based on a spare prototype shell (chassis no. 914006), it was much closer to the standard car in detail. By all accounts Ferry didn't like the car very much and it sits in the Porsche Museum. Neither car saw a racetrack except for the purposes of testing. The 914/8 was not considered for production as a regular model. Another factory prototype, a 914/6 (chassis no. 914114) surfaced in the US in 2001. Together with a surviving prototype Sportomatic 914/6 (chassis no. 914120), reputedly in Southern Germany, they form a unique and fascinating piece of Porsche history.

914/6 models used a similar suspension and brakes to the 911, giving superior handling and braking superiority over the 4-cylinder Volkswagen models along with higher power output. A Volkswagen-Porsche joint venture, Volkswagen of America, handled export to the U.S., where both versions were badged and sold as Porsches, except in California, where they were sold in Volkswagen dealerships. The four-cylinder cars were sold as Volkswagen-Porsches at European Volkswagen dealerships. Slow sales and rising costs prompted Porsche to discontinue the 914/6 variant in 1972 after producing 3,351 of them; its place in the lineup was filled by a variant powered by a new 100 PS (74 kW) 2.0 L, fuel -injected version of Volkswagen's Type 4 engine in 1973. For 1974, the 1.7 L engine was replaced by a 85 PS (63 kW) 1.8 L, and the new Bosch L-Jetronic fuel injection system was added to American units to help with emissions control. 914 production ended in 1976. The 2.0 L flat-4 engine continued to be used in the 912E, which provided an entry-level model until the 924 was introduced.

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February 2014 Sun

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March 2014 Sun

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Sat 1 Los Angeles Literature Show & Restoration Tours

2 Anaheim, Ca 3 All Porsche Swap Meet & car Display

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8 Riverside, CA Walter’s Empire 100 Gimmick Rally

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17 Willow Springs 18 Tony’s Pizza, 19 Streets of Willow Social Meeting 6:30 DE and Autocross 4750 Coffee Rd.

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Long Beach Grand Prix Weekend

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Porsche Parade 2014: Monterey, California! Monterey is the site of our 59th Porsche Parade, to be held this June 15 through 21, 2014. This is PCA’s annual extravaganza of competitive and social events. Only minutes away from the beautiful Pacific Ocean, we’ll be treated to drives on the famous Pacific Coastal Highway, to some of California’s legendary vineyards, and through the hills and valleys of northern California. Of course, Parade has a long history of friendly competition and that will continue this year with the always challenging Concours d’Elegance, TSD rally, autocross, and the tech-quiz. Registration

Registration will open on April 1st (new date!), and there will be a link to register on pca.org and parade2014.pca.org. This Parade will be very popular, but we will accept ALL entries. We can accommodate all entrants for each of the banquets and all competitive events, as well as most activities. Tours on some days will sell out, however. Upon checking out of Parade registration, you will receive an email with the link to our host hotels and discount codes. We have blocked rooms at five area hotels, and we do expect hotel rooms to fill up quickly. Check In

Parade entrants should check in for Parade on Sunday, June 15 between 9 am and 5 pm. This is the only time when all the event chair-people will be all together in one place to check you in, answer all your questions, and make sure you have the banquet seats you want, pick up your meal tickets and are classified properly for the competitive events you’ve entered. That is when you get your Parade goodie-bags and volunteer t-shirts. Late check-in is available throughout the week, but we recommend getting to Monterey on Sunday.

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Banquets

We have five banquets, our Welcome Party on Sunday the 15th, the Concours banquet on Tuesday, TSD banquet on Wednesday, AX on Friday, and our Victory banquet on Saturday. You can sign up for all of them, or individually, through registration. Competitive Events

The Porsche Concours d’Elegance is the showcase of the week’s activities and gets started early on Monday, June 16th on the beautiful fairways of the Monterey Hyatt. We have classes for every Porsche and stage of preparation—from “Full” preparation to “Street” class where only the interior and exterior, including wheels and tires, are judged. The Mobil TSD Rally on Tuesday June 17 th takes us in and around the beautiful vineyards, hills, forests and beaches of the area in a rally that’s sure to become the stuff of legend. We’ll be offering the TSD Rally School on Monday evening, June 16. The Michelin Autocross is on Wednesday and Thursday, June 18 and 19 at nearby Marina airport. Whether you study-up or just show up, the Technical/Historical Quiz on the morning of Friday, June 20 is always a great way to show what you know about our favorite cars… or to face what you don’t. Events and Activities Parade Kids

The Parade Kids program has become a favorite of our family of enthusiasts, with many of the kids forming enduring friendships and looking forward to Parade each year. The 2014 Parade Kids program will have plenty of fun and adventure, true to the California spirit of fun, adventure, and learning in Monterey. Hospitality

The Hospitality area is always one of the best places to hang out at Parade, whether you’re perusing the various vendors, partaking in the planned Beer or Wine tastings, or just looking to visit with friends before heading out to dinner. Gimmick Rally

The Gimmick Rally will held Thursday, June 19th, and is designed to provide a scenic and entertaining outing for everyone, children included. The route showcases the 17-Mile Drive, the Lone Cypress, Carmel and its famous Mission, historic John Steinbeck sites and much, much more. The choice of this year's gimmick will be unique, and provide both fun and challenge, along with capturing the amazing scenery and character of the Monterey Bay area. Tours

Throughout the week you will have an opportunity to go on a different driving tour each day. In addition, most driving tours will run more than once during the week in the event you commit to another activity on a particular day. All tours include a variety of points of interest and a destination.

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Michelin Drive and Compare

Another great event at Parade is the Michelin Drive & Compare and this is your chance to take a couple of thrill laps around the course in two identical Porsches with two different types of tires. Golf Tournament

Please join us on Wednesplaying at the Pacific Point Pinos and the Pacific

day, June 18 for the annual Porsche Parade Golf Tournament. We will be Grove Golf Links, on the tip of the scenic Monterey Peninsula, overlooking Ocean, just a short 5 mile drive from the Hyatt.

Parade of Porsches

The final driving event of Porsche Parade will give you an opportunity to Parade your Porsche and take in the spectacular scenery of Monterey and Pebble Beach. You’ll take in breathtaking views of the coast and hills surrounding Monterey and provide a great view to the locals of all our beautiful Porsches cruising by. Art Show

The art-show is one of Parade’s “must see” events, providing a great venue for our talented and creative members to show off their vision, creativity, imagination and skill. This Parade event continues with categories in fiber arts, jewelry, painting, crafts and photography (both amateur and professional divisions). All Parade entrants may participate, including children. We have an expert judging committee as well as our favorite people’s choice award. Take some time during the week just to see the amazing talent of our PCA artists and craftspeople from around the country. Driver Education

One of the most asked questions about this year’s Parade: will there be a High Performance Driver Education event at nearby Mazda Raceway at Laguna Seca. The answer is yes-June 21-22. For more details, be sure to visit the Parade website. Space will be limited! 5K Run/Walk

One of the best ways to finish off your week at Parade is the 5K run/walk. The event will be held the morning of June 21st, with age classes from 10 years to 80+ years and awards for top male/female in each class, T-Shirts, and a commemorative item for each participant. Please join us! R/C Cars

The R/C contest has become a favorite in recent years with kids young and not-so-young. If you have a “ride” get entered. If not, then come and watch. It’s a blast! Goodie Store

Everyone who’s ever been to Parade knows this is a must-do on your shopping schedule. Whether it’s for this year’s logo designed outerwear, special jewelry, Porsche-themed books, or to add to your miniature car collection, the 2014 Porsche Parade Goodie Store will have a great array of products. Volunteering

For “normal” people, vacation is the time to relax and be served. Porsche Parade is 99% volunteer supported! That's how all of us from all over the country get to know each other, by working a couple of four hour shifts during the week with other PCA members. As a thank you, you will be eligible to attend the exclusive Volunteer Party Luncheon on Saturday, June 21st—there are numerous door prizes too! Prior to Registering for Parade

Ensure you have an account for the member-only portion of www.pca.org You will need to login to register for Parade. Check to see that all your information is up-to-date and current, especially your e-mail address. All pre-Parade materials are sent to you via e-mail, and are posted on the Parade website http://parade2014.pca.org . 18


Tech Academy

The fifth annual Parade Tech Academy will be held Friday, June 20th, immediately following the Tech Quiz. Once again, we have an exciting mix of our outstanding PCA Technical Committee and outside speakers. By attending more than one session, you become eligible for "Tech Academy Accreditation" of various levels, depending on the number of sessions you attend: 

Five Sessions equals a "Doctorate"

Four Sessions earns a "Masters"

Three Sessions takes a "Bachelors"

Two Sessions starts you with an "Associate"

Registration Fees

Everyone signing up for Parade must pay an entrant fee of $169, which covers the entrant and co-entrant. Fees for the four major competitive events are: 

Concours -- $30 per car,

Autocross -- $30 per driver,

TSD Rally -- $15 per car, and

Tech/Historical Quiz -- $15 per person.

Entrant fees for guests are as follows: 

JPP/CAFP -- $20,

Child age 13-15 -- $15,

Child under age 13 -- $10.

Adult guests -- $40.

Additional fees apply for banquets and for selected other activities. Advance Registration is mandatory -- there is no on-site registration during Parade. Parade registrations are not transferable. Fifty percent of your registration fee and 100 percent of your banquet fees will be refunded if your e-mailed cancellation request is received on or before June 10. There is no refund for cancellations made after that time. You may make changes to your registration at any time before June 10. Questions!

If you have questions regarding Parade, please consult the Parade website at Parade2014.pca.org. If you are unable to find your answer there, email Kathleen Behrens, Parade Registrar at registrar@pcaparade.org or call 503.579.3423 (please leave a message).

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The Porsches in the Barn By Spencer Harris

Last month here in the Grapevine I started new column which will, from time to time profile Porsche projects that our GEM membership is working on. Bringing old Porsches back to life will be the focus of these columns.

The Porsches in the Barn

Last month I introduced you to a few of the member’s projects. As a member’s project progresses I will update the membership on that progress. Hopefully we can produce a running log within the Grapevine of member’s cars from the fixer upper stage to the finished products.

The Find I first met Bill and Martha at the PCA Golden Empire Region Christmas party my wife & I hosted in 2011. I knew they owned a 1953 and a 1958 cabriolet from looking over the club membership list a week earlier, but we had never met and I had never seen the cars. I greeted the couple as they arrived for the get together and immediately took them to the garage to show off my restored ‘55 Continental Coupe. Bill offered that he hadn’t driven his 356’s for over 30years. Further, he commented “…these old Porsches are worth over $100,000 all fixed up like this one…” Knowing the time and cost associated with a bare-metal restoration I agreed and told him that I would be interested should he ever want to sell one of his cars. He replied that his daughter would probably want one of them and his son the other. I remember hoping that my son and daughter would want one of my Porsches to keep and continue our family tradition of Porsche ownership, care and restoration.

So this month it is a real treat to share an amazing story from Spencer Harris. Spencer takes us on a journey from discovery to the beginnings of very detailed restoration projects of two of his Porsche 356s. Spencer stated he was motivated to write this article after finishing the book The Cobra in the Barn, by Tom Cotter. A condensed version of the story you are about to read was previously published in the 356 Registry Magazine. On a personal note, I would like to thank Spencer very much for providing this piece all ready written. It make my job so much easier when I receive a piece that is already written, and all details are supplied. Michael Thomas Newsletter Editor

And now, on to the Porsches in the Barn … 20


When my first cousin finished his dental internship and landed his first job as a dentist in Sebring, Florida, he bought a brand new, red ’62 sunroof coupe for around $5,000. At the time in the Southeastern US you could buy a pretty nice home for $5-grand, and I remember my Grandmother remarking that “…Gene has lost his mind spending that kind of money on a car...” (Mammaw is also fondly remembered for bragging occasionally that she “…never drove a car; never wore long breeches and never chewed tobacco…”). Just shy of my 15th birthday, my Mom, Dad and I visited Gene at his folks’ place in Knoxville, Tennessee, and I was completely mesmerized by the shiny, new sports car in the driveway. My cousin walked out the door; tossed me the keys and said “Hey, bud, let’s go for a ride”. We laughed the whole drive about the expression on my Father’s face as I navigated the little coupe out the driveway and onto Kingston Pike (Thunder Road), in West Knoxville. Thankfully, I never got over the experience. Throughout high school and college, I made my annual spring-break trip down to Sebring for the 12-hour race. Gene was always on one or more committees, so I got to see some pretty unique production and prototype cars over the years. Every couple years, Gene would trade for another Porsche and I would test-drive his newest acquisition during my visit. He quit trading after he bought his 914-6 in 1970, and that model was indeed the most fun to drive. When I graduated from college in 1971, I sold my VW bus and bought a topless ’57 speedster. I’ve bought and sold a dozen or so 356’s over the years always hanging onto my Continental (acquired in ’72) which now lives in a Car-Capsule bubble in my garage and does a couple local shows a year.

The previous owners are retired school teachers, both in their eighties. Bill told me he had put both of his kids through college buying, repairing and selling Volkswagens. The 356 cabriolets were their personal drivers. Bill drove the ’53 with the “MI XTC” personalized California blue plate and Martha drove the ’58 with a plate reading “HR XTC”. I never really pushed the owners about when or where they acquired the Porsches, as I got the impression that they had bought and sold many cars over the years and probably didn’t have any records. When the couple retired from teaching they bought a ranch in the foothills of the Sierra Mountains with a small two-room cabin and several out-buildings. They parked the cabriolets in two of the storage sheds along with a ’58 A-coupe (now beautifully restored and owned by their daughter, Linda). For the next few years they lived in the small cabin and built from scratch a handsome two-story home using an old Chevy one-ton to haul building materials from Bakersfield (1-hour away) and across the final 4-mile stretch of dirt roads and cow pastures to their new home. Over time the Porsches were forgotten and their VW Jetta and Beetle took their place as primary drivers.

The days ‘til the next Thursday dragged by, but my mind was racing with dreams, schemes and recollections! I had sold my last open 356 in 1975 (a Convertible-D rolling chassis for $1,000), and watched along with everyone else as prices went up and up and up. The most I had ever paid for a 356 was for my first one - $1,200 for a ’57 Speedster – no top, no frame, no side curtains, but the most fun I’d ever had behind the wheel of a car! I only paid $900 for my Continental Coupe back in ’72. I bought a Speedster shell listed in the Pano for $100 in the early ‘70’s, and didn’t even bother picking it up. A friend ran an E-Production Speedster in SCCA events and I let him have it for the same $100. I could never make myself pay the kind of money people were now asking for D’s, Roadsters, Cabs or OMG-Speedsters! Now, I just might be able to have another 356 convertible!

Spencer’s 1955 356 Continental Coupe

The Deal Ordeal The following October, I asked my wife Tammy to phone Martha to say ‘hi’, and casually ask if Bill may have changed his mind about selling one of his Cabriolets. Martha phoned back a day or two later and told Tammy that Bill was ready to sell his cars. Bill has a regular golf game on Mondays and Wednesdays; something going on this weekend; previous commitment next Tuesday; so Tammy and Martha set-up a meeting at their place the following Thursday morning to look at the cars. I was ecstatic. I have to chuckle when I recall grilling Tammy about that phone conversation. “…Cars? Are you sure she said cars? Did she say wants to sell or ready to sell? Is he going to advertise the cars? She didn’t say anything about how much? And multiple times – Don’t mention a word to anyone – especially

I’m in the oil business and enjoyed living and working overseas for a dozen or so of my 35-years in the industry. I’ve negotiated and executed contracts with Americans, British, French, Dutch, Canadian, Chinese, Japanese, Taiwanese, Thais, Malays, Nigerians and Gabonese (W. Africa), so negotiating business deals, while sometimes challenging, is something I’m accustomed to. I’m normally quite comfortable preparing for negotiations and putting a deal together – or knowing when to walk away. Tammy would probably say I was my usual cool, calm, collected, business-as-usual self, but I readily admit my excitement was veiling my nervousness. The shock of seeing a pair of 356 Cabriolets neglected and wasting away also helped conceal my anxiety.

to any of our friends in the Porsche Club…”

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Thursday morning, October 11, 2012, we’re loaded and out the gate, headed for Pozo Flats – about an hour northeast of our Almond ranch in Shafter, California. I’ve loaded my floor jack, ½ inch ratchet & socket to turn the engines over, 14v flashlight with extra battery, floor creeper, hand tools, gloves, coveralls – I’m ready to crawl under a couple of 356’s and check them out. I’ve thought through my strategy and have a number in mind – if I can buy one of the cabriolets for $40k or less, I’ll do it. I know to the penny how much I put into the restoration of my ’55 coupe; I’ve calculated a percentage increase in the cost of parts, labor and machine work; I therefore know how much I would have in a bare-metal restoration – and I know how much the restored car is worth in the current market. Everything after all is relative. I could have bought an A-Cab thirty years ago for under $4,000; spent $6,000 on a restoration and the car could’ve sold for $15,000. So, now everything’s just multiplied by ten. Am I making 10 times more today than I was in 1982? Do I have ten times more money in my retirement account than I did in 1982? What if he only wants to sell both cars? What if he wants $40k for each car? Do I want to have that much invested in a couple of 356’s? What if the 356 market crashes? That’s precisely what happened to the Enron employees – no diversification! Does Tammy know how to cook Hamburger Helper & Pork ‘n Beans? Nervous? Nah, not a bit!

story house nestled between two Live-Oak covered ridges – the view is breathtaking. Native creatures include deer, boar, coyotes, jackrabbits, possum, foxes, and bobcats. The terraced vegetable garden off the rear patio would rival the average Albertson’s produce aisle. Bill’s “driving range” is positioned to the South of the patio and aimed down the floor of the valley – much further than I can hit. A bucket of range balls and an assortment of clubs wait nearby – hit all you want – you pick ‘em up. Tammy wants to talk about the chickens (she’s always wanted to raise chickens on our place). Then, she wants Martha to show her the garden. I’m trying to be polite and dying to have a look at the cars. Finally, after several subtle nudges, winks and nods we make our way across the acreage toward the three storage barns.

First look at the 1953 356 Cabriolet Now Bill looks as though he’s spent the last few hours on a cotton combine with an open cab. He explains as we make our way across the field that he has spent the morning “cleaning the cars up”. Cool, I’m thinking maybe we can actually start these babies up. On approach to the first barn, I see a pile of VW & Porsche rims, pieces of engine tin, an old-style VW/356 tow bar and other assorted German car components. I have a cursory glance at the 356 coupe shell in the field (’55 coupe) and take a mental inventory – top crushed beyond repair; front clip removed; passenger door missing; maybe some salvageable parts. Bill and his son had bought the coupe and used the front clip to repair his daughter’s ’58 coupe many years ago. After salvaging what they needed they had left the car where it now sat.

The GPS in my truck showed the route from here to there; mile by mile; intersection by intersection; turn by turn; and then 4-1/2 miles of white screen with blue line down the middle. We’re at the little arrow and they’re at the little star at the end – no names, no roads, nothing but fields, cow pastures, horse corrals, gates, cattle guards,

Bill and Martha, right

The sliding door was already open and inside the barn we get our first peek at the ’53 Cabriolet. Looks like Strawberry Red with a white convertible top. Old VW seats and body panels are stacked higher than the cabriolet on one side. In front of the 356 are several pushrod engines and shelves stacked deep with engine tin, cylinder heads, steering wheels, headlight assemblies, more rims, bumpers, trim moldings, carbs, etc. Hey, there’s the passenger door off the old coupe outside. Four flat tires and thirty plus years of dust have rendered the 356 rocker panels to ground level. Debris & critter nests cover the floor to near seat level – I immediately scrap the notion of crawling underneath to look at the floor pans – I am genuinely shocked! I use a broom-stick-handle to poke through the debris on the floors – sounds like there’s metal underneath. “We drove the cars in here in 1980” swears Bill. I don’t even want to try to turn the engine over for fear of causing more damage than thirty years of neglect. I check the engine serial number to confirm it’s a Porsche engine, and check the other engine cases in the front of the building – two more Porsche engines on rotted old wooden pallets. I am amazed at the collection of stuff and more so at the condition of the car.

Tammy Harris, left Live-Oak trees and huge granite outcrops every couple hundred feet threatening the doors and fenders of my F250. We encountered a couple of forks in the ‘road’ with ranch names on signs pointing left or right, and had to give them a try just to hear the GPS announce “recalculating” – kind of a test I like to run on the GPS lady to make sure she really does know where we are. A couple hundred yards from Bill & Martha’s place, I spy the silhouette of either a Beetle or a 356 coupe in an open field next to an upside down ’56 Buick, a dilapidated water tank and some other junk. A bit closer, I recognize the twin beehive taillights and announce “this has got to be the place” followed immediately by “I hope to God that’s not one of the cars.” Bill met us in the driveway and directed us to the parking area between the house and the barn buildings. A dozen laying hens cackle and flutter about as my diesel engine stirs up the dust near the fenced coup and hen hutch behind the house. Their home is a beautiful two22


The second barn 100 feet down the hillside houses the ’58 Cabriolet. This building is open on one side exposing the rear of the car to the elements though; faded paint is the least of my concerns. There’s much less stuff stored in this barn, so the car is much more accessible. More piles of debris and evident nests in the floorboard – the floor jack and coveralls are definitely staying in the pickup today! I check the floors with the broom handle; confirm the Porsche engine number and wiggle the steering wheel a bit. Tammy’s busy looking at old pottery pieces elsewhere in the building and Bill’s in the mood to chat with her about the old cabin down the way where they lived while they were building their house. This time she didn’t pick up on my subtle hints, so I finally gave her a serious glare and made a sharp, zipper motion across my lips. She got the message and decided to go look through the garden with Martha, and leave Bill and me to talk about the cars.

After a pleasant visit on the patio, Tammy and I hacked a half-bucket of golf balls part way down the range and hiked down to gather them up for the next players. I wrote Bill a check for a deposit and Martha promised to dig up all the registration and title paperwork on the cars. We got our calendars out and figured out a day we could return and pick the cars up in two weeks, October 26. As we’re back in the pickup and making our way across the dirt track toward the highway, Tammy asks “You didn’t really buy those cars did you?” “Of course I did” I replied with confidence, “That was a much better investment than anything we have in our accounts at Wells Fargo.”

The Pickups & the Fix-ups We picked up the Cabriolets on October 26th with the help of a friend from work and his adopted son. Ronnie and Matt laughed when they saw the license plates on the cars (MI XTC and HR XTC). They told Bill & Martha that Ecstasy was the name of the date-rape drug, and you probably couldn’t get that plate from DMV these days. We had opted not to take our 7 ft. tall enclosed trailer for the pickup due to the narrow dirt road access; so we took our open trailer and a second, rented open trailer for the trip. After airing the tires, the ’53 was rolled out of the storage shed and onto the trailer with very little effort. The emergency brake was seized on the ’58, so I had to crawl underneath and loosen the adjustment nut before winching the car onto the trailer. Other than finding a jackrabbit asleep in the front floor of the ’53, there were no surprises. Neither car has the original engine; the ’53 had a 1956, 1600N and the ’58 a 1962, 1600N. Both cars were mounted with 15” wheels and there was no sign of the original 1300N engine or 16” wheels from the ’53. Otherwise the cars are 99% complete, dry and relatively rust-free.

1958 356 Cabriolet

After confirming with Bill that he would sell both cars, I admitted to him that I was shocked and surprised at the condition of the vehicles. I truly did not know the value of 356 Porsches in the condition these were in, and would not for the world insult him or his property. “I do know how much effort and cost is involved in restoring these cars, and I’m thinking the cars are worth maybe $10,000 each – maybe $15,000 apiece.” “I would entertain an offer in that range” Bill replied immediately. I thought my knees were going to buckle. My heartbeat was surely nearing redline. I started looking more closely inside the ’53 interior; I double checked the engine serial number; no need to kick the tires – they were already flat; “I’m going to buy two 356 Cabriolets today…” I thought to myself. “How about $25,000 for both cars” offered Bill? Bingo! More intense poking around looking at stuff I’d already looked at twice and thinking of a counter offer. Asian business people customarily practice negotiation for just about any transaction – large or small. To pay the asking price without trying to get a better deal is to “lose face” (and oftentimes an insult to the seller). To haggle a bit and negotiate a price that both parties agree to is to “save face”. No one is offended; no feelings are hurt; both parties get what they want; the seller moves the product with some profit and the buyer gets a discount. Much more fun than walking into a store having their monthly, going-out-of-business sale where everything’s already marked down 40%. “OK” I counter, “I’ll give you $25,000 for everything Porsche; both cabriolets, the old coupe in the field, the extra engines, parts, everything made by or for Porsches – plus I want the old wooden sign hanging from the rafters that reads NOLITE ID COGERE CAPE MALLEUM MAJOREM”. We shook hands and headed back to the house for lemonade. 23


This Little ‘53 Cab goes to Camp

This Little ‘58 Cab stays Home

We delivered the 1953 cabriolet to a restoration shop in San Diego on November 26th for a bare-metal restoration expected to take 18months. The Certificate of Authenticity from Porsche, NA shows the ’53 was delivered with Black over Tan leather and a 1300N engine. Though not specified on the COA the serial number confirms that the car originally had a small “mail-slot” window. I’ve purchased a reproduction European Beech wood frame and acrylic lens from Ted Capp in Washington, Reinhold Plank shipped me a rubber seal from Italy and Tony Garcia at Autobahn Interiors in San Diego will install the tan Connolly leather, black square-weave carpet and black German canvas top & interior. I will install a period correct 1500N or 1500S engine. I have a spare set of 16” rims which will be chromed and installed with baby moons. This car will be a fullon concourse, show-only car with maybe an occasional parade lap or two. Way too many idiots out there texting & driving to risk a 60 -year old 1 of 389 Porsche (389 ’53 Cabs with mail-slot windows).

I’m restoring the 1958 Cabriolet myself and it is currently stripped, sealed and waiting for body & paint at Pete Perez’ Paint & Body, a well-known local hot rod builder (expected start late August). Good news is there's amazingly, minimal rust, so there’s lots of good metal to attach to. Bad news is several signs of front-end and rear-end collision damage with multiple repairs using brass, bondo and lead. After checking/straightening the chassis we're going to replace with NEW panels: entire floor pan, complete front nose panel, front fenders, all panels inside front trunk, all battery compartment panels, front diagonal member, both longitudinal and rocker panels, both lower door skins and door bottoms, complete rear end body panel and all fender braces. The COA shows Silver Metallic over Red leather with optional silver metallic luggage rack and USA bumpers. Tony (Autobahn) is currently working on the top frame and interior from the ’58 and will install red leather, red square weave with red cloth binding and black German canvas top. I have an original luggage rack which I’ve sandblasted and powder coated metallic silver. Bob Chase (Grey Eagle) is making the over-riders which were missing from the car when I bought it. Walt (CE) is building a ’62 1600S motor with 86mm JE pistons, ported 912 heads with 40mm intakes, Carrillo rods, Scat crank, re-ground ‘C’ cam and Solex 40 PII carbs. I plan to drive the ’58 in PCA and Registry events and probably show in wash ‘n shine.

Recent Developments Spencer has updated me on the ‘53’s restoration status. The 356 may have been a happy camper but Spencer was not. Since Spencer’s original writing of this article, Spencer and the San Diego restoration shop has had a disagreement. And the ‘53 356 was taken back home to Shafter. Spencer has stated that he still plans on providing a concours quality restoration for the car. In fact I believe that the ’53 may already at another shop in the process of being restored. Keep us up to date on the progress of these two Spencer.

After Ten Hours of Sand Blasting

Click for more 1958 356 Cabriolet restoration pix

For more 1953 356 Cabriolet Restoration Photos Click Here 24


Picking up the Pieces

Down the Road

Tammy and I went back two-weeks after picking up the cabriolets and rescued the ’55 coupe from the field. This shell was not a roller, so I took half-dozen two-inch round, wooden poles to position under the shell and winch it onto the trailer. This ordeal took nearly as long as loading the two cabriolets and all the other parts on our earlier trip. As we were making one last trip through the barns and picking up a few items we had left behind, Bill announced “This coupe was not part of the original deal, so here’s what I’ll take for it. I paid $50 for the ’55 when I bought it, but I used the front clip on my other coupe, so I want $40”. Well, it was part of the original deal, but I’m certainly not going to argue over $40 and I wouldn’t unload it for $400. It cost me more than 40-bucks to drive up to his ranch and back. Two twenties changed hands; another handshake and everybody saves face! I’ll be using the handbrake assembly from the old coupe on my ’53; I salvaged the rear clip, deck lid, three beehive bases, both doors, the complete front suspension, steering box, pedal and shift assemblies - and hauled the rest to the scrap yard.

I don’t plan on making a hobby or second career out of hunting down barn finds. I will continue to enjoy watching 356 sales on eBay and the Registry website. I consider the auction and sale results a market index equivalent to the Dow Jones Industrial Average - narrow but indicative of the broader markets. Both indices could imply the difference between steak and pork ‘n beans. If another ‘find’ drops out of the sky into my lap, I will definitely pursue it, but I’m too busy farming and drilling oil wells to look for any more projects to pile on my plate right now. Tammy & I are looking forward to completing the restorations, retiring from the oil business and traveling with our 356 collection to PCA and Registry events around the country. Our daughter Carrera lives in Knoxville, Tennessee where she’s working on her PhD at my alma mater. Our son Spencer, Jr. lives in Newfoundland, Canada where he builds houses in the summer and freezes the other 10-months, so we have plenty of excuses to travel outside of California.

I paid 40-bucks for a wooden sign that reads “don’t force it, get a bigger hammer” in Latin.

Having said all that, if you happen to run across an old 356 Porsche in someone’s barn – shoot me an email. I still can’t get this silly grin off my face! Spencer Harris Harris Farms, Shafter, CA. spencer_harris@hughes.net

A pretty rough looking ‘55 356 Coupe

For more pictures of the “Find” Click Here 25


Upcoming Activities Out of Town

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March 2014 GEM Grapevine  

The March 2014 Grapevine Newsletter from the Golden Empire Region of the PCA, Porsche Club of America