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grant m ley architecture portfolio


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resume/c.v.

Responsibility is the key to design. All designers, whether they be architects, urban planners, or urban designers, must be held accountable for the results of their work. We create spaces and places for people, not for ourselves. Therefore, it is imperative that we realize the current paradigm in which we live, recognize when and where issues occur, and do the best we can with the tools given to better the situation for the public that we serve. With this in mind, I set forth on the cusp of beginning my career as an architectural and urban designer, with the goal of changing the world for the better. After taking urbanism classes both at the University of Illinois and the University of Michigan, my main focus is eco-regenerative urban design and architecture and how to facilitate responsible urban design practices with building construction and planning. The synthesis of these separate, yet closely related fields is not always easy or possible, but I hope to put the knowledge I’ve gained to use to inspire designers and non-designers alike to strive for a more sustainable, responsible life.

[p] 847.902.4765 [e] grantmley@gmail.com [a] 235 Bingham Circle, Mundelein, IL 60060


EDUCATION

EXPERIENCE

The University of Michigan

The University of Michigan

Relevant Coursework: ARCH 506 - Sustainable Urbanism & Architecture ARCH 515 - Sustainable Systems I ARCH 562 - Propositions Studio

- Teaching assistant for ARCH 357: Architecture, Sustainability, and the City - Responsible for leading a discussion section component of the course to facilitate students’ mastery of the course material.

Ann Arbor, Michigan Master of Architecture Candidate 2015 - 2017 (expected)

Escola Técnica Superior d’Arquitectura del Vallés Sant Cugat del Vallés, Spain University of Illinois School of Architecture Study Abroad Program 2014 - 2015

Ann Arbor, Michigan Graduate Student Instructor 01.2016 - 04.2016

Mithun

Seattle, Washington Spring Break Externship Program 02.29.2016 - 03.04.2016

Awards & Accolades: Frank B. and Jennie M. Long Traveling Award

- Week-long networking and experience opportunity - Assisted with Photoshop renderings, LEED credit documentation, and construction site punch list items

Illinois for Illinois (I4I) Study Abroad Scholarship

Legat Architects, Inc.

The University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign Champaign, Illinois B.S. in Architectural Studies Minor in Urban and Regional Planning 2011 - 2015 Awards & Accolades: Edmund J James Scholar, 8 semesters Relevant Coursework: UP 203 - Cities: Planning & Urban Life UP 205 - Ecology and its Applications UP 260 - Social Inequality and Planning UP 426 - Urban Design and Planning UP 445 - Economic Development Planning

Waukegan, Illinois Student Intern 05.2014 - 08.2014 05.2015 - 08.2015 05.2016 - 08.2016

- Assisted project architects in completing specific punch list and design items. - Constructed 3D Revit model and created bidding documents for an interior renovation of Centegra Health Systems’ pharmacy spaces under the supervision of the project architect. - Completed facade design studies for Waukegan Township Offices - Created a 3D Revit model of Oak Park and River Forest High School to be used for future projects. Used existing plans and field verification to assist the process. - Coordinated the design development and construction documents for Legat Architect’s new studio located in Gurnee, Illinois (opened April, 2016).

Village of Libertyville Planning Division Libertyville, Illinois Community Development Intern 05.2013 - 08.2013

- Proposed preliminary design layout for a new parking structure for the downtown. - Completed research on downtown historic district guidelines and expansion of the Pace Bus transit system. - Assisted in checking architectural drawings for compliance with the Building Code - Assisted in zoning reviews of lot coverage and fence regulations.

EXPERTISE Programs Revit Rhinoceros 5 V-Ray for Rhino Sketchup AutoCad Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Lightroom Skills Hand-Drafting Sketching Photography Languages English Native Language Spanish Working Proficiency


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[06] Teatro de Sants Escola Técnica Superior d’Arquitectura del Vallés

[12] Medina Gardens University of Michigan

[19] House Without Qualities University of Michigan

[24] Allerton Performance Center University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

table of contents


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[28] Trumpland University of Michigan

[32] Peacock University of Michigan

[33] LINC - Chicago Library University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

[39] Sketch Selections Various


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teatro de sants Fall 2014 | ARCH 475 - Architectural Design and Development Tomeu Ramis and Amadeu Santacana Barcelona, Spain

The Teatro de Sants was the solution to a complex design problem in which I was asked to create a program and design a building to help reconnect the Sants neighborhood of Barcelona, which is currently separated by the Metro Line. My strategy was to create a floating black box theater space as a community focal point to allow circulation through the building and connect the ground level with the level of the adjacent Metro.


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teatro de sants

RESTAURANT

TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN TRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAINTRAIN

THEATER THEATER THEATER THEATER THEATER

REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL REHEARSAL

CAFECAFECAFECAFE

The black box theater acts as a catalyst for movement in two ways. Firstly, the supporting restaurant and cafe programs draw attention to the building and attract patrons. Secondly, by floating above the ground plane, the public is allowed to circulate underneath the theater to the other side, where a multistory lobby encourages upward movement, effectively completing the access gap across the Metro Line.












 




barcelona, spain

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Rendered view from ground level [Above Opposite] Rendered view from top of the Metro Line [Below Opposite] Site context Model, 1:200 [Above]


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medina gardens Winter 2016 | ARCH 562 - Propositions Studio Douglas Kelbaugh Detroit, MI Group Members: Will Kenney, Amy Kurtzburg, Min Ji, Grant Ley, Salma Teekay, Clayton Witt

Medina Gardens is an urban design and architecture proposal that aims to create an Arab-American neighborhood on the western edge of Detroit, anchored by a 2,000-person capacity mosque. This proposal aimed to create an Arab-American community that satisfied the client’s needs through a combination of iconic architecture and program to foster a neighborhood that acts as a regional and national attractor for Detroit and provides a welcoming atmosphere for residents and visitors alike. This studio has been discussed as becoming the basis for a design competition held by the city of Detroit.

The Souk, the Mosque, and the Recreation Campus [Above, from left to right] Full Site Plan [Opposite]


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mosque and souk The Mosque and the Souk, both integral parts of Medina Gardens, were taken on by other team members. Design input was shared between all members, allowing each team to induvidually create something and get feedback from the rest of the team to ensure a cohesive, desirable design was the final result. The Souk team faced a formidable challenge in creating a Middle-Eastern Marketplace in Metro Detroit. Given the lack of typology, this was a successful attempt to create a hybrid between a traditional Arabic souk and an American shopping center. The Mosque, which can accommodate up to 2,000 people, was designed to create an atmosphere of inclusivity and equality, while maintaining a sense of privacy during times of prayer.

[Top] Interior of the Main Prayer Hall [Above] View of the Mosque from Southfield Freeway

medina gardens


detroit, michigan

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Souk District Potential Layout Designs Scale: nts

Layout 1: Small Retail 40’x50’

Layout2: Medium Retail 40’x80’

50’

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor Space

One of three standard layouts for the souk [Top Left] Entrance to the Souk from Joy Road on the North [Top Right] Aerial View [Above]

Drawings compiled by Min Ji, Amy Kurtzburg, Salma Teekay, and Clayton Witt


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medina gardens

recreation campus

Composed as a campus, the southern half of the site acts as a sub-community that caters towards athletics while creating a welcoming, embracing feeling. The central axis continues down from the Mosque District, allowing for direct access to the Recreation Center, complete with basketball, swimming, running, and weightlifting facilities, as well as the Medina Gardens Stadium at the very southern end of the site.


detroit, michigan

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[Left] Recreation Campus Drainage Diagram [[Below] Second-story track of the Recreation Center [Bottom] Recreation Center as viewed from the south. [Opposite] Overall Recreation Campus Plan

Drawings compiled by Will Kenney and Grant Ley


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medina gardens stadium As a part of the client-directed program, we were asked to include a proposal for an on-site soccer stadium that could accommodate NCAA-regulated games. My main responsibility in the project was the design of this stadium. After multiple iterations, the final result was an outdoor stadium flanked by berms on both sides and a tensile roof structure. The stadium can accommodate 2,696 spectators in bleachers on the field’s east and west sidelines, as well as additional standing room on the second level for larger events.

medina gardens


Concept Sketches [Opposite] Aerial View of the Stadium, looking Southwest [Above] North-South Section [Below]

Drawings compiled by Will Kenney and Grant Ley


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house without qualities [om ungers, 1994] Winter 2016 | ARCH 516 - Representation Erik Hermann Unfinished Business

Line

Fi


ill

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Line + Fill

Representation at the University of Michigan focused on the different ways that architecture can be drawn and the unique meanings that stem from different representational methods. Unfinished Business focused specifically on the incompleteness of architecture and drawings, opening up discussion and interpretation as to what was truly envisoned during the design process.


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house without qualities

Process 1

Process 2


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OM Ungers’ House Without Qualities provided a unique challenge within the overarching paradigm of Unfinished Business. The house, designed in 1994, seeks to promote Ungers’ essence of architecture, which shuns all ornamentation and lays bare the architectural elements of room, wall, and window. There is little left to interpretation by the user. I took Ungers’ elements and blurred the distinctions between them, hereby creating new architectural elements, such as a room-wall or a wall-window. The ambiguity and skewed perspectives created by deleting the boundaries challenges Ungers’ idea that there is only one way to create architecture, leaving room for interpretation by the viewer. Ungers has nowhere to hide.


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allerton performance center Fall 2013 | ARCH 373 - Architecture and the Landscape Kennedy Hutson Monticello, Illinois

The Performance center at Allerton Park was designed as an addition to an existing music program hosted at the retreat center. Park directors were looking for a more permanent solution to host concerts as well as increase capacity. The Performance Center at Allerton Park looks to fill this program gap by providing a permanent outdoor music venue with seating for 500, plus room for an additional 1000 guests.

North


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trumpland

Hemespheric

Shatter

Geometric

The Allerton Performance Center draws on precedents such as the Pritzker Pavilion in Chicago, as well as the proximity of the Formal Sculpture Gardens of Allerton Park to inform its design. Shattered glass was used as an inspirational medium to become the basis for the jagged, layered roof structure that cantilevers across the stage and main seating areas.


monticello, illinois

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TICKET SALES

WOMEN

STAGE

MEN STORAGE

DRESSING

DRESSING FOOD PREP CONCESSIONS STORAGE

SUPPORT SPACES

MAIN PERFORMANCE CENTER


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TRUMPLAND Fall 2015 | ARCH 552 - Institutions Studio Ana Morcillo PallarĂŠs New York, NY

As a part of the Institutions Studio, the Presidential Library typology was studied extensively and taken to the next level to create a narrative. Set in the year 2020, TRUMPLAND seeks to capture the essence, ideas, and storyline of a hypothetical Donald J Trump presidency. A roller coaster ride takes the user through the building, beginning at the ground level and ascending to the top with increasing velocity before finally dropping 800 feet to the basement level, mirroring the proposed storyline of President Donald J Trump.


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trumpland

As long as you‛re going to be thinking anyway, think

BIG!

Precedent studies of Buckingham Palace and Lloyd’s of London were contucted to create a new building typology: the palace-tower. The resulting collage section, seen above, combined elements of both buildings in order to illustrate this new typology.


1/16” = 1’-0”


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linc - chicago library


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peacock Fall 2015 | ARCH 537 - Fabrication Asa Peller Ann Arbor, MI Group Members: Kristin Gatzendorfer, Frank Gibase IV, Grant Ley

Peacock was the culmination of the final three weeks of a fabrication course, in which I worked in a team of three to create an object with the CNC routing table. For this project, we wanted to create an object that was sculptural yet operational. We based our idea off of a rotating joint, in which pieces layer together to create a stack that can spread out once fully opened. The joint itself is a simple combination of a hinge and a pin-and-track combination, in which the hinge acts as a cocentric circle for the whole piece. The pin then slides 18 degrees along the track until it catches, pulling each consecutive piece along until the peacock is opened to a full 180 degrees.


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LINC | Chicago Library Spring 2014 | ARCH 374 - Architecture and the City David Emmons Chicago, Illinois

RIVE

D ORE E SH

L AK

5

LLE

LASA

4

E

DRIV

3 5 Minute Walk

1 Minute Walk 1

NORTH AVENUE

CLARK STREET

LASALLE STREET

WELLS STREET

2

GATHERING SPACES AND PROXIMITY 1] Starbucks

2] McDonald’s

3] The Moody Church

4] Chicago History Museum

0

200’ 100’

Pedestrian Bike Bus Car 5] Lincoln Park

The Chicago Mapping Project, above, precluded LINC. Extensive site analysis was conducted to better understand the city and the context surrounding the site. I focused my map on transportation and gathering spaces within a five minute walking radius of the site.


Focus then shifted towards applying the analysis to a building design. LINC was the result of this design application; a twenty-first century library that encompasses four main concepts: Lifelong Learning, Culture, Knowledge, and Leisure while creating a centralized gathering space for the Lincoln Park neighborhood.


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linc: chicago library

1

1

UP

UP

UP

UP

2 2 3 4 5 UP

UP

4

6 UP

12 1

5

UP

8

UP

UP

2

Third Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan 1] Mechanical 2] Children’s Section 3] Computer Lab 4] Classroom 5] Classroom

3

4

9

A-A

1] Mechanical 2] General Collection/Reading Room 3] Exhibition Space 4] Study Room 5] Study Room 6] Book Preservation/Storage

3

UP

5

10

6

11 1

B-B

1

UP

UP

UP

2 2 7

UP

UP

C-C

First Floor Plan 1] Storage Room 2] Office 3] Office 4] Office 5] Office 6] Storage

7] Lecture Hall 8] Mechanical 9] Classroom 10] Computer Lab 11] Lobby Seating 12] Courtyard

UP

Fourth Floor Plan

1] Mechanical 2] General Collection/Reading Room NORTH Scale: 1/16” - 1’

Fifth Floor Plan

1] Mechanical 2] General Collection/Reading Room


READ

[Top] Main entry, from the corner of North and LaSalle [Left] The Atrium [Above] Children’s Room


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linc: chicago library

Column Sizing

Girder Sizing

Main Elevator Core

Fire Stairwells

Structural Axon


chicago, illinois

Alongside the integration of the contextual analysis with building design, the structure was carefully studied and applied to the building design. Structural calculations were conducted to determine the correct beam and column sizing for the building area. A 3/16� section model, pictured right and below, was the culmination of the design process, allowing for the building’s organization and structural system to be fully understood.

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Sketch Selections Selections from 2011 - present


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[p] 847.902.4765 [e] grantmley@gmail.com [a] 235 Bingham Circle, Mundelein, IL 60060

Grant Ley Portfolio 2016  

A collection of undergraduate and graduate architecture projects.

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