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A GRAND M O SQ UE AND M E D INA FO R M E T R O D E T R O I T


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P REFAC E

The studio’s “client” was a group led by Imam XX XX, This team of leading members of the congregation, along with XX, mentored us through the 15 week project, advising on program, urban design and architecture. The congregation informally describes its version of Islam as “Sushi,” denoting a flexible blend of Sunni and Shia branches. This hybridity manifests itself by having the entrances and prayer hall shared by male and female worshipers, unlike the separate, screened entrances for females in traditional mosques. They are also active with young people, and with interfaith initiatives in metro Detroit. The mosque is to be large, hopefully the largest in North America, befitting the most populous Arab community outside of the Middle East. At the request of the Imam, it is domed, although not purely spherical. The building is oriented to face Mecca, which is ironically to the northeast, due to the great circle geometry, with which all air travelers are familiar. On the

The medina has both covered and open air shopping and dining, with a variety of passages that are both wide and narrow, and gathering places both small and large. Restaurants from different Arab countries are plentiful, and there is hookah lounge, in the alcohol-free development. Parking for both the Medina and mosque is accommodated on the site’s western edge, in a large two story parking garage with shops lining part of its ground level. The sports complex includes a recreation center, complete with gym, swimming, running track, exercise/weight-lifting space, kids’ area, cafe, and even a climbing wall in one scheme. There are outdoor soccer fields for all age groups and basketball courts. Either connected, or sited separately, is a regulation size soccer field, with grandstands, concession stands, restrooms and night lighting - suitable for high school and collegiate games. Surface parking is located nearby, and can be shared with the mosque. The whole studio collaborated for the first month on urban design, investigating a variety of programs and site strategies. Then the students subdivided into smaller and smaller teams, ending up with two teams, each of which had three sub-teams of two students, focusing on the mosque, the medina or the sports complex. Fortuitously, there were two Muslim students in the studio - one on each team - that helped with religious and cultural questions.

INTRODUCTION

Some influential members of the Arab-American community, centered in contiguous Dearborn, had shown interest in building a new large mosque. Indeed, the aspiration was for an ambitious Arabian town center or Medina, complete with an Islamic seminary, social events facility, a commercial souk, as well as a major recreation center and soccer stadium. The vision for the medina includes several Middle Eastern ethic restaurants, a halal market, shops, offices, an inn, and housing - all with an intimate scale and organic pattern reminiscent of traditional souks and bazaars.

entrance side of the prayer hall are facilities for storing shoes and coats, and for doing obligatory ablutions prior to worship. On the Mecca side of the hall is the prayer wall, with the mihrab alcove at its center, and a minbar podium for the Imam’s to speak. Ironically. Connected by corridors or colonnades are the Islamic seminary, the Imam’s home, event spaces for weddings and other large gatherings, offices, museum, gift shop, etc., as well as outdoor area for overflow prayer space on important religious days.

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PREFACE

This extraordinary design studio, like many good things in life, started accidentally. I happened on a whim to show XX XX some images of a contemporary mosque that I designed in Dubai. XX XX, newly installed as Detroit’s Director of Planning and Development, was shortly thereafter asked by Mayor XX to look at an open 30 acre site on the western edge of the City, as the potential site for a grand mosque.


The site has considerable constraints: it stretches about a half mile north to south, with a busy, noisy freeway on its western edge, which has a one-way service road abutting it. The east side is open land, laid out for the second phase of a large HOPE VI housing project. The northern edge – Joy Road - is an arterial strip, with spotty auto-oriented commercial buildings. The south side is a residential street, with a public school. The two teams took similar approaches to developing the 30 acres. Both placed the medina on the north end, to take advantage of the commercial nature of Joy Road, and its better vehicular access to the site. The mosque and minarets, both teams agreed, make sense in the middle of the site, next to the mosque complex, and where there is high visibility from the thousands of freeway vehicles. The sports complex seemed logical to place on the south end, as it’s a more independent facility that is less dependent on the mosque and medina. The students’ tireless work, collaborating within their teams and competing with between teams produced highly developed, eminently workable yet inspiring schemes. The respective programs were thoroughly studied and refined over the entire semester. The balancing of old and new cultures, traditional with contemporary architecture resulted in the blending of a sort of a “sushi” environmental atmosphere befitting the congregation’s ethic. This project seems eminently worthy of pursuing proactively for its benefits as a local, metro and national center. It could be a timely and poignant reminder to this country, the land of religious freedom and social diversity.

Fingers crossed, XX XX Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning University of Michigan 4

PREFACE

INTRODUCTION

We hope our efforts, as vivified in this competition submission, will serve to make the Mosque a local and national Islamic spiritual center, the medina a bustling metro commercial and civic center, the recreation center a hub of family activities, and the soccer center a thriving athletic venue. We wish the Muslim community, with the generous help of the City of Detroit, the best of luck in realizing this dream in beautiful, concrete ways.


chapter one the research


SITE H I STORY AND S U RRO UNDING S

Built in 1943, the Herman Gardens’ public housing community was once a healthy bustling community with more than 2,100 apartment units. Located in northwest Detroit on approximately 139 acres, Herman Gardens was, at one time, the public housing “Community of Choice”, but over the years it became one of the most distressed communities in the Detroit Housing Commission’s portfolio. The former resident population was also one of the poorest of DHC’s communities and the property had one of the highest crime rates. After over a decade of planning, the first phase of the 607-unit, mixed-income development named Gardenview Estates was opened on the former site of Herman Gardens on September 2, 2009. Today, there are many fast food restaurants, auto services and liquor stores in the area as well as a few grocery stores and barbers. The site and immediate surroundings have been earmarked for HOPE VI housing, the first phase of which is in place. The development of the new Islamic hub hopes to spur positive development in the region restoring it to its former glory.

HOUSES ACCESSORIES APARTMENTS EDUCATIONAL RELIGIOUS

Bottom Right (Upper): Existing commercial, retail and restaurants in the immediate neighborhood

NURSING GOVERNMENTA L RETAIL TRADE AUTO SERVICES RECREACTION RESTAURANT

Bottom Right (Lower): Building Types in the surrounding area

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RESEARCH

Bottom Left: Historic Progression of the site (Top to Bottom: Plan of Herman Gardens, View of Herman Gardens, Plan of Gardenview Estates)

SITE HISTORY

Top: Regional map showing existing site of Islamic Center of America and proposed site for Grand Mosque and Medina


M OS QU E DE SI GN

Hypostyle mosque • A rectangular hypostyle, usually in wood and earth block or brick, with a flat roof • Started off as the Prophet’s house in Medina, a simple courtyard with rooms on two sides. In 707 CE, the caliph replaced it with a new building with minarets added as visual markers or to carry the adhān (call for prayer). • Originated in the Arabian Peninsula • Most dominant form from the seventh to the thirteenth centuries and has not significantly altered over the ages

Hypostyle Mosque Top: Umayyad Great Mosque, Damascus, Syria Bottom: Typical Plan

Iwan Mosque Top: Masjid-i Shah, Isfahan, Iran Bottom: Typical Plan

Central Plan Mosque Top: Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey Bottom: Typical Plan

Indian Mosque Top: Jami Masjid, Delhi, India Bottom: Typical Plan

Iwan mosque • Mosque with four iwans, Off one iwan is the prayer hall • Traditional vault-and-dome building was used to develop iwans, or vaulted open porches, encompassed by a giant portal (pishtaq) arranged around a central courtyard • Occurs mainly in Iran, Central Asia, and Afghanistan

Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca, Morocco

Shah Faisal Mosque, Islamabad, Pakistan

Mosque by Douglas Kelbaugh, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Contemporary mosques • Mosque design is undergoing a “globalizing” influence in terms of using elements thought to be normative. The dome and the minaret have become the desirable symbols for the mosque, leading to the neglect of regional architectural traditions

MOSQUE DESIGN

Indian mosque • A wide rectangular prayer hall covered with triple domes, a courtyard with a pool of water surrounded by colonnades, and a monumental entrance; Varied in scale • Developed by the Imperial Moguls (1526–1828) Top: Parts of a mosque Upper Middle: Historic typology of mosques Lower Middle: Contemporary mosques Bottom: Traditional Islamic decoration and calligraphy

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RESEARCH

Central Plan mosque • Large central domed space without columns; Pencil-thin minarets at the building’s corners • Developed by the Ottomans (1281–1922) in Anatolia. The origins of this form lie in the Byzantine centralized basilica plan of the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul (then Constantinople)


North America’s Hub

M ATERI AL , WATE R , A ND E NE RG Y CO NS E RVAT ION

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MISSOURI

LEED defines regional materials as building components that originate less than five hundred miles from the site. In the case of this site materials can come from much of Ontario, Canada to the north, Tennessee and the Carolinas to the south, and Minnesota to the west.

New York

P ENNS Y L V A NIA

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WISCONSIN

Sustainability in material use, on-site energy production and water conservation were driving forces in both team’s thought processes from the project’s inception. Several metrics exist to measure sustainability, and here in the United States LEED (the U.S. Green Building Council’s “Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design”) is most common.

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MISSISSIPPI A L A B A MA

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L E G E N D MAJOR INTERSTATE ROUTES

More widely known photovoltaic panels will be deployed throughout the site to offset energy from the grid that may not be produced using sustainable sources. Many of the buildings proposed on the site are oriented to allow for easy installation and maximum energy gain from either photovoltaics or solar thermal technologies.

LO U I S I A N A

FLO RID A

500 MILE RADIUS FROM SOUTHEAST MICHIGAN

Solar collectors are used not for electricity production but for heating water for use inside buildings. Programs like ablutions in the mosque and locker rooms in the Recreation Center will use a large quantity of hot water. This system provides hot water throughout the winter months.

SUSTAINABILITY

Top: The LEED prescribed “regional” radius of 500 miles for material acquisition Middle: Water trickling through the reed bed is cleaned by microorganisms living in the root system and is used for the treatment of gray water for ablutions Bottom Left: Photovoltaic cells are placed on a majority of rooftops to offset energy demands from non-renewable sources Bottom Right: Water is pumped through the panels and warmed by the sun before returning to the building for use in ablutions or other water-related needs

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RESEARCH

The management of storm water is prioritized by creating detention and retention ponds all over the site. These ponds serve not only to manage the site’s rainfall but also enhance its aesthetic and environmental impact. Due to the nature of the ablutions process, the water used in the washing of hands and feet is reclaimed and cleaned through reed beds within the site.


FLORA AND FAU NA

In the initial diagram provided by the client, a large park was requested. Both teams offer different approaches to meeting this request but the hope is that they will prioritize the use of native species in their designs.

The incorporation of native vegetation will ensure that the site will remain active throughout all seasons. Not only will selective plantings be a beautiful addition to the site, they will also provide much needed restoration of habitat in the city for Michigan’s native wildlife.

Big Bluestem

The Wetland Milkweed

New England Aster

Juniper

Sedge

The Pond Shadbush (Juneberry)

Bur-Reed

Kentucky Coffee Tree

Aquatic Plants

SUSTAINABILITY

Monarch butterflies and Mallard ducks are always a treat for the kids to see while playing in the park. New trends in Natural Play encourage creativity in children while fostering an appreciation for nature and the environment. Walking and jogging trails provide a shared amenity for mosque-goers and the site’s residential neighbors to the east.

Butterfly Bush

Natural Play

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RESEARCH

With the Detroit Zoo in close proximity and certain limitations of the site and its context, the studio believed that a new zoo as requested would not be feasible. However, with the proper site planning it is possible for this site to be a haven for a variety of plant and animal life native to Southeastern Michigan. The site sits within a pathway for migratory birds and could function as a stopover point in addition to offering a more permanent home to those that stay in the city year-round.


Water Conservation and Recycling Due to the nature of the ablutions process and our sustainable goals for this project, the water used in the washing of hands and feet is reclaimed and cleaned through reed beds within the site. The proposed reed bed is a subsurface flow unit planted with Bulrush, an endemic species in the lakes of Detroit. The reed bed is filled with aggregate and planted with reeds. Effluent enters one end of it and exits at the other, flowing through gravel voids. Nutrients are taken up by plants and microorganisms, organic matter is stabilized by microorganisms, suspended solids are physically filtered by gravel and roots, and pathogens are destroyed by competing microorganisms and natural die over time.

SUS TA I N ABL E STR AT E G IE S

Renewable Energy Sources and On-site Production Photovoltaic panels are deployed throughout the site to offset energy from the grid that may not be produced using sustainable sources. Most of the rooftops in the souk area are covered in PVs which produce a majority of the energy required for it to function. Solar collectors are used not for electricity production but for heating water for use inside buildings. Programs like ablutions in the mosque and locker rooms in the Recreation Center will use a large quantity of hot water. This system provides hot water throughout the winter months.

On-site Drainage and Storm Water Management To offset the storm water management fee in a large area like the soccer field, a retention pond has been placed next to it on site which collects the runoff from the field.

Storm Water Management Detroit has introduced a storm water management fee, and on sites like this, the charges can be significant. Our team prioritized the management of storm water and provided a blue and green infrastructure. These detention and retention ponds serve not only to manage our site’s rainfall but also enhance Medina Garden’s aesthetic and environmental impact.

Plantings Evergreen and piny trees like dwarf blue pines used as acoustic buffers and to provide spatial enclosure Deciduous trees provide shade and greenery for the local area Local flowering trees like Dogwood and Eastern Redbud line significant paths and entrances Arterial pathways span the entire site and connect different programmatic elements within the site

Arterial pathways span the entire site and connect the diverse range of programmatic elements within the site. These pathways provide a shaded route for pedestrians to move through the site. A provision for bikes has been made by creating bike routes and racks throughout the campus, which makes it easier to reach the far ends of the 30 acre site. Most vehicular traffic is restricted to the outer edge and for service. Locally sourced materials LEED defines regional materials as building components that originate less than five hundred miles from the site. In this case, most of the building material is restricted to locally sourced brick (from Detroit) and concrete. Other materials like Aluminum and Polymers are used only in special cases like for parametric facades and roofs.

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RESEARCH

Bikability and walkability

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES

These retention and detention ponds that are scattered across the site take care of the drainage requirements of the site as well as some of the surrounding areas.


chapter two the minarets


SITE PL AN

This proposal aims to create an Arab-American community with a combination of iconic architecture and a program to foster a neighborhood that acts as a regional and national attraction for Detroit, and provides a welcoming atmosphere for residents and visitors alike. The site is designed keeping in mind the car-dominated transit system of Detroit, as well as the importance of creating a safe and inclusive environment. The main approach to the site is off the Southfield Freeway with secondary entry points through Joy Road and Tireman Avenue. The complex consists of a souk at the north end, the mosque in the middle and a recreation campus and soccer stadium at the south end. The main pedestrian connection through the whole site is a tree-lined north-south avenue through the middle, which acts as a spine that binds them together, creating strong symmetrical views. To maximize visibility of the mosque, it was placed at a central location that can be seen by passing cars on Southfield Freeway. Your eyes are immediately drawn to the large minaret in front, which acts a beacon signaling the presence of an Islamic center. The magnificent dome emerges behind a thicket of trees as you get closer to the mosque. The souk is at the north end to get maximum frontage on both Joy Road and Southfield Freeway. It aims to create the feel of a traditional Middle Eastern market through a combination of indoor and outdoor pedestrian streets lined with stores of different sizes. It also consists of a halal market and a residential component which connects it back to the neighboring community.

The souk at the north end is mainly a cultural space. The mosque has a religious significance, and welcomes everyone from different traditions. The recreation complex has no cultural or religious components and is a purely international experience. The aim of the project is to create a unique destination that reflects Islamic traditions within an American environment, through a range of different experiences as you move through the site. 12

THE MINARETS

SITE PROPOSAL

The recreation complex consists of a family fun center and a soccer stadium. The family center houses basketball courts, swimming pools and many outdoor soccer and football fields as well a park, which is used by the neighboring community and people visiting the site from all over Detroit. The soccer stadium acts as an anchor at the south end of the site and is a regional attractor, which many national, college, and community leagues can use.


THE MINARETS

13 SITE PROPOSAL


Site Procession

DI AG RA M S

Parking Deck(3 stories): Halal Market:

660 pull in spaces

Inn Parking:

15 pull in spaces

Housing:

70 pull in spaces

Parallel Parking:

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Event Center:

28 pull in spaces 12 parallel spaces

Forested Parking:

265 pull in spaces 90 parallel spaces

Rec Center:

80 pull in spaces 30 parallel spaces

Soccer Stadium:

150 pull in spaces 40 parallel spaces

30 pull in spaces

DIAGRAMS

Overall: 1,520 spaces

Left: Parking Plan Right: Procession through the various districts on site with corresponding views

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THE MINARETS

Recreation District 300 spaces

Mosque 395 spaces

Souk 825 spaces

Number of Parking Spaces


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Souk

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62,560 sf

Mosque

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Left: Program Plan

217,640 sf

Recreation District

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Halal Market This grocery store/marketplace supplies Halal and fresh food to the area, and has a restaurant on the second story. Bakery & Deli This marketplace provides a specialized resource to the area. Once in the building you can enter the halal market. Commercial Space These spaces are dedicated to stores that require a larger area to conduct business, to attract customers to the area. Housing This residential area accommodates a younger crowd fronting them on Joy Roy and close to the souk. Senior Housing This residential area is located near the souk giving senior citizens close proximity to it and park space. Bookstore This space is an outlet for crowds to hang out, read and enjoy the natural courtyard space. Upstairs is a coffee shop. Information Center This building provides facilities, security and information for all those visiting the area. Hookah Bar The Hookah Bar provides an area for adolescents, adults and the community to enjoy an authentic Arab experience. Restaurants These four ethnic restaurants provide authentic cultural experiences and cuisines. Traditional Souk This part of the souk is set aside for smaller traditional Islamic commerce such as antiques, carpet stores, etc. Inn This economical housing facility lies within the souk, and provides temporary accommodation for visitors. Farmer’s Market This is a sheltered space located close to the souk and residential areas for temporary stalls, food trucks, etc. Tented Courtyard This courtyard is a sheltered relief in the souk allowing visitors to enjoy a shaded region of the outside space. Natural Courtyard This natural landscape sits within a busy souk, adjacent to both stores and senior housing.

SF: 12,565 As a souk within a souk, the Halal Market is the cornerstone of the site. SF: 6,130

Main Prayer Hall The main prayer hall is the center of the mosque complex and can accommodate over 2,000 people for Friday prayers. Small Prayer Hall An ancillary prayer space is located across from the main prayer hall, for smaller congregations. Event Space Located South West of the Mosque the event space allows for weddings as well as alternate programs to take place. Islamic College The Islamic College provides a space for lectures and field trips, as well as classroom space for students. Museum This museum provides a gallery space for the mosque to educate visitors about Islamic culture. Office Space Ancillary office spaces are located across the hall from the main prayer hall. Imam’s Residence The Imam’s residence as well as an additional guest rooms for visiting scholars are located above the offices.

SF: 30,760 Courtyards: 32,350

Recreation Facility The Rec Center has a field house, basketball courts, an indoor track, gyms and other exercise equipment.

SF: 59,800 284,184 Outdoor Park Space

Soccer Field South of the rec center sits the anchor of the site. The outdoor soccer stadium has a FIFA regulation sized field.

SF: 157,840 Can hold 2,700 Patrons 31,692 for standing room

SF: 89,100 Size of retail varies SF: 11,086 SF: 11,860 SF: 22,440 Coffee shop and outdoor balcony space on second story SF: 3,155 SF: 3,455 SF: 23,750 Varies in size, largest restaurant area is 17,249 square feet SF: 7,125 697 each SF: 8,000 SF: 2,000 SF: 6,350 Akin to the recreation center’s roof, this tent unites the site. SF: 6,580

SF: 6,000 SF: 9,000 SF: 12,500 Auditorium Space: 4,800 Classroom Space: 3,200 SF: 3,000 SF: 2,840

DIAGRAMS

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Square Footage

SF: 2,840

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THE MINARETS

1

Programmatic Use


INITIAL I DE AS AND S K E TCH E S Diorama showing depth of colonnade with dome of the mosque in the background

Scenographic models showing depth of various threshold points in the mosque starting with the big minaret in front, the colonnade and large dome behind it and finally the small minaret in the background

Sketch showing level drops in the entry sequence to the prayer hall of the mosque

Sketch showing detail of faceted faces of the dome with the south-facing panels translucent to allow light to enter

Sketch of main door detail

Sketch of prayer hall carpet detail

Top Left: Model of initial and final mosque design Bottom Left: Modeling techniques used

Initial and final shape of dome

Process of casting the dome - the form was first 3d printed, then reverse cast in rockite and finally a plastic sheet was melted over it

Final shape of dome with triangular faceted patterns

Top Right: Scenographic models showing depth of various layers in the entry sequence of the mosque Bottom Right: Sketches used to understand and resolve various design ideas and problems

Sketch showing the atrium facing outward. The trees under the dome, large copper entrance way, and shoe racks all acts as part of the entry sequence into the mosque.

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INITIAL IDEAS AND SKETCHES

Sketch showing structural grid of columns and domeshaped space-frame holding up the panels

Final mosque design

THE MINARETS

Initial mosque design


Top Left: Sketches used to understand and resolve various design problems in the stadium Bottom Left: Modeling techniques used Right: Model of initial and final site proposal

Initial site model

Sketches showing various views of the stadium

Pattern painted on the underside of the polymer roof

Metal cables holding up the structure of the stadium

Model of the stadium showing the detail of the roof structure

Final site model

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THE MINARETS

INITIAL IDEAS AND SKETCHES

Template of the roof pattern


M OS QU E

The mosque is the crown jewel of the site, and acts as its formal and programmatic linchpin. To maximize visibility of the mosque, it was placed at a central location that can be seen by passing cars on Southfield Freeway. The main approach to the mosque is off Southfield Freeway. The procession of events that one must go through before entering a mosque begins as soon as you enter the site, amplifying the experience. Standing at 200 feet tall, the main minaret is visible from miles away and acts as a beacon signaling the presence of an Islamic center. The magnificent dome emerges from behind a grove of trees as you approach the mosque. The mosque has been designed to create a traditional Islamic experience within an American atmosphere. The parking lot in front of the mosque is designed as a forested grove of trees lined symmetrically along the central pedestrian axis of the site to create the feeling of an Islamic garden. It also doubles as an outdoor event space for Eid and other festivals. The natural landscape is pulled into the building where the structure of the sweeping dome is cut out to allow trees to grow under it. Once inside the mosque the experience continues as you proceed through the grand sky lit atrium and ablutions, before entering the main prayer hall. The prayer hall is a surreal experience with light filtering in through the dome and the inner patterned fabric layer under it. The row of tree like columns and dappled light create the feeling of being in a forest. The large prayer wall in front is a light tinge of blue and has a niche for the mihrab with a skylight allowing light to wash over it.

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THE MINARETS

MOSQUE

The main prayer hall is in the middle of the mosque complex with ancillary spaces on either side, There is a smaller prayer hall across from the main hall for smaller congregations. The Imam’s residence is on the upper floor adjacent to the balcony of the main prayer hall. The Islamic college is to the left of the mosque and has classrooms as well as a large auditorium for sermons. On the right is a banquet hall to host weddings, conferences and other events. The variety of courtyards in the mosque, landscaped, natural and paved, can host a range of events as well as act as overflow prayer space.


View from the parking lot

View from the main approach road with the large minaret straight ahead and dome in the background

View from the front of the mosque showing the dome in the center and two smaller minarets symmetrically placed in the background, framing the prayer wall

Right: Plan of mosque district

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THE MINARETS

View from the under the sweeping canopy of the dome showing the trees emerging out from under it, and the large copper entrance way into the atrium

MOSQUE

Left: Procession showing views of the dome and minaret of the mosque, from the time a person steps out of their car till they approach the main entrance


Top Left: Longitudinal section showing the main prayer hall with the Event space to the right and Islamic college to the left Top Right: View of the shallow painted domes along the exterior colonnade

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THE MINARETS

MOSQUE

Bottom: Cross section showing the main prayer hall and the dome, as well as the tree-covered surface parking lot in front all the way till Southfield freeway


Top Left: Back elevation of the mosque showing the prayer wall and the two smaller minarets framing it, with the large minaret in the background Top Right: View of the atrium of the mosque showing the main lobby where people leave their coats and shoes, and the balcony which acts as overflow prayer space with ablutions below it. This is the only space from where there is an unobstructed view of the dome. The 99 names of Allah are inscribed in the wall surrounding the main prayer hall.

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THE MINARETS

MOSQUE

Bottom: Front elevation of the mosque showing the large minaret in front with the dome and two smaller minarets behind it. It also shows the materiality of the buildings, with the central building made of concrete clad with limestone, and the ancillary spaces on either side made of brick.


The south facing panels on the mosque’s dome are insulated glass and allow for the transmission of sunlight into the mosque during the day and the projection of light out into the night.

Circulation

Sacred Spaces The reason for the dome is three-fold visual impact from both Southfield and the surrounding area, a grand light-filled sacred space, and a sustainable method to insulate the large volume of the mosque underneath.

An ETFE fabric spans the vault-like columns. This semi-transparent patterned fabric filters the light coming in from the dome and scatters it throughout the main prayer hall. This fabric is also airtight, and creates a massive insulating volume of air above the prayer space. A forest of tree-like columns support the ETFE fabric as well as the space frame structure above.

The main prayer hall carpet is the same blue and white Smooth polished concrete in ancillary spaces

Top Left (from left to right): Diagrams showing Circulation and Sacred spaces

As part of the process of approaching the mosque, the texture of paths, courtyards, and interior spaces demarcate degrees of enclosure

MOSQUE

Left: Diagram showing Textures in the mosque district Right: Composition of the dome, and functions and materials of its various layers

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THE MINARETS

A signatory blue and white cobblestone path


SOUK & M EDI NA

This modern day souk aims to create the feel of a traditional middle eastern bazaar or market through a combination of indoor and outdoor pedestrian-oriented streets lined with stores of different sizes. The goal of the souk is to bring people from the surrounding neighborhood as well as the Muslim community to a one-of-a-kind shopping destination. After the initial analysis, it was understood that there was very limited commercial program surrounding the site. Part of the design plan was to incorporate a contemporized traditional Islamic souk that would be a regional and commercial destination. The souk is located at the north end of the site to maximize frontage on Joy Road and Southfield Freeway. Joy Road has some existing small retail and easy vehicular access making it an ideal location for the commercial development. The souk consists of retail spaces, an inn, housing, a halal market, four ethnic restaurants (with inner courtyards), and temporary sheltered retail spaces for farmers’ markets and food trucks. Circulation was the driving force behind the layout of the souk. The main pathway is a continuation of the central north-south pedestrian spine along the entire site, which bends at the main minaret to continue through the mosque and souk. To highlight the main pathway, parametric facades were placed on buildings that are located along this path. It branches out to smaller pathways.

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THE MINARETS

SOUK

The souk has been designed by compressing and opening pathways, through the use of courtyards, which is inspired from traditional souk designs. Three different courtyard conditions are present in the souk to cater to different moods, paved, natural and landscaped. Four different sized bays are proposed which get repeated through the souk, ranging from 40’x70’ (western standard retail size) to 20’x30’ (traditional souk dimensions). Different sized bays allows retailers to divide the spaces if necessary. The main building material of the souk is brick with some use of concrete and aluminum sheeting only for the parametric screens.


Full Plan of souk

Approximate length: 13 kilos Summary:

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout. Full Plan of souk

Integrated into Scheme: Full Plan of souk

Full Plan of souk

Learning from the traditional souk we utilized shops of similar sizes and rotated them throughout the whole site. Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size.

Isolated portion Souk Isolated portion of of Souk Isolated portion of Souk

Axonometric Axonometric

Isolated portion of Souk

Axonometric

Top Left: Plan of the Souk District Top Right: Precedent studies showing examples of a traditional and contemporary souk and a hybridization of the two into the Medina Gardens Souk

Axonometric

Bottom: Section through the souk showing various types of commercial spaces, residential spaces, courtyards, parking etc.

Al- MedinaIntegrated Souk Al- Medina Souk into Scheme: UNESCO World Heritage Site UNESCO World Heritage Site Learning from the traditional souk we Syria Al- Aleppo, Medina Souk Al- Aleppo, Medina Souk utilized shops of similar sizesSyria and rotated them throughout the whole site. UNESCO World Heritage Site UNESCO World Heritage Site Approximate length: 13 kilos Approximate length: 13 kilos Additionally after receiving feedback Aleppo, Syria Aleppo, Syria Summary: Summary: about integrating the souk into our This souk isthat indoors and This souk is indoors and 13akilos length: 13 kilos parking garageApproximate we decided Approximate length: integrates courtyards, This souk integrates courtyards, This souk traditional souq would work really well utilizes stalls of similar sizein and utilizes stalls of similar size and Summary: Summary: them throughout the layout. rotates them throughout the layout. this area due to itsrotates flexibility with size.

Aldar Central Market Al- Medina Souk Aldar Central Market Foster & Partners UNESCO World Heritage Site

Aldar Central Market Foster & Partners

Foster Partners Abu Dhabi, United Arab&Emirates Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Syria Al- Aleppo, Medina Souk AbuAldar Central Market Contemporary/Modern Design Contemporary/Modern Design

UNESCO World Heritage Site 13 kilos Approximate length:

Full Plan of souk

Foster1991469.82 & Partners Area: sq ft.

Abu Dhabi, United Aleppo, Syria 1991469.82 sqArab ft. Emirates Summary: Area: This souk is indoors and 13 kilos Approximate length:

Contemporary/Modern Design Summary:

this area dueafter to itsreceiving flexibilityfeedback with size. Additionally about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size.

Integrated into Scheme: integrates courtyards, This souk

utilizes stalls of similar size and Learning from the traditional souk we rotates them throughout the layout.

about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size.

Full Plan of souk

Isolated portion of Souk Isolated portion of Souk

Axonometric Axonometric

Isolated portion of Souk

Summary:

integrates courtyards, alleys,

balconies and colonnades. Each Summary:

Isolated portion of Souk

Additional weAldar integrated this area dueafter to itsreceiving flexibilityfeedback with Learning size. from centercourtyards, we decided Additionally covered walkways dappled light to utilize a similarwith strategy making about integrating the souk into our and alleyways. a similar size and organizing parking garage we decided thatbuildings a traditional souq would work really well inthem in a coherent manner. Additional we integrated courtyards, this area due to its flexibility with size. covered walkways with dappled light and alleyways.

Isolated portion of Souk

Integrated into Scheme:

Full Plan of souk

Learning from Aldar center we decided to utilize a similar strategy making buildings a similar size and organizing them in a coherent manner. Additional we integrated courtyards, covered walkways with dappled light and alleyways.

Isolated portion of Isolated Souk portion of SoukIsolated portion of Souk

Isolated portion of Souk Isolated portion of Souk

Isolated portion of Souk Isolated portion of Souk

Axonometric Axonometric Al-Medina Souk, Aleppo, Syria Axonometric Aldar Central Market, Abu Dhabi, UAE Foster and Partners Axonometric Axonometric Axonometric Isolated portionSouk of Souk Traditional Contemporary Souk This souk is indoor and Axonometric integrates the courtyards. It This souk is indoor and integrates utilizes stalls of similar sizes courtyards, alleys, balconies and and rotates them through the colonnades. Each space is around the layout. same size and clearly organized to allow easy movement of people. Integration into scheme: Learning from the traditional Integration into scheme: souk, shops of similar Learning from the modern sizes were utilized and contemporary souk, a similar strategy rotated throughout the site. was utilized making buildings of a Additionally, the souk was similar size and organizing them integrated with the parking in a coherent manner. Additionally, garage to begin the experience courtyards, covered walkways with of the souk as soon as one dappled light and alley ways were stepped out of the car. integrated.

Axonometric

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Summar to Summary: utilize a similar strategy ma Contemporary/Modern Design This s buildings a similar size andArea: orga is indoorssq and Area: This souk 1991469.82 ft.easter them in a coherent manne integrates courtyards, alleys, of tra Summar balconies and colonnades. Each plann Additional Summary:we integrated court space is around the same size This as covered with dapple This souk is indoors and andwalkways clearly organized allowing for easter enviro integrates alleys,of tra movement of people. and courtyards, alleyways.

space is around the same size This souk is indoors and for and clearly organized allowing integrates courtyards, alleys, movement of people. balconies and colonnades. Each balconies and colonnades. Each plann spaceinto is around the same size Integrated Scheme: spaceinto is around the same sizeof sa Integrated Scheme: Full Plan Full Plan and clearly organized allowing for of souk and clearly organized allowingenviro for Learning from we decided Full Plan of Aldar soukcenter Learning from Aldar center we decided movement of people. movement of people. to utilize a similar strategy making to utilize a similar strategy making buildings ainto similar size and organizing buildings ainto similar size and organizing Integrated Scheme: Scheme: Full Plan of s them in a coherent manner. Full Plan of souk Integrated them in a coherent manner. Additional weAldar integrated Learning from centercourtyards, we decided Full Plan of souk Additional weAldar integrated Learning from centercourtyards, we decided covered walkways dappled light to utilize a similarwith strategy making covered walkways dappled light to utilize a similarwith strategy making and alleyways. buildings a similar size and organizing and alleyways. buildings a similar size and organizing them in a coherent manner. them in a coherent manner. Additional we integrated courtyards, Additional we integrated courtyards, covered walkways with dappled light covered walkways with dappled light and alleyways. and alleyways.

This souk is indoors and

This souk is indoors and for organized allowing integrates courtyards, This soukand clearly Integrated into Scheme:

Isolated portion of Souk

Foster1991469.82 & Partners Area: sq ft. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Contemporary/Modern Design Summary: is indoorssq and Area: This souk 1991469.82 ft.

is indoorssq and Area: This souk 1991469.82 ft. integrates courtyards, This souk integrates courtyards, alleys,

utilizes stalls of similar size and Summary: balconies and colonnades. Each Summary: rotates them throughout the layout.

is around the same size This souk isspace indoors and integrates alleys, movement of people. courtyards,courtyards, alleys, utilizes stalls of similar size and utilizes stallsintegrates of similar size and Learning traditional the souklayout. we Learning traditional the souklayout. we balconies and colonnades. Each rotatesfrom themthe throughout rotatesfrom themthe throughout utilized shops of similar sizes and balconies and colonnades. Each utilized shops of similar sizes and utilized shops of similar sizes and spaceinto is around the same size Integrated Scheme: rotated them throughout the whole site. Full PlanIntegrated of souk rotated them throughout rotated them throughout the whole and clearly organized allowing for of souk into Scheme: Full site. Plan of souk into Scheme:the whole site.Full Plan Integrated Integrated into Scheme: Full Plan of souk space around same size Additionally after receiving feedback Learning the from Aldar center we decided Additionally after receiving feedback Additionally after receivingisfeedback movement of people. about integrating the souk into Learning from the traditional soukour we to utilize a similar strategy making about integrating the souk into about integrating the souk into our Learning from the traditional soukour we Learning from the traditional souk we and clearly organized allowing for parking garageofwe decided utilized shops similar sizesthat anda parking garageofwe decided buildings a similar size and parking garageofwe decided a utilized shops similar sizesthat anda utilized shops similar sizesthat and Integrated into Scheme: organizing traditional souq would work well in rotated them throughout thereally whole site. Full Plantraditional of souk souq would work well in them inpeople. a coherent manner. traditional souq would work well in rotated them throughout thereally whole site. movement of rotated them throughout thereally whole site. Full Plan of souk Full Plan of souk this area dueafter to itsreceiving flexibilityfeedback with size.Plan of souk Full Additionally This souk is indoors and

This souk is indoors and

integrates courtyards, This souk Integrated into Scheme:

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Aldar Central Market Contemporary/Modern Design

balconies and colonnades space is around the same Med and clearly organized allow Aldar Central Market movement of people Foster & Partners Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Med Integrated into Scheme: Aldar Central Market Contemporary/Modern Design Area: Foster & Partners Area: 1991469.82 sq ft.we d Learning from Aldar center

Isolated portion o

Isolated portion o

Axonometr

Medina Axonometric

Axonometric Garden Souk, Detroit, US The Minarets

Axonometric

Hybrid Souk

Axonometr

Isolated portion of Souk

Axonometric

This souk is a hybrid of eastern and wester shopping markets. Based off traditional Islamic commercial planning, this souk is inviting to all and provides a safe and inclusive environment for all who visit.

Axonometric

SOUK

Aleppo, Syria

rotates them throughout the layout.

26

THE MINARETS

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site


Souk District Potential Layout Designs

Layout 1: Small RetailScale: 40’x50’ nts

Layout2: Medium Retail 40’x80’

50’

Layout 1: Small Retail 40’x50’

Layout2: Medium Retail 40’x80’

50’

Souk District Potential Layout Designs

50’

Scale: nts

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Layout 1: Small Retail 40’x50’ Souk District Potential Layout Designs

Layout2: Medium Retail 40’x80’

Scale: nts

50’ Layout 1: Small Retail 40’x50’ Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’ Layout2: Medium Retail 40’x80’

50’

Layout 1: Small Retail 40’x50’

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor Space Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

50’

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendo

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor Space

50’

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor Space

Layout 2: Medium Retail 40’x80’ LayoutLayout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’ 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor4:Space Layout Traditional Souq Vendor Spac

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor Space

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’ Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor Space

Precedent Studies Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor Space

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site

Layout 3: Large Retail 70’x115’

Aleppo, Syria

Layout 4: Traditional Souq Vendor Space

Approximate length: 13 kilos Summary:

Layout 4: Traditional Souk Vendor Space

Precedent Studies

Precedent Studies

Aldar Central Market Foster & Partners

Precedent Studies Aleppo, Syria

Summary:

Approximate length: 13 kilos

Summary: This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout.

Precedent Studies

Integrated into Scheme:

Precedent Studies Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site

Summary: This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout.

Aldar Central Market Foster & Partners

Learning from the traditional souk we utilized shops of similar sizes and rotated them throughout the whole site. Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size.

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Full Plan of souk Contemporary/Modern Design Area:

Precedent Studies

Full Plan of souk

1991469.82 sq ft.

Summary: This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, alleys, balconies and colonnades. Each space is around the same size and clearly organized allowing for movement of people.

Axonometric

Learning from the traditional souk we utilized shops of similar sizes and rotated them throughout the whole site. Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size.

balconies and colonnades. Each integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and space is around the same size rotates them throughout theand layout. clearly organized allowing for

Isolated portion of Souk

Integrated into Scheme:

Full Plan of souk

Integrated into Scheme:

Full Plan of souk

Aleppo, Syria

Aldar Central Market Foster & Partners

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Contemporary/Modern Design

Approximate length: 13 kilos

Area:

Summary:

Isolated portion of Souk

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout.

Isolated portion of Souk

Integrated into Scheme: Learning from the traditional souk we utilized shops of similar sizes and rotated them throughout the whole site. Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size. Axonometric

Full Plan of souk

integrates courtyards, This souk Isolated portion of Souk Axonometricutilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout.

Isolated portion of Souk

176,937 sq ft.

Integrated into Scheme:

Summary: Learning from Aldar center we decided

to utilize a similar strategy making This souk is hybrid oforganizing western and buildings a similar size and eastern themshopping in a coherentmarkets. manner. Based off Additional we integrated courtyards, of traditional islamic commercial covered walkways with dappled light planning, Our souk is inviting to all and alleyways. Isolated portion of Souk

and provides an inclusive environment to all who come here.

Full Plan of souk

Axonometric

The Minarets

Axonometric

Area:

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site Full Plan of souk

Full Plan of souk Isolated portion of Souk

Isolated portion of Souk

Detroit MI, USA Hybrid Design

Market Foster & Partners

Contemporary/Modern Design Area:

1991469.82 sq ft.

Summary:

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, alleys, balconies and colonnades. Each space is around the same size Medina Gardens and clearly organized allowing for Souk Axonometric movement of people. The Minarets

eastern shopping markets. Based off of traditional islamic commercial planning, Our souk is inviting to all and provides an inclusive environment to all who come here.

Integrated into Scheme: Detroit MI, USA

Full Plan of sou

Hybrid Design

Full Plan of souk

Learning from Aldar center we decided Area: 176,937 sq ft. to utilize a similar strategy making

Isolated portion of Soukbuildings a similar size and organizing

Summary: them in a coherent manner. Additional we integrated courtyards, This souk is hybrid of western and covered walkwayseastern with dappled light shopping markets. Based off and alleyways. of traditional islamic commercial

planning, Our souk is inviting to all Isolated portion and provides an inclusive environment to all who come here.

Medina Gardens Souk The Minarets

of Souk

Detroit MI, USA Design FullHybrid Plan of souk Area:

176,937 sq ft.

Summary: This souk is hybrid of western and eastern shopping markets. Based off of traditional islamic commercial Axonometric planning, Our souk is inviting to all and provides an inclusive environment to all who come here.

Aldar Central Market Foster & Partners

Isolated portion of

Isolated portion of Souk

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Contemporary/Modern Design Area:

Axonometric utilized shops of similar sizes and

rotated them throughout the whole site. Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a Isolated portion of Souk traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size. Medina Gardens Souk

Learning from the traditional souk we utilized shops of similar sizes and rotated them throughout the whole site. Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in Full Plan of souk this area due to its flexibility with size. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Axonometric

1991469.82 sq ft.

Summary:

Learning from the traditional souk we

Full Plan of souk

Isolated portion of Souk

Learning from Aldar center we decided to utilize a similar strategy making Aleppo, Syria buildings a similar size and organizing them in a coherent manner. Additional we integrated courtyards,Approximate length: 13 kilos covered walkways with dappled light Axonometric

Area:

Integrated into Scheme:

1991469.82 sq ft.

Integrated into Scheme:

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, alleys, balconies and colonnades. Each

UNESCO World Heritage Site into Scheme: Integrated

Hybrid Design

Isolated portion of Souk Axonometric

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, alleys, balconies and colonnades. Each space is around the same size Axonometric and clearly organized allowing for movement of people.

1991469.82 sq ft.

Summary:

Isolated portion of Souk

Full Plan of souk

Summary:

Area:

rotated them throughout the whole site. we decided Full Plan of souk Learning from Aldar center we decided Additionally after receiving Learning feedback from Aldar center Area: making 176,937 sq ft. Axonometric Aleppo, Syria to utilize a similar strategy making toour utilize a similar strategy about integrating the souk into parking garage we decidedbuildings that a buildings a similar size and organizing a similar size and organizing Summary: traditional souq would work really well in in a coherent them in a coherent manner. them manner. 13 kilos Approximate length: this area due to its flexibility with size. Additional we integrated courtyards, Thiscourtyards, souk is hybrid of western and Additional we integrated covered walkways with dappled light eastern shopping markets. Based off covered walkways withofdappled light and alleyways. traditional islamic commercial Summary: and alleyways. planning, Our souk is inviting to all and provides an inclusive This souk is indoors and environment to all who come here.

Learning from Aldar center we decided to utilize a similar strategy making buildings a similar size and organizing them in a coherent manner. Additional we integrated courtyards, covered walkways with dappled light and alleyways.

Precedent Studies

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Contemporary/Modern Full Plan of souk Design

space is around the same size movementMedina of people.Gardens Souk organized allowing for Integrated into Scheme: Al- Medina Soukand clearly The Minarets movement of people. Learning from the traditional souk we Integrated into Scheme: Detroit MI, USA Isolated portion of Souk Full Plan of souk utilized shops of similar sizes and

Isolated portion of Souk

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage IsolatedSite portion of Souk

Foster & Partners

Learning from the traditional souk we 1991469.82 sq shops ft. of similar sizes and utilized Aleppo, Syria Area: rotated them throughout the whole site. Full Plan of souk Additionally after receiving feedback kilos Approximate length: 13Summary: about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a This souk is indoors and Summary: traditional souq would work really well in integrates courtyards, this areaalleys, due to its flexibility with size. This souk is indoors and

Integrated into Scheme:

Detroit MI, USA Learning from Aldar center we decided Hybrid Design to utilize a similar strategy making buildings size sq and Area: a similar 176,937 ft. organizing them in a coherent manner. Additional Summary:we integrated courtyards, covered walkways with dappled light This souk is hybrid of western and and alleyways.

Medina Gardens Souk The Minarets

Al- Medina Isolated Souk portion of Souk Integrated into Scheme: Contemporary/Modern Design UNESCO World Heritage Site

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout.

Approximate length: 13 kilos

Summary:

Precedent Studies

Summary:

Aleppo, Syria Full Plan of souk

Full Plan of souk

Approximate length: 13 kilos

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Aleppo, Syria

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site

Aldar Central Market

Integrated into Scheme:Learning from the traditional souk we Full Plan of souk Foster & Partners utilized shops of similar sizes and Learning from Aldar center we decided Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates rotated them throughout the whole site. to utilize a similar strategy making Contemporary/Modern Design Additionally buildings a similar size and organizing after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our them in a coherent manner. Area: 1991469.82 sq ft. Additional we integrated courtyards, parking garage we decided that a covered walkways withtraditional dappled light souq would work really well in Summary: and alleyways. this area due to its flexibility with size. This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, alleys, Detroit MI, USA Each balconies and colonnades. spaceHybrid is aroundDesign the same size Isolated portion of allowing Souk for and clearly organized Aldar Central Market movement of people.

Full Plan of souk

Aleppo, Syria

This souk is indoors and Aldar Central Market integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and Foster & Partners rotates them throughout the layout.

Approximate length: 13 kilos

Precedent Studies

This souk is indoors and

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk integrates courtyards, alleys, utilizes balconies and colonnades. Each stalls of similar size and rotates space is around the same sizethem throughout the layout. and clearly organized allowing for movement Integrated of people. into Scheme:

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site

Learning from the traditional souk we utilized shops of similar sizes and rotated them throughout the whole site. Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size.

Full Plan of souk

Medina Gardens Souk

Minarets Integrated The into Scheme: Full Plan of souk

Integrated into Scheme:

SOUK

rotated them throughout the wholeFoster site. & Partners Aleppo, Syria Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our Contemporary/Modern Design Approximate length: 13 kilos parking garage we decided that a Area: traditional souq would work really well in 1991469.82 sq ft. this area due to its flexibility with size. Summary: Summary:

Precedent Studies

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout.

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, alleys, balconies and colonnades. Each space is around the Isolated same sizeportion of Souk Full Planallowing of soukfor and clearly organized movement of people. Aldar Central

Al- Medina Souk Learning from the traditional souk we Central Market Aldar UNESCO World Heritage Site utilized shops of similar sizes and

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site Full Plan of souk

Summary:

1991469.82 sq ft.

Summary:

Integrated into Scheme:

Aleppo, Syria

Full Plan of souk

Area:

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout.

Bottom: Joy Road elevation

Aleppo, Syria Approximate length: 13 kilos

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Contemporary/Modern Design

Approximate length: 13 kilos

Precedent Studies

Learning from the traditional souk we utilized shops of similar sizes and rotated them throughout the whole site. Additionally after receiving feedback about integrating the souk into our parking garage we decided that a traditional souq would work really well in this area due to its flexibility with size.

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site

Al- Medina Souk UNESCO World Heritage Site

Top Right: Potential layout designs of commercial spaces within the souk

Integrated into Scheme:

Full Plan of souk

This souk is indoors and Isolated portion of Souk integrates courtyards, alleys, balconies and colonnades. Each space is around the same size and clearly organized allowing for movement of people.

Axonometric

Integrated into Scheme: Axonometric

Full Plan of souk

Learning from Aldar center we decided to utilize a similar strategy making buildings a similar size and organizing them in a coherent manner. Additional we integrated courtyards, covered walkways with dappled light and alleyways.

Axonometric

Axonometric

176,937 sq ft.

Summary: This souk is hybrid of western and eastern shopping markets. Based off of traditional islamic commercial planning, Our souk is inviting to all and provides an inclusive environment to all who come here.

Axonometric

Isolated portion of Souk

Axonometric

Aldar Central Market Foster & Partners

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Contemporary/Modern Design Axonometric Area: 1991469.82 sq ft.

Medina Gardens Souk The Minarets Detroit MI, USA Hybrid Design

Isolated portion of Souk

Area:

176,937 sq ft.

27 Isolated portion of Souk

THE MINARETS

Top Left: Right: Bird’s eye view of tented courtyard space within the souk and surrounding commercial spaces and terraces

This souk is indoors and integrates courtyards, This souk utilizes stalls of similar size and rotates them throughout the layout.


Top Left: Diagram showing circulation Top Right: Elevation along the service drive showing the inn and other commercial spaces

28

THE MINARETS

SOUK

Bottom: View of the temporary covered market space for farmers’ markets, food trucks, etc.


FA MILY R EC R E ATI ON CE NT E R A ND S O CCE R S TADIU M

Besides addressing the program needs, we strove to create a Recreation Campus at the south end of the site that acts as an iconic hub for Detroit and the surrounding region. Anchored by a soccer stadium and a family fun/wellness center, the Recreation Campus uses integrative site design by maintaining a central axis, allowing people to walk from the Souk and Mosque areas. The Family Recreation Center sits at the north end of the Recreation Campus. This family fun center includes a swimming pool, two basketball courts, workout room, juice bar, offices, yoga room and other fitness classes. All of these programs are bounded by a suspended track which connects the two buildings of the recreation center on the upper floor. The outside facilities include basketball courts, swimming pools, and a high school-sized soccer field that can be divided into various sizes.

The Soccer Stadium has a FIFA regulation-sized field surrounded by stands that can seat up to 2,700 people. Patrons enter on the mezzanine level and can walk up or down to find seating. The second level of the stadium can greatly increase the capacity of patrons by providing plenty of standing room. A light metal structure holds up a translucent polymer plastic roof with a beautiful geometric pattern layered on the underside, which allows indirect light to come through while still shading the spectators. A berm on the west side acts as a noise barrier between the campus and Southfield Freeway. People can exit the Recreation Center onto the top of the berm and continue along its entire length to the upper level of the stadium, further strengthening the campus atmosphere.

29

THE MINARETS

RECREATION & FAMILY FUN CENTER

Originally a single building, the Recreation Center is divided into two allowing the central axis to continue through the site. Each building has a diagonal cut on the end to allow the occupant’s eye to be drawn toward the minaret. The roof is shaped not only to focus the eyes through the two buildings and towards the minaret, but also to frame the mosque’s dome and the soccer stadium’s canopy overhang. The recreation center is sunk two feet below grade to allow a low profile keeping the roof from becoming too overwhelming, as well as to emphasize the central axis.


Left: Plan of Recreation District Top Right: Procession showing symmetrical views through the central axis of the site facing south toward the soccer stadium

30

THE MINARETS

RECREATION & FAMILY FUN CENTER

Bottom Right: Elevation of the Recreation Center building from the south, with the dome and minaret of the mosque in the background


Top Left: Diagram showing circulation in the Recreation district Top Middle: View of the elevated jogging track around the Recreation campus with the dome and minaret of the mosque seen in the background Top Right: Interior view of the Recreation Center showing the Olympic sized pool with a jogging track around it

31

THE MINARETS

RECREATION & FAMILY FUN CENTER

Bottom: Section through the Recreation Center showing the swimming pool, basketball courts and jogging track inside, with the roof structure of the soccer stadium seen in the background


Top Left: Elevation of the Recreation Center from the north, with the roof structure of the soccer stadium in the background Top Right: Interior view of the Recreation Center showing the Basketball courts with the jogging track around it on the upper level, and the outdoor soccer fields seen through the window

32

THE MINARETS

RECREATION & FAMILY FUN CENTER

Bottom: View along the central pedestrian axis of the site showing the two symmetrical blocks of the Recreation Center with the big minaret behind it at the north end of the axis. The recreation campus is sunk two feet below grade on either side of the pedestrian path to emphasize the importance of the axis and enhance the north-south connection.


Top Left: View of soccer stadium during a game, showing spectators cheering in the stands under the light fabric roof Top Right (Top): View of the main entrance of the soccer stadium showing the cable bridge Top Right (Bottom): Section through the soccer field along the North-South axis, showing the stands and the light roof structure in the background

33

THE MINARETS

RECREATION & FAMILY FUN CENTER

Bottom: Front elevation of the soccer stadium showing the cable bridge which marks its entrance, and the light steel structures supporting the roof on either side. The berm connecting the Recreation Center with the soccer stadium is seen at the far right. The main material used is brick.


chapter three the crescents


Joy Road

SITE PL AN

The Crescents took a user-based design approach in all regions of the site. They envisioned a place that would be enjoyed by students, religious scholars, children and young adults of every race and creed.

Doha Court

ra

Hi

a

al

b ar

le rc

Ci

Aleppo Lane

K

The northernmost section of the site includes the Souk and parking for retail and religious programs. Parking was an ever-present challenge throughout the studio but given the temporal nature of parking demand the team chose to share structured parking between the Souk and the Mosque programs. Joy Road is the primary retail thoroughfare on the site which helped the team position different types of retail in the Souk. Two plazas, one at the north and one at the south end of the souk, provide gathering spaces for events, outdoor dining opportunities for cafes, and informal socialization while shopping.

Longacre Ave

Southfield Freeway

ive

SITE PROPOSAL

Beirut Place

The south end of the site is occupied by the Recreation and Family Fun Center. The collegiate-size soccer stadium and its space frame covering are recognizable from above and are flanked by the smaller more casual sports fields and naturally vegetated park. The Recreation Center itself has numerous programs ranging from a spa to an indoor skate park that are arranged along the eastern edge of the site. It is the hope that this facility becomes the place to be for families and people of all ages! Tireman Ave

36

THE CRESCENTS

The Mosque is positioned toward the middle of the site to maximize the visibility of the structure from the freeway. The Mosque itself sits further back, closer to the residential side of the site to avoid the noise and other disruptive effects of the road while the primary minaret stands nearer to the street, erupting out of a dense grove of trees to signal the mosque’s presence for miles around. It was important to keep the Islamic College, Museum, Banquet Halls, and Imam’s Residence in close proximity to the Prayer Hall. These programs are located on either side of the mosque, the more private (Imam’s Residence, Islamic College and Museum) are on the east side facing the future residential areas while the more public (Banquet Halls and Event Spaces) are on the west side for easy access from the freeway.

Dr

While they have clearly acknowledged the current preference for a car-dominated transit system the team allocated space just south of the primary minaret for a large bus station on the Southfield service road. As it stands, only one bus route runs on the service road but it is the hope of the team that once this area is developed the existing public transit infrastructure will grow making it easier to arrive on site by bus from either Southfield or Joy Road.


Ishmael’s mom works at the Masjid so he spends a lot of his time in the childcare center there.

Amira’s family owns the Yemeni restaurant in the Medina. They immigrated to the United States when she was three years old.

Jasmina and Omar just got married at the Masjid and are having their reception at the Lebanese restaurant across from the Mosque.

Imam XX is from Iraq. He moved to the United States in 1992 and is the former Imam of the Islamic Center of Detroit.

Ibrahim plays soccer for a league in Detroit and spends most of his time practicing & working out at the Recreation Center.

Right: User biographies that inspired the design Left: Visitors to the site take advantage of the spiritual, physical and employment opportunities that exist on the site.

37

THE CRESCENTS

DIAGRAMS

Denise and Scott live in the Senior Housing complex. They enjoy living near the activity of the Medina.


DIAGRAM S

DIAGRAMS

Soccer Stadium: 273

Parallel Parking: 30 Overall: 1,808 spaces

38

THE CRESCENTS

Rec Center: 98 371 spaces

Housing: 80

Round-About spaces: 150

Recreation District

Inn Parking: 15

Museum Parking: 92 242 spaces

Parking Decks (3): 1120 Halal Market: 45

Mosque

1290 spaces

Number of Parking Spaces

Souk

Top Left: The site’s main axis sits on Southfield Freeway and its parallel service road. Much of the congregation is expected to arrive from the South, coming from Dearborn and take the service road to drop off in front of the mosque after which they can choose to park in the surface lots or enter the parking structure to the north.


INITIAL I DE AS AND S K E TCH E S Top Left: Simulating the heart of the campus at night informed solid-void decisions throughout the site Top Right: The group determined that 3D printing was the only option to achieve the desired complexity of form in the dome

INITIAL IDEAS AND SKETCHES

Bottom : Photographic studies explored how light would interact with the dome and the exterior environment

Top Left: Initial site configurations were explored using folded paper massing models set within an MDF site Top Right: The dome was a structural and aesthetic conundrum, here the team sketched out how the three distinct layers mesh

THE CRESCENTS

Bottom Left and Right: Modeling was used to test how the Mosque’s dome relates to the site context, specifically how and where it meets the wall below and the sky above

39


Bottom Left: An early plan with a small condensed Souk area and little internal variation

Top: Structural diagrams explore how each programmatic, structural, and aesthetic piece comes together

Bottom Right: Later renditions of the souk district became increasingly complex and varied in both the types of retail spaces and their experiential qualities

Middle: Midterm proposal drawings were designed in part to test the feasibility and appropriateness of such a large structure on the site. This exercise helped determine that something smaller would be a better option for both the client’s budget and the site.

40

THE CRESCENTS

INITIAL IDEAS AND SKETCHES

Bottom: The changes necessary to transform the stadium complex above into a Family Fun Center and Soccer Stadium below were drastic but the building’s design lineage can still be traced back to the client’s initial request for an indoor stadium


M OS QU E

In traditional Arab mosques there is little need to factor the automobile into the religious progression or individual’s approach. However in Detroit, a city built for vehicular transportation, the congregants arrival sequence begins long before entering the site. The following pages includes images that depict how the primary minaret, a beacon for those driving on Southfield Freeway, is seen and the significance of what it represents is understood even at a great distance. The Mosque’s Dome appears next, its bronze color peaking above the surrounding buildings. After exiting the highway the crescent shaped roundabout gives drivers access to a covered drop-off for passengers and several options for convenient surface lots nearby. From these lots pedestrians are gathered by a colonnade that provides a comfortable walking experience in all seasons while increasing the likelihood of chance encounters with friends and family along the way. Upon approaching the main entrance visitors are given a view into the Islamic Museum which is critical to the interfaith work and educational outreach done by members of the congregation. The removal of shoes and, in the winter months, coats occurs shortly after entering. This process is facilitated by the built in storage system integrated into the walls.

The Imam’s Residence and the Islamic College take up most of the south wing of the mosque while the Event Center and Banquet Hall occupy much of the north wing. 41

THE CRESCENTS

MOSQUE

Ablutions are located on either side of the main atrium after which individuals proceed through the glass wall into the strikingly domed Prayer Hall. On weekdays the demand for space in the Prayer Hall tends to be much lower than the 2000plus people expected on Fridays. To accommodate for a smaller group while still maintaining the grand experience of the hall and reducing winter heating costs, a glass, folding partition can be extended underneath the balcony.


Dome

Processional Collector

Processional Collector

Traditional Arcade Traditional Arcade

Traditional Minaret Traditional Minaret

Beacon Beacon

Beacon

Traditional Minaret

Beacon

Traditional Dome Traditional Dome

Symbolic Translation Symbolic Translation

Traditional Minaret

Traditional Dome

Symbolic Translation

ProcessionalCollector Collector Processional

Symbolic Translation

Beacon

Top: Building element translational diagrams Right: Mosque ground floor plan

Traditional Dome

Bottom: Mosque Symbolic Translation sectional-perspective

MOSQUE

Minaret

Traditional Arcade

43

THE CRESCENTS

Arcade


Prayer Hall

Bottom: Mosque front elevation with Islamic college and event spaces to the right and left respectively

Top: Procession diagram indicating how people enter the mosque from the main entrance or the parking structure and proceed through ablutions and into the prayer hall

MOSQUE

Top: Mosque program diagram

44

THE CRESCENTS

Daycare Center


Driving South on Southfield Freeway

Top: Exterior render approaching the mosque from the service road Bottom: Light streams in from the clerestory windows that line the Prayer Hall. This image is taken from underneath the overflow balcony on the mezzanine level.

Entry into roundabout

45

THE CRESCENTS

MOSQUE

Driving North on Southfield Freeway


SOUK & M EDI NA

Whether you are here for an afternoon of shopping, brunch after prayer, or a stroll through our interior souk, getting lost in a multilevel shopping experience then finding that perfect store is an experience that will make regulars out of first time shoppers. This culturally sensitive retail environment has something for everyone! After studying souks in Aleppo, Syria and Istanbul, Turkey alongside more modern American retail typologies, the souk team worked to hybridize the experiential qualities of both precedents in an effort to create a distinct regional shopping destination. While the mosque is the spiritual heart of the project, the souk is the economic center that financially supports further development and caters to a wide range of people from all walks of life. It is our hope that this space becomes a destination for Muslims and non-Muslims alike. The souk is situated on the north end of the site along Joy Road, a major arterial road in the city. Most of the existing retail in this area is built up along this street. This location is also easily accessible from the Southfield Highway and Service Road making it an ideal spot for retail of all kinds. The proposed commercial spaces include several large ethnic restaurants, a halal market, a cinema, and a bookstorecafe.

We have included a hospice and senior living facilities on the south end of the Souk near the Mosque so there is easy access to pray while still connected with the larger community. An Inn was also requested for guests who visit from out of town which is able to serve as both short and long stay accommodations.

47

THE CRESCENTS

SOUK

The Eid Plaza directly across the street from the mosque is large enough to accommodate large groups for the bi-yearly celebration. The plaza includes a small stage for community events as well as a central crescent sundial. Set within the permeable pavers that make up the hard surface of the plaza are lights that, when sunset arrives, light up like a field of stars. On the east end of the plaza another set of lights on slightly raised pedestals track the phases of the moon and are illuminated in sync with the lunar calendar.


Farmers Market Stalls

Slow Slow Traffic Traffic

Souk

Souk

Second Level Promenade

Second Level Promenade

Farmers Market Stalls

Top Left: Ground floor plan showing the parking structure layout and diversity of retail spaces available in the Souk Top Right: A diagrammatic section through the primary north-south street between the Souk and the parking structure. The parking structure is more than a place to park your car. On market or food truck days the structure is filled with shoppers.

SOUK

Bottom: Eid Plaza elevation of the largest restaurant space with a bookstore on the second level

48

THE CRESCENTS

Food Court FoodTruck Truck Court


Connection Streets

IDEAL

Souk Boundary

APPLIED

Major Streets Connection Streets

P Souk Boundary Major Streets Connection Streets

Top Left: Precedent Souks in Aleppo and Istanbul respectively

SOUK

Top Right: Souk proposal diagram showing how we translated older examples for a new context

49

THE CRESCENTS

Bottom: Section through the Hospice Care facility, Eid Plaza, Restaurant, and Bookstore looking toward the mosque.


FA MILY R EC R E ATI ON CE NT E R A ND S O CCE R S TADIU M

The initial requests for athletics-related programs included an indoor FIFA regulation-sized soccer field, and a recreation center oriented around ‘family fun’. Rather than accrue the expenditures of building, operating, and maintaining separate facilities for these activities, and physically separating soccer from other athletics, the team of designers working on this area opted to combine their efforts to rethink the community recreation center as a typology. The final program layout of the building resulted in a organic procession, with a central circulation corridor that angles its way through the different spaces. This approach was influenced formally by the non-uniform inward tilt of the adjacent soccer concourse against the gymnasiums, and reinforced conceptually throughout the rest of the building based on asymmetrical souk corridors seen in historic Arab urban design precedents. The building is organized programmatically based on group & team athletics (swimming, basketball), and age appropriate family activity spaces, allowing everyone from adults to small children several unique places accessible to them.

Enclosing the soccer stadium was deemed impractical and the facility was ultimately moved outdoors. Located adjacent to Southfield Freeway, the field hugs the west side of the recreation building and includes phase one seating for 1500 people beneath a space frame canopy that utilizes integrated photovoltaics to power concessions and lighting around the field. Water collected from the canopy irrigates the grass and supplements the needs of landscaping elsewhere on the site. The field itself is slightly below grade, which in concert with a double row of appropriate trees adjacent to the field is part of a strategy to keep errant balls from entering the freeway and to reduce automobile noise in this part of the site.

50

THE CRESCENTS

RECREATION & FAMILY FUN CENTER

The center is complete with indoor basketball courts, exercise equipment, a running/ walking track, spa, rock climbing wall, and skate park. The indoor track is enclosed in glass and runs around the second story. Functioning as a clerestory surrounding the pool and basketball gymnasiums, it fills these spaces with an abundance of natural light. Likewise it also gives runners spectacular views of the internal athletics spaces and out to the mosque, stadium and park as well.


Basketball Court Entry

Left: The site to the south of the Recreation Center consists of surface parking, outdoor basketball courts and the Medina Park. The park is a constructed wetland with integrated walking paths and seating areas. With careful plant selection, we hope to attract a host of wildlife that will have a positive impact on the area’s biodiversity and visitors’ wellbeing.

Right: Views of facilities within the Recreation Center

Indoor Basketball Courts

52

THE CRESCENTS

RECREATION & FAMILY FUN CENTER

Natatorium


Tensile Canopy with Solar Membrane

Structural Space Frame

Steel Support Trusses Concrete Columns

Top: East-West section of the Recreation Center

Phase 1 Seating for 1500

Left: Program Diagram

Bottom: East elevation of the Recreation Center

54

THE CRESCENTS

RECREATION & FAMILY FUN CENTER

Right: Stadium seating and photovoltaic canopy diagram


chapter four data


Square Footages (sq. ft.)

DATA

Main Prayer Hall

21,870

26,700

24,285

Atrium

6,100

11,000

8,550

Ablutions

2,790

4,000

3,395

Event Space

9,000

21,000

15,000

12,500

17,400

14,950

Museum

3,000

5,200

4,100

Small Prayer

1,620

6,000

3,810

Office Space

2,840

1,220

2,030

Imam's Residence

2,840

1,200

2,020

3,000

3000

32,350

11,250

21,800

62,560

96,720

79,640

Halal Market

12,565

6,450

9,508

Bakery & Deli

6,130

4,500

5,315

89,100

86,200

87,650

6,350

50,875

28,613

11,860

31,730

21,795

18,600

18,600

22,440

14,590

18,515

Information Center

3,155

2,725

2,940

Hookah Bar

3,450

3,000

3,225

Restaurants

23,750

26,850

25,300

Traditional Souk

7,125

32,200

19,663

Tented Courtyard

11,085

Natural Courtyard

6,580

Islamic College

The table on the right is a comparative study of the proposals by the two teams and gives a quick overview of the areas of the spaces and number of parking spaces available on site. The individual spaces vary in size, but the overall numbers are comparable.

Daycare Courtyards Mosque Total

Souk District

Commercial Space Housing Senior Housing Hospice Bookstore

Eid Courtyard Inn

8,000

Movie Theatre Farmer's Market Souk Total

2,000 203,590

Recreation Recreation Facility District Soccer Field

59,800

Crescents Average

826

250

538

395

1,165

780

11,085 16,500

11,540

18,700

18,700

24,500

16,250

35,000

35,000

5,300

3,650

372,420 288,005

62500

61,150

157,838

86,400 122,119

Rec Total

217,638

148900 183,269

300

380

340

Total

483,788

618,040 550,914

1521

1,795

1658 57

PARKING, PEOPLE & SPACE

Mosque District

Crescents Average Minarets

DATA

Minarets

Parking


chapter five conclusion


CONC LU SI ON

It is often the case that architectural studios deal strictly with the theoretical. Working with an actual client, let alone a prominent religious leader, in an academic setting has been a rare opportunity and a privilege. Four months were spent immersed in studies of the cultural and spiritual traditions that for many of us were previously unknown. Developing cultural competencies in a studio composed of students from different backgrounds has been a tremendous learning experience. Designing a sacred space demands one be intimately familiar with the spiritual traditions and rituals of the religion. Designing a mosque was not just an architectural challenge, it encouraged students to engage with previously unexplored issues of spirituality and culture. Translating these ethereal qualities into physical spaces required a rigorous understanding of customs and the desire for equality and inclusion that are inherent in Islam. The Grand Mosque and Medina offers a unique Middle Easterninspired experience which will attract people from all over the country. The iconic centerpiece of the project is the Mosque, that will likely be the largest in North America. Its contemporary dome in conjunction with the distinctive minaret signals the presence of a sacred space. The Medina, comprised of a large Souk and a Recreation Complex, is a regional destination for Muslims and non-Muslims alike.

59

CONCLUSION

FINAL THOUGHTS

The two proposals outlined in this book are visions of what this site could become. We hope that our work provides a foundation for the community to move forward. This site represents an opportunity to reach out to people of all walks of life, promoting greater understanding and cross-cultural experiences while providing a fantastic place in which to pray.

A Grand Mosque and Medina for Metro Detroit  

A proposed master plan for a new campus for the Islamic Center of America in Detroit, Michigan. All work produced by first-year Master of Ar...

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