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The History of The Grange The Grange is one of the great classic houses of England and one of the earliest – and finest – examples of the Greek Revival period which swept Europe in the early 19th century. It was designed by William Wilkins, architect of the National Gallery, who set it in one of the most idyllic and unspoilt rural landscapes anywhere in Britain. There was a fine 17th century five-storey house already on the site, and Wilkins constructed his temple as an overcoat around it. All of this original five-storey red

brick building, by William Samwell, still survives inside the temple. Wilkins’ client was the banker Henry Drummond, who grew tired of the project before it was complete and sold it to his neighbour Alexander Baring, later the first Lord Ashburton. Ashburton decided to extend the already massive structure and in 1817 commissioned Robert Smirke, who went on to design the British Museum, to add a single storey wing. By the time he died in 1848, Ashburton had

1263 ALICE DE FRANKLYN leases 36 acres to Hyde Abbey on which to build a grange, or granary

THE OWNERS 1662 THE HENLEY FAMILY

1539 The estate passed to the Crown at the Dissolution

1641 SIR BENJAMIN TICHBOURNE

THE ARCHITECTS

THEIR BUILDINGS

c. 1670

1764

WILLIAM SAMWELL Builds a five–floor brick country house, possibly on an unused site

ROBERT ADAM Designs a kitchen block and a naturalistic landscape with a lake, a bridge and a folly

WILLIAM SAMWELL

ROBERT ADAM

Eaton Hall, Cheshire 1674 parts of Ham House, Richmond 1672–77

Kenwood House, London 1767–69 Apsley House, London 1771–78

1700

1600

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Grange Park Opera 2002 Programme  
Grange Park Opera 2002 Programme  

Grange Park Opera 2002 Programme