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Sword & Trowel November 2015

155th Most Illustrious Companion Brett A. Mac Donald, KYGCH Grand Master Cryptic Masons

Table of Contents Sword & Trowel

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October was busy Itinerary Festivals Friends for a Lifetime Freemasonry & Civil War Being the Leader That People Follow Pictures & More Pictures Cryptic Masons Medical Research Foundation Scholarships Humor Cryptic History Contact Information Illustrious Grand Master Cryptic Masons Grand Recorder Editor Website Officers, Grand Council Cryptic Masons Commandery Orders 100 Year Anniversary Souvenir Ad Program Reservation Form

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October was busy Companions, October was a busy month with several Receptions and the Colorado River Fall Festival. At the end of the month several of us attended the Southwest Regional Conference in Las Vegas. We had an excellent presentation on the Cryptic Masons Medical Research Foundation. I was a bit embarrassed when the report of 2014 donations was announced. California had the lowest per-capita donation of $1.80 per member. Two of the jurisdictions had given over $15.00 per member and the other two were about $5.00 per member. At the conference they offer a class for emerging leaders. It is a three year course and Illustrious Companion Paul Erickson, Illustrious Master of San Luis Obispo Council No. 38 was one of two recognized for completing the course. Paul also continues to be a dedicated supporter of CMMRF. He has been making beautiful pen and pencil sets with everything in excess of materials going to CMMRF. If you would like a set drop him an email at: bluelodge1@comcast.net. This month your line officers will meet at the Masonic Home in Covina for our annual strategic planning session. These meetings are helping develop programs to guide our Grand Council into the future. Sincerely and Fraternally, Brett MacDonald Illustrious Grand Master

Itinerary This year I will be emailing out a calendar monthly and if able to attend please make your reservations, in a timely manner. If you have any questions please feel free to call me (626) 991-6688.

GRAND COUNCIL CALENDAR 2015-2016 Thursday – November 12 – Sebastopol – 373 N. Main Street 3 Way York Rite Reception Dress – Purple coat, apron & jewel Ladies – Mid-calf length dress 6:00 pm Social Hour 7:00 pm Dinner Program following Reservations: Bob Mengelberg bobwrm@aol.com Cost: $15.00 Friday-Sunday November 13, 14 & 15 – Grand Council Retreat 1650 E Old Badillo, Covina Department Grand Officer Planning Seminar Sunday – November 15, 2015 – 3 Way York Rite Reception – Santa Monica Dress – Purple coat, apron & jewel Ladies – Mid-calf length dress Friday November 27, 2015 - Sacramento Nor-Cal DeMolay – Masonic Family Dinner Dress – Formal Saturday - February 20, 2016 3 Way York Rite Reception Long Beach March 11, 2016 Grand Officer Conference, Bakersfield Department G.O. only Saturday, March 19-22, 2016 – Formal Opening of Rainbow for Girls Grand Assembly Dress – I.G.M. Tux w/purple accents jewel & apron Lady – formal dress Officers – Suit, jewel & apron Ladies Mid-calf length dress 6:30 pm Social Hour Sword & Trowel

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7:00 pm Formal Opening Reservations: Saturday – March 26 - Stockton 3 Way Reception Contact: David Studley Sunday – May 22-25, 2016 – Doubletree Bakersfield Grand Sessions 5-22-16 Sunday Grand Banquet 5-23-16 Monday Grand Family Banquet 5-24-16 Tuesday Grand Council

Festivals Companions, This month I had the pleasure to attend two York Rite Festivals and two Ish Sodi Awards Ceremonies. You might wonder what these two events have in common, besides being York Rite functions. One reason is they show the dedication of the members of our gentle craft. The festival shows how much time it takes to put together a degree that will affect the future members of the York Rite and remembering the time involved to make these degrees as perfect and meaningful as possible. The Colorado River Fall Festival in Laughlin, Nev. shows dedication in the fact that Companions and Sir Knights from four states traveled to impart our Rite to candidates that will affect them for a lifetime. The Ish Sodi Award shows the dedication of the selfless career of one of our Companions that is an example to our members, young and old and the community of Masons and to our community at large. The two Companions that received the Ish Sodi (Ted Lyau and Hank Clayton) have been the reason that many, many Companions have become dedicated leaders in our craft from their example and working with them over the years. The Companions at the Festivals influence the candidates to be involved in degrees as well as joining in the Rite in general. They also inspire the Companions on the sidelines to go back to their York Rite and improve their degree work. We have a wonderful organization and with the dedication of our members, in all aspects of craft, will affect the growth of the York Rite in the future. Fraternally, Bill Price, Deputy Grand Master

Friends for a Lifetime Friends for a Lifetime: The Masonry I expected By: Robert A.L. Whitfield, KYGCH PIGM “They walk through the doors of a Lodge for the first time expecting to find something more meaningful in their life. It is up to each Mason to extend that hand of friendship and Brotherly love, never forgetting that we were once that man, knocking on that door ourselves.” When I first filled out my application to become a Mason, it was with the expectation that I would find a place where I could develop some great friendships, different from the acquaintances that I knew at work. Like you I had the casual friends that I worked with and those that lived around me. Those people I also considered friends, but there was always a slight veil of distance separating the definition of a “true friend”, someone who I could always count on in times of need. It was a nervous time, even if I kept a bright and confident exterior. I embarked on the ceremonies with great apprehension, not really knowing what would happen next. I then trusted these men to a future that I really needed in my life. Sword & Trowel

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Over the years, I was very fortunate as I met great mentors early on. A mentor is a word I use as an adult substitute for the more accurate term of ‘teacher’. These men taught me to be a leader of others in hundreds of lessons, each building upon each other. What they were really doing was molding me to be their next generation. Some of these lessons were simple and direct such as reminders to always sit properly in lodge as an officer. Others were much more uncompromising. I was expected to learn ritual to the best of my ability and not just that day’s best effort. Showing up as an officer unprepared was not optional. I learned there was a standard of excellence that I was to uphold. These men were not going to lower the ‘Standard of Excellence’ under their tutelage. The most important things that I received during this learning environment was their trust, close friendship, and welcome warmth. This was extended to both my family and myself on a consistent basis. They imparted at each meeting not only lodge lessons, but also life lessons. I came to know these men, their families and ancestral history, as well as their stories about the history of the area that I had come to call home. I learned the importance to physically visit Brothers and their families in need. I learned to be there for their families in their time of loss. This invisible cable tow became the tie that bound me to my Brothers so closely. It went much deeper that just what happens in a business meeting. I am very fond of defining Leaders into two camps. The first is the man that seeks a position and then uses that position to exert authority without care of consequence. This may work, but only lasts until he is replaced. The second is much more valuable and creates a legacy. It is the leader that comes to a position of authority and takes everything he has known to enrich the lives of those around him. He is there to serve, as well as lead. The communication is constant and a sense of teamwork is instilled. The search for solutions to issues is always evident and ownership is shared in each process. A delegation of work always recognizes another’s individual ability. This is then the basis of teamwork and accolades are shared in public. This I learned from my mentors. This, I hope to teach you with this short message. I came to Masonry to be part of something great. In the dining room, the newest man in the room is always my greatest priority of friendship. I was once that person. Making him feel welcome is an obligation within my heart When he knows that I care, only then do I have unspoken permission to ask him to be a part of something larger. Only then do I have his willingness to follow me where I might lead him. Don’t be the Mason that shows up only once a month, sharing a meal once a month, expecting to lead others when you only take time to speak with them once a month, and then wonder why no one is coming to the meeting any longer. It isn’t someone else’s fault. Friends for Life – well that title is earned, and it certainly isn’t earned just within the confines of the Lodge Room.

Freemasonry & Civil War

The American Civil War started in 1861 and it ended in 1865. The Confederacy of the southern states prepared itself for war starting on February 4, 1861. It consisted of eleven states who aimed to secede from the Union and establish itself as a separate and independent country. Sword & Trowel

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The war’s first battle was on April 1, 1861 at Fort Sumter in South Carolina. It was not until January 31, 1865, that the United States Congress abolished slavery by passing the 13th amendment to the United States Constitution. On May 10, 1865 President Andrew Johnson officially ended the American Civil War after the surrender was declared at Appomattox, Virginia. Thousands of lives were lost and many had been badly wounded and would suffer until their eventful death relieved their pains. Estimates are that at least 110,070 were killed in battles or later died from the wounds inflicted in battles, and another 199,790 or so from diseases that were attributed in some way due to that war. However, these reported testaments of compassionate acts by the Freemasons show a less harsh side of those four years of strife and the unusual ways of war; often fathers and sons fighting on opposite sides as were blood and fraternal brothers and friends was far too common. This allowed the “Light of Masonry” to shine brightly even during those troubling times. During that Civil War, approximately 410,000 soldiers were interned in prison camps and it has been estimated that about 56,000 of them were Freemasons. There are recorded stories that indicate how these Masons were true to their Masonic obligations and to our Masonic teachings, even while performing their duties as military fighting men. When they were confronted with a wounded and distressed brother, they did all they could to provide comfort and compassionate assistance. Here are just a few examples of those reports that demonstrate the kindness and concerns shown for their Masonic Brethren, in some cases for others without regard for which side they were fighting. The Masonic sign of distress was witnessed and responded to quite frequently during those troubling times. Lt. Col. Homer Sprague, an 13th Connecticut Volunteer was taken prisoner. During a long march to the prison, Sprague became so exhausted that he collapsed into a ditch. A Confederate Officer allowed him to ride in the ambulance for the remainder of the journey. With some difficulty, he was able to climb into the vehicle. He there learned that the driver was also a Brother Mason. This Brother said to Sprague; “As a Mason I will feed you to the very last crumbs of my food, but as a soldier I will fight you till the last drop of my blood.” Sprague replied; “I hardly know which to admire most, your generosity as a Mason or your spunk as a soldier.” Being known as “The White Apron Men” as the Freemasons were often referred to in those days, were known to remain true to their Promises, they were allowed the liberty of roaming about the camp based solely on their word to not attempt escape. On one occasion a Mason was approached by a non-Mason who stated that he and his friend were very hungry, not having eaten in three days. Without comment, he walked on, but in the afternoon he again spotted the man, and without saying a word to him, dropped a package at his feet. When the man opened it, he saw food and drink, plentiful enough for both he and his friend to nourish them. After the war, one of those men wrote, I was not a Mason during the war, but what I observed of the compassionate ways of the Masons, I was induced to join this beneficent order, and I was made a Mason in 1866. I vowed to pattern my conduct by what I had there observed, especially of how they truly cared for each other. Those Masons were treated with respect, and they were trusted based on their integrity of character. He went on to say that it was just as well that he had not been a Mason at that time. Not being bound to such a promise, he was able to escape and made his way to safety.

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There are other interesting accounts of Masonic compassion being demonstrated during that War. One story was of an Alabama Artillery group, who were resting from a hard fought battle during the day prior that had lasted into to the late night hours, several being killed or wounded. After traveling to a field on the edge of a thicket of trees, they having assumed it to be a fairly safe place to rest and refresh themselves for the next battle. The surviving men were exhausted and some fell into a deep sleep, while others engaged themselves in conversations, some inspecting their weapons and ammunition supplies, while yet others were attending the wounded. A Corporal lay back against the trunk of an old pine tree, watching a flock of birds overhead while contemplating his thoughts of how he would prefer death, rather than being incarcerated in a Yankee prison camp, and at the same time admiring the Navy Colt pistol he had taken from the dead body of a Union Captain during the last battle. He caught a glimpse of a reflection among the trees that he believed might a weapon. Now being of the highest rank, since the Commissioned Officer had been killed in the last battle, he called out to the men, “To your guns boys, get ready.” He silently prayed; Thou Oh God, know our down sittings and our uprisings, and understand our thoughts from afar off, shield and defend us from the evil intent of our enemies. He grimaced in pain as he arose from the scaly bark of that old pine tree. He had been wounded twice in previous battles, the first time by a painful flesh wound to a leg, and the other by a piece of shrapnel from an exploded shell that hit him in the chest, knocking from his feet. When he finally looked at the wound he saw a jagged gash extending from the nipple to the collar bone. He refused a hospital stay, choosing to remain with his comrades and within his duties as a soldier. The Corporal again patted the Colt pistol in his waist band with assurance that he would do better with it, rather than with a heavy rifle. As he arose he looked with pride at the Masonic ring his father, now his Masonic Brother, had presented to him when he was made a Master Mason. He again called out to the troops, “Prepare for battle.” He was suddenly confronted by a Yankee Lieutenant who from the tree line had noted what he perceived to be, a much weakened condition of the Corporal, and was apparently intent on capturing him alive if possible. They were now bound together in a death grip, both men showing unbelievable strength. There’s probably no greater human horror than to be locked together with a person whom you know will kill you, if you don’t kill him first. “To kill or be killed” was a simple and familiar saying; but to actually be in that situation gave it much more meaning. He was struggling to get to the Colt pistol, but being so tightly bound body to body, it was impossible. He somehow garnered a moment of extra strength, and as he pushed on the Lieutenant’s chest, he caught sight of a Masonic emblem, and without hesitation he muttered sounds into the ear of what he now believed to be a brother Mason. On the Lieutenant’s hearing the sounds, the death grip quickly became a brotherly embrace, both men now with tears in their eyes, for what could have resulted had not the discovery been made. Another interesting story was of two opposing Generals, John Gordon of the Confederate Army and Francis Barlow of the Union Army. During a raging battle, General Gordon was crossing the bloodied field of battle, where he came upon General Barlow who had just received what was assumed to be a mortal wound. Even though the fierce battle was continuing all around them, Gordon took the time to show compassion for a fallen brother. He gave Barlow a drink of water and inquired as to what he might do for him. Barlow asked him to write a letter to his wife, which he dictated the words of his supposed, impending death. Upon receipt of the letter his Lady traveled to retrieve his remains, but by then he had received medical care and was recovering to fight again. Several years later these two men met in Washington, D.C., both having assumed that the other had died during the war. They enjoyed Masonic fellowship, sharing brotherly love and affection while remembering their many experiences. Their close friendship and brotherly love continued until their death. The practice of brotherly love, friendship and morality were also demonstrated in lesser famous military actions. In 1863, gun boats including the Albatross, were shelling a small Military port near Mandeville, Louisiana. The Captain of the Albatross was J. E. Hart who had been made a Mason in a Lodge in New York. This Brother had been suffering with pain, fever and delirium for several days, and during that ongoing battle, to ease his misery, he shot himself in the head, taking his own life.

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A friend and Masonic Brother assumed command, and with much grief for the loss, he under a flag of truce, went onto land among those troops they had just been shelling, to inquire of any Masons among the troops and in the town. He asked them to assist him in the performing of Masonic Last Rites for a fallen brother. And whether it would have been considered proper or not, they gave him a most impressive Masonic Funeral. His remains were ceremoniously interned to their long home. The Masons of the area placed a marker at the head of the grave, with the Masonic Square and Compasses most prominent, in honor of this departed Brother. There are many reasons why Freemasonry, more than any other fraternal organizations, has survived and thrived throughout the ages. Our tenants and devotions to them have made this possible. Our rules and customs have encourages us to show kindness and compassion for others, without expectations of anything in return. The mental structure of which our Ancient and Honorable Craft is constructed, transcends all that would most likely cause a division among non-Masons. We must live by our Masonic teachings and our values while looking to the inner goodness of a man, rather than that of the outer appearances, or any other distinctions. We must show love and compassion, assist the needy, lift up the downtrodden and spread Masonic love toward all of God’s people, without regards for one’s religious faith, political leanings or any other personal differences that are of no business of our Fraternity, then we will have become the Masons we so desire to be. These acts of brotherly love and compassion as mentioned herein, are just a few examples of how we Freemasons have demonstrated our devotions to the teachings of our Symbolic Craft, in wars as well as in times of peace. May we, by use of the symbolism of the Masonic trowel, continue the spreading of that cement which units us into one common band of brothers and fellows, and may it someday become common among all good people throughout the world. Let the love and caring we share as Masonic Brothers never cease; and may it always be most predominate. May every moral and social virtue continue to bind us as a Masonic Fraternity of friends and brothers, with a spirit of charity imbedded in our hearts, much so as it was so well demonstrated by our Masonic Brothers, during that Civil War. S.M.I.B. Fred J. ‘Tiny’ Potter, MIPGM

Being the Leader That People Follow By: Robert A.L. Whitfield, KYGCH, MIPGM I have often said that that there are two types of leaders: the first is the person that seeks a position and then uses it to exert power and influence. The second is the person that finds himself in a position of influence, and then uses that position to help others while always setting a high standard of character at the same time. Many of us have spent a long time learning our Craft. For most of us, it has been a bumpy road of success and error. We have seen the highs and the lows both personally and while watching from the sidelines. The question is what will we do with all that is learned and achieved. One thing I have learned is the consistency of my role models. They seem to be of the same mindset and character. Many are not who you may initially think of. Some of them have attained less than I have. Despite this, they are the ones that I quietly admire and also influence me the most. They have come into my life from different directions, yet they are the same type of men. Keeping an open mind, I believe that it is never too late to find a place in our character to emulate and hopefully duplicate their oft-elusive character trait. The most successful leader is one who opens your mind because of their selflessness. They take what they have learned and, without personal concern, choose to share what may be helpful to a given situation. They do NOT guard their position and knowledge as some personal territory. They always seem to have time to for you. They are patient and listen when you need help, never just taking a position of authority. They counsel from a seemingly humble position, leaving a final decision in your hands to make. We admire them because they are teachers in their own quiet way. They are friends from that first handshake. Our inner guard lets Sword & Trowel

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down our personal wariness. We know that we are in the hands in a true and trusty friend upon whose fidelity we can, with the utmost confidence, rely. Leadership requires that we strive to maintain a standard of excellence in whatever we undertake. The leader that people choose to follow is a beacon. He has been down the rough path of learning. He understands that he is serving best by always taking the time to listen first, before giving counsel that may be of benefit to those less informed and in need of help.

Pictures & More Pictures

Ted Lyau’s Ish Sodi Award from California Council No. 2

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The Ish Sodi Award was presented on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 by King Solomon’s Council No. 29 located in Vallejo to Henry C. (Hank) Clayton. Attending the presentation was four Past Grand Illustrious Masters, a Deputy Grand Master, Grand Standard Barrier and many more. Great Dinner catered by Lady Judy Williamson.

Cryptic Masons Medical Research Foundation Our Charity (Cryptic Masons Medical Research Foundation) can really use your support with Dollars. Please send all donations to me, so that I may process the proper receipts and mail all donations to Cryptic Masons Medical Research Foundation in Nashville, Indiana. Please take a few minutes and think about our charity.

Fred J. ‘Tiny’ Potter, MIPGM Chairman, CMMRF (California) 345 Otono Court Camarillo, CA 93012-6822

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Scholarships Companions, your children, grandchildren, & for some, great-grandchildren may receive financial help for attending school. After opening up Scholarship Center website, have them go to bottom of page & find the Scholarship Manual in (PDF format – 450KB) to download. There they will find instructions for filling out the forms. This is the link which will take you to the public Grand Lodge web page on scholarships. All the information you need should be right there. This is a complete manual that you can download that talk about all of the scholarships available from the California Masonic Foundation as well as the Scottish Rite, York Rite, Eastern Star, High Twelve, DeMolay, Job’s Daughters, & Rainbow for Girls.

Humor Last edition an article about Marine Humor was in the publication but this time let’s do mostly Army but include Navy, Air Force and Marine’s. US Army telephone answering machine. We're sorry, but all of our units are out at the moment, or otherwise engaged. Please leave a message with your country, name of organization, region, specific crisis and a number where you can be reached. As soon as we have sorted out the Balkans, Iraq, Korea, China, marching up and down the streets of Washington, D.C. and attending the compulsory Consideration of Others Training, we will return your call. Please speak after the tone, or if you require more options, please choose from the following options: If your crisis is small and is located near the sea, press 1 for the United States Marine Corps. If your concern is distant, with temperate climate and good hotels, and can be solved by one or two low-risk high-altitude bombing runs, press 2 for the United States Air Force. Please note that this service is not available after 1630 hours, or on weekends. Special consideration will be given to customers requiring satellite or stealth technology who can provide additional research and development funding. If your inquiry concerns a situation which can be resolved by a bit of grey funnel, bunting, flags and a really good marching band, please press 3 for the United States Navy. Please note that Tomahawk missile service is extremely limited and will be provided on a first-come, first-serve basis. If you are in really hot trouble, please press 4 and your call will be answered by the United States Army Special Operations Command. Please note that a mandatory credit check will be done to ensure you can afford the inherent TDY costs. Also, be aware that USASOC may bill your account at any time and is not required to tell you why, as it is classified If you are interested in joining the U S Army, and you wish to be shouted at, paid little, have premature arthritis, put your family in a condemned hut miles from civilization, and are prepared to work your ass off, risking your life in all weather and terrains, both day and night, whilst watching Congress erode your original benefits package, then please stay on the line. Your call will be answered shortly by the next available bitter passed-over for promotion Army Recruiter located in a strip mall down by the post office. Have a pleasant day, and thank you again for trying to contact the United States Army!

Cryptic History Reference: Text Book of Cryptic Masonry (A Manual of Instructions in the Degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, & SuperExcellent Master) together with the ceremonies of Installing the Officers, Constituting & Dedicating a Council, & Installing Officers of a Grand Council By Jackson H. Chase, 33rd, Grand Lecturer Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the State of New York

The thought is to give a little history behind the degrees. The Prayer at Opening a Council in the year 1870 is the same as is today – no changes. In the year of 1870 a Psalm is read after the Opening Prayer: “His foundation is in the holy mountains. The Lord loveth the gates of Zion more than all the dwellings of Jacob. Glorious things are spoken of thee, O city of God. Selah. I will make mention of Rahab and Babylon Sword & Trowel

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to them that know me. Behold, Philistia, and Tyre, with Ethiopia: this man was born there. And of Zion it shall be said, This and that man was born in her: and the Highest himself shall establish her. The Lord shall count, when he writeth up the people, that this man was born there. Selah. As well the singers, as the players on instruments, shall be there, call my springs are in thee.� Reference: Psalms 87, verse 1 through 7.

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Contact Information Illustrious Grand Master Cryptic Masons: Most Illustrious Companion, Brett MacDonald, KYGCH Grand Master Cryptic Masons of California (626) 991-6688 © Grand Recorder: Ken Hope 11428 E. Artesia Blvd, #13 Artesia, CA 90701-3872 (562) 924-6500 (W) (562) 484-1611(C) Editor: Richard E. Thornton (209) 747-9518 (C) Website: Grand York Rite of California Note: Hyperlinks or links to other pages or web sites are prevalent throughout the document. Please notice the reference “Sword and Trowel; if you run your mouse over these names you will see “Ctrl + Click to follow link”. These are valid links to York Rite information.

Have you gone to our Grand Council website lately? www.yorkriteofcalifornia.org/ Do you know that there you can find rosters of officers, forms that you need, and a complete copy of the Officers Guide. The Officers guide helps you plan and know what is expected you.

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Officers, Grand Council Cryptic Masons We, Grand Council of Cryptic Masons Grand Officers, are here to assist you, we are here to help. 155th MOST ILLUSTRIOUS GRAND MASTER Brett A. MacDonald, KYGCH & Donna Shekinah Council No. 35 C.M. DEPUTY GRAND MASTER William E. Price & Janet California Council No. 2 C.M. GRAND TREASURER Robert A. L. Whitfield, MIPGM & Genie Oakland Council No. 12 C.M. GRAND DIRECTOR OF RITUAL David L. Chesebro, MIPGM & Sarah San Luis Obispo Council No. 38 C.M. GRAND CHAPLAIN (South) Mark A. Quinto & Trudy San Diego Council No. 23 C.M. GRAND CONDUCTOR OF THE COUNCIL Eduardo Estrada & Natasha Omega Council No. 11 C.M. GRAND SENTINEL Peter G. Champion & Jan San Luis Obispo Council No. 38 C.M.

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GRAND PRINCIPAL CONDUCTOR OF THE WORK Lee P. Whelan & Teresa Riverside Council No. 59 C.M. GRAND RECORDER Kenneth G. Hope, HMIPGM & Sonny Shekinah Council No. 35 C.M. GRAND CHAPLAIN (North) Richard E. Thornton & Cara Stockton Council No. 10 C.M. GRAND CAPTAIN OF THE GUARD William S. Dann & Anne Pacific Council No. 37 C.M. GRAND STEWARD Robert A. Morrison & Pauline Shasta Council No. 6 C.M. GRAND ORATOR James M. Sunseri Orange County Council No. 14 C.M.

GRAND MARSHAL (North) Clive Moss & Betsy Modesto Council No. 61 C.M.

GRAND MARSHAL (South) Paul A. Clark & Cindy Pomona Council No. 21 C.M.

GRAND SOLOIST K. Mark Harris Oakland Council No. 12 C.M.

GRAND MUSICIAN Roderick E. Betham Marysville Council No. 3 C.M.

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Sword and Trowel - November 2015  

A publication by the Grand Council Cryptic Masons of California