Page 1

780-827-3362 780-827-3610 780-827-2446

Have Community Focus delivered to your inbox!

780-827-2296 780-827-3300

From Your Mayor As the end of another year approaches, we reflect on the many accomplishments and initiatives of 2008, acknowledging with appreciation the contributions of our staff, volunteers and citizens.

e this Please recycl publication

: What’s Insidee

g in Grande Cach Pg.2 - Recyclin Notes Pg.3 - Tourism ograms Pg.4 - FCSS Pr unities to Livable Comm Pg.5 - 10 Keys iness Seminars Pg.6 - Small Bus Loans e Beautification re -F st re te In Pg.7 rams & Events Pg.8 - Rec. Prog ce Lift orks has New Fa Pg.11 - Public W Classes Pg.12 - Fitness e lture & Heritag Pg.13 - Rec. Cu ism e to New Urban Pg. 14 - Welcom e Uses About Mixing th l al ’s It 5 .1 Pg

To those of you who have served on and contributed to the work of the Town, through membership on boards and committees, or who have taken advantage of public meetings to provide input, we sincerely thank you. Our community becomes stronger as citizens become engaged and involved, and decision-making more accurately reflects the needs and wishes of residents. 2009 will be another exciting year for Grande Cache, as we look forward to our 40th anniversary celebrations and all the planning that will entail. We will want to look our best as we welcome back former residents and friends, and will rely on support and involvement from all sectors of the community. Working together, we will accomplish wonderful things. On behalf of Council and staff, I extend very best wishes to all for a joyous holiday season and success and happiness in the New Year.

Monthly Tax Installments The Town of Grande Cache is once again offering monthly tax  installments for 2009.  Two (2) options are available:   Postdated Cheques    or    Preauthorized Debit  Please call the Town Office PRIOR to January 1, 2009 should  you wish to participate in the monthly tax program. If you are  already participating in the monthly tax program and wish   to withdraw or change your payment option   please advise the Town Office PRIOR to January   1, 2009, or your payments will continue under  the same option as 2008.   


n i g n i l c y c Re e h c a C e d n a Gr If everyone on the earth lived like the average Canadian, we would need at least four planets to sustain  our lifestyles and provide all the materials and energy we currently use.   

We create a lot of waste – over 1,000 kilograms per person each year. Did you know the majority of stuff  we throw out isn't "waste" at all, it can be reused or recycled! 

Why Recycle?0 years

out 40 Plastics take ab a landfill. to break down in ion years for a It takes one mill break down in a glass bottle to landfill. s 500 Aluminum take down years to break in a landfill.

Recycling Center:   (located at the Ball Diamonds)   

Recycling Locations:  

Grande Cache Bottle Depot  10017‐98 Street   

Business Hours:  Tuesday ‐ Thursday: 1:00 ‐ 6:00 pm  Saturday: 9:00 am ‐ 3:00 pm    Prices:  1 Liter & Under ‐ $0.10  ‐ Glass Bottles  ‐ Plastic Bottles  ‐ Pouches  ‐  Aluminum Cans   ‐ Poly Coat Container 

‐ Cardboard   ‐ Plastic Containers    ‐ Clear Glass    ‐ Tin Cans  Anything Over 1 Liter – $0.25  ‐ Paper (all types)  ‐ Phone Books   ‐ Glass Bottles  ‐ Plastic Bottles  ‐ Pouches  ‐ Christmas Wrapping  ‐ Plastic Bags      ‐  Aluminum Cans   ‐ Poly Coat Container       Refuse Recycling:  Beer Cans & Bottles ‐ $0.10  (located at the Ball Diamonds)   

‐ Grass Clippings   ‐ Leaves  ‐ Garden refuse    ‐ Christmas Trees    

Landfill:  

‐ Computers    ‐ Electronics     ‐ Batteries  ‐ Cars  ‐ Trucks  ‐ Tires        ‐ Alkeline Paint  ‐ Aerosol Cans      Town Office:    

‐ Printer Cartridges    

Public Work Building:   

‐  Used Oil  ‐ Used Oil Filters 

Did you know?

?About 40, 000 tre

es are cut dow each day just n to produce th e newsprint for Canada's d aily papers.

?Recycling 1 Alumin

um Can saves enough electricity to power a TV or a 100 watt light bulb for 3 hours!


Tourism Notes…. . Travel Alberta Accreditation

Upcoming Events

This fall,  the  Tourism  &  Interpretive  Centre  obtained  official  status  of  an Accredited  Travel  Alberta  VIC  (Visitor  Information  Centre).    This  was  a  result  of  meeting  specific  standards  within  the  facility,  including information available and trained staff.  We  will  receive  new  highway  signage  at  no  cost,  as  well   gain status in all Travel Alberta VIC publications.   

In the near future we will host monthly film nights of  travel/educational content.  Starting January 31st at 7  p.m.  the  Historical  Society  will  host  “A  History  of  Grande Cache” based on their book of the same title.   Presented  by  Richard  Wuorinen,  this  will  be  an  informative  evening  in  which  we  can  all  learn  more  about our shared story and ask questions.       Also  watch  for  postings  between  January  and  May,  when we will host promotional shows and events that  will focus on our area’s wildlife and landscape.   

Interpretive Programs

Although our  tourism  activity  has  slowed,  the  winter  season  is  the  time  when  the  interpretive  side  of  our  wonderful Centre starts to play a more active role.  

All these events are free and open to the public, so we  urge  all  Grande  Cachites,  old  and  new,  to  take  We  started  the  season  with  a  Halloween  event  on  advantage  of  what  we  have  to  offer.    Many  visitors  October 29th.  Twenty‐five listeners were enthralled to  have remarked on our unique Centre, of which we can  hear  Robert  Guest’s  ghostly  tales  and  experiences.   all be justifiably proud.  Come help us celebrate!    Mr.  Guest  is  an  intriguing  storyteller  who  leaves  one    guessing  as  to  what  is  fact  versus  fiction.    He  ended  the  evening  with  his  story  featured  in  “Legends  of  Big Horn Gallery Gift Shop  Grande  Cache  &  the  Yellowhead”  (one  of  the  books  Our  gift  shop,  which  carries  various  unique  items  focusing  on  wildlife,  has  already  seen  Christmas  we carry for the Historical Society) .   shoppers  dropping  in,  looking  for  “something    different.”    Come  and  check  out  our  cute  baby  Historical Society clothes, fun T‐shirts and boxers, as well as our books  The  Historical  Society  had  their  annual  potluck  and animal tracks.  We also have new   evening on November 22nd.  After a delicious supper,  Grande Cache branded Roots clothing!  two excellent film shows were enjoyed in our Theatre  on  2006  expeditions  to  Mt  Kvass  and  Mt  De  Veber.   Grande  Cache  is  fortunate  to  have  such  talented  contributing  members  to  the  Historical  Society.   Thanks to Richard Wuorinen, Jo   Sharlow, Jack Deenik, and Lee   Abraham for providing   such great informative   entertainment, as well as   kudos to all the members   who provided such wonderful   food!     

3


Parent Place and Roots  of Empathy Program: 

Grande Cache  Parent  Place,  funded through a partnership with  Children & Youth Services Region 8  and  F.C.S.S.,  has  been  open  since  November  and  already  we  have  surpassed  our  projected  participant  numbers.    Our  Parenting  Classes  are  divided  into  three age groups, 1‐4, 5‐12 and 13‐ 17  years  of  age.    Each  of  these  courses  teaches  parents  helpful  s t r a t e g i e s   o n   e f f e c t i v e  communication,  stages  of  child  d e v e l o p m e n t ,   r e d i r e c t i n g  misbehavior,  and  sidestepping  power  struggles  between  parent  and  child.  These  courses  encourage the development of self ‐esteem  and  character  building  in  our children as well as providing a  strong  knowledge  base  for  parenting.    Classes  can  take  place  one  on  one  or  in  a  group  setting.   Also,  check  out  our  Parenting  Resource  Library.    Anti‐bullying  supports are also available through  Parent Place.   

A first  for  Grande  Cache!    The  Roots of Empathy program is being  facilitated  by  Diana  Blaszczyk  to  grade  one  students  at  Sheldon  Coates  Elementary  School.    A  big  thank  you  goes  to  Principal  Margaret  Price  and  grade  one  teacher  Ms.  Brein  for  supporting  this  program.      The  Roots  of  Empathy  program  teaches  students  about  their  own  feelings  and  the  feelings  of  others.    This  is  accomplished by a mother and her  baby  coming  into  the  classroom  over an 8 month period where the  students  have  the  opportunity  to  i d e n t i f y   t h e                                     baby’s  feelings.                                     This  in  turn                                    helps  them  to                                   describe  their                                   own  feelings  as                                              w e l l   a s                                 understanding the                                        feelings  of                                                others.  In                                                 2009,  the 

4

program will  be  offered  at  Summitview School.   

For more information on Parenting  Supports,  Bullying  or  the  Roots  of  Empathy  program,  please  contact  Diana  Blaszczyk,  Parent  Support  Worker.  Call  827‐2828  or  diana.blaszczyk@grandecache.ca   

Family Relief Respite  Program: 

The Family  Relief  Respite  Program  has  been  available  to  the  community  and  surrounding  Aboriginal  Co‐operatives  and  Enterprises since 2000.   

Funded through  Children  &  Youth  Services,  Region  8  and  managed  through  F.C.S.S.,  The  Family  Relief  Respite program has assisted many  families  in  its  8  year  history  by  providing  child  care  for  registered  parents experiencing stress in their  lives.   

What would  you  do  if  you  had  some  free  time  in  your  day?    Visit  friends,  go  shopping,  attend  appointments,  or  just  relax,  the  Family  Relief  Respite  program  gives  you  the  opportunity  to  take  time for yourself. 

please drop by our office to pick up  your  Newcomers  Package  filled  with  community  programs  and  services  information,  telephone  book, and other great stuff!   

For more  information  on  the  How  to  Make  Your  Budget  Work  program  or  Newcomers  Packages,  please  contact  Joan  Evans,  C o m m u n i t y   C o o r d i n a t o r .   Call  780‐827‐2296  or  e‐mail  joan.evans@grandecache.ca   

Grief and Loss Support: 

Since its  beginning  in  2004,  our  Grief  and  Loss  Support  program  has  helped  over  240  clients.    The  Grief  &  Loss  program  provides  support  for  those  who  are  experiencing a loss of a loved one,  relationship, life style, etc.   

Please contact Kelly Smith, F.C.S.S.  Director if you would like a referral  t o   t h i s   f r e e   p r o g r a m .    Call  780‐827‐2296  or  e‐mail  kelly.smith@grandecache.ca    

Girls Night Out Program: 

Girls Night  Out  for  ages  10  to  14  years  is  a  hit!    Facilitator  Denise  Caines  and  the  participants  have  developed  a  schedule  of  events    If  you  would  like  to  find  out  more  such  as  popcorn  and  movie  night,  about this program, please contact  games  night,  dance  party,  Donna  Kennedy,  Family  Relief  Christmas  baking  and  a  Christmas  Worker.  Call  780‐827‐2828    or    movie,  and  spa  night  to  name  a  few.    This  is  a  free  program,  Donna.kennedy@grandecache.ca   however for special events a small    fee  may  be  required.    There  are  Budgeting Supports and  only  a  few  spots  available,  so  if  your  daughter  would  like  to  Newcomer Packages:  The  How  to  Make  Your  Budget  participate  in  this  program,  please  Work  program  is  up  and  running.   contact  Denise  Caines  to  register.   One on one and group sessions are  Call  780‐827‐2296    or  e‐mail:   available  to  teach  participants  of  denise.caines@grandecache.ca .  all  ages  how  to  manage  a    household budget and how to save  Where To Find Us...  for  the  future.    If  you  are  having  F.C.S.S.  is  located  in  the  Provincial  difficulties  making  ends  meet  or  Building  beside  Home  Hardware  would  like  to  learn  about  complete  with  a  new  sign  budgeting, this program can help.  indicating  the  home  of  Parent    Since  January  2008,  117  Place and Family Relief.      newcomers have moved to Grande  Cache!    If  you  are  a  newcomer, 


Walkable communities are destinations.  These livable  towns and cities are talked about, celebrated and loved  for  their  uniqueness  and  ability  to  champion  the  natural  environment  and  human  spirit.    There  are  a  number  of  key  measures  that  can  be  taken  to  create  places  like  these.    Our  community  has  a  crystal  clear  vision  for  the  future,  and  we  are  in  the  process  of  achieving each of the following measures:    1. Compact, Lively Town Center Buildings  frame  streets;  block  lengths  are  short.    Merchants  take  pride  in  their  shops’    appearances.    A  variety  of  stores  offer  local  products  and  services.    Significant  housing  is  found  downtown  or  in  our  downtown  core  area.    There  is  unique  and  distinct  personality  or  character  to  the place.    2. Many Linkages to Neighbourhoods (including walkways, trails and roadways)

People have choices of many routes from  their  homes  to  the  center;  the  most  direct  are  walking  routes.    All  sidewalks  are  at  least  five  feet  wide  and  most  buffered  from  streets  by  planting  strips,  bike  lanes  or  on‐street  parking.    Well‐ maintained  sidewalks  are  found  on  both  sides  of  most  streets.    Bike  lanes  are  found on most streets.     

3. Low-speed Streets Most motorists  behave  well  on  narrow  neighbourhood  and  town  center  streets  and  near  public  areas  by  yielding  to  pedestrians.    Motorists  make  turns  at  low  speed.    On‐street  parking  slows  traffic  and  protects  pedestrians  on  sidewalks.     

4. Neighbourhood Schools and Parks Most children are able to walk or bicycle to school and  nearby  parks.    There  is  limited  or  no  busing  of  school  children.    Most  residents  live  within  a  half‐mile  (preferably  400  meters)  of  small  parks  or  other  well‐ maintained and attractive public spaces.     

5. Public Places for All Services and facilities are provided for children, teens,  people  with  disabilities  and  senior  citizens.    Public  restrooms,  drinking  fountains  and  sitting  places  are  plentiful. 

6. Convenient, Safe and Easy Street Crossings Downtowns and  neighbourhood  centers  have  frequent, convenient, well‐designed street crossings.    7. Good Landscaping Practices The community has many parks and “green” streets  with trees and landscaping.  Heritage trees line many  streets.    Trails,  bridges  and  promenades  provide  access to the natural areas in town.  Landscaping is  respectful  of  place,  often  featuring  native  species,  drought  resistant  plants,  colorful  materials,  stone  treatments  or  other  local  specialties.    In  desert  and  high  country  areas,  many  methods  are  used  to  minimize use of water and other precious resources.    8. Coordinated Land Use and Transportation People understand and support compact  development,  urban  infill,  integral  placement  of  mixed‐use  buildings,  and  mixed‐income  neighbourhoods.    The  built  environment  is  of  human  scale.   Heritage buildings are respected.  People  support  their  small,  local  stores.    People  seek ways to include affordable homes in  most neighbourhoods.  Residents have a  choice  of  travel  modes  to  most  destinations.     

9. Celebrated Public Space and Public Life Whether it  is  a  plaza,  park,  street  or  square,  well‐ loved  public  spaces  are  c o n v e n i e n t ,  secure  and  c o m f o r t a b l e .   These  places  are  tidy,  often  surrounded  by  r e s i d e n c e s  where  people  keep  an  eye  out  for  appropriate  behaviour.    There  are  many  places  to  sit,  few  or  no  large  blank  walls,  and  few  or  no  open  parking  lots.    Any  parking  lots  have great edges and greens.    10. Many People Walking Many diverse people are walking in   most areas of town.  There are no   rules against loitering.  Lingering in   public places is encouraged and   celebrated.  Children rarely need   to ask parents for transportation. 

5


The Town Works with Community Futures West Yellowhead on Economic Development Projects Small Business Seminars and Brown Bag Video Conference Presentations Effective in  the  new  year,  the  Town  of  Grande  Cache  will  be  able  to  offer  Small  Business  Seminars  and  Brown  Bag  Video  Conference  Presentations.  Video conferencing equipment is  being  installed  at  the  Tourism  &  Interpretive  Centre in support with Community Futures West  Yellowhead.    If  you’re  starting  or  expanding  a  business  and  looking for direction, you can’t afford to miss the  great training sessions designed to save you time  and  money  offered  by  Community  Futures.   Seminars are three hours and cost $35, and you  will  walk  away  with  practical  information  and  ideas to help you in your business planning.  Past  seminars  included  Marketing  Awareness,  Do‐it‐ Yourself  Incorporation,  and  Preparing  your  Business Plan. 

6

The Brown  Bag  Presentations  are  FREE  presentations  that  offer  quick‐to‐learn,  quick‐ to‐use  business  basics  over  the  noon  hour.   Bring  your  own  lunch  and  learn  from  professional  and  experienced  presenters  in  a  casual  classroom  environment.    Past  presentations included Web Design that Works,  E‐Business  Considerations,  Promotional  Strategies, and Exporting Procedures.    Watch  for  new  Seminars  and  Brown  Bag  Presentations  starting  in  February  2009.    For  more information on these Video Conferencing  Presentations,  contact  Tara  Wignes,  Manager  of  Economic  Development  &  Tourism  at  827.3362 ext. 27. 


Interest-Free Loans Available to Help Beautify your Business! In partnership  with  Community  Futures  West  Yellowhead,  interest‐free  loans  are  available  to  all  local  businesses  (retail,  commercial,  or  industry)  for  the  purpose  of  renovating  store  frontages.    In  compliance  with  the  themes  established  as  a  part  of  the  Town’s  overall  Community  Beautification  and  Revitalization  Strategy,  the  intention  is  to  develop  an  attractive  community with a unique and natural mountain identity. 

Design Assistance Available!

The Town of Grande Cache would like to encourage local  businesses to participate in our Beautification process by  revitalizing  your  storefronts.    By  working  with  natural  materials,  local  businesses  can  upgrade  their  facades  to  compliment our overall beautification goals.   

“As part of an overall Vision for our future, the Town of  Grande Cache recognizes the importance of a vibrant  and appealing business community – both in terms of  meeting residents’ needs as well as promoting and  enhancing tourism.”  Mayor Louise Krewusik   

Community Futures West Yellowhead has worked with  the  Town  of  Grande  Cache  to  develop  a  Community  Beautification  Loan  for  local  businesses  to  access  in  order  to  help  with  beautifying  your  store  frontage  to  complement  our  Beautification  and  Revitalization  Strategy.    This  may  include  repairs,  painting,  or  entire  new facades.   

The loan  administered  through  Community  Futures  is  over three‐years, and if approved, is interest‐free to the  business.    If  the  renovation  plans  meet  the  Town’s  beautification standards as set out in our Beautification  and  Revitalization  Strategy,  and  is  approved  by  Council,  the  Town  of  Grande  Cache  will  incur  all  interest  costs  over the three years of the loan.   

Assistance with design ideas for your property is available  through the Town and EDS Group, the firm we have been  working with to accomplish our beautification goals.  More information on this loan is available by calling Tara  Wignes,  Manager  of  Economic  Development  &  Tourism  at  780.827.3362  ext.  27  or  Jason  Paterson,  Executive  Director  of  Community  Futures  West  Yellowhead  at  1.800.263.1716. 

7


January Monthly Draw: 1-Hour Ice Rental

Sun.

Mon.  

Tues.

Wed.

 

4

 

 

5

6   Introduction to   Grappling   (Ages 9‐12) 4–6 pm 

 

Thurs.  

7   WII Sports Drop‐In (All  Ages) 4‐5 pm 

 

8   Introduction to   Grappling   (Ages 9‐12) 4–6 pm 

 

Drop‐In Basketball   (High School) 7‐8 pm 

Drop‐In Volleyball   (High School) 6:30‐8 pm 

  11 

 

12

13   Introduction to   Grappling   (Ages 9‐12) 4–6 pm 

14   WII Sports Drop‐In (All  Ages) 4‐5 pm 

Drop‐In Volleyball   (High School) 6:30‐8 pm    

 

19

 

20

 

Dance Party Drop‐In –  learn new dance moves  (ages 10‐13) 4‐5 pm 

Scrapbooking Fun (Ages  10‐13) 5:30‐6:30 pm  $22.50 

  25 

 

26

27

 

Dance Party Drop‐In –  learn new dance moves  (ages 10‐13) 4‐5 pm 

 

 

8

Drop‐In Basketball  

9 Good Eats & Great Treats  – learn about nutritious  eating & healthy choices  (Ages 8‐10) 2:30‐3:30 pm  $15 

10   Youth Dance   (ages 13‐17)  8–11 pm 

Grotto Climbing Wall Drop ‐In (All Ages)   4‐5:30pm 

 

Geocaching (all ages)   1‐4 pm $5 

Movie: Nick & Norah’s  Infinite Playlist (PG)8pm  16  Good Eats & Great Treats  (Ages 8‐10) 2:30‐3:30 pm  $15 

 

17

Grotto Climbing Wall Drop ‐In (All Ages) 4‐5:30pm 

Movie: City of Ember (PG)   8 pm 

23 Good Eats & Great Treats  (Ages 8‐10) 2:30‐3:30 pm  $15 

24    Family Skate at Power  Pond  7‐10 pm 

Grotto Climbing Wall Drop ‐In (All Ages)   4‐5:30pm 

Movie: Beverly Hills   Chihuahua (G) 8 pm 

28   WII Sports Drop‐In (All  Ages) 4‐5 pm 

(High School) 7‐8 pm 

Game Night 7 pm 

Drop‐In Basketball   (High School) 7‐8 pm 

Scrapbooking Fun (Ages  10‐13) 5:30‐6:30 pm  $22.50 

3

Movie: Journey to the  Centre of the Earth (PG) 8  pm 

Midnight Teen Swim   11pm –12 am 

 

Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm 

22   Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages) 3:30‐ 5pm 

Drop‐In Volleyball   (High School) 6:30‐8 pm 

21   WII Sports Drop‐In (All  Ages) 4‐5 pm   

 

Drop‐In Volleyball   (High School) 6:30‐8 pm 

 

Drop‐In Basketball   (High School) 7‐8 pm 

Sat. 2

Scrapbooking Fun (Ages  10‐13) 5:30‐6:30 pm  $22.50 

18

Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm 

15   Introduction to   Grappling   (Ages 9‐12) 4–6 pm 

 

 

Fri. 1

 

29     Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm    

30 Good Eats & Great Treats  (Ages 8‐10) 2:30‐3:30 pm  $15 

Grotto Climbing Wall Drop ‐In (All Ages) 4‐5:30pm 

Movie: High School   Musical 3 (G) 8 pm 

Multiplex schedule Open House will  d b January.   near the end of  e   Come to  view  drawings  a proposed nd a model of th e on the im  facility, informatio   p n  o r t a nc e recreatio n, the bu  of  dget,   and the p methodo roposed  lo pay for it gy to   . 

 

31


February Monthly Draw: All Day Family Pass at Galaxyland at West Edmonton Mall

Sun. 1

Mon.

Tues. 2   

Wed. 4

Dance Party Drop‐In –  learn new dance  moves (ages 10‐13)   4‐5 pm     

WII Sports Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4‐5 pm 

Drop‐In Volleyball 

 

9      

10    Dance Party Drop‐In –  learn new dance  moves (ages 10‐13)   4‐5 pm 

Drop‐In Volleyball 

(High School) 6:30‐8pm 

WII Sports Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4‐5 pm 

16     Family Day –  Free Swimming  & Skating 1‐4pm    

 

12      Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm    

WII Sports Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4‐5 pm 

Drop‐In Basketball 

(High School) 7‐8 pm 

Drop‐In Volleyball  (High School) 6:30‐8pm    

Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   4‐5:30pm 

7        Game Night 7 pm 

13 Good Eats & Great  Treats (Ages 8‐10) 2:30‐ 3:30 pm $15 

14    Youth Dance (ages  13‐17) 8 – 11 pm 

Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   4‐5:30pm 

Geocaching   (all ages) 1‐4 pm $5 

Drop‐In Basketball  (High School) 7‐8 pm 

  18 

 

Good Eats & Great  Treats (Ages 8‐10) 2:30‐ 3:30 pm $15 

Movie: Casino Royale  (14A) 8 pm 

17   Game Day Drop‐In   (All Ages)   4:30‐5:30 pm 

Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm    

Sat. 6

Scrapbooking Fun  (Ages 10‐13) 5:30‐6:30  pm $22.50 

Fri. 5   

Drop‐In Basketball  (High School) 7‐8 pm 

  11 

 

15

Scrapbooking Fun  (Ages 10‐13)   5:30‐6:30 pm $22.50 

(High School) 6:30‐8pm 

8

Thurs.

3

 

Movie: Madagascar:  Escape 2 Africa (G) 8pm  19      Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm    

 

20 Candle Making   Workshop (all ages)  1:30‐3:30 pm   $5 + supplies 

21

Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   4‐5:30pm 

Movie: Quantum of  Solace (14A) 8 pm 

22

23   

24   Game Day Drop‐In   (All Ages)   4:30‐5:30 pm 

 

Drop‐In Volleyball  (High School) 6:30‐8pm    

 

25   WII Sports Drop‐In  (All Ages) 4‐5 pm 

Drop‐In Basketball 

(High School) 7‐8 pm 

 

26     Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm    

Midnight Teen Swim  11pm –12 am  27  Slipper Making   Workshop (ages 10‐15)  1:30‐3:30 pm   $5 + supplies   

Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   4‐5:30pm   

People of the Peaks  Film Festival 

28                 People of the Peaks  Film Festival 

People of the Peaks Film presented by the Grand  Festival –  e C and Culture Committee ache Arts  .  Watch for  more information on ou r f annual Film Festival sch irst   ed uled at  end of  February.  We a re excited to  have joined the Toronto    International Film Festi val   Circuit. 

9


March Monthly Draw: One Hour Pool Rental with Swim Pack (goggles, nose plug, swim cap, and water bottle)

Sun. 1

Mon. 2   

Tues.

Wed.

3   Game Day Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4:30‐5:30 pm 

WII Sports Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4‐5 pm 

8

9   

11 WII Sports Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4‐5 pm 

16   

18 WII Sports Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4‐5 pm 

St. Patrick’s Day  22 

23   

25 WII Sports Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4‐5 pm 

 

29

30 Easter Camp   (ages 5‐7)   9am‐3:30pm  $15/day  

31 Easter Camp   (ages 5‐7) 9am‐3:30pm  $15/day (inc. snacks. 

Clay Creations   (ages 8‐10) 5:30‐6:30 pm  $15 + supplies 

    

Sat.

6   Movie: Transporter 3  (14A) 8 pm 

 

7     Game Night 7 pm 

12   Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm       

13   Movie: Australia (PG)  8 pm    

14   Geocaching (all ages)  1‐4 pm $5 

19   Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm    

20   Midnight Teen Swim  11pm –12 am 

21   Maple Sugar Festival 

26   Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm       

27   

28

 

 

 

Youth Dance   (ages 13‐17)   8 – 11 pm 

(check  grandecache.ca  for more details) 

Drop‐In Basketball  

(High School) 7‐8 pm 

 

Drop‐In Volleyball  

Clay Creations   (ages 8‐10) 5:30‐6:30 pm  $15 + supplies 

24   Game Day Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4:30‐5:30 pm  (High School) 6:30‐8 pm 

Drop‐In Basketball  

(High School) 7‐8 pm 

17   Game Day Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4:30‐5:30 pm  Drop‐In Volleyball   (High School) 6:30‐8 pm 

Clay Creations   (ages 8‐10) 5:30‐6:30 pm  $15 + supplies 

5   Grotto Climbing Wall  Drop‐In (All Ages)   3:30‐5pm 

Drop‐In Basketball  

(High School) 7‐8 pm 

 

15

Clay Creations   (ages 8‐10) 5:30‐6:30 pm  $15 + supplies 

10   Game Day Drop‐In   (All Ages) 4:30‐5:30 pm  Drop‐In Volleyball (High  School) 6:30‐8 pm    

Fri.

4

 

Drop‐In Volleyball   (High School) 6:30‐8 pm    

Thurs.

Drop‐In Basketball  

(High School) 7‐8 pm 

 

Bring own lunch & drinks) 

(inc. snacks.  Bring own lunch  & drinks) 

10

n... u F n e e w o l l Ha

...at the P ool!


Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

 

 

 

5

6 Easter Camp   (ages 8‐10)   9am‐3:30pm  $15/day (inc. 

7

snacks. Bring own  lunch & drinks) 

12

13

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

1 Easter Camp   (ages 5‐7) 9am‐3:30pm  $15/day (inc. snacks. Bring 

2 Easter Camp   (ages 5‐7) 9am‐3:30pm  $15/day (inc. snacks. Bring 

3 Easter Camp   (ages 5‐7) 9am‐3:30pm  $15/day (inc. snacks. 

4

8

9

10

11

17 Babysitter’s Course  (ages 10+) 1‐6 pm $30 

18   Babysitter’s Course  (ages 10+) 1‐6 pm $30    

own lunch & drinks) 

own lunch & drinks) 

Easter Camp   (ages 8‐10) 9am‐3:30pm  $15/day (inc. snacks. Bring 

Easter Camp   (ages 8‐10) 9am‐3:30pm  $15/day (inc. snacks. Bring 

Easter Camp   (ages 8‐10) 9am‐3:30pm  $15/day (inc. snacks. Bring 

14   

15

16   

own lunch & drinks) 

own lunch & drinks) 

Sat.

Bring own lunch & drinks) 

own lunch & drinks) 

Midnight Teen Swim  11pm –12 am 

Public Works has had a Facelift! Over the course of the past few weeks, the office has been renovated, including new paint, windows, flooring, trim and even some small structural changes. The work was well overdue and was the vision of the lone female in the Public Works Department. Carey Moulun, department secretary, brought her design ideas to life by choosing the warm colours, tile, and even the new office layout. With all the renovations going on around her, she still maintained the office and all her regular duties, while keeping her sense of humour. The Public Works crew would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to Carey for a job well done. The Public Works Department will open its doors to the pubic soon to come in and see our new digs.

11


Get in SHAPE with Fitness Classes at the Rec Centre! Register Early!  All classes must have 5 participants registered at least 1 week prior to their start date or  they will be cancelled.  There is a $5 drop‐in fee for all classes based on room (if there is a free piece of  equipment at 5 minutes past the start of a class, that equipment is deemed available for drop‐in).   

All programs are Free with a 6 month or 1 year membership  Saturday Morning Swim Lessons Jan 10, 2009 ‐ Feb 14, 2009   9:00 ‐ 10:00 am ½ hour classes   Cost: $20.00   

Lunchtime Indoor Cycling Tuesday & Thursday  12:10‐12:50 pm  January 6 ‐ February 12  Location: Lobby  Cost: $41.00 

Swim Lessons Tuesdays & Thursdays     Feb 24‐Mar 26 & April 21‐May 21  Early Bird Kickstart 10:00 ‐ 11:00 am & 5:30 ‐ 7:00pm   (Indoor Cycling) Monday, Wednesday & Friday  ½ hr classes  Cost: $31.00    6:00‐7:00 am  Circuit Training Jan 5‐Feb 13 & Feb 23‐March 27  Monday, Wednesday & Friday  Cost: $81.00 each  1:00‐2:00 pm     Location: Lobby  Jan 5 ‐ Feb 13  Cost: $81.00    After Work Burn Out Feb 23‐March 27  Cost: $67.50   (Indoor Cycling) Location: Fitness Centre    Tuesday & Thursday  Body Sculpting 6:30‐7:30 pm  Tuesday & Thursday  Jan 6‐Feb 12 & Feb 17 ‐ March 26  7:40 ‐ 8:40 pm  Cost: $54.00 each  Jan 6 ‐ Feb 12  Location: Lobby  Location: Lobby    GROOVE Cardio Dance Class Cost: $54.00     Monday & Wednesday  Noon Boot Camp 7:40‐8:40 pm  Monday, Wednesday & Friday  January 5 ‐ February 4  12:10‐12:50pm  Location: Lobby  January 5 ‐ February 13  Cost: $45.00   Location: Lobby  Mix of different dance styles, the  Cost: $61.00  steps are basic but it will get your   

hips and feet moving.  The dance  style is salsa, samba…Latin flavour  with an urban twist!  This class will  be a mix of cardio and core strength.    

12

Step Class Monday & Wednesday  6:30‐7:30 pm  Jan 5‐ Feb 11  Location: Lobby  Cost: $54.00  

Tai Chi Monday’s 6:00‐7:00 pm  Jan 26  ‐ March 9  Location:  Tourism Centre  Cost: $27.00  No Class Feb  16   

Aquafitness Beginner – Intermediate Class  Tuesday & Thursday  Jan 6‐Feb 12 & Feb 17‐March 26  Cost: $54.00 each   9:00‐9:45 am   

Water Running Tuesday & Thursday  Jan 27 ‐ March 5    Cost: $54.00   March 10 ‐ April 30    Cost: $72.00   8:00‐9:00 pm   

Build it & Shake it ½ hour resistance training followed  by a 45 minute water class 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  January 5 ‐ February 6  9:00‐10:15 am  Cost: $84.50    

Deep Water Aquafit Tuesday & Thursday  January 27 ‐ March 5  7:00‐8:00 pm  Cost: $54.00  

Call the Akasaka Recreation Centre to Register! 780.827.2446


Local Recreation, Culture, & Heritage Winter is  on  our  doorstep  and  is  promising  something for all to enjoy.  Take advantage of the  numerous  recreational  activities  Grande  Cache  has to offer, and stay active this winter!    

Physical Activity, Recreation and Sports  As  the  cold  winter  days  begin  to  become  part  of  our  lives,  the  Recreation,  Culture  and  Heritage  Department  continues  to  heat  up.  Hockey,  figure  skating,  swimming,  curling,  and  fitness  training  have  become  the  major  activities  for  the  Rec.  Centre.  Our  Programs  department  offers  many  activities  such  as:  Drop‐in  volleyball  and  basketball  at  the  high  school  gym,  pre‐video  released movies at the Rec. Centre and Lighting of  Rocky the Ram Park celebration (please check out  our  list  of  activities  in  this  newsletter).  For  the  cross  country  skier  the  Nordic  Ski  Club  will  be  grooming trails at the Municipal Campground and  at  Pierre  Gray  Lakes  this  winter,  and  there  are  many miles of trails.   

New Recreation Facility ‐ Update   After  community  consultation  with  the  Rec.  Expansion Steering Committee and direction from  Town Council, it looks like we have a finalized plan  for  our  Town’s  expansion  of  the  Recreation  Facility.    The  Town  has  hired  a  Fundraising  consultant  to  begin  the  work  of  writing  grant  proposals  and  achieving  donations  to  help  make  this  project  a  reality.  We  will  be  having  an  Open  House  in  January  2009  to  show  the  public  the  details of this upcoming project. 

Highlights ‐ A Year in Review  A  review  of  our  calendar  highlights  some  significant successes which enhanced the quality of  life in our community. Many programs, events, and  improvements  were  driven  by  Recreation  Department,  while  others  were  supported  or  facilitated as our expertise at partnering continued  to grow. Successes included:   

Programs and Events:  DeathFest  2008  (David  Wilcox,  Road  Hammers,  Doc  Walker),  Canada  Day,  Blues  and  BBQ  with  Matt  Andersen,  Much  Music  Video  Dance,  Hoja,  Black Elk Hockey Camp, Summer Camps, Circus and  Soccer  Camp,    Skateboard  Park  Grand  Opening,  Farmers  Market,  Aquatics  (swim  lessons,  fun  “themed”  sessions,  Junior  Lifeguard  Club),  Fitness  Training (Spin, Cardio, Step, Circuit) Guitar Lessons,  Painting, Conversational Spanish   

Beautification: The  Grand  Opening  of  Mt.  Hamel  Park;  the  Transition  of  United  Church  Park  to  Mt  Stearn  Park;  Installation  of  Green  Gym  and  (part)  installation  of  Water  Park  in  Central  Park;  further  development  of  Trails,  Campsite  and  Ball  Diamonds.   

On behalf of everyone at   the Recreation Department,   have a healthy and active   winter in Grande Cache! 

13


After 50  years  of  living  in  places  that  are  far  from  work,  entertainment  and  institutional  buildings,  there  has  been  an  increased demand for places that  have  it  all.    Places  where  residents,  if  they  so  desire,  can  live quite comfortably without an  automobile.    Where  most  of  the  daily  activities  are  located  within  walking  distance  and  are  connected  by  attractive  streets  and  public  spaces.    In  addition,  it  would be nice to have a variety of  travel options, housing for all and  protected  natural  areas.    An  attempt  to  deliver  these  amenities  in  one  package  is  a  form  of  planning  called  new  urbanism.    Why  do  we  need  new  urbanism?   Isn’t  the  conventional  way  of  building good enough?    The  planning  of  conventional  suburbs  is  based  on  the  rigid  separation  of  land  uses.    The  assumption is that everyone going  from place to place will use a car.   Consequently, modern cities have  become  dominated  by  pavement  that sprawls in vast   distances across the landscape.   In the process, farms and  wilderness are destroyed.   Residents spend much   of their day in traffic,    

14

and everyone  budgets  a  lot  of  money  for  transportation.    Those  who  can’t  drive  –  the  poor,  the  elderly  and  children  –  are  more  restricted  and  dependent  than  everyone else.    If people are going to walk, there  have to be places to go and things  to  do  nearby.    There  must  be  an  a s s o r t m e n t   o f   p r i v a t e ,  commercial  and  public  buildings;  these  buildings  must  be  connected  by  a  variety  of  public  spaces.    Good  neighbourhoods  also  have  a  balance  of  jobs,  housing and services.    A new urbanist neighbourhood  (also known as a   “traditional   neighbourhood   development”   TND) is created   at the human   scale. 

Buildings are  placed  closer  together  and  exteriors  are   designed  to  be  safe  and  attractive  for  pedestrians.    Streets  are  constructed for slower speeds and  traffic  is  dispersed  through  many  different  connections.    Walking  in  front of a business or around town  is  simply  a  pleasant,  interesting  activity.    Neighbourhoods  like  these  have   survived  and  prospered  over  the  centuries.    New  urbanism  returns  to these time‐tested principles and  adapts  them  for  a  healthy,  sustainable 21st century. 


Town‐making principles  begin  and  end  with  the  premise  that  uses  within  a  neighbourhood  (residential,  lodging,  office,  retail,  manufacturing  and  civic)  should  be  laid  out  in  such  a  manner  as  to  benefit  the  entire  area.    This  approach  represents  an  attempt  to  replicate  the  planning  of  our  country’s  older  towns  rather  than  continue the more recent practice of developing separate single‐use  pods.   

Traditionally, Canadian  town  planning  was  the  work  of  pragmatic  pioneers,  government  consultants  or,  in  the  early  20th  century,  developers  using  architects  and  town  planners.    After  the  Second  World War, however, planning practices took a complete about‐face.   Zoning  By‐laws  were  adopted  by  thousands  of  municipalities  in  a  sweeping  movement  across  the  country.    Using  these  conventional  zoning  By‐laws,  master  plans  were  drawn  up  for  individual  municipalities marked with symbols like R‐1, R‐2, R‐3 (residential); C‐ 1,  C‐2  (commercial);  and  CM,  RM  (industrial).    These  symbols  stipulate the use and density in each area.  Single‐family homes were  completely  separated  from  townhomes  and  apartment  buildings.   Commercial  buildings  could  only  be  built  in  spaces  marked  with  the  “C”  code,  totally  segregated  from  the  residential  areas.    High‐speed  roads, or “collectors,” were designed to connect all of the separated  uses.    Under  these  conventional  zoning  practices,  “open  space”  is  provided  in  the  form  of  buffers,  easements  and  setbacks  instead  of  traditional parks and squares.   

What planners  did  not  foresee  was  the  outcome  that  would  result  from the endless repetition of this pattern.  Instead of roads moving  people swiftly from home to work to play, they have become clogged  with  traffic.    People  spend  hours  every  day  in  the  car  shuffling  children and themselves from one use to the other.  Gaining access to  cultural  and  social  experiences  has  become  a  frustrating,  time‐ consuming experience.   

The Town  of  Grande  Cache  is  now  making  an  effort  to  recover  the  wisdom  of  the  past  –  intermixing  uses  within  neighbourhoods  and  developing plans with flexibility.  This is not always easy:  in order to  accomplish  mixed‐use  planning,  the  Town  must  either  grant  numerous  variances  to  overcome  the  restrictions  of  current  zoning  policies  or  adopt  an  entirely  new  Zoning  By‐law  that  allows  for  this  type of zoning.   

Our Town  is  currently  is  the  process  of  adopting  traditional  neighbourhood  development  (TND)  zoning  reforms  that  restore  the  option  of  creating  new  development  in  traditional  patterns.    This  zoning  enables  a  broad  range  of  activities  within  a  neighbourhood.   People  are  able  to  move  with  ease  from  home  to  shopping  and  workplaces,  and  automobile  reliance  is  reduced  because  biking  and  walking options are provided. 

15


A close  look  at  our  country’s  best‐loved  towns  reveals one very important fact – not one of them is  comprised  of  just  a  single  building  type.    Single  detached  homes  are  mixed  in  with  townhomes  and  apartment  buildings.    Commercial  properties  are  within walking distance of residential properties.  On  the  main  streets  and  town  centers,  “live/works”  are  standard, with apartments and offices located above  storefronts.   

Even with  all  their  mixing  of  types  and  uses,  traditional  towns  are  not  chaotic.    They  have  a  certain  unity  and  functionality  that  result  in  two  things:  appropriate design and appropriate context.   

Context is the other half of the equation.  There  is  a  spectrum  of  environments  from  urban  core  to  natural  wilderness,  and  these  environments  establish the context for buildings.  In the urban  core,  for  example,  the  commercial  activities  dominate.  Buildings are connected in continuous  facades, while streets and landscaping are formal  and geometric.  A broad variety of building types  can  be  accommodated  in  any  context  as  long  as  they  adhere  to  the  local  character  of  the  environment. 

Design and Context

An important  element  of  urban  design  is  the  frontage.   This  is  the  area  between the front façade  and the property lot line.  The elements of a frontage  include  fences,  stoops,  porches  and  galleries,  awnings and arcades.   

Diverse building  types are unified  through  the  use  of  harmonious  frontages  and  facades.    For  instance,  a  two‐ story  house  and  a  four‐story  office  building  can coexist quite  happily,  as  long  as  certain  architectural rules are observed.  The proportions of  the  buildings  should  be  complementary,  as  should  details such as windows and cornices.   

Although diversity  is  important,  it  does  not  justify  excessive  detailing  and  busyness.    Building  facades  cooperate  to  define  the  streetscape  in  much  the  same  way  that  walls  define  a  room.    An  excessive  number  of  appendages  –  such as  porches,  balconies  and bay windows – may destroy the alignment of the  façade.   

For instance,  a  downtown  City  Hall  surrounded  by a berm, a shrub and a waterfall is out of place  in  the  urban  core.    It  is  trying  to  exist  in  a  ruralized landscape that is more appropriate for a  small town.   

Benefits of Diversity

The benefits  of  mixing  building  types  within  one  neighbourhood are substantial.   

The inclusion  of  a  variety  of  residential  building  types  gives  people  a  choice  that  suits  their  lifestyle.    A  wide  range  of  pricing  and  rental  options  can  be  available,  allowing  a  diverse  population to live in the same area.  This means  that several generations can own property in the  same  neighbourhood.    This  also  gives  homeowners  the  opportunity  to  move  from  one  housing  type  to  another  within  the  same  neighbourhood  as  their  needs  change  over  the  years.   

For Information & Inquiries, Please Contact:

16

Town of Grande Cache P.O. Box 300 P: 780.827.3362 F: 780.827.2406

Grande Cache, AB T0E 0Y0 E: admin@grandecache.ca

Community Focus & Associate Publications available online!

Community Focus Winter Newsletter 2008  

Community Newsletter

Advertisement