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Not Art Show

Benefitting Hope For Justice 11 pm-2 am ® after the GRAMMYs at: iPic Theaters at Fulton Market

11 Fulton St, New York, NY 10038


FOR THE RECORDING ACADEMY CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

John Poppo

THE RECORDING ACADEMY™ PRESENTS

PRESIDENT/CEO

Neil Portnow

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Wayne Zahner

VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

Neda Azarfar

EXECUTIVE IN CHARGE OF PRODUCTION & CHIEF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

Branden Chapman

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

Rick Engdahl

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, AWARDS

Bill Freimuth

CHIEF INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT & MEMBER RELATIONS OFFICER

Daryl P. Friedman

CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER

Gaetano Frizzi

CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER

Evan Greene

CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER

Jason James

VICE PRESIDENT, CREATIVE SERVICES

David Konjoyan

VICE PRESIDENT, MEMBERSHIP & INDUSTRY RELATIONS

Laura Segura Mueller MUSICARES VICE PRESIDENT

Dana Tomarken VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE

Judy Wong

SUNDAY, JANUARY 28, 2018 MADISON SQUARE GARDEN NEW YORK CITY

3:00 P.M. GRAMMY AWARDS PREMIERE CEREMONY

®

7:30 P.M. LIVE-TELECAST GRAMMY AWARDS CEREMONY ®

Scott Goldman Bob Santelli Rita George ADVISORS

GENERAL COUNSEL

Joel Katz

NATIONAL LEGAL COUNSEL

Chuck Ortner

DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL

Bobby Rosenbloum

DEPUTY NATIONAL COUNSEL

Sandra Crawshaw-Sparks

PRESS REPRESENTATION Rogers & Cowan BALLOT TABULATION Deloitte & Touche Gary Smith Marijane Unter AEG EHRLICH VENTURES LLC EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

Ken Ehrlich PRODUCER

Renato “Ron” Basile DIRECTOR

Louis J. Horvitz Ken Ehrlich David Wild

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICE

RECORDING ACADEMY TELEVISION COMMITTEE ADVISORY GROUP Gabriel Abaroa Jr. Ed Cherney Leslie Ann Jones Joel Katz Terry Lickona Glenn Lorbecki Hank Neuberger Richard Ranta

WRITERS

GRAMMY MUSEUM

FOUNDING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

RECORDING ACADEMY TELEVISION COMMITTEE Neil Portnow, Co-Chair George J. Flanigen IV, Co-Chair Jason Bentley Jennifer Blakeman Fletcher Foster Jimmy Jam Mike Knobloch Harvey Mason Jr. Alexandra Patsavas Jon Platt John Poppo Bob Santelli Eric Schilling

CO-PRODUCER

Ecologically intelligent practices were integrated into the planning and production of the GRAMMY Awards. Most paper products and other supplies we bought and the services we procured were selected with sensitivity toward positive ecological stewardship. As an organization with a broad public reach, we take our obligations to society very seriously. The Recording Academy is honored to have teamed with the Natural Resources Defense Council, one of America’s most respected nonpartisan environmental organizations, to help reduce the Academy’s ecological footprint.

Terry Lickona SUPERVISING PRODUCER

Eric Cook PRODUCER

Ben Winston PRODUCTION DESIGNER

Brian Stonestreet LIGHTING DESIGNER

Robert A. Dickinson TALENT PRODUCER

Chantel Sausedo GRAMMY PREMIERE CEREMONY PRODUCER

Greg Fera

GRAMMY PREMIERE CEREMONY MUSICAL DIRECTOR

Paul Shaffer

8 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards


As the GRAMMYs® celebrate its 60th Anniversary and I close in on my 40th show, I wanted to take a moment to thank the literally hundreds (probably thousands) of behind the scenes people who have you’re reading this, unless you sing or play an instrument, you belong in that group, and it’s been an honor to work with you over these 38 years. Of course, thanks to the artists who viewers tune in to see, but I don’t know an artist who doesn’t feel like I do about the people behind the scenes who make it possible. And now, on to my annual list of GRAMMY® highlights over the past 38 years. Who will join

1980 1983 1985 1988 1991 1993 1994 1995 1998 1999 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Neil Diamond/Barbra Streisand — “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers” Marvin Gaye — “Sexual Healing” Tina Turner — “What’s Love Got To Do With It” Michael Jackson — ”The Way You Make Me Feel”/“Man In The Mirror” Aerosmith — “Come Together” (tribute to John Lennon) Eric Clapton — “Tears In Heaven” Whitney Houston — “I Will Always Love You” Bruce Springsteen — “Streets Of Philadelphia” Aretha Franklin — “Nessun Dorma” (substitute for Luciano Pavarotti) Ricky Martin — “La Copa De La Vida” Eminem/Elton John — “Stan” U2 — “Beautiful Day” Alan Jackson — “Where Were You (When The World Stopped Turning)” Mary J. Blige — “No More Drama” Springsteen/Grohl/Costello/Kanal/Van Zandt — “London Calling” (tribute to the Clash) Simon & Garfunkel reunion at Madison Square Garden — “The Sounds Of Silence” Prince/Beyoncé — Medley Melissa Etheridge/Joss Stone — Janis Joplin Medley Usher/James Brown — “Caught Up”/”Get Up — I Feel Like Being Like A Sex Machine” Alicia Keys/Jamie Foxx — “Georgia On My Mind” (tribute to Ray Charles) use of hologram on television Madonna/Gorillaz — Tina Turner/Beyoncé — “Proud Mary”/Medley Radiohead — “15 Step” Jay Z/Kanye West/T.I./Lil Wayne/M.I.A. — “Swagga Like Us” Pink — “Glitter In The Air” Mumford & Sons/Bob Dylan/Avett Brothers — Medley Mick Jagger — “Everybody Needs Somebody” (tribute to Solomon Burke) Adele — “Rolling In The Deep” McCartney/Springsteen/Grohl/Walsh — Abbey Road Finale Justin Timberlake/Jay Z — “Suit & Tie” Bruno Mars/Rihanna/Sting/Marleys — Bob Marley Tribute Macklemore & Ryan Lewis/Madonna/Queen Latifah/Mary Lambert — “Same Love” Daft Punk/Stevie Wonder/Pharrell Williams/Nile Rodgers — “Get Lucky” AC/DC — “Highway To Hell” Rihanna/Kanye West/Paul McCartney — “Four Five Seconds” Cast of “Hamilton” — “Alexander Hamilton” Eagles w/Jackson Browne — Glenn Frey Tribute Kendrick Lamar — “The Blacker The Berry”/”Alright” “Let’ Go Crazy” Prince tribute – Bruno Mars “Sandcastles” — Beyoncé “Hello” — Adele


RECORDING ACADEMY

T

he Recording Academy is the world’s leading society of music professionals dedicated to celebrating, honoring and sustaining music’s past, present, and future. In 1957, a visionary group of music professionals based in Los Angeles recognized the need to create an organization that would acknowledge and celebrate the artistic achievements of not only talented musicians and singers, but also important behind-the-scenes contributors such as producers and engineers. Conceived as a way to turn the recording industry into a true community, the Recording Academy was born. Today, our goals are to advance artistic excellence, ensure a vital and free creative community, support and advocate on behalf of music and its makers, and celebrate artistic achievement through the GRAMMY Awards—music’s only peer-recognized award. To accomplish these aims, we developed a network of 12 Chapters across the country that support our members through professional development, advocacy, and philanthropy. In 2000, we launched the Producers & Engineers Wing to create an organized voice for the individuals

10 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

who provide the technical expertise and creative thinking necessary for recorded art. Twenty years ago, the Academy opened an office in Washington, D.C. Launched as a Chapter to engage the local community, it also served as the eyes and ears of music creators just as the music industry was to undergo seismic changes. Since then, we’ve started GRAMMYs on the Hill, the largest music advocacy event in Washington, D.C., and District Advocate day, the only annual grassroots advocacy event for music creators, reaching legislators of all 50 states. Today, the Academy is the only trade association on Capitol Hill representing music’s artists, songwriters, and studio professionals. Through MusiCares and the GRAMMY Museum, the Academy works to protect and support music people in critical times of need, and celebrate the power of music through preservation and education. As the world’s leading society of music professionals, we are dedicated to working yearround to foster a more inspiring world for music and its creators.

ALL PHOTOS: © THE RECORDING ACADEMY 2017/CAROL FLORES

Artists, including (clockwise, from top left) Miley Cyrus, Khalid, and Midland, often visit the Recording Academy’s headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif., to perform, and learn about our initiatives, and how they can join our efforts to support all music creators


HERE’S TO 60 YEARS AND A RETURN TO NEW YORK CITY. Every day we help travelers follow the sound of opportunity to wherever it takes them. Tonight, as the Official Supporter of First Time Nominees, we honor those who create their own sound, blaze new trails through the music industry, and realize their dreams for the first time. Official Airline Partner of the GRAMMY Awards®.

GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license ©2018 The Recording Academy.


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT/CEO

Neil Portnow President/CEO of the Recording Academy

A

s GRAMMY winner George Carlin once said, “I’m 60 years of age. That’s 16 Celsius.” And so it is for the Recording Academy and the GRAMMY Awards. We enjoy the stature and consequence of the well-established organization we are, but we are indeed young at heart. It’s an exciting time for us, celebrating 60 years of making a real difference in the lives of music creators. And the celebration is heightened by our return to New York City for the first time in 15 years. Hosting the GRAMMYs in New York means more than staging the show in one of the world’s most culturally rich cities. It’s also a symbol of the Academy’s reach and breadth, representing music makers from coast to coast. And it’s even more inspiring knowing that, today, we are at our most vital as an organization. The GRAMMYs have never meant more to the music community than they do right now, and that goes well beyond the fact that our show is the most-watched music event on TV and the GRAMMY is the most coveted award in our community. It also speaks to our continued growth as a service organization to our members and the wider music world. Our history is extraordinarily rich. The more than 9,600 GRAMMYs we’ve awarded have, in fact, been historymaking. Many artists have enjoyed big GRAMMY nights that have been headline-grabbing and career-changing. But we’ve had equal impact off the TV screen. Since its founding in 1989, MusiCares, has helped more than 50,000 music people in need with nearly $58 million in support. In the 20 years since we opened an office in Washington, D.C., our work on Capitol Hill has improved the working lives of every musician through securing critical wins for music creators in the areas of creator compensation, funding for the arts, traveling with

12 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

instruments, and protecting wireless microphones. And we have created the largest grassroots movement for music with District Advocate day. The GRAMMY Museum has welcomed more than 1.5 million visitors in Los Angeles and more than 3 million visitors to our traveling exhibits and GRAMMY Museum properties in 28 cities and eight countries in a little less than a decade. Our education-based awards through the Museum—the Music Educator Award and the Jane Ortner Education Award—help bring needed awareness to the role of music education and the role music can play in other fields of study, while programs such as GRAMMY in the Schools have long taken an active role in creating arts education opportunities for students. All of which is truly inspiring. But perhaps more importantly, our future is extraordinarily bright. As we prepare for music advocacy’s most important year in decades, we are working closely with Congress to pass comprehensive music licensing reform, beginning the year with a GRAMMY-timed congressional hearing right here in New York just two days ago. The GRAMMY Museum has already seen extraordinary expansion, with our GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, GRAMMY Museum Experience in New Jersey, GRAMMY Museum Gallery in Nashville, and exhibits as far away as Moscow. We look forward to building on that remarkable growth. We’ve been working hard to continue to make the GRAMMY process and our membership best in class, and made GRAMMY voting the most efficient and effective it’s ever been by moving it to an online platform this year. The recently launched GRAMMY Music Education Coalition is an exciting and ambitious nonprofit collective dedicated to building universal music education participation in schools nationwide. And on TV over the last few years, we’ve expanded our programming with highly successful regular GRAMMY specials on CBS and the “Salute To GRAMMY Legends” on PBS. The latest example: “Elton John: I’m Still Standing— A GRAMMY Salute,” will air on CBS this spring. And there’s so much more opportunity ahead. Yes, we’re proud of the 60 years we’re celebrating tonight, but eagerly anticipating what the next 60 holds in store. With that, on behalf of the Academy and our elected leaders, I welcome you to this milestone GRAMMY show. Congratulations to all the nominees, and my thanks to our dedicated staff and production and broadcast partners. Enjoy the show.


MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

John Poppo Chair of the Board of Trustees

O

n behalf of myself and my fellow Board members, huge congratulations to all of our GRAMMY nominees! There have been some exceptional recordings made this year and we are very eager to celebrate them as they take their place in history on this special 60th anniversary of Music’s Biggest Night. As a lifelong New Yorker, I’m particularly excited to celebrate this milestone show in the city said by many to be the music center of the world—a place that has produced so much of the legendary musical excellence that the Recording Academy has honored over the years. New York’s legacy of cultural and ethnic diversity has not only made it home to just about every genre of music, but it has facilitated the origination of quite a few as well. Whether we’re talking about hip-hop, disco, punk, musical theater, freestyle, salsa, Latin jazz, or folk music, to name just a few, we can’t do so without recalling their connections to New York and its countless famed venues that housed and nurtured them, from Greenwich Village clubs such as CBGB, The Bottom Line, and Village Vanguard, to large nightclubs and discos such as Studio 54, Danceteria, Cotton Club, and Palladium Ballroom; from the theaters of Broadway and Lincoln Center, to concert halls like Irving Plaza, Carnegie Hall, Radio City Music Hall, and of course, the iconic Madison Square Garden, where we will host tonight’s show. That said, New York’s music extends well beyond the walls of its venues. It can be heard pulsing through the streets, in the parks and subways, and at an array of “underground” events not unlike the now historic 1970s Bronx parties that brought us the birth of hip-hop—a

14 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

musical culture that has dominated the charts for decades since. When you add to all this magic some of the most prolific music creators and recording studios in the world, every major record company in the industry, and a melting pot of more than 8 million people hailing from every corner of the globe, the caliber of recordings and iconic artists to emerge is the stuff GRAMMY Moments are made of. So, it seems fitting that the Recording Academy and the world’s pre-eminent music award should celebrate its 60th anniversary in New York tonight, and I thank my colleague Neil Portnow and his wonderful staff for making that happen despite significant challenges. I’m very proud of the Recording Academy’s legacy of monumental accomplishments, particularly in the areas of advocacy, charity, and education, and I thank each of you—members and fans alike—for your continuing contributions to our mission. I trust you will enjoy tonight’s show as we revisit some great memories and we celebrate our very exciting musical future as represented by today’s exceptional talent. Many thanks, once again, to all our members, and in particular my fellow Trustees, for the faith that affords me the honor of serving you and this great organization in such a personally gratifying way.


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CONTENTS

WELCOME 12 President/CEO’s Message 14 Chair’s Message

NOMINEES 26 Childish Gambino 28 Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee featuring Justin Bieber 30 JAY-Z 32 Kendrick Lamar 34 Bruno Mars 36 Lorde 38 Alessia Cara 40 Khalid 42 Lil Uzi Vert 44 Julia Michaels 46 SZA 48 Song Of The Year 54 Complete Nominations List

30 SPECIAL MERIT AWARDS Lifetime Achievement Awards 90 Hal Blaine by Brian Wilson

108

92 Neil Diamond by Micky Dolenz 94 Emmylou Harris by Steve Earle 96 Louis Jordan by Branford Marsalis 98 The Meters by Percy “Master P” Miller 100 Queen by Billy Corgan 102 Tina Turner by Ledisi

116 18 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Trustees Awards 104 Bill Graham by Kevin Lyman 106 Seymour Stein by Ice-T 108 John Williams by Kobe Bryant Technical GRAMMY Award 110 Tony Agnello and Richard Factor by Steve Vai Music Educator Award 112 Melissa Salguero by Sandra Zadrima Hall Of Fame 116 2018 GRAMMY Hall Of Fame


CONTENTS

CELEBRATING 60 YEARS 129 GRAMMYs’ Greatest Moments These 60 events at the GRAMMYs were unforgettable, but we’re reminding you anyway 149 A 60-Year Fashion Trend While styles change, the one constant is the GRAMMY spotlight

149

168 The Birth Of A Music Nation New York City’s mix of cultures has given rise to an array of music forms, from Tin Pan Alley to hip-hop and a lot in between

168

184 MusiCares Person Of The Year Fleetwood Mac becomes the first band ever honored by MusiCares 236 In Memoriam Remembering music people we lost in 2017

RECORDING ACADEMY TODAY 10 Recording Academy 196 Membership & Industry Relations 198 Advocacy & Public Policy 200 The Digital Academy 202 MusiCares Foundation 204 GRAMMY Museum 206 The Latin Recording Academy 208 GRAMMY Week 210 GRAMMY Awards Process 214 Executive Staff 216 National Trustee Officers And Trustees 220 National Staff 226 Recording Academy Chapters 232 Past Chairs

244 GRAMMY Firsts You always remember your first time. So do we

The GRAMMY Award design is a trademark and service mark registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may not be reproduced without permission. The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc., owns, among others, the following trademarks: National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences®, Recording Academy™, GRAMMY®, GRAMMYs®, GRAMMY Awards®, GRAMMY Hall Of Fame®, Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences®, The Latin Recording Academy®, MusiCares®, GRAMMY in the Schools® , and GRAMMY Museum®.

184 20 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

The 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards Program Book is published by the Recording Academy, 3030 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404, in association with FX Group, Inc. © 2018 The Recording Academy. All rights reserved.


We’re your

BIGGEST FAN. Whether you are making the music or just singing along, Aflac helps you and your family so you don’t have to miss a beat. Aflac congratulates this year’s GRAMMY Awards® nominees and winners and is proud to be an Official Partner of the 60th GRAMMY Awards. Visit aflac.com to learn more.

Coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of Columbus. In New York, coverage is underwritten by American Family Life Assurance Company of New York. WWHQ | 1932 Wynnton Road | Columbus, GA 31999. GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license © 2017 The Recording Academy. Z171725

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FOR THE RECORDING ACADEMY David Konjoyan Editor In Chief & Co-Publisher Kiana Butler Editor Iman Woodley Production Manager Tera Allegri Graphic Design Consultation

FOR FX GROUP Kristian Krempel President & Co-Publisher Frank G. Fernandez General Counsel Sherri Hewett-Olson Finance Director Whitney Hendrix Multi-Cultural Media Director Curse Mackey Artist & Media Relations Director Ken Rose Sr. Director of Entertainment & Artist Relations Rhonda Bedikian Artist Relations Elizabeth Ferris Artist Relations Simone Tieber (estudio-5) Creative Director Jason Lowsy (estudio-5) Production Manager James Denny Art Director Scot Shuman Internet & Technical Services ADVERTISING SALES

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SPECIAL THANKS:

FX Group would like to extend a special thank you to the following people for their contribution and support: Professional Sports Publications, Bob Jellen, Dr. Edgar Ramirez-Pagan, Dr. Dan Greenwald, Todd Persico, Christophe Jouany, Camilla Sacre-Dallerup, Avesta Jamei, Mario Polanco, Jon Varvatos & Fokke de Jong, Nish De Gruiter, Charlotte Lagendijk, Kirsten Zwijnenburg and Suitsupply OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE GRAMMY AWARDS

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John Billings The Official 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards program book is published by the Recording Academy, 3030 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404, and produced in association with FX Group, Inc., 309 S. Willow Ave., Tampa, FL 33606. All rights reserved. No part of the publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted in any form, by means electronically, mechanically, photocopying, or otherwise, and no article or photography can be printed without the written consent of the publisher. Reproduction in whole or part without written consent is forbidden. The Recording Academy and FX Group assume no responsibility for statements made by advertisers; the quality or deliverability of products or services advertised; or positioning of advertising.

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GRAMMY Awards is a registered trademark of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc. The GRAMMY Award design is a trademark and service mark registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may not be reproduced without permission. ©2018 The Recording Academy. All rights reserved. Published by

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Steve Baltin, Bruce Britt, Kobe Bryant, Leila Cobo, Billy Corgan, Chuck Crisafulli, Randee Dawn, Micky Dolenz, Steve Earle, Jim Farber, Paul Grein, Andreas Hale, Ice-T, Tammy La Gorce, Ledisi, Kevin Lyman, Branford Marsalis, Percy “Master P” Miller, Ogden Payne, Bryan Reesman, Nic Screws, John Sutton-Smith, Roy Trakin, Steve Vai, David Wild, Brian Wilson, Sandra Zadrima, Paul Zollo

In association with FX Group, Inc. 309 S. Willow Ave., Tampa, FL 33606 813.337.0102 • 866.668.5412 fax info@fxm-group.com www.fxm-group.com

22 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards


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REIMAGINED. REFINED. REMARKABLE.

“We have selected the finest features of the D-28 from both my grandfather’s and my father’s eras. We’ve brought forth this guitar’s rich history and married it with modern innovations.” — Chris Martin IV, Chairman and CEO Visit martinguitar.com to find an authorized Martin dealer.

Inspiring Musicians Worldwide


H

IS UNUSUAL MONIKER COMES BY WAY OF A random interaction with the online Wu-Tang Name Generator, but there’s nothing random about the way Childish Gambino, aka Donald Glover, applies his considerable talents to a celebration of sound and soulfulness on this year’s “Awaken, My Love!” Gambino is now a seven-time GRAMMY nominee, and this year’s five nominations include nods for Album Of The Year and Record Of The Year, the latter for the standout track “Redbone.” The ambition and accomplishment of his current work make it harder to think of Childish Gambino as a “side project,” though Glover is probably best known as a star of TV’s “Community” and as the creator and star of the acclaimed comedy-drama “Atlanta.” Throughout “Awaken, My Love!”, Glover, working with co-writer, co-producer, and longtime Gambino-associate Ludwig Goransson, blends retro-grooves, modern production, and timeless

26 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

musicianship into a funk fantasia that seduces, enlightens, and just plain feels good to listen to. The album is packed with oddball, deep-track references to such groove pioneers as Sly Stone, Funkadelic, the Brothers Johnson, and the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band, but Childish Gambino’s music has such natural flow and is so layered with surprises that it transcends influences to become something inviting and compelling in its own right. The album-opening “Me And Your Mama” is a stunning, shape-shifting epic, while “Have Some Love,” “Riot,” and “California” are exceptional booty-calls to the dance floor. The sound of “Awaken, My Love!” is the sound of an artist capable of inspired craftsmanship, joyous playfulness, and a heartfelt message. For those just awakening to the rising, shining talents of Childish Gambino, perhaps it’s best to heed lyrics from the boogie lullaby “Redbone”: Stay woke.—Chuck Crisafulli

IBRA AKE

RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

CHILDISH GAMBINO


L

UIS FONSI WOKE UP ONE MORNING WITH “Des-pa-ci-to” in his head. The sound of the single word, broken up into its four syllables, was so clear and persistent, he actually searched online to make sure he hadn’t heard it somewhere before. By the time his writing partner, Panamenian Erika Ender, arrived at his Miami home studio that afternoon, he had the blueprint of the chorus, tying “Despacito” to the allure of his birthplace, Puerto Rico. Ender, one of the very few female Latin songwriters in the market, incorporated a sensual, rather than sexual, sensibility into a song about slow seduction. And the icing on the cake was Daddy Yankee’s reggaeton beats, which transformed it from merely a catchy pop hit into an irresistible, danceable anthem with the right amount of edge. In an ever-shrinking world, “Despacito,” produced by the Colombian duo of Mauricio Rengifo and Andrés Torres, encapsulated the increasingly global nature of music that can touch listeners in many corners of the world, regardless of language. With its introductory acoustic guitar, a clear nod to its Latin roots, it’s reggae beats, and just a touch of R&B in Fonsi’s Spanish vocals, “Despacito” was already a

28 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

hit when Justin Bieber heard it in a Colombian nightclub and asked to be part of it the following day, bringing a completely different mainstream pop reading to a song that was essentially Caribbean. The added mix of Josh Gudwin’s production and Bieber’s English and Spanish lyrics struck a universal chord. “Despacito” would become not just the biggest hit of 2017 but the longest-running No. 1 ever on the Billboard Hot 100, tying the 16-week record set by Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men’s “One Sweet Day” in 1996, even as the original video became the first to hit 4 billion views on YouTube. More than a music juggernaut, “Despacito” became a symbol of empowerment and a cultural watershed moment, illustrating the possibilities of Latin music way beyond the traditional scope of what a crossover had previously represented.—Leila Cobo

OMAR CRUZ

FEAT. JUSTIN BIEBER

JOE TERMINI

RECORD OF THE YEAR

LUIS FONSI & DADDY YANKEE


and Bulova are registered trademarks. © 2017 Bulova. 97P124. GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2017 The Recording Academy. GRAMMY® Award-Winning Atlantic Records artist Jess Glynne

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My First Passion

OFFICIAL TIMEPIECE PARTNER


J

AY-Z’s 2013 ALBUM MAGNA CARTA HOLY GRAIL gave the impression that life couldn’t get any better for the once-impoverished emcee. Selling a million copies of the album to Samsung before its official release date and posh song titles such as “Tom Ford,” “Picasso Baby,” and “Heaven” meant his proclivity for celebratory champagne toasts were justified. But if Magna Carta … was the soundtrack to cavalier spending on lavish material possessions, 4:44 is the autobiography of a humbled man returning each item, receipt in hand. 4:44, nominated for Album Of The Year, offers an unrestricted side of JAY-Z fans haven’t experienced before. The 36-minute hip-hop confessional is a bold revelation of scarred relationships, entrepreneurial how-to’s, and unconventional wisdom from an imperfect idol. Still, the 21-time GRAMMY winner and top 60th GRAMMY Awards nominee managed to turn his faults

30 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

RAVEN VARONA

RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

JAY-Z into fortune—the album debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and was certified platinum just six days after its release. “I turned my life into a nice first week release date,” he confidently raps on Record Of The Year contender “The Story of O.J.,” a searing reflection on race relations in America. A mixed-genre of samples from artists such as Nina Simone, the Fugees, and Stevie Wonder serve as the bed on which JAY-Z gently lays his heavy thoughts, compliments of the album’s primary production architect, No I.D. According to JAY-Z, inspiration for the album’s titular track began at 4:44 a.m. As fellow music icon Frank Sinatra might point out, the wee small hours of the morning are the perfect time for tough self-reflection. Like Sinatra, JAY-Z has turned his look in the mirror into great art.—Ogden Payne


2 0 0 0 AT TO R N E Y S | 3 8 LO C AT I O N S W O R L D W I D E ˚

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60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

®

and all of this year’s nominees and winners!

The Entertainment and Media Group of Greenberg Traurig is proud of its longstanding relationship with the RECORDING ACADEMY™ and looks forward to another 60 years!

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A

FTER DOCUMENTING HIS NARROW ESCAPE from poverty on Good Kid, M.A.A.D. City and thumping his chest with unapologetic blackness on To Pimp A Butterfly, Kendrick Lamar went on a spiritual journey for his acclaimed third studio album, DAMN. The 30-year-old may have climbed his way to financial stability, but fear of God remains one of Lamar’s most compelling narratives and deserved its own story. DAMN.—a lyrically dense and marvelously textured piece of art—is that story, with chapters on “GOD.,” two of the deadly sins (“LUST.” and “PRIDE.”), Lamar’s anxiety (“FEAR.”), the isolation of success (“FEEL.”), and the eternal struggles between heaven and hell. Since his breakthrough in 2012, the Compton emcee has become an elite musician of our generation, but has done so while keeping his life relatively private, which makes DAMN. all the more intriguing. Producer Mike Will Made It’s dark keys and grumbling

32 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

bass on the Record Of The Year-nominated “HUMBLE.” has surely blown out speakers across the country while the Rihanna assisted “LOYALTY.” (nominated for Best Rap/Sung Performance) is absolutely swoon inducing. Everything in between the rambunctious opener “BLOOD.” and the finale, “DUCKWORTH.”—a reportedly true story about how DAMN. co-producer Anthony “Top Dawg” Tiffith spared Lamar’s father’s life years before he would sign Lamar to Top Dawg Entertainment— reveal an artist who is determined to perfect his craft and his soul. The work has paid off—this is Lamar’s third Album Of The Year nomination and in just four years he has amassed 29 GRAMMY nominations, including seven this year. “My resume is real enough for two millenniums,” Lamar professes on “LOYALTY.” Can’t be hype when it’s the truth.—Andreas Hale

DAVE FREE

RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

KENDRICK LAMAR


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I

N A YEAR MARKED BY POLITICAL TUMULT AND tragic celebrity passings, Bruno Mars’ 2016 album 24K Magic was a welcome, soul-soothing relief. Showcasing a veritable treasure trove of old-school funk jams, including “That’s What I Like,” “Chunky,” and the hit title track, 24K Magic was so authentically retro, you could have sworn it was unearthed during an archaeological dig. The album’s deft fusion of butt-bumping dance tunes and sweet, sticky balladry was so undeniable, it would earn Mars six GRAMMY nominations, including Record, Album, and Song Of The Year. “There’s not an ounce of fat on Magic, and nearly every track sounds like Top 40 gold,” crowed Entertainment Weekly. “Few albums designed to sound like a party actually play like one,” gushed England’s NME magazine, “but Bruno Mars has pulled it off with style.” Like his GRAMMY-nominated 2010 debut album Doo-Wops & Hooligans and his GRAMMY-winning 2012 sophomore release Unorthodox Jukebox, 24K Magic makes eminently clear that Bruno Mars does his homework. Much like Michael Jackson and Prince before

34 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

him, Mars possesses a knack for composing original tunes that evince his own unique musical personality while channeling an array of pop legends. The album’s charttopping title track evokes the Minneapolis sound made famous by Prince and the Time, while the album’s hit single “That’s What I Like” recalls Bobby Brown’s late ’80s New Jack Swing. Mars’ Top 40 slow drag “Versace On The Floor” features a starlight arrangement that would leave iconic honeydrippers like Luther Vandross and Freddie Jackson nodding in approval. From its fat production sound, courtesy of producers Shampoo Press & Curl, to its feel-good rhythms and eminently memorable lyrics, 24K Magic delivers on every conceivable level. The album catapulted the singer into an exclusive circle of best-selling superstars, including Frank Sinatra, Eagles, Bruce Springsteen, and more. Considering that Mars launched his career less than a decade ago, it seems inevitable that the 32-year-old singer/songwriter will go down in history as one of music’s most successful artists; a pop alchemist capable of turning gold-plated funk into bankable platinum.—Bruce Britt

KAI Z FENG

RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

BRUNO MARS


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S

O MUCH OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY centers on worship of youth: young ideas, young ideals, young ways of perceiving the world. But how wise can youth truly be? In the case of the New Zealand-born Ella Marija Lani Yelich-O’Connor—better known as Lorde—the answer is quite wise indeed. Having debuted four years ago with the multiplatinum smash Pure Heroine, a release that stunned the world with the sly, minimalist “Royals,” a single that earned her two GRAMMYs, Lorde dodged the difficult secondalbum bullet with Melodrama. The Album Of The Year nominee gave Lorde her first No. 1 on the Billboard 200 in its debut week. Melodrama marries heartbreak and hedonism while toying with traditional pop formats; few of its songs could be easily broken into familiar components. And Lorde remains nakedly honest with songs such as “Green Light” and “Perfect Places,” which dive into what it means to struggle with transitioning from teenager to adulthood. “Royals” broke big when Lorde was just 16,

36 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

BRENDAN WALTER

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

LORDE now she’s 21 and as famous as some of the names she used to envy-sing about. Yet Lorde is experimental rather than vain with her music and vocals on Melodrama, even when her lyrics are highly interior. She plays around with digitized effects and low bass elements that enhance, rather than mask, her voice and in the process, offer fresh, exciting textures. Partly this is a result of a canny selection of producers. She wrote and produced the album primarily with Jack Antonoff, who won Album Of The Year with Taylor Swift three years ago. Along with other contributors, including Frank Dukes, Malay, Andrew Wyatt, Flume, and Joel Little (her Heroine collaborator) they crafted what Entertainment Weekly called “shape-shifting compositions” and a “richer, more dynamic palette.” If Heroine was a way to enshrine teen glory, with Melodrama, Lorde promised on Facebook in 2016 that she was “about to show you the new world.” Turns out, this new world she’s showing is a place where we all get to be royally enlightened.—Randee Dawn


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HERE IS A RICH VEIN OF CANADIAN songbirds, from Anne Murray to Joni Mitchell to Avril Levigne; and with her bold, soulful voice and cool charismatic confidence, the Brampton, Ontario-born Alessia Cara has certainly joined that illustrious line, as acknowledged by her four GRAMMY nominations this year. Along with a nod for Best New Artist, she has received two more for Song Of The Year and Best Music Video for “1-800-273-8255” with Logic and Khalid, and another for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance for “Stay” with producer Zedd. Cara began playing guitar at the age of 10 and soon was performing covers of her favorite songs on her own YouTube channel. She posted videos of herself performing songs by the likes of Adele, Jessie J, and Amy Winehouse. Before long, she had millions of views, signed a record deal, and released her first single. “Here,” featuring a sample of Isaac Hayes’ “Ike’s Rap 2,” perfectly captures that common feeling of detachment

38 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

at a loud party full of unfamiliar people; it reached No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 and became a song of the summer in 2015. Her debut album Know-It-All followed later in the year, including the equally perceptive “Wild Things” and “Seventeen,” but it was “Scars To Your Beautiful,” a poignant meditation on beauty, that really captured the public imagination. Cara was soon out on tour as a supporting act for Coldplay and performing on the John Peel Stage at the famed Glastonbury Festival. It was all capped off by more than 150 million YouTube views of her version of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “How Far I’ll Go,” which she recorded for the Moana soundtrack. Cara has been compared to everyone from Lorde to Norah Jones, but this 21-year-old has a unique perspective, mature beyond her years, that makes her very much her own woman and a vibrant new voice.—John Sutton-Smith

ELLEN MATTHEWS

BEST NEW ARTIST

ALESSIA CARA


®


B

EST NEW ARTIST NOMINEES AREN’T ALWAYS new to making music. Many are just new to being recognized for it. Not so with soon-to-be 20-year-old Khalid: This R&B and pop prodigy wrote his first song at the tail end of 2015, when he was still in the moody grips of high school ennui. Oh, how he channeled that ennui. American Teen, Khalid’s debut album, was released in March 2017. Its first single, “Location,” started hypnotizing the masses a full eight months prior. Like a lot of songs on the platinum-certified record, it’s a hyper-modern but deep-soul groove. In a honeyed, unhurried voice, Khalid pleads for the object of his affection to drop him a pin with coordinates. What does he want? To chisel past the virtual into the real: “I don’t wanna fall in love off of subtweets so let’s get personal,” he sings. Anyone who longs for real

40 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

KACEY TOMITA

BEST NEW ARTIST

KHALID connection in the era of texts and Tinder could relate. You don’t have to be a teenager to know that feeling, which is maybe why “Location” zoomed up the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at No. 16 and going triple platinum. If American Teen’s appeal is multigenerational—and it is, judging by Khalid’s already impressive list of collaborators, including Lorde, Future, and Kendrick Lamar—it’s never shy about its youthful obsessions. There are references to apps and cellphone pics, a song about being “Young Dumb & Broke,” and having a car that still reeks of marijuana in the morning. But if anything, these nods to the trials of youth elevate the music, leaving listeners with a refreshing sense of hopefulness. If 19-year-olds are writing songs this calm, graceful, and unselfconscious, can the future be so bad? —Tammy La Gorce


L

IL UZI VERT’S NOMINATION FOR BEST NEW ARTIST at this year’s GRAMMY Awards makes one thing clear that many already suspected by the end of 2017—the Philadelphia-based rapper is not only the next superstar in rap, he is one of the next voices of the genre. Going into 2017, the 23-year-old, born Symere Woods, had established himself as a rising star as part of XXL’s 2016 Freshman Class and on the strength of multiple mixtapes, including 2015’s Luv Is Rage. But this past year he delivered on all of that promise, starting with a feature on Migos’ massive Billboard Hot 100 chart-topper, “Bad And Boujee.” If that appearance and track helped establish Lil Uzi Vert as a potential voice for the next generation of rap fans, the methodical and soulful tune, “XO TOUR Llif3” solidified that status. In the smart song, which helped put him in the “Emo rapper” camp, he opens up about the pain of a past relationship.

42 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

“She said, ‘Baby, I am not afraid to die/Push me to the edge/All my friends are dead,’” he raps. The track’s honesty and emotional resonance helped it take home “Song Of The Summer” at the MTV VMAs. Propelled in part by the success of “XO TOUR Llif3,” Lil Uzi Vert’s proper debut album, Luv Is Rage 2, entered the Billboard 200 at No. 1 with 135,000 copies sold. So, his commercial status as a young rap superstar has been cemented. But Lil Uzi Vert’s impact goes much deeper than numbers. Complex and Spin have both declared him an artist to watch because of his growing cultural impact. Combine his impressive candor as a lyricist, his uncompromising attitude (inspired, in part, by his heroes such as Marilyn Manson), and welldocumented live shows marked by stage dives, and you have a figure who has become one of the most intriguing and undeniable young artists not only in rap, but all of music.—Steve Baltin

SPIKE JORDAN

BEST NEW ARTIST

LIL UZI VERT


S

HE MAY BE UP FOR BEST NEW ARTIST AT THIS year’s GRAMMY Awards, but 24-year-old Julia Michaels is already an established industry veteran. Her singing and performing career is heating up thanks to last year’s triple-platinum single “Issues,” which has surpassed a billion streams globally and is also nominated for Song Of The Year. Over the last few years, she has co-written 11 Top 40 hits, and her artistic fingerprints are all over recent hits from Linkin Park, Britney Spears, Justin Bieber, Ed Sheeran, and Gwen Stefani (she was a primary writer on the latter’s last album). Michaels was drawn to music early. At age 12, she started setting her poetry to music on piano with no training. When she was 15, the fledgling songwriter connected with Joleen Belle, and the duo struck up a partnership that led to promo and library sync songs and later, their theme to the “Austin & Ally” television series. At age 18, she met Lindy Robbins with whom she

44 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

co-wrote tunes for Demi Lovato, Selena Gomez, and Fifth Harmony. Her main collaborator now is Jason Tranter, with whom she has co-written the bulk of her hits. She also prefers old-school pen to paper rather than tablet or smartphone when pouring out her ideas. While it would be easy to bang out a laundry list of her hits and collaborations over the last five years, more important is Michaels’ ability to move fluidly between genres. She can shift from an understated pop tune or a bluesy ballad to a harmony-laden dance track, and she does not always play it straight, exuding a quirkiness and witty playfulness that has attracted many artists to her. The mid-tempo track “Pink” from her EP Nervous System shows how she can reverse expectations and make it work. The racy song, about a mutually intoxicating relationship, gradually swells to a chorus that is simply a sexy whisper. But her talent is making a very loud impression. —Bryan Reesman

CATIE LAFFOON

BEST NEW ARTIST

JULIA MICHAELS


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SZA S

T. LOUIS-BORN, NEW JERSEY-RAISED SOLÁNA Imani Rowe is this year’s leading female GRAMMY nominee, with nods for Best Rap/Sung Performance (the Travis Scott collaboration “Love Galore”), Best R&B Song (“Supermodel”), Best Urban Contemporary Album (Ctrl) and Best R&B Performance (“The Weekend”) in addition to Best New Artist. Signed to Top Dawg Entertainment—which also boasts Kendrick Lamar and ScHoolboy Q among its star-studded roster—SZA released three EPs and wrote songs for Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, and Beyoncé before releasing her debut full-length, Ctrl, last June, debuting at No. 3 on the Billboard 200. She boasts a feathery, pillow-talk lilt that channels traditional jazz stylists like Ella Fitzgerald, defiant rapper Lauryn Hill, the grit of Mary J. Blige, and the lightness of neo-soulster India.Arie alongside idiosyncratic alt influences Björk and Jamiroquai. Like Issa Rae from HBO series “Insecure,” SZA, who contributed to the show’s

46 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

soundtrack, balances the vagaries of love and sexual bravado with a hard-earned independence. She brazenly confesses to “secretly banging” her lover’s homeboy when abandoned on Valentine’s Day (“Supermodel”) and praises the female anatomy with a nod to Forrest Gump (“Doves In The Wind,” featuring labelmate Lamar). But she also admits vulnerability (“I get so lonely I forget what I’m worth,” she pleads on “Drew Barrymore”), fretting about lost opportunities (“Prom”) or wishing she was a “Normal Girl,” the “type … you take home to your mama.” At the start of Ctrl, SZA listens to her mom speak about her greatest fear: that if she lost control “things would just, you know … be fatal.” By the time the album closes with “20 Something,” it’s clear SZA has faced the same fear, and has chosen to channel it productively, fusing quiet rage and sensual longing into music that defies easy categorization, melding all those disparate elements into an alluring whole.—Roy Trakin


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Luis Fonsi

LARRY BUSACCA/GETTY IMAGES

JONATHAN LEIBSON/ GETTY IMAGES

Daddy Yankee

JAY-Z

PULSE MUSIC GROUP

STEFAN EDOUARD

Jason Boyd

Marty James Garton Jr.

No I.D.

IPW

Erika Ender

NICOLAS FELIZOLA

Justin Bieber

OMAR CRUZ

JOHN SHEARER/WIREIMAGE.COM

SONG OF THE YEAR

“DESPACITO”

“4:44”

Ramon Ayala Rodriguez, Justin Bieber, Jason Boyd, Erika Ender, Luis Fonsi & Marty James Garton Jr., songwriters (Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee Featuring Justin Bieber, artists)

Shawn Carter & Dion Wilson, songwriters (JAY-Z, artist)

“Despacito,” which means “slowly” in Spanish, emerged first thing in the morning as Luis Fonsi recalled: “I remember waking up, and the first thing that came to my mind was the melody and the word ‘despacito.’ I literally ran to the studio and recorded it. I came up with the last verse first, rhyming ‘despacito’ with ‘Puerto Rico’ and ‘Ay bendito.’” Meeting up with frequent collaborator Erika Ender, he shared his vision of a “sexy, feel-good pop/urban song” with lyrics that were sensual but not overtly sexual. Musically, he wanted to merge a Latin sound with an urban/Reggaeton beat. “It was like piecing this puzzle together,” he said. With Ender he developed the melody, after which she shaped the words. “The lyrics,” Ender said, “have my woman’s touch. I needed to say how women like to be seduced, but in a classy, elegant way. We need to enjoy life, love, and romance way more despacito.” When writing the second verse, Fonsi felt it needed “a moment of explosion, and that’s when we came up with the idea to call Daddy Yankee. He heard it and immediately said yes, went to the studio, wrote his part and did his magic.” To Ender, the song is a confirmation that “music really is a universal language and a beautiful way of uniting people, showing that America is really the land that makes dreams come true and the land that, historically, embraces everyone. We are in a new era.”

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“I view songwriting with JAY-Z like scoring a movie,” said JAY-Z’s co-writer/producer Dion Wilson, aka No I.D. “My job is to see something in him, and then provoke it to come out with music.” Making the music honest was the goal. “That was the theme: What is necessary to live a good life?” Inspired by this direction, Wilson immediately crafted a track. “It inspired me to make the music exactly as you hear it,” he said. “Then I played it for him, looked at him and said, ‘So? What are you gonna do now?’ [JAY-Z] left the studio immediately, woke up the next day at 4:44 in the morning and started writing the words.” Realizing JAY-Z liked to leap into a song first thing in the morning, Wilson ensured there was always music ready for him: “JAY-Z would go to the treadmill in the early morning. I would have music in his email before he got to the treadmill.” Considered by spiritualists as an angelic sign of awakening, the time 4:44 is not only the album’s title track, but also the exact length of the song, which Wilson said was a happy accident. “That number has a lot of meaning for JAY-Z,” said Wilson. “Both he and Beyoncé were born on the fourth, and they have a long history with that number four and 4:44.” As JAY-Z told iHeartRadio, “I just believe it’s one of the best songs I’ve ever written.” Continued on page 50


Alessia Cara

Justin Tranter

Logic

Drew Taggart

Khalid

“ISSUES”

“1-800-273-8255”

Benny Blanco, Mikkel Storleer Eriksen, Tor Erik Hermansen, Julia Michaels & Justin Drew Tranter, songwriters (Julia Michaels, artist)

Alessia Caracciolo, Sir Robert Bryson Hall II, Arjun Ivatury, Khalid Robinson & Andrew Taggart, songwriters (Logic Featuring Alessia Cara & Khalid, artists)

“Issues” emerged when a fight with her boyfriend led Julia Michaels to write down one key word: “Issues.” Though tears came first, the song soon followed. “Our relationship was a constant projection of insecurities,” she said. “So I knew ‘Issues’ was the most fitting title for this.” To realize the song, she turned first to collaborator Benny Blanco, who laid down a “bare-bones string pad” that set the right vibe. Then she asked her longtime “songwriting husband,” Justin Tranter, to help write the words and melody. “[Justin] helps me puzzle-piece my emotions together,” she said. “I said, ‘I’ve got issues’ and he said, ‘You’ve got ’em too,’ and from there I knew exactly how I wanted this song to go. The next thing we knew, the song had been written. It was cathartic. The next day Tor and Mikkel came in and added the plucked strings, and it was done. It’s a song about my personal life. Only after it was written did I realize how much this song related to others. Because rarely do people in songs openly admit to having issues. I think it speaks to a society constantly trying to be perfect, when all of us are flawed. It says that it is OK to bare it all, and people will still accept you, even if you are teetering on unstable. I had no idea this small idea would turn into something bigger than I could have ever imagined. And I’m so glad it did.”

During Logic’s remarkable 2015 tour, in which he traveled across America to perform in the homes of a dozen lucky fans, he repeatedly received the same message: that his music saved their lives. “That really struck me,” he said. “Because I didn’t try to save anyone’s life, I just tried to make positive music. But can you imagine if I stood up and tried to create a song that was designed to save lives?” It’s that thought that led to writing this song about the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. With producer-pal Arjun Ivatury, Logic created a track and wrote the lyrics. But sensing it needed more, they left open spaces in the track onto which they invited two artists, both close friends and kindred spirits, to contribute. “I thought of Alessia [Cara] first,” said Logic. “She has so many uplifting songs. I told her I was rapping from the perspective of a person who wants to take their life and asked if she could play the operator on the lifeline. She said yes, and did an amazing job. I also wanted the voice of the person explaining why they want to be alive and not hurt anymore, so I reached out to Khalid, who honored me by coming and recording that perfect part. It was then I knew the song was done. And it became a dream come true. No matter what happens, this song already won. It already did its job. I’m just so happy it could help people. And that’s all that matters.”

50 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

KACEY TOMITA

ALEC SCHWEITZER

Arjun Ivatury

ROY KRAMER

MARY ELLEN MATTHEWS

ALEXANDRA GAVILLET

Tor Erik Hermansen and Mikkel Storleer Eriksen

RYAN JAY

Julia Michaels

CATIE LAFFOON

Benny Blanco

LUKE FONTANA

MATT ADAM

SONG OF THE YEAR


Jonathan Yip

KAI Z FENG

JEFFREY CLEARY

STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE.COM

Ray Romulus

Bruno Mars

MIKE SELSKY

Jeremy Reeves

MIKE SELSKY

MIKE SELSKY

Ray Charles McCullough II

Philip Lawrence

MIKE SELSKY

James Fauntleroy

Christopher Brody Brown

“THAT’S WHAT I LIKE” Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus & Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars, artist) To capture the old-school dance party vibe he wanted, Bruno Mars brought together two teams of writer-producers, and threw a party. Merging his Smeezingtons (Mars, Brody Brown, and Philip Lawrence) with old friends the Stereotypes (Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus, and Jonathan Yip), along with James Fauntleroy, he played the track and said it needed more. “Bruno had the outline of the song,” said Yip, “and said ‘I need to get that bounce.’” “He knows exactly what he wants,” said Romulus. “He’s an artist’s artist to the core, and a songwriting genius. He knew the feeling he wanted to bring to the dance floor, which he felt is missing in the marketplace.” Rather than use words, as Reeves explained, Mars let his body explain: “He was dancing the whole time, and would say, ‘I don’t want to dance like this, I want to dance like this!’ And we shaped the song to that movement.” To get that bounce, they used double-time, so that “you bounce twice to it,” said McCullough, also known as Charm. “It’s a slow tempo, which we love because you can bodyroll to it. We added all those in-between beats, which made it modern. These days the drums lead.” The lyrics came from Mars. “All that about the Cadillacs and champagne,” Romulus said, “that’s how Bruno is. He’s giving you a day in the life. It’s real. Working with him in the studio is always joyful, and that translates to the audience. Even how he sings it; you can hear him smiling.”—Paul Zollo

60th Annual GRAMMY Awards 51


home of the

60TH GRAMMY AWARDS®

congratulations to this year’s winners and nominees


NOMINATIONS For recordings released during the Eligibility Year Oct. 1, 2016, through Sept. 30, 2017. Note: More or less than 5 nominations in a category is the result of ties.

GENERAL FIELD

1 RECORD OF THE YEAR

Award to the Artist and to the Producer(s), Recording Engineer(s) and/or Mixer(s), and Mastering Engineer(s), if other than the Artist.

REDBONE Childish Gambino Donald Glover & Ludwig Goransson, producers; Donald Glover, Ludwig Goransson, Riley Mackin & Ruben Rivera, engineers/mixers; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer

DESPACITO Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee Featuring Justin Bieber Josh Gudwin, Mauricio Rengifo & Andrés Torres, producers; Josh Gudwin, Jaycen Joshua, Chris ‘TEK’ O’Ryan, Mauricio Rengifo, Juan G Rivera “Gaby Music,” Luis “Salda” Saldarriaga & Andrés Torres, engineers/mixers; Dave Kutch, mastering engineer

THE STORY OF O.J.

2 ALBUM OF THE YEAR

A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

“AWAKEN, MY LOVE!”

Ramon Ayala Rodriguez, Justin Bieber, Jason Boyd, Erika Ender, Luis Fonsi & Marty James Garton Jr., songwriters (Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee Featuring Justin Bieber)

Childish Gambino Donald Glover & Ludwig Goransson, producers; Bryan Carrigan, Chris Fogel, Donald Glover, Ludwig Goransson, Riley Mackin & Ruben Rivera, engineers/mixers; Donald Glover & Ludwig Goransson, songwriters; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer

4:44 JAY-Z JAY-Z & No I.D., producers; Jimmy Douglass & Gimel “Young Guru” Keaton, engineers/mixers; Shawn Carter & Dion Wilson, songwriters; Dave Kutch, mastering engineer

DAMN. Kendrick Lamar

JAY-Z & No I.D., producers; Jimmy Douglass & Gimel “Young Guru” Keaton, engineers/mixers; Dave Kutch, mastering engineer

HUMBLE.

MELODRAMA

Kendrick Lamar

Lorde

Asheton Hogan & Mike Will Made It, producers; Derek “MixedByAli” Ali, James Hunt & Matt Schaeffer, engineers/mixers; Mike Bozzi, mastering engineer

Jack Antonoff & Lorde, producers; Serban Ghenea, John Hanes & Laura Sisk, engineers/ mixers; Jack Antonoff & Ella Yelich-O’Connor, songwriters; Randy Merrill, mastering engineer

24K MAGIC

24K MAGIC

Bruno Mars Shampoo Press & Curl, producers; Serban Ghenea, John Hanes & Charles Moniz, engineers/ mixers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer

SONG OF THE YEAR

Award to the Artist(s) and to the Featured Artist(s), Songwriter(s) of new material, Producer(s), Recording Engineer(s), Mixer(s), and Mastering Engineer(s) credited with at least 33% playing time of the album, if other than the Artist.

DJ Dahi, Sounwave & Anthony Tiffith, producers; Derek “MixedByAli” Ali, James Hunt & Matt Schaeffer, engineers/mixers; K. Duckworth, D. Natche, M. Spears & A. Tiffith, songwriters; Mike Bozzi, mastering engineer

JAY-Z

3

Bruno Mars Shampoo Press & Curl, producers; Serban Ghenea, John Hanes & Charles Moniz, engineers/ mixers; Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence & Bruno Mars, songwriters; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer

DESPACITO

4:44 Shawn Carter & Dion Wilson, songwriters (JAY-Z)

ISSUES Benny Blanco, Mikkel Storleer Eriksen, Tor Erik Hermansen, Julia Michaels & Justin Drew Tranter, songwriters (Julia Michaels)

1-800-273-8255 Alessia Caracciolo, Sir Robert Bryson Hall II, Arjun Ivatury, Khalid Robinson & Andrew Taggart, songwriters (Logic Featuring Alessia Cara & Khalid)

THAT’S WHAT I LIKE Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus & Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

4 BEST NEW ARTIST

An artist will be considered for Best New Artist if their Eligibility Year release(s) achieved a breakthrough into the public consciousness and notably impacted the musical landscape.

ALESSIA CARA KHALID LIL UZI VERT JULIA MICHAELS SZA

54 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards


WE CELEBRATE

THE AWARD WINNERS & NOMINEES OF THE 60TH GRAMMY AWARDS®

®

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©2018 Time Inc. GRAMMY® GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2018 The Recording Academy


NOMINATIONS POP

7

DANCE/ELECTRONIC MUSIC

5

BEST TRADITIONAL POP VOCAL ALBUM

9

BEST POP SOLO PERFORMANCE

For new vocal or instrumental pop recordings. Singles or Tracks only.

LOVE SO SOFT Kelly Clarkson

PRAYING Kesha

MILLION REASONS Lady Gaga

WHAT ABOUT US P!nk

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new traditional pop recordings.

NOBODY BUT ME (DELUXE VERSION) Michael Bublé

TRIPLICATE Bob Dylan

IN FULL SWING

The Chainsmokers & Coldplay

DESPACITO Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee Featuring Justin Bieber

THUNDER Imagine Dragons

FEEL IT STILL Portugal. The Man

STAY Zedd & Alessia Cara

COLA CamelPhat & Elderbrook, producers; CamelPhat, mixer

Sarah McLachlan

TONY BENNETT CELEBRATES 90 (Various Artists)

8

SOMETHING JUST LIKE THIS

Bonobo, producer; Bonobo, mixer

WONDERLAND

Ed Sheeran

For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative pop recordings. Singles or Tracks only.

BAMBRO KOYO GANDA Bonobo Featuring Innov Gnawa

CamelPhat & Elderbrook

Dae Bennett, producer

BEST POP DUO/ GROUP PERFORMANCE

For solo, duo, group or collaborative performances. Vocal or Instrumental. Singles or Tracks only.

Seth MacFarlane

SHAPE OF YOU

6

BEST DANCE RECORDING

BEST POP VOCAL ALBUM

ANDROMEDA Gorillaz Featuring DRAM Damon Albarn, Jamie Hewlett, Remi Kabaka & Anthony Khan, producers; Stephen Sedgwick, mixer

TONITE LCD Soundsystem

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal pop recordings.

James Murphy, producer; James Murphy, mixer

KALEIDOSCOPE EP

ODESZA Featuring WYNNE & Mansionair

LINE OF SIGHT

Coldplay

Clayton Knight & Harrison Mills, producers; Eric J Dubowsky, mixer

LUST FOR LIFE

10

Lana Del Rey

EVOLVE Imagine Dragons

RAINBOW Kesha

JOANNE Lady Gaga

÷ (DIVIDE) Ed Sheeran

BEST DANCE/ ELECTRONIC ALBUM

For vocal or instrumental albums. Albums only.

MIGRATION Bonobo

3-D THE CATALOGUE Kraftwerk

MURA MASA Mura Masa

A MOMENT APART ODESZA

WHAT NOW Sylvan Esso

56 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards


NOMINATIONS CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

13 BEST METAL PERFORMANCE

15 BEST ROCK ALBUM

11

For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/group or collaborative metal recordings.

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rock, hard rock or metal recordings.

BEST CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM

INVISIBLE ENEMY

EMPEROR OF SAND

August Burns Red

Mastodon

BLACK HOODIE

HARDWIRED...TO SELF-DESTRUCT

Body Count

Metallica

FOREVER

THE STORIES WE TELL OURSELVES

Code Orange

Nothing More

For albums containing approximately 51% or more playing time of instrumental material. For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

WHAT IF The Jerry Douglas Band

SPIRIT Alex Han

MOUNT ROYAL Julian Lage & Chris Eldridge

PROTOTYPE Jeff Lorber Fusion

BAD HOMBRE Antonio Sanchez

ROCK

12 BEST ROCK PERFORMANCE

For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/group or collaborative rock recordings.

YOU WANT IT DARKER

SULTAN’S CURSE

VILLAINS

Mastodon

Queens Of The Stone Age

CLOCKWORKS

A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING

Meshuggah

The War On Drugs

14

ALTERNATIVE

BEST ROCK SONG

A Songwriter(s) award. Includes rock, hard rock, and metal songs. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

EVERYTHING NOW Arcade Fire

BLOOD IN THE CUT JT Daly & Kristine Flaherty, songwriters (K.Flay)

THE PROMISE Chris Cornell

Ben Anderson, Jonny Hawkins, Will Hoffman, Daniel Oliver, David Pramik & Mark Vollelunga, songwriters (Nothing More)

RUN

RUN

Foo Fighters

Foo Fighters, songwriters (Foo Fighters)

NO GOOD

THE STAGE

Kaleo

Zachary Baker, Brian Haner, Matthew Sanders, Jonathan Seward & Brooks Wackerman, songwriters (Avenged Sevenfold)

58 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Vocal or instrumental.

ATLAS, RISE!

GO TO WAR

GO TO WAR

BEST ALTERNATIVE MUSIC ALBUM

James Hetfield & Lars Ulrich, songwriters (Metallica)

Leonard Cohen

Nothing More

16

HUMANZ Gorillaz

AMERICAN DREAM LCD Soundsystem

PURE COMEDY Father John Misty

SLEEP WELL BEAST The National


NOMINATIONS R&B

17 BEST R&B PERFORMANCE

For new vocal or instrumental R&B recordings.

GET YOU

19 BEST R&B SONG

A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

FIRST BEGAN

Daniel Caesar Featuring Kali Uchis

PJ Morton, songwriter (PJ Morton)

DISTRACTION

LOCATION

Kehlani

HIGH Ledisi

Alfredo Gonzalez, Olatunji Ige, Samuel David Jiminez, Christopher McClenney, Khalid Robinson & Joshua Scruggs, songwriters (Khalid)

THAT’S WHAT I LIKE

REDBONE

Bruno Mars

Donald Glover & Ludwig Goransson, songwriters (Childish Gambino)

THE WEEKEND SZA

SUPERMODEL

18

Tyran Donaldson, Terrence Henderson, Greg Landfair Jr., Carter Lang & Solana Rowe, songwriters (SZA)

BEST TRADITIONAL R&B PERFORMANCE

THAT’S WHAT I LIKE

For new vocal or instrumental traditional R&B recordings.

LAUGH AND MOVE ON The Baylor Project

REDBONE Childish Gambino

WHAT I’M FEELIN’ Anthony Hamilton Featuring The Hamiltones

ALL THE WAY Ledisi

STILL Mali Music

Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Jeremy Reeves, Ray Romulus & Jonathan Yip, songwriters (Bruno Mars)

20 BEST URBAN CONTEMPORARY ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded contemporary vocal tracks derivative of R&B.

FREE 6LACK 6LACK

“AWAKEN, MY LOVE!” Childish Gambino

AMERICAN TEEN Khalid

CTRL SZA

STARBOY The Weeknd

60 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

21 BEST R&B ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new R&B recordings.

FREUDIAN Daniel Caesar

LET LOVE RULE Ledisi

24K MAGIC Bruno Mars

GUMBO PJ Morton

FEEL THE REAL Musiq Soulchild

RAP

22 BEST RAP PERFORMANCE

For a rap performance. Singles or Tracks only.

BOUNCE BACK Big Sean

BODAK YELLOW Cardi B

4:44 JAY-Z

HUMBLE. Kendrick Lamar

BAD AND BOUJEE Migos Featuring Lil Uzi Vert


SEPHORA.COM


NOMINATIONS 23

25

BEST RAP/SUNG PERFORMANCE

BEST RAP ALBUM

For a solo or collaborative performance containing both elements of R&B melodies and rap.

PRBLMS 6LACK

CREW Goldlink Featuring Brent Faiyaz & Shy Glizzy

FAMILY FEUD JAY-Z Featuring Beyoncé

LOYALTY. Kendrick Lamar Featuring Rihanna

LOVE GALORE SZA Featuring Travis Scott

24 BEST RAP SONG

A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rap recordings.

4:44

YOU LOOK GOOD Lady Antebellum

BETTER MAN Little Big Town

DRINKIN’ PROBLEM

JAY-Z

Midland

DAMN.

28

Kendrick Lamar

CULTURE Migos

LAILA’S WISDOM Rapsody

FLOWER BOY Tyler, The Creator

COUNTRY

26

BEST COUNTRY SONG

A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BETTER MAN Taylor Swift, songwriter (Little Big Town)

BODY LIKE A BACK ROAD Zach Crowell, Sam Hunt, Shane McAnally & Josh Osborne, songwriters (Sam Hunt)

BROKEN HALOS

BEST COUNTRY SOLO PERFORMANCE

Mike Henderson & Chris Stapleton, songwriters (Chris Stapleton)

BODY LIKE A BACK ROAD

Jess Carson, Cameron Duddy, Shane McAnally, Josh Osborne & Mark Wystrach, songwriters (Midland)

For new vocal or instrumental solo country recordings.

DRINKIN’ PROBLEM

BODAK YELLOW

Sam Hunt

Belcalis Almanzar, Dieuson Octave, Klenord Raphael, Shaftizm, Jordan Thorpe & J White, songwriters (Cardi B)

LOSING YOU

TIN MAN

Alison Krauss

Jack Ingram, Miranda Lambert & Jon Randall, songwriters (Miranda Lambert)

CHASE ME

Miranda Lambert

Brian Burton, Hector Delgado, Jaime Meline, Antwan Patton & Michael Render, songwriters (Danger Mouse Featuring Run The Jewels & Big Boi)

HUMBLE.

TIN MAN I COULD USE A LOVE SONG Maren Morris

EITHER WAY Chris Stapleton

K. Duckworth, Asheton Hogan & M. Williams II, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)

27

SASSY

BEST COUNTRY DUO/ GROUP PERFORMANCE

Marlanna Evans, E. Gabouer, Jason Martin & Wyann Vaughn, songwriters (Rapsody)

For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative country recordings.

THE STORY OF O.J.

IT AIN’T MY FAULT

Shawn Carter & Dion Wilson, songwriters (JAY-Z)

Brothers Osborne

MY OLD MAN Zac Brown Band

62 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

29 BEST COUNTRY ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new country recordings.

COSMIC HALLELUJAH Kenny Chesney

HEART BREAK Lady Antebellum

THE BREAKER Little Big Town

LIFE CHANGES Thomas Rhett

FROM A ROOM: VOLUME 1 Chris Stapleton


NOMINATIONS NEW AGE

30 BEST NEW AGE ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental new age recordings.

REFLECTION Brian Eno

SONGVERSATION: MEDICINE India.Arie

DANCING ON WATER Peter Kater

SACRED JOURNEY OF KU-KAI, VOLUME 5 Kitaro

SPIRAL REVELATION Steve Roach

JAZZ

31 BEST IMPROVISED JAZZ SOLO

For an instrumental jazz solo performance. Two equal performers on one recording may be eligible as one entry. If the Soloist listed appears on a recording billed to another Artist, the latter’s name is in parenthesis for identification. Singles or Tracks only.

CAN’T REMEMBER WHY Sara Caswell, soloist Track from: Whispers On The Wind (Chuck Owen And The Jazz Surge)

DANCE OF SHIVA Billy Childs, soloist Track from: Rebirth

WHISPER NOT Fred Hersch, soloist Track from: Open Book

MILES BEYOND John McLaughlin, soloist Track from: Live @ Ronnie Scott’s (John McLaughlin & The 4th Dimension)

64 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

ILIMBA Chris Potter, soloist Track from: The Dreamer Is The Dream

32 BEST JAZZ VOCAL ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal jazz recordings.

THE JOURNEY The Baylor Project

A SOCIAL CALL Jazzmeia Horn

BAD ASS AND BLIND Raul Midón

PORTER PLAYS PORTER

34 BEST LARGE JAZZ ENSEMBLE ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new ensemble jazz recordings.

MONK’ESTRA VOL. 2 John Beasley

JIGSAW Alan Ferber Big Band

BRINGIN’ IT Christian McBride Big Band

HOMECOMING Vince Mendoza & WDR Big Band Cologne

WHISPERS ON THE WIND

Randy Porter Trio With Nancy King

Chuck Owen And The Jazz Surge

DREAMS AND DAGGERS

35

Cécile McLorin Salvant

33

BEST LATIN JAZZ ALBUM

BEST JAZZ INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM

For vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material. The intent of this category is to recognize recordings that represent the blending of jazz with Latin, Iberian-American, Brazilian, and Argentinian tango music.

UPTOWN, DOWNTOWN

HYBRIDO— FROM RIO TO WAYNE SHORTER

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new instrumental jazz recordings.

Bill Charlap Trio

REBIRTH Billy Childs

PROJECT FREEDOM

Antonio Adolfo

ODDARA Jane Bunnett & Maqueque

Joey DeFrancesco & The People

OUTRA COISA—THE MUSIC OF MOACIR SANTOS

OPEN BOOK

Anat Cohen & Marcello Gonçalves

Fred Hersch

THE DREAMER IS THE DREAM Chris Potter

TÍPICO Miguel Zenón

JAZZ TANGO Pablo Ziegler Trio


New York, New York

.HWFKXP,GDKR

Vancouver, British Columbia

Aspen, Colorado

Representing award caliber homes in every category. Greatness is fueled by passion. At Engel & VĂślkers, our passion is to create an unforgettable experience that is discreetly tailored to each of our clients, wherever they are in their home journey. Across the street, across the country and across the world, Engel & VĂślkers opens the door to the life you aspire.

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NOMINATIONS GOSPEL/CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC

36 BEST GOSPEL PERFORMANCE/SONG

This award is given to the Artist(s) and Songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best traditional Christian, roots gospel or contemporary gospel single or track.

TOO HARD NOT TO Tina Campbell Tina Campbell & Warryn Campbell, songwriters

YOU DESERVE IT JJ Hairston & Youthful Praise Featuring Bishop Cortez Vaughn, David Bloom, JJ Hairston, Phontane Demond Reed & Cortez Vaughn, songwriters

WHAT A BEAUTIFUL NAME

HILLS AND VALLEYS

Hillsong Worship Ben Fielding & Brooke Ligertwood, songwriters

Tauren Wells

EVEN IF MercyMe David Garcia, Ben Glover, Crystal Lewis, MercyMe & Tim Timmons, songwriters

HILLS AND VALLEYS Tauren Wells Chuck Butler, Jonathan Smith & Tauren Wells, songwriters

38 BEST GOSPEL ALBUM

MY LIFE

CLOSE

The Walls Group Warryn Campbell, Eric Dawkins, Damien Farmer, Damon Thomas, Ahjah Walls & Darrel Walls, songwriters

Marvin Sapp

This award is given to the Artist(s) and Songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best contemporary Christian pop, Christian rap/hiphop, or Christian rock single or track.

OH MY SOUL Casting Crowns Mark Hall, Bernie Herms & Nichole Nordeman, songwriters

CLEAN Natalie Grant Natalie Grant, songwriter

66 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, traditional/roots gospel music, including country, Southern gospel, bluegrass, and Americana recordings.

THE BEST OF THE COLLINGSWORTH FAMILY—VOLUME 1 The Collingsworth Family

RESURRECTION

Travis Greene

Le’Andria

BEST CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC PERFORMANCE/SONG

BEST ROOTS GOSPEL ALBUM

CROSSOVER: LIVE FROM MUSIC CITY

BIGGER THAN ME

37

40

GIVE ME JESUS

Le’Andria

CeCe Winans Dwan Hill & Alvin Love III, songwriters

Zach Williams

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, traditional or contemporary/R&B gospel music recordings.

BETTER DAYS

NEVER HAVE TO BE ALONE

CHAIN BREAKER

SUNDAY SONG

Larry Cordle

Joseph Habedank

SING IT NOW: SONGS OF FAITH & HOPE Reba McEntire

HOPE FOR ALL NATIONS Karen Peck & New River

Anita Wilson

LATIN

LET THEM FALL IN LOVE

41

CeCe Winans

39 BEST CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC ALBUM

BEST LATIN POP ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin pop recordings.

LO ÚNICO CONSTANTE Alex Cuba

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, contemporary Christian music, including pop, rap/hip hop, or rock recordings.

MIS PLANES SON AMARTE

RISE

AMAR Y VIVIR EN VIVO DESDE LA CIUDAD DE MÉXICO, 2017

Danny Gokey

ECHOES (DELUXE EDITION) Matt Maher

LIFER MercyMe

Juanes

La Santa Cecilia

MUSAS (UN HOMENAJE AL FOLCLORE LATINOAMERICANO EN MANOS DE LOS MACORINOS) Natalia Lafourcade

EL DORADO Shakira


HELP CHILDREN FIND THEIR VOICE TRANSFORM A GUN. TRANSFORM A LIFE.™ CROSS X LIBERTY UNITED COLLECTOR’S EDITION Each pen is made with melted down illegal gun steel and features the engraved serial number of the destroyed gun. Every purchase helps fund education programs for at-risk kids in the USA, including music, dance and other artistic explorations. LEARN MORE AT CROSS.COM/LIBERTYUNITED

LIBERTY UNITED DONATES 20% OF PROFITS TO PROGRAMS TO PROTECT, EDUCATE, AND TRAIN AT-RISK CHILDREN IN PARTNER COMMUNITIES ACROSS THE UNITED STATES.


NOMINATIONS 42 BEST LATIN ROCK, URBAN OR ALTERNATIVE ALBUM For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin rock, urban or alternative recordings.

AYO Bomba Estéreo

PA’ FUERA

44

46

BEST TROPICAL LATIN ALBUM

BEST AMERICAN ROOTS SONG

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new tropical Latin recordings.

ALBITA Albita

ART OF THE ARRANGEMENT Doug Beavers

C4 Trío & Desorden Público

SALSA BIG BAND

SALVAVIDAS DE HIELO

Rubén Blades Con Roberto Delgado & Orquesta

Jorge Drexler

EL PARADISE Los Amigos Invisibles

RESIDENTE

GENTE VALIENTE Silvestre Dangond

INDESTRUCTIBLE

Residente

Diego El Cigala

43

AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

BEST REGIONAL MEXICAN MUSIC ALBUM (INCLUDING TEJANO)

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new regional Mexican (banda, norteño, corridos, gruperos, mariachi, ranchera and Tejano) recordings.

45 BEST AMERICAN ROOTS PERFORMANCE

Julión Álvarez Y Su Norteño Banda

For new vocal or instrumental American roots recordings. This is for performances in the style of any of the subgenres encompassed in the American Roots Music Field, including Americana, bluegrass, blues, folk or regional roots. Award to the Artist(s).

AYER Y HOY

KILLER DILLER BLUES

NI DIABLO NI SANTO

Banda El Recodo De Cruz Lizárraga

MOMENTOS Alex Campos

ARRIERO SOMOS VERSIONES ACÚSTICAS Aida Cuevas

ZAPATEANDO EN EL NORTE Humberto Novoa, producer (Various Artists)

Alabama Shakes

LET MY MOTHER LIVE Blind Boys Of Alabama

ARKANSAS FARMBOY Glen Campbell

STEER YOUR WAY Leonard Cohen

I NEVER CARED FOR YOU Alison Krauss

68 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

A Songwriter(s) award. Includes Americana, bluegrass, traditional blues, contemporary blues, folk or regional roots songs. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

CUMBERLAND GAP David Rawlings & Gillian Welch, songwriters (David Rawlings)

I WISH YOU WELL Raul Malo & Alan Miller, songwriters (The Mavericks)

IF WE WERE VAMPIRES Jason Isbell, songwriter (Jason Isbell And The 400 Unit)

IT AIN’T OVER YET Rodney Crowell, songwriter (Rodney Crowell Featuring Rosanne Cash & John Paul White)

MY ONLY TRUE FRIEND Gregg Allman & Scott Sharrard, songwriters (Gregg Allman)

47 BEST AMERICANA ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental Americana recordings.

SOUTHERN BLOOD Gregg Allman

SHINE ON RAINY DAY Brent Cobb

BEAST EPIC Iron & Wine

THE NASHVILLE SOUND Jason Isbell And The 400 Unit

BRAND NEW DAY The Mavericks


Excellence The people with an eye for investments salute the people with an ear for music. The Poppo Group of UBS Financial Services Inc. acknowledges the dedication of the Recording AcademyTM and proudly supports the 60th Annual GRAMMY AwardsÂŽ. Michael F. Poppo Managing Director Institutional Consultant The Poppo Group UBS Financial Services Inc. 1251 Avenue of Americas, 2nd Floor New York, NY 10020 212-626-8721

ubs.com/team/thepoppogroup

As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, UBS Financial Services Inc. offers both investment advisory services and brokerage services. Investment advisory services and brokerage services are separate and distinct, differ in material ways and are governed by different laws and separate arrangements. It is important that clients understand the ways in which we conduct business and that they carefully read the agreements and disclosures that we provide to them about the products or services we offer. For more information visit our website at ubs.com/workingwithus. Š UBS 2018. All rights reserved. UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC. CJ-UBS-1412752477


NOMINATIONS 48

50

52

BEST BLUEGRASS ALBUM

BEST CONTEMPORARY BLUES ALBUM

BEST REGIONAL ROOTS MUSIC ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental bluegrass recordings.

FIDDLER’S DREAM Michael Cleveland

LAWS OF GRAVITY The Infamous Stringdusters

ORIGINAL Bobby Osborne

UNIVERSAL FAVORITE Noam Pikelny

ALL THE RAGE—IN CONCERT VOLUME ONE [LIVE] Rhonda Vincent And The Rage

49

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental contemporary blues recordings.

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental regional roots music recordings.

ROBERT CRAY & HI RHYTHM

TOP OF THE MOUNTAIN

Robert Cray & Hi Rhythm

Dwayne Dopsie And The Zydeco Hellraisers

RECORDED LIVE IN LAFAYETTE

HO’OKENA 3.0

Sonny Landreth

Ho’okena

TAJMO

KALENDA

Taj Mahal & Keb’ Mo’

Lost Bayou Ramblers

GOT SOUL

MIYO KEKISEPA, MAKE A STAND [LIVE]

Robert Randolph & The Family Band

Northern Cree

LIVE FROM THE FOX OAKLAND

PUA KIELE

Tedeschi Trucks Band

Josh Tatofi

51

REGGAE

BEST FOLK ALBUM

53

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental traditional blues recordings.

MENTAL ILLNESS

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new reggae recordings.

MIGRATION BLUES

SEMPER FEMINA

BEST TRADITIONAL BLUES ALBUM

Eric Bibb

ELVIN BISHOP’S BIG FUN TRIO Elvin Bishop’s Big Fun Trio

ROLL AND TUMBLE R.L. Boyce

SONNY & BROWNIE’S LAST TRAIN Guy Davis & Fabrizio Poggi

BLUE & LONESOME The Rolling Stones

70 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental folk recordings.

Aimee Mann

Laura Marling

THE QUEEN OF HEARTS Offa Rex

YOU DON’T OWN ME ANYMORE The Secret Sisters

THE LAUGHING APPLE Yusuf/Cat Stevens

BEST REGGAE ALBUM

CHRONOLOGY Chronixx

LOST IN PARADISE Common Kings

WASH HOUSE TING J Boog

STONY HILL Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley

AVRAKEDABRA Morgan Heritage


A WARM CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OUR NOMINEES.


NOMINATIONS WORLD MUSIC

SPOKEN WORD

MUSICAL THEATER

54

56

58

BEST WORLD MUSIC ALBUM

BEST SPOKEN WORD ALBUM (INCLUDES POETRY, AUDIO BOOKS & STORYTELLING)

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental world music recordings.

MEMORIA DE LOS SENTIDOS Vicente Amigo

PARA MI Buika

ROSA DOS VENTOS Anat Cohen & Trio Brasileiro

SHAKA ZULU REVISITED: 30TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Ladysmith Black Mambazo

ELWAN Tinariwen

ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN A HURRY Neil deGrasse Tyson

BORN TO RUN

COME FROM AWAY

Bruce Springsteen

Ian Eisendrath, August Eriksmoen, David Hein, David Lai & Irene Sankoff, producers; David Hein & Irene Sankoff, composers/ lyricists (Original Broadway Cast Recording)

CONFESSIONS OF A SERIAL SONGWRITER Shelly Peiken

OUR REVOLUTION: A FUTURE TO BELIEVE IN (BERNIE SANDERS) Bernie Sanders And Mark Ruffalo

THE PRINCESS DIARIST Carrie Fisher

CHILDREN’S

55 BEST CHILDREN’S ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new musical or spoken word recordings that are created and intended specifically for children.

BRIGHTER SIDE Gustafer Yellowgold

FEEL WHAT U FEEL Lisa Loeb

LEMONADE Justin Roberts

RISE SHINE #WOKE Alphabet Rockers

SONGS OF PEACE & LOVE FOR KIDS & PARENTS AROUND THE WORLD Ladysmith Black Mambazo

72 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

BEST MUSICAL THEATER ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings. Award to the Principle Vocalist(s) and the Album Producer(s) of 51% or more playing time of the album. The Lyricist(s) and Composer(s) of a new score are eligible for an award if they have written and/or composed a new score that comprises 51% or more playing time of the album.

COMEDY

57 BEST COMEDY ALBUM

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

THE AGE OF SPIN & DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS Dave Chappelle

CINCO Jim Gaffigan

JERRY BEFORE SEINFELD Jerry Seinfeld

A SPECK OF DUST Sarah Silverman

WHAT NOW? Kevin Hart

DEAR EVAN HANSEN

Laura Dreyfuss, Mike Faist, Rachel Bay Jones, Kristolyn Lloyd, Michael Park, Ben Platt, Will Roland & Jennifer Laura Thompson, principal soloists; Pete Ganbarg, Alex Lacamoire, Stacey Mindich, Benj Pasek & Justin Paul, producers; Benj Pasek & Justin Paul, composers/lyricists (Original Broadway Cast Recording)

HELLO, DOLLY! Bette Midler, principal soloist; Steven Epstein, producer (Jerry Herman, composer & lyricist) (New Broadway Cast Recording)


NOMINATIONS MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA

59 BEST COMPILATION SOUNDTRACK FOR VISUAL MEDIA

Award to the Artist(s) and/or “in studio” Producer(s) of a majority of the tracks on the album. In the absence of both, award to the one or two individuals proactively responsible for the concept and musical direction of the album and for the selection of artists, songs and producers, as applicable. Award also goes to appropriately credited Music Supervisor(s).

BABY DRIVER (Various Artists) Edgar Wright, compilation producer

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2: AWESOME MIX VOL. 2 (Various Artists) James Gunn, compilation producer

HIDDEN FIGURES: THE ALBUM (Various Artists) Pharrell Williams; Pharrell Williams, compilation producer

LA LA LAND

GAME OF THRONES: SEASON 7 Ramin Djawadi, composer

HIDDEN FIGURES Benjamin Wallfisch, Pharrell Williams & Hans Zimmer, composers

LA LA LAND Justin Hurwitz, composer

61 BEST SONG WRITTEN FOR VISUAL MEDIA

A Songwriter(s) award. For a song (melody & lyrics) written specifically for a motion picture, television, video game, or other visual media, and released for the first time during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

CITY OF STARS Justin Hurwitz, Benj Pasek & Justin Paul, songwriters (Ryan Gosling & Emma Stone) Track from: La La Land

HOW FAR I’LL GO Lin-Manuel Miranda, songwriter (Auli’i Cravalho) Track from: Moana: The Songs

(Various Artists) Marius de Vries & Justin Hurwitz, compilation producers

I DON’T WANNA LIVE FOREVER (FIFTY SHADES DARKER)

MOANA: THE SONGS

Jack Antonoff, Sam Dew & Taylor Swift, songwriters (ZAYN & Taylor Swift)

(Various Artists) Opetaia Foa’i, Tom MacDougall, Mark Mancina & Lin-Manuel Miranda, compilation producers

60 BEST SCORE SOUNDTRACK FOR VISUAL MEDIA

Award to Composer(s) for an original score created specifically for, or as a companion to, a current legitimate motion picture, television show or series, video game, or other visual media.

Track from: Fifty Shades Darker

NEVER GIVE UP Sia Furler & Greg Kurstin, songwriters (Sia) Track from: Lion

STAND UP FOR SOMETHING Common, Andra Day & Diane Warren, songwriters (Andra Day Featuring Common) Track from: Marshall

COMPOSING/ARRANGING

62 BEST INSTRUMENTAL COMPOSITION

A Composer’s award for an original composition (not an adaptation) first released during the Eligibility Year. Singles or Tracks only.

ALKALINE Pascal Le Boeuf, composer (Le Boeuf Brothers & JACK Quartet)

CHOROS #3 Vince Mendoza, composer (Vince Mendoza & WDR Big Band Cologne)

HOME FREE (FOR PETER JOE) Nate Smith, composer (Nate Smith)

THREE REVOLUTIONS Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill & Chucho Valdés)

WARPED COWBOY Chuck Owen, composer (Chuck Owen And The Jazz Surge)

63 BEST ARRANGEMENT, INSTRUMENTAL OR A CAPPELLA

An Arranger’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

ALL HAT, NO SADDLE Chuck Owen, arranger (Chuck Owen And The Jazz Surge)

ESCAPADES FOR ALTO SAXOPHONE AND ORCHESTRA FROM CATCH ME IF YOU CAN John Williams, arranger (John Williams)

HOME FREE (FOR PETER JOE) Nate Smith, arranger (Nate Smith)

ARRIVAL

UGLY BEAUTY/PANNONICA

Jóhann Jóhannsson, composer

John Beasley, arranger (John Beasley)

DUNKIRK

WHITE CHRISTMAS

Hans Zimmer, composer

Chris Walden, arranger (Herb Alpert)

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NOMINATIONS 64

66

BEST ARRANGEMENT, INSTRUMENTS AND VOCALS

BEST BOXED OR SPECIAL LIMITED EDITION PACKAGE

An Arranger’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BOBO YEYE: BELLE EPOQUE IN UPPER VOLTA

LIVE AT THE WHISKY A GO GO: THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS Lynell George, album notes writer (Otis Redding)

WASHINGTON PHILLIPS AND HIS MANZARENE DREAMS

Tim Breen, art director (Various Artists)

Michael Corcoran, album notes writer (Washington Phillips)

EVERY TIME WE SAY GOODBYE

LOVELY CREATURES: THE BEST OF NICK CAVE AND THE BAD SEEDS (1984–2014)

HISTORICAL

Jorge Calandrelli, arranger (Clint Holmes Featuring Jane Monheit)

Tom Hingston, art director (Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds)

68 BEST HISTORICAL ALBUM

ANOTHER DAY OF SUN Justin Hurwitz, arranger (La La Land Cast)

I LIKE MYSELF

MAY 1977: GET SHOWN THE LIGHT

Joel McNeely, arranger (Seth MacFarlane)

Masaki Koike, art director (Grateful Dead)

I LOVES YOU PORGY/THERE’S A BOAT THAT’S LEAVIN’ SOON FOR NEW YORK

THE VOYAGER GOLDEN RECORD: 40TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Shelly Berg, Gregg Field, Gordon Goodwin & Clint Holmes, arrangers (Clint Holmes Featuring Dee Dee Bridgewater And The Count Basie Orchestra)

Lawrence Azerrad, Timothy Daly & David Pescovitz, art directors (Various Artists)

PUTIN Randy Newman, arranger (Randy Newman)

Tim Breen, Benjamin Marra & Ken Shipley, art directors (Various Artists)

PACKAGE

NOTES

Robert Russ, compilation producer; Matthias Erb, Martin Kistner & Andreas K. Meyer, mastering engineers (Glenn Gould)

65

67

LEONARD BERNSTEIN— THE COMPOSER

BEST RECORDING PACKAGE

BEST ALBUM NOTES

EL ORISHA DE LA ROSA

ARTHUR Q. SMITH: THE TROUBLE WITH THE TRUTH

Carlos Dussan, Juliana Jaramillo, Juan Martinez & Claudio Roncoli, art directors (Magín Díaz)

MURA MASA Alex Crossan & Matt De Jong, art directors (Mura Masa)

PURE COMEDY (DELUXE EDITION)

WARFARING STRANGERS: ACID NIGHTMARES

Nicolas Sheikholeslami & Vik Sohonie, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer (Various Artists)

Ted Olson, album notes writer (Various Artists)

Bryan S. Wright, album notes writer (Richard Dowling)

76 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Robert Russ, compilation producer; Martin Kistner & Andreas K. Meyer, mastering engineers (Leonard Bernstein)

BIG BEND KILLING: THE APPALACHIAN BALLAD TRADITION

SLEEP WELL BEAST

SOLID STATE

THE GOLDBERG VARIATIONS—THE COMPLETE UNRELEASED RECORDING SESSIONS JUNE 1955

SWEET AS BROKEN DATES: LOST SOMALI TAPES FROM THE HORN OF AFRICA

THE COMPLETE PIANO WORKS OF SCOTT JOPLIN

Gail Marowitz, art director (Jonathan Coulton)

Jon Kirby, Florent Mazzoleni, Rob Sevier & Ken Shipley, compilation producers; Jeff Lipton & Maria Rice, mastering engineers (Various Artists)

Wayne Bledsoe & Bradley Reeves, album notes writers (Various Artists)

Sasha Barr, Ed Steed & Josh Tillman, art directors (Father John Misty) Elyanna Blaser-Gould, Luke Hayman & Andrea Trabucco-Campos, art directors (The National)

BOBO YEYE: BELLE EPOQUE IN UPPER VOLTA

EDOUARD-LÉON SCOTT DE MARTINVILLE, INVENTOR OF SOUND RECORDING: A BICENTENNIAL TRIBUTE David Giovannoni, album notes writer (Various Artists)

WASHINGTON PHILLIPS AND HIS MANZARENE DREAMS Michael Corcoran, April G. Ledbetter & Steven Lance Ledbetter, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer (Washington Phillips)


AVAILABLE NOW

A portion of the proceeds from the album benefit MusiCares® and the GRAMMY Museum.®

2018GRAMMYALBUM.COM GRAMMY, GRAMMY AWARDS AND THE GRAMOPHONE LOGO ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF THE RECORDING ACADEMY AND ARE USED UNDER LICENSE. © 2018 THE RECORDING ACADEMY.


NOMINATIONS PRODUCTION, NON-CLASSICAL

69 BEST ENGINEERED ALBUM, NON-CLASSICAL An Engineer’s award. (Artists names appear in parentheses.)

EVERY WHERE IS SOME WHERE Brent Arrowood, Miles Comaskey, JT Daly, Tommy English, Kristine Flaherty, Adam Hawkins, Chad Howat & Tony Maserati, engineers; Joe LaPorta, mastering engineer (K.Flay)

IS THIS THE LIFE WE REALLY WANT? Nigel Godrich, Sam Petts-Davies & Darrell Thorp, engineers; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer (Roger Waters)

NATURAL CONCLUSION Ryan Freeland, engineer; Joao Carvalho, mastering engineer (Rose Cousins)

NO SHAPE Shawn Everett & Joseph Lorge, engineers; Patricia Sullivan, mastering engineer (Perfume Genius)

24K MAGIC Serban Ghenea, John Hanes & Charles Moniz, engineers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer (Bruno Mars)

70 PRODUCER OF THE YEAR, NON-CLASSICAL

GREG KURSTIN • Concrete And Gold (Foo Fighters) (A) • Dear Life (Beck) (S) • Dusk Till Dawn (ZAYN Featuring Sia) (S) • LOVE. (Kendrick Lamar Featuring Zacari) (T) • Strangers (Halsey Featuring Lauren Jauregui) (T) • Wall Of Glass (Liam Gallagher) (S)

BLAKE MILLS • Darkness And Light (John Legend) (A) Eternally Even (Jim James) (A) • God Only Knows (John Legend & Cynthia Erivo Featuring yMusic) (S) • Memories Are Now (Jesca Hoop) (A) • No Shape (Perfume Genius) (A) • Semper Femina (Laura Marling) (A)

NO I.D. • America (Logic Featuring Black Thought, Chuck D & Big Lenbo & No ID) (T) • The Autobiography (Vic Mensa) (A) • 4:44 (JAY-Z) (A)

THE STEREOTYPES • Before I Do (Sevyn Streeter) (S) • Better (Lil Yachty Featuring Stefflon Don) (T) • Deliver (Fifth Harmony) (T) • Finesse (Bruno Mars) (T) • Mo Bounce (Iggy Azalea) (S) • Sunshine (Kyle Featuring Miguel) (S) • That’s What I Like (Bruno Mars) (T)

71 A REMIXER’S AWARD

(Artists names appear in parentheses for identification.) Singles or Tracks only.

CAN’T LET YOU GO (LOUIE VEGA ROOTS MIX) Louie Vega, remixer (Loleatta Holloway)

A Producer’s award. (Artists names appear in parentheses.)

FUNK O’ DE FUNK (SMLE REMIX)

CALVIN HARRIS

UNDERCOVER (ADVENTURE CLUB REMIX)

• Don’t Quit (DJ Khaled & Calvin Harris Featuring Travis Scott & Jeremih) (T) • Funk Wav Bounces Vol. 1 (Calvin Harris Featuring Various Artists) (A)

SMLE, remixers (Bobby Rush)

Leighton James & Christian Srigley, remixers (Kehlani)

A VIOLENT NOISE (FOUR TET REMIX) Four Tet, remixer (The xx)

YOU MOVE (LATROIT REMIX) Dennis White, remixer (Depeche Mode)

78 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

SURROUND SOUND

72 BEST SURROUND SOUND ALBUM

For vocal or instrumental albums in any genre. Must be commercially released on DVD-Audio, DVD-Video, SACD, Blu-Ray, or burned downloadonly/streaming-only copies, and must provide a new surround mix of four or more channels. Award to the Surround Mix Engineer, Surround Producer (if any) and Surround Mastering Engineer (if any).

EARLY AMERICANS Jim Anderson, surround mix engineer; Darcy Proper, surround mastering engineer; Jim Anderson & Jane Ira Bloom, surround producers (Jane Ira Bloom)

KLEIBERG: MASS FOR MODERN MAN Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer (Eivind Gullberg Jensen & Trondheim Symphony Orchestra And Choir)

SO IS MY LOVE Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer (Nina T. Karlsen & Ensemble 96)

3-D THE CATALOGUE

Fritz Hilpert, surround mix engineer; Tom Ammermann, surround mastering engineer; Fritz Hilpert, surround producer (Kraftwerk)

TYBERG: MASSES Jesse Brayman, surround mix engineer; Jesse Brayman, surround mastering engineer; Blanton Alspaugh, surround producer (Brian A. Schmidt, Christopher Jacobson & South Dakota Chorale)


NOMINATIONS PRODUCTION, CLASSICAL

73 BEST ENGINEERED ALBUM, CLASSICAL

An Engineer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

DANIELPOUR: SONGS OF SOLITUDE & WAR SONGS Gary Call, engineer (Thomas Hampson, Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony)

KLEIBERG: MASS FOR MODERN MAN Morten Lindberg, engineer (Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Trondheim Vokalensemble & Trondheim Symphony Orchestra)

SCHOENBERG, ADAM: AMERICAN SYMPHONY; FINDING ROTHKO; PICTURE STUDIES Keith O. Johnson & Sean Royce Martin, engineers (Michael Stern & Kansas City Symphony)

SHOSTAKOVICH: SYMPHONY NO. 5; BARBER: ADAGIO Mark Donahue, engineer (Manfred Honeck & Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)

TYBERG: MASSES John Newton, engineer; Jesse Brayman, mastering engineer (Brian A. Schmidt, Christopher Jacobson & South Dakota Chorale)

74 PRODUCER OF THE YEAR, CLASSICAL A Producer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

BLANTON ALSPAUGH • Adamo: Becoming Santa Claus (Emmanuel Villaume, Kevin Burdette, Keith Jameson, Lucy Schaufer, Hila Plitmann, Matt Boehler, Jonathan Blalock, Jennifer Rivera & Dallas Opera Orchestra) • Aldridge: Sister Carrie (William Boggs, Keith Phares, Matt Morgan, Alisa Suzanne Jordheim, Stephen Cunningham, Adriana Zabala, Florentine Opera Chorus & Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra) • Copland: Symphony No. 3;

80 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Three Latin American Sketches (Leonard Slatkin & Detroit Symphony Orchestra) • Death & The Maiden (Patricia Kopatchinskaja & The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra) • Handel: Messiah (Andrew Davis, Noel Edison, Toronto Mendelssohn Choir & Toronto Symphony Orchestra) • Haydn: Symphonies Nos. 53, 64 & 96 (Carlos Kalmar & Oregon Symphony) • Heggie: It’s A Wonderful Life (Patrick Summers, William Burden, Talise Trevigne, Andrea Carroll, Rod Gilfry & Houston Grand Opera) • Tyberg: Masses (Brian A. Schmidt, Christopher Jacobson & South Dakota Chorale)

MANFRED EICHER • Mansurian: Requiem (Alexander Liebreich, Florian Helgath, RIAS Kammerchor & Münchener Kammerorchester) • Monk, M.: On Behalf Of Nature (Meredith Monk & Vocal Ensemble) • Point & Line - Debussy And Hosokawa (Momo Kodama) • Rímur (Arve Henriksen & Trio Mediaeval) • Silvestrov: Hieroglyphen Der Nacht (Anja Lechner)

DAVID FROST • Alma Española (Isabel Leonard) • Amplified Soul (Gabriela Martinez) • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas, Vol. 6 (Jonathan Biss) • Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 (Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra) • Garden Of Joys And Sorrows (Hat Trick Trio) • Laks: Chamber Works (ARC Ensemble) • Schoenberg, Adam: American Symphony; Finding Rothko; Picture Studies (Michael Stern & Kansas City Symphony) • Troika (Matt Haimovitz & Christopher O’Riley) • Verdi: Otello (Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Günther Groissböck, Željko Lučić, Dimitri Pittas, Aleksandrs Antonenko, Sonya Yoncheva, The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra & Chorus)

MORTEN LINDBERG • Furatus (Ole Edvard Antonsen & Wolfgang Plagge) • Interactions (Bård Monsen & Gunnar Flagstad) • Kleiberg: Mass For Modern Man (Eivind Gullberg Jensen, Trondheim Vokalensemble & Trondheim Symphony Orchestra) • Minor Major (Oslo String Quartet) • Northern Timbre (Ragnhild Hemsing & Tor Espen Aspaas) • So Is My Love (Nina T. Karlsen & Ensemble 96) • Thoresen: Sea Of Names (Trond Schau)

JUDITH SHERMAN • American Nocturnes (Cecile Licad) • The Birthday Party (Aki Takahashi) • Discovering Bach (Michelle Ross) • Foss: Pieces Of Genius (New York New Music Ensemble) • Secret Alchemy—Chamber Works By Pierre Jalbert (Curtis Macomber & Michael Boriskin) • Sevenfive—The John Corigliano Effect (Gaudette Brass) • Sonic Migrations— Music Of Laurie Altman (Various Artists) • Tribute (Dover Quartet) • 26 (Melia Watras & Michael Jinsoo Lim)

CLASSICAL

75 BEST ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE

Award to the Conductor and to the Orchestra.

CONCERTOS FOR ORCHESTRA Louis Langrée, conductor (Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra)

COPLAND: SYMPHONY NO. 3; THREE LATIN AMERICAN SKETCHES Leonard Slatkin, conductor (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)

DEBUSSY: IMAGES; JEUX & LA PLUS QUE LENTE Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony)

MAHLER: SYMPHONY NO. 5 Osmo Vänskä, conductor (Minnesota Orchestra)

SHOSTAKOVICH: SYMPHONY NO. 5; BARBER: ADAGIO Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)


We’re the life of the after-after-after-after-

party

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*Regular variety, IRI L52W ending 4.9.17


NOMINATIONS 76

MANSURIAN: REQUIEM

SHOSTAKOVICH: VIOLIN CONCERTOS NOS. 1 & 2

BEST OPERA RECORDING

Alexander Liebreich, conductor; Florian Helgath, chorus master (Anja Petersen & Andrew Redmond; Münchener Kammerorchester; RIAS Kammerchor)

BERG: LULU

Nigel Short, conductor (Tenebrae)

Daniil Trifonov

Lothar Koenigs, conductor; Daniel Brenna, Marlis Petersen & Johan Reuter; Jay David Saks, producer (The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra)

TYBERG: MASSES Brian A. Schmidt, conductor (Christopher Jacobson; South Dakota Chorale)

80

Award to the Conductor, Album Producer(s) and Principal Soloists.

BERG: WOZZECK Hans Graf, conductor; Anne Schwanewilms & Roman Trekel; Hans Graf & Brad Sayles, producers (Houston Symphony; Chorus Of Students And Alumni, Shepherd School Of Music, Rice University & Houston Grand Opera Children’s Chorus)

BIZET: LES PÊCHEURS DE PERLES Gianandrea Noseda, conductor; Diana Damrau, Mariusz Kwiecień, Matthew Polenzani & Nicolas Testé; Jay David Saks, producer (The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; The Metropolitan Opera Chorus)

HANDEL: OTTONE

MUSIC OF THE SPHERES

78 BEST CHAMBER MUSIC/SMALL ENSEMBLE PERFORMANCE

For new recordings of works with chamber or small ensemble (twenty-four or fewer members, not including the conductor). One award to the Ensemble and one award to the Conductor, if applicable.

BUXTEHUDE: TRIO SONATAS, OP. 1 Arcangelo

DEATH & THE MAIDEN Patricia Kopatchinskaja & The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra

George Petrou, conductor; Max Emanuel Cencic & Lauren Snouffer; Jacob Händel, producer (Il Pomo D’Oro)

DIVINE THEATRE—SACRED MOTETS BY GIACHES DE WERT

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV: THE GOLDEN COCKEREL

FRANCK, KURTÁG, PREVIN & SCHUMANN

Valery Gergiev, conductor; Vladimir Feliauer, Aida Garifullina & Andrei Serov; Ilya Petrov, producer (Mariinsky Orchestra; Mariinsky Chorus)

77 BEST CHORAL PERFORMANCE

Award to the Conductor, and to the Choral Director and/or Chorus Master where applicable and to the Choral Organization/Ensemble.

BRYARS: THE FIFTH CENTURY Donald Nally, conductor (PRISM Quartet; The Crossing)

HANDEL: MESSIAH Andrew Davis, conductor; Noel Edison, chorus master (Elizabeth DeShong, John Relyea, Andrew Staples & Erin Wall; Toronto Symphony Orchestra; Toronto Mendelssohn Choir)

82 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Stile Antico

Frank Peter Zimmermann; Alan Gilbert, conductor (NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester)

TRANSCENDENTAL

BEST CLASSICAL SOLO VOCAL ALBUM

Award to the Vocalist(s), Collaborative Artist(s) (Ex: pianists, conductors, chamber groups) Producer(s), Recording Engineers/Mixers with 51% or more playing time of new material.

BACH & TELEMANN: SACRED CANTATAS Philippe Jaroussky; Petra Müllejans, conductor (Ann-Kathrin Brüggemann & Juan de la Rubia; Freiburger Barockorchester)

CRAZY GIRL CRAZY— MUSIC BY GERSHWIN, BERG & BERIO Barbara Hannigan (Orchestra Ludwig)

GODS & MONSTERS Nicholas Phan; Myra Huang, accompanist

IN WAR & PEACE— HARMONY THROUGH MUSIC Joyce DiDonato; Maxim Emelyanychev, conductor (Il Pomo D’Oro)

Joyce Yang & Augustin Hadelich

SVIRIDOV: RUSSIA CAST ADRIFT

MARTHA ARGERICH & FRIENDS— LIVE FROM LUGANO 2016

Dmitri Hvorostovsky; Constantine Orbelian, conductor (St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra & Style Of Five Ensemble)

Martha Argerich & Various Artists

79 BEST CLASSICAL INSTRUMENTAL SOLO

Award to the Instrumental Soloist(s) and to the Conductor when applicable.

BACH: THE FRENCH SUITES Murray Perahia

HAYDN: CELLO CONCERTOS Steven Isserlis; Florian Donderer, conductor (The Deutsch Kammerphilharmonie Bremen)

LEVINA: THE PIANO CONCERTOS Maria Lettberg; Ariane Matiakh, conductor (Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin)


NOMINATIONS 81 BEST CLASSICAL COMPENDIUM Award to the Artist(s) and to the Album Producer(s) and Engineer(s) of over 51% playing time of the album, if other than the artist.

SONGS OF SOLITUDE Richard Danielpour, composer (Thomas Hampson, Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony)

84 BEST MUSIC FILM

Track from: Danielpour: Songs Of Solitude & War Songs

For concert/performance films or music documentaries. Award to the Artist, Video Director, and Video Producer.

BARBARA

VIOLA CONCERTO

ONE MORE TIME WITH FEELING

Alexandre Tharaud; Cécile Lenoir, producer

Jennifer Higdon, composer (Roberto Díaz, Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony)

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds Andrew Dominik, video director; Dulcie Kellett & James Wilson, video producers

HIGDON: ALL THINGS MAJESTIC, VIOLA CONCERTO & OBOE CONCERTO Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

KURTÁG: COMPLETE WORKS FOR ENSEMBLE & CHOIR Reinbert de Leeuw, conductor; Guido Tichelman, producer

Track from: Higdon: All Things Majestic, Viola Concerto & Oboe Concerto

MUSIC VIDEO/FILM

83 BEST MUSIC VIDEO

LES ROUTES DE L’ESCLAVAGE

Award to the Artist, Video Director, and Video Producer.

Jordi Savall, conductor; Benjamin Bleton, producer

UP ALL NIGHT

MADEMOISELLE: PREMIÈRE AUDIENCE—UNKNOWN MUSIC OF NADIA BOULANGER

Beck CANADA, video director; Alba Barneda, Laura Serra Estorch & Oscar Romagosa, video producers

Lucy Mauro; Lucy Mauro, producer

82 BEST CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL COMPOSITION

A Composer’s Award. (For a contemporary classical composition composed within the last 25 years, and released for the first time during the Eligibility Year.) Award to the Librettist, if applicable.

CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA Zhou Tian, composer (Louis Langrée & Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra) Track from: Concertos For Orchestra

PICTURE STUDIES Adam Schoenberg, composer (Michael Stern & Kansas City Symphony) Track from: Schoenberg, Adam: American Symphony; Finding Rothko; Picture Studies

REQUIEM Tigran Mansurian, composer (Alexander Liebreich, Florian Helgath, RIAS Kammerchor & Münchener Kammerorchester)

84 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

LONG STRANGE TRIP (The Grateful Dead) Amir Bar-Lev, video director; Alex Blavatnik, Ken Dornstein, Eric Eisner, Nick Koskoff & Justin Kreutzmann, video producers

THE DEFIANT ONES (Various Artists) Allen Hughes, video director; Sarah Anthony, Fritzi Horstman, Broderick Johnson, Gene Kirkwood, Andrew Kosove, Laura Lancaster, Michael Lombardo, Jerry Longarzo, Doug Pray & Steven Williams, video producers

SOUNDBREAKING

Jain Lionel Hirle & Gregory Ohrel, video directors; Yodelice, video producer

(Various Artists) Maro Chermayeff & Jeff Dupre, video directors; Joshua Bennett, Julia Marchesi, Sam Pollard, Sally Rosenthal, Amy Schewel & Warren Zanes, video producers

THE STORY OF O.J.

TWO TRAINS RUNNIN’

MAKEBA

JAY-Z Shawn Carter & Mark Romanek, video directors; Daniel Midgley, Elizabeth Newman & Chaka Pilgrim, video producers

HUMBLE. Kendrick Lamar The Little Homies & Dave Meyers, video directors; Jason Baum, Dave Free, Jamie Rabineau, Nathan K. Scherrer & Anthony Tiffith, video producers

1-800-273-8255 Logic Featuring Alessia Cara & Khalid Andy Hines, video director; Brandon Bonfiglio, Mildred Delamota, Andrew Lerios, Luga Podesta & Alex Randall, video producers

(Various Artists) Sam Pollard, video director; Benjamin Hedin, video producer


BEST OF LUCK TO YOU AND ALL THE SOUNDEXCHANGE MEMBERS NOMINATED FOR THE 60 TH GRAMMY AWARDS ®: 6LACK (2) Aimee Mann Alabama Shakes Albita Alessia Cara (4) Alex Campos Alison Krauss (2) Alphabet Rockers Anthony Hamilton Arcade Fire August Burns Red Bette Midler Beyoncé Bill Charlap Trio Billy Childs (2) Blake Mills Bob Dylan Bobby Osborne Brent Cobb Brent Faiyaz Brothers Osborne Bruce Springsteen Bruno Mars (6) Cardi B (2) Casting Crowns CeCe Winans (2) Cécile McLorin Salvant Childish Gambino (5) Chris Cornell Chris Eldridge Chris Stapleton (3) Coldplay (2) Common Common Kings Daddy Yankee (3) Daniel Caesar (2) Danny Gokey David Rawlings

Doug Beavers Ed Sheeran (2) Elvin Bishop’s Big Fun Trio Father John Misty (2) Foo Fighters (2) Fred Hersch (2) Glen Campbell Goldlink Gustafer Yellowgold Humberto Novoa India.Arie Iron & Wine J Boog Jason Isbell and The 400 Unit (2) Jay-Z (8) Jeff Lorber Fusion Jerry Seinfeld Jim Gaffigan Joey DeFrancesco + The People John Beasley John McLaughlin Joseph Habedank Josh Tatofi Juanes Julia Michaels (2) Julian Lage Julión Álvarez y Su Norteño Banda Justin Bieber (3) Justin Roberts Kehlani Kelly Clarkson Kendrick Lamar (7) Kenny Chesney Kesha (2) Khalid (5)

Lady Antebellum (2) Lady Gaga (2) Larry Cordle Le’Andria Ledisi (3) Leonard Cohen (2) Lil Uzi Vert (2) Lin-Manuel Miranda (2) Lisa Loeb Little Big Town (2) Logic (2) Lorde Los Amigos Invisibles Luis Fonsi (3) Maren Morris Marvin Sapp Mastodon (2) Matt Maher MercyMe (2) Metallica Michael Bublé Michael Cleveland Midland Migos (2) Miguel Zenón Miranda Lambert (2) Musiq Soulchild Natalia Lafourcade Natalie Grant Noam Pikelny Nothing More (3) Odesza (2) P!nk Peter Kater Portugal. The Man Queens of the Stone Age Raul Midón Reba McEntire

Residente Rhonda Vincent and The Rage Rihanna Robert Cray & Hi Rhythm Rodney Crowell Rubén Blades con Roberto Delgado & Orquesta Sam Hunt (2) Sara Caswell Sarah McLachlan Sarah Silverman Seth MacFarlane Silvestre Dangond Sonny Landreth Steve Roach Sylvan Esso SZA (5) Taj Mahal & Keb ‘Mo’ Tauren Wells (2) The Baylor Project (2) The Chainsmokers The Collingsworth Family The Hamiltones The Jerry Douglas Band The National The War On Drugs The Weeknd Thomas Rhett Travis Scott Vince Mendoza (2) Zach Williams Zedd


RECORDING ACADEMY™

SPECIAL MERIT AWARDS In addition to the GRAMMY Awards, the Recording Academy presents other notable honors. These awards recognize contributions of significance to the recording field that fall outside the framework of the GRAMMY Awards categories and include the Lifetime Achievement Award, Trustees Award, Technical GRAMMY Award, GRAMMY Legend Award, Music Educator Award, and GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Award. The following pages recognize this year’s Special Merit Award recipients. A complete list of past recipients is available in the Awards section of GRAMMY.com.

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

TRUSTEES AWARD

The Lifetime Achievement Award, established in 1962,

This Special Merit Award is presented by vote of the

is presented by vote of the Recording Academy’s

Recording Academy’s National Trustees to individuals

National Trustees to performers who, during their

who have made significant contributions, other than

lifetimes, have made creative contributions of

performance, to the field of recording. The Trustees

outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording.

Award was established in 1967.

TECHNICAL GRAMMY® AWARD

GRAMMY LEGEND AWARD

Presented by vote of the Recording Academy’s National

This Special Merit Award is presented on occasion by

Trustees, the Technical GRAMMY Award recognizes

the Recording Academy to individuals or groups for

individuals and companies that have made contributions of

ongoing contributions and influence in the recording

outstanding technical significance to the field of recording.

field. The GRAMMY Legend Award was inaugurated

The Technical GRAMMY was first awarded in 1994.

in 1990.

MUSIC EDUCATOR AWARD™

GRAMMY HALL OF FAME®

Launched in 2013, the Music Educator Award, in

The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Award was established by

collaboration with the GRAMMY Museum, recognizes

the Recording Academy’s National Trustees in 1973

current educators who have made a significant and

to honor recordings of lasting qualitative or historical

lasting contribution to the field of music education and

significance that are at least 25 years old. Inductees

who demonstrate a commitment to the broader cause

are selected annually by a special member committee

of maintaining music education in their schools.

of experts and historians from all branches of the

The recipient is approved by the Recording Academy’s

recording arts with final approval by the Recording

Board of Trustees.

Academy’s Board of Trustees.

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2018 RECORDING ACADEMY™ LIFETIME ACHEIVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENT DEAR NEIL, There is no one in music more deserving of this Lifetime Achievement Award than you, and it is a testament to your talent and artistic vision that you are still at the very top of your game. You continue to write songs that move us, make records that inspire us and excite audiences the world over with your incomparable skills as a performer. We are so proud that you are a Capitol Records artist and Universal Music Publishing songwriter, and honored that you’ve entrusted us with your singular and career-spanning body of work.

CONGRATULATIONS TO YOU, NEIL With love from your

CAPITOL MUSIC GROUP & UNIVERSAL MUSIC PUBLISHING GROUP FAMILIES


MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

HAL BLAINE

BY BRIAN WILSON

“B

e My Baby” was the first record I heard Hal Blaine play on. I was driving along in Los Angeles and the disc jockey said, ‘Here we go with ‘Be My Baby’ by the Ronettes.’ I started listening and just went “What?!” I pulled over to the side of the road I was so blown away. The song blew my mind—and it starts with the drums. At the time I didn’t know that was Hal playing, but I knew I wanted that drum sound. Hal first played on my records in 1964 and he just blew me away. I couldn’t believe how great he was on those drums. Working with him, I started thinking more broadly about the overall sound, and what was possible in the studio. I liked letting Hal experiment and when we got the right take we’d both get so excited—“We got it!” Sometimes Hal would be in the booth with me for playback and he was always very supportive. He’d listen to the overall mix and say, “I like what you’ve got going.” I could always trust him. He also told me “Good Vibrations” was probably the greatest record that he ever played on. That was cool to hear. I used Hal first before I started working with the whole Wrecking Crew. At first, I was a little intimidated by

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them because they’d played on so many great records. After a couple of sessions I got with it and it wasn’t as rough for me. Hal was a big part of that. He got what I was doing and was right with me. And he made me laugh so much. That helped me a lot. After the sessions were over he’d stay with me and we’d start telling jokes to each other. I couldn’t believe how funny he was. Hal was the most famous drummer in the whole city of Los Angeles when I started working with him. He was playing on everybody’s hit records in the ’60s. I always felt lucky to have him on mine. Hal was so into his drumming, but he’s probably the easiest drummer I ever worked with. He was just so good and could learn anything so fast. He’s one of the best musicians I ever worked with. He’s a legend in the music business. And he’s a friend. I love him. Hal Blaine was part of the famed Los Angeles-based studio musicians known as the Wrecking Crew. He played on many of the best-known hits of the Beach Boys, led by Brian Wilson, including “California Girls,” “God Only Knows,” and “Good Vibrations.”


days I mostly have to tell kids that I sang it long before the Oscarwinning animated film Shrek! Smash Mouth, of course, took “Believer” to the top as a part of that movie in 2001. Neil also wrote “Look Out (Here Comes Tomorrow),” which was on the Monkees’ second album, More Of The Monkees, and the success of that and “I’m A Believer” inspired him to write our next single. “A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You” was recorded in late January 1967 and became a huge hit in only a few weeks. My late great buddy, Davy Jones, sang the lead on “A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You,” and I honor him and Neil by singing it now at all of my solo shows. Always taking time to mention how blessed we were to work with so many gifted songwriters, like Neil. Over the years, of course, Neil became a superstar as a writer and performer. His best-known songs— “Sweet Caroline,” “Cracklin’ Rosie,” “I Am … I Said”—are as recognizable and lasting as Egypt’s pyramids. And he’s never stopped. That brings us to present day. The final Neil Diamond song written for the Monkees was one called, “Love To Love.” With the group’s hectic schedule at that time, though, we never finished “Love To Love.” In 2016, however, Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork, and I finished the track that Neil had started with Davy and producer Jeff Barry 49 years earlier! It ended up being a standout song on our Top 10 album, Good Times; our last Neil Diamond classic, and my last chance to sing with Davy Jones. Thank you, Neil, for giving me and everyone else so many good times and great hits throughout the years. MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

NEIL DIAMOND

BY MICKY DOLENZ

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first heard Neil Diamond’s “I’m A Believer” in midOctober 1966, when his producer, Jeff Barry, played for me and the other Monkees the phenomenal track that Barry had recently cut with Neil on acoustic guitar. Neil had already had a couple of hits on the radio that year—“Cherry, Cherry” and “Solitary Man”—but this was to be one of the biggest records of both his and my career. It came out just a few weeks after I sang the lead vocal, and by Christmas of ’66, it was headed for the No. 1 slot on Billboard, Cash Box, and Record World. It went on to become a worldwide smash in 1967 for the Monkees. A timeless classic, Neil brought it back to the charts in his own re-recorded version in 1971, but these

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Micky Dolenz is an actor, singer, director, writer, and radio DJ who enjoyed seven weeks at No. 1 on the Hot 100 with the Monkees’ “I’m A Believer” in 1966. In 2016, the Monkees celebrated their 50th anniversary with a tour and well-received album, Good Times.


American Music, but 45 years later my only vivid memory of that winter evening is of Emmylou Harris. Now, don’t get me wrong. There exists a high-quality bootleg of that show, evidence that Gram was in fine form that night, but I suspect that I wasn’t the only person that walked out onto Chenevert street when the show was over wondering, “Who was that girl?” Well, to begin with, at the risk of recklessly untimely political incorrectness, she was just so … beautiful. Supernaturally so. Beauty incongruous in any earthly context until she opened her mouth and she sang. Only then did it all make any sense. “Oh, I get it.” I muttered, probably out loud. “She’s an angel.” My first winter in Nashville everybody was listening to two records, Bob Dylan’s Blood On The Tracks and Emmylou Harris’ Pieces Of The Sky. Two of my peers, Rodney Crowell and Danny Flowers, had songs on Emmy’s major label debut and their accomplishment became the benchmark for songwriters in Nashville who aspired to something loftier than a high charting single on the country charts. Emmy’s taste in material was both impeccable and eclectic. Her records were rooted in a love of “the deep dark poetry” in country music that Gram had instilled in her, but she wasn’t afraid to tackle the Beatles or Delbert McClinton or Paul Simon. An Emmylou Harris cover was, and is, the litmus test, the gold standard, the ultimate badge of honor in my crowd, and I’m proud to say that I’ve had two. I suppose it was inevitable that the greatest interpreter of songs of my generation would one day set out to write an entire album of her own material. She had sung a lot of great songs in her career so her standards were high but she did it, and then she did it again, and again, and I am honored that I share my job description, that of singer/songwriter, with Emmylou Harris. MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

EMMYLOU HARRIS

BY STEVE EARLE

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n 1973 I was an 18-year-old aspiring singer/ songwriter following literally in the footsteps of Townes Van Zandt, which meant I spent as much time in Houston, Texas, as anywhere else. Being part of Townes’ crowd meant that his reputation preceded me and I was warmly welcomed in some establishments and banned from others before I ever set foot in the door. Luckily for me, one of the bridges that my mentor hadn’t burned down was the legendary downtown music venue Liberty Hall. Thanks to a benevolent nod and a wink at the door from co-owner and patron of the arts Roberto Gonzales, I was present there on the evening of Feb. 24. Roberto knew that I had practically worshipped Gram Parsons since his tenure with the Byrds and that I was there on a pilgrimage to see the Prophet of Cosmic

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Three-time GRAMMY winner Steve Earle scored Top 10 country hits with “Guitar Town” and “Goodbye’s All We’ve Got Left.” As an actor, he’s appeared on shows including “The Wire” and “Treme.” His most recent album is So You Wannabe An Outlaw.


®


LOUIS JORDAN LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

BY BRANFORD MARSALIS

GILLES PETARD/REDFERNS

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y first encounter with Louis Jordan was in the early ’80s. Jazz great Art Blakey was singing “Ain’t Nobody Here But Us Chickens” and I had no clue what it was. “You need to learn as many of his songs as possible,” Blakey said. “Along with Fletcher Henderson and Cab Calloway, Louis Jordan’s music is the gateway between jazz and popular music. All the great jazz cats knew all of his tunes.” Like many young people, my initial attraction to jazz was its complicated melodies and harmonies. But unlike many young jazzers, I cut my teeth playing popular music before I had ever thought of jazz. So, the idea of having to listen to Jordan was anathema to me. Without me knowing it at that time, Blakey’s advice helped me accelerate my learning; regardless of its complexities, all audiences respond to music with a good beat and a great melody. Not long after that, I was bouncing to the sounds of some of Jordan’s biggest hits. Along with his band, Tympany Five, Jordan cut songs that laid the foundation for R&B and rock and roll, including “Is You Is Or Is You Ain’t (Ma’ Baby),” “Caldonia,” “Beware,” “I Want You To Be My Baby,” “Five Guys Named Moe,” and “Saturday Night Fish Fry.” These songs are classics in the jazz and R&B lexicon, and they made a big difference in how I approached the more complicated styles I play today. Many years later, in 2007, I had the privilege of playing with the great Roy Haynes. During our rehearsal, I played one of Jordan’s songs in my solo. Haynes said, “You know that tune? Wow! Not many young guys know that stuff.” I thought about Art, and how little I knew then, and realized I had come full circle. For his contributions to jazz, blues, and popular music, Louis Jordan is more than worthy to receive the Recording Academy’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Branford Marsalis is a three-time GRAMMYwinning instrumentalist and composer. His most recent album, 2016’s Upward Spiral, received a GRAMMY nomination for Best Jazz Album.


CHARLIE GILLETT/REDFERNS

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

THE METERS

(From left) Leo Nocentelli, Cyril Neville, Joseph “Zigaboo” Modeliste, Art Neville, and George Porter Jr.

BY PERCY “MASTER P” MILLER

W

hen most people think of the music of New Orleans, they think of the birthplace of jazz. And although that is true, we also are the home of the funkmasters, the Meters. If you are from New Orleans, you grew up listening to the Meters. Anyone from the city knows the sound of the “Cissy Strut.” It was the soundtrack to so many moments in NOLA history. When you would hear the intro, you were grabbing your umbrella and handkerchief to catch the second line. When you come from a town like New Orleans, where music is part of the fabric of the city, where the rhythm of the sounds that were birthed here are celebrated across the world, you grow to love the music. It’s part of you. When I reminisce on how many times we would second line to “Cissy Strut,” and what it represented, I feel a sense of pride. All New Orleanians know it well. Most people think of the Meters as a funk band from New Orleans, but they represent so much more. Art Neville, Cyril Neville, Leo Nocentelli, Joseph “Zigaboo”

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Modeliste, and George Porter Jr., are a group of seriously talented musicians who transcend NOLA. As the house band for the legend Allen Toussaint, they made powerful rhythm and funk for a lot of classic artists. They made hits like “Look-Ka Py Py,” which led to sessions with Paul McCartney, Labelle, and the Rolling Stones. The Meters’ music is as synonymous with New Orleans as a bowl of gumbo or a po’ boy sandwich. Their music was important to me all my life. You can walk through the Quarters and still hear “Cissy Strut” playing on any given day. The Meters music will always be in my soul. Such a worthy group of men representing so much of my home city of New Orleans, their music gives us a reason to celebrate. Percy “Master P” Miller is the founder of No Limit Records and current president of urban music at Cinq Music. He sampled elements of the Meters hit “Cissy Strut” on his 1994 song “211.”


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(From left) John Deacon, Freddie Mercury, Roger Taylor, and Brian May

LEX VAN ROSSEN/MAI/REDFERNS

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

QUEEN

BY BILLY CORGAN

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oo often the graying mandarin of rock and roll intelligentsia (and their fleecing minions) conflate achievement with result, which in the case of Queen is all too easy. For they were both a success in the grandest terms and wildly misunderstood; misappropriated as it were by those picking the bones due to singer Freddie Mercury’s early passing. For Freddie was indeed Queen’s biggest fan, and he isn’t round to clarify how they’ve been done wrong.  No, Queen were neither kitsch nor camp, vainglorious nor grandiose. In fact, my argument stands that the lads were more like scientists who took the burgeoning embers of glam and blew on them afoul, all because their recording debut was so savaged by the British press for the high crimes of ambition and pretense. To whit, Freddie declared: “Now we’ll show them!”  ’Til then they were a silvery machine with a few, and in hindsight, innocent musical aims. Less conceptual than Bowie, and certainly less strum-and-drang than Zeppelin, an un-bullied Queen may have registered in the historical

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annals as simply good enough. But Freddie’s revenge now took who and what they were and inverted the plot to now include his own, mythic schadenfreude. An assumption in which came the operatic assassin who’d sing the high C until the glass breaks, and dutifully bandmates Brian May, Roger Taylor, and John Deacon followed, overcranking their own roles so that blue-jean roots were eradicated, and their common language became a bejeweled fugue not on what success is, but sounds like.  Stripped and unadorned, Queen play beautifully, and with a churlish heart, impressionistically sketching Valhalla all while admitting they are nothing more than the kids at the end of the pub having a laugh. So yes, where they got to, which was the tippery-top, they did deserve. But that’s because no one has else dared follow. Billy Corgan is a singer, songwriter, producer, and frontman of celebrated alternative rock band The Smashing Pumpkins.


UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS salutes Maren Morris, Chuck Owen, Brian A. Schmidt and the 34 additional UNT alumni & faculty who collaborated in GRAMMY®-nominated projects this year! For a complete list of GRAMMY® winners from UNT see

about.music.unt.edu


always sultry on the low notes, a take-nomess edgy wail with a hint of yearning, and a smile inside the high notes. All of this while dancing/strutting/sitting in black stilettos, a black leather halter top jumpsuit, while defying her age! She was beautifully defiant. She, like other legends, gave me another master class on the art of singing soul, blues, gospel, and rock and roll like it was one long sentence. Tina Turner ignores any genre box given to her.  As she hovered over the audience in a crane, I could have sworn from my nosebleed seat she looked right at me. We sang with her, reached for her, and she sang, thanking her fans in between notes. Those moments had me in tears because she always owns her presence on this earth, while being unapologetically fearless in a male-dominated genre, while being a sexy grown woman, accenting her energy with passion inside the music. I was looking at a black woman, who was a survivor, who did not let the dark parts of her life become her full story. She changed her narrative, took back her life, and her music. Through faith and doing the work, she continues to inspire the world. She has influenced the next generation of artists like myself, Beyoncé, Alice Smith, Kimberly Nichole, and Fantasia, just to name a few. From this extraordinary woman we have learned to protect our power, know our worth, and to be vibrant when displaying our gifts. She has taught us to work hard, know our strengths and weaknesses, and flaunt our sexuality as a reward for being born a woman. Thank you for your artistry, feminism, and for your philanthropic work, Ms. Tina Turner. Thank you for showing us all how to live with purpose and turn our pain into triumph. You created a lane of your own inside rock and roll and in music. What a beautiful life, full of so much color. Cheers to so much more. BILL MARINO/SYGMA VIA GETTY IMAGES

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

TINA TURNER

BY LEDISI

D

ec. 1, 2000, I sat at The Arena in Oakland, Calif. My friend Joey had surprised me with concert tickets to see the legendary Tina Turner. I sang every song, did every dance move, and screamed to Ms. Tina Turner like she could hear me from the nosebleed seats we were blessed to have. I did not care. I was so happy to be in the room where it happened! I watched our goddess dance onstage with her dancers, women in their early 20s trying to keep up with her. While they wiped sweat from their brows, Queen Tina glided into soulful gems “Let’s Stay Together” and “What’s Love Got To Do With It” and rocked out on hits “It’s Only Love” and “Better Be Good To Me,” and my favorite, “Simply The Best.” Her voice filled the arena,

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R&B singer/songwriter Ledisi is a Governor for the Recording Academy Los Angeles Chapter. She is nominated for three GRAMMY Awards this year: Best R&B Performance for “High,” Best Traditional R&B Performance for “All The Way,” and Best R&B Album for Let Love Rule.


BETTMANN/GETTY IMAGES

TRUSTEES AWARD

BILL GRAHAM

BY KEVIN LYMAN

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will always remember the first time I saw Bill Graham. It was in the parking lot of the Oakland Coliseum, at one of the Grateful Dead’s New Year’s shows in the ’80s. My hustle was making egg rolls and selling them to the crowd waiting for the show, and in the back of my mind I was afraid that we could be shut down at any time. He was walking right towards our little setup and much to my surprise, he said, “Good job turning those things into apple pies last night.” Little did I know that he knew that we had changed the recipe from vegetable pies to apple pies each evening. Bill Graham virtually created the business of concert promotion, and because of that alone he’s an influence and inspiration to those of us who’ve followed him. He cultivated San Francisco’s hippie music scene in the ’60s, made the Fillmore a rock mecca, and helped pioneer iconic poster art and approaches to sound and lighting. But he was also a showman himself, a bigger-than-life

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impresario whose name was as big as the acts on the marquees. His outsized personality and tough business tactics sometimes put him at odds with business partners and competitors. But he truly cared about both the artists and the audiences, as well as the community at large, staging many benefit concerts over the years. He was a giant who helped give birth to a new kind of concert business. All the more reason I was in utter awe that this man who ran the biggest shows in the country even knew what was going on in his parking lots. This stuck with me my whole life and the best compliment I have gotten is when, once in a while, someone who knew Bill says, “Kevin, Bill would have busted your balls, but he would have respected what you have done.” Kevin Lyman is CEO of 4-fini and founder and producer of the Vans Warped Tour


VIVIEN KILLILEA/WIREIMAGE.COM

TRUSTEES AWARD

SEYMOUR STEIN

BY ICE-T

W

hen I started working with Seymour Stein, rap was not yet respected as an art form, but Seymour was way ahead of the curve. He was a giant in my eyes because I knew that he had signed the Talking Heads, the Ramones, and Madonna, but he was very inquisitive about hip-hop. He knew there was something there. I think that’s what Seymour’s always been known for—finding new stuff and knowing there’s a value to it. I was impressed by the fact that he wanted anything to do with rap. My favorite Seymour Stein story is my first meeting with him. I went in to see him and he was dancing around his office in his socks. Then he quickly started to tell me about the calypso music from Trinidad he was listening to and asked me if I understood it. I didn’t really, but he told me calypso artists were singing about issues the same way I was singing about issues, and he said that just because someone might not understand those issues, it doesn’t make the music invalid. He said he might not necessarily understand hip-hop, but that didn’t make it invalid. Right then I realized just how intelligent this dude was.

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People like to throw around the word “genius.” No one knows absolutely everything about everything—but when it comes to music, Seymour Stein definitely is a genius. I’ve continued to use that breakdown he laid out for me in his office with everything new I confront—just because I don’t understand something doesn’t mean it’s invalid. Seymour’s label, Sire, was the best place for me to start my career because I was around some rulebreakers who confirmed my attitude toward the game: You don’t have to be safe. You can always push limits. I’ve never been in a business meeting with Seymour. When you spend time with him it’s always just a lot of fun, a lot of love, and a lot of respect. It’s more about family and never business. Considering how coldblooded this business can be, I think Seymour’s one of the few people so many of us feel a friendship and a love for because he’s such a good person. Cultural icon, hip-hop pioneer, actor, and GRAMMY winner Ice-T signed to Seymour Stein’s Sire Records in 1987. He is nominated this year for Best Metal Performance for “Black Hoodie” with his band Body Count.


CARLO ALLEGRI/GETTY IMAGES

TRUSTEES AWARD

JOHN WILLIAMS

BY KOBE BRYANT

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orns, piano, winds, percussion—each composition imagined separately, only to come together for a timeless piece of music meant to elicit key emotions during pivotal cinematic moments. All created, composed, and drafted with a simple pencil, a piece of paper, and a genius mind. That is the beauty of John Williams. John and I became friends in 2009 when I coldcalled him to better understand how he was able to pull orchestra sections together to create one masterful piece. John’s music achieved a level of perfection that I wanted to replicate on the basketball court. He taught me how the instruments—all with different personalities, needs, strengths and weaknesses—could act successfully as one. And it just so happens, we won a championship that season. Despite John having never seen a basketball game, he is one of my greatest basketball muses. So, it was only fitting that “The Imperial March” played in Staples Center when I walked back onto the court for

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the first time after an Achilles injury. It’s John’s music that inspires us all to imagine ourselves in different ways and to be the best versions of ourselves. When I set out to create an animated short film of my retirement poem, “Dear Basketball,” John, again, was my first call. He graciously accepted and Dear Basketball became only the second animated piece John has ever scored. I’ll never forget the day we listened to his score for the first time. When the first run-through finished, John turned to me and said, “Don’t worry, it will get better.” In my opinion, it was already perfection. But that’s what geniuses do—always strive to get better. Simply stated, John Williams is the Beethoven of our time. His music will forever be a timeless inspiration to us all. Kobe Bryant is a five-time NBA champion and 18-time NBA All-Star. In 2017, Bryant turned his retirement poem, “Dear Basketball,” into an animated short film featuring music by John Williams.


Congratulations, Emmy on your Recording Academy ™ Lifetime Achievement Award

With love and admiration from all of your Warner Music label partners


(From left) Tony Agnello and Richard Factor

BY STEVE VAI

M

ost people who work in audio could not remember a time when Eventide was not a household studio name. Luckily for all of us, the inexorable march of the evolution of audio technology was firmly planted in the unique and fertile imaginations of Richard Factor and Tony Agnello. Eventide Clockworks (later just Eventide) was founded in 1970 in a New York recording studio with inventor Richard Factor at the forefront of creative design. In his preteens he experimented with ham radios, and in 1964 was working at WABC, where one of his assignments was to record the Beatles live at Shea Stadium. His first original design at Eventide was the indispensable tape-search unit for the Ampex MM1000 multitrack recorder. Not long after came the classic 1745 Digital Delay that offered two channels up to 200 milliseconds of independent delay from a single input, the first of its kind. Its eventual successor, the 1745M, was perhaps the first to use RAM in an audio product and also had an optional pitch change module. Tony Agnello joined the team in the early ’70s, and was working on what would become the revolutionary

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H910 Harmonizer, which offered pitch shifting, delay, feedback regeneration, and other unique features. Shortly thereafter, the H949 introduced a finely controllable pitch change capability used for “doubling,” and a “deglitch” option for reducing artifacts in harmonized audio. These products were instantly and wildly successful, and could be considered a paradigm shift in the pantheon of audio production. Agnello’s research into digital reverberation algorithms led Eventide to the manufacturing and selling of affordable HP-compatible RAM expansion boards from the late ’70s to mid-’90s. This also paved the way for true digital signal processing that was sorely missing at the time. Other successes included the launch of the Eventide SP2016 in 1982, with its “Stereo Room” and other unique programs rendered possible by digital signal processing. It quickly achieved legendary status. Eventide reaches out to industry pros for feedback. In the mid-’80s I was approached by Gil Griffith, VP of sales, and was asked what new features I would like to see in the Harmonizer. One of the suggestions I made was for multiple voice, diatonic harmonization, as it was yet to be invented, and I saw it as a very useful tool. I explained that the existing Harmonizer can only create a limited parallel harmony to whatever it’s fed, but multiple voice diatonic harmony would enable the user to enter any particular scale and the produced voices would play back within the confines of that scale. I was thrilled when Eventide released the H3000 (1986), which was the first intelligent/diatonic pitch shifter. Eventide equipment is pervasive in recording and broadcast facilities, police stations across the nation, and even on aircraft around the world. Their industryleading special effects equipment is audible on almost all popular recordings. Richard Factor and Tony Agnello are two of our pioneers whose contribution to the advancement of audio technology is truly historic. HUBERT PIETRZYKOWSKI

TECHNICAL GRAMMY AWARD

TONY AGNELLO & RICHARD FACTOR

Renowned worldwide, three-time GRAMMY Award-winning guitarist/performer/composer/engineer/producer Steve Vai has sold more than 15 million records and toured the world as a solo artist, a member of G3, and with Frank Zappa, David Lee Roth, Whitesnake, and many others.


GRAMMY®


MUSIC EDUCATOR AWARD

MELISSA SALGUERO BY SANDRA ZADRIMA

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ow many people can say that they represent pivotal moments in others’ lives? Melissa Salguero is that person for so many children living in the Hunts Point section in the South Bronx. She incites excitement and motivation in young children, and impacts their lives in profound ways. As a result of her diligent efforts, her resourcefulness, and her love of music, her students are afforded rare opportunities and experiences. Melissa arrives early, each day, to practice with her band students. She provides students with individual instrument lessons during her lunch break, and partners with many companies to expose students to various experiences. Melissa has won the Glee Give a Note contest. She has been honored by the Big Apple Awards, which celebrate New York City educators, and has been a guest on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” after our school was burglarized. On her own, she has raised a significant amount of money to fund her music program and provide instruments for her students. The essence of Melissa’s influence, however, extends beyond these achievements. She is an amazingly talented educator who inspires students to want to learn. She weaves science and technology into all of her lessons; her students are constantly engaged in what she is teaching. She builds strong relationships with her students and they aspire to be better because of her. Thank you, Melissa, for being the reason children love to come to school, even when they are struggling at home. Thank you for inspiring children to be lifelong learners, and for showing everyone that all children can achieve greatness. Most importantly, thank you for making your students believe in themselves and for fostering a love of music, which they will carry within for the rest of their lives. Sandra Zadrima spent 15 years as an educator at P.S. 48, located in the Hunts Point section of the Bronx, where she worked alongside Melissa Salguero. She is currently an assistant principal in the Mamaroneck School District in Mamaroneck, N.Y.

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JBL IS THE PROUD RECIPIENT OF A TECHNICAL GRAMMY® AWARD EXPERIENCE SOUND EXACTLY HOW CREATORS AND PERFORMERS WANT YOU TO HEAR IT: FULL. BOLD. AND TRUE TO THAT VERY MOMENT.

©2018 HARMAN International Industries, Incorporated. All rights reserved. JBL is a trademark of HARMAN International Industries, Incorporated, registered in the United States and/or other countries. Features, specifications, and appearance are subject to change without notice. GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2018 The Recording Academy.


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2018 GRAMMY HALL OF FAME 116 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame was created in 1973 to honor recordings of lasting significance that were issued prior to the 1958 inception of the GRAMMY Awards. Consisting of more than 1,000 recordings, the Hall is now open to any recording that has been in release for at least 25 years. New submissions are voted on annually by a special member committee of experts and historians drawn from all branches of the recording arts. Their choices are subject to final approval by the Trustees of the Recording Academy. The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame is unique in that it is open to all genres of music—popular as well as specialized forms. BY PAUL GREIN

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ublic Enemy’s “Fight The Power” is one of the great protest songs of modern American music. The New York-based group recorded the politically charged work for Spike Lee’s landmark 1989 film, Do The Right Thing. This year, it is inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame—a sure sign that, in the words of another great protest song that is already in the Hall, “The Times They Are A-Changin.’” This year’s class of inductees is exceptionally diverse. It includes a funk smash, a classic country album, a landmark alternative music album, an influential rock ballad, and even a nursery rhyme that played a significant role in the history of recording. Three English rock titans—David Bowie, Queen, and the Rolling Stones— are among those whose recordings were inducted, as is English composer and recording artist Mike Oldfield. Five of the recordings that were saluted this year are the second renditions of those songs to be inducted into the Hall. Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup’s original version of “That’s All Right” joins Elvis Presley’s career-launching cover version in the Hall. Gladys Knight & The Pips’ “I Heard It Through The Grapevine,” the first hit version of that Motown classic, joins Marvin Gaye’s even bigger hit recording (which was recorded before Knight and the Pips’ version, but released after it). In the three other cases, the newly inducted recordings are cover versions of the recordings that preceded them into the Hall. They are Whitney Houston’s megahit rendition of Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You,” Andy Williams’ definitive take on Henry Mancini’s “Moon River,” and Billie Holiday’s jazz interpretation of “My Man,” which was first made famous by Fanny Brice. This is the first entry in the Hall Of Fame for Williams, who hosted the first seven live GRAMMY telecasts. Eleven other artists are being ushered into the Hall for the first time. Among them: Linda Ronstadt, Aerosmith, Leon Russell, Parliament, and Hugh Masekela.


THE CHRONIC

Dr. Dre Death Row (1992), Album This was Dr. Dre’s first solo album. It is inducted one year after N.W.A’s Straight Outta Compton. Dre, of course, was a member of that groundbreaking group. These are the first two rap albums to be inducted into the Hall Of Fame. (In addition, four rap singles have been inducted.) The Chronic launched the careers of several rappers, most notably Snoop Dogg. The album spawned such hits as “Nuthin’ But A ‘G’ Thang,” which received a GRAMMY nomination for Best Rap Performance By A Duo Or Group, and “Let Me Ride,” which won for Best Rap Solo Performance.

BAND OF GYPSYS

Jimi Hendrix Capitol (1970), Album This was Hendrix’s first live album and his first album recorded without the Jimi Hendrix Experience. The guitarist recorded the album with bassist Billy Cox and drummer Buddy Miles at the Fillmore East in New York. Band Of Gypsys combines elements of blues, funk, fusion, and rock. Sadly, Hendrix died less than nine months after this recording. This is his seventh recording to be selected for the Hall Of Fame.

BRING IT ON HOME TO ME

Sam Cooke RCA Victor (1962), Single This deeply soulful song began life as the B-side of the more poporiented “Having A Party.” “Bring It On Home To Me” received a GRAMMY nomination for Best Rhythm & Blues Recording. Cooke’s gospel roots are evident in the song’s call-and-response format. The “response” voice belongs to future R&B star (and three-time GRAMMY winner) Lou Rawls. This is Cooke’s fourth recording in the Hall, following “You Send Me,” “A Change Is Gonna Come” (which also originated as a B-side), and “(What A) Wonderful World.”

DREAM ON

Aerosmith Columbia (1973), Single This rock ballad appeared on Aerosmith’s eponymous debut album. The song was a minor hit when it was first released, but became a Top 10 smash when it was re-released in 1976. This is Aerosmith’s first recording in the Hall Of Fame, though group members Steven Tyler and Joe Perry appeared on Run-D.M.C.’s remake of the band’s “Walk This Way,” which was inducted in 2014.

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HEART LIKE A WHEEL

Linda Ronstadt Capitol (1974), Album This was Ronstadt’s first album to reach No. 1 and her first to receive a GRAMMY nomination for Album Of The Year. The album also brought Ronstadt a nomination for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female. It spawned the hits “You’re No Good,” and “When Will I Be Loved” as well as “I Can’t Help It (If I’m Still In Love With You),” which brought Ronstadt her first GRAMMY for Best Country Vocal Performance, Female.

FIGHT THE POWER

Public Enemy Motown (1989), Single This hard-hitting track has the force of a manifesto. It borrowed the title of a 1975 Isley Brothers hit, but it was even more pointed in its social commentary. The song takes swipes at American cultural icons Elvis Presley and John Wayne. It also mocks the feel-good escapism of “Don’t Worry Be Happy,” which had been a big hit the previous year. It was featured on the Do The Right Thing soundtrack and, in 1990, on Public Enemy’s third album, the provocatively titled Fear Of A Black Planet. It received a GRAMMY nomination for Best Rap Performance.

FLASH LIGHT

Parliament Casablanca (1978), Single This funk classic topped the R&B chart for three weeks in 1978, becoming the first No. 1 R&B hit for any of producer George Clinton’s groups (Parliament, Funkadelic, Bootsy’s Rubber Band). It was from the group’s sixth studio album, Funkentelechy Vs. The Placebo Syndrome—an unwieldly title that hints at the group’s independent streak and loopy sense of humor. The song has been sampled by dozens of artists, including Snoop Dogg, Aaliyah, and Digital Underground.

GRAZING IN THE GRASS

Hugh Masekela UNI (1968), Single This ebullient instrumental track reached No. 1 on both the pop and R&B charts in 1968 and received a GRAMMY nomination for Best Contemporary-Pop Performance, Instrumental. It was the biggest hit for Masekela, who was born in South Africa. The track, which makes liberal use of cowbells, was from Masekela’s eighth album, The Promise Of A Future. Harry Elston, who co-wrote the song, went on to record a hit vocal version the following year with his group, the Friends Of Distinction.

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I CAN’T HELP MYSELF

Four Tops Motown (1965), Single Say the words “Sugar Pie” to just about anybody and you’ll get a smile and the response, “Honey Bunch.” This exuberant recording was the Four Tops’ first No. 1 hit on both the pop and R&B charts. It’s the group’s second recording to be inducted into the Hall, following “Reach Out I’ll Be There.” Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, and Eddie Holland, who received a Trustees Award from the Recording Academy in 1998, wrote both songs.

I HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE

Gladys Knight & The Pips Soul/Motown (1967), Single This fiery track is the group’s second recording in the Hall of Fame, following “Midnight Train To Georgia.” “I Heard It Through The Grapevine” topped the R&B chart for six weeks in 1967–68 and received a GRAMMY nomination for Best Rhythm & Blues Solo Vocal Performance, Female. Marvin Gaye’s smash 1968 version was inducted into the Hall Of Fame in 1998. Norman Whitfield, who co-wrote the song with Barrett Strong, produced both recordings. “… Grapevine” was featured on Knight and the Pips’ first album for Soul/ Motown, Everybody Needs Love.


JOHNNY CASH AT FOLSOM PRISON

Johnny Cash Columbia (1968), Album

(I LOVE YOU) FOR SENTIMENTAL REASONS

The King Cole Trio Capitol (1946), Single

This was the Man In Black’s first live album. His set list included his 1956 hit “Folsom Prison Blues.” The live version of the song reached No. 1 on the country chart and won a GRAMMY for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male. The album brought Cash a second GRAMMY for Best Album Notes. … At Folsom Prison was so popular it spawned a sequel, Johnny Cash At San Quentin. (That 1969 album was inducted into the Hall Of Fame in 2004.) This is Cash’s fifth recording in the Hall. Among country artists, only Hank Williams has more (six).

This tender ballad was the love call for the Greatest Generation. It was the only No. 1 pop hit for the King Cole Trio, the jazz trio in which Nate “King” Cole rose to stardom. Cole’s warm lead vocal is front and center, though the jazz combo sound is also featured. This is the trio’s fourth recording to be selected for the Hall, following “The Christmas Song,” “Straighten Up And Fly Right,” and “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66.” Cole has three more recordings in the Hall as a solo artist.

I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU

Whitney Houston Arista (1992) Houston didn’t just cover this Dolly Parton song; she transformed it, turning it from a gentle country tune into a soaring power ballad. Her version, recorded for the 1992 film The Bodyguard, topped the Billboard Hot 100 for a then-record 14 weeks. It won GRAMMYs for Record Of The Year and Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female. The B-side was the well-known Christian hymn “Jesus Loves Me.” This is Houston’s second recording in the Hall Of Fame, following her eponymous 1985 debut album. Parton’s original recording of “I Will Always Love You” was inducted in 2007.

MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB

Thomas Alva Edison (1878), Single Edison, who invented the phonograph in 1877, recited the lyrics to this nursery rhyme into his own invention. This is Edison’s earliest surviving recording. The Recording Academy has previously acknowledged Edison’s historic contribution to recording, giving him a posthumous Trustees Award in 1977 and a Technical GRAMMY Award in 2010. It goes without saying that this is the oldest recording ever inducted into the Hall Of Fame, a distinction formerly held by “The Stars And Stripes Forever” by Sousa’s Band (1897).

ME AND MRS. JONES

Billy Paul Philadelphia International (1972), Single There have been hundreds of cheating songs through the years, but quite possibly none as classy and elegant as this 1972 smash. Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff co-wrote the song with Cary Gilbert and produced it for their red-hot Philadelphia International Records. The single peaked at No. 1 on both the pop and R&B charts and won a GRAMMY for Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male. The B-side was a soulful version of Elton John’s “Your Song.” The original was inducted into the Hall in 1998.

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Congratulations on the Recording Academy™ Trustees Award


MOON RIVER

Andy Williams Columbia (1962), Track This is the definitive version of one of the greatest film songs of all time. Williams sang the Henry Mancini/Johnny Mercer ballad on the Academy Awards telecast in 1962, where it won Best Song. He recorded it for his hit album Moon River & Other Great Movie Themes. Though his version was never released as a single, it quickly became his signature song. Williams’ velvety voice is just right for the ballad. A surge in intensity near the end adds a dynamic element. Mancini’s original version of the song, which he composed for Breakfast At Tiffany’s, was inducted in 1999.

MY MAN

A NIGHT AT THE OPERA

Billie Holiday

Queen

Brunswick (1937), Single

Elektra (1975), Album

This is Holiday’s eighth recording to be inducted into the Hall Of Fame, which puts her in a tie with Ella Fitzgerald for the most recordings in the Hall by a female artist. Lady Day conveys every bit of pathos in the heartbreaking lyrics “Two or three girls has he/That he likes as well as me/But I love him.” The B-side was another classic torch song, “Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man” from “Show Boat.” Fanny Brice’s version of “My Man,” which she sang in the Broadway revue “Ziegfeld Follies Of 1921,” entered the Hall in 1999.

This album, Queen’s fourth, spawned the hits “Bohemian Rhapsody” and “You’re My Best Friend.” It took its title from a 1935 Marx Brothers film, which the band members watched one night at the studio complex during a break from the sessions. This is Queen’s first album to be inducted into the Hall. Two of the group’s singles, “Bohemian Rhapsody” and the double-sided “We Are The Champions”/”We Will Rock You,” have been saluted. The band is also receiving a Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award this year.

NEVERMIND

PAINT IT, BLACK

Nirvana

The Rolling Stones

DGC (1991), Album

London (1966), Single

The trio’s sophomore album defined 1990s grunge. Nevermind received a 1991 GRAMMY nomination for Best Alternative Music Album. It spawned the singles “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” “Come As You Are,” “Lithium,” and “In Bloom.” This is Nirvana’s second recording in the Hall, following “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” which was inducted last year. Nirvana is the first act to make the Hall with two 1990s releases.

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This song, noteworthy for its use of sitar and its amalgam of North African and Indian musical inflections, reached No. 1 in both the United States and the U.K. It was featured on the group’s sixth U.S. album, Aftermath. The song, which was recorded in March 1966, anticipated the darker, harder direction rock would take in the late ’60s. This is the Stones’ seventh recording in the Hall Of Fame.


NSCAD University CONGRATULATES

Sarah McLachlan

on her nomination for the Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album – Wonderland. The Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (NSCAD) is proud of the many musical and artistic alumni who have been nominated, and have won, significant awards for their achievements in the industry.

WELL DONE!

From all your multi-talented friends, faculty, staff, students and alumni of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

For the rule breakers, the dreamers, the makers, the innovators, the exceptional and the forever curious. NSCAD.ca Inspiring Visual Artists and Designers Since 1887

BA BFA BDes MDes MFA 5163 Duke Street Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3J 3J6 902 444 9600 tel, nscad.ca


THAT’S ALL RIGHT

Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup RCA Victor (1949), Single

SAVOY BLUES

Louis Armstrong & His Hot Five Okeh (1927), Single This is one of three instrumental works (along with Hugh Masekela’s “Grazing In The Grass” and Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells) being inducted this year. Lonnie Johnson, a member of Armstrong’s Hot Five band, played a memorable lead guitar solo on the track. The song was released as the B-side of Armstrong’s hit “Hotter Than That.” This is Armstrong’s 19th recording to be inducted into the Hall, which is more than any other artist.

A SONG FOR YOU

Leon Russell

Elvis Presley was just 11 in 1946 when Crudup wrote and first recorded this song. Presley’s 1954 version of the song on Sun Records was inducted into the Hall Of Fame in 1998. This is the second time that the Hall Of Fame has made room for the original version of a song made famous by Presley. The original “Hound Dog” by Willie Mae “Big Mama” Thornton was inducted in 2013. Crudup’s recording was released by RCA Victor, which signed Presley in 1955.

TUBULAR BELLS

Mike Oldfield Virgin (1973), Album Oldfield was just 20 when he released this, his debut album. He played most of the instruments himself, through use of multitracking. Director William Friedkin used the spooky title theme in his blockbuster film The Exorcist, which was released in December 1973, seven months after the release of Oldfield’s album. Oldfield’s theme, titled “Tubular Bells—Theme From The Exorcist,” won a GRAMMY for Best Instrumental Composition.

Shelter (1970), Single This deeply personal ballad—a secular hymn, really—was featured on Russell’s first solo album, Leon Russell. It has since become a modern-day standard, having been recorded by such notable artists as Andy Williams, Donny Hathaway, Carpenters, Willie Nelson, the Temptations, Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Natalie Cole, Michael Bublé, Herbie Hancock and Christina Aguilera, Whitney Houston, and Amy Winehouse. Russell was just 27 when he recorded and released the song. He was an old soul.

SPACE ODDITY

David Bowie Mercury (1969), Track This classic balances Bowie’s theatrical bent with moments of real poignancy (“Tell my wife I love her very much/She knows”). Bowie recorded the song in June 1969, when space travel was very much on peoples’ minds. It was just one month before the first moon landing. The song didn’t become a big hit in the U.S. until it was re-released by RCA Victor in 1973. It’s Bowie’s third entry in the Hall Of Fame, following The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars and “Changes” (which also became a big hit only after it was re-released).

Paul Grein is a veteran music journalist and historian whose work appears regularly at Yahoo.com and Hitsdailydouble.com.

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TONY HEYES ~ THE REAL-LIFE CAMERON WALSH, LEADER OF THE ROADHOUSE SONS BAND!

C O M I N G

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2 0 1 8 !

J. H. SANDERSON’S AUDIOBOOK FIVE OF THE ROADHOUSE SONS SERIES! “THE PLOT LINE IS FANTASTIC AND THE AUTHOR HAS CRAFTED EACH ASPECT WITH SUCH AUTHORITY THAT IT IS IMPOSSIBLE NOT TO BE COMPLETELY TAKEN IN... WELL DONE.” ~ JACOB CLEVELAND, LITERARY CRITIC

THAT WAS THEN...

CRUMBLIN’ DOWN

NARRATED BY BROADWAY’S PHILIP HERNÁNDEZ THE ONLY ACTOR IN BROADWAY’S HISTORY TO PLAY BOTH JEAN VALJEAN AND JAVERT IN LES MISÉRABLES!

SEWELL & HEYES ...THIS IS NOW!

TREVOR SEWELL NARRATES “DANGEROUS GAMBLES”, AND WRITES AND RECORDS THE ROADHOUSE SONS SONG!

C O M I N G

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2 0 1 8 !


275* AND COUNTING Berklee College of Music is proud to salute our 60th Annual GRAMMY AwardsÂŽ alumni and faculty nominees.

*Number of GRAMMY Awards received by Berklee alumni and faculty to date. Photo: Power Station at BerkleeNYC represents a new home for Berklee at the historic Power Station studios on West 53rd Street.


GRAMMYs’ GREATEST HITS

60 memorable moments in GRAMMY history BY PAUL GREIN

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GRAMMY telecast is a collection of moments: a mix of commanding live performances, poignant acceptance speeches, funny remarks, impressive award sweeps, and surprising shutouts. And always, it’s that mix that keeps things interesting: a blend of artists from every genre; of all-time legends and hitmakers of the moment; of roof-raising production numbers and intimate solo spots. Tonight is the 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards. To mark the milestone, here are 60 GRAMMY moments to remember.

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Yoko Ono and her 6-year-old son Sean Ono Lennon (who can barely peer over the podium) accept Album Of The Year for Double Fantasy. The award comes less than 15 months after John Lennon was shot to death in New York. “I think John is with us here today,” Ono says. She maintains her composure while she is at the podium, but breaks down in the audience when a few bars of “(Just Like) Starting Over” are piped in during the announcement of the Record Of The Year nominees.

Adele, 28, becomes the first artist in GRAMMY history to sweep the “big three” awards— Album, Record, and Song Of The Year—twice. She first accomplished the feat five years earlier. While it’s unquestionably Adele’s night, she generously shares the spotlight with Beyoncé. “My artist of my life is Beyoncé,” Adele says. “The Lemonade album was just so monumental and so well thoughtout and so beautiful and soulbaring. … All us artists here, we f***ing adore you. You are our light.”

Barbra Streisand and Neil Diamond demonstrate the potency of star power, great chemistry, and simple staging with their performance of “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers.” Walking out without an introduction, the two stars face each other from opposite sides of the stage and slowly come together. When, near the end of the song, Streisand strokes Diamond’s cheek, the audience erupts. Streisand would allude to the impact of the pairing when she returned to the GRAMMY stage the following year to present an award with Barry Gibb: “I feel like I’m cheating on Neil Diamond.”

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FEB. 28, 1984 Michael Jackson, 25, becomes the first artist to win eight GRAMMYs in one night. His sweep includes Album Of The Year for Thriller and Record Of The Year for “Beat It.” The telecast is a virtual coronation for the pop star, who is, at this moment, as hot as Elvis Presley and the Beatles were at their peaks. Jackson elected not to perform on the show. He probably figured he’d have enough to do just scooping up awards.

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5 FEB. 21, 2001 Elton John and Eminem perform “Stan,” Eminem’s song about a deranged fan. The drama is in the backstory: The rapper had been under fire for lyrics that were seen as homophobic. Elton, the most famous gay pop star, lent his support because he cared more about Eminem’s artistry than his personal views. At the end of the performance, the two stars hug, pat each other on the back, and clasp hands overhead in a show of newfound understanding. And then, Eminem raises both arms out of camera range and appears to give the audience the finger.

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MARCH 1, 1995

FEB. 26, 1985 Prince and the Revolution give an explosive performance of “Baby I’m A Star” from Purple Rain. The band is joined onstage by the Time, percussionist Sheila E., and a steady stream of audience members who want to join the party. Nineteen years later, Prince and Beyoncé open the telecast with a medley consisting of three songs from Purple Rain as well as her smash “Crazy In Love.”

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Bruce Springsteen opens the telecast with “Streets Of Philadelphia,” which he composed for Jonathan Demme’s AIDS drama, Philadelphia. Moments later, the somber ballad is named Song Of The Year. Accepting the award, Springsteen expresses his appreciation to “the folks who have come up to me in restaurants and on the street who’ve lost their sons or their lovers or their friends to AIDS and said the song meant something to them.” Nearly 50,000 Americans will die of HIV/AIDS in 1995, making it the peak year of the epidemic.

FEB. 12, 2012 Jennifer Hudson, 30, sings “I Will Always Love You” in tribute to Whitney Houston, whose death the day before had shocked fans around the world. It also forced GRAMMY producers to scramble to come up with a fitting tribute literally overnight. “We’ve had a death in the family,” is the way host LL Cool J refers to Houston’s passing. Hudson’s version of the song is gentler, more subdued than Houston’s steel-belted rendition. A radiant Houston, then at the pinnacle of her career, had opened the GRAMMY telecast 18 years earlier by performing the song.

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FEB. 26, 1985

FEB. 24, 1993

Tina Turner caps one of the most dramatic comebacks in pop music history by winning three awards, including Record Of The Year for “What’s Love Got To Do With It.” Turner’s performance of the song is one of the show’s highlights. She dramatically descends a ramp of stairs and struts across the stage in a shiny red mini-dress, spiky high heels, and artfully disheveled hair. Four minutes later, she walks back up those same steps in triumph.

“I want to thank a lot of people, but the one person I want to thank is my son, for the love he gave me and the song he gave me,” Eric Clapton says on winning his sixth award of the night—Record Of The Year for “Tears In Heaven.” The rock legend had co-written the song about his 4-year-old son Conor, who died in a tragic accident two years earlier. Clapton’s heartfelt remark is as graceful and understated as the song itself.

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13 FEB. 25, 1998 Aretha Franklin fills in for an ailing Luciano Pavarotti to sing “Nessun Dorma” from Puccini’s opera, Turandot. Franklin had performed the piece at the annual MusiCares dinner two nights earlier, but had no idea, until just a few hours before show time, that she would be singing it on live TV. The response to her bravura performance proves that a great singer can sing anything.

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FEB. 24, 1999 Ricky Martin, 27, gives arguably the most star-making performance in the history of the GRAMMYs when he sings a bilingual version of the 1998 World Cup anthem, “La Copa De La Vida (The Cup Of Life).” Relatively few in the broad TV audience know who Martin is when he starts his song. By the time he finishes, he’s a star. Before the end of May, Martin would have the No. 1 album and single on the Billboard charts and would be on the cover of Time illustrating their story “Latin Music Goes Pop.”

12 JAN. 26, 2014 Macklemore & Ryan Lewis and Mary Lambert perform their marriageequality anthem “Same Love,” which is a Song Of The Year contender. They are joined by New Orleans musician Trombone Shorty and Queen Latifah, who officiates the weddings of 33 same- and opposite-sex couples. Madonna then joins the assemblage with a tender rendition of her 1987 hit, “Open Your Heart.” Call it a stunt if you want, but the GRAMMYs took a stand on an important social issue that was then unsettled. Exactly 17 months later, in an historic decision, the Supreme Court declared same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states.

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JAN. 31, 2010 P!nk, 30, has a surprise in store as she sings “Glitter In The Air.” She slips out of a white robe and into a silk swing that hoists her high above the audience. She performs an astonishing aerial ballet, singing live all the while. Midway through the performance, she is lowered into a pool of water, so she is dripping wet for the big finish. The performance was such a jaw-dropper, Oprah invited P!nk onto her talk show to discuss it. “I’ve always seen dancers do it behind the singer, but the singer’s never done it,” P!nk said. “So I was like, ‘Why can’t I do it?’” She added impishly: “And I wanted to get all the famous people wet.”


15 MARCH 2, 1974 Stevie Wonder, 23, wins his first GRAMMY—and his second, third, fourth, and fifth as well. The night caps a miraculous recovery for the musician, who was involved in a life-threatening auto accident less than seven months earlier. Wonder is playful as he performs the ebullient “You Are The Sunshine Of My Life,” a contender for Record and Song Of The Year. Wonder changes a key lyric to “God is the apple of my eye.”

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FEB. 25, 1998

Accepting his Album Of The Year award for Still Crazy After All These Years, Paul Simon, 34, is surprisingly witty and self-deprecating. “Most of all, I’d like to thank Stevie Wonder, who didn’t make an album this year,” he jokes. (Wonder had won the award the previous two years, and would win it again the following year.) Host Andy Williams was impressed by Simon’s quip: “I knew he was great, but I didn’t know he was that funny.”

Anything can happen on live TV, and on this night it does. A shirtless stage-crasher with the words “Soy Bomb” scrawled on his torso injects himself into Bob Dylan’s performance of “Love Sick.” The man gyrates for about 30 seconds before he is escorted offstage. When Dylan finishes the song, he receives an extended standing ovation, in part for keeping his cool in a bizarre situation. “Love Sick” is the opening track on Dylan’s acclaimed album Time Out Of Mind, which wins Album Of The Year.

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18 FEB. 15, 2016 Kendrick Lamar, 28, who went into the night with a near-record 11 nominations, wins five GRAMMYs, including Best Rap Album for To Pimp A Butterfly. He also gives one of the night’s most talked-about performances with “The Blacker The Berry” and “Alright,” songs that had become unofficial anthems of the Black Lives Matter movement. The staging, which incorporates prison and chain-gang imagery, evokes America’s ugly racial history. “Alright” wins Best Rap Performance and Best Rap Song.

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19 JAN. 31, 2010 Beyoncé, 28, becomes the first woman to win six GRAMMYs in one night (a record matched by Adele two years later). She wins three awards, including Song Of The Year for her blockbuster hit “Single Ladies (Put A Ring On It).” Beyoncé doesn’t perform that song on the telecast. Instead, she sings a powerful version of her hit “If I Were A Boy” and a surprising (and convincing) cover of Alanis Morissette’s snarling “You Oughta Know.” You could say she slayed.

20 MARCH 2, 1988 Michael Jackson, 29, performs two songs from Bad—a carnal “The Way You Make Me Feel” and a spiritual “Man In The Mirror,” on which he is backed by a gospel choir. The sequence rates a perfect 10, which is what host Billy Crystal is driving at when he jokes, “And I can’t believe the East German judge gave him a 5.6.”

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22 FEB. 8, 2006 Madonna opens the show with an imaginative sequence in which she interacts with the animated cartoon band Gorillaz. The spot, which marks one of the first uses of hologram technology on TV, fuses Madonna’s “Hung Up” and the Gorillaz/De La Soul collaboration “Feel Good Inc.,” a Record Of The Year contender. This marks the third time GRAMMY producers have turned to Madonna for an opening number, a sign of her broad appeal and strong theatrical instincts. Only Whitney Houston and Paul Simon have opened the show as often. KEVIN MAZUR/WIREIMAGE.COM

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21 FEB. 23, 1983 Marvin Gaye, 43, sings his smoldering comeback smash, “Sexual Healing.” It’s his first (and, sadly, last) GRAMMY performance. When the R&B legend later wins for the first time, after 20 years of hits, he expresses gratitude and hope. “Stay with us,” he says. “We’re going to try to give you more.” He thanks his mother, son, and daughter. He doesn’t mention his father, who shoots him to death 13 months later.


23 FEB. 8, 2009 Raising Sand by Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, one of the most unlikely collaborations in GRAMMY history, also becomes one of the most lauded. Plant and Krauss win five awards this night, including Album and Record Of The Year. “I’d like to say I’m bewildered,” Plant says on accepting Album Of The Year. “In the old days we would have called this selling out, but I think it’s a good way to spend a Sunday.”

24 FEB. 8, 2015 Sam Smith, 22, is the night’s top winner with four awards, including Record and Song Of The Year for “Stay With Me (Darkchild Version).” Mary J. Blige joins Smith to perform the ballad on the telecast, bringing added intensity to the already soulful song. In accepting Record Of The Year, Smith says, “I want to thank the man who this record is about, who I fell in love with last year. Thank you so much for breaking my heart because you got me four GRAMMYs.”

SAM EMERSON

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25 MARCH 16, 1971 Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water” is the big winner as the GRAMMYs are telecast live for the first time. Paul Simon, 29, becomes the first person to sweep the “big three” awards in one night. Aretha Franklin’s gospel-infused performance of the song is one of the show’s highlights. Her rendition is released as a single a few days after the telecast and goes on to win an award on the following year’s show.

FEB. 25, 1986 Whitney Houston, 22, performs a smoky version of the torch song “Saving All My Love For You,” and then wins her first GRAMMY for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female. Making the moment even sweeter: The award is presented by Houston’s cousin Dionne Warwick, a past winner in this category. Seven months later, in an unprecedented feat, Houston’s GRAMMY appearance earns her an Emmy for Outstanding Performance In A Variety Or Music Program.

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27 MARCH 2, 1988 U2 wins Album Of The Year with their classic, The Joshua Tree. Bono, 27, accepts the award with the kind of eloquent and thoughtful remarks that have become his trademark. He notes that U2 set out to make soul music. “To us, soul music is not about being black or white, or the instruments you play or whether you use a drum machine or not. It’s a decision to reveal or conceal.”

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MARCH 14, 1972 Carole King, 30, becomes the first woman to sweep the “big three” awards in one night. But the singer/songwriter is 3,000 miles away, at home in Los Angeles. She had given birth to a daughter less than three months before the show, and wasn’t able to fly to New York, where the show is taking place. “Well, she had triplets,” is how presenter Herb Alpert announces King’s third award of the night for Record Of The Year.

29 FEB. 21, 1990 Bonnie Raitt, 40, wins four awards, including Album Of The Year for Nick Of Time. “This is a real miracle for me after all this time,” she says on winning her first televised award. Raitt had overcome substance abuse problems and the indignity of being dropped by her longtime record label. Raitt’s strong showing, and the grace that she shows in her multiple trips to the podium, makes her a star overnight—after nearly 20 years of recording and touring.

FEB. 13, 2011 Never let it be said that Lady Gaga doesn’t know how to make an entrance. The superstar, 24, is wheeled onstage inside a giant egg. She hatches from it to perform her new single, the LGBTQ anthem “Born This Way.” Later, in accepting the award for Best Pop Vocal Album (for The Fame Monster), Gaga thanks Whitney Houston. Gaga reveals that when she co-wrote “Born This Way,” she imagined that Houston was singing it. Who knew?

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Chance The Rapper, 23, becomes the first streamingexclusive artist to win a GRAMMY. He takes three awards in all, including Best New Artist and Best Rap Album for Coloring Book. Chance performs two songs from his mixtape, “All We Got” and “How Great,” in an exhilarating, genre-bridging sequence that also features gospel stars Kirk Franklin and Tamela Mann and a white-robed gospel choir. At the end of the performance you’re a believer— at least in Chance’s talent.

Amy Winehouse, 24, wins five GRAMMYs, including Record and Song Of The Year for “Rehab.” She is unable to attend the show in person because of visa problems, but appears via satellite from a studio in London. Tony Bennett co-presents the award for Record Of The Year. Three years later, the two singers would team to record the standard “Body And Soul.” That collaboration, which was Winehouse’s final recording before her death, also won a GRAMMY. KEVIN MAZUR/WIREIMAGE.COM

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30 FEB. 23, 2000 Santana wins eight awards, equaling Michael Jackson’s 1984 record for the biggest one-night sweep. The band’s haul includes Album Of The Year for Supernatural and Record Of The Year for “Smooth,” a propulsive collaboration with Rob Thomas. (Thomas, 28, wasn’t even born when Santana recorded such groundbreaking albums as Santana and Abraxas.)


34 FEB. 13, 2005 Melissa Etheridge, bald after undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer, performs a blistering version of “Piece Of My Heart” in tribute to Janis Joplin, who is receiving a posthumous Lifetime Achievement Award. Etheridge’s performance is thrillingly alive, fueled, perhaps, by her brush with mortality. Joss Stone joins her in the tribute.

35 FEB. 24, 1987 Janet Jackson, 20, steps into her own with a tightly choreographed performance of “What Have You Done For Me Lately” and “Nasty.” The stardom-certifying moment comes three years after Jackson made her GRAMMY show debut, playing a cameo role in brother Michael’s Thriller-year sweep. (He had asked his three sisters to join him at the podium when he picked up one of his awards.)

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FEB. 15, 2016 The GRAMMYs air their first-ever live performance from a Broadway stage. The show cuts away to the Richard Rodgers Theatre in New York, where the cast of the smash hit “Hamilton” performs “Alexander Hamilton.” The cast album later wins for Best Musical Theater Album. The show’s creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda, raps his acceptance speech. In doing so, he reveals the range of his influences, from the creators of “Fiddler On The Roof” to a trio of late rappers: “The best idea goes in the pot/Whether you’re Harnick and Bock, Pun, Biggie or Pac.”

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U2 opens the first GRAMMY telecast following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks with a powerful version of “Walk On,” which speaks to the importance of resiliency in the face of adversity. There are two other Sept. 11-related performances on the show. Alan Jackson offers his gentle rumination, “Where Were You (When The World Stopped Turning).” And native New Yorkers Billy Joel and Tony Bennett team for a bittersweet “New York State Of Mind.”

The ageless Mick Jagger hits the GRAMMY stage for the first time to perform “Everybody Needs Somebody To Love” as a tribute to R&B great Solomon Burke, who had died four months previously. The Rolling Stones had released their version of the song in 1965. Jagger moves like, well, Jagger, proving he’s still got it at 67. Raphael Saadiq provides strong support as guitarist and bandleader. (Saadiq’s touring band, Stone Rollin’, plays behind them.)

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Kanye West, 27, playfully addresses press reports about his volatile personality when he wins three GRAMMYs, including Best Rap Album for his debut, The College Dropout. “I know everybody asked me the question. … Everybody wanted to know what I would do if I didn’t win. I guess we’ll never know.” West goes on to win Best Rap Album with his next two albums as well.

Bruce Springsteen, Dave Grohl, Elvis Costello, and Steven Van Zandt perform the Clash’s punk classic “London Calling” in tribute to that band’s Joe Strummer, who had died two months earlier. They are joined by No Doubt’s Tony Kanal on bass and Costello sideman Pete Thomas on drums. The performance sets a standard for all-star tributes on future shows.


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41 FEB. 12, 2012 Good things come to those who wait. Forty-two years after the Beatles’ Abbey Road received a GRAMMY nomination for Album Of The Year, Paul McCartney performs the prized closing medley from the album— “Golden Slumbers,” “Carry That Weight,” and “The End.” Macca gets some high-powered back-up support from Bruce Springsteen, Dave Grohl, and Joe Walsh. Appropriately, the performance closes the show. You want to try to follow that?

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FEB. 13, 2005 Usher teams with James Brown in a performance that seems to mark the passing of the torch. Usher, 26, starts things off with a sleek rendition of his current hit, “Caught Up.” Brown, 71, follows with one of his signature hits, “Get Up—I Feel Like Being Like A Sex Machine.” At the end of the sequence, the Godfather of Soul hails Usher as “the new godson.” This is to be Brown’s last GRAMMY appearance. He died on Christmas Day 2006.

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And the winner is—freedom of expression. Dixie Chicks win all five awards for which they’re nominated, including Album, Record, and Song Of The Year, as the music community rallies around the controversial group. The Chicks had experienced a deep backlash after lead singer Natalie Maines expressed contempt for President George W. Bush at a London concert in 2003. On winning Album Of The Year, Maines thanks the voters for their support and says, “We get the message … I think people were using their voice the same way this loudmouth did.”

Helen Reddy, 31, shows the value of a clever acceptance speech when she picks up the award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female, for her feminist anthem “I Am Woman.” “I would like to thank [my husband and manager] Jeff Wald because he makes my success possible and I would like to thank God because She makes everything possible.” Reddy’s provocative remark enabled her to lead media coverage of the event.

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JAN. 31, 2010 Taylor Swift, 20, becomes the youngest artist to win Album Of The Year —a record that still stands. She takes the award for her country crossover smash, Fearless. She also performs on the show alongside Stevie Nicks, who had shared the Album Of The Year award 32 years earlier for Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours. The two stars back each other on Swift’s “You Belong With Me” and Nicks’ “Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win).”

MARCH 1, 1994 Frank Sinatra’s presentation of a career achievement award to his musical hero Bing Crosby is a highlight of the first “The Best On Record” show. It also establishes a lovely GRAMMY tradition of artists paying tribute to other artists who influenced and inspired them. Sinatra says of Crosby, “We all stole from him. He’s the big daddy in more ways than one.” Three decades later, Sinatra would be on the receiving end of similar compliments when Bono presents him with a GRAMMY Legend Award.

48 MARCH 2, 1974 Three years after they were crowned Best New Artist, Karen and Richard Carpenter present the award for Best New Artist to Bette Midler. The irony: Midler had long poked fun at Karen’s goody-two-shoes image in her act. Midler curtsies when Karen hands her the GRAMMY, and jokes, “My dear, isn’t that a hoot? ... I’m surprised she didn’t hit me over the head with it.” This wasn’t the Carpenters’ last date with GRAMMY. In January 1983, they would join a few dozen other past winners for a photo shoot keyed to the 25th anniversary show the following month. Sadly, Karen didn’t live to see the show. She died on Feb. 4 at age 32.

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47 JAN. 26, 2014 Lorde, 17, takes Song Of The Year for “Royals” (which she co-wrote with her producer, Joel Little). The New Zealander is the youngest winner in the category’s history. Her elegant ballad doesn’t suggest her age, but her breathless acceptance speech does. “Thank you to everyone who has let the song explode, ‘cuz it’s been mental,” she said.


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FEB. 13, 2011 Mumford & Sons team with Bob Dylan and the Avett Brothers in a segment devoted to rootsy songs that grew out of the folk tradition. The performance gives Mumford & Sons a huge career boost. The next awards year, the song they performed in that segment, “The Cave,” is nominated for Record and Song Of The Year. The year after that, they take Album Of The Year for Babel.

50 FEB. 8, 2009 Jay Z, T.I., Kanye West, and Lil Wayne perform their smash “Swagga Like Us.” The superstar rappers are joined by M.I.A., whose “Paper Planes” was sampled on the record. M.I.A. is nine months pregnant, but her baby delays his arrival to allow mom this moment of GRAMMY glory. “Swagga Like Us” wins for Best Rap Performance By A Duo Or Group. (M.I.A.’s son was born on Feb. 11, three days after the GRAMMYs.)

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FEB. 21, 1990 D.J. Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince become the first rap act to get their own performance spot on the GRAMMYs. They perform their hit “I Think I Can Beat Mike Tyson.” The breakthrough took a while: A year earlier, Kool Moe Dee had done some rapping at the podium. In 1988, Run DMC performed as part of a salute to New York. And in 1985, Grandmaster Melle Mel had been featured in Chaka Khan’s performance of “I Feel For You.” But there’s no going backwards—for rap or for the Fresh Prince, a.k.a. Will Smith. The next time Smith performs on the telecast (in 1998), he opens the show.

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Natalie Cole, 42, sings a silky “Unforgettable” in unison with a filmed performance of the song by her father, Nat “King” Cole. The sequence requires perfect timing, but seems entirely effortless (a Cole family trait). Natalie wins three awards, including Album and Record Of The Year. “I thank my dad for leaving me such a wonderful, wonderful heritage,” she says.

Norah Jones, 23, wins five awards, including Album Of The Year for Come Away With Me. Jones’ father, Ravi Shankar, had shared that same award 30 years previously for The Concert For Bangla Desh. Jones performs the jazzy ballad “Don’t Know Why” on the telecast. She is introduced by Tony Bennett, who exclaims, “I want to tell you something about this lady. She is phenomenal—she is gonna be around a long time.”

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FEB. 13, 2011 Esperanza Spalding, 26, becomes the first jazz artist to win Best New Artist. She prevails over four artists that had had far more commercial success—Justin Bieber, Drake, Florence And The Machine, and Mumford & Sons. Backstage, Spalding told reporters she was surprised when her name was called. “I looked at my brother and said like, ‘Really?’ He said, ‘Yes. Go.’”

55 FEB. 25, 1981 Christopher Cross, a 29-year-old singer/songwriter from Texas, wins five awards, including Album, Record, and Song Of The Year, and Best New Artist. He remains the only artist to sweep the “big four” awards in one year. Unfortunately, it was a textbook case of too much, too soon. Cross has yet to win another GRAMMY.

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56 APRIL 13, 1965 In the first posthumous GRAMMY tribute, Sammy Davis Jr., 39, sings a medley of Nat “King” Cole hits on the second “The Best On Record” show. Cole had died of cancer at 45 just two months earlier. While it went unsaid, it was a case of one African-American trailblazer tipping his hat to another. Both legends have since received the Recording Academy’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

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Culture Club wins Best New Artist, prompting the group’s flamboyant lead singer Boy George to say, “Thank you, America. You’ve got taste, style and you know a good drag queen when you see one.” The group accepts the award via satellite from London, where they are congratulated by their pal Joan Rivers. (Rivers had teamed with the group earlier in the show to comically read the GRAMMY voting process rules.)

Billy Crystal outdoes himself in his third appearance as host. His most inspired bit is a parody of Bobby McFerrin’s “Don’t Worry Be Happy,” as Billy had supposedly learned it from his crotchety grandfather. “My grandfather’s point of view was slightly different than Bobby’s,” Crystal explains, singing “I don’t feel so great/Who could with this prostate?/I’m worried, I feel crappy.” Crystal’s performance would make him the only GRAMMY host to win an Emmy for his efforts.

Hillary Rodham Clinton becomes the first first lady to win a GRAMMY when she takes Best Spoken Word Or Non-Musical Album for the audiobook edition of her best-seller, It Takes A Village. “I’m amazed,” she said. “I didn’t even know that GRAMMYs were given to tonedeaf singers like me.”

Jennifer Lopez, 30, wears a green gown with a neckline so plunging that it could have put the “low” in J-Lo. As Lopez’s co-presenter David Duchovny quips onstage, “This is the first time in five or six years that I’m sure that nobody is looking at me.” Donatella Versace deserves a special award for designing the most famous dress in GRAMMY history.

Paul Grein is a veteran music journalist and historian. He writes regularly for such outlets as Yahoo.com and Hitsdailydouble.com. Some of the photos in this story appeared in the book And The GRAMMY Goes To...The Official Story Of Music’s Most Coveted Award. 144 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards


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THE GOOD, THE WILD AND THE For 60 years, Music’s Biggest Night has produced some of fashion’s biggest moments BY NIC SCREWS

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T WAS THE YEAR 2000—back when award shows were more fully-clothed affairs—and Jennifer Lopez, then a budding dancer/actress/singer on the arm of her arguably more famous boyfriend, Sean “Puffy” Combs, sashayed on to the GRAMMY scene in a printed yet sheer silk chiffon Versace gown. Remember it? Of course you do. The now infamous dress and the career-changing moment it sparked for J.Lo is pure GRAMMY magic and one of the reasons why fashion has become almost as synonymous with the GRAMMYs as the awards themselves. The GRAMMYs may not have invented the red carpet, and sure, the frocks may be more traditional at other award shows, but the GRAMMY Awards have long been the red carpet of style mavericks and trendsetters, a place to be totally dressed up yet nearly naked (thanks to artists such as Cher and Madonna and, of course, Lopez, who took it up a notch) or deliberately attention-grabbing (see: Lady Gaga at any of her GRAMMY appearances). In celebration of the GRAMMYs’ 60th anniversary, we compiled a fashion retrospective. Here, our highlight reel of some of the best, wildest and most unforgettable looks from Music’s Biggest Night.

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THE BEGINNING–1960s

NAT KING COLE 2ND GRAMMY AWARDS, 1959 Nat “King” Cole was truly unforgettable. The seductive crooner, known for his velvety smooth baritone voice and for helping to break the color barrier in music and television, was the definition of debonair. While performing on the first GRAMMY broadcast presented on television, Cole favored the timelessness of a perfectly-fitted tuxedo and polished yet masculine grooming. It was a classic and appropriate look for the ceremony, a black-tie affair featuring music’s top stars. NBC/NBCU PHOTO BANK VIA GETTY IMAGES

ANN-MARGRET 4TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1962 Before becoming linked to Elvis, then girl-of-the-moment Ann-Margret (a nominee for Best New Artist that night) made her GRAMMY debut in a demure flapper-fringe cocktail dress complete with matching opera-length gloves. While the award may have gone to pianist Peter Nero, Ann-Margret and her coiffed, signature red mane and kittenish-mod vibe left quite an impression. Fifty-five years later, Katy Perry wore a nearly identically feathered skirt to the 59th GRAMMY Awards.

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MAMAS AND THE PAPAS & HERB ALPERT 9TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1967 The Mamas And The Papas were the quintessential ’60s counterculture hippies. To many, they represented the idealistic freedom of the changing times. Their pop-folk style— in melody and in fashion—was at the height of popularity in 1967 (the same year as the Summer of Love) when they won their sole GRAMMY of their short career together. Long straight-haired Michelle Phillips’ effortless, golden girl look is still emulated today by throngs of women. And Herb Alpert (far right) might not have set any fashion trends, but the influential musician could make a case for first artist to hold a GRAMMY to his ear. DONALDSON COLLECTION/MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/ GETTY IMAGES

BOBBIE GENTRY 10TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1968 Could-be beauty queen turned country music royalty Bobbie Gentry made her GRAMMY debut as the award show rounded out its first decade. The “Ode To Billie Joe” singer accepted her three statues in a sky-blue pantsuit with her trademark piled high raven hair and deeply mascaraed lashes. The next year, Rep. Charlotte T. Reid (R-Ill.) would make headlines as the first woman to wear a pantsuit on the House floor, arguably making Gentry’s subtle look a big deal. NBCU PHOTO BANK

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1970s

LYNN ANDERSON 13TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1971 Known for her crossover appeal and All-American good looks, country artist Lynn Anderson certainly went the unusual route for the 1971 ceremony. She wore a flashyand-feathered, canary yellow gown complete with a matching chinstrap choker to accept her award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance for “Rose Garden.” ABC PHOTO ARCHIVES/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES

ISSAC HAYES 14TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1972 A year before he became “Black Moses,” Isaac Hayes parted the stage to accept his first GRAMMY Award for his iconic, decade-defining hit, “Theme From Shaft.” Hayes stood out among his afro- and bell bottom-wearing contemporaries in a leather, pastoral cloak—complete with his signature shaven-head, dark shades, and thick gold chain. ABC PHOTO ARCHIVES/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES

CHER 16TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1974 Before there was a Madonna, Gaga or Rihanna, there was Cher. The original Goddess of Pop showed off her enviable body backstage in a naval-flaunting bandeau bikini and sheer cover-up by longtime costume designer and collaborator Bob Mackie. Instead of her iconic feathered headdress, Cher finished off the look with an oversized bedazzled butterfly hairpin atop her down-tothere black mane. MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

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1970s

BETTE MIDLER & STEVIE WONDER 17TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1975 Wearing a 45-rpm record of the Dell-Vikings’ “Come Go With Me” as a hat, 1973 Best New Artist winner Bette Midler presented Stevie Wonder with his GRAMMY for Album Of The Year (his fourth win of the night). Not to be outdone by Midler’s cheeky headpiece and formfitting, deep neckline cocktail dress, which she claimed she got from Cher, Wonder accepted the honor in a patchwork tuxedo made of varying shades of blue and textures before whisking Midler backstage. RON GALELLA/WIREIMAGE.COM

BEE GEES 21ST GRAMMY AWARDS, 1979 The Bee Gees defined the disco era thanks to their of-the-moment combination of gifted musicality and flair for showmanship. They epitomized the flashy fashion of the dance floor—feathered hair, shirts unbuttoned to the navel, a penchant for velvet and satin suiting—making them true style titans of their time. SAM EMERSON

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1980s

GRACE JONES 25TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1983 Cult icon Grace Jones is known for her outrageous style statements. Oversized Karl Lagerfeld hat and plunging shift dress aside, her look at the 1983 ceremony had all the hallmarks of a true ’80s beauty moment: bold colors, glossy lips, angular cheekbones, and a daring androgyny. CHRIS WALTER/WIREIMAGE.COM

CYNDI LAUPER 26TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1984 She’s So Unusual isn’t just the title of Cyndi Lauper’s debut album—it’s also the songstress’ personal motto. Along with her fearless and larger-than-life persona, Lauper donned one of her colorful and clashing ensembles to her first GRAMMYs: a metallic crop top, a multicolored printed skirt, complete with big hair, and bigger baubles. The look likely inspired others to go big and have fun. BARRY KING/WIREIMAGE.COM

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PRINCE 27TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1985 In full rock-god form, Prince managed to ooze sex appeal as he performed in a gender-blurring ensemble of a lace two-piece outfit with heeled boots. As always with Prince, the look was amped up and showed off why he was such a sartorial pioneer— taking an androgynous and experimental sense of personal style to the next level.

THE JUDDS 28TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1986 Naomi and Wynonna Judd—country music’s most famous mother-daughter duo—show off their affinity for high hair, shiny fabrics, leopard prints, and padded shoulders in complementary looks fitting of another mid-’80s cultural phenomenon: the prime-time soap opera “Dynasty.” JIM SMEAL/WIREIMAGE.COM

RUN DMC 30TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1988 Consider Run DMC the godfathers of streetwear. Run, Jam Master Jay, and DMC greatly influenced the future of fashion as we know it. Their typical style trifecta included Adidas tracksuits and sneakers, chunky gold rope chains, and fedoras. For the GRAMMYs, the trio took it up a notch, opting for matching leather Adidas jackets. Their allegiance to Adidas resulted in the firstever endorsement deal between a music act and an athletic company. RON GALELLA LTD./WIREIMAGE.COM

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1990s

SELENA 36TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1994 Selena—known as the Queen of Tejano—influenced an entire generation of Latin pop fans thanks to her infectious, chart-topping hits (such as “Dreaming Of You”) and her statement-making costumes (many of which she designed herself). The night she took home her GRAMMY, Selena dressed up her scarlet lips with a ultra-sparkly, figure-hugging beaded gown worthy of a queen. ROBIN PLATZER/IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES

TLC 38TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1996 Girl groups have been coordinating ensembles since forever, but TLC really made it CrazySexyCool. Their successful and memorable style formula nearly always included parachute pants, shiny fabrics, and ample midriff, inspiring group Halloween costumes since the ’90s. RON GALELLA/WIREIMAGE.COM

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1990s

ANNIE LENNOX 37TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1995 Arguably one of the most chameleon-like female artists of all time, a 41-year-old Annie Lennox humored the red carpet when she showed up to the 1995 ceremony as a dominatrix Minnie Mouse. Of the look, she said at the time, “What else is a girl going to wear to the GRAMMYs?” RON GALELLA LTD./WIREIMAGE.COM

GWEN STEFANI 39TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 1997 In one of her more conservative outfits to date, Gwen Stefani—then the perpetually platinum blonde lead singer of No Doubt— showed up to the affair in a bodice, floral embroidered dress with a matching satin trench coat. Stefani’s look proved that rockers could rock on and be feminine too. RON WOLFSON/THE LIFE IMAGES COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

WILL SMITH, PUFF DADDY & MASE 41ST GRAMMY AWARDS, 1999 Sean Combs (known then as Puff Daddy) showed why he was known as the shiny suit man. Posing, along with fellow rappers Will Smith and Mase, Combs really embraced his role in this style of the moment in hip-hop culture with his cream, monochromatic three-button suit. Mase followed suit in all lavender and Smith in a gray T-Shirt blazer with mismatched black collar. KEVIN MAZUR/WIREIMAGE.COM

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2000s

JENNIFER LOPEZ 42ND GRAMMY AWARDS, 2000 With one daring, down-to-there neckline, Jennifer Lopez perfected the art of take-over-the-room (and internet) fashion. Thanks to her plunging, sheer tropical print Versace gown (not just a green dress, but the green dress), Google Images launched and America discovered the usefulness of double stick tape. SCOTT GRIES/IMAGEDIRECT

’N SYNC 43RD GRAMMY AWARDS, 2001 There was nothing synching about the suits all five members of ’N Sync wore to the GRAMMYs. In what could only be described as “upholstery-chic,” the looks really told the tale of peak boy-band fashion. Note the elaborate use of atypical suiting materials such as brocade and velvet, nighttime shades, and the variety of frosted hair tips. SCOTT GRIES/IMAGEDIRECT

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NELLY 43RD GRAMMY AWARDS, 2001 Following the success of his breakthrough album, Country Grammar, rapper Nelly attended the GRAMMY ceremony in 2001 looking like a set of iced out Louis Vuitton luggage. His suit was made of a leatherlike material emblazoned with the French fashion house’s signature LV monogram—a look Nelly described years later as, “Definitely the worst outfit I’ve ever worn in my life.” STEVE GRANITZ/WIREIMAGE.COM

IMOGEN HEAP 49TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 2007 Always the risk-taker, British singer/ songwriter Imogen Heap attended the show in what Pop Sugar described as a “modern day Mary Poppins” look thanks to the pairing of a full skirt, hairpiece, and umbrella for adornment purposes only. The outfit was designed by a fan who contacted Heap about a collaboration on MySpace. Perhaps a Facebook dress is in her future. FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES

M.I.A. 51ST GRAMMY AWARDS, 2009 Eight years before Beyoncé carried twins on the GRAMMY stage, a very pregnant M.I.A. performed and flaunted her belly in a sheer and strategically placed polka-dot patched Henry Holland mini dress. M.I.A. (and her unborn son) hit the stage with Kanye West, JAY-Z, and Lil Wayne, performing their ultrahit “Swagga Like Us.” JASON MERRITT/GETTY IMAGES

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2010s

LADY GAGA 52ND GRAMMY AWARDS, 2010 Lady Gaga looked like she was from another planet, literally, when she arrived to the GRAMMYs in a custom galactic-inspired Armani Prive gown. She completed the memorable space-age look in her uniquely Gaga way: with towering platforms and by carrying a starshaped sparkle in lieu of a handbag. She’d return to outer space seven years later on the GRAMMY red carpet in a getup inspired by David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust. JASON MERRITT/GETTY IMAGES

RIHANNA 53RD GRAMMY AWARDS, 2011 At first glance, it seemed as though Rihanna showed up in an ethereal, fluffy ringed dress, a more romantic look for the usually-daring star. But a closer look would expose, well, most of Rihanna. The flesh-toned panels in her white striped gown were indeed her actual flesh. She topped off the sneakily seductive look with soft hair and bold, but feminine, makeup. GREGG DEGUIRE/FILMMAGIC

PHARRELL WILLIAMS 56TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 2014 Pharrell Williams’ infamous oversized Vivienne Westwood hat made a lot of people “Happy.” The vintage Arby’s meets Smokey the Bear-inspired top hat was so popular that it even earned its own Twitter account (@pharrellhat) after making its red carpet debut. Arby’s later bought the hat for $44,100, with the money going to Pharrell’s charity From One Hand To AnOTHER. LARRY BUSACCA/WIREIMAGE.COM

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BEYONCÉ 55TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 2013 Nearly every dress Beyoncé has worn since her GRAMMY debut in 2000 could be included in a GRAMMY fashion retrospective, but it was her unexpected look in 2013 that makes our list. In a surprise departure from her ultra-glam curve-hugging gowns, Beyoncé arrived in a sculptural, monochromatic jumpsuit to accept her award for Best Traditional R&B Performance. The subtle fashion moment included a simple low ponytail, with clutch and gorgeous Art Deco bangles by jeweler Lorraine Schwartz. JASON MERRITT/GETTY IMAGES

TAYLOR SWIFT 58TH GRAMMY AWARDS, 2016 Not only did Album Of The Year winner Taylor Swift take home music’s biggest prize at the 58th ceremony, she stunned on the red carpet when she arrived in an ultra-fresh and festive hot pink and coral two-piece ensemble (custom Atelier Versace) that was equal parts sexy and dramatic. Swift finished the look with a bold pout and a sleek, blunt bob. That summer, crop tops were seen at music festivals everywhere. JEFF VESPA/WIREIMAGE.COM

Nic Screws is a style expert writer, and founder of NS Style + Creative. Previously, she was the style director at Bloomberg Media.

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From Broadway musicals to hip-hop, the cultural vibrancy of the city that never sleeps has spawned a wealth of musical genres BY JIM FARBER

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M

ANY MAJOR CITIES HAVE THEIR SOUND. Yet, over the last century, New York has originated, or fostered, more pivotal ones than any place on Earth. From the erudite ballads of the Great American Songbook and the pop craft of the Brill Building, to the polyrhythms of salsa, the riot of punk, and the fresh beats of hip-hop, New York has birthed as many styles as it has neighborhoods. It’s not just the profusion of ethnicities this city attracts that accounts for its long string of creative bursts. It’s also the ambition and need of those starry-eyed souls who choose to move here. The particular nexus of density, volume, and financing found in New York provides an ideal proving ground for the curious and gifted. That’s the spirit the GRAMMYs honor by returning to this city for the first time in 15 years. This year’s setting for music’s most prestigious showcase and awards ceremony reflects the imperial role New York has long played in the creative and intellectual life of the United States. Since the mid-1800s, the city has served as the country’s arts capitol. In 1883 and 1891, New York unveiled two of the most renowned music venues in America—the Metropolitan Opera House and Carnegie Hall, respectively. An equally pivotal moment arrived in 1892 when Bohemianborn composer Antonín Dvořák became director of the city’s National Conservatory of Music. There, he mixed European classical elements with Native- and African-American folk styles, in the process blueprinting the kinds of genre mashups that would inform every form of American popular music to come.

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HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES

TIN PAN ALLEY New York solidified its role as the business center of the music industry with the late 19th century rise of Tin Pan Alley—the snarky nickname affixed to the area occupied by the song publishers who dominated popular music through the early 20th century. In cramped offices on West 28th Street, these publishers controlled the copyrights to the top hits of the era, generating a deep trove of ragtime songs, sentimental ballads, jazz odes, and blues salutes.

Tin Pan Alley, circa early 1900s

By the 1930s, top Tin Pan Alley composers developed a more sophisticated style, leading to the creative Vesuvius later known as the Great American Songbook. During this boom, composers such as Irving Berlin, Dorothy Fields, Howard Arlen, Sammy Cahn, and George Gershwin mixed urbane wit with elevated melodies, drawing on African-American jazz and blues while

making sure to grace their compositions with a croonable chorus. Many of these songwriters were of Eastern European Jewish descent, a crucial lineage in New York history. As outsiders in a society plagued by anti-Semitism, the artists got their “in” by creating a breathtaking fantasia of chic music, laced with clever messages.


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AFM musicians who record under our agreement share in the following funds:

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THE BROADWAY MUSICAL The three-decade reign of the Great American Songbook overlapped the rise of American musical theater, centered in New York’s Broadway district. Theatrical productions in the city originally centered themselves downtown, but, by the 1920s and ’30s, they migrated to Times Square. The musicals of the nascent era had fly-away plots and light concerns. Most strung together popular songs of the era such as “Someone To Watch Over Me” and “Fascinating Rhythm” by George and Ira Gershwin or songs by Cole Porter and Rodgers and Hart, among others. New York’s musical theater took a huge leap in 1927 with “Show Boat.” The piece seamlessly melded a serious play into a musical, aided by the alchemy of Jerome Kern’s music and Oscar Hammerstein II’s lyrics. Using “Show Boat” as their inspiration, Broadway’s creators ushered in their most sanctified era—the ’40s through the early ’60s. This golden period kicked off with Rodgers and Hammerstein’s

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THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE While the writers of the American Songbook were elaborating their work in the theaters of Midtown, African-American artists were thriving to an equal degree uptown. The Cotton Club, in Harlem, hired the visionary musician Fletcher Henderson as its first house band leader in 1923, and then advanced the starry career of Duke Ellington, whose orchestra served as the club’s house band from 1927 to 1931. At the time, the Cotton Club had a “whites only” admission policy, though its prime performers, such as Cab Calloway and Coleman Hawkins, were black. That same policy ruled a few blocks away at the Apollo Theater until that storied venue began accepting black patrons in 1934. By the swing era of the ’40s, artists such as Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, and Count Basie

Cab Calloway (with baton) leads his orchestra during a New Year’s Eve celebration at the Cotton Club in Harlem in 1937

BETTMANN/GETTY IMAGES

Joan Roberts and Alfred Drake (far left) with fellow cast members of the Broadway musical “Oklahoma!” in 1943

GEORGE KARGER/PIX INC./THE LIFE IMAGES COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

“Oklahoma!” in 1943, followed by “Carousel” (1945), and “South Pacific” (1949), leading to a string of classic musicals in the ’50s and early ’60s, from “My Fair Lady” to “Fiddler On The Roof.” Many of the cast albums from these shows landed on the pop charts, as did the soundtracks to their subsequent film versions.


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DOO-WOP Meanwhile, deep in the outer boroughs of Brooklyn and the Bronx, the doo-wop trend was finding fresh expression. The layered vocal style had already enjoyed well-established pockets of creativity around the nation, but the street culture and echoing subways of New York provided the ideal breeding ground for expanding a sound based on a cappella harmonies. Up in Harlem, groups such as Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers and the Ravens brought soul to the style, while in the further boroughs,

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creative leaps came from a wave of ItalianAmerican singing acts such as Dion and the Belmonts and Johnny Maestro and the Brooklyn Bridge. During the 1950s, such acts racked up huge hits. New York doo-wop also provided a template for the coming “girl group” trend, inspired by nationally-known acts such as the Bobbettes, from Spanish Harlem, and the Chantels, from the Bronx.

Jerry Leiber (right) and Mike Stoller work in Stoller’s New York City apartment in 1959

DAVID ATTIE/GETTY IMAGES

reinvigorated the uptown clubs, playing before mixed audiences. The ’40s also saw the ascendance of bebop, pioneered by artists such as Charlie Parker, Charlie Christian, and Thelonious Monk. Their bold styles established New York’s cutting-edge sound, incubated in a packed array of clubs along 52nd Street, including Birdland and the 21 Club. The city continued to be the epicenter of forwardthinking jazz with the advent of hard-bop in the ’50s, innovated by artists such as Sonny Rollins and Art Blakey. By the late 1950s, an L.A. transplant to New York, Ornette Coleman, blew out the boundaries of the music even further by forging freejazz, along with artists such as Albert Ayler and Sun Ra.

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers

THE BRILL BUILDING YEARS The harmonies of young female groups became a major theme, and selling point, for the songwriters of the Brill Building, located at 1619 Broadway. In the tight warrens of that structure, as well as those across the street at Aldon Music, young lyricists and melodists created high-strung teenage dramas for yearning groups such as the Shirelles, the Shangri-las, and the Exciters. In the early ’60s, such acts spawned smash hits such as “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” “Tell Him,” and “Leader Of The Pack” as well as songs inspired by the grit and promise of the city such as “Spanish Harlem” and “On Broadway.” The authors of the songs, including the teams of Carole King and Gerry Goffin, Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann, and Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, went on to become some of the most important pop writers of the 20th century. Along with scribes such as Doc Pomus, Shadow Morton, and Bert Berns, they drew inspiration from Latin music as well as from rhythm and blues. By mingling those genres with mainstream pop, these writers greatly expanded the notion of popular music and, in the process, created what could be called “the second great American Songbook.” Again, the writing was dominated by Jewish musicians who’d fallen in love with sounds originated by their fellow ethnic outsiders.


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A crowd gathers outside of Cafe Wha? in Greenwich Village in 1965

GREENWICH VILLAGE FOLK As the musicians of Midtown were defining mainstream pop in the early ’60s, a more raw and subversive movement was developing downtown. Along a narrow corridor of Bleecker Street in Greenwich Village lay smoke-choked clubs such as Cafe Au Go Go and The Bitter End while, around the way, sat holes-in-the-wall such as Cafe Wah? and Gerde’s Folk City. Into these sacred dives flowed a wealth of young singer/songwriters, inspired by a mix of progressive politics, bohemian culture, and rural American music. During the peak years of the resulting Village folk scene (1962 to 1965), the writer/ poets of Bleecker Street created a catalog of mellifluous tunes, informed by highly personal and richly literary lyrics. Many of the writers went on to become iconic (Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell). The scene’s

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accent on eccentric, and uncommercial, writing had profound effects on the expectations for all future pop stars. Led by Dylan, singers were now meant to write their own songs, rather than rely on the old method of finding words and music penned by others. Perhaps the writer most-finely attuned to the New York sensibility at play was Laura Nyro. Her songs united every strand of the city’s musical history, while creating its own clamorous language. In Nyro’s highly dramatic recordings, such as “And When I Die,” “Stoney End,” and “Eli’s Coming,” listeners could hear the grandeur of the Grand Concourse, the striving of the Lower East Side, the chic of Riverside Drive, and the soul of Harlem. Her music found an ideal showcase in several live recordings, including one cut at the Fillmore East in 1970.

PRE-PUNK AND GLAM-ROCK The fact that Laura Nyro played the Fillmore in the East Village on the same bill as Miles Davis epitomized the brilliant eclecticism of that venue. But if the Fillmore served as the prime showcase for progressive music in the city, another even edgier venue offered a breeding ground for a group that would become one of the most influential of all time. The Dom on St. Marks Place provided the first showcase for the Velvet Underground, a shock-rock act that pushed the outlaw character of the city to its limit. Led by the edgy poets Lou Reed and John Cale, and featuring the chilly singer Nico—all sponsored by Andy Warhol—Velvet Underground came to epitomize New York at its most dark and daring. The full constellation of the Warhol scene enjoyed a kind of club house at the Park Avenue


South venue Max’s Kansas City. A scene developed there so fertile that, after the Fillmore closed in 1971, Max’s helped incubate music’s next big trend—glitter rock. It’s there that David Bowie hooked up with Iggy Pop and Lou Reed, inspiring some of glam rock’s most important recordings, including Reed’s Transformer and Bowie’s Hunky Dory. Max’s didn’t just help launch American glam, it offered an early showcase for Bruce Springsteen, who, in 1973, featured as his opening act the Wailers led by Bob Marley. In 1972, the New York Dolls played some of their first gigs at a run-down East Village creative space known as the Mercer Arts Center. In shows there, and at the nearby Club 82, the Dolls not only extended the outrage and freshness of glam, they presaged the in-your-face attitude and raucous musicality of a style that, for many, would define New York for years.

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RICHARD CREAMER/MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES RICHARD E. AARON/REDFERN

THE PUNK, SALSA, AND DISCO EXPLOSION OF THE ’70s That style—punk—would find a perfect incubator at CBGB, a fantastic wreck of a place on the then rancid Bowery. After Richard Hell and Tom Verlaine convinced owner Hilly Kristal to allow their band Television to appear at his dive in 1974, a wave of hungry bands with big ideas rushed in. Together, they created the most vital live scene New York had hosted since the early ’60s folk boom. CBGB may have been dubbed punk’s ground zero (epitomized by the minimalist sound of the Ramones), but the venue actually presented a wildly broad swath of acts, from arty intellectuals (Talking Heads), to neo-’60s punk poppers (Blondie) to psychedelic explorers (Television) to a post-hippie street poet (Patti Smith). Rock wasn’t the only sound finding a new voice courtesy of New York artists in the mid-’70s. At the same time, a Cuban/ Puerto Rican dance style that dated back to the New York of the ’60s—salsa—found a new commercial voice. The Fania AllStars, featuring vaunted artists such as Ray Barretto, Celia Cruz, and Héctor Lavoe, brought the salsa sound to a mainstream audience, selling millions of records while generating top-rated local radio shows devoted to its sound and culture. As the late ’70s dawned so did the dance

The New York Dolls perform on “The Real Don Steele Show” in 1973

Tito Puente and Celia Cruz

beats of disco. That style, which got its start earlier in the decade at gay, black, and Latin clubs in New York, exploded into an international phenomenon by 1977. Disco hit its creative peak at two key venues:

Studio 54, the most exclusive, and starpacked club of the era, and the Paradise Garage, which inspired its mainly black and gay dance music fans to party to the early hours of the next day.


LAURA LEVINE/CORBIS/GETTY IMAGES

Grandmaster Flash

HIP-HOP A great irony was playing out in all these scenes. Right when New York was experiencing what many editorialized as its lowest point—with crime rampant, finances depleted, and infrastructure crumbling— the city was also finding its artistic apex. The punk scene quickly gave way to the slicker, broader, new wave movement, which created, in reaction, the avant-garde “anti-rock” of no wave, peopled by freaks such as Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, the Contortions, and DNA. Meanwhile, yet another scene was brewing up in the Bronx, one that, arguably, would end up having more influence on music than any other ’70s sound the city produced. Though the borough may have been burnt out and financially impoverished, the Bronx’s resourceful young devised a style rich enough to define all the generations in its wake. After Bronx native DJ Kool Herc set up two turntables at a party in 1973 and invented the break-beat, others soon began to rap over those beats and a wholly new approach to music was born, elaborated by

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artists such as Grandmaster Flash, Grand Wizard Theodore, and Spoonie Gee. From the late ’70s through 1984, New York hosted the only major hip-hop scene in the world. Throughout the ’80s and ’90s, the boroughs kept pumping out world-class rappers, from KRS-One, Slick Rick, and Fat Joe (in the Bronx), to LL Cool J, Salt-N-Pepa, and A Tribe Called Quest (in Queens), to Big Daddy Kane, the Notorious B.I.G., Lil’ Kim, and JAY-Z (courtesy of Brooklyn). ROCK REDUX While hip-hop and R&B had come to define modern pop in the new millennium, the early aughts saw an important comeback for cutting edge New York rock. Brooklyn’s Williamsburg area became the city’s new epicenter of hip, spawning bands from the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, TV On The Radio, and the Rapture to Grizzly Bear, LCD Soundsystem, and the National. But that growth brought its own problem. The astronomical rise in New York rents over the next decade made it nearly impossible for new generations of innovative young

musicians to follow in their forebears’ footsteps. The transformation of New York from the edgy place of the ’60s through the ’90s to the hugely monied mecca it is today has undoubtedly lessened its creative spark. On the other hand, in the age of technology and social media, scenes no longer need tie themselves to a physical space at all. Instead, they thrive online, in a virtual anywhere, allowing a kid from Goa or Guam equal entry to the world’s stages as one from London or Los Angeles. Amid this universalized, and equalized, world of creation, the specificity and history of New York music history isn’t weakened. If anything, the opposite holds true. No matter where you come from, anyone who makes music, now and forever, will owe a great debt to the wealth of sounds and styles this city has nurtured. Jim Farber, who served as chief music critic of the New York Daily News for 25 years, currently contributes to The New York Times, The Guardian, Entertainment Weekly, Music Aficionado, and many other publications.


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FLEETWOOD MAC

AND THE CHAIN THAT KEEPS THEM TOGETHER The men and women who make up the first band to receive the MusiCares Person of the Year honor have been linked together for four decades Fleetwood Mac was honored as the 2018 MusiCares Person of the Year on Jan. 26 at a special tribute performance and dinner in New York recognizing their accomplishments as artists and humanitarians. A friend and ally of the music community, MusiCares’ mission is to ensure music people have a compassionate place to turn in times of need while focusing the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the well-being of our community.

BY DAVID WILD

I

T’S SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST A RUMOUR—HERE IN 2018, Fleetwood Mac is becoming the first band ever honored by the Recording Academy as the MusiCares Person of the Year. To explicitly state the obvious, Fleetwood Mac is not—nor has it ever been—a single person. Indeed, over the years, the name, band, and brand Fleetwood Mac has meant many things to countless people on every continent. For instance, over in England, way back in the late ’60s, Fleetwood Mac stood for a major, chart-topping British

blues-based band. By the early ’70s, Fleetwood Mac had come to be something significantly less stable and clear-cut, and with so many assorted members coming and going that sometimes you needed a scorecard to keep track of all the players. Yet in the hearts and minds of multiple generations of those who care about music, Fleetwood Mac has come to represent five gifted individuals who are now forever linked in one of music’s most lasting and treasured chains. For millions of us, Fleetwood Mac is, first and

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WARNER REPRISERECORDS

“The truth about Rumours is that Rumours was the truth.”

foremost, a charismatic and compelling group made up of three men and two women who are still standing and still playing as they come together to accept this tremendous and richly deserved honor: namely, Lindsey Buckingham, Mick Fleetwood, Christine McVie, John McVie, and Stevie Nicks. As with other truly great bands, it somehow feels as if “The Chain” that strongly links these five remarkable individuals has always existed—and always will too. Yet in truth, the existence of Fleetwood Mac as we all know the band today really started in one pivotal moment back in 1974 when Fleetwood made one of the best and most fateful decisions in the history of popular music. In late 1974, Fleetwood Mac hit another significant bump in the road when the group’s latest lead guitarist, frequent lead singer, and songwriter Bob Welch announced he was leaving. Now there were just three members left in the ranks of Fleetwood Mac—name partners Fleetwood on drums, John McVie on bass, and Christine McVie, formerly Christine Perfect, still there and still perfect on keyboards and vocals, and, at the time, still married to John. Thankfully, faced with a sudden musical void to fill, Fleetwood thought back to some tracks he had heard while checking out Sound City, a Los Angeles

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recording studio, as a relatively inexpensive place to record the band’s next album. “Do you always trust your first initial feeling?” That was the memorable question poetically posed in the song “Crystal,” a gorgeous composition written by Nicks featuring a moving lead vocal by Buckingham that was first recorded for their 1973 debut effort as a duo, Buckingham Nicks. It was then more famously redone for Fleetwood Mac, the game-changing 1975 release that will forever hold a special place in the enduring history of this legendary band. This was one of the songs that made a big initial impression on Fleetwood. “Thankfully, the undeniable musical genius of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks struck an instant chord with me when I first heard them,” Fleetwood says today with a laugh. “So, I trusted my first initial feeling, and believe me, that has made all the difference.” And so it was that Fleetwood Mac as most of us know it was born. As Christine McVie recently told me, “The Fleetwood Mac album represents a magical time to remember when the planets all aligned for us. This is where the goose bumps all began.” In most rock and roll stories, Fleetwood Mac might be the peak


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Onstage, late ‘70s

goose bumps moment in any story. Yet remarkably, this debut was in some ways the musical prelude to an even more popular masterpiece called Rumours. “The truth about Rumours,” says Stevie Nicks, “is that Rumours was the truth.” And the truth is that by any possible standard whatsoever, Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 album Rumours remains one of the most popular, beloved, and acclaimed albums in rock history. To date, Rumours has sold more than 45 million copies around the world—give or take a million. Rumours also won the 1977 GRAMMY for Album Of The Year. Ultimately, the truths that Nicks, Buckingham, Christine McVie, John McVie, and Fleetwood shared with a listening world on Rumours were game-changing not simply for Fleetwood Mac, but for the landscape of popular music. How did something so timeless as Rumours happen— especially during a time when both the McVies and Buckingham and Nicks were breaking up romantically? In a tense time when so much could have gone wrong, how did so much go so right? For Buckingham, whose sonic genius flowered on Rumours, the enduring phenomenon of that album was a kind of chain reaction that resulted from not just the “soap opera” behind the scenes in the band, but also the powerful and unlikely musical combination of individuals who somehow managed to stick together in the right time and place. “Obviously having lived through it and having been inside the perfect storm of Rumours, it may be difficult for us to be objective about what made it so big,” Buckingham says with a laugh. “But in terms of musical style, you have to look at the range of reference points we all had. … Beyond the songs that Christine and Stevie and I wrote that stand the test of time, the album has an organic feel and a real sense of groove that Mick Fleetwood and John McVie brought to the party. “There are a lot of big albums from the time that don’t have that kind of groove when you listen back. That’s all about chemistry, and it’s utterly unpredictable because the fact is that on a musical level, we were five people who didn’t necessarily belong in a group together. Yet there was a natural synergy that came from our differences. … There was just this spontaneous and natural feeling coming together of these interwoven things that didn’t all come from the same place but that somehow added up to be more than the sum of its parts.”

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Fleetwood Mac—flanked by David Crosby and Stephen Stills—accept the Album Of The Year GRAMMY for Rumours at the 20th GRAMMY Awards in 1978

“That’s the thing about the Fleetwood Mac story—you can’t make this stuff up, and thankfully, we don’t have to.” “The truth is we never did break the chain back then,” Nicks says. “We kept going back to the studio and trying to make something great together—despite how untogether we might have been outside of the studio. We never even really considered flying off from one another while we were making that music, because we understood fully what we were doing and how important it was. And I think we just psychically knew that record was going to live on forever in history—when we were making it. And I think when you know that, in your heart of hearts, and everyone knew it, you really don’t let in a lot of stuff that could worm its way into the situation and destroy everyone’s good intentions. We just didn’t let it happen.” Ever since those early moments of triumph, Fleetwood Mac has been full of highs and lows, artistic and chemical, from the wild ambitious experimentation of 1979’s Tusk, to 1982’s more polished Mirage and 1987’s extremely successful Tango In The Night. Yet by the time the latter album was released, the best known and bestloved lineup of Fleetwood Mac began to splinter, with Buckingham walking away from a band he now found dysfunctional. It would take the first inauguration of President Bill Clinton to bring all five classic band members back together in 1993, which helped set the stage for the band to reunite in 1997 for The Dance, a chart-topping success that earned the band three GRAMMY nominations. By then

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the band was in a healthier and happier place. But when Christine McVie, tired of life on the road, returned to England and seemingly retired from the band in 1998, it was widely assumed to be the end of Fleetwood Mac’s classic era. Fleetwood Mac soldiered on without her, releasing Say You Will in 2003, but McVie’s surprise return to the band in 2014 was the very best kind of musical homecoming. The name of Fleetwood Mac’s wildly successful subsequent reunion tour, On With The Show, perfectly and movingly summed up the spirit that keeps Fleetwood Mac united against long odds. Now, in 2018, Fleetwood Mac remains a remarkably vital and relevant presence—and their unique backstory and mix of men and women, Brits and Americans, has helped them earn a singular and inclusive place in rock history. As Fleetwood once told me, “Our amazing, strange but true story will someday make one hell of a great Broadway musical. That’s the thing about the Fleetwood Mac story—you can’t make this stuff up, and thankfully, we don’t have to.” David Wild is an Emmy-nominated television writer, a best-selling author, and a contributing editor at Rolling Stone. He is also a writer on the GRAMMY Awards telecast.


Sisters & Brothers! ORIGINAL RECORDINGS OF DR. EMANUEL BRONNER

Sisters & Brothers features original recordings of Dr. Emanuel Bronner—visionary, soapmaker, grandfather and founder of Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps. Recorded between 1968 and 1988 on a variety of home-recording devices, the newly re-mastered tracks reveal Emanuel Bronner’s ‘All-One’ philosophy and its potential to unite humankind across Spaceship Earth. This lovingly edited and designed limited-edition gatefold vinyl LP is a beautiful tribute to Dr. Bronner and his legacy. All proceeds from sales of the album benefit the non-profit organization Jail Guitar Doors, an international non-profit which provides prisoners with music education, and was founded by Billy Bragg, Wayne Kramer, and Margaret Saadi Kramer in 2009. Buy the vinyl at drbronner.com or download the digital album at drbronners.bandcamp.com


In this, our 170th year, Hammacher Schlemmer congratulates ÂŽ In this, 170th year, Hammacher Schlemmer congratulates theour GRAMMY Awards on their 60th Anniversary. the GRAMMY AwardsÂŽ on their 60th Anniversary.

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Selling out venues is the only kind of selling out you should do. You make the music we all enjoy. But sometimes getting paid for it forces you to make deals you wish you hadn’t. That’s why Sound Royalties was created. We’re a new kind of company that gives you the financial support you need without making you give up the rights to your music. We’re run by music people for music people. And, since we have our own financial resources, we can create the funding that works best for you. So, talk to us today and keep what’s yours.

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RECORDING ACADEMY ™ The Recording Academy’s headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif.

MEMBERSHIP & INDUSTRY RELATIONS ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY DIGITAL ACADEMY MUSICARES

®

GRAMMY MUSEUM

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THE LATIN RECORDING ACADEMY GRAMMY WEEK ®

GRAMMY AWARDS PROCESS ®

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®


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Chart your own course with over 300 destinations during the Celebrity Cruises Sail Beyond Event. Book now and for a limited time enjoy two free perks like complimentary Wi-Fi or beverage package, plus savings for everyone in your stateroom.* Call 1-800-CELEBRITY or your Travel Agent. *Visit celebrity.com for full terms and conditions. Cruise must be booked Jan 15th– Feb 28th, 2018. Offer applies to select 4-night and longer cruises departing March 1, 2018, to April 30, 2019. Galapagos, transatlantic, transpacific, repositioning, and certain other itineraries are excluded. Savings Offer: Savings amount is per person and based on stateroom category: $50 for inside; $100 for ocean view and veranda; $150 for Concierge Class and AquaClass; $200 for Suites. Savings is applied to cruise fare at checkout. Offer applies to first two guests in stateroom. Free Perks Offer: Each of the first two guests in an ocean view through AquaClass® stateroom is eligible to receive two complimentary amenities. 50% Off Offer: Savings applies to the cruise fares of the third and fourth passengers booked in a triple, quad, or family ocean view, veranda, Concierge Class, or Suite Class stateroom. Offers and prices are subject to availability, cancellation, and change without notice at any time. ©2018 Celebrity Cruises Inc. Ships’ registry: Malta and Ecuador.


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MEMBERSHIP & INDUSTRY RELATIONS

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he Recording Academy is the premier membership organization for music professionals. Representing the music-making process in its entirety, Recording Academy Voting Members are the creators, performers, songwriters, producers, engineers, and other professionals who vote in the GRAMMY Awards process. Associate Members are the managers, publicists, entertainment lawyers, and business executives who advance the industry in all its facets. With 12 regional Chapters in Atlanta, Austin (Texas Chapter), Chicago, Los Angeles, Memphis, Miami (Florida Chapter), Nashville, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Seattle (Pacific Northwest Chapter), and Washington, D.C., the Recording Academy offers members a local connection to ensure that we remain a strong community. Our Producers & Engineers Wing, a network of producers, engineers, remixers, manufacturers, technologists, and other related music-recording

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Jonathan McReynolds moderates a discussion with R&B singer Ledisi (center) and BMI’s Catherine Brewton at an Up Close & Personal event hosted by the Chicago Chapter

professionals, addresses critical issues that impact the art and craft of music with an aim to uphold recording integrity. Sound quality, development of new technologies, technical best practices, education in the recording arts, and advocacy for the rights of music creators are all part of the Producers & Engineers Wing mix. The Recording Academy also offers a membership opportunity focused on shaping the next generation of music leaders through the GRAMMY University Network (GRAMMY U), which comprises college students planning to dedicate their professional careers to music. Through active participation in the Recording Academy and its initiatives, our members ensure that music remains a thriving part of our shared cultural heritage.


“The Best Animated Feature Of The Year” – Dwight Brown, Huffington Post

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ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY Reps. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), Louie Gohmert (R-Texas), David Cicilline (D-R.I.), and Linda Sanchez (D-Calif.), country artist Kelsea Ballerini, Rep. Joe Crowley (D-N.Y.), and Recording Academy Advocacy Chief Daryl P. Friedman attend Congressional Briefing: Up Close With A GRAMMYNominated Artist

Rep. Dwight Evans (D-Pa.) discusses music creators’ rights with Recording Academy Trustee Ivan Barias (left) and rapper Chill Moody (right) at BreedStudio in Philadelphia on District Advocate day

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ubbed the “supersized musicians lobby” by Congressional Quarterly, the Recording Academy is the only membership organization representing performers, songwriters, producers, engineers, and all music professionals. Our Advocacy & Public Policy team partners with Academy members from across the country to present a powerful lobbying force that fights for music creators’ rights year-round. On District Advocate day, the largest nationwide grassroots lobbying campaign for music, Academy members visit the offices of their local congressional members. The GRAMMY Fund for Music Creators—a political action committee—gives Academy members the opportunity to help protect the rights of music makers by supporting members of Congress who advocate for them. Recording Academy leaders also serve as expert witnesses before key congressional hearings determining music policy. GRAMMYs on the

Hill brings members to the nation’s capital each spring to advocate for creators’ rights, while thousands of members across the country join the efforts online. Our education efforts include the Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus, where we produce events with members of Congress on Capitol Hill to educate policymakers about the issues facing music makers. We make it easy for members to stay informed and engaged, even from the convenience of their own home with the Advocacy Action tool, which allows members to advocate directly for pro-music policies with government officials. GRAMMY.com/Advocacy provides regular blogs, op-eds from Academy members featured in publications around the country, and news bulletins to give our members real-time updates on policy matters. We want Recording Academy members to develop and exchange meaningful ideas that will ensure a better future for all music creators. Events to enhance these efforts include the Advocacy Town Hall, a series of congressional briefings on key policy matters, GRAMMY Industry Roundtable, a series where policy leaders and music professionals discuss critical issues in a private, off-the-record setting, and the Music Policy Retreat, a semiannual gathering co-founded and co-hosted by Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow for leaders of every major music association to discuss common legislative goals. For more information about Advocacy & Public Policy, visit GRAMMY.com/Advocacy.

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THE DIGITAL ACADEMY

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s rapid advances in digital technology continue to redefine society, the Recording Academy remains committed to expanding the organization’s digital initiatives to better communicate and advance our mission and brand. In 2017, we launched a fully redesigned website, which serves as a veritable one-stop Recording Academy shop. The music destination now leads users through a consistent experience, allowing them to seamlessly connect the lines between our Awards, advocacy, education, and MusiCares initiatives. GRAMMY.com houses a variety of engaging music content, including the latest industry news, exclusive interviews with music creators and performances, curated playlists, and comprehensive GRAMMY Awards history featuring archives of past telecasts, winners, nominees, and more. For the 60th GRAMMY Awards, for the first time, Recording Academy members were able to vote in the

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GRAMMY Awards process online, creating greater efficiency while providing flexibility for musicians who are often on the go. As part of that process, the Academy provides Voting Members the ability to listen to full tracks of nominated music in a streaming, on-demand format. The GRAMMY Awards continues to be served by a mix of web-based, mobile, and social media efforts that help build awareness for and drive viewership to the telecast. The Academy’s website and social media platforms work in concert to deliver live event coverage, video, photo uploads, and editorial content that provide an authentic GRAMMY journey for fans. As we enter our sixth decade of celebrating and supporting music, the organization will continue to make significant investments to create contemporary digital programs while continually innovating its digital initiatives for the best engagement and communication with music fans and our members.


GAME CHANGING FLAVORS.

© 2015 Blue Diamond Growers. All rights reserved.


KEVIN MAZUR/WIREIMAGE.COM

MUSICARES

providing members of the music community access to addiction recovery treatment and sober living. Prevention is our most powerful ally to keep our community members from falling into crisis. MusiCares hosts a variety of Healthy Essentials maintenance and preventative services year-round, including dental and medical screenings, hearing clinics, and personal health workshops. Traditional outlets might not meet the needs and schedules of busy music professionals. Our Safe Harbor Room program offers support to those in recovery while participating in televised music shows and major music events, while the MusiCares Sober Touring Network provides a means to get individuals to support meetings while on the road. Held during GRAMMY Week, MusiCares’ annual Person of the Year tribute gala honors a recording artist whose contributions to the world of music are matched by their humanitarian and philanthropic efforts. Recent honorees include Fleetwood Mac, Tom Petty, Lionel Richie, Bob Dylan, and Carole King. Your help is more important now than ever. Please consider MusiCares for your personal or professional charitable contribution. Your contribution can make a real difference in the lives of the members of our music family.

Tom Petty performs at the 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year gala in his honor

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he Recording Academy doesn’t just celebrate music, we support its creators. MusiCares was established by the Academy to safeguard the health and well-being of music people. A four-star charity and safety net in times of need, MusiCares offers confidential preventative, recovery, and emergency programs to address financial, medical, and personal health issues. Over the past fiscal year, MusiCares provided more than $5.9 million to more than 7,800 music professionals. Open to music professionals who meet the qualifications for aid, MusiCares’ Emergency Financial Assistance Program provides support for basic living expenses, including rent, utilities, and car payments; medical expenses, including dentist and hospital bills; psychotherapy; and medical treatment for critical illnesses. MusiCares is a leading force in the effort to address the problems of addiction in our industry by

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If you are a music professional in need, call MusiCares’ toll-free phone line in the West region (800.687.4227), South region (877.626.2748), or East region (877.303.6962). To learn more about MusiCares’ programs and services, visit MusiCares.org.


GRAMMY MUSEUM

TIMOTHY NORRIS/WIREIMAGE.COM

others. The Museum takes many of these exhibits on the road, and more than 20 of them have toured cultural institutions around the world. The 200-seat Clive Davis Theater at GRAMMY Museum L.A. Live hosts public programs year-round, including intimate interviews with award-winning and upand-coming artists, live performances, film screenings, lectures, and continuing education classes. We know that music education has a lasting impact on children and their development. The Museum’s education division offers a variety of Sheryl Crow performs at the GRAMMY Museum’s An Evening With multidisciplinary programs designed to event in Los Angeles bring music to schools and communities in need, while building students’ knowledge of the world through the arts. stablished as a partnership between the Recognizing those in the classroom who use music Recording Academy and AEG, the GRAMMY to inspire the next generation of creators, the Museum Museum is a philanthropic arts organization presents two awards each year—the Music Educator dedicated to cultivating a greater understanding of the Award, in conjunction with the Recording Academy, history and significance of music. honors a music teacher, and the Jane Ortner Educator The first GRAMMY Museum opened its doors in Award recognizes non-music teachers who use music in Los Angeles in 2008. Since then, the organization the classroom to teach other subjects. has worked to make music a valued and indelible part To expand our reach in other historically significant of our society through exhibits, education, grants, music communities throughout the country, the first public programming, and additional Museums and GRAMMY Museum outside of Los Angeles opened gallery spaces. in Cleveland, Miss., in 2016. That same year, the In 2017, the Museum integrated with its sister GRAMMY Museum Gallery at Musicians Hall of Fame organization, the GRAMMY Foundation, to broaden debuted in Nashville, Tenn. In the fall of 2017, the the reach of the Academy’s music education and Museum opened its first East Coast outpost with the preservation initiatives. debut of the GRAMMY Museum Experience Prudential The Museum has showcased more than 60 exhibits, Center in Newark, N.J. spotlighting artists ranging from Michael Jackson, Bob Dylan, and the Ramones to Bruce Springsteen, Tupac To learn more about the GRAMMY Museum and its Shakur, Taylor Swift, Leonard Bernstein, and many programs, visit GRAMMYMuseum.org

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THE LATIN RECORDING ACADEMY

Mon Laferte performs "Amárrame," which won a Latin GRAMMY for Best Alternative Song at the 18th Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards in 2017

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aunched by the Recording Academy in 1997, the Latin Recording Academy is an international, membership-based organization comprised of Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking musicians, songwriters, producers, and other creative and technical music professionals. With the 20th anniversary of the Latin GRAMMY Awards on the horizon, the organization is dedicated to celebrating and improving the quality of life and cultural condition for the Latin music community. Each fall, Latin GRAMMY Awards nominees and winners are recognized by their peers through a process similar to the GRAMMY Awards, with a few important differences: membership and voting are international, the eligible releases can be issued both inside and outside the United States, and the recordings are primarily in Spanish or Portuguese. During Latin GRAMMY Week, The Latin Academy hosts its annual Person of the Year gala, which celebrates a notable Latin recording artist and benefits educational programs supported by the organization. The Latin Academy also recognizes the long-lasting careers of legendary Latin music creators with a Special Awards ceremony honoring Lifetime Achievement and Trustees Award recipients, and the recently created Producers & Engineers Circle brings together technical professionals who influence the art and craft of the recording arts. After a turbulent year of natural disasters and a tense political climate, the 18th Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards not only provided powerful and memorable performances

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but a reminder of the resilience of the Hispanic community. The three-hour broadcast, which aired live from MGM Grand Garden arena in Las Vegas, garnered 8 million U.S. viewers and reached more than 80 million people worldwide, making Univision stations No. 1 for the night. #LATINGRAMMY became a worldwide trending topic and the telecast was the most social program on TV and the most social awards special on Twitter across Hispanic networks year-to-date, according to Nielsen. In 2014, The Latin Recording Academy launched the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation to further advance the awareness and appreciation of the significant contributions of Latin music and The Latin Academy’s educational programs through scholarships and fellowships. Generous contributions have been pledged to Latin GRAMMY Foundation to help young talented students fulfill their music dreams. LatinGRAMMY.com continues to be an effective source of The Latin Academy’s international communication for members, media, and Latin music fans. The Latin GRAMMYs’ social networks reach more than 4 million users worldwide and growing. The active, generous, and selfless participation of The Latin Recording Academy’s Trustees, various ad hoc committees, and active members, along with the help of its sister organization, the Recording Academy, ensures that programs and activities are current and relevant to the Latin music community worldwide. For more information, visit LatinGRAMMY.com


MYTH & TRADITION

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uring GRAMMY Week, the Recording Academy produces an impressive schedule of private and public programs that celebrate and illuminate the indelible place of music in our society. We honor groundbreaking industry leaders with GRAMMY Salute To Industry Icons, celebrated during Clive Davis’ and the Recording Academy’s Pre-GRAMMY Gala, an exclusive event for which the Academy teams with the innovative music executive to produce this legendary annual GRAMMY party. The official GRAMMY Nominees Reception brings

Dave Matthews (right) presents attorney Elliot Groffman with a Service Award at the 2017 Entertainment Law Initiative GRAMMY Week event

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MICHAEL KOVAC/WIREIMAGE.COM

JEFF KRAVITZ/WIREIMAGE.COM

GRAMMY WEEK Clive Davis and Jennifer Hudson on the red carpet at Clive Davis’ and the Recording Academy’s Pre-GRAMMY Gala

together GRAMMY nominees in a night of celebration prior to the GRAMMY Awards telecast. The Producers & Engineers Wing’s annual GRAMMY Week gala celebrates recording excellence and the professionals working “behind the glass” whose visionary talents have significantly impacted the audio production landscape. The Entertainment Law Initiative aims to promote future careers in entertainment law by inviting the nation’s top law students to participate in a legal writing contest and scholarship competition. The program is spotlighted with a high-profile awards ceremony during GRAMMY Week attended by students, music attorneys and executives, and Recording Academy members. MusiCares hosts the prestigious Person of the Year tribute dinner and concert two nights before the GRAMMY Awards. The event honors individuals for their philanthropic and creative achievements and raises funds for MusiCares’ health and human services programs. Other activities are added from year to year to bring further breadth to the programming. The week ends with the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony, GRAMMY Awards telecast, and the GRAMMY Celebration after-party, a glamorous postshow affair. It’s an entire day of celebrating not just GRAMMY Award nominees and recipients, but also the spirit and value of music.

Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow presents Jack White with the President’s Merit Award at the Producers & Engineers Wing’s annual GRAMMY Week gala


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Every 3.3 minutes someone dies of lung cancer. To help patients like Emily, please donate to www.lungcancerfoundation.org 


GRAMMY AWARDS PROCESS

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he GRAMMY Awards process continuously evolves to reflect the evolving world of music. Each year, from early July through August, we receive more than 20,000 entries, which are processed and verified by Recording Academy staff for eligibility. Next, over a three-week period each fall at the annual GRAMMY Awards screening meetings, hundreds of qualified music experts gather in Los Angeles to fully vet the entries and ensure they are placed in their appropriate genre Fields. Once the screening process is complete, the entry list is created and posted online for Voting Members who are eligible to cast their votes in the first round. Members of 25 craft committees with expertise in the Fields of packaging, album notes, historical, surround sound, remixing, composing/arranging, producing, and engineering also meet to determine the nominees in these respective specialty categories. When the first ballot has closed, the initial results are tallied by the Recording Academy’s independent accounting firm and the nominations list is created. In some categories, the top five nominees are determined by this vote. In the General Field and in several of the specialized genre Fields—such as Jazz, Classical, and American Roots Music—the initial list is brought down to the top 15 to 30 vote recipients in each category, and is then voted on by special national nomination review committees—by genre— comprising Voting Members from each of the Academy’s Chapters and approved by the National Board of Trustees. These committees gather for

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multiday meetings to determine the five nominees in these categories. The votes are cast by secret ballot and are, once again, tabulated by our independent accounting firm. The top five vote recipients in each category become GRAMMY nominees. The nominations for the 60th GRAMMY Awards were announced in November. Approximately two weeks later, final ballots were posted online for Voting Members, who select the GRAMMY recipients by casting their votes. The accounting firm again tabulates the votes and the sealed results are opened for the first time during the GRAMMY Awards telecast and GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony. A group of specialists representing every genre of music meets in April to determine the necessity, integrity, and feasibility of Awards-related proposals submitted throughout the year. Any proposals approved by the Academy’s Board of Trustees will be implemented immediately for the upcoming Awards year.


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CONGRATULATIONS GRAMMY® WINNERS

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est

Yo u

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ser ve

Billings Artworks Ridgway Colorado

MAKER OF THE GRAMMY® FOR FORTY ONE YEARS

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NEIL PORTNOW President/CEO

WAYNE ZAHNER Chief Financial Officer

NEDA AZARFAR Vice President, Marketing Communications

BRANDEN CHAPMAN Executive In Charge Of Production & Chief Business Development Officer

RICK ENGDAHL Chief Information Officer

BILL FREIMUTH Senior Vice President, Awards

DARYL P. FRIEDMAN Chief Industry, Government & Member Relations Officer

GAETANO FRIZZI Chief Human Resources Officer

EVAN GREENE Chief Marketing Officer

JASON JAMES Chief Digital Officer

DAVID KONJOYAN Vice President, Creative Services

LAURA SEGURA MUELLER Vice President, Membership & Industry Relations

ADVISORS

RECORDING ACADEMY

EXECUTIVE STAFF

JOEL KATZ General Counsel

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CHUCK ORTNER National Legal Counsel

BOBBY ROSENBLOUM Deputy General Counsel

SANDRA CRAWSHAWSPARKS Deputy National Counsel

GARY SMITH Managing Partner, Deloitte & Touche

DOUG HALLEY Partner, Deloitte & Touche


1 in 8 Women will be Diagnosed Time should be up for breast cancer too

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IN 2018 an estimated 2,470 men will be diagnosed and 460 men will die from breast cancer


NATIONAL TRUSTEE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

TRUSTEE OFFICERS

JOHN POPPO Chair Of The Board

RUBY MARCHAND Vice Chair

TERRY HEMMINGS Secretary/Treasurer

CHRISTINE ALBERT Chair Emeritus

TRUSTEES

MINDI ABAIR

CARLOS ALVAREZ

CARLOS H. ALVAREZ

JEFF BALDING

IVAN BARIAS

SCOTT BILLINGTON

JOHN BURK

ED CHERNEY

GREG “STRYKE” CHIN

MIKE CLINK

TRACY GERSHON

TRACY HAMLIN

Los Angeles

Memphis

LINDA LORENCE CRITELLI

New York

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Florida

Los Angeles

SUE ENNIS

Pacific Northwest

Texas

Los Angeles

GEORGE J. FLANIGEN IV

Nashville

Nashville

Florida

Nashville

Philadelphia

Los Angeles

Washington, D.C.


NATIONAL TRUSTEE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

MATT HENNESSY

Chicago

TERRY JONES

TAMMY HURT

BRETT JAMES

RODNEY JERKINS

BOOKER T. JONES

KEM

MIKE KNOBLOCH

Los Angeles

TERESA LABARBERA

JEFF LEVENSON

Atlanta

Nashville

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

Philadelphia

Chicago

JAMES MCKINNEY

ANN MINCIELI

RIGGS MORALES

TIM PALMER

NICK PHILLIPS

Texas

San Francisco

GINO ROBAIR

JUSTIN ROBERTS

NILE RODGERS

MICHAEL ROMANOWSKI

SHANNON SANDERS

TYLER STONE

RICHARD STUMPF

Washington, D.C.

San Francisco

ERIC SCHILLING

Florida

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New York

Chicago

KEN SHEPHERD

Memphis

New York

New York

MATT STILL

Atlanta

Texas

San Francisco

Pacific Northwest

New York

Nashville

New York


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NATIONAL STAFF

THANK YOU TO THE DEDICATED STAFF OF THE RECORDING ACADEMY Mazen Alawar

Maureen Droney

Claudine Little

Adriana Rodriguez

Christee Albino

Christina Dudash

Lourdes Lopez Patton

Laura Rodriguez

Tera Allegri

Todd Dupler

Aubrie Lorrimer

Sean Ruderman

Jessica Allen

Rick Engdahl

Lauren Loverde

Rachel Ryding

Michael Almanza

Ashey Ernst

Nora Luna

Stephen Salazar

Stacy Anderson

RenĂŠe Fabian

Ricky Lyon

Luke Savage

Lyn Aurelius

Virginia Faddy

Paul Madeira

Mark Schulz

Neda Azarfar

Yvonne Faison

Michelle Maree

Tahsan Scott

Grace Baca

Rachel Fentz

Marlon Mata

Laura Segura Mueller

Erin Baxter

Bill Freimuth

Alan Matkovic

Ashley Sheehan

Graceann Belgiorno

Annmarie Frenzell

Christen McFarland

Justin Shover

Joaquin Benavente

Daryl P. Friedman

Tim McPhate

Laura Sibigtroth

Kate Blair

Gaetano Frizzi

Ann Meckelborg

Lani Simmons

Jaimie Briggs

Jason Gino

Joseph Melendez

Julie Smith

Len Brown

Lisa Goich-Andreadis

Hillary Melin

Susan Stewart

Nicole Brown

Allison Gomer

Daniel Mendoza

Michael Sticka

Bri Buchanan

Shonda Grant

Philip Merrill

Rex Supa

Eric Burnett

Evan Greene

Charles Lee Mills IV

Stephanie Sybert

Kiana Butler

Brian Haack

Clinton Misamore

Lindsey Taylor

Marlena Campbell

Shumetris Halford

Christian Mitchell

Ashley Thomas

Jim Cannella

Tera Healy

Trisha Mitra

Jonathan Tol

Michele Caplinger

Shannon Herber

Ben Moore

Natalia Tufail

Jose Cardenas Jr.

Nate Hertweck

Miranda Eggleston Moore

Clay Upton

Christina Cassidy

Brittany Hoover

Alexis Mouer

Simona Vackova

Jamieson Chandler

Jon Hornyak

Marc Mutnansky

Kevin Veiga

Branden Chapman

Casey Immoor

Jalyn Nelson

Tanushree Verma

Joanna Chu

Frances Inomata

Leigha Nettleton

Lauren Wagner

Marta Clark

Jason James

Kiyumi Nishida

Jacqueline Wallach

Brian Clasby

Sarah Jansen

Ralph J. Olivarez

Alicia Warwick

Uziel Colon

Theresa Jenkins

Todd Parker

Kali Weissman

Michael Compton

Jeriel Johnson

Melissa Pazornik

Tim Whalen

Kenny Cordova

Justin Joseph

Scott Petersen

Courtney White

Andie Cox

Maurice Kalous

Neil Portnow

Reid Wick

Laura Crawford

Jane Kim

Adriana Preciado

Alexandra Williams

Neil Crilly

Kristin Klimas

Brittany Presley

Charlotte Williams

Nick Cucci

Brian Klinsport

Kelley Purcell

Audrey Wiltz

Kelly Darr

David Konjoyan

Nathan Pyle

Linda Wilvang

Kayenecha Daugherty

Leah Larocco

Paul Raksit

Michael Winger

Yasmin de Soiza

Katrina Lee

Esperanza Ramirez

Iman Woodley

Adrian Diaz

Jordan Leonard

Moises Ramirez

Candice Yang

Ivan Diaz

Michael Lewan

Jamesina Rammelkamp

Betty Zabezhinsky

Jenny Dinh

Julienne Lin

Sean Riley

Wayne Zahner

220 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards


NATIONAL TRUSTEE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

TRUSTEE OFFICERS

JOHN POPPO Chair Of The Board

RUBY MARCHAND Vice Chair

TERRY HEMMINGS Secretary/Treasurer

CHRISTINE ALBERT Chair Emeritus

TRUSTEES

MINDI ABAIR

CARLOS ALVAREZ

CARLOS H. ALVAREZ

JEFF BALDING

IVAN BARIAS

SCOTT BILLINGTON

JOHN BURK

ED CHERNEY

GREG “STRYKE” CHIN

MIKE CLINK

TRACY GERSHON

TRACY HAMLIN

Los Angeles

Memphis

LINDA LORENCE CRITELLI

New York

216 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Florida

Los Angeles

SUE ENNIS

Pacific Northwest

Texas

Los Angeles

GEORGE J. FLANIGEN IV

Nashville

Nashville

Florida

Nashville

Philadelphia

Los Angeles

Washington, D.C.


NATIONAL TRUSTEE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

MATT HENNESSY

Chicago

TERRY JONES

TAMMY HURT

BRETT JAMES

RODNEY JERKINS

BOOKER T. JONES

KEM

MIKE KNOBLOCH

Los Angeles

TERESA LABARBERA

JEFF LEVENSON

Atlanta

Nashville

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

Philadelphia

Chicago

JAMES MCKINNEY

ANN MINCIELI

RIGGS MORALES

TIM PALMER

NICK PHILLIPS

Texas

San Francisco

GINO ROBAIR

JUSTIN ROBERTS

NILE RODGERS

MICHAEL ROMANOWSKI

SHANNON SANDERS

TYLER STONE

RICHARD STUMPF

Washington, D.C.

San Francisco

ERIC SCHILLING

Florida

218 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

New York

Chicago

KEN SHEPHERD

Memphis

New York

New York

MATT STILL

Atlanta

Texas

San Francisco

Pacific Northwest

New York

Nashville

New York


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NATIONAL STAFF

THANK YOU TO THE DEDICATED STAFF OF THE RECORDING ACADEMY Mazen Alawar

Maureen Droney

Claudine Little

Adriana Rodriguez

Christee Albino

Christina Dudash

Lourdes Lopez Patton

Laura Rodriguez

Tera Allegri

Todd Dupler

Aubrie Lorrimer

Sean Ruderman

Jessica Allen

Rick Engdahl

Lauren Loverde

Rachel Ryding

Michael Almanza

Ashey Ernst

Nora Luna

Stephen Salazar

Stacy Anderson

RenĂŠe Fabian

Ricky Lyon

Luke Savage

Lyn Aurelius

Virginia Faddy

Paul Madeira

Mark Schulz

Neda Azarfar

Yvonne Faison

Michelle Maree

Tahsan Scott

Grace Baca

Rachel Fentz

Marlon Mata

Laura Segura Mueller

Erin Baxter

Bill Freimuth

Alan Matkovic

Ashley Sheehan

Graceann Belgiorno

Annmarie Frenzell

Christen McFarland

Justin Shover

Joaquin Benavente

Daryl P. Friedman

Tim McPhate

Laura Sibigtroth

Kate Blair

Gaetano Frizzi

Ann Meckelborg

Lani Simmons

Jaimie Briggs

Jason Gino

Joseph Melendez

Julie Smith

Len Brown

Lisa Goich-Andreadis

Hillary Melin

Susan Stewart

Nicole Brown

Allison Gomer

Daniel Mendoza

Michael Sticka

Bri Buchanan

Shonda Grant

Philip Merrill

Rex Supa

Eric Burnett

Evan Greene

Charles Lee Mills IV

Stephanie Sybert

Kiana Butler

Brian Haack

Clinton Misamore

Lindsey Taylor

Marlena Campbell

Shumetris Halford

Christian Mitchell

Ashley Thomas

Jim Cannella

Tera Healy

Trisha Mitra

Jonathan Tol

Michele Caplinger

Shannon Herber

Ben Moore

Natalia Tufail

Jose Cardenas Jr.

Nate Hertweck

Miranda Eggleston Moore

Clay Upton

Christina Cassidy

Brittany Hoover

Alexis Mouer

Simona Vackova

Jamieson Chandler

Jon Hornyak

Marc Mutnansky

Kevin Veiga

Branden Chapman

Casey Immoor

Jalyn Nelson

Tanushree Verma

Joanna Chu

Frances Inomata

Leigha Nettleton

Lauren Wagner

Marta Clark

Jason James

Kiyumi Nishida

Jacqueline Wallach

Brian Clasby

Sarah Jansen

Ralph J. Olivarez

Alicia Warwick

Uziel Colon

Theresa Jenkins

Todd Parker

Kali Weissman

Michael Compton

Jeriel Johnson

Melissa Pazornik

Tim Whalen

Kenny Cordova

Justin Joseph

Scott Petersen

Courtney White

Andie Cox

Maurice Kalous

Neil Portnow

Reid Wick

Laura Crawford

Jane Kim

Adriana Preciado

Alexandra Williams

Neil Crilly

Kristin Klimas

Brittany Presley

Charlotte Williams

Nick Cucci

Brian Klinsport

Kelley Purcell

Audrey Wiltz

Kelly Darr

David Konjoyan

Nathan Pyle

Linda Wilvang

Kayenecha Daugherty

Leah Larocco

Paul Raksit

Michael Winger

Yasmin de Soiza

Katrina Lee

Esperanza Ramirez

Iman Woodley

Adrian Diaz

Jordan Leonard

Moises Ramirez

Candice Yang

Ivan Diaz

Michael Lewan

Jamesina Rammelkamp

Betty Zabezhinsky

Jenny Dinh

Julienne Lin

Sean Riley

Wayne Zahner

220 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards


NATIONAL STAFF

MUSICARES EXECUTIVE STAFF

MUSICARES BOARD OF DIRECTORS NEIL PORTNOW President/CEO

LATIN RECORDING ACADEMY BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Christina Scholz Ana Serrato Roger Tang Ariana Walton Wynnie Wynn

HONORARY CHAIR John Branca

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE LUIS DOUSDEBES Chief Financial Officer

VICE CHAIR Marcelo Castello Branco

CHAIR Michael McDonald

SECRETARY Johnny Ventura

VICE CHAIR Kirdis Postelle SECRETARY/TREASURER James Higa DANA TOMARKEN Vice President

JUDY WONG Vice President, Finance

DEBBIE CARROLL Senior Executive Director

STAFF

Danielle Bowker Brett Bryngelson Stefanie Curtiss Ryan Donahue Carol Flores Shireen Janti Reid Dorit Kalev Erica Krusen Jennifer Leff Dina Morales Nicole Oliva Harold Owens Anita Ramsarup

222 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

TREASURER Eduardo Hütt DAVINA ARYEH Chief Marketing Officer

LATIN RECORDING ACADEMY EXECUTIVE STAFF

GABRIEL ABAROA JR. President/CEO

Neil Portnow CHAIR EMERITUS Luis Cobos

CHAIR EMERITUS Alexandra Patavas Steve Bloom Pete Fisher Jody Gerson Jeff Harleston Ambrosia Healy Tamara Hrivnak Jeff Jones Mike Knobloch Rob Light Kevin Lyman Carianne Marshall Harvey Mason Jr. John Poppo Kirdis Postelle Scott Powell Andie Simon

CHAIR Laura Tesoriero

IVELIESSE MALAVE Vice President, Communications

AIDA SCORZA Vice President, Awards

STAFF

Diana Alvarado Michelle Aranguren Karine Bello Pamela Castrillón Livys Cerna Victoria Cruell Berenice Diaz Melanie García Adriano Haubenthal Caitlin Marino Andres Mendez Ixamar Patiño Madari Pendas Teresa Romo Grace Santa-Ana Claudia Santos

TRUSTEES Javier Aguirre Christine Albert Luis Balaguer Eduardo Bergallo Eva Cebrián Carla Estrada Oscar Gómez Terry Lickona John Poppo Rafa Sardina LEGAL COUNSEL Jorge Hernandez-Toraño Joel Katz Bobby Rosenbloum

LATIN GRAMMY CULTURAL FOUNDATION EXECUTIVE STAFF

MANOLO DIAZ Senior Vice President


We make a big deal over the tiniest items. Old Dominion’s focus on premium service means every item arrives with one of the lowest claims ratios and one of the best on-time records in the industry. OD Domestic offers: • • •

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NATIONAL STAFF

BECKY VILLAESCUSA Vice President, Strategic Planning & Corporate Development

BOB SANTELLI Founding Executive Director

STAFF

Coralys Julian Nannette Velez

LATIN GRAMMY CULTURAL FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

RITA GEORGE Chief Operating Officer

CHAIR Luis Cobos VICE CHAIR Neil Portnow SECRETARY/ TREASURER Raúl Vázquez

MICHAEL STICKA Controller and Senior Director Of Finance & Administration

PRESIDENT Gabriel Abaroa Jr. DIRECTOR Mireya Cisneros

GRAMMY MUSEUM GRAMMY MUSEUM L.A. LIVE EXECUTIVE STAFF

SCOTT GOLDMAN Executive Director

224 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

WAYNE ZAHNER Chief Financial Officer

STAFF

Alejandra Aceves Jerry Buszek Shaun Carter Thoko Dlamini Ana Estrada Loren Fishbein Eric Forcen Erlin Frausto Israel Galvez Sergio Galvez Pablo Garces Kelsey Goelz Cynthia Gomez Benjamin Guzman Kristen Jennings

Crystal Larsen Adam LeBow Tony Lehr Daniel Lopez Patrick Lundquist LaShon Malone Nayelli McChesney Hillary Morimoto John Morrison Wendy Murphy Julie Mutnansky Kaitlyn Nader Schyler O’Neal Nwaka Onwusa Maria Pacheco Geovanny Palma Karla Perez Alberto Rodriguez Rosalie Sanchez David Sears Lynne Sheridan Jacob Shochet Derek Spencer Stacie Takaoka-Fidler

GRAMMY MUSEUM L.A. LIVE BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIR Neil Portnow

Mattie McFaddenLawson Carolyn Powers Brian Sheth David Webster

GRAMMY MUSEUM MISSISSIPPI EXECUTIVE STAFF

EMILY HAVENS Executive Director

STAFF

Carlee Calderon NaCherrie Cooper Jane Marie Dawkins Willie Gant Chace Holland Katie Hugley Jack McWilliams LindseyAnna Pardue

VICE CHAIR Dan Beckerman

GRAMMY MUSEUM MISSISSIPPI BOARD OF DIRECTORS

SECRETARY Charles B. Ortner

PRESIDENT Becky Nowell

ASSISTANT SECRETARY Ted Fikre

VICE PRESIDENT Sen. Willie Simmons

Pamela Alexander John Branca Tim Bucher John Burk Branden Chapman Geoff Cottrill Ken Ehrlich Giselle Fernandez Todd Goldstein Brian Hoesterey Jimmy Jam Joel Katz Michal Katz Terry Lickona Jay Marciano

SECRETARY Wilma Wilbanks TREASURER Jim Tims ASSISTANT TREASURER Eddie Guillot Will Hooker Jon Hornyak Carol Puckett Nan Sanders Bill Simmons Myrtis Tabb Tricia Walker Blake Wilson


CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF EAST REGION

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR

Tera Healy

Ashley Sheehan

Brittany Presley

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, EAST REGION/NEW YORK CHAPTER

Graceann Belgiorno

CHICAGO

NEW YORK

PHILADELPHIA

WASHINGTON, D.C.

MARK HUBBARD

BEN ALLISON

CAROL RIDDICK

CARL “KOKAYI” WALKER

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

TRUSTEES Matt Hennessy KEM Justin Roberts

TRUSTEES Linda Lorence Critelli Jeff Levenson Ann Mincieli ​Riggs Morales Nile Rodgers Richard Stumpf

ADVISORS Ariel Borujow Chaka Pilgrim

TRUSTEES Ivan Barias Terry Jones

TRUSTEES Tracy Hamlin James McKinney

CHAPTER STAFF

PRESIDENT Carol Riddick

PRESIDENT Carl “Kokayi” Walker

PRESIDENT Ben Allison

PROJECT MANAGER Lauren Loverde

VICE PRESIDENT Lauren Hart

VICE PRESIDENT Von Vargas

VICE PRESIDENT Kathy Sommer

MEMBERSHIP MANAGER Yasmin de Soiza

SECRETARY Jeri Johnson

SECRETARY Ferddy Calderon

SECRETARY Joe D’Ambrosio

MANAGER, CHAPTER ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS Stacy M. Anderson

GOVERNORS Marcus Baylor Anthony Bell Catherine Marie Charlton Aliya Crawford Sarah Dash Paul “Starkey” Geissinger David Ivory VASSY K Eric “Chill” Moody Ryan Moys Ben O’Neill Octavius “Ted” Reid III Darrell Robinson Deidre Robinson Ashley Scott Toby Seay Stephanie Seiple Wendell Sewell Dana Sorey Dan “Dilemma” Thomas

GOVERNORS Aderonke “DJ Soupamodel” Ariyo Kia Bennett Deborah Bond Wayne Bruce Priscilla Clarke Tarik “Konshens The MC” Davis Angie Gates Chelsey Green Jake Grotticelli Nicolas Laget Mark Meadows Kurosh Nasseri Pete Novak Elise Perry Andrés Salguero Tonya Sharpe Michelle Shellers Art Sherrod Maimouna Youssef Billy Zero

PRESIDENT Mark Hubbard VICE PRESIDENT Matt Brown SECRETARY Lisa Kaplan GOVERNORS Andrew Barber Jeffrey Becker​ Elliot Bergman Brian Deck Steven Gillis​ Zak Jablow James “Stump” Mahoney Jonathan McReynolds Eric Morgeson​ Daxx Nielsen Tomeka Reid James “J. Ivy” Richardson David Roberts Ken Shipley​ Stephen Shirk David Skidmore​ Sir William James Stokes the Baptist Susan Voelz Dessa Wander Anita Wilson ADVISOR Evan Weis

CHAPTER STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Sarah Jansen MEMBERSHIP MANAGER Maurice Kalous PROJECT COORDINATOR Kristin Klimas

226 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

GOVERNORS Ray Angry Carolina Arenas Richard Barone Jennifer Blakeman Adam Block Torae Carr Terri Lyne Carrington Tom Chapin Samantha Cox John Doelp Jamie Dominguez Richard Einhorn ​Erika Elliott Charlie Feldman Gloria Gaynor Amy Helm Ken “Duro” Ifill Tracey Jordan David Kahne Emily Lazar Joe Mardin Rob Mounsey Nicki Richards Maria Schneider Karen Sherry Sharon Tapper Judy Tint Philip Traugott Debra White Lenny White

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Nick Cucci

ADVISORS Mitch Beer Shawn Gee

CHAPTER STAFF SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Mark Schulz MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER Ashley Thomas

ADVISORS Anshia Crooms Abby O’Neill

CHAPTER STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Jeriel Johnson MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER Kayenecha Daugherty


CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF SOUTH REGION

SENIOR REGIONAL DIRECTOR

SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER

Susan Stewart

Lyn Aurelius

MANAGER, ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

Ashley Ernst

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, SOUTH REGION/NASHVILLE CHAPTER

Nathan Pyle

ATLANTA

FLORIDA

MEMPHIS

NASHVILLE

TAI ANDERSON

LEE LEVIN

GEBRE WADDELL

TREY FANJOY

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER STAFF

TRUSTEES Tammy Hurt Matt Still

TRUSTEES Carlos Alvarez Greg “Stryke” Chin Eric Schilling

TRUSTEES Scott Billington Ken Shepherd

TRUSTEES Jeff Balding George J. Flanigen IV Tracy Gershon Brett James Shannon Sanders

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Alicia Warwick

PRESIDENT Tai Anderson VICE PRESIDENT Jorel “Jfly” Flynn SECRETARY Melissa Love GOVERNORS Martina Albano David Barbe Bryan-Michael Cox Diane Durrett Eric Essix John Driskell Hopkins Gwen Hughes Billy Johnson Crystal Johnson-Pompey Thom “TK” Kidd Shay Lawson Kevin Leahy Al “Butter” McLean Kelly Price Lyn Schenbeck Ian Schumacher Ben Tanner Velena Vego Matt Williams ADVISORS Justin “Henry” Henderson Greggory Smith

CHAPTER STAFF SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Michele Rhea Caplinger SENIOR MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER Erin Baxter

PRESIDENT Lee Levin VICE PRESIDENT Doug Emery SECRETARY Jeremy Norkin

VICE PRESIDENT Matt Ross-Spang SECRETARY Tim Kappel

GOVERNORS Daniel Betancourt Jimmy Douglass Stephen Gibb Bill Hamel Nicole Henry Tony Mardini Niko Marzouca Jorge Mejia Joey Mercado Marianne Mijares Veronica “Milcho” Milchorena Tim Mitchell Lukes Morgan Teedra Moses George Noriega Lauren “Lolo” Reskin Jon Secada Dan Warner Betty Wright Angel Zamora

GOVERNORS Sean Ardoin Brad Blackwood Cindy Cogbill Chris Finney Justin Fisher Catrina Guttery John Paul Keith Vicki Loveland Susan Marshall Lawrence “Boo” Mitchell PJ Morton Carl Nappa Halley Phillips Jeff Powell Terrance Simien Kim Stephens Tricia Walker Bruce Watson Kirk Whalum Pat Mitchell Worley

ADVISORS Rico Love Vicente Solis

ADVISORS James Duke Tiffany Lamson

GOODWILL AMBASSADOR Iggy Pop

CHAPTER STAFF

CHAPTER STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Kenny Cordova SENIOR MEMBERSHIP MANAGER Marta Clark PROJECT MANAGER Jessica Allen

228 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

PRESIDENT Gebre Waddell

SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Jon Hornyak SENIOR MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER Reid Wick

PRESIDENT Trey Fanjoy VICE PRESIDENT Ben Fowler SECRETARY Lori Badgett GOVERNORS Ruby Amanfu Joanna Carter Dave Cobb David Corlew John Esposito Fletcher Foster Leslie Fram Jennifer Hanson Dave Haywood Daniel Hill Will Hoge Doug Howard Beverly Keel Jacquire King Chandra LaPlume Frank Liddell David Macias Erika Wollam Nichols Gary Paczosa Nick Palladino Leslie Roberts Ken Robold Akiko Rogers Liz Rose Steve Schnur Victoria Shaw Shaun Silva Jon Randall Stewart Troy Tomlinson Jimi Westbrook ADVISORS Chuck Harmony Dave Mustaine

MEMBERSHIP MANAGER Laura Crawford PROJECT COORDINATOR Courtney White CHAPTER ASSISTANT Bri Buchanan


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CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF WEST REGION

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Neil Crilly

Paul Raksit

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Katrina Lee

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, WEST REGION/LOS ANGELES CHAPTER

Luke Savage

LOS ANGELES

PACIFIC NORTHWEST

SAN FRANCISCO

TEXAS

PETER ASHER

KRIS ORLOWSKI

PIPER PAYNE

DAVID MESSIER

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

ADVISORS Mike Einziger Ariel Rechtshaid

TRUSTEES Sue Ennis Tyler Stone

CHAPTER STAFF

PRESIDENT Kris Orlowski

TRUSTEES Nick Phillips Gino Robair ​Michael Romanowski

TRUSTEES Carlos H. Alvarez Tim Palmer Teresa LaBarbera

PRESIDENT Piper Payne

PRESIDENT David Messier

VICE PRESIDENT Julie Schuchard

VICE PRESIDENT Lisa Morales

SECRETARY Michelle Jacques

SECRETARY Laura Mordecai

GOVERNORS Larry Batiste Laura Bergmann Nahuel Bronzini Ariane Cap Minna Choi McKay Garner Cliff Goldmacher Jim Greer Meklit Hadero Brian Hinman Sarah Jones David Katznelson Camilo Landau Tony Leong Daniel Levitin Justin Lieberman Lyz Luke PC Muñoz Marc Senasac Jessica Thompson

GOVERNORS Chip Adams Yolanda Adams Ricky Anderson Bun B Taylor Hanson Malcolm Harper Jack Ingram Danny Jones Paul “Pappy” Middleton Tre Nagella Adam “SaulPaul” Neal Michael Salgado Chris Shaw Chris “Frenchie” Smith Gilbert Velasquez Andrea Villarreal Heather Wagner Reed Paul Wall Brian Courtney Wilson Dan Workman

ADVISORS Kevin Choice Jerry Suarez

ADVISOR Obie Bermudez Sarah Jaffe

CHAPTER STAFF

CHAPTER STAFF

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Michael Winger

SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Theresa Jenkins

CHAPTER BOARD TRUSTEES Mindi Abair John Burk Ed Cherney Mike Clink Rodney Jerkins Booker T. Jones Mike Knobloch

SENIOR MEMBERSHIP MANAGER Yvonne Faison

PRESIDENT Peter Asher

PROJECT MANAGER Shannon Herber

VICE PRESIDENT Julia Michels

SENIOR MANAGER, CHAPTER ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS Nicole Brown

SECRETARY Rachel Stilwell GOVERNORS Cheche Alara John Beasley Evan Bogart Claudia Brant Darrell Brown Warryn Campbell Tyrese Gibson Wendy Goldstein Andrew Gould Jeff Greenberg Sarah Hudson Om’Mas Keith Larry Klein Ledisi Joel Madden Orly Marley Manny Marroquin Carianne Marshall Harvey Mason Jr. Maureen “Mozella” McDonald Orianthi Julie Pilat Carmen Rizzo Dana Sano Rafa Sardina Lindsey Stirling Sevyn Streeter Chrissy Stuart Ryan Tedder Chris Walden

230 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

VICE PRESIDENT David Gross SECRETARY Portia Sabin GOVERNORS Tim Bierman Jen Czeisler Astra Elane Rachel Flotard Bill Gibson Ryan Hadlock Catherine Harris-White Eric Lilavois Dmitriy Lipay Glenn Lorbecki Tendai Maraire Tucker Martine Ian Moore Daniel Pak Chris Porter Sarah Shannon Amber Sweeney Maggie Vail Will Wakefield Rachel White ADVISORS Jody Brotman Andrew Joslyn

CHAPTER STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Michael Compton MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER Jordan Leonard

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER Christen McFarland MEMBERSHIP MANAGER Allison Gomer

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER Christee Albino MEMBERSHIP MANAGER Brittany Hoover


PAST CHAIRS

JAMES B. CONKLING

PAUL WESTON

ROBERT L. YORKE

JOHN SCOTT TROTTER

NESUHI ERTEGUN

F.M. SCOTT III

GEORGE AVAKIAN

PETE KING

MORT L. NASATIR

IRVING TOWNSEND

WESLEY H. ROSE

BILL LOWERY

JAY L. COOPER

J. WILLIAM DENNY

JAY S. LOWY

WILLIAM IVEY

MICHAEL MELVOIN

MICHAEL GREENE

ALFRED SCHLESINGER

RON KRAMER

HENRY L. NEUBERGER III

JOEL A. KATZ

PHIL RAMONE

LESLIE ANN JONES

GARTH FUNDIS

DANIEL CARLIN

TERRY LICKONA

JIMMY JAM

GEORGE J. FLANIGEN IV

CHRISTINE ALBERT

ACTING NATIONAL CHAIRMAN 1957–1961

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1965–1966

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1971–1973

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1981–1983, CHAIRMAN 1989-1991

CHAIRMAN 1993–1995

CHAIRMAN 2003–2005

232 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1961–1962

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1966–1967

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1973–1975

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1983–1985

CHAIRMAN 1995–1997

CHAIRMAN 2005–2007

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1962–1963

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1967–1968

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1975–1977

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1985–1987

CHAIRMAN 1997–1999

CHAIR 2007–2009

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1963–1964

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1968–1969

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1977–1979

CHAIRMAN 1987–1989

CHAIRWOMAN 1999–2001

CHAIR 2009–2013

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1964–1965

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1969–1971

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1979–1981

CHAIRMAN 1991–1993

CHAIRMAN 2001–2003

CHAIR 2013–2015


ERIC HERNANDEZ

BRUNO MARS

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IN MEMORIAM

John Abercrombie

Arthur Blythe

Wayne Cochran

Fats Domino

Paul James Abler

Black Bo

Kelan Phil Cohran

Jimmy Dotson

Muhal Richard Abrams

Andre “L.A. Dre” Bolton

Fred Cole

Bill Dowdy

Ken Ackerman

Sheila Bond

Bill Collings

Gord Downie

Gustav Åhr aka Lil Peep

Helen Borgers

Benny Collins

George Dreyfus

Martin Ain

Bimba Bosé

Dick Contino

Carlo Driggs

Alan Aldridge

John Boudreaux Jr.

Fiora Corradetti Contino

Errol Dyers

Alessandro Alessandroni

Géori Boué

Barbara Cook

Tom Edwards

Geri Allen

Derek Bourgeois

Eric Cook

Pavel Egorov

Ronnie Allen

Patrick Bourgeois

John Byrne Cooke

Terry Elam

Gregg Allman

Jesse Boyce

Jimmy Copley

Halim El-Dabh

Tommy Allsup

Jack Boyle

Kenny Cordray

Larry Elgart

Joey Alves

Charles Bradley

Chris Cornell

Martín Elías

Kishori Amonkar

José Bragato

Joey Corpus

Jan Elliott

Herb Oscar Anderson

Thomas Brandis

Frank Corsaro

Kitty Moon Emery

David Angel

Loalwa Braz

Jason Corsaro

Calep Emphrey Jr.

Harry Anger

Daniel Brewbaker

Larry Coryell

Wendell Eugene

David Arben

William David Brohn

James Cotton

Dave Evans

Gary Arnold

Lonnie Brooks

Tom Coyne

Eric Eycke

Svend Asmussen

Mar Brown

John Critchinson

Vincent Falcone

José Vicente Asuar

Tammy Brown

Dub Crouch

Huang Feili

Xavier “X” Atencio

Eduard Brunner

Willy Cruz

Joe Fields

George Avakian

Dave Bry

Salvador “Sal” Cuevas

Seth Firkins

David Axelrod

Bill Bryson

Bob Cunningham

Mark Fisher aka k-punk

Luis Enriquez Bacalov

Paul Buckmaster

Clem Curtis

Robert Fisher

Margie Balter

Sonny Burgess

Holger Czukay

Roy Fisher

Junior Barber

Charles “Chuckie” Bush II

Steve Dahl

Pat “Fitzy” Fitzpatrick

Mike Barhorst

Ronnie Butler

Bill Dana

Edi Fitzroy

Chuck Barris

Joy Byers

Warrel Dane

Laura Flax

Mahi Beamer

Eamonn Campbell

Enzo Dara

June Foray

Kenny Beard

Glen Campbell

Donna Darlene

Rev. Jim Forrester

Jimmy Beaumont

Jeffrey Campbell aka

Wilson das Neves

Bob Forshee

Michael “DikMik” Davies

Bruce Forsyth

Walter Becker

Educated Rapper

Belchior

Ralph Carney

CeDell Davis

Robert Fraker

Émile Belcourt

Barbara Carroll

Ronnie Davis

Bobby Freeman

Melissa Bell

Howard Carroll

Tony Davis

Evelyn Freeman Roberts

Jiří Bělohlávek

Mel Carter

Robert De Cormier

Kaleb Freitas

Chester Bennington

Valerie Carter

Henry-Louis de La Grange

Louis Frémaux

Pierre Bergé

Erik Cartwright

Laudir de Oliveira

Michael Friedman

Shelley Berman

Kathleen Cassello

Gervase de Peyer

Jim Fuller

Ilene Berns

David Cassidy

Gary DeCarlo

Martin Funderud

Chuck Berry

Roland Cazimero

Alvin DeGuzman

Thomas Füri

Chris Bevington

Manno Charlemagne

Jonathan Demme

Brian Gallagher

Kalika Prasad

Sheila Raye Charles

Magín Díaz

Brian Galliford

Jacques Charpentier

Rob “Apex” Dickeson

Sandy Gallin

Rick Chavez

Philip Dikeman

Vin Garbutt

Elisabeth Chojnacka

Pat DiNizio

Kevin Garcia

John Blackwell Jr.

Dave Christenson

Richard Divall

Landy Gardner

Kimble Blair

Earl Clark

Lorenzo Dixon aka

Phil Garland

Lee Blakeley

José Miguel Class

William Blankenship

John Coates Jr.

Trish Doan

Dick Gautier

Edward Blau

Kurt Cochran

Richard Dobson

Nicolai Gedda

Bhattacharya Hayward Sherman Bishop Jr.

236 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

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IN MEMORIAM

John Maxwell Geddes

Benard Ighner

Rosemarie Lang

Thomas Meehan

John Warren Geils Jr. aka

Richie Ingui

Steve Lang

Luiz Melodia

Glen “Cookie” Inman

Gordon Langford

Thara Memory

Troy Gentry

Alan Jabbour

Bruce Langhorne

D.L. Menard

Sonny Geraci

Jay “Icepick” Jackson

James Laurence

Misha Mengelberg

Caesar Giovannini

Al Jarreau

Reggie Lavong

Robert Miles

Pentti “Whitey” Glan

Anne Jeffreys

June LeBell

Eric Miller

Melly Gomez

James J.J. Jenkins

Katie Lee

Frank Miller

Jack Good

Kristine Jepson

Deke Leonard

Phil Miller

Cuba Gooding Sr.

Shelby Jewell

Murray Lerner

Donald Mitchell

Philip Gossett

Tzipora Jochsberger

John Lever

Keith Mitchell

Scott Gould

Evan Johns

Walter Levin

Billy Mize

Nigel Grainge

Blake Johnson

Brenda Lewis

Ivan Mogull

Kyla Greenbaum

Michael Johnson

Jerry Lewis

Kurt Moll

Ed Greene

Robert “P-Nut” Johnson

Ralph Lewis

Jonathan Moore

Dick Gregory

Brenda Jones

David Lewiston

Pete Moore

Don Grilley

Hedley Jones

Daniel Licht

Bennett Morgan

Edward Grimes

Melvyn “Deacon” Jones

Harvey Lichtenstein

Jay R. Morgenstern

Horacio Guarany

Shawn Jones

Nona Liddell

Walter “Junie” Morrison

Robert Guillaume

Warren “Rhubarb” Jones

Ingvar Lidholm

Margaret Moser

Peter Hall

Kim Jong-Hyun

Jaki Liebezeit

Chuck Mosley

Johnny Hallyday

Manfred Jung

Earl “Wya” Lindo

Sylvia Moy

Stuart Hamilton

Ikutaro Kakehashi

Thor Lindsay

Ronald “Bingo” Mundy

Rosie Hamlin

Hiroshi “Monsieur”

Malcolm Lipkin

David Murph

Tommy LiPuma

Sunny Murray

J. Geils

Bruce Hampton

Kamayatsu

Chad Hanks

David Kapralik

Carol Lloyd

Chris Murrell

Grant Hart

Marcus “Intalex” Kaye

Chuck Loeb

Jim Nabors

Tony Lorenzo

Toshio Nakanishi

Keith Harvey

aka Trevino

John “Sib” Hashian

Tommy Keene

Mundell Lowe

Jimmy Nalls

Walter Hautzig

Mike Kellie

Jay S. Lowy

Carol Neblett

Peggy Hayama

Leonid Kharitonov

Nora Mae Lyng

Vincent Nguini

Skip Haynes

Maxx Kidd

Geoff Mack

Geoff Nicholls

Bill Hearn

Wilhelm Killmayer

Gabriel “Negru” Mafa

Abby Nicole

Bob Heatherly

Thandi Klaasen

Mario Maglieri

Bern Nix

Jon Hendricks

Roberta Knie

Kevin Mahogany

Dick Noel

Karl Hendricks

Robert Knight

Mitch Margo

Shea Norman

Pierre Henry

Dmitri Kogan

William “Bill” Marín

Corki Casey O’Dell

Bob Higgins

Siegfried Köhler

Don Markham

Lee O’Denat aka Q

Buck Hill

Péter Komlós

Ric Marlow

Rory O’Donoghue

Dave Hlubek

Aloys Kontarsky

Naomi Martin

Paul O’Neill

Robbie Hoddinott

Leo Kristi

Lionel Augustus Martin

William Onyeabor

William M. Hoffman

Joan Krueger

Allan Holdsworth

Rainer Kussmaul

Yuushi Matsuyama

Aubrey Holt

Pete Kuykendall

Ralphie May

Ernst Ottensamer

Matt Holt

Helen Kwalwasser

William Mayer

Tommy Page

Randy Hongo

Vincent La Selva

Yung Mazi

Ralph Paige

Linda Hopkins

Fredell Lack

Tom McClung

Tom Paley

Virgil Howe

Marty Lacker

Goldy McJohn

Judy Parker

Mike Hudson

Gerry Lacoursiere

Reggie Joseph “Mac”

Kirby Parker

Don Hunstein

Jimmy LaFave

Al Hurricane Sr.

Deborah Lamprell

Stuart McLean

Angel Parra

Dmitri Hvorostovsky

Martin Landau

Vernon McQueen

Frankie Paul

238 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

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Reggie Ossé aka Combat Jack

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IN MEMORIAM

Skipp Pearson

Helmut Roehrig

Zurab Sotkilava

Billy Joe Walker Jr.

David Peel

Mickey Roker

Harry Sparnaay

Jo Walker-Meador

Dave Pell

Jim Rollins

Ben Speer

Evan Sewell Wallace aka

Buddy Pendleton

Juan Romero

Rosa Nell Speer Powell

Harry Pendleton

Louis Roney

Jerome Spence

Don Warden

Jerry Perenchio

Clotilde Rosa

Thornton Spencer

Leon Ware

Carol Peters

Jerry Ross

Marc Spitz

A.D. Washington

Roberta Peters

Dave Rosser

Irwin Stambler

James Watson

Marilyn Petrone

Sidney Rothstein

Kevin Stanton

Elaine Hoffman Watts

Tom Petty

Elliot “Dean” Rubinson

Orrin Star

Peter Overend Watts

Eugene Phillips

David Rumsey

Howard Stark

Fred Weintraub

Ray Phiri

Zuzana Ruzickova

Cameron Spencer Starnes

Leo “Bud” Welch

Willie Pickens

Eric Salzman

Larry Steinbachek

Barbara Weldens

David B. Pigg

Harry Sandler

Elyse Steinman

Red West

Wally Pikal

Johnny Sandlin

Rick Stevens

John Wetton

Tulsa Pittaway

Ben Sandoval

Chuck Stewart

Chris Whorf

Kim Plainfield

Carles Santos

Ken Stilts

Hurshel Wiginton

Derek Poindexter

Tony “It” Särkkä

Robert Strängen Dahlqvist

Max Wilcox

Robert “Pops” Popwell

Josh Schwartz

Jonathan Strasser

Keith Wilder

Miles Porcaro

Joey Scinta

Clyde Stubblefield

Don Williams

Rob Potts

Janet Seidel

Tammy Sullivan

Phil Williams

Joey Powers

Bob Seidemann

Daisy Sweeney

Norro Wilson

John Preston

Mark Selby

Luigi Ferdinando Tagliavini

Keith Wissmar

Norma Procter

María Martha Serra Lima

Grady Tate

Curtis Womack

Prodigy

Jessy Serrata

Jeffrey Tate

Christopher Wong Won aka

Skip Prokop

Shadia

Bobby Taylor

Michael Prophet

Natalia Shakhovskaya

Tony Terran

Graham Wood

Scott Putesky aka

Charles “Bobo” Shaw

Ammon Tharp

Ed Woods

Iain Shedden

Wendy Thatcher

Bob Wootton

Janet Rains aka Jane Train

Kenny Shields

Banner Thomas

Endrik Wottrich

Elkin Ramírez

John Shifflett

Marvell Thomas

Gil Wright

Joseph Rascoff

Pete Shotton

Stuart Thompson

Steve Wright

Gil Ray

Walter “Bunny” Sigler

Francis Thorne

Greg Yates

Larry Ray

George Silfies

Mel Tillis

Rodney Yeargin aka

Sandra Reemer

Noel “Scully” Simms

William Tolley

Della Reese

Ted Simons

Richard Toop

Ritchie York

Garnet Reid

Dudley Simpson

Veljo Tormis

George Young

George Reiff

Peter Skellern

Fernando Toussaint

Malcolm Young

Ludger Rémy

Stanislaw Skrowaczewski

Vlastimir Trajković

Geoffrey Gurrumul

Cel Revuelta

Heather Slade-Lipkin

Gilles Tremblay

Leon Rhodes

Joni Sledge

Greg Trooper

Fernando Riba

Tzvi Small

Butch Trucks

Belton Richard

Barry “Frosty” Smith

Hal Tulchin

Aamir Zaki

Denis Richard

Fenwick Smith

Kerry Turman

Jessi Zazu

Keni Richards

Keely Smith

Avo Uvezian

Alberto Zedda

Don Rickles

Toby Smith

Mika Vainio

Luis Zett

Paquita Rico

Barbara Smith Conrad

Dave Valentin

Z’ev

Ben Riley

Dmitry Smolsky

Marián Varga

Grigori Zhislin

Nic Ritter

Kelley Sallee Snead

Daniel Viglietti

Paul Zukofsky

Lyle Ritz

Ann Sneed

Guy Villari

Kayton Roberts

Ted Sommer

Bea Wain

Maggie Roche

Rosalie Sorrels

Robert “Bilbo” Walker

Daisy Berkowitz

240 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

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A timeline of historic GRAMMY firsts

1958

The GRAMMY Awards appear on TV for the first time as a taped “NBC Sunday Showcase.”

1959

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

Bobby Darin becomes the first Best New Artist winner.

Henry Mancini’s The Music From Peter Gunn becomes the first Album Of The Year winner.

244 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Henry Mancini becomes the first person to win five GRAMMYs in one night, all for his work on the Breakfast At Tiffany’s soundtrack.

1961

Bing Crosby is honored with the first Lifetime Achievement Award (then known as the Golden Achievement Award).

1963

1965

Roger Miller becomes the first person to win six GRAMMYs in one night, including three for his country hit “Dang Me.” RALPH CRANE/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

Domenico Modugno’s “Nel Blu Dipinto Di Blu (Volare)” becomes the first winner for both Record and Song Of The Year.


MARK AND COLLEEN HAYWARD/GETTY IMAGES

The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band becomes the first rock album to win Album Of The Year.

1968

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

1967

Stevie Wonder becomes the first and only artist to date to win Album Of The Year for three consecutive studio albums. He wins for Songs In The Key Of Life, having won previously for Innervisions and Fulfillingness’ First Finale.

Paul Simon becomes the first person to win seven GRAMMYs in one night, all for his work on Simon & Garfunkel’s Bridge Over Troubled Water and its classic title track.

1970

1971

The GRAMMY telecast, staged at the Hollywood Palladium, is broadcast live for the first time.

1974

1976

The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame inducts its first class of recordings: “The Christmas Song” (The King Cole Trio), “Body And Soul” (Coleman Hawkins), “Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue” (pianist George Gershwin with conductor Paul Whiteman), “West End Blues” (Louis Armstrong & His Hot Five), and “White Christmas” (Bing Crosby and the Ken Darby Singers).

Glen Campbell’s By The Time I Get To Phoenix becomes the first country album to win Album Of The Year.

60th Annual GRAMMY Awards 245


Lauryn Hill becomes the first hip-hop artist to win Album Of The Year and the first woman to win five GRAMMYs in one night. She takes the awards for her solo debut album, The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill.

1980

1981

FRANK TRAPPER/CORBIS VIA GETTY IMAGES

Christopher Cross becomes the first artist to sweep the “big four” awards: Album, Record, and Song Of The Year, plus Best New Artist.

1983

1997

1998

1999

Michael Jackson becomes the first person to win eight GRAMMYs in one night. He receives six of his awards for Thriller.

John Lennon becomes the first posthumous winner for Album Of The Year. He is honored for Double Fantasy, a collaboration with his wife, Yoko Ono.

246 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards

SCOTT GRIES/IMAGEDIRECT

Madison Square Garden is the first major arena to host the GRAMMY Awards.

Santana’s Supernatural becomes the first album to win GRAMMYs in nine categories.


2009

LESTER COHEN/WIREIMAGE.COM

2003

Bill Clinton becomes the first U.S. president to win a GRAMMY, receiving Best Spoken Word Album For Children for Prokofiev: Peter And The Wolf/Beintus: Wolf Tracks.

DAN MACMEDAN/WIREIMAGE.COM

Esperanza Spalding becomes the first jazz artist to win Best New Artist.

2010

Taylor Swift becomes the first woman to win Album Of The Year for a second time as a lead artist. She wins for 1989, six years after she took the award for Fearless.

2015

Adele becomes the first person to sweep the awards for Album, Record and Song Of The Year twice. She’s honored for 25, five years after she wins those categories for 21.

2016

KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/GETTY IMAGES

Beyoncé becomes the first woman to win six GRAMMYs in one night. Five of her awards come for I Am… Sasha Fierce.

Arcade Fire becomes the first alternative music act to win Album Of The Year. The band wins for The Suburbs.

60th Annual GRAMMY Awards 247


j o h nv a r v a t o s . c o m

Nic k Jon a s New York , N Y 2018

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