59th Grammy Awards Programme.

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59th ANNUAL

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SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12 2017 THE RECORDING ACADEMY ®

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FOR THE RECORDING ACADEMY CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

John Poppo

THE RECORDING ACADEMY® PRESENTS

PRESIDENT/CEO

Neil Portnow CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Wayne Zahner VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

Neda Azarfar EXECUTIVE IN CHARGE OF PRODUCTION & CHIEF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

Branden Chapman Rick Engdahl Bill Freimuth CHIEF INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT & MEMBER RELATIONS OFFICER

Daryl P. Friedman CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER

Gaetano Frizzi CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER

Evan Greene CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER

Jason James VICE PRESIDENT, CREATIVE SERVICES

David Konjoyan VICE PRESIDENT, MEMBERSHIP & INDUSTRY RELATIONS

Laura Segura Mueller SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, SPECIAL PROJECTS

Nancy Shapiro

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2017 STAPLES CENTER

PRESS REPRESENTATION

12:30 P.M. GRAMMY AWARDS PREMIERE CEREMONY®

BALLOT TABULATION

5:00 P.M. LIVE-TELECAST GRAMMY AWARDS® CEREMONY

ADVISORS Joel Katz NATIONAL LEGAL COUNSEL

Chuck Ortner DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL

Bobby Rosenbloum DEPUTY NATIONAL COUNSEL

Sandra Crawshaw-Sparks

Deloitte & Touche Gary Smith Marijane Unter

AEG EHRLICH VENTURES LLC EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

Ken Ehrlich DIRECTOR

Louis J. Horvitz WRITERS

CO-PRODUCER

VICE PRESIDENT

GENERAL COUNSEL

Rogers & Cowan

Ken Ehrlich David Wild Terry Lickona

Dana Tomarken Judy Wong

Gabriel Abaroa Jr. Leslie Ann Jones Joel Katz Terry Lickona Glenn Lorbecki Hank Neuberger Richard Ranta

LOS ANGELES

MUSICARES EXECUTIVE STAFF

VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE

Neil Portnow, Co-Chair George J. Flanigen IV, Co-Chair Jason Bentley Jennifer Blakeman Fletcher Foster Jimmy Jam Mike Knobloch Harvey Mason Jr. Alexandra Patsavas Jon Platt John Poppo Bob Santelli Eric Schilling

RECORDING ACADEMY TELEVISION COMMITTEE ADVISORY GROUP

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, AWARDS

RECORDING ACADEMY TELEVISION COMMITTEE

SUPERVISING PRODUCER

Ecologically intelligent practices were integrated into the planning and production of the GRAMMY Awards. Most paper products and other supplies we bought and the services we procured were selected with sensitivity toward positive ecological stewardship. As an organization with a broad public reach, we take our obligations to society very seriously. The Recording Academy is honored to have teamed with the Natural Resources Defense Council, one of America’s most respected nonpartisan environmental organizations, to help reduce The Academy’s ecological footprint.

Eric Cook CONSULTING PRODUCER

Ben Winston PRODUCTION DESIGNER

Brian Stonestreet LIGHTING DESIGNER

Robert A. Dickinson TALENT PRODUCER

Chantel Sausedo GRAMMY PREMIERE CEREMONY PRODUCER

Greg Fera GRAMMY PREMIERE CEREMONY MUSICAL DIRECTOR

Cheche Alara

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards


37 FOR 37

Since 1980, I have had the privilege of producing the GRAMMY Awards® and working with nearly every great artist who has impacted our musical landscape for the past 37 years. Below I’ve listed a few of them who stand out, but I’d like to take this moment to thank every artist who’s graced our stage for always making me, and the GRAMMY Awards, look good year in and year out … 1980 1983 1985 1988 1991 1993 1994 1995 1998 1999 2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004 2005 2005 2005 2006 2008 2009 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 2015 2016 2016 2016

Neil Diamond/Barbra Streisand — “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers” Marvin Gaye — “Sexual Healing” Tina Turner — “What’s Love Got To Do With It” Michael Jackson — ”The Way You Make Me Feel”/“Man In The Mirror” Aerosmith — “Come Together” (tribute to John Lennon) Eric Clapton — “Tears In Heaven” Whitney Houston — “I Will Always Love You” Bruce Springsteen — “Streets Of Philadelphia” Aretha Franklin — “Nessun Dorma” (substitute for Luciano Pavarotti) Ricky Martin — “La Copa De La Vida” Eminem/Elton John — “Stan” U2 — “Beautiful Day” Alan Jackson — “Where Were You (When The World Stopped Turning)” Mary J. Blige — “No More Drama” Springsteen/Grohl/Costello/Kanal/Van Zandt — “London Calling” (tribute to the Clash) Simon & Garfunkel reunion at Madison Square Garden — “The Sounds Of Silence” Prince/Beyoncé — Medley Melissa Etheridge/Joss Stone — Janis Joplin Medley Usher/James Brown — “Caught Up”/”Get Up — I Feel Like Being Like A Sex Machine” Alicia Keys/Jamie Foxx — “Georgia On My Mind” (tribute to Ray Charles) Madonna/Gorillaz — first use of hologram on television Tina Turner/Beyoncé — “Proud Mary”/Medley Radiohead — “15 Step” Jay Z/Kanye West/T.I./Lil Wayne/M.I.A. — “Swagga Like Us” Pink — “Glitter In The Air” Mumford & Sons/Bob Dylan/Avett Brothers — Medley Mick Jagger — “Everybody Needs Somebody” (tribute to Solomon Burke) Adele — “Rolling In The Deep” McCartney/Springsteen/Grohl/Walsh — Abbey Road Finale Justin Timberlake/Jay Z — “Suit & Tie” Bruno Mars/Rihanna/Sting/Marleys — Bob Marley Tribute Macklemore & Ryan Lewis/Madonna/Queen Latifah/Mary Lambert — “Same Love” Daft Punk/Stevie Wonder/Pharrell Williams/Nile Rodgers — “Get Lucky” AC/DC — “Highway To Hell” Rihanna/Kanye West/Paul McCartney — “Four Five Seconds” Cast of “Hamilton” — “Alexander Hamilton” Eagles w/Jackson Browne — Glenn Frey Tribute Kendrick Lamar — “The Blacker The Berry”/”Alright”

KEN EHRLICH


A

s the GRAMMY Awards celebrates its 59th annual ceremony, The Recording Academy has built a rich tradition as the premier outlet for honoring achievements in the recording arts and for supporting the music community. In 1957 a visionary group of music professionals and label executives in Los Angeles recognized the need to create an organization that would acknowledge and celebrate the artistic achievements of not only talented musicians and singers, but also important behindthe-scenes contributors such as producers and engineers. Conceived as a way to create a real recording industry community, The Recording Academy was born and the GRAMMY Awards process began. The GRAMMYs are the only peerpresented award to honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position. The GRAMMY Awards themselves have grown right along with the organization that presents them. Initially a series of taped network TV specials titled “The Best On Record,” the GRAMMYs have long been a state-of-the-art live extravaganza (in 2003 the GRAMMYs became the first awards show to broadcast in highdefinition television and 5.1 surround sound) and the premier music awards show on television. In addition to the GRAMMY Award, The Recording Academy presents several other awards to honor important music and music professionals. The Lifetime Achievement Award celebrates performers and other music professionals who have made outstanding contributions to recording in their lifetimes. The Trustees Award recognizes primarily nonperforming contributors. The Technical GRAMMY Award is presented to individuals and/or companies who have made contributions of outstanding technical significance to the recording field. The GRAMMY Legend Award is presented on occasion to individuals or

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groups for ongoing contributions and influence in the recording field. And the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame was established in 1973 to commemorate recordings, at least 25 years old, of lasting qualitative or historical significance. As the music industry continues its evolution from analog to digital, The Recording Academy has continued its mission to be the leading force in honoring, celebrating and advancing music. The Academy has been at the forefront of critical issues affecting both the music community and the general population, such as legislation impacting the arts community, protection of intellectual property rights, piracy, archiving and preservation issues, censorship concerns, and creating dialogue between the music and technology sectors. To accomplish this mission, The Recording Academy has developed a network of 12 Chapters across the country to provide industry service and program development to our nearly 25,000 members. The Academy also launched the Producers & Engineers Wing in 2000 to create an organized voice for the important technical and creative community. Through its Washington, D.C.-based Advocacy & Public Policy office, The Academy seeks to amplify the voice of music creators in national policy matters. The Academy was instrumental in helping form the Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus in 2004, and in 2007 co-founded the musicFIRST Coalition, which has taken a leadership role in the fight to expand radio performance royalties to all music creators. In 2015 The Academy launched the GRAMMY Creators Alliance, a collective of music creators, advised by top industry managers, that offers a platform for the creative community to form a unified voice on crucial issues impacting the future of music. Through its affiliated MusiCares Foundation, The Academy works to protect and support music people in crisis. The Recording Academy presents the Music Educator Award to honor a current

Kendrick Lamar performs at the 58th GRAMMY Awards in 2016

educator who has made a significant contribution to the field of music education. Since 2008, The Recording Academy has worked with the Natural Resources Defense Council to focus its awareness on the carbon footprint of The Academy and GRAMMY Awards production, and to aid The Academy in communicating to its vendors an interest in sustainable solutions. In 2009 The Academy’s headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif., attained LEED gold-level certification, further demonstrating the organization’s positive environmental impact. Finally, The Academy opened the doors to the GRAMMY Museum in December 2008, launching a state-of-the-art cultural facility at the exciting L.A. Live complex in downtown Los Angeles. Expanding the institution’s reach, the 28,000-square-foot GRAMMY Museum Mississippi opened in March 2016 in Cleveland, Miss. These Museums bring the mission, impact and legacy of The Recording Academy and the GRAMMYs to the public year-round.

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THE RECORDING ACADEMY®



FROM THE PRESIDENT/CEO

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NEIL PORTNOW

President/CEO of The Recording Academy

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

elcome to the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards, an evening the world has come to recognize as Music’s Biggest Night. That’s not just because the GRAMMY Awards creates the biggest spotlight of the year for artists, but also because it brings together the entire industry — from the pop, rock and hip-hop communities to the worlds of gospel, Americana, country, jazz, classical, and artists representing all of our 84 categories — for a week of communal celebration of the art of music and those who create it. It’s no coincidence that The Recording Academy’s flagship endeavor creates this collective experience. As a peer organization of music-making professionals, The Academy reflects the consensus of the creative community in the GRAMMY Awards. But we also focus on the needs of that community year-round through a number of programs and services we provide to our community, and beyond. With a new administration and Congress now in office, our advocacy work faces the challenges of engaging with new faces, ideas and agendas. Growing relationships on both sides of the aisle on behalf of music creators is our strength, and we’ll look to continue to build on last year’s successes. Among those victories: President Barack Obama signed into law The Academy-backed Better Online Ticket Sales Act, which will protect artists and music fans by cracking down on online ticket scalpers; The Academy launched the political action committee, the GRAMMY Fund for Music Creators; and by the end of the last Congress, more than 70 congressional members had become co-sponsors of pro-music legislation such as the Fair Play Fair Pay Act, Allocation For Music Producers Act and Songwriter Equity Act. In addition, our local and regional advocacy efforts have grown at a remarkable pace. In 2016 our GRAMMYs in My District initiative engaged more than 2,000 members who visited their representatives’ local offices on a single day to voice the concerns of music makers. Our MusiCares Foundation continued an outstanding tradition this year by honoring the great Tom Petty as its Person of the Year. Tom joined the ranks of such recent MusiCares honorees as Bob Dylan, Carole King, Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen, Barbra Streisand, and Neil Young, all of whom, like Tom, have not just changed the course of music, but have made a tremendous impact on the world community through worthy causes they believe in and the lives of countless people touched by their generosity. With Tom’s compassionate help, we expect to raise record-setting revenue again, which will help the thousands of music people in need who benefit each year from MusiCares’ consistently growing essential health and human services programs. The GRAMMY Museum continues to expand its sphere of influence, both physically through the recent opening of the GRAMMY Museum Mississippi and the GRAMMY Museum Gallery at Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tenn., and through an expanding slate of educational initiatives designed to inspire music fans of all ages. Of course, celebrating our 59th telecast this year means we’re on the eve of the milestone 60th GRAMMY Awards in 2018, and we’re looking forward to many exciting opportunities to celebrate, both on the show itself and in our business activities. As always, these are just some highlights from the past year and some of our goals for the future. For greater detail, we invite you to learn much more about our activities in The Recording Academy section of this book. On behalf of The Academy’s elected leaders, I offer congratulations to all the nominees and extend thanks to our dedicated staff and production and broadcast partners. Tonight’s show will offer an abundance of evidence why we firmly believe in the power of music and all that it provides to our culture and lives.


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FROM THE CHAIR

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JOHN POPPO

Chair of the Board of Trustees

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

elcome to Music’s Biggest Night — the 59th GRAMMY Awards. On behalf of myself and my esteemed colleagues on the Board of Trustees, big congratulations to all this year’s nominees! As the peer-awarded GRAMMY is recognized worldwide to be the preeminent symbol of musical excellence, a GRAMMY nomination represents no small achievement, and we are all excited to celebrate with our talented friends tonight. I’d like to take this opportunity to also recognize and thank my fellow Trustees and the many other elected leaders who tirelessly give their time to support this big night, along with the many other initiatives for which The Recording Academy is responsible 365 days a year. Its work in the areas of advocacy, education, philanthropy, and charity — in service to its membership and the music community at large — is second to none. As we all know, music inspires, comforts, heals, and brings us joy. A universal language that speaks directly to the very heart and soul of humanity, music has the power to transcend the polarizing barriers of race, politics and cultural differences to bring people together. So I hope all music creators, Academy members and music lovers watching our show tonight appreciate the role they play in making the world a better place, whether it’s by creating, promoting, sharing, protecting, or simply appreciating music. I thank you for supporting our mission at The Recording Academy “to ensure music remains an indelible part of our culture, both here and around the globe.” Finally, I thank you again for affording me the great honor and privilege of serving as Chair of this wonderful organization. Enjoy the show and have a great night!


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BEYONCÉ SoundExchange Member since 2013

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 9 NOMINATIONS


BEST OF LUCK TO YOU AND ALL THE SOUNDEXCHANGE MEMBERS NOMINATED FOR THE 59 TH GRAMMY AWARDS ®: 2 Chainz Adele Alabama Shakes Amy Schumer Anderson .Paak Andrea Bocelli Anoushka Shankar Anthony Hamilton Ari Hest Ariana Grande Barbra Streisand Beyoncé Bill Frisell BJ the Chicago Kid Blink-182 Blue Highway Bob Dylan Bob Moses Bon Iver Brad Mehldau Brady Rymer and The Little Band That Could Brandy Clark Branford Marsalis Quartet Brian Lynch Brothers Osborne Bryson Tiller Cage the Elephant Carla Morrison Carol Burnett Carrie Underwood Catherine Russell Chance the Rapper Chris Young Chucho Valdes Chuck Loeb Claire Lynch Coldplay Crowder D.R.A.M. Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society David Bowie David Cross Daya De La Soul Demi Lovato Desiigner

Dierks Bentley Disturbed DJ Khaled Dolly Parton Doyle Lawson Drake Elle King Elvis Costello Fantasia Fat Joe Flume Fonseca For King & Country Frances England Fred Hersch French Montana Gaither Vocal Band Gallant Gilberto Gil Gordon Goodwin Gordon Mote Gregory Porter Grupo Niche Halsey Herb Alpert Hillary Scott & The Scott Family Illya Kuryaki & The Valderramas Jack White Jacob Collier James Hetfield Jamie XX Janiva Magness Jean-Michel Jarre Jekalyn Carr Jesse & Joy Jill Scott Joe Bonamassa Joe Louis Walker Joey Alexander John Beasley John Scofield Josh Groban Joshua Redman Joss Favela Judy Collins Justin Bieber

Kalani Pe’a Kanye West Keith Urban Kelly Clarkson Kelly Price Kelsea Ballerini Kendrick Lamar Kenny Barron Trio Kenny Chesney KING Kirk Franklin Korn Kris Kristofferson Kurt Elling La Maquinaria Nortena La Sonora Santanera Lalah Hathaway Lars Ulrich Laura Pausini Lauren Daigle Laurie Lewis Leon Bridges Lil Wayne Lil Yachty Loretta Lynn Lori McKenna Los Rakas Lurrie Bell Maren Morris Margaret Cho Mark O’Connor Michael Spiro Mike Posner Mint Condition Miranda Lambert Musiq Soulchild Mya Natalie Grant P!nk Panic! at The Disco PartyNextDoor Patti Smith Patton Oswalt Peter Erskine Peter Gabriel Peter Kater PJ Harvey Prince

Radiohead Recess Monkey Remy Ma René Marie Rhiannon Giddens Rihanna Ro James Sanalejo Sarah Jarosz ScHoolboy Q Sean Paul Secret Agent 23 Skidoo Shirley Caesar Sia Sierra Hull Snarky Puppy Sofi Tukker Solange Steve Aoki Steve Gadd Band Sturgill Simpson Tamela Mann Ted Nash Big Band Terrace Martin The Avett Brothers The Chainsmokers The Record Company The Tierney Sutton Band The Time Jumpers Thomas Rhett Tim Bowman, Jr. Tina Guo Travis Greene Twenty One Pilots Tycho Vangelis Wayne Wallace La Orquesta Sinfonietta Weezer White Sun William Murphy Willie Nelson Yo-Yo Ma Zach Williams Ziggy Marley


Contents

28 114

Welcome

12 President/CEO’s Message 14 Chair’s Message

Nominees

26 Adele 28 Beyoncé 30 Lukas Graham 32 Rihanna feat. Drake 34 Twenty One Pilots 36 Justin Bieber 38 Drake 40 Sturgill Simpson 42 Kelsea Ballerini 44 The Chainsmokers 46 Chance The Rapper 48 Maren Morris 50 Anderson .Paak 52 Song Of The Year 56 Complete Nominations List 18

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126

Special Merit Awards Lifetime Achievement Awards 102 Shirley Caesar by Kirk Franklin 104 Ahmad Jamal by Robert Glasper 106 Charley Pride by Darius Rucker 108 Jimmie Rodgers by John Mellencamp 110 Nina Simone 112 Sly Stone by Childish Gambino 114 The Velvet Underground by Iggy Pop

Trustees Awards 116 Thom Bell by Kenny Gamble 118 Mo Ostin by Lorne Michaels 120 Ralph S. Peer by Gloria Trevi Technical GRAMMY Award 122 Alan Dower Blumlein by Isabel Garvey Music Educator Award 124 Keith Hancock by Ginny Theodorakis Hall Of Fame 126 2017 GRAMMY Hall Of Fame


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Contents

160 172

146 Features

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146 Powerful Fashion Statements Explore how artists convey cultural, theatrical and political messages through fashion

228 In Memoriam Remembering music people we lost in 2016

160

The Recording Academy Today

136 The Art Of The Remix GRAMMY-winning remixers share their approach to crafting the perfect remix

Inside GRAMMY Museum Mississippi Take a tour of the new must-see music museum located in the heart of the Mississippi Delta

Still A Heartbreaker On the precipice of a 40th anniversary tour, 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year Tom Petty reflects on his career

236 Music’s Biggest Hosts A photo history of GRAMMY emcees

10 186 188

The Recording Academy Membership & Industry Relations GRAMMY Week

190 GRAMMY Museum 192 MusiCares Foundation 194 Advocacy & Public Policy 196 The Latin Recording Academy 198 The Digital Academy 200 GRAMMY Pro 202 GRAMMY Awards Process 206 Executive Staff 208 National Trustee Officers And Trustees 212 National Staff 218 Recording Academy Chapters 224 Past Chairs

The GRAMMY Award design is a trademark and service mark registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may not be reproduced without permission. The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc., owns, among others, the following trademarks: National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences®, The Recording Academy®, GRAMMY®, GRAMMYs®, GRAMMY Awards®, GRAMMY Hall Of Fame®, GRAMMY Pro®, Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences®, The Latin Recording Academy®, MusiCares Foundation®, GRAMMY in the Schools®, and GRAMMY Museum®. The 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards Program Book is published by The Recording Academy, 3030 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404, in association with FX Group, Inc. © 2017 The Recording Academy. All rights reserved. 20

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards


YO U R D E S T I N AT I O N F O R T H E F U L L K I TC H E N A I D C R A F T CO F F E E CO L L E C T I O N


FOR THE RECORDING ACADEMY EDITOR IN CHIEF & CO-PUBLISHER

David Konjoyan SENIOR EDITOR

Tim McPhate PRODUCTION MANAGER

Iman Saadat Woodley ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Kiana Butler ASSISTANT EDITOR

Renée Fabian GRAPHIC DESIGN CONSULTATION

Tera Allegri

FOR FX GROUP PRESIDENT & CO-PUBLISHER

Kristian Krempel GENERAL COUNSEL

Frank G. Fernandez MULTI-CULTURAL MEDIA DIRECTOR

Lillybeth Sales CHIEF RISK OFFICER

William Babcock ARTIST & MEDIA RELATIONS DIRECTOR

Curse Mackey SR. DIRECTOR OF ENTERTAINMENT & ARTIST RELATIONS

Ken Rose ARTIST RELATIONS

Rhonda Bedikian Elizabeth Ferris CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Simone Tieber PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jason Lowsy GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Andrea Carroz ART DIRECTOR

James Denny INTERNET & TECHNICAL SERVICES

Scot Shuman ACCOUNTING — C&L VALUE ADVISORS

Terry Wilson ADVERTISING SALES

Doug Beaudoin Tom Brady Jay Hurst Gjon Kukli Jason Luce Charlie Poe Matthew Vaughn Jonathan Wilson

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Steve Baltin, Bruce Britt, Childish Gambino, Chuck Crisafulli, Alan di Perna, Bill Flanagan, Kirk Franklin, Kenny Gamble, Isabel Garvey, Robert Glasper, Paul Grein, Andreas Hale, Nick Krewen, Tammy La Gorce, John Mellencamp, Lorne Michaels, Melinda Newman, Jessica Nicholson, Tamara Palmer, Ogden Payne, Iggy Pop, Darius Rucker, Nic Screws, John Sutton-Smith, Ginny Theodorakis, Roy Trakin, Gloria Trevi, Steven Ward, Lisa Zhito, Paul Zollo SPECIAL THANKS:

FX Group, Inc. would like to extend a special thank you to the following people for their contribution and support: Professional Sports Publications, Dr. Edgar Ramirez-Pagan, Dr. Michael O’Neal, Dr. Jed Webber, and Alex Caballero FRONT COVER

Design by IE Design + Communications ©2016 The Recording Academy OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE GRAMMY AWARDS

WireImage.com GRAMMY AWARD STATUE DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY

John Billings The Official 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards program book is published by The Recording Academy, 3030 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404, and produced in association with FX Group, Inc., 309 S. Willow Ave., Tampa, FL 33606. All rights reserved. No part of the publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted in any form, by means electronically, mechanically, photocopying, or otherwise, and no article or photography can be printed without the written consent of the publisher. Reproduction in whole or part without written consent is forbidden. The Recording Academy and FX Group assume no responsibility for statements made by advertisers; the quality, deliverability of products or services advertised; or positioning of advertising. GRAMMY Awards is a registered trademark of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc. The GRAMMY Award design is a trademark and service mark registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may not be reproduced without permission. ©2017 The Recording Academy. All rights reserved. Published by The Recording Academy

In association with FX Group, Inc. 309 S. Willow Ave., Tampa, FL 33606 813.337.0102 | 866.668.5412 fax info@fxm-group.com www.fxm-group.com

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards


HOME TO THE

Music

From the very first GRAMMY Awards® at the Beverly Hilton in 1959, Hilton continues to be the proud home away from home for touring artists around the world.

GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards®, and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2017 The Recording Academy. ©2017 Hilton.




RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

W

hen Adele announced the follow-up to 2011’s 21, fans feared that, happily partnered and a mom, she’d no longer be the queen of pain. After all, 21’s brokenhearted tales such as “Rolling In The Deep,” “Someone Like You” and “Rumour Has It” had registered new heights on the misery index as well as on the sales charts, winning statues for Record, Album and Song Of The Year at the 54th GRAMMYs. The album moved 14 million copies in the United States and moved fans to heartfelt tears. They needn’t have worried. With 25, the British superstar looked back at her first quarter of life with nostalgia and remorse. In a letter to her fans, the 10-time GRAMMY winner wrote, “My last record was a break-up record and if I had to label this one I would call it a make-up record. … Making up for lost time. Making up for everything I ever did and never did.” “Hello,” the haunting lead single and a contender for Record Of

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

ALASDAIR MCLELLAN

Adele The Year featuring production by Adele’s co-writer Greg Kurstin, oozed with regret and a deep desire to make amends, whether to a romantic partner or to her younger self. It blasted onto the Billboard Hot 100 at No. 1. Adele co-wrote every song on the soulful 25, pairing with 21 collaborators Paul Epworth and OneRepublic’s Ryan Tedder, as well as new partners such as popmeisters Max Martin and Shellback, Bruno Mars, and Danger Mouse, who brought synthladen, echoey textures to “River Lea” that cast Adele in a different musical light than her two previous sets. The public gave Adele a hero’s welcome: 25 sold 3.38 million copies in its first week — the highest weekly tally for any album since Nielsen Music started tabulating sales in 1991 — and has gone on to attain diamond certification in the United States. It was a fine “Hello,” indeed. — Melinda Newman



ROBIN HARPER FOR PARKWOOD ENTERTAINMENT

RECORD OF THE YEAR ALBUM OF THE YEAR

Beyoncé T

hough she has earned 20 GRAMMY Awards since 2000 — and leads this year’s field with nine nominations — Queen Bey has not yet won Album Of The Year (she was previously nominated for 2013’s Beyoncé, 2008’s I Am … Sasha Fierce and as part of Lady Gaga’s The Fame Monster for 2010) or Record Of The Year (“Say My Name,” “Crazy In Love” [featuring Jay Z], “Irreplaceable,” and “Halo” received nods for 2000, 2003, 2007, and 2009, respectively). With Lemonade, Beyoncé transcended the pop diva who teased us about putting a ring on it to a bold provocateur wielding a baseball bat and raised middle finger while publicly questioning the fidelity of her equally high-profile mate. Introduced in February by way of the “Formation” video the day before her Super Bowl 50 performance, then suddenly released in April via Tidal (the streaming service she co-owns with Jay Z, among other artists), she punctuated the release of Lemonade with an HBO

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

special featuring videos for every track. Beyoncé takes the sourness of marital discord as well as her Black Lives Matter indignation toward police brutality and racial inequity to create the fruits of an album that seamlessly blends the personal and political. Whether providing a Black Power showcase for her Southern roots with nods to murdered New Orleans social media star Messy Mya (“Formation”), calling out “Becky with the good hair” (“Sorry”) or crooning a gun-themed country song that would be covered by the Dixie Chicks (“Daddy Lessons”), Beyoncé proved an indomitable force. From being “Drunk In Love” to telling her man to “suck on my balls,” Beyoncé proved an adept manipulator of the pop zeitgeist, breaking down musical, racial and gender boundaries with seemingly effortless aplomb. The reigning monarch of 2016 pop earned her royalty the old-fashioned way: She worked hard for it. In a year of dystopian upheaval, that provided us with a distinct Bey of hope. — Roy Trakin



Lukas Graham M

any great pop ballads capture a poignant moment in a person’s life. But Lukas Graham’s “7 Years,” nominated for Record Of The Year, is more ambitious in scope. In just under four minutes, it encapsulates an entire life story from age 7 to age 60 — cycling through the past, present and future. The story is that of Lukas Forchhammer, the frontman for the Danish trio, who grew up in an anarchist community in Copenhagen, Denmark, and went on to become a pop sensation. But the life passages that “7 Years” evoke — adolescent kicks, marriage, parenthood, aging — touch on universal life experiences. The song was inspired by the death of Forchhammer’s father at age 61. “I heard the piano, and I just started singing, ‘Once I was 7 years old’,” Forchhammer told Rolling Stone. “Then I started writing it down.” But while Forchhammer’s tremulous, vulnerable voice is the song’s focal point, “7 Years” was very much a collaborative effort. Forchhammer created the original demo with Morten Ristorp and

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Stefan Forrest, collectively known as the production team Future Animals. From there it was taken up by producer Morten “Pilo” Pilegaard, who overdubbed keyboards, bass, drums, and virtual strings, working entirely in the digital domain. A film-sound designer, Pilegaard also added cinematic elements that enhance the narrative, including a film projector whirring, children’s voices, ticking clocks, and audience noises. Live strings were overdubbed in Copenhagen before the project went to Los Angeles for mixing by Delbert Bowers. The song’s main vocal hook repeats 12 times, and the production ebbs and flows around this recurring motif. Drums, strings and other instruments enter and withdraw at just the right moments, like actors in a well-staged play. Despite comprising some 65 tracks, “7 Years” is deceptively simple. Behind the song’s emotional punch, there are myriad layers of artistry. Like a masterpiece painting. — Alan di Perna

DANNY CLINCH

RECORD OF THE YEAR


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RIHANNA: PAOLO REVERSI; DRAKE: DAN MARTENSEN

RECORD OF THE YEAR

Rihanna

Featuring Drake

F

lavored with sultry vocals and a melodic rhyme scheme, Rihanna’s “Work” is as spicy as a dish from the Barbadian singer’s hometown. With off-kilter lyrics rooted in Jamaican patois, the infectious dance hall-inspired riddim served as the soundtrack for dance-floor romance in 2016. In its truest form, “Work” checks all the boxes of a modern millennial love story. Its edgy narrative exudes confidence dotted with specks of vulnerability: “You took my heart on my sleeve for decoration,” Rihanna accuses in the first verse. But in the following verse she pleads, “Baby, don’t you leave,” in what sounds like one last attempt to save an unrequited love affair. Drake soon chimes in with hints of consolation and listeners are left wondering if the idealized liaison will truly work. The dynamic pairing of Rihanna and Drake has historically been a recipe for chart-topping success. “What’s My Name?” — their first collaboration — rocketed to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2010 and earned a GRAMMY nomination.

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Though “Work” topped the Billboard Hot 100 for nine consecutive weeks, the repetitive, sometimes inaudible, wordplay was an unorthodox approach unheard in the traditional pop space. In an interview with Forbes, the song’s co-writer Jahron “PARTYNEXTDOOR” Brathwaite admitted there was some uncertainty behind the song’s potential to become a hit single from Rihanna’s eighth studio album, Anti. “Nobody really understood it,” Braithwaite said. “Nobody really agreed with it but [Rihanna]. She told me it was her little brother and her mom’s favorite song.” “Work” has since become much more than a Fenty family favorite. In addition to Record Of The Year, “Work” received a nod for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance and reached quadrupleplatinum status. As her 14th chart-topper, the song earned Rihanna the distinction of the solo artist with the third-most No. 1 hits in Hot 100 history, trailing the Beatles and Mariah Carey. Clearly, something’s working. — Ogden Payne


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Twenty One Pilots T

hree GRAMMY nominations — Record Of The Year and Best Pop Duo/Group Performance for “Stressed Out,” and Best Rock Performance for “Heathens” — proved a fitting way to close out a remarkable 2016 for Columbus, Ohio-based Twenty One Pilots. In 2015 the duo — comprising Tyler Joseph and Josh Dun — lifted off with their fourth studio album, Blurryface, which hit No. 1 on the Billboard 200 and has been certified double-platinum in the United States. Dubbed the “biggest new band of the past year” by Rolling Stone, the Pilots have been among the bestreceived acts on the festival circuit, with memorable performances at Austin City Limits Music Festival, Life Is Beautiful and Lollapalooza, among others. Twenty One Pilots soon graduated to headlining arenas — selling out venues such as The Forum in Los Angeles and two nights at New York’s Madison Square Garden. The duo also managed to land a hit song on the big screen with “Heathens,” featured in the

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blockbuster smash Suicide Squad. The song garnered Joseph two additional GRAMMY nominations for Best Rock Song and Best Song Written For Visual Media. With such a jam-packed year, it’s easy to understand the spirit behind “Stressed Out,” which has emerged as an anthem for overanxious millennials. Calling for a return to simpler times, Joseph sings, “Wish we could turn back time to the good ol’ days/When the momma sang us to sleep.” The track’s deceptively simple vibe belies its inventive production, courtesy of GRAMMY winner Mike Elizondo, fusing pop, rock, rap, and reggae elements; memorable instrumental, vocal and lyrical hooks; and coy arrangement tactics such as the absence of drums in the first part of each stanza. Those who have seen the duo’s incredibly energetic and dynamic live show have witnessed the cathartic release that comes from watching tens of thousands screaming along to “Stressed Out.” It’s a transcendent moment and one that displays, on a nightly basis, why Twenty One Pilots are flying high. — Steve Baltin

JABARI JACOBS

RECORD OF THE YEAR



Justin Bieber

S

orry,” one of three No. 1 singles from Justin Bieber’s fourth studio album, Purpose, was supposed to be the song that plugged us into the 22-year-old pop dynamo’s headspace. In fact, the word on the street before Purpose’s fall 2015 release was that the whole album was an expression of regret over recent troubles that landed Bieber in hot water, legally and in the public imagination. “Sorry”’s indelible lyric — “Yeah, I know that I let you down/ Is it too late to say sorry now?” — sung by Bieber in a pleading voice, really did seem like an expression of public atonement for youthful reckless behavior rather than a bid for forgiveness amid the wreckage of a failed relationship. But look a little deeper and you’ll find that not all the purpose of Purpose — a pop synthesis of dance music and modern R&B birthed with the help of collaborators such as Diplo, Skrillex and Jason “Poo Bear” Boyd — is concession-making. On “I’ll Show You,” a sly come-on of a song, Bieber sings: “Act like you know me, but you never will/There’s one thing that I know for sure/I’ll show you.”

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Underneath all the self-reproach, as “I’ll Show You” seems to suggest, lies a healthy blast of Bieber swagger. And few would deny that Purpose, which zoomed to the top of the Billboard 200 in its first week, merits the renewed confidence. Like Michael Jackson and Justin Timberlake before him, Bieber has grown up in the public eye. And like those artists — and onetime fellow Album Of The Year nominees — he has managed to weather the scrutiny of being a young star in the spotlight without compromising his ability to grow as an artist. Hear it on the lowkey, sweetly romantic “Company” and again on the quiet anthem “Love Yourself.” Purpose, from beginning to end, is a soaring testament to Bieber’s talent — he co-wrote all 13 of the album’s tracks in addition to his role as co-producer. It’s a strong enough record to render the personal stuff unimportant. With his armful of GRAMMY nods, Bieber answered his own question: As far as music is concerned, it’s never too late to say sorry. — Tammy La Gorce

PETER YANG

ALBUM OF THE YEAR


266* AND COUNTING

Berklee College of Music is proud to salute our 59th Annual GRAMMY AwardsÂŽ alumni and faculty nominees.

*Number of GRAMMY Awards received by Berklee alumni and faculty to date.


JOSEPH OKPAKO/REDFERNS

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

Drake

U

ntil it was surpassed in 2009 by Dubai’s Burj Khalifa at 2,722 feet, the CN Tower reigned supreme as the world’s tallest free-standing structure, its 1,815.5-foot needle piercing the skyline of Toronto, the beloved hometown of Drake, Canada’s own towering hip-hop star. There’s no coincidence that on the cover of Views, which garnered 59th GRAMMY nominations for Album Of The Year and Best Rap Album, the man born Aubrey Drake Graham is perched on the edge of the tower’s observation deck, feet dangling as he surveys his domain below. And what a considerable domain it has become. The prolific pace at which the singing rapper (or is that rapping singer?) dispenses his pointed, poetic flows, which seem both at once intimate and universal, is staggering. Views — a 20-song, 81-minute finely nuanced magnum opus that delves into loyalty, expectation and, to a certain extent, betrayal — helped Drake set a new record of 20 songs simultaneously appearing on the Billboard Hot 100 during one week: 18 of them featured on the album itself. Whether it’s the Caribbean torque of “One Dance,” the tropical

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polyrhythms of “Too Good,” the sober orchestral ambience of “Keep The Family Close,” the soulful R&B hue of “Weston Road Flows,” or the Timmy Thomas-sampled “Hotline Bling,” it all proved to be a palatable elixir for Drake aficionados everywhere. The album, which was produced by Drake and an impressive contingent of mainly Toronto-centric producers, engineers and artistic compadres, including longtime cohorts Noah “40” Shebib, Boi-1da and Nineteen85, counts for the majority of the rapper’s eight GRAMMY nominations (including Best Rap Song and Best Rap/Sung Performance for “Hotline Bling” as well as Best Rap Performance for “Pop Style” featuring The Throne aka Jay Z and Kanye West). Other milestones ensued: “One Dance,” featuring Kyla and Wizkid, became Drake’s first Billboard chart-topping single as the lead artist, spending 10 weeks at No. 1 (and 15 weeks at the same position in the U.K.), while Views sat atop the Billboard 200 for 13 nonconsecutive weeks and became the first album to surpass 1 billion streams on Apple Music. “Controlla” and “Too Good,” featuring Rihanna, also kept Drake’s career sizzling — indicators that this inventive entertainer will continue to stand tall. — Nick Krewen



Sturgill Simpson C

ontrary to popular belief, Sturgill Simpson is not a complete unknown. For devotees of country’s burgeoning underground movement, Simpson has been a bright light over the course of two independent releases: High Top Mountain (2013) and Metamodern Sounds In Country Music (2014). A Sailor’s Guide To Earth, nominated for Album Of The Year and Best Country Album, marks Simpson’s major label debut. Despite this apparent stamp of Music Row approval, Simpson maintained his independence by producing the collection himself. The nine tracks reflect a variety of influences: sweeping orchestral strings on opener “Welcome To Earth (Pollywog)” ease into the slick countrypolitan of “Breakers Roar.” There’s beefy retro soul on “Keep It Between The Lines,” full-bodied country twang on “Sea Stories,” and muscular electric rock on “Brace For Impact (Live A Little)” and “Call To Arms.” All but one song was written by Simpson: an unexpected cover of Nirvana’s “In Bloom.”

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The message is clear: Simpson isn’t interested in debating what is and what is not country. He’s going to do his thing, and if that means covering a Nirvana song or including funk band the Dap-Kings on several tracks, well, welcome to country music’s insurgency. The album’s maritime theme comes from the Kentucky native’s stint in the U.S. Navy. Following his discharge, Simpson wandered around the Pacific Northwest. Eventually he landed in Nashville, Tenn., with its open-mic nights and honky-tonks. That peripatetic background found its way into A Sailor’s Guide ..., whose homesick title character is a metaphor for Simpson when he was on tour for Metamodern Sounds … just as his son was born. “I also wanted [A Sailor’s Guide …] to be something that when my son is older and maybe I’m gone, he can listen to it and get a sense of who I was,” he said. With an Album Of The Year nomination, even more music lovers will get a sense of who Simpson is: a unique, genre-bending talent. — Lisa Zhito

RETO STERCHI

ALBUM OF THE YEAR


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Kelsea Ballerini S

ince her debut studio album, The First Time, was released in 2015, Kelsea Ballerini’s career has blossomed at ferocious speed. Ballerini’s flirty, confident lead single, “Love Me Like You Mean It,” and her third single, the soaring ballad “Peter Pan,” have been certified platinum by the RIAA, while her second single, the playful “Dibs,” earned gold status. All three songs topped Billboard’s Country Airplay chart, making Ballerini the first female country artist to notch three consecutive No. 1 hits from a debut album in nearly 25 years. Meanwhile, the Best New Artist nominee has arguably risen to the forefront of the latest crop of female artists hoping to break through at country radio. The 23-year-old Tennessee native began penning songs while still a teenager. By age 20, Ballerini had signed publishing and recording deals, setting up a whirlwind of radio success, touring and awards. In 2015 Ballerini was honored with the Rising Star award at Billboard’s annual Women in Music event. The accolades continued

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in 2016, as Ballerini was named the Academy of Country Music’s New Female Vocalist of the Year, and earned Country Music Association Award nominations for New Artist of the Year and Female Vocalist of the Year. Also in 2016, the vivacious entertainer served as co-host and performer on ABC’s music series “Greatest Hits,” and launched her inaugural headlining tour. Ballerini, who wrote or co-wrote all 12 tracks on her debut project, remains a songwriter at heart. Her songs are built on a bedrock of astute and confessional lyrics embedded within enticing pop melodies. The enthusiasm and resilience of youth drive the album, thriving amid trials of an uncommitted boyfriend (“XO”), parents divorcing (“Secondhand Smoke”) and rejection (“Square Pegs,” “Stilettos”). Ballerini’s songwriting, combined with her effervescent girl-nextdoor persona, has quickly won the hearts of music fans. As country’s newest golden girl readies her next album, those fans can only hope the second time will be as glorious as the first. — Jessica Nicholson

GUERI N BLASK

BEST NEW ARTIST



The Chainsmokers S

ince forming in 2012, indie electro-dance duo the Chainsmokers have enjoyed a meteoric rise to become among the country’s hottest acts, earning three Top 10 singles in 2016 alone and setting the record for most No. 1s on Billboard’s Hot Dance/Electronic Songs chart. Now the duo — comprising Andrew Taggart and Alex Pall — is nominated for three 59th GRAMMY Awards: Best Dance Recording for their smash “Don’t Let Me Down” (with singer Daya) and Best Pop/Duo Performance for the bittersweet “Closer” (with singer Halsey) as well as Best New Artist. Not bad for a couple of years’ work. In that short time, the New York-based Chainsmokers have evolved from the “frat-boy” aesthetic of their debut novelty hit, 2014’s “#Selfie,” to become one of the freshest creators of massappeal melodic pop. Taggart, as producer, songwriter and singer, and Pall, as DJ and sound designer, started out by creating remixes of their favorite indie bands, attracting millions of streams on

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YouTube. When “#Selfie” hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot Dance/ Electronic Songs chart, selling more than 1 million copies, the video — with cameos by Snoop Dogg and David Hasselhoff — garnered nearly a half-billion views. Their biggest hit to date is the more intimate “Closer,” a poignant duet between Taggart and Halsey, which became one of the top singles of summer 2016. No. 1 in the United States for 12 consecutive weeks and a huge hit internationally, the song has even been dubbed “Don Henley’s ‘The Boys Of Summer’ for the age of Snapchat” by Slate. “Closer” was the pair’s third Top 10 single, each charting higher than the last: “Roses” went to No. 6 in February 2016 and “Don’t Let Me Down” peaked at No. 3 in July. Although the Chainsmokers have redefined themselves a few times already in their short career, their emo vibe, “bro” style and whimsical beats have combined to burn up the charts faster than an addict through a pack of smokes. — John Sutton-Smith

TASO PAPADAKIS

BEST NEW ARTIST


®


Chance The Rapper T

his is my part, nobody else speak.” When Chancelor Bennett uttered those memorable lines as a guest on childhood hero Kanye West’s “Ultralight Beam,” he essentially proclaimed that 2016 belonged to him. He wasn’t lying. Seven GRAMMY nominations, including one for Best New Artist and a nod in every category in the Rap Field, are evidence of Chance The Rapper’s testimony. The 23-year-old has served as a beacon among the harrowing backdrop of a South Side of Chicago recently marred by violence. His presence has become a symbol of hope in his hometown and beyond. After a pair of mixtapes — including 2013’s critically acclaimed Acid Rap and a run as lead vocalist on the Social Experiment’s 2015 album, Surf — Chance and his unmistakable cadence solidified his place as rap’s latest chancellor with the release of the gospel-rap-

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by-proxy Coloring Book in 2016. Led by the celebratory “No Problem” (featuring Lil Wayne and 2 Chainz) and anchored with an ode to Chi-Town’s fallen on “Summer Friends” and the triumphant “How Great,” Coloring Book was acclaimed as a scintillating exercise in joyful harmonies — a celebration of life, love and blessings. Chance’s 14-track sermon is the first streaming-only album to chart on the Billboard 200 and earn a GRAMMY nomination. Considering he refuses to tie himself down to a record label, his accomplishments are all the more miraculous. With his 2016 including a tribute performance in honor of Muhammad Ali at the ESPY Awards, a meeting with President Barack Obama and leading a parade of young voters through his hometown to voting booths on Election Day, Chance’s triumphant year could leave anyone speechless. — Andreas Hale

ZOE RAIN

BEST NEW ARTIST



Maren Morris S

anctuary is where you find it. And for rising country powerhouse Maren Morris, sweet, soul-nurturing sanctuary might not be found in any particular house of worship, but in the driver’s seat of a moving car with a well-tuned FM radio turned up loud. That’s the vision of redemption Morris presents in “My Church,” the lead single from her major label debut album, Hero, which beautifully captures the simple, transformative pleasure found in the combination of a revving engine, a moment of selfreflection and a favorite tune cranked at high volume. In “My Church,” Morris sings of finding solace and inspiration in the music of Hank Williams and Johnny Cash. Fittingly, the Nashville, Tenn.-based artist’s music offers some of the same satisfaction of classic country, albeit with some modern twists. Morris sings of love and hope, loneliness and heartache, and drinking and regret. But

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her songs shatter genre conventions, mixing old-school musicianship and soulful vibes with a gleaming pop sheen. (Morris co-produced Hero with busbee, Ian Fitchuk, Brad Hill, and Brett Tyler). And while a tint of Texas-born twang in her vocals helps root Morris in country tradition, her humor, self-assuredness, openheartedness, and plainspoken approach all work to create a new standard for what a female country star is supposed to sound like. Morris arrives as a multiple first-time GRAMMY nominee — she’s also up for Best Country Album, Best Country Song and Best Country Solo Performance. As a vocalist and songwriter, she has already proven herself to be distinctive and compelling, and while she’s willing to genuflect before the altar of country music’s past, she just may be forging the sound of the genre’s future. We can only hope that as Morris speeds ahead she lets us ride shotgun. — Chuck Crisafulli

J OH N SH EARER

BEST NEW ARTIST


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Anderson .Paak T

he cover of Anderson .Paak’s 2016 album, Malibu, features an illustration of the singer/rapper/songwriter washing ashore while seated at a piano. The tripped-out portrait could serve as a metaphor for .Paak’s career. For years, the multiinstrumentalist drifted like flotsam on the West Coast music scene, eventually grabbing the attention of hip-hop heavy hitter Dr. Dre, who featured .Paak on Compton, his 2015 GRAMMY-nominated album. Then came Malibu and suddenly .Paak was hailed as a solo artist in his own right, packing all the incendiary potential of a beached warhead. And for good reason. Featuring an impressive cast of alt-rap artists, including Talib Kweli and ScHoolboy Q, production by the likes of 9th Wonder and Madlib, among others, and GRAMMY winners Pino Palladino and Robert Glasper on bass and keys, respectively, Malibu veritably baptizes listeners in a bracing tide of old-school funk, vaporous soul-jazz and well-tempered rap. Fueled by the infectious singles “Come Down” and “The Season/Carry Me,” Malibu penetrated the Top 5 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart

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while landing on many best-of 2016 lists, including Pitchfork, Stereogum and NME, and receiving a GRAMMY nomination for Best Urban Contemporary Album. Born and raised in Oxnard, Calif., .Paak’s career extends back to 2009 when he began guest performing on a plethora of indie rap records. In 2012 he issued debut recordings under the alias Breezy Lovejoy, including O.B.E. Vol. 1 and Lovejoy, before releasing his first solo recording as Anderson .Paak, the acclaimed Venice, in 2014. As if his appearance on Dre’s Compton wasn’t impressive enough, in 2016 .Paak notched a distinguished list of collaborations, including appearances on albums by artists such as BJ The Chicago Kid, Mac Miller and A Tribe Called Quest. The year also saw the emergence of NxWorries, a project with producer Knxwledge that birthed their debut studio album, Yes Lawd! It seems that .Paak has appeared on a jillion recordings, yet the singer gives the impression that he’s hardly breaking a sweat. “Don’t I make it look easy,” he crows on the pungently funky “Come Down.” Yes you do, Mr. .Paak. You most certainly do. — Bruce Britt

JABARI JACOBS

BEST NEW ARTIST


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Song Year

“FORMATION” Khalif Brown, Asheton Hogan, Beyoncé Knowles & Michael L. Williams II, songwriters Beyoncé, artist Lest anyone assume today’s songs don’t pack a powerful cultural punch, look no further than “Formation” to dispel that myth. Crystallizing the intensifying racial divisions in America, Beyoncé and her co-writing team crafted a compellingly authentic statement of black pride and preservation. Accompanied by a video that generated more than 7 million views in one day, the song did what great art often does: it empowered and outraged people. Many criticized it as condemning police, about which Beyoncé stated to

Michael L. Williams II

PRINC E WIL L IAMS/ WIREI MAG E .CO M

Beyoncé

COURTE SY O F PAR KWO O D ENTERTAINME NT

Asheton Hogan

DIWANG VAL D E Z O F MOTION FAMILY

Khalif Brown

BENNE TT RAG L IN/B E T/ GETTY IMAG E S

OF THE

Elle: “I think the most powerful art is usually misunderstood. But anyone who perceives my message as anti-police is completely mistaken. … I am against police brutality and injustice. … If celebrating my roots and culture during Black History Month made anyone uncomfortable, those feelings were there long before a video and long before me. I’m proud of what we created and I’m proud to be a part of a conversation that is pushing things forward in a positive way.” Despite the controversy, she remained resolute in her conviction of the song’s positive impact. “I hope I can create art that helps people heal,” she said. “Art that makes people feel proud of their struggle. Everyone experiences pain, but sometimes you need to be uncomfortable to transform. Pain is not pretty, but I wasn’t able to hold my daughter in my arms until I experienced the pain of childbirth!”

“HELLO”

Greg Kurstin

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LINDSEY BY RNES

Adele

SIMON EMMETT

Adele Adkins & Greg Kurstin, songwriters

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Adele, artist “Hello” is pure Adele, remarkably powerful and vulnerable all at once. Though she’s long past the “rubbish” romance that inspired many of her early songs, this time around Adele channeled other ghosts from her past to color the songs on her Album Of The Year-nominated 25. “We were happy at the time, but I tend to go for moody chords, and Adele’s voice invokes so much emotion,” says co-writer Greg Kurstin. That emotion, attached to the soaring “Hello from the other side” refrain, was so chilling that both songwriters recognized it instantly. “I started playing piano chords,” says Kurstin. “And Adele sang different ideas until we landed on what became the verse. I improvised while she thought of ideas on the spot.” With regard to marrying the contrasting feelings of loss and triumph, Kurstin adds, “I was trying to find a balance, and with the verse production being what it was, the chorus ended up quite uplifting.” That strident sound of Adele belting out the dark but exultant chorus in full voice, as only she can, was there from the start, but with a slight key alteration. “Adele sang the chorus out while we wrote it, as it is on the record,” he says. “It was originally in F-sharp minor but we took it down to F minor. I like the darker sound that it became after doing that.”


The prescription for “I Took A Pill In Ibiza” was filled when a friend challenged Mike Posner to write something true. “I told him I made up my songs,” says Posner, “and he said, ‘Why don’t you just tell the truth?’ I didn’t have an answer. I got on an airplane and on the flight I wrote the song. It was my slow answer to that question, my first attempt at telling the truth in a song.” On the plane Posner wrote the melody and words, casing out the chords later. “I explicitly do not try to make songs relatable,” he says. “I would rather write something that is real to me. No one who is listening to the song has taken a pill in Ibiza in front of Avicii. I’ve come to understand that the more specific a song is, the more universal it becomes.” Though titled for the first line, “I Took …” encompasses several stories. “One is of me in my hometown,” says Posner. “Fans asked me how to make it and I told them you don’t want to be high like me.” Unlike many modern-day songs, which are recorded immediately, Posner performed the song on the road for more than a year before recording it, which allowed him to shape it gradually. “I knew it was a special one,” he says. “Playing it live was great. By the end of the song, [the audience] would be singing the chorus with me.”

Hinged on a self-referential line that evokes the infamous “You probably think this song is about you” lyric from Carly Simon’s “You’re So Vain,” Justin Bieber distances himself in “Love Yourself ” from the song itself: “I didn’t wanna write a song/’Cause I didn’t want anyone thinking I still care.” “Love Yourself ” was cowritten with Ed Sheeran and Benjamin Levin aka Benny Blanco, and enhanced by Sheeran’s organically fluid phrasing. “I think [Sheeran is] one of the most talented writers in the game

Stefan Forrest

“7 YEARS” Lukas Forchhammer, Stefan Forrest, Morten Pilegaard & Morten Ristorp, songwriters Lukas Graham, artist A rare song with lyrics that span decades in the singer’s life, “7 Years” reflects backward to the past and forward to the unrealized future. The song came to life when bandmate Morten Ristorp played a repeating riff on a “cheapo keyboard,” inspiring frontman Lukas Forchhammer to run to the microphone. The first words that emerged were: “When I was 7 years old.” Recognizing a spark, Forchhammer started writing. “I kept writing more about ages — 7, 11, 20. Then we passed the age we were and went on to 30 and 60.” To refine the lyric, Forchhammer turned to producer/songwriter

B E N WAT TS

PE T E R YANG

Justin Bieber, artist

Lukas Forchhammer

FAIT H SILVA

right now,” Bieber told Capital FM. Although the title implies self-affirmation, it’s actually a condemnation of those so consumed with self-love that they’re incapable of loving another. During an interview with Ryan Seacrest, Bieber expounded on the song’s subject: “It’s definitely about someone in my past, someone who I don’t want to put on blast. It’s cool because so many people can resonate with that, because how many women do we bring back that mom doesn’t really necessarily like?” Though Purpose has been heralded as the maturation of Bieber as an artist, the stark arrangement of “Love Yourself ” represents a return of sorts to his roots. “It’s just me and a guitar. Basically that’s how I started, playing on the street with a guitar.”

Justin Bieber, Benjamin Levin & Ed Sheeran, songwriters

MAGNUS LARSSON

Mike Posner, artist

“LOVE YOURSELF”

Ed Sheeran

JACQUES LORCH

Mike Posner, songwriter

Benjamin Levin

MAGNUS LARSSON

“I TOOK A PILL IN IBIZA”

Justin Bieber

DANNY CLINCH

ME R E D IT H T RAUX

Mike Posner

Morten Pilegaard

Morten Ristorp

Stefan Forrest for input. “I was jamming on the song,” says Forchhammer, “and Stefan was egging me on. When we write together, songs become more complete.” Sound designer Morten Pilegaard, who Forchhammer refers to as “a good finisher,” adjusted the sonics. A team of collaborators is indicative of Forchhammer’s allinclusive mantra. “It’s very much a group effort. We all contribute our special touch to the music and give credit to anyone who can enhance the music.” As for his proclivity for profuse rhyming, Forchhammer says, “I started writing rap music when I was in my teens. So when I improvise melodies, the rap rhymes come easily.” Forchhammer admits that hearing the news of the group’s GRAMMY nominations “was unfathomable. Only 11 people in Danish history have been nominated for a GRAMMY. And now we’re nominated for three.” — Paul Zollo

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

53


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Nominations

For recordings released during the Eligibility Year Oct. 1, 2015, through Sept. 30, 2016. Note: More or less than 5 nominations in a category is the result of ties.

General Field

1

Record Of The Year Award to the Artist and to the Producer(s), Recording Engineer(s) and/or Mixer(s) and Mastering Engineer(s), if other than the Artist.

HELLO Adele Track from: 25 Greg Kurstin, producer; Julian Burg, Tom Elmhirst, Emile Haynie, Greg Kurstin, Liam Nolan, Alex Pasco & Joe Visciano, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne & Randy Merrill, mastering engineers [XL Recordings/Columbia Records]

FORMATION Beyoncé Track from: Lemonade Beyoncé Knowles, Mike Will Made-It & Pluss, producers; Jaycen Joshua & Stuart White, engineers/mixers; Dave Kutch, mastering engineer [Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records]

7 YEARS Lukas Graham Track from: Lukas Graham Future Animals & Pilo, producers; Delbert Bowers, Sebastian Fogh, Stefan Forrest & David LaBrel, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer [Warner Bros. Records]

WORK Rihanna Featuring Drake Boi-1da, producer; Noel “Gadget” Campbell, Kuk Harrell, Manny Marroquin, Noah “40” Shebib & Marcos Tovar, engineers/ mixers; Chris Gehringer, mastering engineer [Westbury Road Entertainment]

STRESSED OUT Twenty One Pilots Track from: Blurryface Mike Elizondo & Tyler Joseph, producers; Neal Avron & Adam Hawkins, engineers/mixers; Chris Gehringer, mastering engineer [Fueled By Ramen] 56

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

2

Album Of The Year Award to the Artist(s) and to the Album Producer(s), Recording Engineer(s) and/or Mixer(s) and Mastering Engineer(s), if other than the Artist.

25 Adele Danger Mouse, Samuel Dixon, Paul Epworth, Greg Kurstin, Max Martin, Ariel Rechtshaid, Shellback, The Smeezingtons & Ryan Tedder, producers; Julian Burg, Austen Jux Chandler, Cameron Craig, Samuel Dixon, Tom Elmhirst, Declan Gaffney, Serban Ghenea, John Hanes, Emile Haynie, Jan Holzner, Michael Ilbert, Chris Kasych, Greg Kurstin, Charles Moniz, Liam Nolan, Alex Pasco, Mike Piersante, Ariel Rechtshaid, Rich Rich, Dave Schiffman, Joe Visciano & Matt Wiggins, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne & Randy Merrill, mastering engineers [XL Recordings/Columbia Records]

LEMONADE Beyoncé James Blake, Kendrick Lamar, The Weeknd & Jack White, featured artists; Vincent Berry II, Ben Billions, James Blake, BOOTS, Jonny Coffer, Dannyboystyles, Michael Dean, Alex Delicata, Diplo, Derek Dixie, Kevin Garrett, Diana Gordon, HazeBanga, Hit-Boy, Just Blaze, King Henry, Beyoncé Knowles, Ezra Koenig, Jeremy McDonald, MeLo-X, Mike Will Made-It, Pluss, Jack White & Malik Yusef, producers; Mike Dean, Jaycen Joshua, Greg Koller, Tony Maserati, Lester Mendoza, Vance Powell, Joshua V. Smith & Stuart White, engineers/mixers; Dave Kutch, mastering engineer [Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records]

PURPOSE Justin Bieber Big Sean, Diplo, Halsey, Travis Scott & Skrillex, featured artists; The Audibles, Axident, Justin Bieber, Big Taste, Benny Blanco, Blood, Jason “Poo Bear” Boyd, Scott “Scooter” Braun, Mike Dean, Diplo, Gladius, Josh Gudwin, Nico Hartikainen, Mark “The Mogul” Jackson, Steve James, Ian Kirkpatrick, Maejor, MdL, Skrillex, Jeremy Snyder & @ S O U N D Z, producers; Simon Cohen, Diplo, Mark “Exit” Goodchild, Josh Gudwin, Jaycen Joshua,

Manny Marroquin, Chris “Tek” O’Ryan, Johannes Raassina, Gregg Rominiecki, Chris Sclafani, Bart Schoudel, Skrillex, Dylan William & Andrew Wuepper, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne & Randy Merrill, mastering engineers [Def Jam Recordings]

VIEWS Drake dvsn, Future, Kyla, PARTYNEXTDOOR, Rihanna & Wizkid, featured artists; Brian AlexanderMorgan, Axlfoliethc, Beat Bully, Boi-1Da, Cardo, Dwayne “Supa Dups” Chin-Quee, Daxz, DJ Dahi, Frank Dukes, Maneesh, Murda Beatz, Nineteen85, Ricci Riera, Allen Ritter, Noah “40” Shebib, Southside, Sevn Thomas, Jordan Ullman, Kanye West, Wizkid & Young Exclusive, producers; Noel Cadastre, Noel “Gadget” Campbell, Seth Firkins, David “Prep” Bijan Hughes & Noah “40” Shebib, engineers/mixers; Chris Athens, mastering engineer [Young Money/Cash Money/Republic Records]

A SAILOR’S GUIDE TO EARTH Sturgill Simpson Sturgill Simpson, producer; Geoff Allan, David Ferguson & Sean Sullivan, engineers/ mixers; Gavin Lurssen, mastering engineer [Atlantic]

3

Song Of The Year A Songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

FORMATION Khalif Brown, Asheton Hogan, Beyoncé Knowles & Michael L. Williams II, songwriters (Beyoncé) Track from: Lemonade [Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records; Publishers: WB Music Corp./Sounds From Eardrummers LLC/Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp/Oakland 13 Music]


We Applaud

THIS YEAR’S GRAMMY® AWARD WINNERS & NOMINEES

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Nominations HELLO Adele Adkins & Greg Kurstin, songwriters (Adele) Track from: 25 [XL Recordings/Columbia Records; Publishers: Universal – Songs of Polygram Int’l Inc./EMI April Music Inc./Kurstin Music]

Pop

5

Track from: Blurryface [Fueled By Ramen]

Best Pop Solo Performance

7

I TOOK A PILL IN IBIZA Mike Posner, songwriter (Mike Posner)

For new vocal or instrumental pop recordings. Singles or Tracks only.

[Island; Publishers: North Greenway Productions/ SonyATV Tunes LLC]

HELLO Adele

LOVE YOURSELF Justin Bieber, Benjamin Levin & Ed Sheeran, songwriters (Justin Bieber)

Track from: 25 [XL Recordings/Columbia Records]

HOLD UP Beyoncé

[Def Jam Recordings; Publishers: Songs Of Universal Inc. o/b/o Please Don’t Forget To Pay Me Music/Universal Music Corp. o/b/o Bieber Time Publishing/SonyATV Songs LLC]

[Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records]

7 YEARS Lukas Forchhammer, Stefan Forrest, Morten Pilegaard & Morten Ristorp, songwriters (Lukas Graham)

[Def Jam Recordings]

Track from: Lukas Graham [Warner Bros. Records; Publishers: WB Music Corp o/b/o Lukas Graham Songs/WB Music Corp o/b/o Stefpublishing & Halla!Halla! Publishing/ Then We Take The World/Westside Independent Music Publishing o/b/o Thou Art the Hunger/Late 80’s Music/F*** YOU DAVE]

4

Best New Artist An Artist will be considered for Best New Artist if their eligibility year release(s) achieved a breakthrough into the public consciousness and notably impacted the musical landscape.

LOVE YOURSELF Justin Bieber PIECE BY PIECE (IDOL VERSION) Kelly Clarkson [RCA Records/19 Recordings Limited]

DANGEROUS WOMAN Ariana Grande [Republic Records]

6

CINEMA Andrea Bocelli [Sugar Music/Verve]

FALLEN ANGELS Bob Dylan [Columbia Records]

STAGES LIVE Josh Groban [Reprise]

SUMMERTIME: WILLIE NELSON SINGS GERSHWIN Willie Nelson [Legacy Recordings]

ENCORE: MOVIE PARTNERS SING BROADWAY Barbra Streisand

For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative pop recordings. Singles or Tracks only.

Best Pop Vocal Album

KELSEA BALLERINI THE CHAINSMOKERS

[Disruptor Records/Columbia]

CHANCE THE RAPPER

7 YEARS Lukas Graham

MAREN MORRIS

Track from: Lukas Graham [Warner Bros. Records]

WORK Rihanna Featuring Drake CHEAP THRILLS Sia Featuring Sean Paul [RCA Records/Monkey Puzzle Records]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new traditional pop recordings.

[Columbia Records]

[Westbury Road Entertainment]

58

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

Best Pop Duo/ Group Performance

CLOSER The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey

ANDERSON .PAAK

STRESSED OUT Twenty One Pilots

8

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal pop recordings.

25 Adele [XL Recordings/Columbia Records]

PURPOSE Justin Bieber [Def Jam Recordings]

DANGEROUS WOMAN Ariana Grande [Republic]

CONFIDENT Demi Lovato [Hollywood Records/Island Records]



Nominations THIS IS ACTING Sia

EPOCH Tycho

[RCA Records/Monkey Puzzle Records]

[Ghostly International]

Dance/ Electronic Music

BARBARA BARBARA, WE FACE A SHINING FUTURE Underworld

9

Best Dance Recording For solo, duo, group or collaborative performances. Vocal or instrumental. Singles or Tracks only.

TEARING ME UP Bob Moses Track from: Days Gone By Bob Moses, producers; Mark “Spike” Stent, mixer [Domino Recording Co. Ltd.]

12

Best Rock Performance

[Astralwerks]

For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/ group or collaborative rock recordings.

LOUIE VEGA STARRING...XXVIII Louie Vega

JOE (LIVE FROM AUSTIN CITY LIMITS) Alabama Shakes

[Vega Records]

Contemporary Instrumental Music

11

[ATO Records]

DON’T HURT YOURSELF Beyoncé Featuring Jack White Track from: Lemonade [Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records]

BLACKSTAR David Bowie

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album

Track from: Blackstar [ISO/Columbia Records]

Track from: Collage The Chainsmokers, producers; Jordan “DJ Swivel” Young, mixer [Disruptor Records/Columbia]

For albums containing approximately 51% or more playing time of instrumental material. For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

THE SOUND OF SILENCE (LIVE ON CONAN) Disturbed

NEVER BE LIKE YOU Flume Featuring Kai

[Herb Alpert Presents]

DON’T LET ME DOWN The Chainsmokers Featuring Daya

Harley Streten, producer; Eric J Dubowsky, mixer [Mom+Pop Music/Future Classic.]

RINSE & REPEAT Riton Featuring Kah-Lo Riton, producer; Wez Clarke, mixer [Interscope Records]

DRINKEE Sofi Tukker

HUMAN NATURE Herb Alpert WHEN YOU WISH UPON A STAR Bill Frisell [Okeh Records]

WAY BACK HOME: LIVE FROM ROCHESTER, NY Steve Gadd Band [BFM Jazz]

Sofi Tukker, producers; Bryan Wilson, mixer [Ultra Records]

UNSPOKEN Chuck Loeb

10

[Shanachie Entertainment]

Best Dance/ Electronic Album For vocal or instrumental albums. Albums only.

SKIN Flume

CULCHA VULCHA Snarky Puppy [Ground Up Music]

[Reprise]

HEATHENS Twenty One Pilots Track from: Suicide Squad: The Album [Atlantic Records/WaterTower Music]

13

Best Metal Performance For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/group or collaborative metal recordings.

SHOCK ME Baroness Track from: Purple [Abraxan Hymns]

SILVERA Gojira Track from: Magma [Roadrunner Records Inc.]

ROTTING IN VAIN Korn

[Mom+Pop Music/Future Classic.]

[Roadrunner Records Inc.]

ELECTRONICA 1: THE TIME MACHINE Jean-Michel Jarre

DYSTOPIA Megadeth

[Ultra Records]

60

Rock

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Track from: Dystopia [UMe]


Humber College congratulates Larnell Lewis, music alumnus and faculty member, and Snarky Puppy on their Best Contemporary Instrumental Album nomination for Culcha Vulcha.

creativearts.humber.ca


Nominations THE PRICE IS WRONG Periphery

MAGMA Gojira

PERMISSION Ro James

Track from: Periphery III: Select Difficulty [Sumerian]

[Roadrunner Records Inc.]

Track from: Eldorado [ByStorm Entertainment/RCA Records]

14

Best Rock Song A Songwriter(s) award. Includes rock, hard rock and metal songs. For Song Eligibility Guidelines see Category #3. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BLACKSTAR David Bowie, songwriter (David Bowie) Track from: Blackstar [ISO/Columbia Records; Publishers: Nipple Music admin. by RZO Music Inc.]

BURN THE WITCH Radiohead, songwriters (Radiohead) Track from: A Moon Shaped Pool [XL Recordings; Publisher: Warner/Chappell Music Ltd.]

HARDWIRED James Hetfield & Lars Ulrich, songwriters (Metallica)

[DCD2/Fueled By Ramen]

WEEZER Weezer [Crush/Atlantic]

I DO Musiq Soulchild Track from: Life On Earth [My Block Inc./Entertainment One]

NEEDED ME Rihanna

Alternative

[Westbury Road Entertainment/ Roc Nation Records]

16

CRANES IN THE SKY Solange

Best Alternative Music Album

Track from: A Seat At The Table [Saint Records/Columbia Records]

Vocal or instrumental.

22, A MILLION Bon Iver [Jagjaguwar]

BLACKSTAR David Bowie

18 Best Traditional R&B Performance For new vocal or instrumental traditional R&B recordings.

[Blackened Recordings; Publisher: Creeping Death Music]

[Columbia Records]

THE THREE OF ME William Bell

HEATHENS Tyler Joseph, songwriter (Twenty One Pilots)

THE HOPE SIX DEMOLITION PROJECT PJ Harvey

Track from: This Is Where I Live [Stax Records]

[Vagrant]

WOMAN’S WORLD BJ The Chicago Kid

Track from: Suicide Squad: The Album [Atlantic Records/WaterTower Music; Publishers: Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./ Stryker Joseph Music]

MY NAME IS HUMAN Rich Meyer, Ryan Meyer & Johnny Stevens, songwriters (Highly Suspect) [300 Entertainment; Publisher: MCID]

15

Best Rock Album

POST POP DEPRESSION Iggy Pop [Loma Vista Recordings]

A MOON SHAPED POOL Radiohead

R&B

ANGEL Lalah Hathaway

17

Track from: Lalah Hathaway Live [Hathaway Entertainment/Entertainment One]

Best R&B Performance For new vocal or instrumental R&B recordings.

[RCA Records]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

SLEEPING WITH THE ONE I LOVE Fantasia Track from: The Definition Of... [RCA Records/19 Recordings Limited]

CALIFORNIA Blink-182 TELL ME I’M PRETTY Cage The Elephant

Track from: In My Mind [Motown Records]

[XL Recordings]

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rock, hard rock or metal recordings.

[BMG]

62

DEATH OF A BACHELOR Panic! At The Disco

TURNIN’ ME UP BJ The Chicago Kid Track from: In My Mind [Motown Records]

CAN’T WAIT Jill Scott Track from: Woman [Blues Babe Records/Atlantic Records]



Nominations 19

Best R&B Song A Songwriter(s) award. For Song Eligibility Guidelines see Category #3. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

COME AND SEE ME J. Brathwaite, Aubrey Graham & Noah Shebib, songwriters (PARTYNEXTDOOR Featuring Drake) Track from: PARTYNEXTDOOR 3 (P3) [OVO Sound/Warner Bros. Records; Publishers: Party OMO Ltd./Warner Chappell Music/Sandra Gale/EMI Music Publishing/ Mavor & Moses Inc./Kobalt]

20 Best Urban Contemporary Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded contemporary vocal tracks derivative of R&B.

LEMONADE Beyoncé [Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records]

OLOGY Gallant

22

Best Rap Performance For a rap performance. Singles or Tracks only.

NO PROBLEM Chance The Rapper Featuring Lil Wayne & 2 Chainz [Chance The Rapper]

PANDA Desiigner

[Mind Of A Genius Records/Warner Bros. Records]

[Getting Out Our Dreams Inc./ Def Jam Recordings]

WE ARE KING KING

POP STYLE Drake Featuring The Throne

Track from: T R A P S O U L [RCA Records; Publishers: The MeKanics Music/ EMI April Music Inc.]

[KING Creative LLC]

Track from: Views [Cash Money Records/Republic Records]

KISS IT BETTER Jeff Bhasker, Robyn Fenty, John-Nathan Glass & Teddy Sinclair, songwriters (Rihanna)

[OBE/Steel Wool/Art Club/EMPIRE]

Track from: Anti [Westbury Road Entertainment/Roc Nation Records; Publishers: Songs of Universal/Sony/ATV Songs/The Kills Effect/Way Above Music]

[Westbury Road Entertainment/ Roc Nation Records]

EXCHANGE Michael Hernandez & Bryson Tiller, songwriters (Bryson Tiller)

LAKE BY THE OCEAN Hod David & Musze, songwriters (Maxwell) Track from: blackSUMMERS’night [Columbia Records; Publishers: SonyATV Tunes LLC o/b/o Muszewell/EMI April Music Inc. o/b/o itself and Ben Ami Music]

LUV Magnus August Høiberg, Benjamin Levin & Daystar Peterson, songwriters (Tory Lanez) Track from: I Told You [Mad Love/Interscope Records; Publishers: Infinite Stripes/Back Hair Music Publishing admin. by Universal Music Publishing/Please Don’t Forget To Pay Me Music admin. by Universal Music Publishing/Tory Lanez Publishing/Tony Kelly Music/Universal – Songs of PolyGram Int. Inc./ Dub Plate Music Publishers Ltd./Shocking Vibes Music Ltd./Greensleeves Publishing Ltd.]

MALIBU Anderson .Paak ANTI Rihanna

21

[RNG/EMPIRE]

THAT PART ScHoolboy Q Featuring Kanye West Track from: Blank Face LP [Top Dawg Entertainment/Interscope Records]

23

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new R&B recordings.

Best Rap/Sung Performance

IN MY MIND BJ The Chicago Kid [Motown Records]

LALAH HATHAWAY LIVE Lalah Hathaway [Hathaway Entertainment/Entertainment One]

VELVET PORTRAITS Terrace Martin [Sounds Of Crenshaw/Ropeadope]

HEALING SEASON Mint Condition [Mint Condition Music LLC]

[Planet 9]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

ALL THE WAY UP Fat Joe & Remy Ma Featuring French Montana & Infared

Best R&B Album

SMOOVE JONES Mýa

64

Rap

For a solo or collaborative performance containing both elements of R&B melodies and rap.

FREEDOM Beyoncé Featuring Kendrick Lamar Track from: Lemonade [Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records]

HOTLINE BLING Drake Track from: Views [Cash Money Records/Republic Records]

BROCCOLI D.R.A.M. Featuring Lil Yachty [EMPIRE/Atlantic Records]


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Nominations ULTRALIGHT BEAM Kanye West Featuring Chance The Rapper, Kelly Price, Kirk Franklin & The-Dream Track from: The Life Of Pablo [G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam Recordings]

FAMOUS Kanye West Featuring Rihanna [G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam Recordings]

24

Best Rap Song A song must contain music and lyrics and must be either a new song or a song first achieving prominence during the eligibility year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

ALL THE WAY UP Joseph Cartagena, Edward Davadi, Shandel Green, Karim Kharbouch, Andre Christopher Lyon, Reminisce Mackie & Marcello Valenzano, songwriters (Fat Joe & Remy Ma Featuring French Montana & Infared) [RNG/EMPIRE]

FAMOUS Chancelor Bennett, Ross Birchard, Ernest Brown, Andrew Dawson, Kasseem Dean, Mike Dean, Noah Goldstein, Kejuan Muchita, Patrick Reynolds, Kanye West, Cydel Young & Malik Yusef, songwriters (Kanye West Featuring Rihanna) [G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam; Publishers: Please Gimme My Publishing/EMI Blackwood Music Inc./ BMG Platinum Songs/Mr. Redan Music admin. by BMG Rights Management (US) LLC/Juvenile Hell/Universal Music-MGB Songs/Noah Goldstein admin. by Donda Publishing/EMI April Music Inc./ Sound EQ Music/Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./Papa George Music admin. by WarnerTamerlane Publishing Corp./Chancelor Bennett Publishing Designee/Monza Ronza/Universal Tunes/Donda Publishing/EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Warp Publishing/Plain Pat What Up/ Jabriel IZ Myne/Universal Music Corp.]

HOTLINE BLING Aubrey Graham & Paul Jefferies, songwriters (Drake) Track from: Views [Cash Money Records/Republic Records; Publishers: Sandra Gale/EMI Music Publishing/ Nyan King Music Inc./EMI April/Sony ATV]

NO PROBLEM Chancelor Jonathan Bennett, Dwayne Carter, Rachel Cato, Peter Cottontale, Tauheed Epps, Jonathan Hoard, Cam O’bi, Ivan Rosenberg, Conor Szymanski, Lakeithsha Williams & Jaime Woods, songwriters (Chance The Rapper Featuring Lil Wayne & 2 Chainz) [Chance The Rapper; Publishers: Greatauk/Brass Zebra/Chance The Rapper LLC/Warner/Chappell/ Resevoir Media Music/Greenhouse People/ Lifespeak/Rachel Cato]

ULTRALIGHT BEAM Chancelor Bennett, Kasseem Dean, Mike Dean, Kirk Franklin, Noah Goldstein, Samuel Griesemer, Terius Nash, Jerome Potter, Kelly Price, Nico “Donnie Trumpet” Segal, Derek Watkins, Kanye West, Cydel Young & Malik Yusef, songwriters (Kanye West Featuring Chance The Rapper, Kelly Price, Kirk Franklin & The-Dream) Track from: The Life Of Pablo [G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam; Publishers: Please Gimme My Publishing/EMI Blackwood Music Inc./ Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./Papa George Music admin. by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp/For the Write Price admin. by Kobalt Songs Music Publishing/2082 Music Publishing/ WB Music Corp./Universal Music Brentwood Benson Songs/Universal Music Z-Tunes LLC/ Monza Ronza/Universal Tunes/Chancelor Bennett Publishing Designee/Noah Goldstein Music/JLOL ASCAP/Samuel Griesemer Publishing Designee/ BMG Platinum Songs/Mr. Redan Music/ Jabriel IZ Myne/Universal Music Corp.]

25

Best Rap Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rap recordings.

COLORING BOOK Chance The Rapper [Chance The Rapper]

AND THE ANONYMOUS NOBODY De La Soul [A.O.I. Records]

MAJOR KEY DJ Khaled [Epic]

VIEWS Drake [OVO Sound/Young Money/Cash Money/Republic]

66

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

BLANK FACE LP ScHoolboy Q [Top Dawg Entertainment/Interscope Records]

THE LIFE OF PABLO Kanye West [G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam Recordings]

Country

26 Best Country Solo Performance For new vocal or instrumental solo country recordings.

LOVE CAN GO TO HELL Brandy Clark Track from: Big Day In A Small Town [Warner Bros. Records]

VICE Miranda Lambert [Vanner Records/RCA Nashville]

MY CHURCH Maren Morris Track from: Hero [Columbia Nashville]

CHURCH BELLS Carrie Underwood Track from: Storyteller [19 Recordings/Arista Nashville]

BLUE AIN’T YOUR COLOR Keith Urban Track from: Ripcord [Capitol Records Nashville]

27 Best Country Duo/ Group Performance For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative country recordings.

DIFFERENT FOR GIRLS Dierks Bentley Featuring Elle King Track from: Black [Capitol Records Nashville]



Nominations 21 SUMMER Brothers Osborne Track from: Pawn Shop [EMI Records Nashville]

SETTING THE WORLD ON FIRE Kenny Chesney & P!nk [Blue Chair Records/Columbia Nashville]

JOLENE Pentatonix Featuring Dolly Parton [RCA Records]

THINK OF YOU Chris Young With Cassadee Pope Track from: I’m Comin’ Over [RCA Nashville]

MY CHURCH busbee & Maren Morris, songwriters (Maren Morris)

[Warner Bros.]

Track from: Hero [Columbia Nashville; Publishers: International Dog Music/Words & Music/BMG Platinum Songs/BMG Rights Management/Hello I Love You Music]

INNER PASSION Peter Kater & Tina Guo

VICE Miranda Lambert, Shane McAnally & Josh Osborne, songwriters (Miranda Lambert)

ROSETTA Vangelis

[Vanner Records/RCA Nashville; Publishers: SonyATV Tree Publishing/Pink Dog Publishing/ Smack Songs LLC/Kobalt Songs Music Publishing/ Anderson Fork In The Road Music/ Kobalt Music Publishing]

WHITE SUN II White Sun

[Hearts Of Space Records]

[Decca]

[Be Why]

29

Jazz

Best Country Song

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new country recordings.

A Songwriter(s) award. For Song Eligibility Guidelines see Category #3. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

Best Improvised Jazz Solo

BIG DAY IN A SMALL TOWN Brandy Clark

28

BLUE AIN’T YOUR COLOR Clint Lagerberg, Hillary Lindsey & Steven Lee Olsen, songwriters (Keith Urban) Track from: Ripcord [Capitol Records Nashville; Publishers: Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./ Songs of The Corn admin. by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./HillarodyRathbone Music admin. by BMG Rights Management (US) LLC/House Of Sea Gayle Music admin. by ClearBox Rights/Spirit Catalog Holdings, S.a.r.l. admin. by Spirit Two Nashville]

DIE A HAPPY MAN Sean Douglas, Thomas Rhett & Joe Spargur, songwriters (Thomas Rhett) Track from: Tangled Up [The Valory Music Co.; Publishers: EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Cricket On The Line admin. by Sony/ ATV Music Publishing LLC/Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./Eastman Pond Publishing admin. by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./ Music of Big Deal/Nice Life/Brodsky Spensive Publishing admin by Words & Music, a division of Big Deal Music]

HUMBLE AND KIND Lori McKenna, songwriter (Tim McGraw) Track from: Damn Country Music [Big Machine Records; Publishers: Songs of Universal Inc./Hoodie Songs]

Best Country Album

[Warner Bros. Records]

FULL CIRCLE Loretta Lynn [Legacy Recordings]

HERO Maren Morris [Columbia Nashville]

A SAILOR’S GUIDE TO EARTH Sturgill Simpson [Atlantic]

RIPCORD Keith Urban [Capitol Records Nashville]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

31

For an instrumental jazz solo performance. Two equal performers on one recording may be eligible as one entry. If the Soloist listed appears on a recording billed to another Artist, the latter’s name is in parenthesis for identification. Singles or Tracks only.

COUNTDOWN Joey Alexander, soloist Track from: Countdown [Motema Music]

IN MOVEMENT Ravi Coltrane, soloist Track from: In Movement (Jack DeJohnette, Ravi Coltrane & Matthew Garrison) [ECM]

WE SEE Fred Hersch, soloist [Palmetto Records]

New Age

30

Best New Age Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental new age recordings.

OROGEN John Burke [John Burke]

68

DARK SKY ISLAND Enya

I CONCENTRATE ON YOU Brad Mehldau, soloist Track from: Blues And Ballads (Brad Mehldau Trio) [Nonesuch]

I’M SO LONESOME I COULD CRY John Scofield, soloist Track from: Country For Old Men [Impulse!]



Nominations 32

Best Jazz Vocal Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal jazz recordings.

SOUND OF RED René Marie [Motema Music]

UPWARD SPIRAL Branford Marsalis Quartet With Special Guest Kurt Elling [Okeh]

TAKE ME TO THE ALLEY Gregory Porter [Blue Note]

HARLEM ON MY MIND Catherine Russell [Jazz Village]

THE STING VARIATIONS The Tierney Sutton Band [BFM Jazz]

33 Best Jazz Instrumental Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new instrumental jazz recordings.

BOOK OF INTUITION Kenny Barron Trio [Impulse!]

DR. UM Peter Erskine

30 Trio Da Paz

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album

[Zoho]

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new ensemble jazz recordings.

REAL ENEMIES Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society [New Amsterdam Records]

MONK’ESTRA, VOL. 1 John Beasley [Mack Avenue Records]

KALEIDOSCOPE EYES: MUSIC OF THE BEATLES John Daversa [BFM Jazz]

ALL L.A. BAND Bob Mintzer [Fuzzy Music]

PRESIDENTIAL SUITE: EIGHT VARIATIONS ON FREEDOM Ted Nash Big Band [Motema Music]

35

Best Latin Jazz Album For vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material. The intent of this category is to recognize recordings that represent the blending of jazz with Latin, Iberian-American, Brazilian, and Argentinian tango music.

ENTRE COLEGAS Andy González

[Fuzzy Music]

[Truth Revolution Records]

SUNDAY NIGHT AT THE VANGUARD The Fred Hersch Trio

MADERA LATINO: A LATIN JAZZ PERSPECTIVE ON THE MUSIC OF WOODY SHAW Brian Lynch & Various Artists

[Palmetto Records]

NEARNESS Joshua Redman & Brad Mehldau [Nonesuch]

COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN John Scofield [Impulse!]

70

34

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

[Hollistic Musicworks]

CANTO AMÉRICA Michael Spiro/Wayne Wallace La Orquesta Sinfonietta [Patois Records]

TRIBUTE TO IRAKERE: LIVE IN MARCIAC Chucho Valdés [Jazz Village]

Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music

36 Best Gospel Performance/Song This award is given to the Artist(s) and Songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best traditional Christian, roots gospel or contemporary gospel Single or Track.

IT’S ALRIGHT, IT’S OK Shirley Caesar Featuring Anthony Hamilton Stanley Brown & Courtney Rumble, songwriters Track from: Fill This House [Light Records/Entertainment One; Publishers: Stan Brown Music/Courtney Adrianna Rumble]

YOU’RE BIGGER [LIVE] Jekalyn Carr Allundria Carr, songwriter Track from: The Life Project [Live] [LUNJEAL Music Group/Entertainment One; Publisher: ALJELUN Publishing]

MADE A WAY [LIVE] Travis Greene Travis Greene, songwriter Track from: The Hill [Live] [RCA Inspiration; Publisher: Greenelight International]

GOD PROVIDES Tamela Mann Kirk Franklin, songwriter Track from: One Way [TillyMann Music; Publisher: Second Half Music Publishing]

BETTER Hezekiah Walker Jason Clayborn, Gabriel Hatcher & Hezekiah Walker, songwriters Track from: Azusa: The Next Generation 2 — Better [Entertainment One/Azusa; Publishers: JayClay Publishing/Luv-Ki/Phat Chordz Productions]


Album Available Everywhere

A portion of the album proceeds benefit the MusiCares Foundation ® and the GRAMMY Museum Foundation TM — The Recording Academy ®-affiliated charitable organizations focused on music education programs and critical assistance for music people in need.

2017GRAMMYALBUM.COM GRAMMY, GRAMMY Awards and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy and are used under license. pc2017 The Recording Academy.


Nominations 37

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song This award is given to the Artist(s) and Songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best contemporary Christian pop, Christian rap/ hip-hop or Christian rock Single or Track.

Best Gospel Album This award is given to the Artist(s) and any Producer(s) or Engineer(s) responsible for at least 51% playing time of an album containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded vocal, traditional or contemporary/R&B gospel music recordings.

LISTEN Tim Bowman Jr.

TRUST IN YOU Lauren Daigle Lauren Daigle, Michael Farren & Paul Mabury, songwriters

[Lifestyle Music Group/Motown Gospel]

Track from: How Can It Be [Centricity Music; Publishers: CentricSongs/Sony/ ATV Timber Publishing/Integrity’s Alleluia Music/ Farren Love and War Publishing]

[Light Records/Entertainment One]

PRICELESS For King & Country Benjamin Backus, Seth Mosley, Joel Smallbone, Luke Smallbone & Tedd Tjornhom, songwriters

FILL THIS HOUSE Shirley Caesar A WORSHIPPER’S HEART [LIVE] Todd Dulaney [Entertainment One/Worship]

LOSING MY RELIGION Kirk Franklin

LOVE REMAINS Hillary Scott & The Scott Family [EMI Records Nashville]

40

Best Roots Gospel Album This award is given to the Artist(s) and any Producer(s) or Engineer(s) responsible for at least 51% playing time of an album containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded vocal traditional/roots gospel music, including country, Southern gospel, bluegrass, and Americana recordings. (Subject to eligibility criteria.)

BETTER TOGETHER Gaither Vocal Band [Gaither Music Group]

NATURE’S SYMPHONY IN 432 The Isaacs [House Of Isaacs]

HYMNS Joey+Rory

Track from: Run Wild. Live Free. Love Strong. [The Anniversary Edition] [Fervent/Curb Records; Publishers: Warner Tamerlane/Dayspring Music LLC/Kilns Music/ WB Music Corp./Word Music LLC/Method To The Madness/Shankel Songs/CentricSongs/2 Hour Songs/R1WAY Music Publishing/ Wordspring Music LLC]

[Fo Yo Soul Recordings/RCA Records]

KING OF THE WORLD Natalie Grant Natalie Grant, Becca Mizell & Samuel Mizell, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

GOD DON’T NEVER CHANGE: THE SONGS OF BLIND WILLIE JOHNSON (Various Artists)

This award is given to the Artist(s) and any Producer(s) or Engineer(s) responsible for at least 51% playing time of an album containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded vocal contemporary Christian music, including pop, rap/hip-hop or rock recordings. (Subject to eligibility criteria.)

Jeffrey Gaskill, producer [Alligator Records]

Track from: Be One [Curb Records; Publishers: SeeSeeBubba Songs admin. by Music Services/Maxx Melodies/BMG Platinum Songs/Takin It To The Maxx]

THY WILL Hillary Scott & The Scott Family Bernie Herms, Hillary Scott & Emily Weisband, songwriters Track from: Love Remains [EMI Records Nashville; Publishers: W.B.M. Music Corp./EKT Publishing admin. by W.B.M. Music Corp./ WB Music Corp./Thankful For This Music admin. by WB Music Corp./Songs of Universal Inc./G650 Music]

72

38

DEMONSTRATE [LIVE] William Murphy [RCA Inspiration]

39

POETS & SAINTS All Sons & Daughters [Integrity Music]

AMERICAN PRODIGAL Crowder [sixstepsrecords/Sparrow Records]

CHAIN BREAKER Zach Williams Mia Fieldes, Jonathan Smith & Zach Williams, songwriters

BE ONE Natalie Grant

[Essential Records/Provident/Sony Music; Publishers: Anthems of Hope/Upside Down Under/Be Essential Songs/Not Just Another Song Publishing/So Essential Tunes]

YOUTH REVIVAL [LIVE] Hillsong Young & Free

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

[Curb Records]

[Hillsong Music Australia]

[Gaither Music Group/Farmhouse Recordings]

HYMNS AND SONGS OF INSPIRATION Gordon Mote [New Haven Records]

Latin

41

Best Latin Pop Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin pop recordings.

UN BESITO MAS Jesse & Joy [Warner Music Mexico]

ILUSIÓN Gaby Moreno [Metamorfosis/Sony Music US Latin]


CONGRATULATIONS HILLSONG YOUNG & FREE ON YOUR GRAMMY NOMINATION ®


Nominations SIMILARES Laura Pausini

HECHO A MANO Joss Favela

[Warner Music Italia/Warner Music Group]

[Sony Music Latin]

SEGUIR LATIENDO Sanalejo

UN AZTECA EN EL AZTECA, VOL. 1 (EN VIVO) Vicente Fernández

[Marmaz Records]

BUENA VIDA Diego Torres [Sony Music Latin]

42 Best Latin Rock, Urban Or Alternative Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin rock, urban or alternative recordings.

ILEVITABLE iLe [Sony Music Latin]

L.H.O.N. (LA HUMANIDAD O NOSOTROS) Illya Kuryaki & The Valderramas

GENERACIÓN MAQUINARIA EST. 2006. La Maquinaria Norteña [Azteca Records/Fonovisa/UMLE]

TRIBUTO A JOAN SEBASTIAN Y RIGOBERTO ALFARO Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea [East Side Records/Shea Records]

44 Best Tropical Latin Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new tropical Latin recordings.

CONEXIÓN Fonseca

[Sony Music]

[Sony Music Entertainment US Latin LLC]

BUENAVENTURA La Santa Cecilia

LA FANTASIA HOMENAJE A JUAN FORMELL Formell Y Los Van Van

[Universal Music Latin Entertainment]

LOS RAKAS Los Rakas [Universal Music Latino]

AMOR SUPREMO Carla Morrison [Cosmica Records]

43

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new regional Mexican (banda, norteño, corridos, gruperos, mariachi, ranchera, and Tejano) recordings.

RAÍCES Banda El Recodo De Cruz Lizárraga [Fonovisa]

74

[Sony Music Entertainment México]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

American Roots Music

45 Best American Roots Performance For new vocal or instrumental American Roots recordings. This is for performances in the style of any of the subgenres encompassed in the American Roots Music Field, including Americana, bluegrass, blues, folk or regional roots. Award to the Artist(s).

AIN’T NO MAN The Avett Brothers Track from: True Sadness [American Recordings/Republic Records]

MOTHER’S CHILDREN HAVE A HARD TIME Blind Boys Of Alabama Track from: God Don’t Never Change: The Songs Of Blind Willie Johnson [Alligator Records]

FACTORY GIRL Rhiannon Giddens Track from: Factory Girl [Nonesuch Records Inc.]

HOUSE OF MERCY Sarah Jarosz

[EGREM]

Track from: Undercurrent [Sugar Hill Records]

35 ANIVERSARIO Grupo Niche

WRECK YOU Lori McKenna

[Niche Business Enterprises Inc. dba PPM USA]

[CN Records]

LA SONORA SANTANERA EN SU 60 ANIVERSARIO La Sonora Santanera

46

[Sony Music Entertainment México, S.A. De C.V.]

DONDE ESTÁN? Jose Lugo & Guasábara Combo [En Grande Music LLC]

Best American Roots Song A Songwriter(s) award. Includes Americana, bluegrass, traditional blues, contemporary blues, folk or regional roots songs. For Song Eligibility Guidelines see Category #3. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

ALABAMA AT NIGHT Robbie Fulks, songwriter (Robbie Fulks) Track from: Upland Stories [Bloodshot Records; Publisher: Lorne Rall Music]



Nominations CITY LIGHTS Jack White, songwriter (Jack White/The White Stripes) Track from: Jack White Acoustic Recordings 1998–2016 [Columbia/Third Man Records; Publisher: Peppermint Stripe Music]

48

Best Bluegrass Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental bluegrass recordings.

GULFSTREAM Eric Adcock & Roddie Romero, songwriters (Roddie Romero And The Hub City All-Stars)

ORIGINAL TRADITIONAL Blue Highway

Track from: Gulfstream [Octavia Records; Publishers: Grand Bayou Music/ Roddie Romero Music]

BURDEN BEARER Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver

KID SISTER Vince Gill, songwriter (The Time Jumpers) Track from: Kid Sister [Rounder Records; Publishers: Vinny Mae Music admin. by Songs of Kobalt Music Publishing]

WRECK YOU Lori McKenna & Felix McTeigue, songwriters (Lori McKenna) [CN Records; Publishers: Melanie Howard Music Inc./Rusty Muffler Songs admin. by Kobalt Songs Music Publishing]

47

Best Americana Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental Americana recordings.

TRUE SADNESS The Avett Brothers [American Recordings/Republic Records]

THIS IS WHERE I LIVE William Bell [Stax]

THE CEDAR CREEK SESSIONS Kris Kristofferson [KK Records LLC]

THE BIRD & THE RIFLE Lori McKenna [CN Records]

KID SISTER The Time Jumpers [Rounder Records]

[Rounder Records]

[Mountain Home Music Company]

THE HAZEL AND ALICE SESSIONS Laurie Lewis & The Right Hands [Spruce And Maple Music]

NORTH BY SOUTH Claire Lynch [Compass Records]

COMING HOME O’Connor Band With Mark O’Connor [Rounder Records]

49

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Best Contemporary Blues Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental contemporary blues recordings.

THE LAST DAYS OF OAKLAND Fantastic Negrito [Believe Global/Blackball Universe]

LOVE WINS AGAIN Janiva Magness [Blue Élan Records]

BLOODLINE Kenny Neal [Cleopatra Blues]

GIVE IT BACK TO YOU The Record Company [Concord Records]

EVERYBODY WANTS A PIECE Joe Louis Walker [Provogue]

51

Best Traditional Blues Album

Best Folk Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental traditional blues recordings.

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental folk recordings.

CAN’T SHAKE THIS FEELING Lurrie Bell

SILVER SKIES BLUE Judy Collins & Ari Hest

[Delmark Records]

[Wildflower Records/Cleopatra Records]

LIVE AT THE GREEK THEATRE Joe Bonamassa

UPLAND STORIES Robbie Fulks

[J&R Adventures]

[Bloodshot Records]

BLUES & BALLADS (A FOLKSINGER’S SONGBOOK: VOLUMES I & II) Luther Dickinson

FACTORY GIRL Rhiannon Giddens

[New West Records]

THE SOUL OF JIMMIE RODGERS Vasti Jackson [VJM]

PORCUPINE MEAT Bobby Rush [Rounder Records]

76

50

[Nonesuch Records Inc.]

WEIGHTED MIND Sierra Hull [Rounder Records]

UNDERCURRENT Sarah Jarosz [Sugar Hill Records]



Nominations 52 Best Regional Roots Music Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental regional roots music recordings.

BROKEN PROMISED LAND Barry Jean Ancelet & Sam Broussard [Swallow Records]

[Dub Rockers/VP Records]

[87 Music/Hill Kid/Raise Up Music/ Easy Star Records]

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new musical or spoken word recordings that are created and intended specifically for children.

SOJA: LIVE IN VIRGINIA SOJA [ATO Records]

54

E WALEA Kalani Pe’a

Best World Music Album

[Kalani Pe’a Music LLC]

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental world music recordings.

Joshua Caffery & Joel Savoy, producers [Valcour Records]

Reggae

53

Best Reggae Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new reggae recordings.

SLY & ROBBIE PRESENTS... REGGAE FOR HER Devin Di Dakta & J.L [Tuff Gong International/Taxi Records]

ROSE PETALS J Boog [Wash House Music Group]

ZIGGY MARLEY Ziggy Marley [Tuff Gong Worldwide]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

EXPLORER OF THE WORLD Frances England [Frances England Music]

[Canyon Records]

I WANNA SING RIGHT: REDISCOVERING LOMAX IN THE EVANGELINE COUNTRY (Various Artists)

55

Best Children’s Album

World Music

[Octavia Records]

Children’s

FALLING INTO PLACE Rebelution

IT’S A CREE THING Northern Cree

GULFSTREAM Roddie Romero And The Hub City All-Stars

78

EVERLASTING Raging Fyah

DESTINY Celtic Woman [Manhattan Records]

WALKING IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF OUR FATHERS Ladysmith Black Mambazo [Ladysmith Black Mambazo]

SING ME HOME Yo-Yo Ma & The Silk Road Ensemble [Masterworks]

LAND OF GOLD Anoushka Shankar [Deutsche Grammophon]

DOIS AMIGOS, UM SÉCULO DE MÚSICA: MULTISHOW LIVE Caetano Veloso & Gilberto Gil [Nonesuch]

INFINITY PLUS ONE Secret Agent 23 Skidoo [Underground Records]

NOVELTIES Recess Monkey [Recess Monkey]

PRESS PLAY Brady Rymer And The Little Band That Could [Bumblin’ Bee Records]

SADDLE UP The Okee Dokee Brothers [Okee Dokee Music]

Spoken Word

56

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling) THE GIRL WITH THE LOWER BACK TATTOO Amy Schumer [Simon & Schuster Audio]

IN SUCH GOOD COMPANY: ELEVEN YEARS OF LAUGHTER, MAYHEM, AND FUN IN THE SANDBOX Carol Burnett [Penguin Random House Audio]

M TRAIN Patti Smith [Penguin Random House Audio]


THE BIGGEST STARS. ONE PLANET. WINNER! BEST PRODUCTION SHOW – Las Vegas Review-Journal 2016 Readers’ Poll

FEB 8 – 25 MAY 24 – JUNE 11 SEPT 6 – OCT 7

WINNER – “BEST RESIDENT PERFORMER”

JLOVEGAS.COM

MARCH 22 – APRIL 8 | MAY 3 – 20 | AUGUST 11 – SEPTEMBER 2

B r it n ey Pi e c e O f M e. c o m

188 SHOWS - OVER 679,000 TICKETS SOLD OVER $98M GROSS

39 SHOWS - OVER 167,000 TICKETS SOLD OVER $36M GROSS

RESIDENCY BEGINS IN MARCH

RESIDENCY RETURNS IN JULY

#1 THEATRE IN THE UNITED STATES

#1 Theatre in United States: Pollstar 2016 3Q YTD Top 100 Theatre Venues, October 17, 2016


Nominations UNDER THE BIG BLACK SUN: A PERSONAL HISTORY OF L.A. PUNK (JOHN DOE WITH TOM DESAVIA) (Various Artists)

Musical Theater

Music For Visual Media

Tom DeSavia, John Doe, Scott Sherratt & Dan Zitt, producers [Penguin Random House Audio]

58

59

Best Musical Theater Album

UNFAITHFUL MUSIC & DISAPPEARING INK Elvis Costello

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings. Award to the Principle Vocalist(s) and the album Producer(s) of 51% or more playing time of the album. The Lyricist(s) and Composer(s) of a new score are eligible for an award if they have written and/or composed a new score that comprises 51% or more playing time of the album.

[Penguin Random House Audio]

Comedy

57

Best Comedy Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

...AMERICA...GREAT… David Cross [Liberal Jewrun Media Productions]

AMERICAN MYTH Margaret Cho [Clownery Records]

BOYISH GIRL INTERRUPTED Tig Notaro [Secretly Canadian]

LIVE AT THE APOLLO Amy Schumer [Maverick]

TALKING FOR CLAPPING Patton Oswalt [ASpecialThing Records]

BRIGHT STAR Carmen Cusack, principal soloist; Jay Alix, Peter Asher & Una Jackman, producers; Steve Martin, composer; Edie Brickell, composer & lyricist (Original Broadway Cast) [Ghostlight]

THE COLOR PURPLE Danielle Brooks, Cynthia Erivo & Jennifer Hudson, principal soloists; Stephen Bray, Van Dean, Frank Filipetti, Roy Furman, Joan Raffe, Scott Sanders & Jhett Tolentino, producers (Stephen Bray, Brenda Russell & Allee Willis, composers & lyricists) (New Broadway Cast) [Broadway Records]

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF Danny Burstein, principal soloist; Louise Gund, David Lai & Ted Sperling, producers (Jerry Bock, composer; Sheldon Harnick, lyricist) (2016 Broadway Cast) [Broadway Records]

AMY (Various Artists) Salaam Remi & Mark Ronson, compilation producers [Republic Records]

MILES AHEAD (Miles Davis & Various Artists) Steve Berkowitz, Don Cheadle & Robert Glasper, compilation producers [Columbia/Legacy]

STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON (Various Artists) O’Shea Jackson (Ice Cube) & Andre Young (Dr. Dre), compilation producers [Capitol Records/UMe]

SUICIDE SQUAD (COLLECTOR’S EDITION) (Various Artists) Mike Caren, Darren Higman & Kevin Weaver, compilation producers VINYL: THE ESSENTIALS SEASON 1 (Various Artists) Stewart Lerman, Randall Poster & Kevin Weaver, compilation producers

[Masterworks Broadway]

[Atlantic/Warner Bros. Records]

[DMI Soundtracks]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Award to the Artist(s) and/or “in studio” Producer(s) of a majority of the tracks on the album. In the absence of both, award to the one or two individuals proactively responsible for the concept and musical direction of the album and for the selection of artists, songs and producers, as applicable. Award also goes to appropriately credited Music Supervisor(s).

KINKY BOOTS Killian Donnelly & Matt Henry, principal soloists; Sammy James Jr., Cyndi Lauper, Stephen Oremus & William Wittman, producers (Cyndi Lauper, composer & lyricist) (Original West End Cast) WAITRESS Jessie Mueller, principal soloist; Neal Avron, Sara Bareilles & Nadia DiGiallonardo, producers; Sara Bareilles, composer & lyricist (Original Broadway Cast)

80

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media

[Atlantic/WaterTower Music]


s mber e m and cers s, CA), fi f o le he and t Los Ange rk City) s n a ( i ic 7 Yo f Mus ), Local 4 02 (New ir o n o i 8 e L t dera hicago, I nd Local ers on th e F an (C ,a mb ds. meric l 10-208 ville, TN) e our me and awar s A e h h ca T s at work ies. s l o n a u d L t o i e N t f a ( r a o ord an cong ® omin l 257 e rec ory comp s o Loca proudly AMMY n h w at GR rtists for sign a e 59th s d tho cor tulate ns who re a r g on ia lso c y music a e b W d porte p u s are

AFM musicians who record under our agreement share in the following funds:

The American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada • 1501 Broadway, Suite 600; New York, NY 10036 • www.afm.org


Nominations 60

61

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media

Best Song Written For Visual Media

Award to Composer(s) for an original score created specifically for, or as a companion to, a current legitimate motion picture, television show or series, video games or other visual media.

A Songwriter(s) award. For a song (melody & lyrics) written specifically for a motion picture, television, video game or other visual media, and released for the first time during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BRIDGE OF SPIES Thomas Newman, composer [Hollywood Records]

QUENTIN TARANTINO’S THE HATEFUL EIGHT Ennio Morricone, composer [Decca]

THE REVENANT Alva Noto & Ryuichi Sakamoto, composers [Milan Records]

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS John Williams, composer [Walt Disney Records]

STRANGER THINGS VOLUME 1 Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein, composers [Lakeshore Records]

STRANGER THINGS VOLUME 2 Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein, composers [Lakeshore Records]

CAN’T STOP THE FEELING! Max Martin, Shellback & Justin Timberlake, songwriters (Justin Timberlake, Anna Kendrick, Gwen Stefani, James Corden, Zooey Deschanel, Walt Dohrn, Ron Funches, Caroline Hjelt, Aino Jawo, Christopher Mintz-Plasse & Kunal Nayyar) Track from: Trolls [Villa40/RCA Records; Publishers: Tennman Tunes admin. by Universal Music-Z Tunes LLC/ MXM Music admin. by Kobalt Songs Music Publishing Inc./DWA Songs]

HEATHENS Tyler Joseph, songwriter (Twenty One Pilots) Track from: Suicide Squad: The Album [Atlantic/WaterTower Music; Publishers: WarnerTamerlane Publishing Corp./Stryker Joseph Music]

JUST LIKE FIRE Oscar Holter, Max Martin, P!nk & Shellback, songwriters (P!nk) Track from: Alice Through The Looking Glass [RCA Records/Walt Disney Records; Publishers: EMI Blackwood Music Inc./P!nk Inside Publishing/ MXM Music admin. by Kobalt Songs Music Publishing Inc./Wolf Cousins/WB Music Corp. o/b/o Warner/Chappell Music Scandinavia/ Lionheart Music/Walt Disney Music Company/ Wonderland Music Company Inc.]

PURPLE LAMBORGHINI Shamann Cooke, Sonny Moore & William Roberts, songwriters (Skrillex & Rick Ross) Track from: Suicide Squad: The Album [Atlantic/WaterTower Music; Publishers: Copaface admin. by Kobalt Music/EMI Blackwood Music Inc./4 Blunts Lit At Once/Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp. o/b/o itself/Rich Forever and Close Range Publishing]

TRY EVERYTHING Mikkel S. Eriksen, Sia Furler & Tor Erik Hermansen, songwriters (Shakira) Track from: Zootopia [Walt Disney Records; Publisher: Walt Disney Music Company]

THE VEIL Peter Gabriel, songwriter (Peter Gabriel) Track from: Snowden [Real World Records/Peter Gabriel Ltd.; Publishers: Real World Music Ltd/Sony ATV]

Composing/Arranging

62 Best Instrumental Composition A Composer’s award for an original composition (not an adaptation) first released during the Eligibility Year. Singles or Tracks only.

BRIDGE OF SPIES (END TITLE) Thomas Newman, composer (Thomas Newman) Track from: Bridge Of Spies [Hollywood Records]

THE EXPENSIVE TRAIN SET (AN EPIC SARAHNADE FOR DOUBLE BIG BAND) Tim Davies, composer (Tim Davies Big Band) Track from: The Expensive Trainset [Origin Records]

FLOW Alan Ferber, composer (Alan Ferber Nonet) Track from: Roots & Transitions [Sunnyside Communications Inc.]

L’ULTIMA DILIGENZA DI RED ROCK — VERSIONE INTEGRALE Ennio Morricone, composer (Ennio Morricone) Track from: Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight [Decca Records]

SPOKEN AT MIDNIGHT Ted Nash, composer (Ted Nash Big Band) Track from: Presidential Suite: Eight Variations On Freedom [Motema Music]

82

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards


P R O U D H O M E O F 5 9 T H G R A M M Y AWA R D S

®

C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S

TO ALL OF THIS YEAR’S NOMINEES AND WINNERS


Nominations 63

Best Arrangement, Instrumental Or A Cappella An Arranger’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

ASK ME NOW John Beasley, arranger (John Beasley) Track from: MONK’estra, Vol. 1 [Mack Avenue Records]

GOOD “SWING” WENCESLAS Sammy Nestico, arranger (The Count Basie Orchestra) Track from: A Very Swingin’ Basie Christmas! [Concord Jazz]

LINUS & LUCY Christian Jacob, arranger (The Phil Norman Tentet) Track from: Then & Now: Classic Sounds & Variations Of 12 Jazz Legends [Mama Records]

LUCY IN THE SKY WITH DIAMONDS John Daversa, arranger (John Daversa)

Track from: Kaleidoscope Eyes: Music Of The Beatles [BFM Jazz]

FLINTSTONES Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier) Track from: In My Room [Membran]

SOMEWHERE (DIRTY BLVD) (EXTENDED VERSION) Billy Childs & Larry Klein, arrangers (Lang Lang Featuring Lisa Fischer & Jeffrey Wright) Track from: New York Rhapsody [Sony Classical]

Package

65

Track from: Big Band Holidays [Blue Engine Records]

[Westbury Road Entertainment]

An Arranger’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR? Gordon Goodwin, arranger (Gordon Goodwin’s Big Phat Band Featuring Take 6) Track from: A Big Phat Christmas — Wrap This! [Music Of Content]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

[Warner Music France]

[J.Views]

ANTI (DELUXE EDITION) Robyn Fenty, Roy Nachum & Ciarra Pardo, art directors (Rihanna)

Best Arrangement, Instruments And Vocals

EDITH PIAF 1915–2015 Gérard Lo Monaco, art director (Edith Piaf)

Track from: The Art Of Elegance [Concord Records]

WE THREE KINGS Ted Nash, arranger (Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra With Wynton Marsalis)

64

Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package

401 DAYS Jonathan Dagan & Mathias Høst Normark, art directors (J.Views)

Best Recording Package

Track from: In My Room [Membran]

66

I’M A FOOL TO WANT YOU Alan Broadbent, arranger (Kristin Chenoweth)

Track from: Kaleidoscope Eyes: Music Of The Beatles [BFM Jazz]

YOU AND I Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier)

84

DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET John Daversa, arranger (John Daversa Featuring Renee Olstead)

BLACKSTAR Jonathan Barnbrook, art director (David Bowie) [ISO/Columbia Records]

HUMAN PERFORMANCE Andrew Savage, art director (Parquet Courts) [Rough Trade Records]

I LIKE IT WHEN YOU SLEEP, FOR YOU ARE SO BEAUTIFUL YET SO UNAWARE OF IT (BOX SET) Samuel Burgess-Johnson & Matthew Healy, art directors (The 1975) [Dirty Hit/Interscope]

PAPER WHEELS (DELUXE LIMITED EDITION) Matt Taylor, art director (Trey Anastasio) [ATO Records]

TUG OF WAR (DELUXE EDITION) Simon Earith & James Musgrave, art directors (Paul McCartney) [Concord Records]

Notes

67

Best Album Notes THE COMPLETE MONUMENT & COLUMBIA ALBUMS COLLECTION Mikal Gilmore, album notes writer (Kris Kristofferson) [Legacy Recordings]

SUNSET MOTEL Sarah Dodds & Shauna Dodds, art directors (Reckless Kelly)

THE KNOXVILLE SESSIONS, 1929– 1930: KNOX COUNTY STOMP Ted Olson & Tony Russell, album notes writers (Various Artists)

[No Big Deal Records]

[Bear Family Productions Ltd.]

22, A MILLION Eric Timothy Carlson, art director (Bon Iver)

ORK RECORDS: NEW YORK, NEW YORK Rob Sevier & Ken Shipley, album notes writers (Various Artists)

[Jagjaguwar]

[The Numero Group]



Nominations SISSLE AND BLAKE SING SHUFFLE ALONG Ken Bloom & Richard Carlin, album notes writers (Eubie Blake & Noble Sissle) [Harbinger Records/The Musical Theater Project]

WAXING THE GOSPEL: MASS EVANGELISM & THE PHONOGRAPH, 1890–1900 Richard Martin, album notes writer (Various Artists) [Archeophone Records]

Historical

[Archeophone Records]

Production, Non-Classical

69

68

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical

THE CUTTING EDGE 1965–1966: THE BOOTLEG SERIES, VOL. 12 (COLLECTOR’S EDITION) Steve Berkowitz & Jeff Rosen, compilation producers; Mark Wilder, mastering engineer (Bob Dylan)

An Engineer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

Best Historical Album

[Columbia/Legacy]

MUSIC OF MOROCCO FROM THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS: RECORDED BY PAUL BOWLES, 1959 April G. Ledbetter, Steven Lance Ledbetter, Bill Nowlin & Philip D. Schuyler, compilation producers; Rick Fisher & Michael Graves, mastering engineers (Various Artists) [Dust-To-Digital]

ORK RECORDS: NEW YORK, NEW YORK Rob Sevier & Ken Shipley, compilation producers; Jeff Lipton & Maria Rice, mastering engineers (Various Artists) [The Numero Group]

VLADIMIR HOROWITZ: THE UNRELEASED LIVE RECORDINGS 1966–1983 Bernard Horowitz, Andreas K. Meyer & Robert Russ, compilation producers; Andreas K. Meyer & Jeanne Montalvo, mastering engineers (Vladimir Horowitz) [Sony Classical]

86

WAXING THE GOSPEL: MASS EVANGELISM & THE PHONOGRAPH, 1890–1900 Michael Devecka, Meagan Hennessey & Richard Martin, compilation producers; Michael Devecka, David Giovannoni, Michael Khanchalian & Richard Martin, mastering engineers (Various Artists)

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

ARE YOU SERIOUS Tchad Blake & David Boucher, engineers; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer (Andrew Bird) [Loma Vista Recordings]

BLACKSTAR David Bowie, Tom Elmhirst, Kevin Killen & Tony Visconti, engineers; Joe LaPorta, mastering engineer (David Bowie) [ISO/Columbia Records]

DIG IN DEEP Ryan Freeland, engineer; Kim Rosen, mastering engineer (Bonnie Raitt) [Redwing Records]

HIT N RUN PHASE TWO Booker T., Dylan Dresdow, Chris James, Jamie Lewis, Ben Mühlethaler, Prince, Justin Stanley & Johua Welton, engineers; Dylan Dresdow, mastering engineer (Prince) [NPG Records]

UNDERCURRENT Shani Gandhi & Gary Paczosa, engineers; Paul Blakemore, mastering engineer (Sarah Jarosz) [Sugar Hill Records]

70 Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical A Producer’s award. (Artists names appear in parentheses.)

BENNY BLANCO

• Cold Water (Major Lazer Featuring Justin Bieber And MØ) (S) • Friends (Francis And The Lights Featuring Bon Iver) (S) • Kill Em’ With Kindness (Selena Gomez) (T) • Love Yourself (Justin Bieber) (S) • Luv (Tory Lanez) (S) • Wild Love (Cashmere Cat Featuring The Weeknd & Francis And The Lights) (S)

GREG KURSTIN

• Cheap Thrills (Sia Featuring Sean Paul) (S) • Hello (Adele) (S) • Love You To Death (Tegan And Sara) (A) • Million Years Ago (Adele) (T) • Something In The Way You Move (Ellie Goulding) (T) • Water Under The Bridge (Adele) (T)

MAX MARTIN

• Can’t Stop The Feeling! (Justin Timberlake) (S) • Dangerous Woman (Ariana Grande) (S) • Into You (Ariana Grande) (S) • Just Like Fire (P!nk) (T) • Rise (Katy Perry) (S) • Send My Love (To Your New Lover) (Adele) (S) • Side To Side (Ariana Grande Featuring Nicki Minaj) (T)

NINETEEN85

• For Free (DJ Khaled Featuring Drake) (S) • Hotline Bling (Drake) (S) • Not Nice (PARTYNEXTDOOR) (S) • One Dance (Drake Featuring Wiz Kid & Kyla) (S) • Rising Water (James Vincent McMorrow) (T) • Sept. 5th (dvsn) (A) • Too Good (Drake Featuring Rihanna) (S) • We Move (James Vincent McMorrow) (A)

RICKY REED

• Better (Meghan Trainor Featuring Yo Gotti) (S) • Cruel World (Phantogram) (S) • Girls Talk Boys (5 Seconds Of Summer) (S) • HandClap (Fitz And The Tantrums) (S) • Me Too (Meghan Trainor) (S) • No (Meghan Trainor) (S) • Sober (DJ Snake Featuring JRY) (T) • You Don’t Get Me High Anymore (Phantogram) (S)



Nominations 71

Surround Sound

Production, Classical

Best Remixed Recording

72

73

A Remixer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses for identification.) Singles or Tracks only.

Best Surround Sound Album

Best Engineered Album, Classical

For vocal or instrumental albums in any genre. Must be commercially released on DVDAudio, DVD-Video, SACD, Blu-ray or burned download-only/streaming-only copies, and must provide a new surround mix of four or more channels. Award to the Surround Mix Engineer, Surround Producer (if any) and Surround Mastering Engineer (if any).

An Engineer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

CALI COAST (PSIONICS REMIX) Josh Williams, remixer (Soul Pacific) Track from: Awake [Diso Studios]

HEAVY STAR MOVIN’ (STARRO REMIX) starRo, remixer (The Silver Lake Chorus) Track from: Silver Lake Chorus Remixes [Six Degrees Records]

NINETEEN HUNDRED EIGHTY-FIVE (TIMO MAAS & JAMES TEEJ REMIX) Timo Maas & James Teej, remixers (Paul McCartney & Wings) [Casablanca/Republic Records]

ONLY (KASKADE X LIPLESS REMIX) Kaskade & Lipless, remixers (Ry X) [Loma Vista Recordings]

TEARING ME UP (RAC REMIX) André Allen Anjos, remixer (Bob Moses) [Domino Recording]

WIDE OPEN (JOE GODDARD REMIX) Joe Goddard, remixer (The Chemical Brothers) [Astralwerks]

DUTILLEUX: SUR LE MÊME ACCORD; LES CITATIONS; MYSTÈRE DE L’INSTANT & TIMBRES, ESPACE, MOUVEMENT Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, surround mix engineers; Dmitriy Lipay, surround mastering engineer; Dmitriy Lipay, surround producer (Ludovic Morlot & Seattle Symphony) [Seattle Symphony Media]

JOHNSON: CONSIDERING MATTHEW SHEPARD Brad Michel, surround mix engineer; Brad Michel, surround mastering engineer; Robina G. Young, surround producer (Craig Hella Johnson & Conspirare) [Harmonia Mundi]

MAJA S.K. RATKJE: AND SING ... Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer (Maja S.K. Ratkje, Cikada & Oslo Sinfonietta) [2L (Lindberg Lyd)]

PRIMUS & THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY (5.1 SURROUND SOUND EDITION) Les Claypool, surround mix engineer; Stephen Marcussen, surround mastering engineer; Les Claypool, surround producer (Primus) [ATO Records]

REFLECTIONS Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer (Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene) [2L (Lindberg Lyd)]

88

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CORIGLIANO: THE GHOSTS OF VERSAILLES Mark Donahue, Fred Vogler & David L Williams, engineers (James Conlon, Guanqun Yu, Joshua Guerrero, Patricia Racette, Christopher Maltman, Lucy Schaufer, Lucas Meachem, LA Opera Chorus & Orchestra) [Pentatone Music]

DUTILLEUX: SUR LE MÊME ACCORD; LES CITATIONS; MYSTÈRE DE L’INSTANT & TIMBRES, ESPACE, MOUVEMENT Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, engineers (Ludovic Morlot & Seattle Symphony) [Seattle Symphony Media]

REFLECTIONS Morten Lindberg, engineer (Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene) [2L (Lindberg Lyd)]

SHADOW OF SIRIUS Silas Brown & David Frost, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (Jerry F. Junkin & The University Of Texas Wind Ensemble) [Naxos]

SHOSTAKOVICH: UNDER STALIN’S SHADOW — SYMPHONIES NOS. 5, 8 & 9 Shawn Murphy & Nick Squire, engineers; Tim Martyn, mastering engineer (Andris Nelsons & Boston Symphony Orchestra) [Deutsche Grammophon]


are well see State University es nn Te e dl ars. id M m d faculty fro rs throughout the ye ® nominations and winne Students, alumni, an Y nor rolls of GRAMM presented in the ho

ce n a m r o f r e P d n a g in rd o c e R in e c n e l l e c x E : MTSU re

alum Nominee and 59th GRAMMY

Chris Young, MTSU®

alum, winner, multiple GRAMMY ® Nominee and 59th GRAMMY

Hillary Scott, MTS®U

David McLister

alum, CEO of untry Music, the Academy of Co ® Nominee and 59th GRAMMY

Pete Fisher, MTSU

Joseph Llanes

Sara Kauss

The MTSU Department of Recording Industry recognized among the best in the world MTSU’s Department of Recording Industry has been selected a “Top 25 Music School” by The Hollywood Reporter and Billboard Magazine.

the rding Industry Department of Reco of UMG Nashville and former Senior VP

of Beverly Keel, chair

mtsu.edu

The MTSU School of Music celebrates the achievements of our award-winning faculty artists Lalo Davila is an award-winning performer, instructor, and conductor. His performances can be heard on GRAMMY®nominated recordings, in video games, and on commercials. Davila has composed music for many shows including, Breaking Bad and Burn Notice.

Music professor Cedric Dent is a founding member of GRAMMY®-winning, multi-platinum group Take 6 and was recently added to the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre, and Dance Hall of Fame.

Dr. Cedric Dent, essor School of Music Prof 1216-3726 / Middle Tennessee State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or disability. See our full policy at www.mtsu.edu/titleix.

Lalo Davila, Director Percussion Studies

of


Nominations 74 Producer Of The Year, Classical A Producer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

BLANTON ALSPAUGH

• The Aeolian Organ At Duke University Chapel (Christopher Jacobson) • Bolcom: Canciones De Lorca & Prometheus (René Barbera, Jeffrey Biegel, Carl St. Clair, Pacific Chorale & Pacific Symphony) • Brahms: The Four Symphonies (Leonard Slatkin & Detroit Symphony Orchestra) • Copland: Appalachian Spring Complete Ballet; Hear Ye! Hear Ye! (Leonard Slatkin & Detroit Symphony Orchestra) • Corigliano: The Ghosts Of Versailles (James Conlon, Guanqun Yu, Joshua Guerrero, Patricia Racette, Christopher Maltman, Lucy Schaufer, Lucas Meachem, LA Opera Chorus & Orchestra) • Dvořák: Symphonies Nos. 7 & 8 (Andrés OrozcoEstrada & Houston Symphony) • Dvořák: Symphony No. 6; Slavonic Dances (Andrés Orozoco-Estrada & Houston Symphony) • Floyd: Wuthering Heights (Joseph Mechavich, Heather Buck, Vale Rideout, Susanne Mentzer, Kelly Markgraf, Georgia Jarman, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra & Florentine Opera Company)

DAVID FROST

• Bach: The Cello Suites According To Anna Magdalena (Matt Haimovitz) • Bates: Anthology Of Fantastic Zoology (Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra) • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas, Vol. 5 (Jonathan Biss) • Brahms & Dvořák: Serenades (Boston Symphony Chamber Players) • Fitelberg: Chamber Works (ARC Ensemble) • Ispirare (Melia Watras) • Overtures To Bach (Matt Haimovitz) • Schoenberg: Kol Nidre; Shostakovich: Suite On Verses Of Michelangelo Buonarroti (Ildar Abdrazakov, Alberto Mizrahi, Riccardo Muti, Duain Wolfe, Chicago Symphony Orchestra & Chorus) • Shadow Of Sirius (Jerry F. Junkin & The University Of Texas Wind Ensemble)

MARINA A. LEDIN AND VICTOR LEDIN

• Friedman: Original Piano Compositions (Joseph Banowetz) • Moszkowski: From Foreign Lands (Martin West & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra)

JUDITH SHERMAN

• American First Sonatas (Cecile Licad) • Berlin: This Is The Life! (Rick Benjamin & Paragon Ragtime Orchestra) • Centennial Commissions, Vol. II (Charles Neidich & Pro Arte Quartet) • Gernsheim & Brahms: Piano Quintets (Reiko Uchida & Formosa Quartet) • Latin American & Spanish Masterpieces For Flute & Piano (Stephanie Jutt) • Similar Motion (Momenta Quartet) • Tchaikovsky: Complete Works For Violin & Orchestra (Jennifer Koh, Alexander Vedernikov & Odense Symphony Orchestra) • Tower: String Quartets Nos. 3–5 & Dumbarton Quintet (Miami String Quartet)

ROBINA G. YOUNG

• Johnson: Considering Matthew Shepard (Craig Hella Johnson & Conspirare) • Lutosławski: Concerto For Orchestra; Brahms: Piano Quartet (Miguel Harth-Bedoya & Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra) • Mozart: Keyboard Music, Vols. 8 & 9 (Kristian Bezuidenhout) • Prokofiev: Piano Concertos Nos. 2 & 5 (Vadym Kholodenko, Miguel Harth-Bedoya & Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra) • A Wondrous Mystery — Renaissance Choral Music For Christmas (Stile Antico)

Classical

75 Best Orchestral Performance Award to the Conductor and to the Orchestra.

BATES: WORKS FOR ORCHESTRA Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony) [SFS Media]

IBERT: ORCHESTRAL WORKS Neeme Järvi, conductor (Orchestre De La Suisse Romande) [Chandos]

PROKOFIEV: SYMPHONY NO. 5 IN B-FLAT MAJOR, OP. 100 Mariss Jansons, conductor (Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra) [RCO]

ROUSE: ODNA ZHIZN; SYMPHONIES 3 & 4; PROSPERO’S ROOMS Alan Gilbert, conductor (New York Philharmonic) [Dacapo Records]

SHOSTAKOVICH: UNDER STALIN’S SHADOW — SYMPHONIES NOS. 5, 8 & 9 Andris Nelsons, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra) [Deutsche Grammophon]

76

Best Opera Recording Award to the Conductor, Album Producer(s) and Principal Soloists.

CORIGLIANO: THE GHOSTS OF VERSAILLES James Conlon, conductor; Joshua Guerrero, Christopher Maltman, Lucas Meachem, Patricia Racette, Lucy Schaufer & Guanqun Yu; Blanton Alspaugh, producer (LA Opera Orchestra; LA Opera Chorus) [Pentatone Music]

HANDEL: GIULIO CESARE Giovanni Antonini, conductor; Cecilia Bartoli, Philippe Jaroussky, Andreas Scholl & Anne-Sofie von Otter; Samuel Theis, producer (Il Giardino Armonico) [Decca]

HIGDON: COLD MOUNTAIN Miguel Harth-Bedoya, conductor; Emily Fons, Nathan Gunn, Isabel Leonard & Jay Hunter Morris; Elizabeth Ostrow, producer (The Santa Fe Opera Orchestra; Santa Fe Opera Apprentice Program For Singers) [Pentatone Music]

MOZART: LE NOZZE DI FIGARO Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor; Thomas Hampson, Christiane Karg, Luca Pisaroni & Sonya Yoncheva; Daniel Zalay, producer (Chamber Orchestra Of Europe; Vocalensemble Rastatt) [Deutsche Grammophon]

SZYMANOWSKI: KRÓL ROGER Antonio Pappano, conductor; Georgia Jarman, Mariusz Kwiecień & Saimir Pirgu; Jonathan Allen, producer (Orchestra Of The Royal Opera House; Royal Opera Chorus) [Opus Arte]

90

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards



Nominations 77

Best Choral Performance Award to the Conductor, and to the Choral Director and/or Chorus Master where applicable, and to the Choral Organization/Ensemble.

HIMMELRAND Elisabeth Holte, conductor (Marianne Reidarsdatter Eriksen, Ragnfrid Lie & Matilda Sterby; Inger-Lise Ulsrud; Uranienborg Vokalensemble) [2L (Lindberg Lyd)]

JANÁČEK: GLAGOLITIC MASS Edward Gardner, conductor; Håkon Matti Skrede, chorus master (Susan Bickley, Gábor Bretz, Sara Jakubiak & Stuart Skelton; Thomas Trotter; Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra; Bergen Cathedral Choir, Bergen Philharmonic Choir, Choir Of Collegium Musicum & Edvard Grieg Kor) [Chandos]

LLOYD: BONHOEFFER Donald Nally, conductor (Malavika Godbole, John Grecia, Rebecca Harris & Thomas Mesa; The Crossing) [Albany Records]

PENDERECKI CONDUCTS PENDERECKI, VOLUME 1 Krzysztof Penderecki, conductor; Henryk Wojnarowski, choir director (Nikolay Didenko, Agnieszka Rehlis & Johanna Rusanen; Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra; Warsaw Philharmonic Choir) [Warner Classics]

STEINBERG: PASSION WEEK Steven Fox, conductor (The Clarion Choir) [Naxos]

78

[2L (Lindberg Lyd)]

SERIOUS BUSINESS Spektral Quartet [Sono Luminus]

STEVE REICH Third Coast Percussion [Cedille Records]

TRIOS FROM OUR HOMELANDS Lincoln Trio [Cedille Records]

79 Best Classical Instrumental Solo Award to the Instrumental Soloist(s) and to the Conductor when applicable.

ADAMS, J.: SCHEHERAZADE.2 Leila Josefowicz; David Robertson, conductor (Chester Englander; St. Louis Symphony) [Nonesuch]

DAUGHERTY: TALES OF HEMINGWAY Zuill Bailey; Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor (Nashville Symphony) Track from: Daugherty: Tales Of Hemingway; American Gothic; Once Upon A Castle [Naxos]

DVOŘÁK: VIOLIN CONCERTO & ROMANCE; SUK: FANTASY Christian Tetzlaff; John Storgårds, conductor (Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra) [Ondine]

Best Chamber Music/ Small Ensemble Performance

MOZART: KEYBOARD MUSIC, VOLS. 8 & 9 Kristian Bezuidenhout

For new recordings of works with chamber or small ensemble (24 or fewer members, not including the conductor). One award to the Ensemble and one award to the Conductor, if applicable.

1930’S VIOLIN CONCERTOS, VOL. 2 Gil Shaham; Stéphane Denève, conductor (The Knights & Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra)

FITELBERG: CHAMBER WORKS ARC Ensemble [Chandos] 92

REFLECTIONS Øyvind Gimse, Geir Inge Lotsberg & Trondheimsolistene

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

[Harmonia Mundi]

[Canary Classics]

80 Best Classical Solo Vocal Album Award to the Vocalist(s), Collaborative Artist(s) (Ex.: pianists, conductors, chamber groups), Producer(s), and Recording Engineers/Mixers with 51% or more playing time of new material.

MONTEVERDI Magdalena Kožená; Andrea Marcon, conductor (David Feldman, Michael Feyfar, Jakob Pilgram & Luca Tittoto; La Cetra Barockorchester Basel) [Archiv Produktion]

MOZART: THE WEBER SISTERS Sabine Devieilhe; Raphaël Pichon, conductor (Pygmalion) [Erato]

SCHUMANN & BERG Dorothea Röschmann; Mitsuko Uchida, accompanist [Decca]

SHAKESPEARE SONGS Ian Bostridge; Antonio Pappano, accompanist (Michael Collins, Elizabeth Kenny, Lawrence Power & Adam Walker) [Warner Classics]

VERISMO Anna Netrebko; Antonio Pappano, conductor (Yusif Eyvazov; Coro Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia; Orchestra Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia) [Deutsche Grammophon]

81 Best Classical Compendium Award to the Artist(s) and to the Album Producer(s) and Engineer(s) of over 51% playing time of the album, if other than the artist.

DAUGHERTY: TALES OF HEMINGWAY; AMERICAN GOTHIC; ONCE UPON A CASTLE Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer [Naxos]



Nominations THEOFANIDIS: BASSOON CONCERTO Christopher Theofanidis, composer (Martin Kuuskmann, Barry Jekowsky & Northwest Sinfonia)

UPSIDE DOWN & INSIDE OUT OK Go Damian Kulash Jr. & Trish Sie, video directors; Melissa Murphy & John O’Grady, video producers

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: DISCOVERIES Martyn Brabbins, conductor; Ann McKay, producer

Track from: Bassoon Concertos — Theofanidis, Hummel, Mozart [Estonian Record Productions]

[Paracadute]

[Albion Records]

WINGER: CONVERSATIONS WITH NIJINSKY C. F. Kip Winger, composer (Martin West & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra)

Best Music Film

GESUALDO Tõnu Kaljuste, conductor; Manfred Eicher, producer [ECM New Series]

WOLFGANG: PASSING THROUGH Judith Farmer & Gernot Wolfgang, producers; (Various Artists) [Albany Records]

Track from: Winger: Conversations With Nijinsky [VBI Classic Recordings]

ZAPPA: 200 MOTELS — THE SUITES Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor; Frank Filipetti & Gail Zappa, producers

Music Video/Film

[Universal Music]

82 Best Contemporary Classical Composition A Composer’s award. (For a contemporary classical composition composed within the last 25 years, and released for the first time during the Eligibility Year.) Award to the Librettist, if applicable.

BATES: ANTHOLOGY OF FANTASTIC ZOOLOGY Mason Bates, composer (Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra) [CSO Resound]

DAUGHERTY: TALES OF HEMINGWAY Michael Daugherty, composer (Zuill Bailey, Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony) Track from: Daugherty: Tales Of Hemingway; American Gothic; Once Upon A Castle [Naxos]

94

83

Best Music Video Award to the Artist, Video Director and Video Producer.

FORMATION Beyoncé Melina Matsoukas, video director; Candice Dragonas, Juliette Larthe, Nathan Scherrer & Inga Veronique, video producers

For concert/performance films or music documentaries. Award to the Artist, Video Director and Video Producer.

I’LL SLEEP WHEN I’M DEAD Steve Aoki Justin Krook, video director; Brent Almond, Matt Colon, David Gelb, Ryan Kavanaugh, Michael Theanne, Happy Walters & Matthew Weaver, video producers [Netflix]

THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK THE TOURING YEARS (The Beatles) Ron Howard, video director; Brian Grazer, Ron Howard, Scott Pascucci & Nigel Sinclair, video producers [Apple Corps Ltd./UMe]

RIVER Leon Bridges Miles Jay, video director; Dennis Beier, Allison Kunzman & Saul Levitz, video producers

LEMONADE Beyoncé Beyoncé Knowles Carter & Kahlil Joseph, video directors; Ed Burke, Steve Pamon, Todd Tourso, Dora Melissa Vargas, Erinn Williams & Beyoncé Knowles Carter, video producers

[Columbia Records]

[Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records]

UP&UP Coldplay Vania Heymann & Gal Muggia, video directors; Candice Dragonas, Juliette Larthe, Nathan Scherrer & Natan Schottenfels, video producers

THE MUSIC OF STRANGERS Yo-Yo Ma & The Silk Road Ensemble Morgan Neville, video director; Caitrin Rogers, video producer

[Parlophone Records/Atlantic]

AMERICAN SATURDAY NIGHT: LIVE FROM THE GRAND OLE OPRY (Various Artists) George J. Flanigen IV, video director; Steve Buchanan, John Burke, Lindsey Clark, Robert Deaton, Pete Fisher & George J. Flanigen IV, video producers

[Parkwood Entertainment/Columbia Records]

HIGDON: COLD MOUNTAIN Jennifer Higdon, composer; Gene Scheer, librettist (Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Jay Hunter Morris, Emily Fons, Isabel Leonard, Nathan Gunn & The Santa Fe Opera)

GOSH Jamie XX Romain Gavras, video director; Iconoclast, video producers

[Pentatone Music]

[Young Turks]

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

84

[Tremolo Productions]

[Grand Ole Opry LLC]


CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NOMINEES ON ONE OF OUR BIGGEST YEARS EVER.

SONY MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT


@RISEUPSLU

WWW.RISEUPSLU.COM


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NOW AVAILABLE!

A Star-Studded Appreciation!

Collected for the first time, A GRAMMY® Salute to Music Legends features the testimonials noted artists and musicians have written to honor The Recording Academy® Special Merit Awards honorees. The honorees featured in A GRAMMY® Salute to Music Legends have made extraordinary contributions to blues, classical, country, R&B, rock, rap, and other forms of music either as performers or behind the scenes as producers, engineers, songwriters, executives, or technical innovators. The collected tributes are sometimes touching, sometimes humorous, and always inspiring. Take a peek inside A GRAMMY® Salute to Music Legends and order your copy at www.backwingstore.com/grammysalute!

®


THE RECORDING ACADEMY ®

Special Merit Awards In addition to the GRAMMY Awards, The Recording Academy presents other notable honors. These awards recognize contributions of significance to the recording field that fall outside the framework of the GRAMMY Awards categories and include the Lifetime Achievement Award, Trustees Award, Technical GRAMMY Award, GRAMMY Legend Award, Music Educator Award, and GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Award. The following pages recognize this year’s Special Merit Awards recipients. A complete list of past recipients is available in The Recording Academy Awards section of GRAMMY.org.

Lifetime Achievement Award

Trustees Award

The Lifetime Achievement Award, established in 1962, is presented by vote of The Recording Academy’s National Trustees to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording.

This Special Merit Award is presented by vote of The Recording Academy’s National Trustees to individuals who have made significant contributions, other than performance, to the field of recording. The Trustees Award was established in 1967.

Technical GRAMMY® Award

GRAMMY Legend Award

Presented by vote of The Recording Academy’s National Trustees, the Technical GRAMMY Award recognizes individuals and companies that have made contributions of outstanding technical significance to the field of recording. The Technical GRAMMY was first awarded in 1994.

This Special Merit Award is presented on occasion by The Recording Academy to individuals or groups for ongoing contributions and influence in the recording field. The GRAMMY Legend Award was inaugurated in 1990.

Music Educator Award™

GRAMMY Hall Of Fame®

Launched in 2013, the Music Educator Award recognizes current educators (kindergarten through college, public and private schools) who have made a significant and lasting contribution to the field of music education and who demonstrate a commitment to the broader cause of maintaining music education in their schools. The recipient is approved by The Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees.

The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Award was established by The Recording Academy’s National Trustees in 1973 to honor recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance that are at least 25 years old. Inductees are selected annually by a special member committee of experts and historians from all branches of the recording arts with final approval by The Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees.

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards 101


LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Shirley Caesar BY KIRK FRANKLIN

102

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES

T

his is my third draft trying to pay tribute to a legend in such a limited space. I have been nervous ever since I was approached to write about this icon; this bar in gospel music, Pastor Shirley Caesar, or the lady we refer to in our gospel family as “Momma Shirley.” This had to be perfect because I know that if I write something that doesn’t represent, I’ll get that early morning call, followed by that after-the-sermon scratchy preacher-sounding voice (that just killed the pulpit) saying, “Son, this is Momma Shirley. You should have tried a fourth time!” This had to include the weight and impact one individual could have, and continues to have, on an entire genre of music. Since gospel music is one of the pillars of American art forms, her shoulders bear most of the burden of the advancement and evolution of the sound of Americana. Do the research. Google the name. Whether it’s the late ’50s with the Caravans, musicals, TV appearances, multiple GRAMMY Awards, the “beans, greens, potatoes, tomatoes” sermon that made her a viral hit with millennials this past Thanksgiving, and countless other awards and inductions along with her star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, when you speak of Shirley Caesar, “put some respek” on her name! We love this woman in our close-knit community of singing believers. She’s our queen, our mother and our hero. She keeps the younger female artists’ dresses at a level below the knee because “it’s appropriate.” She lets me know when I’m gyrating too much onstage during my concerts. She’s our thermometer; she’s the “Governor of the Gospel.” How guilty we are that our forbearers have to patiently wait for moments like this to be reminded in these rare occasions their contribution is the bed of experience we’re honored to rest upon. As we complain about the lack of hot tea in our dressing rooms, or the soundcheck being too early after our first-class flight into a city, we should remind ourselves that legends like Pastor Caesar drank from “colored only” water fountains or wept when their leaders were gunned down in a single decade. How foolish we are. How does she maintain her relevancy decade after decade?

There is no secret … there’s just Shirley. How many praises or trophies could ever be enough to applaud a voice that never gave up and never let go of her faith? A voice that sang of a sweet “Bye And Bye.” I’m so glad she won’t have to wait until then. Her “Bye And Bye” has become her here and now! How sweet. A 10-time GRAMMY winner, Kirk Franklin has four 59th GRAMMY nominations, including Best Gospel Album for 2015’s Losing My Religion. Franklin teamed with Shirley Caesar for “I’m Ready” on the 2003 album Shirley Caesar And Friends.


We proudly congratulate our 59th Annual GRAMMY Award Nominees ®

ALBUM OF THE YEAR

BEST RAP PERFORMANCE

BEST SPOKEN WORD ALBUM

LEMONADE

PANDA

THE GIRL WITH THE LOWER BACK TATTOO

KEVIN GARRETT

DESIIGNER

PURPOSE

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LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Ahmad Jamal BY ROBERT GLASPER

104

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

GILLES PETARD/REDFERNS

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hen I was 12, my mom told the guy at our local record store that I played piano and was starting to play jazz, and so he gave me a copy of Jamal At The Pershing, Volume 2 with Israel Crosby on bass and Vernel Fournier on drums. It was the first tape I ever owned, and the only one for a long time. I was listening to this tape all the time: I rocked it on my Walkman every day. Something about Ahmad’s space and dynamics and how dramatic it was when he played was like watching a movie. I could see things in my head when I listened to it. It was like the soundtrack to my thoughts, and it influenced me more than I even realized at the time. Ahmad’s playing inspired me from the first moment I heard him. He was the first jazz pianist who wasn’t afraid to make your head nod, make you feel good. Without him cats would have had to work harder to get the sound he got. Without him, jazz would be different. Hip-hop would be different too. The unmistakable, undeniable groove of his trio literally sounds like you muted the rapper in a live trio and rapper performance. His music has been part of some of the most seminal moments in hip-hop: J Dilla loved his phrasing, and both “The World Is Yours” by Nas and “Stakes Is High” by De La Soul are samples of Ahmad Jamal tunes. Like hip-hop, Ahmad’s music is a mantra: a prayer that evokes a feeling and healing. That’s why he’s among the most sampled musicians to date. He is one of the only artists who acoustically can make your head nod in the hip-hop-head-nod way without the boom-bap or electric bass — the obvious hip-hop things. Ahmad Jamal has the real aesthetic things that make hip-hop what it is. He showed that mainstream art can be radical and feel good. It’s what I still strive for in my own career. In many ways, Ahmad Jamal is the spirit of our music as much as the sound: the definition of cool. When you’re cool you don’t try to be cool, you just are. You know what you’ve got, what your potential is. Winners forget they’re in the race, they just love to run. Ahmad Jamal laid the foundations for me to be who I am as a musician. He made me understand that I didn’t have to constantly prove myself, or be afraid to make it feel good. One of the dopest

things about him is his restraint. He is a master of technique, but at the same time he is a pioneer of playing less; using space instead of notes. This taught me one of the greatest lessons: that I should have the technique and command of my instrument to do what I want, but only do as much as the music needs. Ahmad is like Miles in that respect. Miles didn’t play all the notes; less is more. Not because you can’t play more, but because less is what’s needed. The epitome of swag. Ahmad Jamal changed the concept of the piano trio as we know it. More than any other, his trio bridged the gap between other genres of music, especially between hip-hop and jazz — even R&B and jazz. There has never been any other that sounded even close. Thank you, Mr. Jamal, for always being you. Pianist Robert Glasper is a two-time GRAMMY winner with his band Robert Glasper Experiment. He is nominated this year in the Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media category as co-producer on the soundtrack for the 2015 Miles Davis biopic, Miles Ahead.


Congratulations Mo‌.. you did it your way. With Love From Your Burbank Family

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LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Charley Pride BY DARIUS RUCKER

106

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

PICTORIAL PRESS/CACHE AGENCY

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ith three GRAMMY wins and 67 country chart hits — including 29 No. 1 singles — to his credit, Charley Pride has accomplished so much in country music, and he did it at a time when the world was a lot different than it is now. Growing up as an African-American kid, I was inspired by watching Charley Pride do something that everybody — white or black — told him he was not supposed to do by having a hugely successful career in country music, and doing it with class. Charley has been an inspiration for me in a lot of ways. He’s one of the reasons that I felt I could do what I wanted to do both in the rock world and the country world. My attitude was, if Charley had the courage to do it, and do it with his head up and with dignity, why can’t I? When we first met, I asked Charley for his advice and the first thing he told me — in his Mississippi accent — was, “Be who you are.” The way he said it just hit me so hard. I got exactly what he was saying: Don’t try to go out and sing like anybody else or be like anybody else, just be who I am. If that works, it works, and if it doesn’t, you were true to yourself. Having now become good friends with Charley, I have discovered what a great man and a great soul he is. Every time I talk to him he’s always got something amazing to say to me, something I need to listen to or some piece of advice I need to take with me. When we meet up, his embrace always says, “It’s you and me against the world, kid.” That’s a great feeling. And let’s not forget his songs. I can’t believe “She’s Too Good To Be True,” “Kiss An Angel Good Mornin’” and my favorite, “Is Anybody Goin’ To San Antone.” Those are iconic country songs, and when you hear them today they still hold up. And that voice! Even today Charley still sounds like he’s 24 years old.

Charley Pride is truly an icon and a legend. He is somebody that we all should look up to, and somebody who handles himself with the utmost class and the utmost dignity. There is nobody who deserves this Lifetime Achievement Award more. A three-time GRAMMY winner, Darius Rucker’s most recent release is 2015’s Southern Style. Rucker and Pride performed “Kiss An Angel Good Mornin’” at the 2016 Darius & Friends benefit concert.



LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Jimmie Rodgers BY JOHN MELLENCAMP

108

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

GAB ARCHIVE/REDFERNS

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immie Rodgers put down a big footprint and said, “Here, fill it.” In just six years as a professional musician, Rodgers left an indelible mark on the music industry for generations to follow. As a songwriter, his stories of hard work and heartache resonated with audiences. It was his unprecedented blend of musical genres, the combination of blues, folk, jazz, and yodeling, that made him a major influence on country music artists such as Bill Monroe, Johnny Cash and Merle Haggard, as well as other artists like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. In 1997 Bob Dylan made a tribute record to Jimmie Rodgers called The Songs Of Jimmie Rodgers — A Tribute, which I was honored to be a part of along with Alison Krauss, Willie Nelson and Van Morrison, among others. After teaching himself to play the guitar, Rodgers entered and won an amateur talent contest at 12 years old. Evidently the call of music had caught him, and Jimmie ran away to join a traveling road show. Although his initial musical career was cut short when his father retrieved him, the die was cast. Jimmie Rodgers the musician was born. It was through working with his father on the railroad that Rodgers was exposed to the music of southern African-American “gandy dancers,” railroad workers who used rhythm and song to synchronize their labor based on the task at hand. This undoubtedly had a strong influence on Rodgers, who spent the next 12 years of his life working on the railroad while playing and singing to railway workers in the evenings. In 1924 Rodgers contracted tuberculosis, which ended his career as a brakeman on the railway but opened the door to his legacy as an entertainer. On April 18, 1927, Rodgers, then 29 years old, performed for the first time on WWNC, Asheville, N.C.’s first radio station. Shortly thereafter, Rodgers auditioned for then-RCA talent scout Ralph S. Peer. Rodgers’ first recording session lasted two hours and 20 minutes, and he was paid $100 for his first two songs, “The Soldier’s Sweetheart” and “Sleep, Baby, Sleep.” Rodgers then enlisted his sister-in-law, Elsie McWilliams, as his co-writer. The two penned over 40 songs together, including his next

recording, “Blue Yodel,” better known as “T For Texas,” the song that sold half a million copies in the following two years. Rodgers was the first performer inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame and has been called the Father of Country Music. What Rodgers really did was create an entirely new musical style — a style not bound by any tradition but driven by emotion. Music that did more than entertain; it elevated and connected with millions of people of his generation and many musicians and listeners to come. Jimmie Rodgers was the real deal. He kept his local and regional identity, yet still managed to speak to the world. His influence in all musical genres cannot be overestimated, and his legacy and influence is found everywhere. America’s Original Roots Music Hero left his mark on rock, blues and pop by inspiring artists and musicians to find their own voice, to be pioneers creating music that might some day also make its mark. Jimmie Rodgers had an emotional connection with his audience. His fans felt that he had changed their lives with his music. As artists, isn’t that what we all aspire to do? John Mellencamp is a 14-time GRAMMY nominee who won the Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male GRAMMY for 1982. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2008. He received the Woody Guthrie Award in 2003 and the John Steinbeck Award in 2012.



LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Nina Simone

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

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ina Simone once said, “I’ll tell you what freedom is to me: no fear!” If ever there was a personal statement that bottled the legacy of the High Priestess of Soul, this would be it. Born in Tryon, N.C., in 1933, Eunice Kathleen Waymon displayed prodigious musical talent early on, taking up piano at age 3. Immersing herself in classical music, she had aspirations of becoming a concert pianist. After graduating as class valedictorian in high school, she applied to the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Her dreams were shattered, however, when the school denied her admission, which she suspected was a racerelated decision. Despite the setback, Simone would become a fixture on the East Coast nightclub circuit in the late ’50s. With her piano stylings reflecting a blend of jazz, gospel, folk, and classical influences, and armed with a hypnotic voice, she attracted the attention of influential label executive Syd Nathan. After signing with Nathan, the two were at loggerheads over the repertoire for her debut album, 1958’s Little Girl Blue. Winning the battle, Simone handpicked songs such as George Gershwin’s “I Loves You, Porgy,” which became the lone Top 20 single of her career. Into the early ’60s, Simone would record a variety of music, from standards to jazz and even folk ballads. In 1964 Simone signed to Philips Records in concert with the changing tides of her music. With the civil rights movement reaching a boiling point in America, Simone — who once pondered, “How can you be an artist and not reflect the times?” — was inspired to pen groundbreaking protest anthems such as “Four Women,” “To Be Young, Gifted And Black” and “Mississippi Goddam,” the latter written partially in response to the 1963 murder of civil rights activist Medgar Evers. Simone, who in her own words “realized there was no turning back,” became a pioneering activist. And what a voice she possessed. Few artists sang with such conviction, evidenced by moody soul classics such as “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood,” “I Put A Spell On You” and “SeeLine Woman.” Simone’s talent was complemented by her iconic

unapologetic style, which included head wraps, bold jewelry and floor-skimming sheaths. Her career was wildly eclectic and influential, and she delighted live audiences until 2002, the year prior to her death. A true cultural touchstone, Simone’s artistry set a powerful example for countless artists, including Lauryn Hill, Aretha Franklin, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Mary J. Blige, Erykah Badu, Beyoncé, and Adele. Her activism also positively impacted artists such as Alicia Keys, Elton John, Bono, John Legend, and Kanye West, who has sampled Simone multiple times. With racial tensions still running high today, Simone’s fearless mantra seems all the more relevant. And though the answer to the title of the recent Oscar-nominated documentary What Happened, Miss Simone? might be complicated, perhaps the truth can be found within her music.



LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Sly Stone BY CHILDISH GAMBINO

112

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES

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he first time I was exposed to Sly Stone was when I heard the Atlanta hip-hop group Arrested Development’s “People Everyday,” which borrowed from Sly & The Family Stone’s “Everyday People.” I really liked the song, but my dad steered me back to the original and I started listening to a lot of the Family Stone. That was a real discovery for me because I didn’t know that funk-soul music could be that warm. I came from a big religious family, like Sly, and hearing him was the first time I heard that kind of music coming from a place of love and community. The music always felt inclusive. It really did feel like family. On a musical level, Sly was so great at writing and arranging these songs that had a kind of perfect structure. A lot of the time the Family Stone seems like a jam band, but the songs are just so well-built. Something like “Just Like A Baby” has such a great groove to it — it takes you along somewhere deep, like a lullaby. An adult lullaby. I think about songs like “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin),” “Family Affair,” “Hot Fun In The Summertime,” “Everybody Is A Star,” and “Stand!” Sly and the band always make those grooves sound loose and fun but you know how much thought and collaboration as a group had to go into getting that just right. He was a prodigy and a virtuoso, and he was also a master at speaking the musical language he wanted to speak through his band. Today, the music sounds different from what’s coming out now, but it doesn’t sound older — it just sounds warmer. What Sly is actually saying in those songs is still relevant because he’s talking about issues that will always be relevant. Funkadelic was the mind of a musical movement, and Sly was the heart. I don’t mean the center — I mean the heart. The music was heavy, but it was joyous. It was all about feeling. As much as we need to get out of our heads, we need to get deeper into our hearts, and that’s where Sly’s music takes you. I think that sense of family was always important to him, and it’s always been important to me. I’m so appreciative of what his music was pushing us toward, and I salute everything Sly’s done for music to make us feel more like a community.

Golden Globe-winning actor and musician Donald Glover aka Childish Gambino is a two-time GRAMMY nominee. He released his psychedelic soul and R&B album “Awaken, My Love!” in December 2016.


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LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

The Velvet Underground BY IGGY POP

114

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES

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hen I first saw the Velvet Underground play live in a tiny room at Max’s Kansas City in New York, they were everything a great 21st-century rock and roll band should be. But the year was 1972 and they were so far ahead of their time that only a few people noticed. By 1967, the year the Velvets dropped the banana on America, the country was in a war so ugly that the time was over for music that sounded innocent. Here was the sound of reality knocking on the door. Picture, if you will, a Conestoga covered wagon, like in a Western movie, rolling through 20th-century Times Square. It’s past midnight. All good people have gone to bed, and only the drifters and hustlers, idlers and runaways are there to bear witness. Inside are four leather-wrapped figures in shades and boots. Nobody’s smiling. This is the future. Music is pouring forth from this pioneer apparition. It is pounding, scratching, sneering at times; but also finely wrought, memorable and elegant. Boy, did I notice! I heard their first album one night at a Bohemian house party on the University of Michigan campus, and, like a lot of people, I didn’t get it at all. It unnerved me. But within a week, I was hooked. Here was exotica, corruption, seduction, and sophistication, all tethered to the post of good old rock and roll. I became a follower and a believer too. They brought a mix of erotic literature, the European canon, the Brill Building, country blues, deadpan humor, trash can consciousness, minimalism, primitivism, and the dry wit and sharp lens of Warholism to New York, the USA and my ears. It was superb. It was a maelstrom. And it influenced anybody any good who came after. Over time, the group grew and matured, crystallizing their sound right up until the end of their existence, leaving us with the most moving and heartfelt rock song I ever heard, called, simply, “Rock & Roll.” For me, and for a lot of people, that says it all.

(The Velvet Underground comprised [top] drummer Maureen “Moe” Tucker and frontman/guitarist Lou Reed and [bottom] bassist John Cale and guitarist Sterling Morrison.) Iggy Pop worked with the Velvet Underground’s John Cale when Cale produced the Stooges’ 1969 self-titled debut album. Considered the Godfather of Punk, Pop is a two-time GRAMMY nominee, including a current nomination for Best Alternative Music Album for Post Pop Depression.


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TRUSTEES AWARD

Thom Bell BY KENNY GAMBLE

116

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

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met Tommy when I was about 17. I was in the same high school class with his sister and I walked her home one day. We got to her house and I heard music coming from inside. She told me that was her older brother playing piano. I went in there, met him and that was it — I think we wrote two or three songs that day. Whenever I see Thom I tell him I still think we should record those songs. He was so talented and we just had fun, whatever we did. We actually recorded some records together as Kenny & Tommy, then we started our own little band called the Romeos. Leon Huff was a part of that, and the beautiful thing was that we played the latest recordings that were out but we rearranged them. People loved that, and that was the start of how Thom, Leon and I would work together in the studio. The Philly sound really came from the songs, and the enthusiasm of Tommy and the rest of us to make the songs everything they could be. The studio became like a workshop, with all of us trying to come up with new ways of expressing the music. Tommy was responsible for a lot of the sophistication in our sound, like using a French horn or flutes or timpani. He had a classical ear and he could always hear what the right sound would be for a track. He was an arranger’s arranger — he’d have us switch from a trumpet to a flügelhorn because the flügelhorn’s sound was just a little softer. Me and Huff would have the chords and an idea of how we wanted things, but Tommy had every note thought out and written down. The records he produced were just unbelievable. I thought the sound he had with the Delfonics on “La-La (Means I Love You)” and “Didn’t I (Blow Your Mind This Time)” was great. Then he had a run with the Stylistics with “You Are Everything” and “You Make Me Feel Brand New” — incredible. And with the Spinners he had “I’ll Be Around” and “Could It Be I’m Falling In Love” — amazing sound. Later on he worked with people like Deniece Williams and Elton John. He just kept making great music. I guess I picked the right girl to walk home that day, because as soon as I met Tommy it was the beginning of a long friendship

and a great musical collaboration. He was a tremendous asset to what we did at Philadelphia International. We’ve been able to do so many things together and we’ve had so many good times. I’d say Tommy Bell is one of the real treasures of the music industry. Along with his songwriting partner Leon Huff, Kenny Gamble received The Recording Academy’s Trustees Award in 1999. Together, Thom Bell and Gamble and Huff are credited with helping to create the quintessential Sound of Philadelphia.



TRUSTEES AWARD

Mo Ostin BY LORNE MICHAELS

118

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES

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told Paul Simon, who is my neighbor and also a well-known recording artist, that I was going to be writing something about Mo Ostin in honor of his Recording Academy Trustees Award. He had this to say: “No other record executive in my lifetime can claim a higher place in the pantheon of music than Mo Ostin. He was a great record executive: shrewd but fair, modern but respectful of the great music that preceded rock and roll, a defender of artistic integrity while still keeping an avuncular eye out for the excesses of ego. And all this while maintaining a friendship with Frank Sinatra.” Mo was already a legend before I got to know him. I started spending time with Mo and of course Evelyn when Paul Simon signed with Warner Bros. Records in 1979. Since that time, I have never made a major decision in my life without asking Mo for advice. From the very beginning I intuitively knew to trust his wisdom, his warmth, his toughness, and his way of looking at the world. My friendship with Mo has been one of the great joys of my life. There is so much about Mo Ostin’s time in the music business that seems charmed, almost miraculous, to me. The fact that he was around Clef Records, which later became Verve Records, in the late ’40s and early ’50s, working for jazz impresario Norman Granz with artists like Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, and Louis Armstrong. Seems to me he was in the right place at the right time. When that ended and Frank Sinatra wanted to start his own label, Reprise, he hired Mo to run it. To be around Frank Sinatra in 1960 and all that that meant had to be pretty cool. And then when Reprise was sold to Warner Bros. he headed the resulting label as well. It was the middle of the ’60s and the music had changed, and Mo was right there again in the midst of it. His first significant signing was the Kinks. After that, he signed Jimi Hendrix. Sinatra to Hendrix does not make sense unless you were following the music and going where it led. That was just the beginning of Mo’s great period. He went on to run Warner Bros. Records for 25 years. These are some of the artists whose careers and lives Mo helped to shape in that period: Fleetwood Mac, Van Morrison, Neil Young,

Randy Newman, Joni Mitchell, James Taylor, Frank Zappa, the Grateful Dead, Paul Simon, the Beach Boys, George Harrison, Eric Clapton, the Who, Madonna, Prince, Talking Heads, Eagles, Dire Straits, Steely Dan, Bob Marley, ZZ Top, Rod Stewart, Van Halen, Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers, Quincy Jones, Green Day, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. He also brought into Warner Bros. label founders like David Geffen (Geffen Records), Chris Blackwell (Island Records) and Seymour Stein (Sire Records). What an amazing time that was to be in the record business. Artists attract artists, and who wouldn’t have wanted to be around Warner Bros. Records then. I was around then, and believe me, it was happening. When all is said and done, there are endless accomplishments and career highlights. What I admire about Mo is that wherever the music was, he went. Most importantly, he always managed to create a culture where artists felt supported, protected and nourished. In short, he built a home. In his time in the record business Mo had the best of it. And all in all, he was the best of it. A 14-time Emmy winner, Lorne Michaels is the creator and executive producer of “Saturday Night Live.” Along with Paul Simon and Neil Young, Michaels inducted Mo Ostin into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003.


Mo,

You’ve always known when to push the button. A gentleman and a genius, you championed artistic freedom, inspired legendary careers, and changed our business forever. We wouldn’t be the same without you.

Congratulations

from your Warner Music Group family


TRUSTEES AWARD

Ralph S. Peer BY GLORIA TREVI

120

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

COURTESY OF THE PEER FAMILY

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alph S. Peer’s legacy created a global music family that today has homes in 28 different countries. When I first learned that Peer had travelled to Mexico City in 1928 and met composer Agustín Lara and began publishing his works, inspired by poetic lyrics such as “Arráncame la vida con el último beso de amor” (“Rip my life from me with the last kiss of love”), I decided to join peermusic. I said to myself, “Who could better house my catalog than a company built by a man who uniquely saw the magic and force behind our Latin music?” An extraordinary song needs an extraordinary team, and that is exactly what Ralph S. Peer created. With peermusic he built a fortress for songwriters, where our songs would be nurtured, felt, understood, and protected. “Bésame Mucho” and “Granada,” two signature Latin classics published by peermusic that would garner audiences worldwide, are just two clear examples of how Peer expanded and nurtured the international footprint of Latin music. Throughout his career, he relentlessly proved his hunger and passion for other forms of music with his willingness to travel the world to find it. Peer served as executive producer for Mamie Smith’s “Crazy Blues,” which has been cited as the first blues record issued by a record label. He recorded James P. Johnson’s “Carolina Shout,” considered one of jazz’s first solo piano recordings. And Peer released Fiddlin’ John Carson’s “The Little Old Log Cabin In The Lane,” the first country record. He was also the producer for the 1927 Bristol Sessions, considered by Johnny Cash as the “single most important event in the history of country music,” which introduced Jimmie Rodgers and the Original Carter Family. His vision to see Latin, blues, country, jazz as well as classical music not just as genres, but as whole industries, was unprecedented, as was his commitment to protect each song as a precious jewel. Along the way, Peer sought out and worked with many other artists who would go on to release timeless recordings, including Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, Little Richard, Hoagy Carmichael, Pérez Prado, and Buddy Holly. A true pioneer, Ralph S. Peer understood the song and the

songwriter unlike anyone else. Today, I am a singer/songwriter with the privilege of working with a team blessed by the vision of this extraordinary man. He always knew that music broke all barriers. In today’s world, it is beautiful to know that what music unites cannot be taken apart. Thank you, Ralph. With a career spanning more than 30 years, Mexican singer/ songwriter and peermusic catalog artist Gloria Trevi released her latest studio album, El Amor, in 2015. She was among the headliners for The Latin Recording Academy’s Latin GRAMMY Acoustic Sessions in 2016.



TECHNICAL GRAMMY AWARD

Alan Dower Blumlein BY ISABEL GARVEY

122

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

COURTESY OF THE EMI ARCHIVE TRUST

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lan Dower Blumlein filed a patent for a two-channel audio system called “stereo” on Dec. 14, 1931. It included a unique circuit to preserve directional sound and was to start a revolution in sound recording, performance and listening. Blumlein brought his equipment to Abbey Road Studios in 1934 and recorded the London Philharmonic Orchestra and, as a result, changed the way we make and listen to music. At age 7, Blumlein repaired the family doorbell and promptly presented his father with an invoice. Blumlein’s legendary career as an electrical engineer saw him pioneer many innovations that assisted the telecommunications industry and enhanced the process of cutting records, again ensuring that sound quality was paramount. Blumlein’s dedication to sound through technology was most evident when he visited a movie theater with his wife in 1931 and, even while “off-duty,” considered that the sound should follow the actors on-screen, and the idea of “stereo” was born. Blumlein’s idea for what he termed “binaural sound” would crucially cover both the recording process and the listening experience. The first test film to use stereo sound was called “Trains At Hayes” and was shot from a window at the EMI building in Hayes, West London. The film successfully followed the sound of a train moving right to left on the screen. Blumlein understood that the audio experience could be improved and through his invention he gave people a chance to develop a deeper connection to music, either at home or in the theater, and he has undoubtedly inspired people to make and innovate their own music because of that connection. Blumlein would later develop inventions that helped shape the broadcast of moving images — or television — starting in 1933. Blumlein was a remarkable engineer and we are proud that he played such a significant part in Abbey Road Studios’ history. His influence on recording technology is still evident today all over the world and inspires our engineers every day. The development

of our new studios and mix stage, which continue to push sound technology forward, wouldn’t be possible without his genius. He’s a hero to everyone within our walls. Isabel Garvey is managing director of Abbey Road Studios and has led its recent development, overseeing two new studios and a new mix stage, opening in March. Abbey Road Studios awarded Alan Dower Blumlein a plaque celebrating his achievements in sound in 2015.



MUSIC EDUCATOR AWARD

Keith Hancock BY GINNY THEODORAKIS

124

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

STEVE WYLIE PHOTOGRAPHY

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very so often we encounter people who are so remarkable that it is difficult to describe them in words. But I will try to explain what makes Keith Hancock such an exceptional music teacher. Keith Hancock is a truly gifted musician and an outstanding music teacher. Through his tireless efforts, he inspires his students’ love for making music and cultivates an environment of camaraderie that quite literally changes their lives. We have been blessed to have both of our children in Keith’s choral program. He made such an impact on our daughter that she is now pursuing a dual degree in music education and vocal performance, and aspires to follow in Keith’s footsteps as a choir director. We have also seen Keith’s positive influence on our son, who has experienced tremendous growth in his self-confidence as well as his vocal talent. Keith’s hard work and dedication have built a robust, awardwinning choral department. It is particularly remarkable that he has developed such a distinguished music program in a California public high school at a time when funding for the arts and music has been slashed to the bone. Not only do his six choirs perform a variety of repertoire, but he also provides opportunities and ceaseless encouragement for students to perform solo or in small groups. He has built a culture based on the values of hard work, mutual respect and support among his students. Most importantly, he has instilled in them a genuine appreciation and love for music. Many of his alumni have gone on to pursue careers in music education, vocal performance or theater arts. The importance of Mr. Hancock’s choral program extends beyond the classroom. Every year, the Tesoro High School choirs present a tribute concert that showcases a particular genre of music. While these concerts are fun for students and audience members alike, they serve a greater purpose: all proceeds from them go toward a charity of his students’ choosing. In the past, proceeds have supported diabetes research, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and TOMS Shoes giving initiative, to name a few. The bond Keith Hancock forms with his students lasts well

beyond their time in his choirs. It is very telling that at the final concert each year, Keith and his students invariably start crying together onstage during the performance of their final song — such is the love his students have for him and he has for them. Fittingly, the Tesoro choir motto is familia per cantum: family through singing. We are sincerely thankful for the impact Keith Hancock has made on our family. Because of him, music matters in the lives of his students, their parents and the community at large. Ginny Theodorakis is a parent and former booster president of the Tesoro High School Choral Program under the direction of Keith Hancock. Both of her children were a part of Hancock’s choirs and she feels honored she was involved with his music program.



GRAMMY Hall Of Fame The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame was created in 1973 to honor recordings of lasting significance that were issued prior to the 1958 inception of the GRAMMY Awards. Consisting of more than 1,000 recordings, the Hall is now open to any recording that has been in release for at least 25 years. New submissions are voted on annually by a special member committee of experts and historians drawn from all branches of the recording arts. Their choices are subject to final approval by the Trustees of The Recording Academy. The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame is unique in that it is open to all genres of music — popular as well as specialized forms.

By Paul Grein

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he 25 recordings that were inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame this year run the gamut from Merle Haggard’s Okie From Muskogee to N.W.A’s Straight Outta Compton, albums that are miles apart stylistically and in terms of the values and attitudes they express. Straight Outta Compton is the first rap album to be selected for the Hall. (Three rap singles were previously inducted.) Haggard, who died April 6, 2016, isn’t the only legendary artist who recently died to be saluted this year. Recordings by David Bowie and Prince were also inducted. Classic recordings by three famous family acts — Mills Brothers, the Everly Brothers and the Jackson 5 — were also chosen this year. (Classics by the Beach Boys, who included three Wilson brothers, and Sly & The Family Stone, who

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included three Stone siblings, were also inducted.) The Hall welcomed three 1991 releases: Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” R.E.M.’s “Losing My Religion” and Bonnie Raitt’s “I Can’t Make You Love Me.” They are the first recordings from the 1990s to be honored. Louis Armstrong’s 1939 recording of “When The Saints Go Marching In” was inducted. It’s his 18th induction, which extends his lead as the artist with the most recordings in the Hall. Billie Holiday’s 1956 album Lady Sings The Blues was also honored. It’s her seventh recording to be inducted, which puts her just behind Ella Fitzgerald (eight) as the female artist with the most recordings in the Hall. (Bonus points if you picked up on the fact that Straight Outta Compton and Lady Sings The Blues later became the titles of successful biopics about those artists.)


ABC

The Jackson 5 Motown (1970), Single This exuberant tutorial was the title track of the group’s second album. An irresistible blend of pop, R&B and bubblegum, “ABC” was the follow-up to “I Want You Back,” which is already in the Hall. The J5 also have a third recording in the Hall, “I’ll Be There.” Thus, three of the group’s first four Motown singles have been inducted. Easy as 1-2-3! Michael Jackson was just 11 when these three singles were released, younger than any other artist with a recording in the Hall.

CHANGES

David Bowie RCA Victor (1972), Single This single, from Bowie’s fourth album, Hunky Dory, was a chart hit twice, in 1972 and again in 1974. Bowie wrote and co-produced the song and played the jazzy sax solo at the end. “Changes” is one of Bowie’s signature songs, which is apropos since he was such a master of reinvention. It is Bowie’s second recording to be inducted, following his 1972 album The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars.

THE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS

Arlo Guthrie Reprise (1972), Single Folk artist Steve Goodman wrote this train song, which is a modern-day folk classic. Guthrie’s version, from his fourth studio album, Hobo’s Lullaby, was a hit in 1972. The sing-along chorus, “Good mornin’ America/How are ya?” inspired the title of ABC’s long-running morning TV show. This is Guthrie’s second recording to be inducted into the Hall, following 1967’s “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree.” That matches the number of recordings in the Hall by his father, folk legend Woody Guthrie. They are the only parent and child who each have a recording in the Hall.

(HEP-HEP!) THE JUMPIN’ JIVE

Cab Calloway And His Orchestra Vocalion (1939), Single With deft scat singing, clever jive talk and a playful spirit, Calloway had crossover appeal to an extent rare among African-American artists of his time. You can’t listen to this delightful recording without smiling and swinging to the rhythm. The exclamation point in the title was apt. This is Calloway’s second recording to be selected for the Hall. The first was his 1931 signature song, “Minnie The Moocher.”

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I GOT YOU BABE

Sonny & Cher Atco (1965), Single This heartfelt song expresses eternal truths in the simplest of lyrical language. It proves that simple doesn’t have to mean dumb. Cher was just 19 when the song was released. She and Sonny Bono were a couple, but were not yet legally married. “I Got You Babe” was featured on their debut album, Look At Us; on their 1970s TV show, “The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour”; and in such films as Groundhog Day.

JAILHOUSE ROCK Elvis Presley RCA Victor (1957), Single

I CAN’T MAKE YOU LOVE ME

Bonnie Raitt Capitol (1991), Single This Mike Reid/Allen Shamblin ballad is one of the most exquisite torch songs ever written — and certainly one of the most honest and self-aware. Raitt sang the song with tenderness and understanding. Bruce Hornsby’s piano playing adds to the bluesy mood. Though many top artists such as George Michael and Adele have since covered the song, Raitt’s version remains definitive. The song appeared on Raitt’s 11th studio album, Luck Of The Draw. The album was her follow-up to Nick Of Time, which is already in the Hall.

I GET AROUND

The Beach Boys Capitol (1964), Single This exhilarating smash became the Beach Boys’ first No. 1 hit in July 1964, right in the thick of the British Invasion. “I Get Around” was from the group’s sixth studio album, All Summer Long, which also describes how long the record remained in power rotation. The single is two minutes and 12 seconds of pure joy, energy and youthful strut. Brian Wilson and Mike Love wrote and produced the song, which is the fifth Beach Boys recording to be inducted.

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The title song from Presley’s third film was one of his biggest hits. It was also one of his best. The film’s iconic performance scene was a forerunner of the music video, perfectly blending Broadway-style theatricality and rock and roll. This is Presley’s seventh recording in the Hall (the first from one of his films). Among rock artists, only the Beatles (15) and Bob Dylan (nine) equal or surpass that total.

LADY SINGS THE BLUES

Billie Holiday Clef (1956), Album This 1956 album, which was released in conjunction with Holiday’s autobiography of the same name, features such classics as “Strange Fruit,” “Good Morning Heartache” and “God Bless The Child.” Holiday died just three years after the album’s release. She was 44. This is Holiday’s second album in the Hall (her other five entries are singles). It follows Lady In Satin, which was released in 1958.


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MAGGIE MAY

Rod Stewart Mercury (1971), Single The term “cougar” wasn’t in popular use in 1971 when Stewart had his breakthrough hit with this song about a school-age boy having his first sexual encounter with an older woman. The song (unlike that euphemism) isn’t glib or exploitive. It treats the two central characters as real people, not as clichés. Stewart produced and co-wrote the song with Martin Quittenton, who also played on the track. “Maggie May” was originally the B-side of “Reason To Believe,” but it soon became the more popular side. Both songs were featured on Stewart’s third album, Every Picture Tells A Story.

MISSION—IMPOSSIBLE

Lalo Schifrin Dot (1967), Single Schifrin composed, arranged and conducted this cool, jazzy instrumental, which was the theme song for the 1966–1973 TV series. (It has also been featured in the long-running film franchise.) The song brought Schifrin a GRAMMY for Best Instrumental Theme. It’s the second TV theme song to be inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame. The first was Henry Mancini’s “Peter Gunn,” the theme from the 1958–1961 detective series.

OKIE FROM MUSKOGEE

Merle Haggard Capitol (1969), Album This live album was recorded at the Civic Center in Muskogee, Okla., on Oct. 10, 1969, the day before the studio version of “Okie From Muskogee” hit the country chart. That song was a flash point during the culture wars of the 1960s. It stood up for the establishment and called out the “hippies out in San Francisco” and others who were challenging it. The album also features such Haggard classics as “Mama Tried,” “Branded Man” and “Workin’ Man Blues.” It’s Haggard’s second recording in the Hall, following 1968’s “Mama Tried.”

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LOSING MY RELIGION

SIGN “O” THE TIMES

R.E.M.

Prince

Warner Bros. (1991), Single

Paisley Park/Warner Bros. (1987), Album

This superb track combines elements of pop, rock, alternative, and folk. It’s one of the few alt-rock hits to prominently feature a mandolin. With its jangly guitar sound, it was as if the Byrds had a hit smack in the middle of the MTV era. Featured on the group’s seventh studio album, Out Of Time, “Losing My Religion” won a GRAMMY for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal and received nominations for Record and Song Of The Year.

This sprawling, eclectic album has been likened to the Beatles’ 1968 double album, The Beatles, better known as the White Album. It was Prince’s ninth studio album; his second double album, following 1999 (which is also in the Hall). Sign “O” The Times received a GRAMMY nomination for Album Of The Year. A third Prince album, Purple Rain (credited to Prince And The Revolution), is also in the Hall.

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards


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in 1911. A version by (Fred) Waring’s Pennsylvanians, titled “Stack O’ Lee Blues,” was a hit in 1924. The most commercially successful adaptation was Lloyd Price’s “Stagger Lee,” a No. 1 hit in 1959. This is Hurt’s second recording in the Hall. It follows “Frankie,” also from 1928.

STATESBORO BLUES

Blind Willie McTell Victor (1928), Single Few blues songs from the pre-electric era have assumed the status of standard more than “Statesboro Blues,” which was written by McTell, the master of the 12-string guitar. The title refers to the town of Statesboro, Ga. The Georgia-based Allman Brothers Band included the song on their 1971 album, At Fillmore East. (That classic live album is already in the Hall.) McTell influenced such artists as Janis Joplin and Bob Dylan (who wrote a song titled “Blind Willie McTell”).

STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON SMELLS LIKE TEEN SPIRIT

Nirvana DGC (1991), Single This song, more than any other, introduced the world to grunge. It instantly became the definitive anthem for the disaffected teens of Generation X. The members of Nirvana wrote the song, which was featured on their sophomore album, Nevermind. Kurt Cobain died of a self-inflicted gunshot less than three years after this song was released. He was just 27. Jay Z’s 2013 smash “Holy Grail” (featuring Justin Timberlake) references lyrics from the Nirvana classic.

SMOKE ON THE WATER

Deep Purple Warner Bros. (1973), Single This smash contains one of the most famous riffs in rock history. The song put a hard-rock band in the Top 5 on the Billboard Hot 100, and not with an out-of-character ballad, but with an example of what they actually do best. “Smoke On The Water” propelled two of Deep Purple’s albums (their sixth studio album, Machine Head, and their second live album, Made In Japan) into the Top 10 at the same time.

STACK O’LEE BLUES

Mississippi John Hurt Okeh (1928), Single This was a popular American folk song about the murder of Billy Lyons by “Stag” Lee Shelton in 1895. The song was first published

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N.W.A Ruthless/Priority (1988), Album This was a hugely influential album in hip-hop, and in the gangsta rap subgenre in particular. It was released in August 1988, the same month that saw the debut of “Yo! MTV Raps,” which further catapulted rap into the mainstream. Straight Outta Compton’s most incendiary track, “F*** Tha Police,” angrily addressed the hot-button topic of police brutality against African-Americans. The lyric “So police think they have the authority to kill a minority” would fit on a protest sign today at a Black Lives Matter march.



THANK YOU (FALETTINME BE MICE ELF AGIN)

YOU ALWAYS HURT THE ONE YOU LOVE

Sly & The Family Stone

Mills Brothers

Epic (1969), Single

Decca (1944), Single

This song can’t possibly be 47 years old: It still sounds fresh today. The funky sound, frisky rhythm and even the offbeat spelling of the title all had an obvious influence on Prince (who was then an 11-year-old kid in Minneapolis). The song, which was written and produced by Sly Stone, incorporates clever nods to such past Sly hits as “Dance To The Music” and “Everyday People.” “Thank You …” is the group’s fourth recording to be inducted into the Hall.

This was the second smash by the legendary family group, following 1943’s “Paper Doll.” It originated as the B-side of “Till Then,” which was a No. 1 R&B hit. But “You Always Hurt …” ultimately became a far greater pop success. The recording begins as a tender ballad, but the pace picks up about 80 seconds in. The result is an unusual combination of poignant and jaunty. Mills Brothers consisted of John Mills and his sons Herbert, Harry and Donald.

WAKE UP LITTLE SUSIE

The Everly Brothers Cadence (1957), Single A charming rockabilly song capturing a more innocent time, “Wake Up Little Susie” was the brothers’ follow-up to “Bye Bye Love,” which is already in the Hall. The duo has a third recording in the Hall, “All I Have To Do Is Dream.” Thus, three of the Everlys’ first four singles for Cadence Records have been inducted. Ooh la la! The Everlys are one of three duos with three or more recordings in the Hall. Simon & Garfunkel (who paid homage to the Everlys by covering “Wake Up Little Susie” and “Bye Bye Love”) lead with four entries. Lester Flatt And Earl Scruggs also have three.

THE WANDERER

Dion Laurie (1961), Single This muscular track was Dion’s follow-up to his No. 1 smash “Runaround Sue,” which was previously inducted into the Hall. Both songs were featured on his first solo album, Runaround Sue. “The Wanderer” is a synthesis of R&B, doo-wop, and rock and roll. On the surface, it’s the story of a man boasting about his many conquests, but listen closer. His outward bravado is betrayed by his admission, “But I’m going nowhere.” Dion has a third entry in the Hall, “I Wonder Why,” which was his first hit with Dion And The Belmonts.

WHEN THE SAINTS GO MARCHING IN

Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra Decca (1939), Single This rousing song is closely associated with both Armstrong and his hometown, New Orleans. It’s perfect for Satchmo’s ebullient personality. Armstrong opens the recording with a spoken spiel, “Sisters and brothers, this is Rev. Satchmo getting ready to beat out this mellow sermon for you. My text this evening, ‘When the saints go marching in.’” You tell ’em, Reverend. The song has since been recorded by such top artists as the Weavers and Fats Domino.

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YOU DON’T OWN ME

Lesley Gore Mercury (1963), Single Gore was just 17 when she had a hit with this song, which was ahead of its time in its feminist awareness. This predated Aretha Franklin’s call for “Respect” by nearly four years. Quincy Jones produced the recording, which was included on Gore’s sophomore album, Lesley Gore Sings Of Mixed-Up Hearts. Claus Ogerman arranged and conducted the smash, giving it a cool elegance. You may be surprised to learn that two male songwriters, John Madara and David White, co-wrote the song. They showed a lot of insight into how women were (and are) thinking. Paul Grein is a veteran music journalist and historian who writes regularly for Yahoo.com and Hitsdailydouble.com, among other outlets.


Treasure it. Play it. Stand in awe of it.

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REMIXING

IT UP

SHUTTERSTOCK

Go behind the scenes with GRAMMY-winning remixers as the Best Remixed Recording category turns 20 By Tamara Palmer



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here have been seismic movements in studio technology since the first GRAMMY-winning remixer, the late house music pioneer Frankie Knuckles, began manipulating songs with razor blades and slashing reel-to-reel tape recordings in the late ’70s. Razor blades have since been replaced by mouse clicks, and tape has given way to computers with seemingly limitless tracks on digital audio workstations. Though recent GRAMMY-winning remixers such as Tiësto, Skrillex, David Guetta, and Cedric Gervais may use different tools to drive their creative process, the name of the game remains the same: craft the perfect remix. Similar to the process of songwriting, the path to an artful remix can vary. Some remixers prefer to work alone while others collaborate with artists and their representation. In terms of general execution, the craft of remixing entails refurbishing an original song with a new coat of paint through the addition of different rhythms, beats, phrases, and instruments. Adding the unique ingredients of a remixer’s heart and soul, the right remix can enhance the original song while broadening its appeal.

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When he was honored with the first Remixer Of The Year GRAMMY for 1997, Knuckles had already concocted remixes for GRAMMY-winning artists such as Michael Jackson, Janet Jackson, Chaka Khan, and Toni Braxton, transforming ballads such as the latter’s soaring “Un-Break My Heart” into dancefloor heaters. By that time, Knuckles had ditched the razor blades to craft new studio arrangements, often with the addition of live piano and new vocals. David Morales, Knuckles’ longtime Def Mix Productions partner, won the Remixer Of The Year GRAMMY the following year, for 1998. Morales’ status as an in-demand remixer was the result of his work with artists such as GRAMMY winner Mariah Carey. In 1995 he retooled her No. 1 hit “Fantasy” with “Fantasy (Sweet Dub Mix).” For the remix of “Fantasy,” Morales disregarded the song’s original instrumentation and Tom Tom Club sample and went into Carey’s studio to build a fresh club-ready backing track using her personal digital multitrack machines. Carey also worked directly with him to sing the song anew for the remix. “[My remix for] ‘Fantasy’ was almost 80 tracks,” Morales notes. “I programmed my drums on drum machines and [producer] Satoshi Tomiie programmed keyboards on software. Terry Burrus played

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Frankie Knuckles



live piano. First, I had to create the music for the remix, which really had nothing to do with the original version. Once that’s done, Mariah comes in and does what Mariah does: She vibes to the track and makes it happen. I did a couple of different versions of the remix so there’s something special about all of them.” Carey’s involvement with Morales’ remixes has taken her songs to a different level, evidenced by Billboard Dance Club Songs chart-toppers such as “It’s Like That” and “Say Somethin’.” As a result, Morales has built a long-standing, close working relationship with Carey. “Mariah was very comfortable with me in the studio,” says Morales. “We had good chemistry between us. She was always open to suggestions. We always just went into the studio and made it happen. We never had a plan. We just went with the flow.” Sometimes an official remix is more of a strategic collaboration between a producer and record label. Dave Audé, the 2015

GRAMMY winner for Best Remixed Recording (the category was renamed in 2001), was honored for his remix of “Uptown Funk” by Mark Ronson and Bruno Mars. Audé, who is normally hired by labels to cross songs over into clubs, says Mars’ label, RCA, asked him to create a remix for rhythmic radio and radio mix shows with the hopes of launching the song, which is currently the longestrunning Billboard Hot 100 No. 1 of the 2010s, into the stratosphere. “All the planets aligned and it was a big record,” Audé says. “I’ve done a million remixes for everybody there is and it’s cool that I got nominated and won a GRAMMY for a huge record like this.” Audé’s approach to the remix was consistent with how he’s taken on hits by artists such as Katy Perry, Demi Lovato, Coldplay, and U2. “I didn’t want to mess with the original formula too much,” he says. “I left a lot of the guitars and horns in there and left the song intact. So I think the arrangement is pretty close and it feels like ‘Uptown Funk’ and not a techno version. The great thing about me

CLAIRE GREENWAY/GETTY IMAGES

David Morales

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coming on five months after the record was out was that … it made me go, ‘It’s already huge, why not just beat it up a little bit? Just make it a little bit dancier, because the record’s already great.’ If I would have gotten the record earlier, I probably would have done something totally and completely different.” A remix can be about vastly more than moving beats, phrases and ideas around; it can bind two incredible artists together in a way that transcends time and space. Remixer Louie Vega never got to meet GRAMMY winner Curtis Mayfield, who died in 1999, but he feels a profound connection to him — a connection that is palpable when listening to Vega’s 2005 GRAMMY-winning “Superfly (Louie Vega EOL Mix),” which reimagines Mayfield’s seminal 1972 Top 10 hit “Superfly.” “Because it was Curtis Mayfield and it was so special, I wanted to bring in the rhythm section of my Elements Of Life band, which consisted of Selan Lerner on keyboard, Luisito Quintero on percussion and Gene Perez on electric bass,” Vega says. “I started with … keyboards and we came up with the bass and the foundation of the track. I sampled some of the original parts, like the intro, and then it goes into the new groove.

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louie vega “The combination of it together was really, really wonderful. We created a whole new rhythm for it and it worked in the house and dance genre[s]. We were playing that record all over the world and a lot of my friends who were DJs started playing it.” Remixes can also begin as a passion project out of sheer love for a song. Such was the case for Tiësto, who earned the Best Remixed Recording GRAMMY for 2014 for his remix of fellow GRAMMY winner John Legend’s “All Of Me.” “I heard the original one day on the radio and immediately realized that I wanted to remix the song,” the Dutch DJ/producer reveals. “The piano section in particular appealed to me and I knew I could use that to build the remix. “As my birthday was coming up, I wanted to release it as a gift to my fans. So I called it ‘[All Of Me] (Tiësto’s Birthday Treatment Remix)’ and we made it available as a download. Within about a day, my manager got a call from Sony saying, ‘We’d like to use this remix and can we make a deal to pick it up?’ We worked it out and things went crazy from there.” Legend himself became an enthusiastic supporter of Tiësto, which was parlayed into a future collaboration.

KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES

Dave audÉ

MICAH SMITH

“I’ve done a million remixes for everybody there is and it’s cool that I got nominated and won a GRAMMY for a huge record like [‘Uptown Funk’].”



STEVEN LAWTON/GETTY IMAGES

tiËsto

“John was actually the first one to give me a call and let me know how much he liked the mix,” recalls Tiësto. “He invited me over to his house to meet and go over new music. We spent an afternoon talking and listening to stuff. The end result was that John agreed to do another song with me and that [became my 2016 single] ‘Summer Nights.’” The 59th GRAMMY Awards marks the 20th year that remixers will be recognized for their talents on Music’s Biggest Night. Whether working on a remix as a passion project or as a result of being approached by an artist, management or label, remixers take immense pride in their craft. Though the manner in which they approach their work may differ, one thing is certain: winning a GRAMMY can completely transform the trajectory of a remixer’s career.

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“This is really crazy for me,” said Skrillex during his Best Remixed Recording acceptance speech for Benny Benassi’s “Cinema (Skrillex Remix)” at the 54th GRAMMY Awards in 2012. “Just a year and a half ago, I was making [this remix] in my bedroom.” “I did not expect [a] GRAMMY,” Vega says of his Best Remixed Recording GRAMMY win. “You start getting calls [when the nominations happen] and I just freaked out. I was like, ‘Wow!’” Tamara Palmer has spent decades chasing beats, rhymes, remixes, and basslines. Both a writer and DJ, she is the author of Country Fried Soul: Adventures In Dirty South Hip-Hop and a veteran electronic music specialist.



KEVORK DJANSEZ IAN/GETTY IMAGES


More Than A

Fashion Statement Wardrobe, hair and makeup help artists convey cultural, theatrical and political messages BY NIC SCREWS


Kendrick Lamar performs at the 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards on Feb. 15, 2016 KEVORK DJANSEZIAN/ GETTY IMAGES

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inutes after scoring his fifth GRAMMY of the night for Best Rap Album at the 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards on Feb. 15, 2016, Kendrick Lamar delivered one of the most talked about and politically charged GRAMMY performances

in recent history. In celebration of his critically acclaimed album To Pimp A Butterfly, Lamar performed a riveting medley rife with strong allusions to racial inequality and black identity. But it was the theatrical aspect of his performance that drove home the masterful, consciousness-raising lyrics and profundity that are trademarks of Lamar’s artistry. Clad in blue prison garb, Lamar took the stage to perform “The Blacker The Berry” while shackled to four African-American “prisoners” who served as his backup dancers. Soon the men broke free of their chains and were joined by African dancers as Lamar transitioned into “Alright,” the hopeful anthem co-opted by the Black Lives Matter movement. In full righteous-fury mode, Lamar ended his performance in front of a map of Africa with the word “Compton,” his hometown, written across it.

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The stylistic vision for this memorable performance sprung from a collaboration between Lamar and his longtime stylist, Dianne Garcia. According to Garcia, Lamar showed her a 1995 photograph of a group of inmates walking in leg chains as visual inspiration for his GRAMMY performance. “He told me he would like to open the performance in that exact uniform and chains and then wanted the prisoners to break through the chains in the second sequence and turn into these African warriors under black lights,” says Garcia. “It was quite a complex transition and it was my job to dissect how I could execute his vision and gather the team that could make it happen.” With the help of choreographer Fatima Robinson, a graphic designer and a team of eight — which included costume assistants and seamsters — Garcia researched multiple African tribes to ensure the looks were as authentic as possible. “This performance needed to be raw and literal to confront the issues he was addressing. “Kendrick and I have been working together for quite some time, so intuitively I understand who he is as a person and as an artist,” Garcia adds. “The challenge was to execute his vision with respect to its heritage and make sure that it had the same effectiveness on the



Beyoncé performs during the Super Bowl 50 halftime show on Feb. 7, 2016 TODD ROSENBERG

audience as his music and his skill as a performer.” Lamar and his team’s attention to detail follow a long history of artists parlaying fashion into a powerful and head-turning tool to express cultural and political views. “That’s the role of fashion in our society,” explains Meredith Rutledge-Borger, associate curator at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland. “Clothing and personal style say something about the wearer and can be the best visual representation of an artist, their music and our times.” Like Lamar, GRAMMY winner Beyoncé is known for creating sartorial statements as a way to heighten and showcase the messages behind her artistry. “She has been making quite a statement in her videos and performances with her choice of makeup, hair and costumes,” says

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Garcia, who helped style Lamar’s military-inspired look for a wet and fiery performance of “Freedom” with Beyoncé at the 2016 BET Awards. Garcia notes that styling an artist for the stage presents its own unique challenges, something she experienced firsthand while preparing for Lamar’s BET Awards performance. “[Stage] performances are very different than dressing someone on the red carpet because you have to design or style the outfits into context with the music, choreography, lighting, and other visuals. There are quite a few teams that you have to synergize with in order for a performance to work as a whole.” Beyoncé might be the current queen of orchestrating the many parts of a performance to present a holistic message. During the Super Bowl 50 halftime show in 2016, she unleashed a look reminiscent of 1960s Black Panthers while performing her hit


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“Prince’s iconic appearance was playful, as virtuosic as his guitar playing, politicized, boundary-busting, and genre-defying.”

“Formation” alongside Afro-clad backup dancers, who wore all black, including the Panthers’ signature beret. The performance came a day after she released her “Formation” video, which features implicit commentary on police brutality, claims of racial inequality in the response to Hurricane Katrina and black financial power. The video has been considered the most politically charged work of her 20year career. Lamar and Beyoncé’s sartorial statements are certainly no coincidence. “Hip-hop and R&B are hugely provocative spaces for fashion expression because these movements have always been fighting for visibility,” says Sarah Niblock, the associate dean of media, arts and design at University of Westminster in London. “When hip-hop emerged, many artists flaunted symbols of conspicuous consumption through expensive [designer] labels, cars and jewelry as a proclamation of wealth on equal footing [with] the elite classes, despite inauspicious roots. Having achieved global recognition, now more and more artists are using the musical stage as a political platform.” In 2016 the music industry lost two giants whose legacies aligned with their performance art: David Bowie and Prince. Both men challenged the conventions of masculinity, gender and genre boundaries throughout their storied careers. According to Niblock, who co-authored the biography Prince: The Making Of A Pop Music Phenomenon, Prince’s dandyism was his most political intervention. He was a master at using fashion to wage war on mainstream ideas of how men should look and behave. “Prince’s iconic appearance was playful, as virtuosic as his guitar playing, politicized, boundary-busting, and genre-defying,” she says. “Musically and sartorially, he refused to be generically categorized as black R&B or soul. From the outset, he particularly wanted to appeal to young women by being overtly sensual, but in an unthreatening way. He hated the butch machismo of his male contemporaries.”

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Prince PAUL BERGEN/REDFERNS

David Bowie CHRIS WALTER/ WIREIMAGE.COM


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Lady Gaga’s meat dress on display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/ GETTY IMAGES

Young Thug’s Jeffery album cover

Niblock also credits male stars such as Elvis Presley, Mick Jagger and Little Richard for “very much upturning the applecart when it came to stereotypical manliness.” Looking to more contemporary artists, there are endless examples of stars who have paid homage to Bowie and Prince in style terms, from Lady Gaga to Bruno Mars and Janelle Monáe. Young Thug — dubbed the “leader of the psychedelic fashion movement of rap hippies” by GQ — is arguably the modern example of a male artist forcing society to rethink gender norms. The Atlanta rapper openly shops in the women’s section and occasionally wears dresses, including the blue ruffled Alessandro Trincone dress with white umbrella hat he wore for the cover of his 2016 mixtape, Jeffery.

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But who could forget the dress made of raw flank steak that Lady Gaga wore to the 2010 MTV Video Music Awards? According to Gaga, she wore the dress, designed by Franc Fernandez, in protest of the U.S. military’s now-defunct “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. “If we don’t stand up for what we believe in [and] if we don’t fight for our rights, pretty soon we’re going to have as much rights as the meat on our bones,” Gaga told Ellen DeGeneres. The meaty ensemble — boots and all — was preserved by taxidermists and is now on display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. “The day after Lady Gaga wore that meat dress, the world was abuzz for obvious reasons,” says Rutledge-Borger. “But there was serious political intent behind Gaga’s attention grab, so



“Pete Seeger once said that all songs are political. I would argue that all fashion is political to some extent as well.”

The outfit Bruce Springsteen wore on the cover of 1984’s Born In The U.S.A. album on display at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland COURTESY OF THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME

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we knew that was something we wanted to add to our collection.” Some of the other statement-making pieces currently housed at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame vary from the in-your-face, such as Tom Morello’s pro-union Unite! baseball cap or Sid Vicious’ swastika T-shirt, to the more subtle, including Springsteen’s everyman uniform of jeans and a plain T-shirt. “Pete Seeger once said that all songs are political,” says Rutledge-Borger. “I would argue that all fashion is political to some extent as well.” Through a variety of its own exhibits, the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live has also highlighted the cultural relevance of the music/fashion intersection. In 2011 the Museum debuted Hip-Hop: A Cultural Odyssey, an exhibition exploring the four-decade history of hip-hop in the United States. Among the items featured was a sneaker gallery from the private collection of GRAMMY winner Everlast, highlighting that kicks once reigned supreme as an ultimate status symbol for rappers. On display in 2011–2012, the exhibit George Harrison: Living In The Material World showcased a look at the former Beatle’s creative life, including the special white suit Harrison wore at The Concert for Bangladesh in 1971. It featured an Om on each lapel, a sacred Hindu symbol representing spiritual perfection and reflecting Harrison’s deeply spiritual nature. Beyond fashion, artists have turned to beauty — specifically hair and makeup — to engineer boundary-busting moments. Take the eclectic style choices of André 3000 and Cee Lo Green — both artists have been known to don wigs. Or Katy Perry, the true lady chameleon, who can change your perception of her from appearance to appearance with the swap of a new, unexpected hair color or bold eye shadow (or fake braces, which she has also worn to dissociate herself from her pinup image). And of course, Prince, who had a long list of iconic beauty moments, from the mild, such as his signature coifs and use of eye makeup, to the more radical, like the time in 1993 when he took the stage with the word “slave” written across his cheek — a gesture meant to protest his music label. Rutledge-Borger cites Bowie’s impressive use of hair and makeup to create multiple mercurial identities as he set the bar for making statements


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about gender, sexuality and cultural identity. “Hair has always been a special signifier in rock and roll, from the early days when a slicked-back, piled-up [ducktail] indelibly labeled a member of the rocker and rebel tribe,” she says. “Artists like Bowie and Alice Cooper and Kiss used makeup specifically as a statement of pure rebellion and nonconformity.” Shirley Manson, alt-rock icon and lead singer of the GRAMMY-nominated band Garbage, has been vocal throughout her career about her use of makeup as a means of social messaging and defiance. Manson, whose signature look has included heavy eyeliner and bright lips since the early ’90s, told Billboard in May 2016 that she wears makeup as war paint meant to repel, not attract. “Nowadays this approach is completely standard but back when I emerged it really wasn’t,” says Manson. “It was considered quite unusual to see an alternative singer with really glamourous makeup. It went against the grain.” The unapologetic feminist, who at 50 years old rocks cotton candy pink hair, says she continues her use of bold eye makeup as her way of confronting the media and pop culture’s insistence that women should behave and look perfectly. “Black eyeliner to me has and always will be the ultimate tool to express ‘f*** you’,” says Manson. “It’s Cleopatra, it’s Siouxsie Sioux. It’s darkness and it is power and it is all that is mysterious, rebellious and true.” As for the future of activism by way of fashion and beauty, Manson maintains that today’s artists — now having the pressure to “perform” on social media platforms such as Snapchat and Instagram — will only continue to leverage creative messaging to attract people to their sound and steadily alter our culture and history, oftentimes with their style of choice. “Artists have and always will be creative with their messaging. It’s never going to stop,” says Manson. “If you don’t have a very powerful and unique way of communicating your individuality, you will not flourish in any era, let alone this current one.” Nic Screws is a New York-based stylist, writer and fashion consultant. Prior to opening her own firm, NS Style + Creative, she was most recently the style director at Bloomberg Media.

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Sneakers from Everlast’s private collection on display in 2011 at the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live’s Hip-Hop: A Cultural Odyssey exhibit REBECCA SAPP/ WIREIMAGE.COM



The

Cradle Rocks

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Take a tour through GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, the new must-see music destination spotlighting the birthplace of America’s music and the history of Music’s Biggest Night

MATT HORTON

By Steven Ward

he Mississippi Delta is not just considered the home of the blues but, as the state’s official welcome sign proclaims, it’s the “birthplace of America’s music.” This fertile, flat ground was traversed by local musicians who planted the seeds of blues, country, gospel, and R&B and mixed it all together, harvesting a new multicultural crop that would become known as rock and roll. Who are some of those musicians who put Mississippi on the musical map? There are blues legends such as Willie Dixon, Robert Johnson, Howlin’ Wolf, Jimmy Reed, Elmore James, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, and B.B. King. Country artists include Jimmie Rodgers, Tammy Wynette and Conway Twitty; jazz musicians include Hank Jones, Cassandra Wilson and Lester Young. And there’s Sam Cooke, Bo Diddley and Elvis Presley — all of whom played major roles in the development of popular music. So dynamic is the Magnolia State’s roster of musicians and so intertwined is the history of the Mississippi Delta with our musical culture, the compass for the location of the second official GRAMMY Museum seemed to point in one direction. “When thinking about which region we would bring our first-ever GRAMMY Museum outside of Los Angeles to, we kept going back to the Delta and Mississippi,” says Rita George, Chief Operating Officer for the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live. “With its proximity to Delta State University and other regions where The Recording Academy has an imprint, including Memphis and Nashville, Cleveland, Miss., was the perfect place for this new development. And the city of Cleveland and the entire Delta region have welcomed the Museum with open arms. We are truly thankful to be able to place a much-deserved spotlight on the state’s music history — the cradle of American music.” Opened on March 5, 2016, GRAMMY Museum Mississippi is the most technologically advanced music-themed museum in the South. Nestled in a 28,000-square-foot facility next to Delta State University, which features the renowned Delta Music Institute, GRAMMY Museum Mississippi mixes educational programs (see sidebar) and public events with permanent and traveling multimedia exhibits. The result is similar to its sister museum in Los Angeles — an experience that provides a comprehensive overview of the region’s rich legacy and the lineage of the GRAMMY Awards. Before stepping inside the Mississippi Museum, one is greeted by giant black-and-white portraits of King, Presley, Beyoncé, Johnny Cash, and Justin Timberlake on the building. Inside the lobby, large photographs of Bruce Springsteen, Adele, Cooke, and Janis Joplin stare back as visitors begin their musical journey. Visitors start in the Sanders Soundstage, a 140-seat theater that shows a 19-minute film highlighting some of the greatest performances in GRAMMY history, including the teaming of Paul McCartney with Rihanna and Kanye West in 2015 and Aretha Franklin stepping in for Luciano Pavarotti to sing “Nessun Dorma” in 1998.

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One of the first exhibits visitors will experience is The Evolution Of The GRAMMY Award. Inside this gallery, five GRAMMY Awards from past to present sit on display to illustrate the origin and development of the GRAMMY statue handed out to winners at the annual ceremony. Meanwhile, the awards are flanked on either side by identical video walls that present a collection of short segments of artists performing their songs and snippets of memorable GRAMMY acceptance speeches. Highlights include the late Robin Williams’ last appearance on the GRAMMYs, humble speeches by “American Idol” alumni Kelly Clarkson and Jennifer Hudson, and gracious addresses by Bono and John Mayer. Visitors then enter an expansive main area that leads to different exhibits in every direction. To the left is the History Of The GRAMMY Awards, which commemorates the GRAMMY Awards from the ceremony’s origins in 1959 to the present. One of the many highlights is Frank Sinatra’s appearance on the first televised GRAMMY special, “The Best On Record,” in 1963. Looking to the right, towers of album covers highlight each Album Of The Year GRAMMY recipient through the decades. One look up at the 1980s tower and you can spot Toto’s Toto IV (1982), Michael Jackson’s Thriller (1983), Lionel Richie’s Can’t Slow Down (1984), and Phil Collins’ No Jacket Required (1985).

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CREATIVE SOURCES PHOTOGRAPHY/RION RIZZO WILL JACKS

Inside the GRAMMY Museum Mississippi lobby

Outfits worn by Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and Lady Gaga on display in the On The Red Carpet exhibit


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For those desiring additional eye candy, the Legacy Of The Electric Guitar exhibit features a wall of popular music’s most important guitars, including a vintage 1959 Gibson Les Paul and a 1964 Fender Stratocaster, tracing the history of the electric guitar by decades. Additionally, the Iconic Instruments exhibit features instruments owned by GRAMMY winners, including a Bob Dylan guitar amp, Miles Davis trumpet and Bruno Mars drum kit, among others.

Iconic Instruments exhibit

WILL JACKS

WILL JACKS

Mississippi Museum’s Roland Room

Visitors experience the Dance To The Music exhibit

RORY DOYLE

To the right of the towers are the exhibits GRAMMY Legends, Recent Winners and On The Red Carpet, featuring special outfits worn by GRAMMY legends, winners and performers. Visitors can eye dresses worn by Taylor Swift and Lady Gaga, suits worn by Marty Stuart and Ben Harper, and glamorous outfits worn by Beyoncé and Barbra Streisand. One of the more colorful ensembles? An Elton John-inspired red, blue and yellow feathered outfit worn onstage by Cee Lo Green at the 53rd GRAMMY Awards in 2011. At first glance, this exhibit seems to merely encapsulate fancy and expensive fashion choices seen on television. But it underscores the enormous impact Music’s Biggest Night has on fashion and that fashion has on the wider culture. After all, it was at the 42nd GRAMMY Awards in 2000 when Jennifer Lopez donned her now-infamous green Versace dress that propelled people to search for it online, which inspired Google to create its image library. Speaking of big moments at the GRAMMY Awards, visitors have a chance to sit down in an intimate screening room to watch a one-of-a-kind film on the making of the milestone 50th GRAMMY Awards in 2008. The behind-the-scenes mini documentary contains everything from that year’s GRAMMY nominations announcement to footage of production personnel deciding who will perform on the telecast. Among the film’s highlights is the meeting of Beyoncé and Tina Turner. Watching the stars rehearse their performance of “Proud Mary” in tribute to Turner sends shivers down the spine, not to mention their interviews about what it meant to collaborate for the first time on music’s biggest stage. As exciting as its visuals are, the interactive and multimedia exhibits truly distinguish GRAMMY Museum Mississippi. If the sound of music gets you moving, you may want to take virtual dance lessons with three-time GRAMMY winner Ne-Yo at the Dance To The Music exhibit. Visitors take their place on a colorful dance floor with lights that change with each step while, on a screen in front of the floor, Ne-Yo gives tutorials on classic moves by Jackie Wilson, James Brown and Jackson, including the latter’s Moonwalk. If you prefer picking up an instrument, The Roland Room features a lighted stage with a variety of electronic musical instruments at the ready. One can literally jump up and indulge their inner rock star by playing drums, piano or guitar. The stage also features a DJ mixing board and a place for aspiring vocalists to grab a microphone. Ever wanted to write and produce a song with a GRAMMY winner? You can do just that with folk-blues singer/songwriter Keb’ Mo’ in the Singing & Songwriting/Producing Pods. First, you write and record a verse of a Keb’ Mo’ song by choosing songwriting themes, words and phrases. Via computer, visitors then choose the instruments they want as well as shape the song’s sound and production before listening back to the completed tune with Keb’ Mo’. Audiophiles will appreciate the opportunity to trace the history of recorded sound in the Mono To Surround exhibit. In an acoustically enhanced room, you can listen to artists such as Lady Antebellum and Dave Matthews Band through various formats, including wax cylinder, gramophone, vinyl, cassette, and 5.1 surround sound.


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The Landmark Moments In American Popular Music timeline exhibit functions as a synopsis of music’s most historical events. Benchmarks include the recording of the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and the legacy of MTV to Presley’s first appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1956 and Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain’s death in 1994. The southeast area of the exhibit hall is dedicated to the state of Mississippi, including the Museum’s educational centerpiece: the state-of-the-art, interactive Mississippi Music Table. By selecting Mississippi-related artists and songs on giant displays configured as a table, visitors can explore an electronic gateway that serves as a nexus of the region’s music. Looking down at the display, images of various artists float by. By pressing the image and picking an artist — for example, B.B. King — one can scan King’s biography and a photo gallery, see his GRAMMY Awards and nominations, and hear his songs. You can also see which artists King influenced and the artists he was influenced by, forming a virtual thread that allows the user to explore the deep roots of the Mississippi Delta region. The Mississippi Museum is also home to traveling exhibits, including Pride & Joy: The Texas Blues Of Stevie Ray Vaughan. Curated by the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live and guest curator Jimmie Vaughan, Stevie Ray’s brother, the exhibit provides a deep examination of the guitarist’s career and iconic standing, featuring video, guitars, clothes, posters, and other Vaughan

memorabilia. Ladies And Gentlemen ... The Beatles!, which closed in June 2016, chronicled the rise of Beatlemania in the United States from 1964–1966. The Taylor Swift Experience exhibit, which originally debuted at the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live in December 2014 before moving to Manhattan’s South Street Seaport District in New York in November 2016, will open at the Mississippi Museum on March 3, 2017. Guaranteed to satiate Swifties, the exhibit chronicles the 10-time GRAMMY winner’s meteoric rise, including early childhood books, tour costumes and GRAMMY red carpet outfits, one of her coveted GRAMMY Awards, handwritten lyrics, and video. With a five-star rating on TripAdvisor.com, and a No. 1 ranking on the website’s list of things to do in Cleveland, the Mississippi Museum has forged positive momentum in its first year, attracting more than 30,000 visitors. Befitting an impressive museum offering engaging exhibits and vast learning opportunities, GRAMMY Museum Mississippi is, in the words of one TripAdvisor reviewer, definitely worth “a repeat visit or two.” (For more information on GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, visit www.grammymuseumms.org.) Steven Ward is the news director at The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Miss., and a freelance writer.

RORY DOYLE

Museum visitors explore the Mississippi Music Table

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An Educational Blueprint The walls of the state-of-the-art GRAMMY Museum Mississippi are supported by a solid foundation of education

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f music is akin to religion, to paraphrase Jimi Hendrix, then GRAMMY Museum Mississippi represents a cathedral of opportunity. The Mississippi Museum is a veritable musical feast for the senses, offering stimuli for the eyes, ears and, more importantly, the brain. In its aim toward sparking the latter, GRAMMY Museum Mississippi’s mission is anchored by education, whether it’s teaching visitors about the influence of Mississippians on American music or demonstrating the commonalities between various genres of music. On a deeper level, the Mississippi Museum offers an educational sanctuary for students, with more than 4,300 students passing through its doors since its opening. Beyond their impressive aesthetics, the Museum’s plethora of exhibits, films and artifacts provide overarching historical, cultural and social context for music in general, in addition to relaying expansive information about the history and legacy of the GRAMMY Awards. Throughout their journey, visitors also learn about the creative process of music making and the evolution of the art and technology of recorded sound. Building on exhibit themes, workshops at GRAMMY Museum Mississippi’s Sanders Soundstage provide students with opportunities to interact with entertainment industry professionals and ask questions about their work, hear intimate live performances, and have hands-on opportunities to explore topics such as songwriting, instrumentation and music production. More than 1,000 students have participated in workshops since the Museum’s opening.

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Guest artists who have participated in education programs include GRAMMY winners Mavis Staples and Los Angeles Guitar Quartet, film composer Martin Shore, and GRAMMYnominated country singer/songwriter Maren Morris. In addition to educational programs with special guests, local Mississippi artists teach workshops at the Mississippi Museum. Plus, the adjacent Delta Music Institute’s Mobile Music Lab presents workshops on topics such as songwriting, music production and guitar basics, which are administered by Delta Music Institute instructors and students. The Museum’s education efforts also include supplying complimentary lesson plans to assist teachers with integrating the arts into core subject areas. Created by the Museum and its Teacher Advisory Board, the lesson plans are available for all schools via www.grammymuseumms.org. The core subjects featured in the lesson plans are music, art, science, history, math, and language arts, with the underlying goals of providing opportunities for students to learn, explore and experience music and arts education, and offsetting the decline in these program areas in schools. “GRAMMY Museum Mississippi offers a one-of-a-kind educational experience for people of all ages, especially students,” says Emily Havens, GRAMMY Museum Mississippi Executive Director. “Whether inspiring young musicians to cultivate their creativity, providing enrichment opportunities via our many workshops or supplementing a music instructor’s curriculum, we hope to have a future GRAMMY winner say they got their start at GRAMMY Museum Mississippi.”

“We hope to have a future GRAMMY winner say they got their start at GRAMMY Museum Mississippi.”




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Tom Petty

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Four decades into a prosperous career, the 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year remains a songwriter with a pure heart By Bill Flanagan

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SAM JONES

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers, Mojo album photo shoot, 2010

Tom Petty was honored as the 2017 MusiCares Person of the Year on Feb. 10 at a special tribute performance and dinner in Los Angeles, recognizing his accomplishments as an artist and humanitarian. MusiCares’ mission is to ensure music people have a compassionate place to turn in times of need while focusing the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the health and welfare of the music community. You can learn more at the MusiCares section of GRAMMY.org.

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om Petty — usually with his legendary band the Heartbreakers but also as a solo artist and as part of Mudcrutch and the Traveling Wilburys — has given music lovers four decades of great records and joyful concerts. There are only a handful of musicians in the rock era who have maintained such a high level of quality and popularity. At the root of everything Petty has accomplished are the songs he has written, more than 25 chart hits, among them “Breakdown,” “American Girl,” “Refugee,” “The Waiting,” “You Got Lucky,” “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around,” “I Won’t Back Down,” “Free Fallin’,” “Runnin’ Down A Dream,” “Learning To Fly,” “Mary Jane’s Last Dance,” and “You Don’t Know How It Feels.” Petty grew up on Top 40 radio in the days of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Motown, and he never accepted that the best rock and roll and the most popular rock and roll were two different categories. But the hits are only the start. Petty has composed a catalog that speaks with depth and compassion: “I Forgive It All,” “Fault Lines,” “Square One,” “Angel Dream,” “Wildflowers,” “Straight Into Darkness,” “Southern Accents,” and “No Second Thoughts.” You can listen to Petty’s music for a lifetime and never get to the bottom of it, or run out of sweet surprises. It is why he was inducted into the

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Songwriters Hall of Fame. It’s why he has co-written songs with Bob Dylan and has been covered by Roy Orbison and Johnny Cash. Tom Petty has been such a big star for so long, we may sometimes take for granted that he is also one of the best songwriters alive. It’s the life’s work of a life well spent. One could also call Petty the conscience of the music business — but it would cause a lot of trouble. One, Petty would not want to be called the conscience of anything; his songs portray flawed, selfeffacing and very human characters who aspire to be worthy of love and beauty, but sometimes fall short. The best you can say about some of the characters Petty sings about is that, after they stumble, they dust themselves off and try again. The other reason is that Petty has always been wary of the business side of music. This is an artist who has gone to war with his record company more than once, who broke the bones in his hand punching a recording studio wall and made a whole concept album about the corruption of an industry that has rewarded him well. Yet there’s no missing that Petty’s orneriness is born of a devotion to rock music so deep that it’s hard to believe 40 years in the business has not broken his heart. You only have to listen to Petty’s SiriusXM Radio program, “Buried Treasure,” to know he is as much a fan of the music as he is a star. He is one of those third-


You are about to go on tour to celebrate 40 years since the first Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers album. I have trouble getting my head around that. When somebody says 40 years, I think they’re talking about the Depression.

generation rockers who internalized the mythology of the Beatles, Dylan and the counterculture so completely that he has spent his whole career trying to live up to it. Tom Petty grew up in hard circumstances and has spent a lifetime learning to be peaceful. He says he makes music for the only reason anyone should — because he has no choice. “In my mind, honestly, it always came down to, ‘But what do I have to lose?’ Because I didn’t have nothin’,” laughs Petty. “I had nothing to lose, which is really incredible weaponry for the war of life. It’s sort of like being a kamikaze pilot. I don’t have anything to lose so I know I’m gonna make my strike. I didn’t have anything to fall back on. I didn’t have any other opportunities. Anytime it got grim, I was at worst back to zero. But I could always feel like it was moving forward in some way.” Tom Petty is a lucky man. He found out young what he was meant to do and has spent his life doing it.

Yeah. It does get your attention. It got my attention. But it seems like 40 years to me.

Does it? Yeah. Someone asked me, “Does it feel like 40 years?” And I thought for a second, and said, [laughs] “Yeah. It really does.” It’s almost all I’ve ever known. We’re very fortunate to be in the position we’re in today after all this time. It humbles you that you have fans that will stand by you like that. And I’m proud of us, you know? I’m proud that our last record [2014’s Hypnotic Eye] was No. 1. We’re still making new stuff that people are interested in, which is a real hard trick at your 40th year. We can’t do that unless there’s an audience to back it up. As corny as it sounds, I’m grateful.

What does being named MusiCares Person of the Year mean to you?

At what point did you realize, “I can do this forever? This isn’t for five years or 10 years. This is going to go on and on.”

I am very flattered. I don’t know what else to say. In my experience they always give that to somebody who is pretty legendary, who has been around a long time. I’m glad to do it. It’s a great charity. I know people that have benefitted from MusiCares. You don’t usually hear stories about somebody that was in trouble and a charity came right through with the money, but I’ve heard that story from several musicians that were down and needed some help and MusiCares [was] right there. I think it’s a fantastic operation and I’m glad to help.

I’m not sure exactly at what point that was, but when I started out I don’t think there were any rock stars that were 40. The ’50s class was probably in their 30s. I didn’t plan for it to go on this long. I wasn’t really thinking about what I was gonna do down the road much. I thought I might wind up a record producer. Something like that, you know? Because I just didn’t ever see anybody get that long a run. But time goes by and you look up one day and you realize, “Wow. This thing is still going strong.” Every year I’m just amazed that we’re still doing it. And we’re still having fun and it’s still good. I’m sure if we thought we weren’t good, you know, if we thought it wasn’t worth the money or it was an inferior product in some way, we wouldn’t do it — because we don’t have to do it. We’re doing it because we love it and, honestly, it’s the only life I know at this point. After all this time I don’t know what else I would do. I don’t want to sit around and do nothing. I’d go crazy. I love playing with the Heartbreakers. I played with them just the other day. It was the first time in a couple of years that I played with all of them. It’s a great band. You just don’t find bands like that.

I know you’ve supported a lot of good causes privately, but I can’t remember you ever talking about it from the stage or tying your charitable work to your music. Well, it’s not charity if you take credit for it. True charity — just my personal belief — you don’t say anything about. Charity is definitely something you have to be aware of when you’ve been blessed like I have. It’s your responsibility. You owe it to people.

It is. And I do believe in the cause. I think it’s a very good operation, which is hard to say for certain about a lot of big organized charities. You often wonder where the money is actually going or if it does more than pay for the office. But this is such a noble thing. I’m all for MusiCares because I know people where they came through and they helped them. There’s so many musicians and people in this business who you might think are living a wonderful life, but who have had great hardship and haven’t had the blessings that some of us have had — especially the guys from the ’50s and ’60s. I know for a fact that they help people and I’m glad to be there. And it’s their gig. If they want to raise money by doing all those things you just mentioned, I’m all for it. I’ll be there with a smile.

DENNIS CALLAHAN

I say this with total respect for MusiCares, which is a really great cause: I was reading a press release and the auction was described as featuring VIP experiences, one-of-a-kind celebrity memorabilia, backstage meet-and-greets, and a special VIP lounge. I thought, “Tom must really believe in this, ’cause that’s everything he doesn’t go for.”

Soundcheck at the Oakland Coliseum, early 1990s

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards 175


RED SLATER

Mudcrutch circa early 1970s: (l-r) Randall Marsh, Tom Petty, Mike Campbell, and Tom Leadon

Jourard, who was in the Motels. He and his brother Jeff were local Gainesville guys as well. It’s really stunning to read the book and see how many of the local guys eventually made it onto records and had a hit here or there. I didn’t realize how unusual it was until I got away from it. In retrospect, it was a really big music scene for a town that had about 100,000 people, if that. There [were] so many bands and probably 20 that worked. That you knew. And some that came along after we left. They still had people come out of there and make records. One thing that was really good about Gainesville is that there were so many opportunities to play. There’s a lot of gigs because of the college there, the University of Florida. There was always something going on that you could get 100 bucks for. We could play a fraternity party social and pick up 50, 100 bucks and then that night we’d do another gig. What’s really strange is that Mudcrutch would fill up a 1,000-seat auditorium for a dollar apiece. We would play these outdoor shows on Sunday afternoons where they’d throw up a PA and thousands of people would come. That was the days of the love-in and everything. It kind of climaxed on Halloween one year [in] ’72 or ’73. They always had this thing called a Halloween ball. All the best rock bands came. They’d have probably six bands on Halloween night. Mudcrutch kind of topped that bill and 10,000 people came. It was free but still, 10,000 was a lot. So we had that mentality of the difference between playing a concert and playing in a club. We did both. It was great training in Gainesville to play clubs where we would play five 45-minute sets every night, six nights a week.

That’s for sure. You say it’s a couple of years since you’ve played with all of them because you were out with Mudcrutch, which includes Heartbreakers Mike Campbell and Benmont Tench. There are albums that are Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers albums. There are albums that are Tom Petty solo albums. There are Mudcrutch albums. But in all of them, you’re the main singer and the main songwriter and there’s almost always Mike and Benmont. Is there an emotional difference to you when you start a project to say it’s Mudcrutch or it’s the Heartbreakers or it’s a solo record?

When you were making 1979’s Damn The Torpedoes you famously had a legal battle with the record company during which you declared bankruptcy and said, “I’ll go back and be a peanut farmer before I give you this record.” You won the case and Damn The Torpedoes became your breakthrough album. Then in 1981 you had another label battle over the price of Hard Promises.

Mudcrutch, for sure, is a different thing because the rhythm section is different. You have different bass and drums, which is a huge thing — there’s also more lead singers. Mudcrutch is a different mindset for sure. Full Moon Fever was a solo record where Mike played on it. Benmont and Howie [Epstein, former Heartbreakers bassist] might have stuck their heads in for a minute. I think Howie left. I remember him being there and leaving. I think Benmont played on one song. But that was a solo record. I don’t think Wildflowers should have been called a solo record, necessarily. But we had done tracks with other people. I had done tracks with Ringo [Starr] playing the drums. We had different people, but it basically ended up being the Heartbreakers minus [drummer] Stan Lynch and plus [drummer] Steve Ferrone, who soon became a Heartbreaker. That was the lineup that stuck. So that one I don’t think is truly a solo record. But it started out as something I was gonna do on my own.

No. [laughs] All of us probably dropped out of high school. There’s a book out about the Gainesville music scene written by Marty

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Recording Damn The Torpedoes in Los Angeles, 1979

JOEL BERNSTEIN

What was it about Gainesville, Fla.? One little town turns out Stephen Stills, two members of the Eagles, and you and the Heartbreakers. Did your high school have a really good music teacher or something?

I was a real wound-up kid, wasn’t I?


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I think I walked away from it feeling like, “They’re gonna win anyway. I’ve won my round but I haven’t stopped greed.” Which is at the root of all American problems. It’s greed. How much do you need? Once your grandkids’ kids are set for life, do you really need some more?

DENNIS CALLAHAN

Promotional image, circa mid-1980s

When you’re vindicated like that, when you go to war for a righteous cause and you win, does it make you then start looking for fights? It made me consciously aware that I didn’t want that job. They were big fights. There’s a lot of pressure but knowing you’re right kind of holds you there. But I’ll tell you — by the time it’s over, you’re just glad it’s over. I really didn’t want to be in that situation any more than I had to be. With the record pricing thing, I really thought other artists were gonna throw in behind me. And nobody threw in. Nobody.

Right. Like when Pearl Jam went to war with Ticketmaster. Exactly. I thought people would go, “I don’t need that extra dollar either.” And nobody did. [laughs] It left me hanging out there to dry. It’s lonely when you’re suddenly fighting the entire industry. Did I win? Well, I won for a while. This might sound egotistical, but the truth is, if [MCA Records] had listened to me in 1981 they wouldn’t have gone out of business. It was pricing your product out of the hands of the everyday person that killed your trip. I don’t know if I walked away from that feeling victorious. I think I walked away from it feeling like, “They’re gonna win anyway. I’ve won my round but I haven’t stopped greed.” Which is at the root of all

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American problems. It’s greed. How much do you need? Once your grandkids’ kids are set for life, do you really need some more? Is it worth hurting someone or hurting the earth or hurting anything when you’ve already got more money than you’re gonna be able to spend in your lifetime or your kids’ lifetimes? There are many people who are consumed with making more money. This is fascinating to me. Maybe it’s because I was poor as a kid and I understand that you can get a certain amount of money and you’re fine. You don’t have to do everything to make more. But in American society that drive is prevalent, of making as much money as you possibly can and then never stopping. It isn’t like they’re gonna get to a point and go, “OK, I got my dough.” I don’t understand why a billionaire needs more money. But they all think they do. This is something that fascinates me. And I’ve written about it again and again. I do think it’s at the core of all of these problems that we have. You’ve made a lot of money and it’s OK now if you didn’t make any more. You just have to stay within some guidelines so you don’t destroy the planet or somebody’s life. Somehow in there America got convinced that if you’re not rich, you’re not having a good life. That wasn’t the case when I grew up. When I grew up people were quite happy in the middle class. I was kind of on the low end of the middle class but we still could own our house and have a car. They didn’t make a fortune but they weren’t really trying to make any more. You weren’t judged by how many cars you had or what kind of clothes you wore.

Your 2002 album The Last DJ was a pretty fierce critique of ... Same subject.

The same subject. It’s about the music business but it’s really just about capitalism without any brakes. Do you think you burned any bridges with that record? I hope not. I could have picked something else than the music business for the metaphor, I suppose, but I knew the music business. I hope I didn’t burn any bridges. I know some people were rubbed the wrong way in the beginning. But I felt like



The song “The Last DJ” has one of my favorite lines: “The boys upstairs want to see how much you’ll pay for what you used to get for free.” Exactly.

The Traveling Wilburys in 1988 (l-r): Bob Dylan, Jeff Lynne, Petty, Roy Orbison, George Harrison

NEAL PRESTON

something needed to be said and so I said it. Now I get more people saying to me, “Wow, I get The Last DJ now. You were right about that.” At the time it was tough because I thought I’d done something really good and it was not received that way. Radio, in particular, had a problem with it. And I love radio. That hurt my feelings. I just thought, “Well, I’ve hit on a subject that nobody wants to deal with.” But I’m not sorry I did it. I mean, a song like “Joe” [a song about a label executive telling an artist, “You get to be famous, I get to be rich”], I heard it on the radio and I was like, “Wow, I don’t know if I would write that today.” But … it’s true.

That’s true of water, television, everything. Everything. [laughs] Your mail. It’s just crazy. We’ve raised people to try to get money out of everything. I don’t know. I don’t want to sound like I’m a cranky old man bitching that the past was better. But it was.

Bill Flanagan is a producer of Spotify’s “Drawn And Recorded” and VH1’s “The Breaks,” and hosts “Written In My Soul” and “Flanagan’s Wake” on SiriusXM Radio. He also contributes essays to “CBS Sunday Morning.”

DENNIS CALLAHAN

Onstage, late 1970s

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THE RECORDING ACADEMY® TODAY

The Recording Academy’s headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif.

Membership & Industry Relations GRAMMY® Week GRAMMY Museum® MusiCares Foundation® Advocacy & Public Policy The Latin Recording Academy® The Digital Academy GRAMMY Pro® The GRAMMY Awards® Process

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MEMBERSHIP & INDUSTRY RELATIONS

RECORDING ACADEMY MEMBERSHIP The Recording Academy is the premier membership organization for music professionals. Through active participation in The Academy and its initiatives, members join a community that positively impacts the lives of music creators and the music industry at large. Voting members are the songwriters, performers, producers, engineers, and other creative individuals who vote in the GRAMMY Awards process and are eligible to serve as Trustees who govern the organization and set its advocacy positions. Associate members comprise managers, executives and other professionals who advance the industry through involvement in The Academy. For college students planning to dedicate their professional careers to music, GRAMMY University Network (GRAMMY U) offers a membership opportunity focused on shaping the next generation of leaders.

organized voice for the creative and technical recording community, P&E Wing members address critical issues that impact the art and craft of recorded music. Sound quality, development of new technologies, technical best practices, education in the recording arts, and advocacy for the rights of music creators are all part of the P&E Wing mix. In Washington, D.C., The Recording Academy serves as the voice of songwriters, performers and studio professionals, ensuring the creators’ voice is amplified on Capitol Hill. Through the GRAMMYs on the Hill and GRAMMYs in My District initiatives, Academy members influence policies and legislation that affect the music community. Members have an opportunity to gather with each other to directly lobby lawmakers on Capitol Hill during annual GRAMMYs in My District events. Whether fighting for free

expression, copyright protection, music education, or fair pay for all creators across all platforms, The Academy leads the charge to advance the rights of its members and of the entire recording community. GRAMMYPro.com is the digital home for members of The Recording Academy. Connecting and empowering Academy members from all backgrounds, genres and disciplines, GRAMMY Pro hosts a community of music professionals pursuing excellence in the business and craft of music. The staff headquartered in Santa Monica, Calif., as well as in the 12 Chapters, conducts the daily operations of The Recording Academy with guidance provided by the National Board of Trustees. The Trustees are elected by the Governors of each Chapter to provide vision and ensure effective corporate governance of The Academy.

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Representing music markets across the country, The Recording Academy’s 12 regional Chapters work year-round building community through professional development programming, networking, advocacy, and philanthropy. Academy members are associated with the Chapter closest to their home city, and also have full access to the services and support of all 12 Chapters. The Academy serves its national membership through Chapters located in Atlanta, Austin (Texas Chapter), Chicago, Los Angeles, Memphis, Miami (Florida Chapter), Nashville, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Seattle (Pacific Northwest Chapter), and Washington, D.C. The Producers & Engineers Wing is a Recording Academy membership division created to serve the needs of producers, engineers, remixers, manufacturers, technologists, and other related musicrecording professionals. A network with more than 6,000 members, the P&E Wing comprises experts whose work spans all genres, regions and styles. As a powerful,

The Avett Brothers perform during a GRAMMY U SoundChecks installment on June 19, 2016, in Austin, Texas

For more information on Recording Academy membership, visit www.grammypro.com.



GRAMMY® WEEK

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ith GRAMMY Week, The Recording Academy takes advantage of the days prior to the highly anticipated GRAMMY Awards telecast to produce a colorful schedule of private and public programs that celebrate and illuminate the indelible place of music in our society. The Academy honors groundbreaking industry leaders with GRAMMY Salute To Industry Icons, celebrated during Clive Davis’ and The Recording Academy’s Pre-GRAMMY Gala, an exclusive event for which The Academy teams with the innovative music executive to produce this legendary annual GRAMMY party. The official GRAMMY Nominees Reception brings together GRAMMY nominees in a night of celebration prior to the GRAMMY Awards telecast. The Producers & Engineers Wing’s annual GRAMMY Week gala celebrates excellence in music and audio and the professionals working “behind the glass” whose visionary talents have significantly

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impacted the audio production landscape. Members of GRAMMY Camp — Jazz Session, comprising the nation’s top high school instrumentalists and vocalists, travel to the host city of the GRAMMY Awards and perform at key events, including the GRAMMY Celebration after-party, the GRAMMY Nominees Reception and more. The Entertainment Law Initiative aims to promote future careers in entertainment law by inviting the nation’s top law students to participate in a legal writing contest and scholarship competition. ELI is toasted with a highprofile luncheon and awards ceremony attended by students, music attorneys, executives, and members of The Recording Academy.

MusiCares hosts the prestigious Person of the Year tribute dinner and concert two nights before the GRAMMY Awards. The event honors individuals (the most recent honorees include Lionel Richie, Bob Dylan, Carole King, Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney, and Barbra Streisand) for their philanthropic and creative achievements. Funds raised from the annual Person of the Year tribute benefit MusiCares’ health and human services programs and the event draws attention to the important work of the organization. The GRAMMY Charity Online Auctions, which raise money for MusiCares, are held in conjunction with the GRAMMY Awards at www.ebay.com/grammy. Finally, the week ends with the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony, GRAMMY Awards telecast and the GRAMMY Celebration after-party, a glamorous post-show affair. It’s an entire day of celebrating not just the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards nominees and recipients, but also the spirit and importance of music in everyone’s lives.

MICHAEL KOVAC/WIREIMAGE.COM

LARRY BUSACCA/GETTY IMAGES

Adam Lambert and Jack Antonoff perform during Clive Davis’ and The Recording Academy’s PreGRAMMY Gala on Feb. 14, 2016

Honoree Rick Rubin, Josh Groban and Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow attend the Producers & Engineers Wing’s annual GRAMMY Week gala on Feb. 11, 2016

The Recording Academy’s full calendar of GRAMMY Week programs differs slightly each year. For complete news and information on GRAMMY Week, visit www.grammy.com.



GRAMMY MUSEUM®

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T

he GRAMMY Museum has served as a dynamic educational and interactive institution dedicated to the power of music since opening its doors in 2008. The 30,000-square-foot facility — developed as a joint venture of The Recording Academy and AEG — is part of L.A. Live, the premier sports and entertainment destination in downtown Los Angeles. The GRAMMY Museum explores and celebrates the enduring legacies of all forms of music; the creative process; the art and technology of the recording process; and, of course, the colorful history of the GRAMMY Awards. Through more than two dozen cutting-edge exhibits, the Museum provides a one-ofa-kind visitor experience — engaging, educational, celebratory, and inspirational. Dedicated Museum computer databases contain information on nearly 60 years of GRAMMY recordings and artists, and rare artifacts connect visitors to the legendary recordings and artists honored by the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame and The Recording Academy’s Special Merit Awards. The Museum also shares the process through which GRAMMY winners are selected as well as how the telecast comes together. Since its inaugural year, the Museum has presented exhibits such as a Michael Jackson memorial retrospective; All Eyez On Me: The Writings Of Tupac Shakur; Sinatra: An American Icon; The Taylor Swift Experience; and Whitney! Celebrating The Musical Legacy Of Whitney Houston. The Museum’s more recent exhibits include Hey! Ho! Let’s Go: Ramones And The Birth Of Punk; Ladies And Gentlemen ... The Beatles!; Respect! Otis Redding And The Revolution Of Soul; and Bruce Springsteen: A Photographic Journey. The GRAMMY Museum also hosts a wide range of public programs in the 200-seat Clive Davis Theater, including artist interviews, live performances, film screenings, lectures, and continuing education classes. The past year has seen an exciting lineup of critically acclaimed programs with artists ranging from James

Jane Ortner Artist Award recipient Lady Gaga performs at the 2016 Jane Ortner Education Award Luncheon on April 4, 2016

Bay, Josh Homme and Iggy Pop to Panic! At The Disco and Anoushka Shankar, among others. All past public programs are available for viewing in the GRAMMY Museum’s archives. The Museum’s Education Division offers a variety of multidisciplinary programs to inspire, teach and engage students, teachers and families. From education workshops based on state and national educational content standards, to digital music production, workshops emphasizing various career pathways, and outreach programs designed to bring music to disenfranchised communities, the Museum aims to build students’ knowledge of the world through music. To celebrate the intersection of music and education, the Museum hosted its Jane Ortner Education Award event on April 4, 2016, featuring award recipients Lady Gaga and Southern California-based educator Jonathan Bernal. To expand its reach in other historically significant music communities throughout the country, the first GRAMMY Museum outside of Los Angeles officially opened in Cleveland, Miss., on March 5, 2016. Situated along the historical Mississippi

Blues Trail and Mississippi Country Music Trail near the campus of Delta State University, GRAMMY Museum Mississippi is the most technologically advanced music-themed museum in the South. A 28,000-square-foot facility, the Mississippi Museum’s permanent exhibits include interactive experiences such as Mono To Surround and Dance To The Music, as well as exhibits highlighting the Museum’s historic location. The Mississippi Museum also puts music education at the forefront of its mission by providing tours and lesson plans for teachers, student workshops, and educational and public programs. In addition to the Mississippi Museum, the GRAMMY Museum opened the GRAMMY Museum Gallery at the Musicians Hall of Fame in Nashville, Tenn., on March 29, 2016. Membership dues and donations support the GRAMMY Museums’ public and educational programs as well as maintain its cutting-edge exhibits. There are a variety of membership packages available, including corporate packages. All members enjoy exclusive access to both Museum locations and their programs.

To learn more about the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live and its various programs, or to become a member, visit www.grammymuseum.org or call 213.765.6800. For more information on GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, visit www.grammymuseumms.org or call 662.441.0100.


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E

stablished in 1989 by The Recording Academy, MusiCares provides a safety net of critical assistance for music people in times of need. MusiCares’ services and resources cover a wide range of financial, medical and personal emergencies, and each case is treated with integrity and confidentiality. Since its inception, MusiCares has developed into a premier support system for music people and its innovative programs and services are designed to meet the specific needs of its constituents. Last year MusiCares distributed more than $4.5 million in direct financial assistance to more than 6,000 music people in need. MusiCares also earned its third consecutive fourstar rating from charity evaluator Charity Navigator. Only 14 percent of charities have earned this top rating for at least three consecutive years.

EMERGENCY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM With a commitment to providing help to those in need as quickly as possible, the Emergency Financial Assistance Program provides assistance for basic living expenses, including rent, utilities and car payments; medical expenses, including doctor, dentist and hospital bills; psychotherapy; and treatment for HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, hepatitis C, and other critical illnesses. The program is open to music people who are able to document at least five years of employment in the music industry and/or credited contribution to six commercially released recordings or videos, and who can demonstrate proof of need. MusiCares operates toll-free phone lines in the West region (800.687.4227), East region (877.303.6962) and South region (877.626.2748).

HEALTHY ESSENTIALS SERVICES Proactive services can often prevent our community members from falling into crisis. MusiCares has developed a slate of Healthy Essentials maintenance and

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preventative services, including dental and medical screenings and clinics; workshops on financial, legal and health issues; and panels at industry conferences and festivals. In addition, MusiCares helps music professionals understand and access medical insurance options available under the Affordable Care Act.

ADDICTION RECOVERY The MusiCares MAP Fund, launched when MusiCares joined with the Musicians’ Assistance Program, has become a leading force in the effort to identify and address the problems of addiction in our industry by utilizing a pool of resources set aside specifically to provide members of the music community access to addiction recovery treatment and sober living. The MusiCares MAP Fund benefit concert is held annually to generate resources for our addiction recovery services. Staffed by qualified chemical dependency and intervention specialists, the MusiCares Safe Harbor Room program, which is sponsored by the Bohemian Foundation and RBC Capital Markets, offers a support network to those in recovery while they are participating in the production of televised music shows and other major music events. In addition, MusiCares offers weekly addiction support groups for people in the music industry to discuss how to best cope with the issues surrounding the recovery process, and the MusiCares Sober Touring Network provides a resource of individuals across the United States who take music people to recovery support meetings while on the road. MusiCares holds an annual Teens Make Music Contest in partnership with DrugFree.org, which invites teen musicians to create songs or videos about the importance of healthy choices or the dangers of drug abuse. The contest is open to young musicians ages 14–18, and the first-place winner receives two tickets to the GRAMMY Awards.

2016 MusiCares Person of the Year Lionel Richie

PERSON OF THE YEAR TRIBUTE The annual MusiCares Person of the Year tribute gala takes place during GRAMMY Week. Each year, the event honors a recording artist who has made important contributions to the world of music and has demonstrated extraordinary humanitarian and philanthropic efforts. Launched in 1991, the event generates significant financial support for MusiCares and draws attention to the critical work of the organization. The 2017 honoree is Tom Petty. Previous honorees are Tony Bennett, Bono, Natalie Cole, Phil Collins, David Crosby, Neil Diamond, Bob Dylan, Gloria Estefan, Aretha Franklin, Don Henley, Billy Joel, Elton John, Quincy Jones, Carole King, Paul McCartney, Luciano Pavarotti, Bonnie Raitt, Lionel Richie, Paul Simon, Bruce Springsteen, Sting, Barbra Streisand, James Taylor, Brian Wilson, Stevie Wonder, and Neil Young. Throughout the year, the GRAMMY Charity Online Auctions raise funds for MusiCares programs by bringing exclusive VIP experiences and autographed memorabilia to the public through various partners, including Charitybuzz, eBay, Julien’s Auctions, Omaze, and Prizeo.

HOW CAN I HELP? Your help is more important now than ever. Please consider MusiCares for your personal or professional charitable contribution. Your contribution can make a real difference in the lives of the members of our music family.

To learn more about MusiCares’ programs and services, visit www.musicares.org or call 310.392.3777.

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ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY

Kathy Sledge (center) leads Academy members in singing “We Are Family” during 2016 GRAMMYs on the Hill Advocacy Day on April 14, 2016, in Washington, D.C.

MISSION The only membership organization representing all types of music creators, The Recording Academy was dubbed the “supersized musicians lobby” by Congressional Quarterly. The Academy’s Advocacy & Public Policy office in Washington, D.C., partners with Academy members from across the country to present a powerful lobbying corps for music creators’ rights.

ADVOCACY The GRAMMYs on the Hill Awards is an annual celebration where Academy members, lawmakers and music industry professionals honor music creators and legislators who have improved the overall environment for music, followed by GRAMMYs on the Hill Advocacy Day, a day of grassroots lobbying on Capitol Hill. GRAMMYs in My District is the largest nationwide grassroots lobbying campaign for music in which Academy members visit the local offices of congressional

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members. The GRAMMY Fund for Music Creators — a political action committee — gives Academy members another meaningful opportunity to help protect the rights of music makers by supporting members of Congress who advocate for music creators. Recording Academy leaders serve as expert witnesses before key congressional hearings determining music policy.

EDUCATION The Advocacy office’s education efforts include the Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus, where The Academy jointly produces events with members of Congress on Capitol Hill to educate policymakers about the issues facing music makers. In addition, online and social media engagement includes an Advocacy Action tool that allows members to advocate directly for pro-music policies with government officials, as well as dedicated Facebook (GRAMMYAdvocacy) and Twitter (@GRAMMYAdvocacy) pages,

regular blogs, op-eds from Academy members featured around the country, and news bulletins to give Academy members real-time updates on policy matters.

DIALOGUE Events include the GRAMMY Town Hall, a series of congressional briefings to educate Academy members on key policy matters, GRAMMY Industry Roundtable, a series where policy leaders and music professionals discuss critical issues in a private, off-the-record setting, and the Music Leaders Retreat, a semiannual gathering co-founded and co-hosted by Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow for leaders of every major music association to discuss common legislative goals and important community issues. For more information about Advocacy & Public Policy at The Recording Academy, visit www.grammy.org/advocacy.


BE INSPIRED BY THE MUSIC OF THE SAILS

W

hen the wind begins to freshen, the captain calls you to the top deck. You’re standing with shipmates, listening to the swell of classical music playing in the background. You are in awe, as you watch acres of canvas being pulled skyward, up the tall straight masts of a majestic Star Clippers sailing vessel. Imagine the emotion of the sweet music and the breeze off the glistening ocean—what could be more magical than this moment? For over 25 years, Star Clippers has built a family of vessels to provide a unique sailing experience like no other with the elegance and amenities of a private yacht. Each year, the ship sails to exhilarating new itineraries and off-the-beaten-path destinations and ports untouched by larger vessels. Join us on yet another adventure-filled sojourn to wondrous parts of the world where you’ll be ready for riveting encounters and unforgettable memories.

Congratulations! Our Sails Salute GRAMMY® Nominees and Winners Book by March 28, 2017 and receive EXCLUSIVE $100 per cabin onboard beverage credit. Promo Code: GRAMMY2017

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CONTACT STAR CLIPPERS AT 800.442.0551 • info@starclippers.com • www.starclippers.com or Your Travel Professional All rates are in US dollars per person based on double occupancy and do not include airfare, port charges or gratuities. Book by March 28, 2017 and mention promo code: GRAMMY2017. Offer of $100 onboard beverage credit is per cabin ($50 per person), has no cash value, is not redeemable for cash, is non-transferable and will expire if not used by the last evening of the passenger’s sailing. This offer is for new bookings only. Space is limited. Offer may be changed or withdrawn at any time. Other restrictions may apply. Star Clipper GSA, Inc. dba Star Clippers America acts only as a sales and marketing agent for Star Clippers, Ltd. for purpose of booking travel arrangements on Star Clippers vessels. Star Clippers, Ltd. operates the vessels on which you will be sailing. © Star Clippers 2017. Ship’s Registry: Malta.CST#37231


THE LATIN RECORDING ACADEMY® ®

KEVIN WINTER/WIREIMAGE.COM

Jennifer Lopez and 2016 Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year Marc Anthony at the 17th Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards on Nov. 17, 2016, in Las Vegas

I

n 2016 The Latin Recording Academy celebrated its 17th year of honoring Latin music. The Latin Recording Academy, a venture launched by The Recording Academy, is a unique international membership-based association dedicated to improving the quality of life and cultural condition for Latin music and its creators. The Latin Recording Academy Board of Trustees drive the organization’s efforts in staging the annual Latin GRAMMY Awards and many ancillary events while fulfilling The Latin Academy’s mission. The Latin GRAMMY Awards aims to recognize artistic and technical excellence, not sales figures or chart positions, and the nominees and respective winners are determined by their peers — the qualified Voting members of The Latin Recording Academy. Latin GRAMMY nominees and winners are chosen through a process similar to the GRAMMY Awards, with a few important differences: membership and voting are international, the eligible releases can be issued both inside and outside the United States and the recordings are primarily in Spanish or Portuguese. This year, the Latin GRAMMY Awards process was facilitated for the first time using an online voting tool.

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Culminating a busy week of Latin GRAMMY-related events, the 17th Latin GRAMMY Awards telecast aired on the Univision Network live from T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. More than 9 million viewers tuned in to all or part of the live three-hour broadcast in the United States, in addition to approximately 80 million viewers worldwide. The telecast positioned Univision as the No. 3 broadcast network for the entire evening among adults 18–34. The Biggest Night in Latin Music was a worldwide trending topic on Twitter and the No. 1 social program on TV for the night. The Latin Academy continued building on a long-standing tradition when Marc Anthony was celebrated as the 2016 Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year. The Person of the Year gala has become a top networking and entertainment dinner, gathering members of the Latin music industry. Additionally, The Latin Recording Academy recognized the impressive long-lasting careers of El Consorcio (Mocedades), Eugenia León, Ricardo Montaner, Ednita Nazario, and

Piero as 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award recipients; and Carlos Mejía Godoy, Nelson Motta and Rafael Solano as 2016 Trustees Award recipients. In 2014 The Latin Recording Academy, with the support of The Recording Academy, announced the creation of the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation as a means to further awareness and appreciation of the significant contributions of Latin music and its creators through scholarships, fellowships, grants, and educational programs. The Latin Recording Academy, The Recording Academy, generous corporate sponsors, and a group of individuals have pledged sufficient funds to allow the Foundation to continue helping young students fulfill their music dreams. In May 2016, the Latin GRAMMY Foundation announced the recipient of the Juan Luis Guerra Scholarship, awarding $200,000 to Berklee School of Music student Jesús Molina-Acosta, a pianist from Colombia. In July 2016, an additional $700,000 in scholarships was awarded to 43 students from various Latin American countries, Spain and the United States. Additionally, the Cultural Foundation awarded $20,000 in grants to institutions from various countries for the purpose of research and preservation of Latin music. LatinGRAMMY.com continues to be the spine of The Latin Academy’s international communication for members, media and Latin music fans. The Latin GRAMMYs’ social networks continue to grow, reaching more than 4.2 million users worldwide. The active, generous and selfless participation of The Latin Recording Academy’s Trustees, various ad hoc committees and active members around the world, along with the help of its sister organization, The Recording Academy, ensures that programs and activities are current and relevant to the Latin music community.

For more information, visit www.latingrammy.com, or contact The Latin Recording Academy’s headquarters in Miami at 305.576.0036 or the Awards office in Santa Monica at 310.581.8689.


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THE DIGITAL ACADEMY

A

s The Recording Academy has grown its mission, programs and services to meet the needs of the 21st-century music community, the organization’s digital initiatives continue to expand to communicate and advance our mission and the GRAMMY brand. And like the digital world itself, The Academy’s digital work will accelerate at an even faster pace moving forward. This growth stems from the development of a long-term strategy to leverage our digital platforms in a cohesive and comprehensive way to further build on our unique position in the music industry; draw awareness to our core tenets of musical excellence, philanthropy and advocacy; and break through the clutter to engage our fans while providing quality services and utility to our valued members. Over the past year, The Academy has bridged its various digital platforms like never before to support a wide array of

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initiatives, from advocacy calls to action to MusiCares fundraising, member awareness, fan engagement and, of course, the GRAMMY Awards process and GRAMMY telecast itself. The GRAMMY Awards process is supported through The Academy’s commitment to provide Voting members the ability to listen to full tracks of nominated music in a streaming, ondemand format. This online evaluation tool has become a powerful resource for our Voting members. Next on the horizon: a commitment to building an online tool to make the voting process even more efficient. The GRAMMY Awards telecast is served by a mix of web-based, mobile and social media efforts that help build awareness for and drive viewership to Music’s Biggest Night, celebrating music and its cultural impact in ways that connect with music fans in an accessible and conversational voice.

GRAMMY Live offers a live video stream of GRAMMY activities, including a live webcast of the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony and special behindthe-scenes action and backstage coverage during the GRAMMY telecast, including red carpet interviews and exclusive GRAMMY Week content. More than 70 categories of awards are presented during the Premiere Ceremony, and until 2008 the presentation was only available to those in attendance. GRAMMY.com and Academy social media platforms work in concert to deliver live event coverage, video, photo uploads, and editorial content that provide an authentic GRAMMY journey for fans. The success of this engagement led to the 58th GRAMMY Awards generating more than 121 million social interactions on GRAMMY Monday, trailing only the World Cup and Super Bowl as the top social media event for 2016. GRAMMY.com traffic reached 3.1 million visitors, and GRAMMY YouTube channel views topped 88 million. The Academy also utilizes its digital presence year-round to support the organization’s initiatives by sharing unique content on such platforms as YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, GRAMMY.com, and the informational GRAMMY.org where users can explore the music and artists who are impacting the culture, learn important Academy-related news and engage in Academy programs. The GRAMMY Pro website provides Academy members with exclusive professional development content, easy online membership management tools and a members-only social network where they can share, connect and learn from one another. The Academy is continually innovating its digital initiatives for the best engagement and communication with music fans and Academy members, and is making significant investments going forward to continue to create contemporary digital programs.



GRAMMY PRO®

Recording Academy members can enjoy access to GRAMMYPro.com online and via their smartphones and tablets

G

RAMMY Pro is The Recording Academy’s Membership & Industry Relations initiative designed to foster a true professional community. Through online content, events, community engagement, and collaborations with industry partners, GRAMMY Pro offers a wide range of professional development resources to expand the knowledge base and networks of today’s music professionals. Representing the diverse interests of membership, GRAMMY Pro continues to evolve with the changing needs and feedback of Recording Academy members. GRAMMY Pro’s members-only website, www.grammypro.com, gives Academy members 24/7 access to exclusive online content. The website features a library of videos and articles exploring the business and craft behind music. Quick tutorials provide tips and techniques from industry

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veterans while in-depth interviews with professionals from various backgrounds deliver insight into the latest topics, trends and technologies shaping the music industry. Marketing, branding, social media, production, engineering, singing, songwriting, touring, management, and licensing are among the array of topics covered through the site. Themed content series such as GRAMMY Pro Songwriter Week focus on specific crafts, providing members with resources to sharpen their skills, learn new techniques and seek inspiration. In addition, coverage of professional development events presented by The Recording Academy’s 12 Chapters bring local programming directly to members nationwide. The website also serves as members’ gateway to the GRAMMY Awards process with links to balloting and telecast ticket information, as well as an online listening

function; a one-stop shop for membership management, allowing for easy signups and renewals; one-click access to Membership staff; and a community where members can build business relationships, collaborate creatively or simply connect socially with other artists and music professionals across the country. In addition to on-demand resources via the website, GRAMMYPro.com offers live-streamed programming with a range of professional development offerings, including up-close-and-personal conversations, engaging presentations and a variety of activities to serve Recording Academy members of all backgrounds and experience levels.

For more information, please visit www.grammypro.com.


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GRAMMY AWARDS® PROCESS

®

T

he GRAMMY Awards process is complex and involved. Each entry is subjected to verification, screening and multilevel nominating procedures, ensuring fairness and integrity. Each year, from early July through August, The Recording Academy receives more than 20,000 entries, which are processed and verified by Academy staff for eligibility. Next, over a two-week period each fall at the annual GRAMMY Awards screening meetings, hundreds of music experts from around the country gather in Los Angeles to sort entries for placement in their appropriate categories.

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The genres include Alternative Music, American Roots Music, Children’s, Classical, Country, Dance/Electronic Music, Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music, Jazz, Latin, Metal, Music For Visual Media, New Age, Pop/Rock, R&B, Rap, Reggae, Regional Roots Music, Traditional Pop, and World Music. During the screening process, a great deal of care is taken to ensure each entry has been fully vetted for eligibility and placed into its appropriate category. These screening meetings are one of many vital steps in the complete GRAMMY Awards process. Once the screening process is complete,

the entry list is created and sent with the first ballot to all Voting members of The Recording Academy. In addition, 25 craft committees with experts in the fields of packaging, album notes, historical, surround sound, remixing, composing/ arranging, producing, and engineering meet to determine the nominees in these respective specialty categories. When the first ballot has closed, the initial results are tallied by The Recording Academy’s independent accounting firm and the nominations list is created. This list is determined by the first-round vote of Academy Voting members in good standing. In some categories, the top five nominees are determined by this vote. In the General Field and in several of the specialized genre Fields — such as Jazz, Classical and American Roots Music — the initial list is brought down to the top 15 to 30 vote recipients in each category, and is then voted on by special national nomination review committees — by genre — comprising Voting members from each of The Academy’s Chapter cities and approved by the National Board of Trustees. These committees, much like the screening committees, gather for multiday meetings to determine the top five nominees in each category. The votes are cast by secret ballot and are, once again, tabulated by our independent accounting firm. The top five vote recipients in each category become GRAMMY nominees. The nominations are generally announced in early December. Approximately two weeks later, final ballots are sent to Voting members of The Academy, who select the GRAMMY recipients. The accounting firm again tabulates the votes and the sealed results are opened for the first time during the GRAMMY Awards telecast and GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony. A group of specialists representing every genre of music meets in April to determine the necessity, integrity and feasibility of Awards-related proposals submitted throughout the year. Any proposals approved by The Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees will be implemented immediately for the upcoming Awards year.


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THE RECORDING ACADEMY® EXECUTIVE STAFF

NEIL PORTNOW President/CEO

WAYNE ZAHNER Chief Financial Officer

NEDA AZARFAR Vice President, Marketing Communications

BRANDEN CHAPMAN Executive In Charge Of Production & Chief Business Development Officer

RICK ENGDAHL Chief Information Officer

BILL FREIMUTH Senior Vice President, Awards

DARYL P. FRIEDMAN Chief Industry, Government & Member Relations Officer

GAETANO FRIZZI Chief Human Resources Officer

EVAN GREENE Chief Marketing Officer

JASON JAMES Chief Digital Officer

DAVID KONJOYAN Vice President, Creative Services

LAURA SEGURA MUELLER Vice President, Membership & Industry Relations

NANCY SHAPIRO Senior Vice President, Special Projects

GARY SMITH Managing Partner, Deloitte & Touche

DOUG HALLEY Partner, Deloitte & Touche

ADVISORS

JOEL KATZ General Counsel

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CHUCK ORTNER National Legal Counsel

SANDRA BOBBY ROSENBLOUM CRAWSHAW-SPARKS Deputy General Deputy National Counsel Counsel


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THE RECORDING ACADEMY® NATIONAL TRUSTEE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

TRUSTEE OFFICERS

JOHN POPPO Chair Of The Board

RUBY MARCHAND Vice Chair

ERIC SCHILLING Secretary/Treasurer

GEORGE J. FLANIGEN IV Chair Emeritus

TRUSTEES

MINDI ABAIR Los Angeles

CLAUDIA BRANT Los Angeles

GREG “STRYKE” CHIN Florida

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CARLOS ALVAREZ Texas

JEFF BALDING Nashville

IVAN BARIAS Philadelphia

SCOTT BILLINGTON Memphis

MAURETTE BROWN CLARK Washington, D.C.

HELEN BRUNER Philadelphia

BRANDON BUSH Atlanta

ED CHERNEY Los Angeles

BETH COHEN Florida

LINDA LORENCE CRITELLI New York

BRIAN DECK Chicago

MIKE CLINK Los Angeles



THE RECORDING ACADEMY® NATIONAL TRUSTEE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

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FLETCHER FOSTER Nashville

TRACY GERSHON Nashville

TERRY HEMMINGS Nashville

MATT HENNESSY Chicago

BRETT JAMES Nashville

RODNEY JERKINS Los Angeles

KEM Chicago

MIKE KNOBLOCH Los Angeles

JEFF LEVENSON New York

GLENN LORBECKI Pacific Northwest

SUSAN MARSHALL Memphis

JAMES MCKINNEY Washington, D.C.

ANN MINCIELI New York

CHERYL PAWELSKI Los Angeles

NICK PHILLIPS San Francisco

GINO ROBAIR San Francisco

NILE RODGERS New York

MICHAEL ROMANOWSKI San Francisco

KAREN SHERRY New York

MATT STILL Atlanta

TYLER STONE Pacific Northwest

RICHARD STUMPF New York

GILBERT VELASQUEZ Texas

PAUL WALL Texas

DAN WARNER Florida

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards


COMFORT MEETS COLOR Free shipping and free returns. Order online or call 844.482.4800.


NATIONAL STAFF

Thank You To The Dedicated Staff Of The Recording Academy

212

Rob Accatino

Ivan Diaz

Kristin Klimas

Stacey Adams

Nick DiFruscia

Brian Klinsport

Nathan Pyle Paul Raksit

Mazen Alawar

Jenny Dinh

David Konjoyan

Esperanza Ramirez

Christee Albino

Monica Dozier

Aaron Krieshok

Moises Ramirez

Jessica Allen

Maureen Droney

Leah Larocco

Sean Riley

Michael Almanza

Todd Dupler

Katrina Lee

A.J. Roach

Stacy Anderson

Rick Engdahl

Michael Lewan

Laura Rodriguez

Lyn Aurelius

Ashley Ernst

Claudine Little

Rachel Ryding

Neda Azafar

RenĂŠe Fabian

Daniel Lopez

Stephen Salazar

Grace Baca

Virginia Faddy

Lourdes Lopez Patton

Mark Schulz

Erin Baxter

Yvonne Faison

Nora Luna

Tahsan Scott

Graceann Belgiorno

John Farrey

Paul Madeira

Laura Segura Mueller

Joaquin Benavente

Rachel Fentz

David Mar

Nancy Shapiro Ashley Sheehan

Kate Blair

Brian Fox

Marlon Mata

Nicole Brown

Annika Frank

Alan Matkovic

Bri Buchanan

Jennie Freeburg

Lila Mayes

Eric Burnett

Bill Freimuth

Christen McFarland

Kiana Butler

Annmarie Frenzell

Tracy McKee

Jim Cannella

Daryl P. Friedman

Timothy McPhate

Michele Caplinger

Gaetano Frizzi

Ann Meckelborg

Jose Cardenas Jr.

Sara Furrer

Joseph Melendez

Christina Cassidy

Lindsay Gabler

Hillary Melin

Jamieson Chandler

Jason Gino

Daniel Mendoza

Branden Chapman

Lisa Goich-Andreadis

Philip Merrill

Wendi Cherry

Shonda Grant

Charles Lee Mills IV

Joanna Chu

Evan Greene

Clinton Misamore

Marta Clark

Shumetris Halford

Trisha Mitra

Brian Clasby

Tera Healy

Ben Moore

Britaney Coleman

Shannon Herber

Miranda Eggleston Moore

Michael Compton

Nate Hertweck

Marc Mutnansky

Kenny Cordova

Brittany Hoover

Leigha Nettleton

Lacy Cowden

Jon Hornyak

Kiyumi Nishida

Andie Cox

Casey Immoor

Ralph J. Olivarez

Laura Crawford

Frances Inomata

Todd Parker

Neil Crilly

Jason James

Melissa Pazornik

Nick Cucci

Sarah Jansen

Scott Petersen

Michael Winger

Kelly Darr

Theresa Jenkins

Neil Portnow

Iman Saadat Woodley

Kayenecha Daugherty

Jeriel Johnson

Adriana Preciado

Candice Yang

Yasmin de Soiza

Angela Jollivette

Brittany Presley

Lisa Zahn

Adrian Diaz

Maurice Kalous

Kelley Purcell

Wayne Zahner

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Justin Shover Laura Sibigtroth Lani Simmons Julie Smith Susan Stewart Michael Sticka Rex Supa Lindsey Taylor Ashley Thomas Jonathan Tol Clay Upton Simona Vackova Patrick Waller Alicia Warwick Kali Weissman Tim Whalen Courtney White Reid Wick Alexandra Williams Charlotte Williams Audrey Wiltz Linda Wilvang



NATIONAL STAFF MusiCares Staff

Latin Recording Academy Staff

EXECUTIVE STAFF

EXECUTIVE STAFF

®

MusiCares Foundation Board of Directors PRESIDENT/CEO Neil Portnow

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

HONORARY CHAIR John Branca

DANA TOMARKEN Vice President

CHAIR

GABRIEL ABAROA JR. President/CEO

Marcelo Castello Branco

VICE CHAIR

TREASURER

Michael McDonald

Eduardo Hütt

SECRETARY/TREASURER JUDY WONG Vice President, Finance

CHAIR EMERITUS

SECRETARY

LUIS DOUSDEBES Chief Financial Officer

Bill Silva

DEBBIE CARROLL Senior Executive Director

STAFF

Danielle Bowker Brett Bryngelson Stefanie Curtiss Ryan Donahue Carol Flores Shireen Janti Reid Dorit Kalev Erica Krusen Jennifer Leff Dina Morales Nicole Oliva Harold Owens Anita Ramsarup Christina Scholz Ana Serrato Roger Tang Wynnie Wynn

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

John Burk Pete Fisher Susan Genco Jody Gerson Jeff Harleston Olivia Harrison James Higa Tamara Hrivnak Mike Knobloch Rob Light Kevin Lyman John Poppo Kirdis Postelle Scott Powell Andie B. Simon

CHAIR

Laura Tesoriero

VICE CHAIR

Alexandra Patsavas

Stasia Washington

Latin Recording Academy Board of Trustees

Johnny Ventura Neil Portnow

CHAIR EMERITUS Luis Cobos

TRUSTEES

DAVINA ARYEH Chief Marketing Officer

AIDA SCORZA Vice President, Awards

STAFF

Diana Alvarado Michelle Aranguren Karine Bello Pamela Castrillon Livys Cerna Uziel Colon Victoria Cruell Berenice Diaz Melanie Garcia Adriano Haubenthal Caitlin Marino Ixamar Patino Teresa Romo Grace Santa-Ana Claudia Santos

Luis Balaguer Fernando Barbosa Carla Estrada George J. Flanigen IV María Cristina Garcia-Cepeda Oscar Gómez Sebastian Krys Terry Lickona Cris Morena John Poppo

TRUSTEE AD HONOREM Andy García

LEGAL COUNSEL

Jorge Hernandez-Torano Joel Katz Bobby Rosenbloum



NATIONAL STAFF

Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation Staff EXECUTIVE STAFF

GRAMMY Museum Staff GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live EXECUTIVE STAFF

MANOLO DIAZ Vice President

STAFF

BOB SANTELLI President

Coralys Julian Nannette Velez

Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation Board of Directors

SECRETARY/TREASURER

GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live Board of Directors RITA GEORGE Chief Operating Officer

Raúl Vázquez

Dan Beckerman

Gabriel Abaroa Jr.

SECRETARY

DIRECTOR

Charles B. Ortner WAYNE ZAHNER Chief Financial Officer

STAFF

Alejandra Aceves David Alonso Karla Barron Jerome Buszek Shaun Carter Athena Dryden Ana Estrada Loren Fishbein Eric Forcen Erlin Frausto Israel Galvez

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CHAIR

Neil Portnow

VICE CHAIR/TREASURER

PRESIDENT

Mireya Cisneros

EXECUTIVE STAFF

EMILY HAVENS Executive Director

STAFF

Carlee Calderon Jane Marie Dawkins Willie Gant Chace Holland Vickie Jackson Jack McWilliams Robin Webb

Mississippi

CHAIR

Neil Portnow

GRAMMY Museum Mississippi

SCOTT GOLDMAN Executive Director

Luis Cobo

VICE CHAIR

Sergio Galvez Juan Garces Benjamin Guzman Kristen Jennings Crystal Larsen Adam LeBow Harold Lehr LaShon Malone Nayelli McChesney Hillary Morimoto Christopher Morrison Julie Mutnansky Kaitlyn Stuebner Nader Schyler O’Neal Nwaka Onwusa Maria Pacheco Karla Perez Rosalie Sanchez David Sears Lynne Sheridan Derek Spencer Eric Stock Stacie Takaoka-Fidler Erin Walsh Karen Yi

ASSISTANT SECRETARY Ted Fikre

John Branca Branden Chapman Ken Ehrlich Giselle Fernandez-Farrand Todd Goldstein Jimmy Jam Joel Katz Terry Lickona Jay Marciano Mattie McFadden-Lawson Carolyn Powers Brian Sheth

GRAMMY Museum Mississippi Board of Directors PRESIDENT

Lucy Janoush

VICE PRESIDENT

Sen. Willie Simmons

TREASURER James I. Tims

ASSISTANT TREASURER Thomas “Eddie” Guillot Jr.

SECRETARY

Wilma Wilbanks Will Hooker Jon Hornyak Carol Puckett Nan Sanders Bill Simmons Tricia Walker Blake A. Wilson



CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF East Region

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Tera Healy

Ashley Sheehan

Regional Staff

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, EAST REGION/NEW YORK CHAPTER

Brittany Presley

Graceann Belgiorno

Chicago

New York

Philadelphia

Washington, D.C.

Justin Roberts

Ben Allison

Dyana Williams

Carl “Kokayi” Walker

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

Brian Deck Matt Hennessy Kem

Linda Lorence Critelli Jeff Levenson Ann Mincieli Nile Rodgers Karen Sherry Richard Stumpf

PRESIDENT

Justin Roberts VICE PRESIDENT

Miss Alex White SECRETARY

Andrew Barber GOVERNORS

William Beckett Elliot Bergman Jayson “JC” Brooks Matt Brown Bonny Dolan Vin Dombroski Steven Gillis Mark Hubbard Zak Jablow Lisa Kaplan James “Stump” Mahoney Daxx Nielsen Tomeka Reid James “J. Ivy” Richardson Stephen Shirk John Stirratt Susan Voelz Dessa Wander Anita Wilson ADVISORS

Eric Morgeson David Roberts

CHAPTER STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Sarah Jansen MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

Maurice Kalous PROJECT COORDINATOR

Kristin Klimas

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ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

PRESIDENT

Ben Allison VICE PRESIDENT

Riggs Morales SECRETARY

Judy Tint GOVERNORS

Ray Angry Jennifer Blakeman Adam Block Jonatha Brooke Terri Lyne Carrington Tom Chapin Norman Chesky Ray Chew Samantha Cox Joe D’Ambrosio Lauren Davis Guy Eckstine Richard Einhorn Erika Elliott Gloria Gaynor Amy Helm Scott Jacoby Tracey Jordan Emily Lazar Joe Mardin Martha Mooke Rob Mounsey Arturo O’Farrill Neeta Ragoowansi Maria Schneider Kathy Sommer Rob Stevenson Philip Traugott Debra White Mark Wilder

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

Carolina Arenas John Doelp

Ivan Barias Helen Bruner

Maurette Brown Clark James McKinney

CHAPTER STAFF

PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT

Dyana Williams

Carl “Kokayi” Walker

VICE PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

Ashley Scott

Tracy Hamlin

SECRETARY

SECRETARY

Stephanie Seiple

Diane Blagman

GOVERNORS

GOVERNORS

Marcus Baylor Anthony Bell Adam Blackstone Aaron Camper Catherine Marie Charlton Aliya Crawford Sarah Dash Louis deLise Paul “Starkey” Geissinger Lauren Hart Jeri Johnson Terry Jones Helen Little Phil Nicolo Ted Reid Carol Riddick Ryan Schwabe Toby Seay Wendell Sewell Andrew “Pop” Wansel

Aderonke Ariyo Kia Bennett Deborah Bond Wayne Bruce Ferddy Calderon Priscilla Clarke Sean Glover Chelsey Green Jake Grotticelli Lorenzo Johnson Nicolas Laget Carolyn Malachi Lora Moinkoff Kate Moran Kurosh Nasseri Verny Varela Von Vargas Daniel Weatherspoon Janine Wilson Maimouna Youssef

ADVISORS

ADVISORS

Vassy K Chill Moody

Tarik “Konshens” Davis Angie Gates

CHAPTER STAFF

CHAPTER STAFF

SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Mark Schulz

Wendi Cherry

MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

MEMBER & PROJECT MANAGER

ADVISORS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Nick Cucci SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Zahn MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

Yasmin de Soiza MANAGER, CHAPTER ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

Stacy M. Anderson

Ashley Coleman

Kayenecha Daugherty


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CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF South Region

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

Susan Stewart

Regional Staff

MANAGER, ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, SOUTH REGION/NASHVILLE CHAPTER

Lyn Aurelius

Ashley Ernst

Nathan Pyle

Atlanta

Florida

Memphis

Nashville

Tai Anderson

Lee Levin

Scott Bomar

Shannon Sanders

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER STAFF

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Brandon Bush Matt Still

Greg “Stryke” Chin Beth Cohen Dan Warner

Scott Billington Susan Marshall

Alicia Warwick

PRESIDENT

Scott Bomar

Jeff Balding Fletcher Foster Tracy Gershon Terry Hemmings Brett James

PRESIDENT

Tai Anderson VICE PRESIDENT

Jorel “Jfly” Flynn SECRETARY

Lyn Schenbeck GOVERNORS

Martina Albano David Barbe Kristian Bush Diane Durrett Michael Graves Traci Hale John Driskell Hopkins Gwen Hughes Tammy Hurt Billy Johnson Thom “TK” Kidd Kevin Leahy Melissa Love Margaret Marshall Al “Butter” McLean Steve Moretti Kelly Price Shani Sammons Ian Schumacher Matt Williams ADVISORS

Mac Powell Velena Vego

CHAPTER STAFF SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Michele Rhea Caplinger

Lee Levin VICE PRESIDENT

Doug Emery SECRETARY

Regina Kelland GOVERNORS

Ivan Alvarez Chad Bernstein Daniel Betancourt Javier Garza Stephen Gibb Nicole Henry Niko Marzouca Jorge Mejia Marianne Mijares Boris Milan Veronica “Milcho” Milchorena Tim Mitchell George Noriega Jeremy Norkin Lauren “Lolo” Reskin Andres Saavedra Ana Rosa Santiago Jon Secada Tommy Torres Betty Wright

PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT

Jim McCormick SECRETARY

Kim Bledsoe Lloyd GOVERNORS

Sean Ardoin Chris Bell Chris Finney Catrina Guttery Tim Kappel Yvette Landry Vicki Loveland Shannon McNally Lawrence “Boo” Mitchell PJ Morton Halley Phillips Matt Ross-Spang Ken Shepherd Jody Stephens Gebre Waddell Tricia Walker Bruce Watson Jay Weigel Rueben Williams Pat Mitchell Worley

Shannon Sanders VICE PRESIDENT

Robert K. Oermann SECRETARY

Lori Badgett GOVERNORS

Marta Clark PROJECT MANAGER

ADVISORS

ADVISORS

Bill Hamel Alex Harris GOODWILL AMBASSADOR

Iggy Pop

CHAPTER STAFF

ADVISORS

Justin Fisher John Paul Keith

CHAPTER STAFF SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Jon Hornyak

SENIOR MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

SENIOR MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

Erin Baxter

Kenny Cordova

Reid Wick

Jessica Allen

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

PRESIDENT

Mark Bright Joanna Carter Dave Cobb David Corlew John Esposito Trey Fanjoy Ben Fowler Leslie Fram Garth Fundis Kevin Griffin Jennifer Hanson Lisa Harless Dave Haywood Brandon Heath Daniel Hill Allison Brown Jones Beverly Keel Chandra LaPlume David Macias Martina McBride Daniel Miller Kevin Moore Erika Wollam Nichols Gary Paczosa Nick Palladino Leslie Roberts Steve Schnur Jon Randall Stewart Troy Tomlinson Jimi Westbrook

SENIOR MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

220

SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER

Akiko Rogers Phil Thornton

MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

Laura Crawford PROJECT COORDINATOR

Courtney White CHAPTER ASSISTANT

Bri Buchanan


LET US TACKLE THE DROPS


CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF West Region

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Neil Crilly

Paul Raksit

Katrina Lee

Regional Staff

Los Angeles

Pacific Northwest San Francisco

Texas

John Burk

Sue Ennis

Piper Payne

David Messier

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

TRUSTEES

Mindi Abair Claudia Brant Ed Cherney Mike Clink Rodney Jerkins Mike Knobloch Cheryl Pawelski PRESIDENT

John Burk VICE PRESIDENT

Evan Bogart SECRETARY

Qiana Conley GOVERNORS

Cheche Alara Adam Anders Peter Asher Edie Lehmann Boddicker Darrell Brown Warryn Campbell Tyrese Gibson Ross Golan Wendy Goldstein Jeff Greenberg Booker T. Jones Om’Mas Keith Gavin Lurssen Joel Madden Orly Marley Manny Marroquin Carianne Marshall Harvey Mason Jr. Maureen “Mozella” McDonald Julia Michels Stephan Moccio Loretta Muñoz Rafa Sardina Rachel Stilwell Lindsey Stirling Chrissy Stuart Christopher Tin Jojo Villanueva Chris Walden Tremaine Williams

222

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

Mike Einziger Melissa Etheridge

Glenn Lorbecki Tyler Stone

CHAPTER STAFF

PRESIDENT

Nick Phillips Gino Robair Michael Romanowski

Carlos Alvarez Gilbert Velasquez Paul Wall

PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT

Piper Payne

David Messier

VICE PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

Camilo Landau

Lisa Morales

SECRETARY

SECRETARY

Tom Murphy

Andrea Villarreal

GOVERNORS

GOVERNORS

Laura Bergmann Tony Brooke Alex Brose Ariane Cap Jennifer Culp Laura Dean McKay Garner Cliff Goldmacher Michelle Jacques Sarah Jones David Katznelson Zoë Keating Greg Landau Lyz Luke Kitty Margolis PC Muñoz Robbie Percell Julie Schuchard Marc Senesac Kylee Swenson Gordon

Chip Adams Yolanda Adams Ricky Anderson Bun B Ernest Gonzales Taylor Hanson Malcolm Harper Jack Ingram Danny Jones Sharilyn Mayhugh Paul “Pappy” Middleton Laura Mordecai Tre Nagella Adam “SaulPaul” Neal Tim Palmer Kevin Russell Joseph Stallone Mark Stansberry Teresa LaBarbera Whites Dan Workman

Catherine Harris-White Daniel Pak

ADVISORS

ADVISORS

Jim Greer

Mark Lettieri

CHAPTER STAFF

GOODWILL AMBASSADOR

CHAPTER STAFF

ADVISORS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Sue Ennis

Kelley Purcell

VICE PRESIDENT

SENIOR MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

SECRETARY

Tim Bierman

Yvonne Faison

Andrew Joslyn

PROJECT MANAGER

GOVERNORS

Shannon Herber MANAGER, CHAPTER ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

Nicole Brown

Jen Czeisler Astra Elane Steve Fisk Rachel Flotard Bill Gibson David Gross Eric Lilavois Dmitriy Lipay Ben London Tendai Maraire Tucker Martine Ian Moore Kris Orlowski Kurt B. Reighley Portia Sabin Amber Sweeney Maggie Vail Will Wakefield Rachel White Alan Yamamoto ADVISORS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Ledisi

SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Michael Compton

CHAPTER STAFF

MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

Michael Winger

Christee Albino

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR

Christen McFarland

Brittany Hoover

John Farrey

MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

Brian Fox

Theresa Jenkins



PAST CHAIRS

JAMES B. CONKLING

ACTING NATIONAL CHAIRMAN 1957–1961

GEORGE AVAKIAN

PETE KING

ROBERT L. YORKE

JOHN SCOTT TROTTER

MORT L. NASATIR

IRVING TOWNSEND

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1962–1963

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1967–1968

JAY L. COOPER

J. WILLIAM DENNY CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1977–1979

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1979–1981

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1981–1983 CHAIRMAN 1989–1991

ALFRED SCHLESINGER

RON KRAMER

GARTH FUNDIS

DANIEL CARLIN

CHAIRMAN 1987–1989

CHAIRMAN 2001–2003

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CHAIRMAN 1991–1993

CHAIRMAN 2003–2005

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1968–1969

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1963–1964

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1966–1967

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1975–1977

224

PAUL WESTON

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1961–1962

NESUHI ERTEGUN

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1964–1965

WESLEY H. ROSE

F.M. SCOTT III

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1965–1966

BILL LOWERY

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1969–1971

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1971–1973

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1973–1975

WILLIAM IVEY

MICHAEL MELVOIN

MICHAEL GREENE

HENRY L. NEUBERGER III

JOEL A. KATZ

PHIL RAMONE

LESLIE ANN JONES

TERRY LICKONA

JIMMY JAM

GEORGE J. FLANIGEN IV

CHRISTINE ALBERT

JAY S. LOWY

CHAIRMAN 1993–1995

CHAIRMAN 2005–2007

CHAIRMAN 1995–1997

CHAIR 2007–2009

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1983–1985

CHAIRMAN 1997–1999

CHAIR 2009–2013

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1985–1987

CHAIRWOMAN 1999–2001

CHAIR 2013–2015



AMPLIFYING THE VOICES THAT CARRY THE FARTHEST. UCLA Optimists shine on every stage. On scientific stages, they’re pioneers who innovate the future. On community stages, they create and sustain ideas that catalyze social justice. And on actual stages, Bruins, like world-class soprano Angel Blue, shatter expectations—and stereotypes. Determined to keep her dreams alive, she supported herself through school by entering, and winning, beauty pageants. Today she takes curtain calls in premier opera houses across the world—inspiring the next generation of Optimists, wherever they are.

HOW FAR WILL YOUR VOICE CARRY?

UCLA.edu/optimists


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IN MEMORIAM Colonel Abrams Achieng Abura Tayssir Akla Francis Akos Edward Albee Roye Albrighton Michael Alexisch Muhammad Ali Peter Allen Mose Allison Nicholas “Pumpkin” Alvarado Ernestine Anderson Jeff Anderson Kevin Anderson Lucas Anderson Signe Toly Anderson Lee Andrews Guda Anjaiah José Luis Armenteros Brian Asawa Joe Ascione Cash Askew James Atkins Anahid Ajemian Avakian Bill Backer Ernesto Baffa Issa Bagayogo Victor Bailey Jimmy Bain David Baker Doug Baker Lennie Baker Koyo Bala Mangalampalli Balamuralikrishna Doug Banks Mei Baojiu Melhem Barakat Gato Barbieri Sunil Bardewa Allan Barnes Ken Barrie Christopher Barriere aka Mr. 3-2 Tony Barrow Cliff Barrows Sherwin Bash Leslie Bassett Robert Bateman Johannes Bauer Robert Baustian Mubarak Begum Raj Begum Remo Belli Headley Bennett Pascal Bentoiu Leo Beranek Jonathan Bernbaum John Berry Kendall Betts Phoebe Binkley Roberto Bissonnette Neil Black Winston “Merritone” Blake Em Bohlka Shannon Bolin Kaye Paul Booker Jimmy Borges

228

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Johan Botha Gérard Bourgeois Jim Boyd Oscar Brand Bobby Breen Buddy Bregman Leo Brennan Robbie Brennan Carlos Brock Corry Brokken Clyde Brooks Douglas “Swipey” Brooks Bonnie Brown Paul Brown Tommy Brown Don Buchla Irma Bule Bill Bumgardner Jon Bunch Billy Joe Burnette Pete Burns Rusty Burns Earl Solomon Burroughs aka Jack Hammer Bobby “El Charro Negro” Butler John Byrd Steve Byrd Joe Cabot Denis Čabrić Al Caiola Lamar Dupré Calhoun aka DJ Crazy Toones Harrison Calloway Cecil Bustamente Campbell aka Prince Buster Lecresia Campbell Rey Caney Charmian Carr Inocente Carreño Elisabeth Carron Keith Carter aka Big Kap Dave Cash Michael Casswell Geneviève Castrée Donny Catron Danny Champagne Mike Chapman Eric Charles Charles Chaynes Phil Chess Steve “Tregenda” Childers John Chilton Grace Chinga Rick Christian Eddy Christiani Gavin Christopher Nelson Chu aka DJ Official Barrelhouse Chuck Franz Cibulka Don Ciccone Roger Cicero Barrett Clark Guy Clark Joe Clay Thomas “TC” Clay Mikey Clement Bob Coburn

Mac Cocker Leonard Cohen Ray Colcord Daryl Coley Ray Columbus John Conquest Tony Conrad Buster Cooper Jerry Corbetta Attrell Cordes aka Prince Be Sergei Cortes Tim Cotton Wade Cox Bob Cranshaw Caroline Crawley Clifford Crawley Phyllis Creore Tim Cretsinger Pati Crooker Connie Crothers Clifford Curry Phyllis Curtin Bobby Curtola Jean-Michel Damian Micah Danemayer Dan Daniel Mike Daniels Raymond Daveluy Ken Davidson Peter Maxwell Davies Bobby “Top Hat” Davis Danny Davis Dennis Davis Renée De Haan Lupe De La Cruz Nora Dean Gloria DeHaven John Del Carlo Melina Dellamarggio Paul Demers Colin Demge Daniela Dessi Vinjamuri Seetha Devi Harold Devold Alirio Díaz Billy Dixon Chelsea Faith Dolan aka Cherushii Nina Dorda Andrew Dorff Elena Doria Joe Dowell Pádraig Duggan Patty Duke Anatol Dumitras Lucille Dumont Wayne Duncan Holly Dunn Stanley “Buckwheat” Dural Jr. Denise Duval Roland Dyens Kirk Dyer Ben Edmonds Robert “Big Sonny” Edwards David Egan Bob Elliott Bobby Ellis

Geneviève Elverum Keith Emerson Adrian Enescu Jon English David Enthoven Jules Eskin Mack Evans Amar Ezzahi Brian Faber Richard Fagan Billy Faier Joey Feek Jack Feierman Thomas Fekete Mohamed Tahar Fergani Candice Burnside Ferguson Brandon Ferrell Peter Feuchtwanger Irving Fields Chris Finley Kevin “Danny” Finn Brien Fisher Carrie Fisher Charlie Fite Micky Fitz Jerry Wayne Flowers Joey Floyd James R. Fonseca Pete Fountain Don Francks Dave Franklin Gigliola Frazzoni Bob French Don Friedman Alejandro “Jano” Fuentes Mike “Gabby” Gaborno Juan Gabriel Hernán Gamboa John Garcia Ernesto Gauna George Gaynes Bruce Geduldig Nadine Gelineau Keith Gemmell Gwyneth George David Gest Alex Ghassan Robin Ghosh Mike Gibbons Craig Gill Mic Gillette Hubert Giraud Melvin Goins Benny Golbin Bob Goldstone Giorgio Gomelsky Nick Gomez-Hall Paul Gordon Angus R. Grant Gogi Grant Ron Grant Mark Gray Nigel Gray Buddy Greco Nik Green Yates Green Bob Grever Ray Griff

Dale “Buffin” Griffin Gegham Grigoryan Tammy Grimes Christina Grimmie Ojārs Grīnbergs Piotr Grudzinski Pelle Gudmundsen Holmgreen Jean Paul Guerrero aka DJ Jinx Paul Gib Guilbeau Amber Gurung Juan Habichuela Merle Haggard Andre Hajdu Bill Ham Ofelya Hambardzumyan Robert Hamlett Joe T. Haney Ross Hannaford Herbert Hardesty Nikolaus Harnoncourt Vaughn Harper Dickie Harris Nicholas Harris Ricky Harris Eddie Harsch Alex Hartness Ted Harvey Jimmie Haskell Adnan Abu Hassan Bill Hawkins Jimmy Hayman Leon Haywood Leonard Haze Brendan Healy Nachum Heiman Jerry Heller Fred Hellerman Bill Henderson Edmund “Leon” Henderson Florence Henderson Nat Hentoff Bern Herbolsheimer Ray Hesson Hubert Dwane “Hoot” Hester Mohammad Heydari Joseph Hibbs Dan Hicks Tyruss Himes aka Big Syke Radim Hladík Dmytro Hnatyuk Sara Hoda Chip Hooper David Horowitz Yassy Hosseini Travis Hough Ken Howard Preston Hubbard Aaron Huffman David Hughes aka Scabs Karel Husa Ali Ahmad Hussain Khan Bobby Hutcherson Pete Huttlinger Johnny Igaz aka Nackt George S. Irving Matt Irwin


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IN MEMORIAM Bud Isaacs Keiichi Ishizaka André Isoir Christine Jackson Wayne Jackson James Jamerson Jr. Sonny James Junaid Jamshed Fran Jeffries Wilfred Jeffs aka Bill Sevesi Karina Jensen Ekrem Jevrić Joan Marie Johnson Jody Clay Johnson Terry Johnson Anton Jones Denny Jones Kacey Jones Marshall “Rock” Jones Randy Jones Sharon Jones Vic Jordan Kevin Junior Kitty Kallen Eddie Kamae Candye Kane Paul Kantner Oleg Karavaichuk Oscar Karlsson Charles Kaufman Howard Kaufman Michiyuki Kawashima Bap Kennedy Herb Kent Jeff Kent Amanda Allen Kershaw Abdul Rashid Khan Norman Killeen James King Biser Kirov Carlton Kitto Philip Kives Sverre Kjelsberg Eri Klas Zoltán Kocsis Samisoni Koroitamudu aka Big Makk Bob Krasnow Bill Kyle Julius La Rosa Greg Lake Pierre Lalonde Werner Lämmerhirt Louis Lane Penny Lang Tran Lap Edmond Lapine Marty Laster Dick Latessa Luke Lavelle Kevin Lawrence Seymour Lazar Sam Leach Vander Lee Jade Lemons “Bashful Bob” Letson Ida Levin

230

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards

David Lewis J. Reilly Lewis Joe Ligon Richard Linke Justin “Kid Cali” Lishey Jane Little Olle Ljungström Gary Loizzo Rufus Long Andrew Loomis John D. Loudermilk Charlie “Sonny” Louvin Jr. Sam Lovullo Jim Lowe Enrique “Quique” Lucca José Lugo Sviatoslav Luther Mike Lyon Richard Lyons Lonnie Mack Griffin Madden William Maginnis Timmy Makaya Gary Malke aka Gary D. Ursula Mamlok Pablo Manavello David Mancuso Kalabhavan Mani Marlene Marder Joe Marillo Léo Marjane Micki Marlo Neville Marriner Rick Marroquin Garry Marshall Tony Martell George Martin Paul Martin Ricci Martin Bob Mason Carlo Mastrangelo Joseph Matlock aka Joey Casio Denise Matthews aka Vanity Ireng Maulana Gisela May Jason Adrian McCarty aka Dilatedears Bobby Lee McCollum Gayle McCormick Jim McCoy Henry McCullough Hugh McDonald Fred McFarlane Draven McGill Sidney “Doc” McKay John McKellen Sean McKeough Jeff McLaren John McMartin Kevin Meaney Gustav Meier Getachew Mekurya José Menese Nick Menza Lewis Merenstein Louis Meyers

George Michael Rusty Michael Frankie Michaels Billy Miller Fergus Miller Jack Miller Ned Miller Lawrence Minors Pete Mitchell Habib Mohebian Michael Mohede Chips Moman Fernando J. Montilla Scotty Moore Memo Morales Mariano Mores Jennifer Morris John Morthland Robert Motherbaugh Sr. aka General Boy Greg Motycka Hubert Mounier aka Cleet Boris Alphonse Mouzon Otto-Werner Mueller Edgar Muenzer Edoardo Müller Patrice Munsel Frank Murray Ernie Myers Guy Nadon Asami Nagakiya Hiroko Nakamura Billy Name Emilio Navaira Arthur Nayyar James M. Nederlander Tonio Neuhaus Andy “Thunderclap” Newman Aurèle Nicolet Josefin Nilsson Maralin Niska Marni Nixon Fredrik Noren Lola Novaković Frank Noya Peter Nthwane Munyaradzi Nyemba Russell Oberlin Hod O’Brien Claus Ogerman Milt Okun Pauline Oliveros Horacio Olivo Rudy Osborne Olumuyiwa Osinuga aka Nomoreloss Guido Osorio Johnny P David Page Robert Page Earl Paige Robert Paiste Pantelis Pantelidis Jerry Clyde Paradis Margaret Pardee Laurent Pardo

Rick Parfitt Don Parmley Ioan Gyuri Pascu Anne Pashley Billy Paul Joyce Paul Robert Paulson aka Cadalack Ron Gary S. Paxton Larry Payton Stewart Pearce Lou Pearlman Sandy Pearlman Trisco Pearson Betsy Pecanins Mike Pedicin Harry Peel Cauby Peixoto Juan Peña aka El Lebrijano Jean-Jacques Perrey Erik Peterson Trever Peterson Lorenzo Piani Nelson Pinedo Feral Pines Adrian Posse Curtis Potter Sylvester Potts Freddy Powers A.V. Prakash Georges Prêtre Bill Price Prince Roland Prince Tavín Pumarejo Curly Putman Howard Quilling Ismael Quintana Gustavo “El Loco” Quintero Harry Rabinowitz Brian Rading Richard Fay “Buck” Rambo Bobby Ramirez aka DTTX Alfonso Ramos Doug Raney Gordon Ranney Einojuhani Rautavaara Esma Redžepova Hans Reffert Clarence Reid aka Blowfly Alberto Remedios Kimi “Qiao” Renliang Wolfgang Renner Joanna Reyes Debbie Reynolds Peter Reynolds George Reznik Sir Mack Rice Roberto “Snaffu” Rigor Jimmy Riley Jean-Claude Risset Matt Roberts Floyd Robinson Thomas Round Allan Rouse Eugeniusz Rudnik Ben Runnels

Leon Russell Keli May Rutledge Karel Ruzicka Sr. Phil Ryan Lotte Rysanek-Doerle Amjad Sabri Michael Sacha Peter Sadlo Morley Safer Adam Sagan Veena Sahasrabuddhe Kashif Saleem Horacio Salgán Larry Salinas Ramon “Chunky” Sanchez William “Sonny” Sanders Peter Sarstedt Andréanne Sasseville Bob Saxton Mike Scap Heinrich Schiff Ramblin’ Lou Schriver Dorothy “Dottie” Schwartz Elliott Schwartz Larry Scott Johnny Sea Tom Searle Derek Serpell-Morris aka DJ Derek Afeni Shakur Garry Shandling Ross Shapiro Farhang Sharif Jean Shepard Rose L. Shure Nicole Siegrist aka Denalda Nicole Renae Eddy Silitonga Gabriele Sima William Sims Frank Sinatra Jr. Raynoma Gordy Singleton Tom Size Michael Sklar Joe Skyward Dale Sledd Vasyl Slipak Vertamae Smart-Grosvenor Brett Smiley Derek Smith Doug Smith Earl Smith Jr. aka DJ Spank Spank Gregg Smith Louis Smith Rickey Smith Paul Smoker David Smyrl Gilli Smyth Danny Smythe Barry Socher Leif Solberg Tamás Somló Om Prakash Sonik aka Omi Riki Sorsa Sam Spence Elton Spitzer John Stabb



IN MEMORIAM Ralph Stanley Kay Starr Chuck Stearman Jeremy Steig Lewis “Lewie” Steinberg Rick Steiner Louis Stewart Mary Stewart Michael Stewart Fred Stobaugh Jadranka Stojaković Chris Stone Steven Stucky Vi Subversa Jonathan Sutter aka Tenor Fly Dave Swarbrick Michele Sylvan Mark Taimanov Ab Tamboer Jennifer Kiyomi Tanouye Gordie Tapp B.E. Taylor Betty Loo Taylor Malik Taylor aka Phife Dawg Mike “Taffy” Taylor

Mieke Telkamp Joe Temperley Rod Temperton Manolo Tena Gianmaria Testa Alan Thicke Toots Thielemans John Thomas Rex Thompson Sir Charles Thompson Elliot Tiber Lupe Tijerina T.J. Tindall Taylor Tolle Isao Tomita Fred Tomlinson Royal Torrence aka Little Royal Dominique Trenier Richard Trentlage John Trickett Mduduzi “Mandoza” Tshabalala Bob Tubert Robert Tuggle Charlie Tuna

Tommy Turner L.C. Ulmer Chayito Valdez Ramon “Boo” Valdez Rudy Van Gelder Vincent Van Haaff Karl David Van Hoesen Jimmie Van Zant Richard “Rick” Vanaugh Naná Vasconcelos Palani Vaughan Colin Vearncombe aka Black Bobby Vee Alan Vega Alex Vega Les Waas Freddie Wadling Carlos Walker aka Shawty Lo Don Waller Eddy Wally Bob Walsh Conor Walsh Bunny Walters Ann Ward Chris Warren

Rob Wasserman Tyriece Watson aka Lor Scoota Fritz Weaver Fred Weisz Bobby Wellins Papa Wemba Jacques Werup June Whisnant Donald H. White Maurice White Ruth White Trentavious White aka Bankroll Fresh Gene Wilder Monty Lee Wilkes Allan Williams Kim Williams Mentor Williams Toni Williams Bob Williamson Claude Williamson Ruby Wilson Gerhard Wimberger Jeff Windisch Alan Wise

Brandon Chase Wittenauer Elliot Wolff Victoria Wood James Woolley Bernie Worrell Martha Wright Rick Wright Zhou Xiaoyan Glenn Yarbrough Pete Yellin Nora York Adam Young Jimmy Young Steve Young (Colourbox co-founder) Steve Young (country singer/songwriter) Umy Youngblood Robert “Bob” Younts Mick Zane Bernard Zaslav Allan Zavod Pete Zorn

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Hosting Music’s Biggest Night

ince the first live televised GRAMMY Awards broadcast in 1971, The Recording Academy has called on some of the world’s biggest names in entertainment to steer the show. When the GRAMMYs brought on superstar musicians such as John Denver and LL Cool J or hot comedians such as Ellen DeGeneres and Jon Stewart, the hosts always provided extra star power and, often, a lot of laughs. For the 59th GRAMMYs, James Corden was tapped to bring together the best of both worlds. Take a look back at the 14 unforgettable hosts who took the GRAMMY stage before him.

[FPO]

ANDY WILLIAMS

Host: 1971–1977 Williams served as host of the first-ever live GRAMMY broadcast in 1971 and stayed on for seven years. It’s still the longest GRAMMY-host run, consecutive or otherwise. It was GRAMMY Awards show producer Pierre Cossette’s ability to convince the pop singer to host that helped get a live GRAMMY telecast on the air. ABC PHOTO ARCHIVES/DISNEY ABC TELEVISION GROUP

JOHN DENVER

Host: 1978–1979, 1982–1985 By the time Denver hosted his first GRAMMY show in 1978, he had charted four No. 1 pop singles and had just starred in the hit film Oh, God! He was as big a pop culture name as there was and, as it turned out, an amiable and capable host. Shortly after Denver’s final show in 1985, the GRAMMYs would make a major shift, looking primarily to hot comedic talent to guide the festivities. SAM EMERSON

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59th Annual GRAMMY Awards


KENNY ROGERS

Host: 1980, 1986 Country superstar Rogers ushered in the 1980 ceremony by garnering his own GRAMMY win for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male for “The Gambler,” the only host to win an award the same year they hosted. In 1986 USA For Africa and “We Are The World” dominated the night, and Rogers was game to embrace a socially conscious music scene and honor talent in all genres. SAM EMERSON

PAUL SIMON

Host: 1981 Simon, himself a 14-time GRAMMY winner when he hosted, brought wry humor to the show, at one point acknowledging of the hosting gig, “It’s not only a great honor to be asked, but I think it’s a very nice career move as well.” Fittingly, he also gave the audience a performance of his “Late In The Evening.” SAM EMERSON

BILLY CRYSTAL

GARRY SHANDLING

Host: 1987–1989 To paraphrase one of his famous “SNL” one-liners, Crystal was mahvelous as GRAMMY host. The Emmy winner, who was riding high in blockbusters such as Throw Momma From The Train, proved to be the perfect host amid the backdrop of subsiding Cold War tensions. “Speaking of presidents, Ronald Reagan is back in Los Angeles,” he said during his opening monologue in 1989. “Just what we need: another out-of-work actor in town.”

Host: 1990–1991, 1993–1994 Overseeing the GRAMMYs during a time of change — the first televised rap award in 1990, the Persian Gulf War in 1990–1991, Bill Clinton taking office in 1993, and the rise of CDs — Shandling brought levity to each year he hosted with clever quips: “Compact discs are overtaking the business, of course, which is ruining my life because I make love to music and I cannot find 45s anymore.”

SAM EMERSON

ANTHONY NESTE

59th Annual GRAMMY Awards 237


WHOOPI GOLDBERG

Host: 1992 EGOT (Emmy, GRAMMY, Oscar, Tony) winner Goldberg was the first woman to host a live GRAMMY telecast. The comedian — no stranger to pushing the envelope — delivered one of the raunchiest jokes in GRAMMY history (perhaps second to Shandling) referencing the show’s accounting firm: “I must tell you, Deloitte & Touche are two things I do nightly.” COURTESY OF THE RECORDING ACADEMY

PAUL REISER

Host: 1995 In 1995 Reiser was in the middle of a seven-season run with his show “Mad About You.” But the actor/writer/comic was also an accomplished musician who co-wrote the theme for the sitcom, making him a host particularly empathic to the sensitive musician. “We’re here to celebrate,” he said during the telecast. “We never find somebody who took a good song and ruined it and drag him onstage to yell at him.” RICK DIAMOND

ELLEN DEGENERES

Host: 1996–1997 During her first hosting gig, DeGeneres warned the audience, “This is not your father’s GRAMMYs,” and she reiterated that sentiment the following year when she opened the show with “This Is Ellen’s GRAMMY Song,” backed by Shawn Colvin, Sheila E., Chaka Khan, Meshell Ndegeocello, and Bonnie Raitt. The all-female band rocked Madison Square Garden, the first major arena to host the GRAMMYs. ERIC DRAPER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

KELSEY GRAMMER

Host: 1998 “Given the fact that four out of five of you will not get GRAMMYs tonight, it didn’t seem like a bad idea to have a psychiatrist on hand,” Grammer joked as he opened the GRAMMYs’ milestone 40th show. The “Frasier” star was forced to go off script after rapper Ol’ Dirty Bastard interrupted Shawn Colvin’s acceptance speech, and when Michael Portnoy crashed Bob Dylan’s “Love Sick” performance with “Soy Bomb” scrawled across his chest. JIM MCHUGH

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ROSIE O’DONNELL

Host: 1999–2000 O’Donnell ushered the GRAMMYs into the new millennium. Tuned into pop culture and politics, “The Rosie O’Donnell Show” host barbed past telecasts (bringing out two sushi chefs dressed as “Soy” and “Sauce” in reference to “Soy Bomb” the previous year) and riffed on the day’s musicians (introducing Alanis Morrissette by saying, “Some of us take our broken, obsessive relationships to therapy, she’s taken hers to No. 1”). FRANK MICELOTTA ARCHIVE/HULTON ARCHIVE

QUEEN LATIFAH

Host: 2005 Following a two-year stint with no official host, the GRAMMYs appointed multihyphenate GRAMMY winner Queen Latifah to reign over the 2005 ceremony. The queen was nominated that year for Best Jazz Vocal Album for The Dana Owens Album and led a GRAMMY night dominated by another royal member of the music family, Ray Charles, who died the previous year. FRANK MICELOTTA/GETTY IMAGES

JON STEWART

Host: 2001–2002 Stewart was just two years into “The Daily Show” when he hosted the GRAMMYs. Presiding over the first post-Sept. 11 GRAMMY telecast, Stewart helped the nation heal by providing comic relief, evidenced by his airport security bit (featuring Jimmy Kimmel) that opened the evening in February 2002. Appropriately, the clever funnyman, who has won two GRAMMYs himself, became the first GRAMMY host to stand in his underwear and socks and drop an “a** play” reference. KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES

LL COOL J

Host: 2012–2016 A two-time GRAMMY winner, LL Cool J served as host for Music’s Biggest Night for five consecutive years. Cumulatively, he presided over 10 GRAMMY shows, tributes and specials. The actor/rapper proved to be a masterful master of ceremonies, whether poignantly addressing the passing of Whitney Houston, beat-boxing with Taylor Swift or “puttin’ suckers in fear” as a performer on the GRAMMY stage himself. KEVIN WINTER/WIREIMAGE.COM

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AEG and AEG LIVE celebrate our partnership with The Recording AcademyŽ. We’re proud to set the stage for legendary performances and everlasting memories and welcome our colleagues to the show.



j o h nv a r v a t o s . c o m

Vintage Trouble, 2017 K ings Theatre, Brooklyn, N Y


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