58th Grammy Awards Programme.

Page 1


At Bell Labs, we’re working with musicians and artisits to enrich how we experience sound and vision, through technology. In 1934, our listening experience changed forever. Technical GRAMMYŽ Award recipient and Bell labs scientist, Dr. Harvey Fletcher created the first stereophonic recording - the beginning of surround sound as we know it. Since then, innovation at Bell Labs and our collaborations with the music industry have continued to shape sound itself - from the vocoder to MP3 compression, and now, the new Human Digital Orchestra. When music and meaningful technology meet, great things happen. Visit us, celebrate with us, come innovate with us.




A G ALLERY FOR

ENLIGHTENED LIVING

Serenity Calling, a gallery for enlightened living, has assembled a collection of empowering pieces to help you tap into, and realize your truest intentions. Discover the frequency that speaks to you.

S E R E N I T Y- C A L L I N G . C O M 818.275.2174 28914 R o a d s i d e D r i v e S u i t e 1 0 4 Agoura Hills, CA 91301


Congratulations to all the GRAMMY nominees and winners! Thank you for your music and talent that continues to inspire worldwide. ÂŽ




BY


THE RECORDING ACADEMY® PRESENTS

FOR THE RECORDING ACADEMY CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

John Poppo PRESIDENT/CEO

Neil Portnow CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS EXECUTIVE IN CHARGE OF PRODUCTION & CHIEF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

Branden Chapman CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER

Rick Engdahl SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, AWARDS

Bill Freimuth CHIEF INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT & MEMBER RELATIONS OFFICER

Daryl P. Friedman CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER

Gaetano Frizzi CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER

Evan Greene CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER

Jason James VICE PRESIDENT, CREATIVE SERVICES

David Konjoyan

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2016 STAPLES CENTER LOS ANGELES

12:30 P.M. GRAMMY AWARDS PREMIERE CEREMONY® 5:00 P.M. LIVE-TELECAST GRAMMY AWARDS® CEREMONY

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, SPECIAL PROJECTS

VICE PRESIDENT

Scott Goldman VICE PRESIDENT

Dana Tomarken VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE

Judy Wong

ADVISORS GENERAL COUNSEL

Joel Katz NATIONAL LEGAL COUNSEL

Chuck Ortner

8

Gabriel Abaroa Jr. Leslie Ann Jones Joel Katz Terry Lickona Glenn Lorbecki Hank Neuberger Richard Ranta

PRESS REPRESENTATION Rogers & Cowan

BALLOT TABULATION Deloitte & Touche Gary Smith

AEG EHRLICH VENTURES LLC EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

Ken Ehrlich DIRECTOR

Louis J. Horvitz WRITERS

Ken Ehrlich David Wild CO-PRODUCER

Terry Lickona

Nancy Shapiro

FOUNDATIONS EXECUTIVE STAFF

Neil Portnow, Co-Chair George J. Flanigen IV, Co-Chair Jason Bentley Jennifer Blakeman Fletcher Foster Jimmy Jam Mike Knobloch Alexandra Patsavas Jon Platt John Poppo Bob Santelli Eric Schilling

RECORDING ACADEMY TELEVISION COMMITTEE ADVISORY GROUP

Wayne Zahner

Neda Azarfar

RECORDING ACADEMY TELEVISION COMMITTEE

SUPERVISING PRODUCER

Ecologically intelligent practices were integrated into the planning and production of the GRAMMY Awards. Most paper products and other supplies we bought and the services we procured were selected with sensitivity toward positive ecological stewardship. As an organization with a broad public reach, we take our obligations to society very seriously. The Recording Academy is honored to have teamed with the Natural Resources Defense Council, one of America’s most respected nonpartisan environmental organizations, to help reduce The Academy’s ecological footprint.

Eric Cook CONSULTING PRODUCER

Walter C. Miller PRODUCTION DESIGNER

Brian Stonestreet LIGHTING DESIGNER

Robert A. Dickinson TALENT PRODUCER

Chantel Sausedo GRAMMY PREMIERE CEREMONY PRODUCER

Greg Fera

DEPUTY GENERAL COUNSEL

GRAMMY PREMIERE CEREMONY MUSICAL DIRECTOR

Bobby Rosenbloum

Ray Chew

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


1 9 0 0 AT TO R N E YS | 3 8 LO C AT I O N S W O R L D W I D E ˚

Congratulations Nominees The Entertainment and Media Group of Greenberg Traurig proudly supports The Recording Academy® and the 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards®. Thank you for the gift of music!

Amsterdam +31 (0) 20 301 7300 | Atlanta 678.553.2100 | Las Vegas 702.792.3773 | London* +44 (0) 203 349 8700 | Los Angeles 310.586.7700 Miami 305.579.0500 | New York 212.801.9200 | San Francisco 415.655.1300 | Silicon Valley 650.328.8500 | Washington, D.C. 202.331.3100

G R E E N B E RG T R A U R I G , L L P | AT TO R N E YS AT L AW | W W W.GT L AW.CO M Greenberg Traurig is a service mark and trade name of Greenberg Traurig, LLP and Greenberg Traurig, P.A. ©2016 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. Attorneys at Law. All rights reserved. Contact: Joel A. Katz in Atlanta at 678.553.2100. °These numbers are subject to fluctuation. *Operates as Greenberg Traurig Maher LLP. 26680


THE RECORDING ACADEMY®

10

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

KEVIN MAZUR/WIREIMAGE.COM

A

s the GRAMMY Awards celebrates its 58th annual ceremony, The Recording Academy has built a rich tradition as the premier outlet for honoring achievements in the recording arts and for supporting the music community. In 1957 a visionary group of music professionals and label executives in Los Angeles recognized the need to create an organization that would acknowledge and celebrate the artistic achievements of not only talented musicians and singers, but also important behind-the-scenes contributors such as producers and engineers. Conceived as a way to create a real recording industry community, The Recording Academy was born and the GRAMMY Awards process began. The GRAMMYs are the only peerpresented award to honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position. The GRAMMY Awards themselves have grown right along with the organization that presents them. Initially a series of taped network TV specials titled “The Best On Record,” the GRAMMYs have long been a state-of-the-art live extravaganza (in 2003 the GRAMMYs became the first awards show to broadcast in highdefinition television and 5.1 surround sound) and the premier music awards show on television. In addition to the GRAMMY Award, The Recording Academy presents several other awards to honor important music and music professionals. The Lifetime Achievement Award celebrates performers and other music professionals who have made outstanding contributions to recording in their lifetimes. The Trustees Award recognizes primarily nonperforming contributors. The Technical GRAMMY Award is presented to individuals and/or companies who have made contributions of outstanding technical significance to the recording field. The GRAMMY Legend Award is presented on occasion to individuals or groups for ongoing contributions and

Paul McCartney, Kanye West and Rihanna at the 57th GRAMMY Awards

influence in the recording field. And the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame was established in 1973 to commemorate recordings, at least 25 years old, of lasting qualitative or historical significance. As the music industry continues its evolution from analog to digital, The Recording Academy has continued its mission to be the leading force in honoring, celebrating and advancing music. The Academy has been at the forefront of critical issues affecting both the music community and the general population, such as legislation affecting the arts community, protection of intellectual property rights, piracy, archiving and preservation issues, censorship concerns, and creating dialogue between the music and technology sectors. To accomplish this mission, The Recording Academy has developed a network of 12 Chapters across the country to provide industry service and program development to our nearly 25,000 members. The Academy also launched the Producers & Engineers Wing in 2000 to create an organized voice for the important technical and creative community. Through its Washington, D.C.-based Advocacy & Public Policy office, The Academy seeks to amplify the voice of music creators in national policy matters. The Academy was instrumental in helping form the Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus in 2004, and in 2007 co-founded the musicFIRST Coalition, which has taken a leadership role in the fight to expand radio performance royalties to all music creators.

In 2015 The Academy launched the GRAMMY Creators Alliance, a collective of music makers and creators, advised by top industry managers, that offers a platform for the creative community to form a unified voice on crucial issues impacting the future of music. Through its affiliated MusiCares Foundation and GRAMMY Foundation, The Academy works to protect and support music people in crisis, and provide young people with real-world exposure to music and the music industry. In 2014 The Recording Academy and GRAMMY Foundation partnered to launch the first-ever Music Educator Award to honor a current educator who has made a significant contribution to the field of music education. Since 2008, The Recording Academy has worked with the Natural Resources Defense Council to focus its awareness on the carbon footprint of The Academy and GRAMMY Awards production, and to aid The Academy in communicating to its vendors an interest in sustainable solutions. In 2009 The Academy’s headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif., attained LEED gold-level certification. Finally, The Academy opened the doors to the GRAMMY Museum in December 2008, launching a state-of-the-art cultural facility at the exciting L.A. Live complex in downtown Los Angeles. To expand the institution’s reach, a 27,000-plus squarefoot GRAMMY Museum Mississippi is expected to open in March. These Museums bring the mission, impact and legacy of The Recording Academy and the GRAMMYs to the public year-round.



FROM THE PRESIDENT/CEO

I

NEIL PORTNOW

President/CEO of The Recording Academy

12

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

t’s my pleasure to welcome you to the 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards. For the industry, this is a night of celebration and camaraderie. For all the nominees, it’s a special night of recognition from their peers for their musical achievements. And for fans, it’s a chance to see unique GRAMMY Moment performances they won’t see anywhere else. It is truly a night that captures the world’s imagination and engages us like few others, as record-setting social metrics demonstrate each year. We’re understandably very proud of our show. To be sure, the GRAMMY Awards is our flagship, but it’s not the only TV programming we produce. In fact, over the last few years, we have grown our television footprint well beyond the annual GRAMMY Awards, and some exciting new endeavors are happening. This year, we teamed with CBS to produce our first-ever official network arrivals show. For some time now, what happens on the GRAMMY red carpet has stirred media buzz around the world. The GRAMMY arrivals has become an integral part of the GRAMMY night experience. Combined with the GRAMMY Premiere Ceremony and the GRAMMY telecast, the new official red-carpet show completes a night of exciting celebration. One of the most heartfelt events during GRAMMY Week has been our Special Merit Awards Ceremony. Lifetime Achievement and Trustees Award, Technical GRAMMY Award, and Music Educator Award recipients were celebrated at a small gathering and the honorees’ acceptance speeches never failed to be simultaneously funny, humble, touching, and most of all, uniquely inspired. While the intimacy of the night was special, the modest scale was a missed opportunity to bring greater awareness to these legendary artists and music professionals. So I’m pleased that this year we will team with PBS’ “Great Performances” to air these deserving honors along with musical performances in the summer. I expect this will become an ongoing annual broadcast. Three years ago we began a new series of shows shining the GRAMMY spotlight on artists with legendary GRAMMY track records. First was a fitting tribute to the great Whitney Houston shortly after her untimely and tragic passing. Next came a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ historic appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” That was followed by a salute to Stevie Wonder on the occasion of his Album Of The Year-winning Songs In The Key Of Life turning 40. In December 2015, we lit the candles on an evening commemorating the 100th birthday of Ol’ Blue Eyes, Frank Sinatra. Given the strong audiences for these shows, going forward, we’ll continue to look for opportunities for similarly themed and meaningful specials. Finally, the MusiCares Foundation continues to top itself with each successive Person of the Year fundraising gala. Over the last few years, events honoring Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, Carole King, Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen, Barbra Streisand, James Taylor, and Neil Young have not only raised millions of dollars for the essential work of our health and human services organization, they’ve been remarkably entertaining and unique shows. Many have aired on AXS TV or have been shown on PBS. Each broadcast has added to the awareness of MusiCares’ important work. We’re proud of this growing slate of programming and the greater TV awareness and opportunities it affords both current and legendary artists. Of course, The Academy achieved fine results in all facets of our business this past year, from our education programs through the GRAMMY Foundation and GRAMMY Museum to our advocacy work on Capitol Hill and in local districts throughout the country. And, through our stellar Awards process. Which leads us back to tonight. I offer my congratulations to all the nominees, my thanks to our dedicated staff and production and broadcast partners, and my invitation to you to enjoy the show. I’m confident that tonight you will “Witness Greatness.”


THE KECK EFFECT: MORE HIGH NOTES

The USC Tina and Rick Caruso Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery can help with a wide variety of treatments, including care of the professional voice, cosmetic facial plastic surgery and hearing loss. Our team will tailor a comprehensive, interdisciplinary plan that’s right for you. That’s The Keck Effect — more ways to help you hear and make music.

ent.KeckMedicine.org (800) USC-CARE

© 2016 Keck Medicine of USC


FROM THE CHAIR

O JOHN POPPO

Chair of the Board of Trustees

14

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

n behalf of my esteemed colleagues on The Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees and myself, I welcome you to Music’s Biggest Night — the 58th GRAMMY Awards. As the uncontested symbol of music’s best-in-class, the peer-awarded GRAMMY is a special, coveted honor, and we extend our most enthusiastic congratulations to all of this year’s nominees for their outstanding achievements. We thank them for their fine work, which inspires us all to continue to raise the bar of excellence in recorded music. We’re quite sure our Voting members were faced with some especially difficult choices in selecting this year’s recipients. We are also proud of the many achievements of our Academy in the past year. While everything certainly culminates with our extraordinary Awards process and GRAMMY celebration, as most of you know, The Academy is defined by so much more than one amazing night. It has truly become the premier music organization in the world and is actively engaged 365 days a year in the ongoing pursuit of its mission — to ensure music remains an indelible part of our culture, both here and around the globe. To that end, we are thrilled to say, due in large part to our intense national advocacy efforts, we have now seen the introduction of the Fair Play Fair Pay Act in Congress. This represents a monumental step toward protecting the rights and livelihoods of all music creators. In addition, our GRAMMYs in My District program is proving to be a huge success, garnering considerable notice and action in our local communities. Through the fine work of our affiliates — MusiCares, the GRAMMY Foundation, the GRAMMY Museum, and The Latin Recording Academy — we continue to increase our charity, education, archiving, preservation, and international outreach initiatives. MusiCares’ Person of the Year and MAP Fund events were huge successes and will enable us to help even more musicians in need. The Foundation’s continued expansion of GRAMMY Camp, GRAMMY in the Schools and grant funding programs provides more opportunities for the next generation of music creators. Along with the GRAMMY Museum’s licensing of its exhibits and the addition of GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, the development and production of successful new TV properties, and the significant growth of our presence in China and other foreign markets, these are only some of the ways in which we have strengthened The Academy brand for the benefit of its membership and the music community at large. Never a group to rest on its laurels, the Board has engaged in an in-depth, long-range strategic planning process along with staff to further chart a course to even greater accomplishments well into the future. As there is still much work to be done in an increasingly challenging industry, we look to your continued support in both celebrating and protecting our music and its creators. In closing, I would like to take this opportunity to thank our very capable and wonderful staff, led by my friend and colleague Neil Portnow, and especially my fellow Board members and all of our dedicated elected leaders for their tireless efforts to make The Recording Academy the relevant and consequential organization it is. Most of all, I would like to thank them, and you, for the faith that affords me the great honor and privilege to serve as your Chair.


*

#1 Independent Promoter Worldwide

Michael Gudinski

& the team at Frontier Australia & New Zealand Congratulate all our touring artists on their GRAMMY ® nominations. Good luck.

Taylor Swift On 7 GRAMMMY ® nominations And performing her largest show of The 1989 World Tour at Sydney’s ANZ Stadium on Nov 28, filmed exclusively for Apple Music, in front of 76,000 fans

Ed Sheeran On 3 GRAMMY ® nominations And 6 sold out stadium shows across Australia & New Zealand

A$AP Rocky Don Henley Drake Ellie Goulding Foo Fighters James Bay Muse Pentatonix Pharrell Williams * Billboard Boxscores August 2015; Top Independent Promoter (International) Billboard Touring Awards 2015

frontiertouring.com

A company is only as good as the company it keeps


Contents WELCOME

12 President/CEO’s Message 14 Chair’s Message

36

NOMINEES

24 D’Angelo And The Vanguard 26 Mark Ronson And Bruno Mars 28 Ed Sheeran 30 Taylor Swift 32 The Weeknd 34 Alabama Shakes 36 Kendrick Lamar 38 Chris Stapleton 40 Courtney Barnett 42 James Bay 44 Sam Hunt 46 Tori Kelly 48 Meghan Trainor 50 Song Of The Year 54 Complete Nominations List

96 SPECIAL MERIT AWARDS

114

Lifetime Achievement Awards 86 Ruth Brown by Rep. John Conyers Jr. 88 Celia Cruz by Marc Anthony 90 Earth, Wind & Fire by Big Boi 92 Herbie Hancock by Chick Corea 94 Jefferson Airplane by Patti Smith 96 Linda Ronstadt by Aaron Neville 98 Run DMC by Ice Cube

Trustees Awards 100 John Cage by Thurston Moore 102 Fred Foster by Dolly Parton 104 Chris Strachwitz by Country Joe McDonald Technical GRAMMY Awards 106 EMT by Chuck Ainlay 108 Dr. Harvey Fletcher by Peter Asher Music Educator Award 110 Phillip Riggs by Sarah Stafford Hall Of Fame 114 2016 GRAMMY Hall Of Fame



Contents FEATURES

136 164

174

126

Ready For The Red Carpet Fitness and nutrition join standbys such as fashion on the red-carpet checklist as artists prep for Music’s Biggest Night

238

136

Building Their Brand How artists use makeup, hair and even nail art to define themselves on the GRAMMY red carpet

THE RECORDING ACADEMY TODAY

154

Giving Back For artists creating their own foundations, charity isn’t as easy as simply writing a check

164

Candid Camera Official GRAMMY portrait photographer Danny Clinch handpicks some unexpected backstage and rehearsal photos

174

Sailing On 2016 MusiCares Person of the Year Lionel Richie sits down for a chat with Pharrell Williams

232 In Memoriam Remembering music people we lost in 2015

Sinatra 100 A photo collage of the GRAMMYs’ TV birthday salute to the Chairman of the Board

10 The Recording Academy 190 Membership & Industry Relations 192 GRAMMY Week 194 GRAMMY Museum 196 MusiCares Foundation 198 GRAMMY Foundation 200 Advocacy At The Academy 202 The Latin Recording Academy 204 The Digital Academy 206 GRAMMY Pro 208 The GRAMMY Awards Process 212 Executive Staff 214 National Trustee Officers And Trustees 218 National Staff 224 Recording Academy Chapters 230 Past Chairs

The GRAMMY Award design is a trademark and service mark registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may not be reproduced without permission. The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc., owns, among others, the following trademarks: National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences®, The Recording Academy®, GRAMMY®, GRAMMYs®, GRAMMY Awards®, GRAMMY Hall Of Fame®, GRAMMY Pro®, Latin Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences®, The Latin Recording Academy®, MusiCares Foundation®, GRAMMY in the Schools®, and GRAMMY Foundation®. The 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards Program Book is published by The Recording Academy, 3030 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404, in association with FX Group. © 2016 The Recording Academy. All rights reserved.



FOR THE RECORDING ACADEMY EDITOR IN CHIEF & CO-PUBLISHER

David Konjoyan SENIOR EDITOR

Tim McPhate PRODUCTION MANAGER

Iman Saadat Woodley ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Kiana Butler ASSISTANT EDITOR

Renée Fabian

OFFICE MANAGER

Laurie Bailey EXECUTIVE ASSISTANTS

James Denny Joseph Duhamel Sharon Singer ART DIRECTOR

Simone Tieber GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Andrea Carroz Jason Lowsy INTERN DESIGNER

FOR FX GROUP PRESIDENT & CO-PUBLISHER

Kristian Krempel VP OF OPERATIONS

Angela Krempel GENERAL COUNSEL

Frank G. Fernandez SR. DIRECTOR OF ENTERTAINMENT & ARTIST RELATIONS

Ken Rose ARTIST RELATIONS ADVISOR

Elizabeth Ferris WEST COAST SUPPORT

Rhonda Bedikian ARTIST & MEDIA RELATIONS DIRECTOR

Curse Mackey PROJECT DIRECTOR/ CREATIVE SERVICES

Devin Mueller NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR

Adam Longaker SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR

Jake Groeschen ADVERTISING SALES

Doug Beaudoin Tom Brady Adair Dunn Allistair Gibson Blair Hall Paul Harris Eric Mader Dave Van Neil Charles Warner Matthew Wheat Jonathan Wilson

Bailey Luna INTERNET & TECHNICAL SERVICES

Scot Shuman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Chuck Ainlay, Marc Anthony, Peter Asher, Big Boi, Bruce Britt, Danny Clinch, Rep. John Conyers Jr., Chick Corea, Chuck Crisafulli, Alan di Perna, Shannon Edwards, Bill Forman, Paul Grein, Andreas Hale, Ice Cube, Nick Krewen, Tammy La Gorce, Lauren Levinson, Country Joe McDonald, Thurston Moore, Aaron Neville, Melinda Newman, Jessica Nicholson, Dolly Parton, Bryan Reesman, Patti Smith, Sarah Stafford, John SuttonSmith, Roy Trakin, Pharrell Williams, Lisa Zhito, Paul Zollo SPECIAL THANKS

FX Group, Inc. would like to extend a special thank you to the following people for their contribution and support: Professional Sports Publications/PSP & The Recording Academy

The Official 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards program book is published by The Recording Academy, 3030 Olympic Blvd., Santa Monica, CA 90404, and produced in association with FX Group, Inc., 202 South Parker Street, Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33606. All rights reserved. No part of the publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted in any form, by means electronically, mechanically, photocopying, or otherwise, and no article or photography can be printed without the written consent of the publisher. Reproduction in whole or part without written consent is forbidden. The Recording Academy and FX Group assume no responsibility for statements made by advertisers; the quality, deliverability of products or services advertised; or positioning of advertising. GRAMMY Awards is a registered trademark of the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, Inc. The GRAMMY Award design is a trademark and service mark registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office and may not be reproduced without permission. © 2016 The Recording Academy. All rights reserved. Published by The Recording Academy

FRONT COVER ARTWORK

GRAMMY statue photograph by Tom Keller © 2015 The Recording Academy OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER FOR THE GRAMMY AWARDS

WireImage.com GRAMMY AWARD STATUE DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY

John Billings

In association with FX Group, Inc. 202 South Parker Street, Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33606 813.283.0100 | 866.668.5412 fax info@fxm-group.com www.fxm-group.com



MAKE SOME WAVES ADO R AMA IS YO U R CO M PLE TE R E SO U RC E FO R PRO AU D I O TO O L S , M US I C AL I N S TR U M ENTS , I N - D EPTH K N OWLED G E AN D S U PP O RT

AMPLIFIERS & MIXERS | RECORDING & MIDI | DJ EQUIP. | PA & LIVE SOUND | MICROPHONES

TRADE-IN for CASH or GEAR We buy all models of audio equip., musical instruments, photo, video, cinema, and lighting gear.

TRADE & USED Jack Gold jackg@adorama.com 800 -223-2500 – #6

NEW YORK’S PREMIER SOUND STAGE adorama.com/livetheatre


M USICAL INSTRU M E NTS | SPE AKE R & MON ITOR CAB IN E TS | AU DIO for VIDEO | STAG E & STU DIO P OWE R

CORPORATE SALES Ray Garcia rayg@adorama.com 212- 645 -5754

VISIT OUR STORE 42 W 18 ST NYC 800 -223 -2500 adorama.com


RECORD

OF THE YEAR

Irresistibly sexy yet imbued with a childlike vulnerability, D’Angelo And The Vanguard’s “Really Love” seems destined to become one of the most seductive singles of the digital age, if not of all time. Culled from the acclaimed 2014 album Black Messiah, the song’s intro teaser commences with rich, velvety strings overlapping hushed female vocals. From this rich sonic mist emerges an R&B slow jam with a clopping rhythm suggesting a romantic countryside jaunt in a courting carriage. When D’Angelo croons “I’m in really love with you,” the ungrammatical sentiment is as endearing as a love note passed along by an infatuated schoolkid. Backed by the Vanguard — bassist Pino Palladino, drummer Chris “Daddy” Dave, guitarists Jesse Johnson and Isaiah Sharkey, keyboardist Cleo “Pookie” Sample, and vocalist Kendra Foster — the song’s ingenuity is trumped only by its audaciousness. “Really Love” clocks in at nearly six minutes, well in excess of radio’s time strictures. But if there’s one big statement that defines D’Angelo’s career, it’s that true artistry knows no constraints. D’Angelo arrived on the international music scene in 1995 with Brown Sugar, a debut album that found the dynamic singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist triumphantly asserting his individuality while evoking the spirits of Marvin Gaye, Curtis Mayfield, Al Green, and Prince. He resurfaced five years later with the acclaimed follow-up Voodoo, which earned the 2000 GRAMMY for Best R&B Album. Jointly, Brown Sugar and Voodoo were so colossally creative and engaging, D’Angelo was heralded as a pioneer of the neo-soul movement. Nearly 15 years in the making, Black Messiah was issued in the waning weeks of 2014 and, like its predecessors, the album immediately asserted its influence. It earned a GRAMMY nomination for Best R&B Album and topped many critics’ year-end best-of lists, while peaking at No. 3 on Billboard’s Top R&B Albums chart and No. 5 on the Billboard 200. “Here’s to messiahs worth waiting for,” cheered Rolling Stone in its review of Black Messiah. We’ll toast to that. — Bruce Britt 24

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

GREG H ARRIS

D’ANGELO AND THE VANGUARD



RECORD

OF THE YEAR

Some of life’s simplest pleasures are quite timeless: sunny days, starry nights, hot romance, cold pizza. Musically, there are some fine, timeless pleasures as well: a sly and sexy funk guitar riff, the blast of a killer horn section, an irresistible sing-along vocal, and an undeniable backbeat that insists you get on up and start moving. Mark Ronson and Bruno Mars managed to deliver a stretch limo-sized heap of these musical pleasures with “Uptown Funk,” the latest collaboration between the producer and singer and the lead single from Ronson’s Best Pop Vocal Album-nominated Uptown Special. The track showcases Ronson at his groove-building best and gives Mars a chance to fully cut loose with a vocal performance that ranges from sly shout-outs (“Harlem; Hollywood; Jackson, Mississippi”) to hot-blooded “gon’ give it to ya” throw downs. Together, Ronson and Mars created a work that’s proud of its heritage, drawing upon the electrofunk of early Prince and ANDY FORD/NME/TIME INC. (UK)

KAI Z FENG

MARK RONSON FEATURING BRUNO MARS

the Time, the party vibe of Chic and Rick James, the brassy punch of Earth, Wind & Fire, and the raise-the-roof energy of James Brown. Yet, while honoring musical pleasures past, “Uptown Funk” hits listeners as something fresh, exciting and inviting — the soundtrack to a party happening right now that you definitely don’t want to miss. This party got crazy quickly. On its path to becoming an international hit, “Uptown Funk” became a record-setter. With 14 weeks at No. 1 in the United States, it tied for the second-longest stay atop the Billboard Hot 100. Meanwhile, the video for “Uptown Funk” joined the YouTube elite in becoming the ninth video to surpass 1 billion views. Mars punctuates his vocals with shouts of “don’t believe me just watch.” But all it takes is one listen to believe in the timeless pleasure of getting completely funked up. — Chuck Crisafulli



RECORD

OF THE YEAR

Romance, it seems, never goes out of style. Millions have been moved by a 25-year-old pop star who isn’t afraid to declare, “Darling, I will be loving you till we’re 70.” Ed Sheeran’s soulinflected, romantic ballad “Thinking Out Loud” is no doubt one of the most successful recordings in his short but stellar career to date, garnering 58th GRAMMY nominations for Record Of The Year, Song Of The Year and Best Pop Solo Performance. A classic ode to lifelong love, it’s an unusual hit in an era of casual hookups and swipe-and-scroll digital dating. But that also may be the key to its phenomenal success. Sheeran himself has described “Thinking Out Loud” as a “walking down the aisle song.” “I am [an] acoustic balladeer who sings soppy love songs to teenage girls,” said an unapologetic Sheeran in an interview with The Telegraph in 2014. “And that’s something I’ve never really shied away from, or wanted to shy way from. ’Cause I think it’s something I can do quite well.” “Thinking Out Loud” offers ample evidence of just how well he does it. Produced by Jake Gosling, the track’s spare, understated arrangement leaves plenty of room for Sheeran’s evocative voice — intimate and husky in the verses, soaring into the singer’s impassioned upper register for the choruses. “Thinking Out Loud” has drawn comparisons to Marvin Gaye’s “Let’s Get It On.” But Sheeran has frequently said the prime influence for his soulful performance was Van Morrison, one of his earliest musical influences. “Thinking Out Loud” was written in February 2014 by Sheeran with a good friend, singer/songwriter Amy Wadge. The subject was Sheeran’s then-girlfriend, Athina Andrelos. Although the 2013 passing of Sheeran’s grandfather and the fatal illness of Wadge’s mother-in-law also inspired the song’s timeless ideal of a love that never dies. — Alan di Perna

28

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

BEN WATTS

ED SHEERAN



RECORD

OF THE YEAR

ALBUM

OF THE YEAR

TAYLOR SWIFT Few albums have gone on to inspire song-by-song remakes, and only then after they’ve withstood the test of time. But in the case of Taylor Swift’s 1989, indie music icon Ryan Adams debuted his largely acoustic remake one year after Swift’s release. Adams’ homage introduced Swift’s exceptional songwriting to an audience that usually ignores mainstream pop. Of course, Swift is no stranger to reinvention. Her latest album casts off the last vestiges of a contemporary country style that dates back to her first hit, the platinum “Tim McGraw,” at the age of 16. Swift’s current venture into electro-pop terrain includes nine collaborations with 2014 Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical GRAMMY winner Max Martin, who recorded Britney Spears’ “… Baby One More Time” back when Swift was just 8 years old. According to Swift, her label loved 1989, but asked for three country songs to round it out. She graciously declined. The album has since gone on to yield two No. 1 singles, including “Blank Space,” her tongue-in-cheek ode to the media’s obsession with her dating life. Last October, “Blank Space” became the most-viewed video in Vevo’s history. It subsequently landed on numerous critics’ year-end lists.

30

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CHRIS POLK/GETTY IMAGES/TAS RIGHTS MANAGEMENT

Rolling Stone, which declared 1989 its 10th best album of 2014, compared the artist’s pop reinvention on the album to Bob Dylan going electric at the Newport Folk Festival. As for what direction Swift’s music will take next, that’s anyone’s guess. But it’s a safe bet that it will be entirely her decision, and that we’ll all be paying attention. — Bill Forman



RECORD

OF THE YEAR

ALBUM

OF THE YEAR

The Weeknd — the artist formerly known as Abel Tesfaye — had quite a year in 2015. He spawned a chart-topping album with Beauty Behind The Madness; two No. 1 singles, “The Hills” and the Record Of The Yearnominated “Can’t Feel My Face”; and a pair of songs on the hit Fifty Shades Of Grey soundtrack, with “Earned It” earning three 58th GRAMMY nominations, including Best R&B Performance. And to top it off, he received a grand total of seven 58th GRAMMY nods. The Weeknd’s success is a tribute to his own hard work and career savvy that took him from quirky Toronto-based Drake prodigy and mixtape cult figure to a literal man on fire in the hit video for his scorching “Can’t Feel My Face.” This star-making collaboration with tunesmith Max Martin, among others, harnessed all his noir prog-R&B prowess into an undeniable crossover Top 40 anthem. In a world of à la carte streaming, The Weeknd managed to create a unified statement with Beauty Behind The Madness, a tortured confessional

32

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

that enlists the likes of fellow nominee Ed Sheeran for the brooding mea culpa “Dark Times” and ice queen Lana Del Rey for the existential angst of “Prisoner,” where the two claim to be “addicted to a life that’s so empty and so cold.” “The Hills,” … Madness’ second hit, is a similarly disturbing but irresistible tale of an illicit druggy affair. Its refrain is taken from the title of a Wes Craven horror film, the threat of guilt, shame and violence bubbling just below the surface. “I only love it when you touch me, not feel me,” insists The Weeknd. But in 2015, plenty of us were feeling him. By channeling Marvin Gaye’s “Sexual Healing” sensuality, Prince’s “Purple Rain” spirituality and Michael Jackson’s “Off The Wall” sass, the triple-threat entertainer — singer, dancer and songwriter — may prove to be the heir to all three as the newly minted king of soul, funk and pop. — Roy Trakin

KALEN HOLLOMON

THE WEEKND


Music that starts out like this...

shouldn’t end up sounding like this.

,

RIVA Audio’s premium wireless Bluetooth speakers, with patented Trillium™ technology, play your music the way it was meant to be heard — with true bass, treble and mid-range, crystal-clear vocals and stunning separation. Whether at home, the beach, the office or out on tour, RIVA gives you Awesome Audio Anywhere. Join the RIVA Nation at www.rivaaudio.com.

DESIGNED

TO

AMAZE


ALBUM

OF THE YEAR

in short order. For the 58th GRAMMY Awards, the group snagged four nominations: Best Rock Performance and Best Rock Song for “Don’t Wanna Fight” and Best Alternative Music Album and Album Of The Year for their sophomore album, Sound & Color. Formed in 2009 as the Shakes, the Alabama upstarts spent two years gigging, working day jobs and building a musical repertoire that resulted in the 2011 EP Alabama Shakes, a title that soon became their band moniker. Healthy Internet chatter and airplay, along with a strong CMJ showcase, led to a label deal and their Top 10 debut, Boys & Girls, in 2012. A steady stream of touring followed, and the band received two GRAMMY nominations for 2012, Best New Artist and Best Rock Performance for “Hold On.” Despite landing nominations in the Rock Field, Alabama Shakes have increasingly incorporated elements of funk and Southern soul into their music. The multifaceted Sound & Color builds upon the gritty blues intensity of Boys & Girls. BRANTLEY GUTIERREZ Brittany Howard, the group’s triple-threat singer/songwriter/guitarist, invokes the likes of Janis Joplin, Otis Redding and Bon Scott — she can be righteous and raucous, funky and feisty, and acoustic and intimate. Her like-minded bandmates, guitarist Heath Fogg, bassist Zac Cockrell and drummer Steve Johnson, match her emotion and power note for note. Sound & Color also finds the group expanding their instrumental palette. Elements such as vibraphone and strings were incorporated around the stinging guitars and driving rhythm section, earning the praise of Rolling Stone, which championed the effort as one of its 50 best albums of 2015. Hitting No. 1 on the Billboard 200, Sound & Color is undoubtedly, as Rolling Stone described, “the sound of a band with whole galaxies ahead of it.” — Bryan Reesman

ALABAMA SHAKES While the Internet has leveled the musical playing field for indie artists, making it challenging to rise above the cluttered fold, some artists have still managed to strike gold, and on their own terms. Proof positive: Athens, Ala., retro-rock quartet Alabama Shakes parlayed a strong digital presence into a potent real-world splash

34

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


©2015 City of Hope

THE MIRACLE OF SCIENCE WITH SOUL

GUS SURVIVED LEUKEMIA

KOMMAH SURVIVED BREAST CANCER

JIM SURVIVED ESOPHAGEAL CANCER

When you have cancer, what you want most is a miracle. City of Hope creates scientific miracles that make lives whole again. We are a world leader in cancer research and treatment. Here scientists partner with physicians to turn laboratory breakthroughs into treatments that outsmart cancer. Here we care for the person, not just the body, so your life after cancer can be richer and more rewarding. At City of Hope, we combine science with soul to create miracles. See how these people survived cancer at CityofHope.org


ALBUM

OF THE YEAR

When Kendrick Lamar released “The Blacker The Berry” shortly after he won his first career GRAMMYs last year, it sent shockwaves through the industry. The artist’s harrowing vocals had captured the essence of the burgeoning Black Lives Matter movement. Fiercely unapologetic, with a wicked stream of consciousness, the song was indicative of the social commentary that was to come from Lamar’s highly anticipated follow-up to 2012’s Good Kid, M.A.A.D City. The bar was already set extraordinarily high for Lamar as his major label debut ran roughshod over the industry with dynamic rhymes, scintillating production and an engaging narrative. However, To Pimp A Butterfly proved to be a surprise departure as Lamar tapped into the nation’s political and cultural consciousness. A fascinating look at the world through the eyes of a 27-year-old from Compton, Calif., To Pimp A Butterfly is set amid the turbulent backdrop of America’s current race relations as Lamar attempts to unpack his personal demons and cope with newfound fame. By enlisting collaborators such as P-Funk architect George Clinton (“Wesley’s Theory”) and R&B legend Ronald Isley (“How Much A Dollar Cost”), Lamar delivers a pervasive litany of poetry layered over a sonic backdrop deeply influenced by the pre-hip-hop masters of funk, soul, jazz, and spoken word. From the album’s arresting artwork down to the cleverly edited and haunting conversation with the late rapper Tupac Shakur on “Mortal Man,” the album is a challenging yet rewarding listening experience. It’s no surprise then that Lamar’s 11 nominations for the 58th GRAMMY Awards have made him the third most nominated artist in a single year — trailing only Michael Jackson and Babyface’s 12 nominations for 1983 and 1996, respectively. In addition to topping several year-end lists, including Rolling Stone, Billboard and The New York Times, To Pimp A Butterfly earned nods for Album Of The Year and Best Rap Album, and the wistfully optimistic Pharrell Williamsco-produced “Alright” garnered Song Of The Year, Best Rap Performance, Best Rap Song, and Best Music Video nominations. With To Pimp A Butterfly offering maximum nutritional value, the artist formally known as K Dot has managed to concoct a uniquely profound offering that sticks to your ribs. — Andreas Hale

36

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CHRISTIAN SAN J OSE

KENDRICK LAMAR


INTRODUCING THE YEAR’S BEST NEW PERFORMER THE WORLD’S FIRST HEADPHONES WITH PERSONALIZED SOUND. BUILT IN PARTNERSHIP WITH 27X GRAMMY® WINNER, QUINCY JONES.

Discover more at AKG.COM/N90Q

The first headphones delivering a personalized sound experience at the touch of a button

Tailor the sound for a wide array of music genres with an equalizer adjustment accessible on the control ring

Built-in DAC allows full HD audio playback

Best-in-class distortion-control and noise-canceling systems

©2016 HARMAN International Industries, Incorporated. AKG is a trademark of HARMAN International Industries, Incorporated, registered in the United States and/or other countries. All rights reserved. GRAMMY,® GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2016 The Recording Academy.


ALBUM

OF THE YEAR

Chris Stapleton’s commanding voice is a rarity. It is at once distinctive and raw, yet possesses the versatility to meld the genres of bluegrass, Southern rock, Stax soul, and classic country. A former frontman for GRAMMY-nominated soul-bluegrass collective the SteelDrivers, Stapleton later traversed genres to form roots-rock outfit the Jompson Brothers. As a songwriter, he’s contributed chart-topping country singles for artists including Kenny Chesney, Darius Rucker and Luke Bryan. On his debut solo album, Traveller, Stapleton combines his booming barroom country-meets-classic soul voice with his confessional songwriting. The result has netted the Kentucky native a 58th GRAMMY nomination not only in the Best Country Album category, but also a place among the coveted Album Of The Year nominees. Meanwhile, the project’s title track has earned Stapleton additional GRAMMY nominations for Best Country Song and Best Country Solo Performance. Stapleton’s music sounds as effortless as it does authentic. On the album’s chilling closer, “Sometimes I Cry,” his soul-shouting vocal throbs with such wounded desperation that it’s easy to forget the track was recorded live before a music industry audience in Nashville, Tenn. Befitting the album’s spontaneous character, many of the final tracks on Traveller were originally recorded while the musicians were testing mics in the studio. Stapleton’s finely tuned songcrafting permeates nearly all of Traveller’s 14 tracks, with the exception of two cover songs, “Tennessee Whiskey” and “Was It 26.” “Nobody To Blame” rumbles with a harmonica-laced sound and regret-filled vocals reminiscent of country music’s outlaw movement pioneers such as Waylon Jennings and Hank Williams Jr. His nuanced delivery shines through in the lament “The Devil Named Music,” the starry-eyed romance of “More Of You” and the reverent storytelling of “Daddy Doesn’t Pray Anymore.” Stapleton’s years-in-the-making success story has taken him from performing in tiny music clubs and songwriter rounds to becoming a four-time GRAMMY nominee. Undeniable talent has allowed Stapleton to forge a career steeped in integrity, making his journey a road worth traveling. — Jessica Nicholson 38

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

BECKY FLUKE

CHRIS STAPLETON



BEST NEW

ARTIST

Courtney Barnett was born in 1987 in Pittwater, an Australian seaside town 25 miles outside of Sydney. By the time she hit her tweens, Barnett had ingested enough Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain to want to pick up a guitar and start writing songs of her own. Which is not unusual. What is unusual, however, is how Barnett has soared to worldwide fame as a gifted songwriter on the basis of idiosyncratic lyrics such as: “I’m breathing but I’m wheezing/Feel like I’m emphysemin’/My throat feels like a funnel/Filled with Weet-Bix and kerosene.” The Best New Artist nominee — who emerged in 2012 with the EP I’ve Got A Friend Called Emily Ferris. — is a master of mining her own head for minutiae, then translating that minutiae into striking metaphors. The above lyrics from “Avant Gardener,” a track from 2013’s The Double EP: A Sea Of Split Peas, may offer as apt a description of an asthma attack as it gets. Profundity is not always involved, but humor usually is. “Don’t Apply Compression Gently” chases a bitter pill of self-awareness with a teaspoon of gratitude: “I replicate the people I admire/But at least I’m not bitter and sad … /I may not be 100 percent happy/But at least I’m not with you.” The ’90s indie rock indebted “Pedestrian At Best” — which is featured on her debut studio album, Sometimes I Sit And Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit., and placed No. 4 on Rolling Stone’s best songs of 2015 list — pokes fun at fat cats: “Give me all your

40

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

POONEH GHANA

COURTNEY BARNETT money/And I’ll make some origami, honey.” The latter song is from an impressive debut that, though long on style, doesn’t shortchange on musical substance. Barnett speak-sings, and sometimes hollers, in a ramshackle, loosey-goosey fashion that invites a comparison to Sheryl Crow crossed with Bob Dylan. And she can play: The Aussie’s guitar work transmits a grungy swagger that hasn’t sounded quite so fresh since the early ’90s. In addition to her wit and hardcore realism, critics have taken notice of Barnett’s “slacker” vibe. But vibes, like attitudes, can be deceiving. Barnett is as clever as she is gifted. Still, no one could have made a debut album this strong without doing hard labor in the pit of the soul. — Tammy La Gorce


Music & Event

insurance specialists You provide the show We provide the cover an (818) 815-2600

infoLA@rtib.net

halfpage-01-22-16-2-3-print.pdf

1

1/19/16

www.rtworldwide.com 12:34 PM

company


BEST NEW

ARTIST

James Bay is a pop/rock singer with a simple twist of old soul, the latest in an impressive line of young gossamer-voiced English artists that includes James Blake, Ed Sheeran and Sam Smith. The sensitive but intense singer/ songwriter/guitarist is nominated for three GRAMMY Awards: Best New Artist, Best Rock Song for “Hold Back The River” and Best Rock Album for his acclaimed debut, Chaos And The Calm. Born in the small market town of Hitchin, located just north of London, a young Bay developed a natural, classic songwriting style, a flair for inventive guitar melodies and the voice of a veteran, not to mention model good looks. (He was invited to perform at the prestigious Burberry fashion show in 2014.) Bay picked up an old family guitar at age 11 and learned to play by ear from listening to artists such as Van Morrison and Eric Clapton. At 18, he moved to Brighton, England, to study music and play the city’s open-mic nights. Bay finally caught major-label attention in 2012 after a fan posted a video of one of his performances on YouTube. A first EP, The Dark Of The Morning, was released in 2013 and within a year Bay was selling out his first UK headline tour and boasting two songs in the British Top 10. He also landed the coveted opportunity to open for the legendary Rolling Stones in London’s Hyde Park. Released in March 2015, Chaos And The Calm ascended to No. 15 on the Billboard 200. Along the way, Bay earned a sea of new fans, among them Taylor Swift, for whom Bay opened on the European leg of her 1989 tour. With feathery vocals that pull on the heartstrings and a trademark image — including shoulder-length locks, chiseled cheekbones and Panama hat —Bay has all the necessary ingredients to carry on what is becoming a welcome tradition of small English market towns exporting smart, sensitive and soulful singers. — John Sutton-Smith

42

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

ELLIOT HAZEL

JAMES BAY


JOIN THE TEAM THAT’S

CURING

CHILDHOOD CANCER. A new treatment, developed at the Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer Research, is producing stunning results by reprogramming a child’s immune system to destroy cancer cells. Welcome to Strong Against Cancer: A team of doctors, nurses, researchers, hospitals, companies and people like you— captained by Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson. We have the science and the results. Now we need the resources to bring this life saving treatment to more children. Learn more or donate at StrongAgainstCancer.org


BEST NEW

ARTIST

Sam Hunt certainly isn’t the first country artist to forge a sound that’s just a little bit country and a whole lot everything else. But Hunt’s 2014 debut album, Montevallo, upped the genre-jumping ante, delivering a collection that fans — and a few critics — argued was barely country at all. That’s just fine with Hunt. “I do think I’m country, but your definition of that word might be different from my definition,” Hunt told Rolling Stone Country in 2014. “In my opinion, country music, the sound of country, has always evolved. But the one thing that has not changed is the story element. And I think country songs are truthful songs about life written by country people.” Infusing pop, R&B and hip-hop influences, the approach works for Hunt. Montevallo earned a 58th GRAMMY nomination for Best Country Album. The album’s wideranging appeal also led to a No. 3 spot on the Billboard 200, and the smooth ballad “Take Your Time” cracked the Top 20. A native of rural Cedartown, Ga., Hunt’s first success was as a college football quarterback, which led to a training camp tryout with the NFL’s Kansas City Chiefs. Though he never considered himself especially musical, he

44

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

spent his off-field time teaching himself to play and write songs on a guitar scored from a pawn shop. Much to his surprise, Hunt found he was pretty good at it. When the time came to choose between a career playing pro football or music, music won out. Following his move to Nashville, Tenn., Hunt honed his craft as a songwriter, working with established tunesmiths and ultimately writing hits for Kenny Chesney, Keith Urban and Billy Currington. After deciding to pursue a career as an artist, Hunt eschewed the traditional development deal process, instead releasing a free acoustic mixtape, Between The Pines, via his website and Facebook. If it all sounds very millennial generation, well, it is. And it’s the kind of rule-breaking that has come to be a Hunt signature. “I always try to zig when they zag,” he told Rolling Stone Country. “I guess it’s a football term, but it applies to a lot of different areas of life.” — Lisa Zhito

STEVEN WORSTER

SAM HUNT



BEST NEW

SARAH BARLOW AND STEPHEN SCHOFIELD

ARTIST

TORI KELLY Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: An impresario who has already discovered one superstar via YouTube scours the online platform and stumbles across videos of another massive talent sporting limitless potential. Then he signs the rising star and within months helps her ink a record deal. And later, said star earns her first GRAMMY nomination for Best New Artist. What separates Scooter Braun protégé Tori Kelly from Justin Bieber — a literal unknown whom Braun helped shape into the pop powerhouse he is today — is she undertook a very public apprenticeship, solidified by the popularity of her numerous YouTube videos. Now 23, the California native — a multifaceted guitarist, pianist and drummer with a killer set of pipes — first tested her competitive mettle at age 10 on “Star Search” and later on “America’s Most Talented Kids” before briefly signing a major label deal. In 2010 Kelly auditioned for “American Idol” and made it to

46

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Hollywood week, only to be cut from the show before the top 24 were selected. Undaunted, Kelly started posting videos to YouTube and her cover of Frank Ocean’s “Thinkin Bout You” ultimately attracted more than 24 million views. Viral success gave Kelly the courage to develop her songwriting muscle and in 2012 she released the EP Handmade Songs By Tori Kelly, which cracked the Top 10 on Billboard’s Top Heatseekers chart. While headlining clubs and opening for such artists as Jewel and Ed Sheeran, Kelly landed Braun as her manager, eventually releasing the 2013 EP Foreword and her 2015 full-length debut, Unbreakable Smile. Fueled by the urban-pop hit “Nobody Love” and “Should’ve Been Us,” Unbreakable Smile peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard 200. Named Billboard’s Women In Music breakthrough artist in 2015, Kelly’s powerfully soulful vocals and seamless stylistic adaptability indicate that her music will offer enough universal appeal to sustain that unbreakable smile of hers for many years to come. — Nick Krewen


SY N C H AU D I O.CO M @ SYNCHAUDIO

// MUSIC SYNCHRONIZATION // MUSIC LICENSING // ARTIST DEVELOPMENT // CREATIVE MUSIC SEARCHES // STRATEGIC MEDIA CONSULTING


BEST NEW

ARTIST

In the year since Meghan Trainor landed GRAMMY Record and Song Of The Year nominations for her chart-topping “All About That Bass,” she has proven that the success of the self-empowerment doo-wop hit was just the beginning. Her follow-up, “Lips Are Movin,” soared to No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100, making her one of only five female artists to follow up her debut No. 1 song (which logged eight consecutive weeks in the top spot) with another Top 5 song. She continued to show her flirty, sassy side with the humorous “Dear Future Husband.” But then, just when we thought we had her pegged, she flipped the tables with the stirring, soulful romantic ballad “Like I’m Gonna Lose You” featuring John Legend. And while she is able to stand on her own, Trainor once again showed herself to be much in demand as a duet partner on the sultry “Marvin Gaye” with fellow 58th GRAMMY nominee Charlie Puth. Signed to a publishing deal while still in high school, the Nantucket, Mass., native put her songwriting stamp on tunes recorded by such GRAMMY-winning artists as Rascal Flatts and GRAMMY-nominated acts such as Hunter Hayes. As she moved from a behind-the-scenes songwriter into the spotlight, in 2014 she co-wrote Fifth Harmony’s “Sledgehammer,” the girl group’s first Top 40 hit. Of Trainor’s 2015 platinum-selling debut album, Title, Billboard said, “You can’t miss this young artist’s skills with melodic and rhythmic hooks, turns of phrase and selfdeprecating jokes, along with her fluid, flexible voice.” Maybe Trainor saw her success coming all along. On “Who I Wanna Be,” a song Trainor released in 2012, she predicted, “And I could go to the GRAMMYs/Holding hands with Adele and the family/But I gotta get the one hit song.” Looks like many of Trainor’s dreams have turned to reality in the last few years, and that’s no treble. — Melinda Newman

48

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

BROOKE NIPAR

MEGHAN TRAINOR


WHEN YOUR BEST FRIEND IS YOUR

ENEMY’S WORST NIGHTMARE!

FASTER THAN DIALING 911 protection services

844-8K9-WOOF

PROTECTION WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST

globalk9protection.com


SONG

Pharrell Williams

“ALRIGHT” Kendrick Duckworth, Kawan Prather, Mark Anthony Spears & Pharrell Williams, songwriters Kendrick Lamar, artist Opening with the words “Alls my life I has to fight,” inspired by The Color Purple, Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel addressing racism, “Alright” has emerged as an anthem for the Black Lives Matter movement. It’s a song of hope in the context of anguish over recent deaths of black youths at the hands of police and stands as a shining example of the pure power of song to express a sentiment that is beyond mere words. As Lamar explained to MTV, the song was informed by a South African journey during which he witnessed outrageous poverty. “When I went to Africa and I got to see other people’s problems, [I realized] their struggle [was] 10 times harder and [they were] raised crazier than I was.” The music was composed with Pharrell Williams, who was inspired by trap music. “[We wanted something] a little bit more colorful … [so we added] … something a bit more mystical. I kind of had my A Tribe Called Quest hat on that day,” Williams told Montreality. Lamar later expounded further on the reality that led to this song: “The senseless acts of killings of these young boys out here … this is reality, this is my world. This is what I talk about in my music,” Lamar told TMZ. “Hip-hop is not the problem. Our reality is the problem of the situation. This is our music. This is us expressing ourselves.” 50

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Taylor Swift

BARLOW & SCHOFIELD/TAS RIGHTS MANAGEMENT

Shellback

DANIEL ROOS

Max Martin

FREDRIK HJERLING

MARIE THOMAS

Kawan Prather

CHOI YONG BIN

Mark Anthony Spears

CHRISTIAN SAN JOSE

Kendrick Lamar

CHRISTIAN SAN JOSE

OF THE YEAR

“BLANK SPACE” Max Martin, Shellback & Taylor Swift, songwriters Taylor Swift, artist Written with Swedish hitmakers Max Martin and Shellback, “Blank Space” emerged from Taylor Swift’s desire to counter a common media misconception. “Every few years the media finds something that they unanimously agree is annoying about me,” Swift told NME. The most prevalent accusation being that her songs are written only for “emotional revenge” on former boyfriends. “It was just kind of excessive,” she added, “[but] then I found … comedy in it.” That comedy emerged in a character designed to mirror every myth about her. “Emotionally fragile and [an] unpredictable mess … I created this whole character and I had fun doing it,” Swift said about the role she fleshed out in the video to extremes. However, not everyone picked up on the irony. “Half the people got the joke,” she said, “half the people thought I was really owning the fact that I’m a psychopath. … Either one’s fine.” A famous mishearing of the lyric led many to think Swift was singing about Starbucks and not lost lovers, which was also fine by her. She called it “a delightful misunderstanding about this song, which was written about misunderstandings.” In fact, the lyrics for “Blank Space” were constructed from various lines she’d collected over many years. “Writing [the] song was a journey,” Swift told NME. “I’ll come up with a line that I think is clever, like, ‘Darling, I’m a nightmare dressed like a daydream.’ And I just pick them and put them where they fit and construct the bridge out of more lines. … It was really more like a crossword puzzle. ‘Blank Space’ was like the culmination of all my best [lines], one after the other.”


“GIRL CRUSH”

“SEE YOU AGAIN”

Hillary Lindsey, Lori McKenna & Liz Rose, songwriters

Andrew Cedar, Justin Franks, Charles Puth & Cameron Thomaz, songwriters

Little Big Town, artist A tale of jealousy, “Girl Crush” emerged fast during a songwriting sleepover at Liz Rose’s Nashville, Tenn., home. “[Hillary Lindsey, Lori McKenna and I] hole up for three days,” says Rose, “and we write in our pajamas. In the morning we write our coffee songs, and in the late afternoon, our wine songs. This was a coffee song. Lori had the [title] idea one morning in the kitchen. Hillary picked up my Gibson and said, ‘Do you mean like this?’ And [she] literally wrote the whole first verse. And Lori and I said, ‘Yes — just like that!’ It was very magical and awesome.” McKenna adds, “The title was one of those hashtag things you see. Sometimes people will use that phrase when inspired by other women, not necessarily in love with them.” Lindsey says “Girl Crush” could have gone in many directions. “It could have been a woman-power song; it didn’t have to be about jealousy,” she says. But the concept wasn’t discussed or overthought; instead they leapt on it. “Once Hillary heard the title, she took Liz’s old Gibson and sang the first four lines, and we all instantly knew what it was going to be,” adds McKenna. Written in under two hours, they quickly recorded it onto a phone — all three singing — before moving on. “We didn’t even demo it,” says Rose. “We didn’t know really what happened.” They played “Girl Crush” for their friends Karen Fairchild and Kimberly Schlapman of Little Big Town that afternoon, who instantly grabbed it. As Rose puts it, “The song gods in the heavens gave it to us.”

Wiz Khalifa Featuring Charlie Puth, artists Wiz Khalifa

C AT IE LAFFO O N

Charlie Puth

ANO UK MO R G AN

Justin Franks

KYL E C AME R E R

Andrew Cedar

JOS E UB E DA

Liz Rose

K E L S E Y FR E E MAN

Lori McKenna

S PE NC E R CO MB S

B EC KY FLUK E

Hillary Lindsey

Conceived as a closing elegy to the late actor Paul Walker for the film Furious 7, “See You Again” came about when songwriter/producer Charlie Puth entered a writing session in progress with Andrew Cedar and Justin Franks. “Andrew had the chord changes,” says Puth, “but with 20 different arpeggiated synths. I suggested stripping it down to just piano.” Puth played Cedar’s starkly poignant changes on an acoustic piano, and sang the first words that emerged: “It’s been a long day.” Puth and Franks had only met that day, and neither had informed the other they had each recently lost dear friends. But these tacit feelings of loss informed the song. “I thought of my friend,” says Puth. “When I found out he was gone, I texted him. One last time.” The perfect phrase emerged, matching the rest of the melody: “Tell you all about it when I see you again.” The line was so touching, they both began to weep. “It was intense because we had just met. And we wrote this insane hook together,” says Puth. “It was a really powerful humanistic moment.” Though Puth provided the ethereal vocals on the demo, the idea was to replace them with the voice of a superstar. But Universal Pictures, in hearing the poignant soul in Puth’s voice, knew he was the singer, a decision Puth says has changed his life. “And all because of one simple phrase, ‘I’ll see you again.’ It’s universal.” Puth adds that getting Wiz Khalifa was icing on the cake. “When Wiz heard the song, he wanted in. It’s a dream come true.”

“THINKING OUT LOUD” Ed Sheeran & Amy Wadge, songwriters

Amy Wadge

SPI LT MILK MANAGEMENT

Ed Sheeran

BEN WATTS

Ed Sheeran, artist The seed that spawned “Thinking Out Loud” materialized before Ed Sheeran and Amy Wadge officially started a songwriting session. “I initially started playing around with the chords that turned into the song when Ed was in the shower,” remembers Wadge. “And he heard it and started singing ‘take me into your loving arms’ while he was walking around upstairs.” But it was after sharing sorrow over loved ones lost when the song truly took form. With one guitar and two voices, the entire song came in 20 minutes. “Ed came up with the title,” says Wadge. “It came when he was vocalizing it, and I knew it was perfect. I sang, ‘When your legs don’t work like they used to before and I can’t sweep you off of your feet,’ and then we both developed it from there.” As with all the songs this duo has created, Wadge says words and music emerged together in short order. “Ed is such a prolific writer; he works very quickly. We had the words, melody and structure very quickly.” Wadge admits to being amazed by the reception “Thinking Out Loud” has received. “I have been absolutely blown away by what has happened with the song,” she says. “I’m not sure exactly why it’s resonated so much but the subject matter appeals to every generation, as in the end it’s about falling, and staying, in love with someone. I also think that the way Ed delivers it is extraordinary, as you believe every single word.” — Paul Zollo

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

51




NOMINATIONS For recordings released during the Eligibility Year October 1, 2014, through September 30, 2015. Note: More or less than 5 nominations in a category is the result of ties.

GENERAL FIELD

1

Record Of The Year

Award to the Artist and to the Producer(s), Recording Engineer(s) and/or Mixer(s) and mastering engineer(s), if other than the artist.

REALLY LOVE D’Angelo And The Vanguard

D’Angelo & Brent Fischer, producers; Russell Elevado, Ben Kane & Rafa Sardina, engineers/mixers; Dave Collins, mastering engineer Track from: Black Messiah [RCA Records]

UPTOWN FUNK Mark Ronson Featuring Bruno Mars

Jeff Bhasker, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars & Mark Ronson, producers; Josh Blair, Riccardo Damian, Serban Ghenea, Wayne Gordon, John Hanes, Inaam Haq, Boo Mitchell, Charles Moniz & Mark Ronson, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer Track from: Uptown Special [RCA Records]

THINKING OUT LOUD Ed Sheeran

Jake Gosling, producer; Jake Gosling, Mark “Spike” Stent & Geoff Swan, engineers/mixers; Stuart Hawkes, mastering engineer Track from: X [Atlantic]

BLANK SPACE Taylor Swift

Max Martin & Shellback, producers; Serban Ghenea, John Hanes, Sam Holland & Michael Ilbert, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer Track from: 1989 [Big Machine Records]

CAN’T FEEL MY FACE The Weeknd

Max Martin & Ali Payami, producers; Serban Ghenea, John Hanes & Sam Holland, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer [Republic]

54

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

2

Album Of The Year

Award to the Artist(s) and to the Album Producer(s), Recording Engineer(s) and/or Mixer(s) & Mastering Engineer(s), if other than the artist.

SOUND & COLOR Alabama Shakes

Alabama Shakes & Blake Mills, producers; Shawn Everett, engineer/mixer; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer [ATO Records]

TO PIMP A BUTTERFLY Kendrick Lamar

Bilal, George Clinton, James Fauntleroy, Ronald Isley, Rapsody, Snoop Dogg, Thundercat & Anna Wise, featured artists; Taz Arnold, Boi-1Da, Ronald Colson, Larrance Dopson, Flying Lotus, Fredrik “Tommy Black” Halldin, Knxwledge, Koz, Lovedragon, Terrace Martin, Rahki, Sounwave, Tae Beast, Thundercat, Andrew “Pop” Wansel, Whoarei & Pharrell Williams, producers; Derek “Mixedbyali” Ali, Thomas Burns, Andrew Coleman, Hart Gunther, James “The White Black Man” Hunt, Mike Larson, 9th Wonder & Matt Schaeffer, engineers/mixers; Mike Bozzi, mastering engineer [Top Dawg Entertainment/ Aftermath Records/ Interscope Records]

BEAUTY BEHIND THE MADNESS The Weeknd

Lana Del Rey, Labrinth & Ed Sheeran, featured artists; Dannyboystyles, Mike Dean, Ben Diehl, Labrinth, Mano, Max Martin, Stephan Moccio, Carlo Montagnese, Ali Payami, The Pope, Jason Quenneville, Peter Svensson, Abel Tesfaye & Kanye West, producers; Jay Paul Bicknell, Mattias Bylund, Serban Ghenea, Noah Goldstein, John Hanes, Sam Holland, Jean Marie Horvat, Carlo Montagnese, Jason Quenneville & Dave Reitzas, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne & Dave Kutch, mastering engineers [Republic]

3

Song Of The Year

A Songwriter(s) Award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

ALRIGHT Kendrick Duckworth, Kawan Prather, Mark Anthony Spears & Pharrell Williams, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar)

TRAVELLER Chris Stapleton

Track from: To Pimp A Butterfly [Top Dawg Entertainment/ Aftermath Records/Interscope Records; Publishers: WB Music Corp./Hard Working Black Folks Publishing/EMI April Music Inc./ Even More Water From Nazareth/ Sounwave TDE Productions/ SonyATV/In Thee Face Music Publishing/BMG Gold Songs]

1989 Taylor Swift

BLANK SPACE Max Martin, Shellback & Taylor Swift, songwriters (Taylor Swift)

Dave Cobb & Chris Stapleton, producers; Vance Powell, engineer/mixer; Pete Lyman, mastering engineer [Mercury Nashville]

Jack Antonoff, Nathan Chapman, Imogen Heap, Max Martin, Mattman & Robin, Ali Payami, Shellback, Taylor Swift, Ryan Tedder & Noel Zancanella, producers; Jack Antonoff, Mattias Bylund, Smith Carlson, Nathan Chapman, Serban Ghenea, John Hanes, Imogen Heap, Sam Holland, Michael Ilbert, Brendan Morawski, Laura Sisk & Ryan Tedder, engineers/mixers; Tom Coyne, mastering engineer [Big Machine Records]

Track from: 1989 [Big Machine Records; Publishers: Sony/ATV Tree Publishing/Taylor Swift Music/MXM admin. by Kobalt Songs Music Publishing, Inc.]

GIRL CRUSH Hillary Lindsey, Lori McKenna & Liz Rose, songwriters (Little Big Town) Track from: Pain Killer [Capitol Records Nashville; Publishers: Warner-Tamerlane

Publishing Corp./Songs Of Crazy Girl Music, Songs of Universal, Inc., Hoodie Songs, HillarodyRathbone Music admin. by BMG Rights Management (US) LLC]

SEE YOU AGAIN Andrew Cedar, Justin Franks, Charles Puth & Cameron Thomaz, songwriters (Wiz Khalifa Featuring Charlie Puth)

Track from: Furious 7: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack [Atlantic; Publishers: Artist Publishing Group West/J Franks Publishing/Andrew Cedar Publishing admin. by WB Music Corp./Wiz Khalifa Publishing admin. by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./Charlie Puth Music Publishing/Artist 101 Publishing Group admin. by Warner Chappell Music, Universal Pictures Music, UPG Music Publishing]

THINKING OUT LOUD Ed Sheeran & Amy Wadge, songwriters (Ed Sheeran) Track from: X [Atlantic; Publishers: Sony/ ATV Music Publishing/ BDi Music Limited]

4

Best New Artist

For a new artist who releases, during the eligibility year, the first recording which establishes the public identity of that artist.

Courtney Barnett James Bay Sam Hunt Tori Kelly Meghan Trainor

POP

5

Best Pop Solo Performance

For new vocal or instrumental pop recordings. Singles or Tracks only.

HEARTBEAT SONG Kelly Clarkson

Track from: Piece By Piece [RCA Records/ 19 Recordings Limited]



NOMINATIONS LOVE ME LIKE YOU DO Ellie Goulding Track from: Fifty Shades Of Grey (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) [Republic]

THINKING OUT LOUD Ed Sheeran Track from: X [Atlantic]

BLANK SPACE Taylor Swift

Track from: 1989 [Big Machine Records]

CAN’T FEEL MY FACE The Weeknd

Track from: Beauty Behind The Madness [Republic]

6

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance

For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative pop recordings. Singles or Tracks only.

SHIP TO WRECK Florence & The Machine Track from: How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful [Republic]

SUGAR Maroon 5

Track from: V [222 Records/Interscope]

UPTOWN FUNK Mark Ronson Featuring Bruno Mars

Track from: Uptown Special [RCA Records]

BAD BLOOD Taylor Swift Featuring Kendrick Lamar [Big Machine Records]

SEE YOU AGAIN Wiz Khalifa Featuring Charlie Puth

Track from: Furious 7: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack [Atlantic]

7

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new traditional pop recordings.

56

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

THE SILVER LINING: THE SONGS OF JEROME KERN Tony Bennett & Bill Charlap

[RPM Records/Columbia Records]

GO The Chemical Brothers Featuring Q-Tip

SHADOWS IN THE NIGHT Bob Dylan

Tom Rowlands & Ed Simons, producers; Steve Dub Jones & Tom Rowlands, mixers [Astralwerks]

STAGES Josh Groban

NEVER CATCH ME Flying Lotus Featuring Kendrick Lamar

[Columbia]

[Reprise]

NO ONE EVER TELLS YOU Seth MacFarlane [Republic]

MY DREAM DUETS Barry Manilow (& Various Artists) [Verve Music Group]

8

Best Pop Vocal Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal pop recordings.

PIECE BY PIECE Kelly Clarkson [19/RCA]

HOW BIG, HOW BLUE, HOW BEAUTIFUL Florence & The Machine [Republic]

UPTOWN SPECIAL Mark Ronson [RCA Records]

1989 Taylor Swift

[Big Machine Records]

BEFORE THIS WORLD James Taylor [Concord Records]

DANCE/ ELECTRONIC MUSIC

9

Best Dance Recording For solo, duo, group or collaborative performances. Vocal or Instrumental. Singles or Tracks only.

WE’RE ALL WE NEED Above & Beyond Featuring Zoë Johnston

Andrew Bayer, Jono Grant, Tony McGuinness & Paavo Siljamäki, producers; Jono Grant, Tony McGuinness & Paavo Siljamäki, mixers [Ultra/Anjunabeats]

Steven Ellison, producer; Kevin Marques Moo, mixer Track from: You’re Dead! [Warp Records]

RUNAWAY (U & I) Galantis

Linus Eklöw, Christian Karlsson & Svidden, producers; Linus Eklöw, Niklas Flyckt & Christian Karlsson, mixers Track from: Pharmacy [Big Beat/Atlantic]

WHERE ARE Ü NOW Skrillex And Diplo With Justin Bieber

Sonny Moore & Thomas Pentz, producers; Sonny Moore & Thomas Pentz, mixers Track from: Skrillex And Diplo Present Jack Ü [Owsla/Mad Decent/Atlantic]

10

CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

11

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album

For albums containing approximately 51% or more playing time of instrumental material. For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

GUITAR IN THE SPACE AGE! Bill Frisell [Okeh]

LOVE LANGUAGE Wouter Kellerman

[Listen 2 Entertainment Group]

AFRODEEZIA Marcus Miller

[Blue Note Records]

SYLVA Snarky Puppy & Metropole Orkest [Impulse!]

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO JAZZ, CHAPTER IV Kirk Whalum [Mack Avenue Records]

Best Dance/ Electronic Album

ROCK

OUR LOVE Caribou

Best Rock Performance

For vocal or instrumental albums. Albums only.

[Merge Records]

BORN IN THE ECHOES The Chemical Brothers [Astralwerks]

CARACAL Disclosure

[Capitol Records]

IN COLOUR Jamie XX

12

For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/group or collaborative rock recordings.

DON’T WANNA FIGHT Alabama Shakes [ATO Records]

WHAT KIND OF MAN Florence & The Machine

[Young Turks Recordings]

Track from: How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful [Republic]

SKRILLEX AND DIPLO PRESENT JACK Ü Skrillex And Diplo

SOMETHING FROM NOTHING Foo Fighters

[Owsla/Mad Decent/Atlantic]

Track from: Sonic Highways [RCA Records]

EX’S & OH’S Elle King

Track from: Love Stuff [RCA Records]


MAURICE, PHILIP, VERDINE & RALPH

EARTH, WIND & FIRE CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 2016 RECORDING ACADEMY ® LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IT’S AN HONOR TO BE A PART OF YOUR AMAZING CAREER YOU ARE SHINING STARS DAMIEN SMITH


NOMINATIONS MOANING LISA SMILE Wolf Alice

Track from: My Love Is Cool [RCA Records/Dirty Hit]

13

Best Metal Performance

For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/group or collaborative metal recordings.

IDENTITY August Burns Red [Fearless Records]

CIRICE Ghost

[Loma Vista Recordings]

512 Lamb Of God

LYDIA Richard Meyer, Ryan Meyer & Johnny Stevens, songwriters (Highly Suspect)

WHAT KIND OF MAN John Hill, Tom Hull & Florence Welch, songwriters (Florence & The Machine)

Best R&B Performance

COFFEE Brook Davis & Miguel Pimentel, songwriters (Miguel)

Track from: How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful [Republic; Publishers: Rodeoman Music/EMI April Music/Universal Music Publishing]

15

Best Rock Album

CHAOS AND THE CALM James Bay

[7Bros Records]

[Republic]

CUSTER Slipknot

KINTSUGI Death Cab For Cutie

Best Rock Song

DON’T WANNA FIGHT Alabama Shakes, songwriters (Alabama Shakes) [ATO Records; Publisher: Alabama Shakes Publishing]

EX’S & OH’S Dave Bassett & Elle King, songwriters (Elle King)

Track from: Love Stuff [RCA Records; Publishers: Elle King Music/EMI Music Publishing, Inc./Bassett Songs/ EMI April Music, Inc.]

HOLD BACK THE RIVER Iain Archer & James Bay, songwriters (James Bay)

Track from: Chaos And The Calm [Republic; Publishers: B-Unique/ Kobalt/Iain Archer/Kobalt]

[Atlantic]

MISTER ASYLUM Highly Suspect

[300 Entertainment]

DRONES Muse

[Warner Bros. Records]

.5: THE GRAY CHAPTER Slipknot [Roadrunner Records]

ALTERNATIVE

16

Best Alternative Music Album Vocal or instrumental.

SOUND & COLOR Alabama Shakes [ATO Records]

VULNICURA Björk

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

17

For new vocal or instrumental R&B recordings.

IF I DON’T HAVE YOU Tamar Braxton

Track from: Calling All Lovers [Epic Records]

RISE UP Andra Day

[Warner Bros. Records/ Buskin Records]

BREATHING UNDERWATER Hiatus Kaiyote

Track from: Choose Your Weapon [Flying Buddha/Sony Masterworks]

PLANES Jeremih Featuring J. Cole [Def Jam Recordings]

EARNED IT (FIFTY SHADES OF GREY) The Weeknd Track from: Fifty Shades Of Grey (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) [Universal Studios/ Republic Records]

18

Best Traditional R&B Performance For new vocal or instrumental traditional R&B recordings.

HE IS Faith Evans

Track from: Incomparable [Prolific Music Group/BMG]

LITTLE GHETTO BOY Lalah Hathaway

[Entertainment One/8th Floor]

LET IT BURN Jazmine Sullivan

[One Little Indian]

Track from: Reality Show [RCA Records]

THE WATERFALL My Morning Jacket

SHAME Tyrese

[Capitol Records]

[Voltron Recordz]

CURRENTS Tame Impala

MY FAVORITE PART OF YOU Charlie Wilson

[Interscope]

58

Best R&B Song

R&B

THANK YOU Sevendust

A Songwriter(s) Award. Includes rock, hard rock and metal songs. For Song Eligibility Guidelines see Category #3. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

19

Track from: Mister Asylum [300 Entertainment; Publisher: MCID]

Track from: VII: Sturm Und Drang [Epic Records]

14

[Anti-/Dbpm]

A Songwriter(s) Award. For Song Eligibility Guidelines see Category #3. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rock, hard rock or metal recordings.

Track from: .5: The Gray Chapter [Roadrunner Records]

STAR WARS Wilco

Track from: Forever Charlie [RCA Records]

Track from: Wildheart [RCA Records/ByStorm Entertainment; Publishers: Art Dealer chic/Pop Killer/Dleaurean]

EARNED IT (FIFTY SHADES OF GREY) Ahmad Balshe, Stephan Moccio, Jason Quenneville & Abel Tesfaye, songwriters (The Weeknd)

Track from: Fifty Shades Of Grey (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) [Universal Studios/Republic Records; Publishers: SONGS Music Publishing, LLC, o/b/o Songs Of SMP, Songs Of Universal, Inc. and Sing Little Penguin, Universal Music Corp, CP Music Group, Inc., Universal Pictures Music and UPG Music Publishing]

LET IT BURN Kenny B. Edmonds, Jazmine Sullivan & Dwane M. Weir II, songwriters (Jazmine Sullivan)

Track from: Reality Show [RCA Records; Publishers: JazLady Publishing, Dwane M. Weir II/ Sean Michael Anderson Music LLC/ Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., Sony/ATV Songs LLC]

REALLY LOVE D’Angelo & Kendra Foster, songwriters (D’Angelo And The Vanguard)

Track from: Black Messiah [RCA Records; Publishers: Ah Choo Music Publishing/12:00 AM Music admin. by Universal Polygram International Publishing, Ear Kandy Music, WarnerTamerlane Publishing Corp.]

SHAME Warryn Campbell, Tyrese Gibson & DJ Rogers Jr., songwriters (Tyrese)

[Voltron Recordz; Publishers: Peer Music/Sounds From The Soul/ Campbell Kids Music/Warner Chappell/@PenTorious D.J. Rogers Jr. Sounds From The Soul/Gibson & Gibson Music Publishing]


Located at 425 West 50th Street, Stella Tower is one of Manhattan’s most unique luxury condominiums. Originally built and designed by renowned Art Deco architect, Ralph Walker, in 1927 as the New York Telephone building, Stella Tower has been thoughtfully converted into 51 high-end residences. The building shines as a new beacon, showcasing dramatic 360-degree New York City views with intricate handcrafted brick masonry, dramatic setbacks, and remarkable finishes.

Over 80% Sold | Immediate Occupancy | Starting at $3,995,000 Stellatower.com 212.606.7676 info@stellatower.com The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from the sponsor. File No.CD13-0205. Sponsor: 435 West 50 Property Owner L.P. 111 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10011. Equal Housing Opportunity.


NOMINATIONS 20

Best Urban Contemporary Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded contemporary vocal tracks derivative of R&B.

EGO DEATH The Internet

[Odd Future/Columbia]

[Cash Money Records]

TRAP QUEEN Fetty Wap

Track from: Fetty Wap [300 Entertainment/ RGF Productions]

ALRIGHT Kendrick Lamar

YOU SHOULD BE HERE Kehlani

Track from: To Pimp A Butterfly [Top Dawg Entertainment/ Aftermath Records/ Interscope Records]

BLOOD Lianne La Havas

TRUFFLE BUTTER Nicki Minaj Featuring Drake & Lil Wayne

[Tsunami Mob/Atlantic]

[Nonesuch]

WILDHEART Miguel

[RCA Records/ ByStorm Entertainment]

BEAUTY BEHIND THE MADNESS The Weeknd [Republic]

21

Best R&B Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new R&B recordings.

COMING HOME Leon Bridges

[Columbia Records]

BLACK MESSIAH D’Angelo And The Vanguard [RCA Records]

CHEERS TO THE FALL Andra Day [Warner Bros. Records/ Buskin Records]

REALITY SHOW Jazmine Sullivan [RCA Records]

FOREVER CHARLIE Charlie Wilson [RCA Records]

RAP

Track from: The Pinkprint [Young Money/Cash Money]

ALL DAY Kanye West Featuring Theophilus London, Allan Kingdom & Paul McCartney [Def Jam Recordings]

23

Best Rap/ Sung Collaboration

For a newly recorded rap/sung collaborative performance by artists who do not normally perform together.

ONE MAN CAN CHANGE THE WORLD Big Sean Featuring Kanye West & John Legend

Track from: Dark Sky Paradise [Universal/Def Jam]

GLORY Common & John Legend [Def Jam Recordings/ ARTium Records]

CLASSIC MAN Jidenna Featuring Roman GianArthur [Epic Records]

THESE WALLS Kendrick Lamar Featuring Bilal, Anna Wise & Thundercat

22

Track from: To Pimp A Butterfly [Top Dawg Entertainment/ Aftermath Records/ Interscope Records]

For a rap performance. Singles or Tracks only.

ONLY Nicki Minaj Featuring Drake, Lil Wayne & Chris Brown

Best Rap Performance APPARENTLY J. Cole

Track from: 2014 Forest Hills Drive [Roc Nation/Columbia Records] 60

BACK TO BACK Drake

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Track from: The Pinkprint [Young Money/Cash Money]

24

Best Rap Song

A song must contain music and lyrics and must be either a new song or a song first achieving prominence during the eligibility year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

ALL DAY Ernest Brown, Tyler Bryant, Sean Combs, Mike Dean, Rennard East, Noah Goldstein, Malik Yusef Jones, Karim Kharbouch, Allan Kyariga, Kendrick Lamar, Paul McCartney, Victor Mensah, Charles Njapa, Che Pope, Patrick Reynolds, Allen Ritter, Kanye West, Mario Winans & Cydel Young, songwriters (Kanye West Featuring Theophilus London, Allan Kingdom & Paul McCartney) [Def Jam Recordings; Publishers: Please Gimme My Publishing/ EMI Blackwood Music Inc./MPL Communications Inc./TYLER BRANT PUBLISHING/WB Music Corp./Hard Working Black Folks Inc./Top Dawg Music/Excuse My French Music/EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Monarch Music/Abou Thiam Publishing/Victor Kwesi Mensah Publishing Designee/ ALLEN KYARIGA/EMI Blackwood Music o/b/o Papa George Publishing/Kaya and Ethan Music/Primary Wave Brian/Noah Goldstein admin. by Reach Music Publishing/Ritter Boy LLC/Mario Winans Publishing Designee/ Broken Locks/Songs of Universal Inc./Jabriel Iz Myne/Universal Music/Patrick Reynolds Publishing Designee/Smooth Thug Music/ Noel Ellis Publishing Designee/ Justin Combs Music Publishing administered by EMI April Music]

ALRIGHT Kendrick Duckworth, Kawan Prather, Mark Anthony Spears & Pharrell Williams, songwriters (Kendrick Lamar) Track from: To Pimp A Butterfly [Top Dawg Entertainment/ Aftermath Records/Interscope Records; Publishers: WB Music Corp./Hard Working Black Folks Publishing/EMI April Music Inc./ Even More Water From Nazareth/ Sounwave TDE Productions/ SonyATV/In Thee Face Music Publishing/BMG Gold Songs]

ENERGY Richard Dorfmeister, A. Graham, Markus Kienzl, M. O’Brien, M. Samuels & Phillip Thomas, songwriters (Drake) Track from: If Youre Reading This Its Too Late [Young Money/Cash Money; Publishers: Sandra Gale/EMI Music Publishing, 1damentional publishing LLC/Sony/ATV Tunes, LLC, Matthew O’Brien/otek north/ WB Music Corp./Jack Russell Music Ltd./Notting Hill Music Ltd.]

GLORY Lonnie Lynn, Che Smith & John Stephens, songwriters (Common & John Legend)

Track from: Selma (Music From The Motion Picture) [Def Jam Recordings/ARTium Records; Publishers: BMG Sapphire Songs/John Legend Publishing/Reach Music Songs/ Think Common Music Inc./ Universal Music — MGB Songs]

TRAP QUEEN Tony Fadd & Willie J. Maxwell, songwriters (Fetty Wap) Track from: Fetty Wap [300 Entertainment/RGF Productions; Publishers: RGF Publishing, Zoovier, BMG Gold Songs, Tony Fadd Beats]

25

Best Rap Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rap recordings.

2014 FOREST HILLS DRIVE J. Cole [Roc Nation/Columbia Records]

COMPTON Dr. Dre

[Aftermath/Interscope]

IF YOURE READING THIS ITS TOO LATE Drake [Cash Money/Young Money]

TO PIMP A BUTTERFLY Kendrick Lamar [Top Dawg Entertainment/ Aftermath Records/ Interscope Records]

THE PINKPRINT Nicki Minaj

[Young Money/Cash Money]


Discover the difference of natural botanical ingredients for a permanent hair color

experience like no other.

Find naturtint at your local HealtH Food Store. learn More at

naturtintusa.com

|

877.372.6567


NOMINATIONS COUNTRY

26

Best Country Solo Performance

For new vocal or instrumental solo country recordings.

BURNING HOUSE Cam

Track from: Welcome To Cam Country [Arista Nashville/RCA Records]

TRAVELLER Chris Stapleton

Track from: Traveller [Mercury Nashville]

LITTLE TOY GUNS Carrie Underwood

Track from: Greatest Hits: Decade #1 [19 Recordings/Arista Nashville]

JOHN COUGAR, JOHN DEERE, JOHN 3:16 Keith Urban [Capitol Records Nashville]

CHANCES ARE Lee Ann Womack

Track from: The Way I’m Livin’ [Sugar Hill Records]

27

Best Country Duo/ Group Performance For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative country recordings.

STAY A LITTLE LONGER Brothers Osborne [EMI Records Nashville]

IF I NEEDED YOU Joey And Rory

[Gaither Music Group]

THE DRIVER Charles Kelley, Dierks Bentley & Eric Paslay [Capitol Records Nashville]

GIRL CRUSH Little Big Town

Track from: Pain Killer [Capitol Records Nashville]

LONELY TONIGHT Blake Shelton Featuring Ashley Monroe [Warner Bros.]

62

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

28

Best Country Song

A Songwriter(s) Award. For Song Eligibility Guidelines see Category #3. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

CHANCES ARE Hayes Carll, songwriter (Lee Ann Womack)

29

Best Country Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new country recordings.

[MCA Nashville]

PAIN KILLER Little Big Town

ARBITERS OF EVOLUTION Donny McCaslin, soloist

DIAMOND RINGS AND OLD BARSTOOLS Barry Dean, Luke Laird & Jonathan Singleton, songwriters (Tim McGraw)

PAGEANT MATERIAL Kacey Musgraves

Track from: Pain Killer [Capitol Records Nashville; Publishers: Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./Songs Of Crazy Girl Music, Songs of Universal, Inc., Hoodie Songs, HillarodyRathbone Music admin. by BMG Rights Management (US) LLC]

HOLD MY HAND Brandy Clark & Mark Stephen Jones, songwriters (Brandy Clark)

THE BLADE Ashley Monroe [Warner Bros.]

[Mercury Nashville]

TRAVELLER Chris Stapleton

[Mercury Records]

NEW AGE

30

Track from: The Thompson Fields (Maria Schneider Orchestra) [ArtistShare]

FRIEND OR FOE Joshua Redman, soloist

Track from: The Bad Plus Joshua Redman (The Bad Plus Joshua Redman) [Nonesuch]

PAST PRESENT John Scofield, soloist

Track from: Past Present [Impulse!]

32

Best New Age Album

Best Jazz Vocal Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental new age recordings.

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal jazz recordings.

GRACE Paul Avgerinos

MANY A NEW DAY: KARRIN ALLYSON SINGS RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN Karrin Allyson

[Round Sky Music]

BHAKTI WITHOUT BORDERS Madi Das [Kuli Mela]

VOYAGER Catherine Duc [MG Music Ltd.]

LOVE Peter Kater

Track from: 12 Stories [Warner Bros Records; Publishers: Songs of Parallel/Vista Loma Music admin. by Amplified Administration and Harlan Howard Songs]

[Mysterium Music]

TRAVELLER Chris Stapleton, songwriter (Chris Stapleton)

JAZZ

Track from: Traveller [Mercury Nashville; Publishers: WB Music Corp./Ken Tucky Music]

CHEROKEE Christian McBride, soloist

Track from: Live At The Village Vanguard (Christian McBride Trio) [Mack Avenue Records]

[Capitol Records Nashville]

GIRL CRUSH Hillary Lindsey, Lori McKenna & Liz Rose, songwriters (Little Big Town)

Track from: My Favorite Things [Motema Music]

MONTEVALLO Sam Hunt

Track from: The Way I’m Livin’ [Sugar Hill Records; Publishers: Highway 87 Music admin. by BMG/Chrysalis]

Track from: Sundown Heaven Town [Big Machine Records/McGraw Music; Publishers: Songs of Universal, Inc./Creative Nation Music/Twangin and Slangin Songs/ Country Paper/Pulse Nation/BMG Gold Songs/Glassbean/We Jam Writers Group]

GIANT STEPS Joey Alexander, soloist

ASIA BEAUTY Ron Korb

[Humbledragon]

31

Best Improvised Jazz Solo

For an instrumental jazz solo performance. Two equal performers on one recording may be eligible as one entry. If the soloist listed appears on a recording billed to another artist, the latter’s name is in parenthesis for identification. Singles or Tracks only.

[Motema Music]

FIND A HEART Denise Donatelli [Savant Records]

FLIRTING WITH DISASTER Lorraine Feather [Jazzed Media]

JAMISON Jamison Ross [Concord Jazz]

FOR ONE TO LOVE Cécile McLorin Salvant [Mack Avenue Records]

33

Best Jazz Instrumental Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new instrumental jazz recordings.

MY FAVORITE THINGS Joey Alexander [Motema Music]



NOMINATIONS BREATHLESS Terence Blanchard Featuring The E-Collective [Blue Note Records]

COVERED: RECORDED LIVE AT CAPITOL STUDIOS Robert Glasper & The Robert Glasper Trio [Blue Note Records]

BEAUTIFUL LIFE Jimmy Greene

SUITE CAMINOS Gonzalo Rubalcaba [5Passion]

INTERCAMBIO Wayne Wallace Latin Jazz Quintet IDENTITIES ARE CHANGEABLE Miguel Zenón

Track from: Worth Fighting For [Live] [Motown Gospel; Publishers: ACER/Aaron Lindsey Music/ Capitol Christian Music Publishing admin. by Capitol CMG]

GOSPEL/ CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song

[Patois Records]

[Miel Music]

[Mack Avenue Records]

PAST PRESENT John Scofield [Impulse!]

34

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new ensemble jazz recordings.

Best Gospel Performance/Song

LINES OF COLOR Gil Evans Project KÖLN Marshall Gilkes & WDR Big Band

WORTH [LIVE] Anthony Brown & Group Therapy Anthony Brown, songwriter

[Alternate Side Records]

CUBA: THE CONVERSATION CONTINUES Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra [Motema Music]

THE THOMPSON FIELDS Maria Schneider Orchestra [ArtistShare]

HOME SUITE HOME Patrick Williams [BFM Jazz]

35

Best Latin Jazz Album

For vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material. The intent of this category is to recognize recordings that represent the blending of jazz with Latin, Iberian-American, Brazilian, and Argentinian tango music.

MADE IN BRAZIL Eliane Elias IMPROMPTU The Rodriguez Brothers [Criss Cross Jazz]

64

36

This award is given to the Artist(s) and Songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best traditional Christian, roots gospel or contemporary gospel Single or Track.

[Blue Note/ArtistShare]

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

WORTH FIGHTING FOR [LIVE] Brian Courtney Wilson Aaron Lindsey & Brian Courtney Wilson, songwriters

[Tyscot Records; Publishers: Key Of A Music/Tyscot Music]

WANNA BE HAPPY? Kirk Franklin Kirk Franklin, songwriter

[RCA Records/Fo Yo Soul Recordings; Publishers: Aunt Gertrude Music Publishing admin. by Universal Music-Brentwood Benson Songs and Irving Music, Inc. admin. by Universal Music Publishing]

INTENTIONAL Travis Greene Travis Greene, songwriter [RCA Inspiration; Publishers: Greenlight International/ VNavidavi Music]

HOW AWESOME IS OUR GOD [LIVE] Israel & NewBreed Featuring Yolanda Adams Neville Diedericks, Israel Houghton & Meleasa Houghton, songwriters

Track from: Covered: Alive In Asia [Live] [RGM NewBreed/RCA Inspiration; Publishers: Integrity’s Praise! Music, RGM-NewBreed Publishing, Sound Of The New Breed, CCMG Publishing, Neville D. Publishing]

37

This award is given to the Artist(s) and Songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best contemporary Christian pop, Christian rap/hip-hop, or Christian rock single or track.

HOLY SPIRIT Francesca Battistelli

Track from: If We’re Honest (Deluxe Edition) [Fervent/Curb/Word]

LIFT YOUR HEAD WEARY SINNER (CHAINS) Crowder Ed Cash, David Crowder & Seth Philpott, songwriters

Track from: Neon Steeple (Deluxe Edition) [sixstepsrecords/Sparrow Records; Publishers: sixsteps Music/worshiptogether.com Songs/sixsteps Songs/Worship Together Music admin. at CapitolCMGPublishing.com/ Alletrop Music]

BECAUSE HE LIVES (AMEN) Matt Maher Daniel Carson, Ed Cash, Jason Ingram, Matt Maher & Chris Tomlin, songwriters Track from: Saints And Sinners [Essential Records/Provident Label Group; Publishers: Sony/ ATV Tree Publishing/I Am A Pilgrim Songs/Sony/ATV Timber Publishing/Open Hands Music/ Alletrop Music admin. by Music Services/worshiptogether.com Songs/sixsteps music admin. by CapitolCMGPublishing.com/ Worship Together Music/sixsteps songs/SDG Publishing admin. by CapitolCMGPublishing.com]

SOUL ON FIRE Third Day Featuring All Sons & Daughters Tai Anderson, Brenton Brown, David Carr, Mark Lee, Matt Maher & Mac Powell, songwriters

Track from: Lead Us Back: Songs Of Worship (Deluxe) [Essential Records/Provident Label Group; Publishers: DATAMAMA MUSIC/Thankyou Music/Sony/ATV Tree Publishing/ I Am A Pilgrim Songs]

FEEL IT Tobymac Featuring Mr. Talkbox Cary Barlowe, David Arthur Garcia & Toby McKeehan, songwriters

[ForeFront Records; Publishers: Achtober Songs/Universal Music — Brentwood Benson Publishing/D Soul Music admin. by CapitolCMGPublishing.com/Castle Bound Music, Inc./We Be Pawtying]

38

Best Gospel Album

This award is given to the artist(s) and any producer(s) or engineer(s) responsible for at least 51% playing time of an album containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, traditional or contemporary/ R&B gospel music recordings.

DESTINED TO WIN [LIVE] Karen Clark Sheard [Karew Records/ Entertainment One]

LIVING IT Dorinda Clark-Cole [Entertainment One/ Light Records]

ONE PLACE LIVE Tasha Cobbs [Motown Gospel]

COVERED: ALIVE IN ASIA [LIVE] Israel & NewBreed

[RGM NewBreed/RCA Inspiration]

LIFE MUSIC: STAGE TWO Jonathan McReynolds [Entertainment One/ Tehillah Music]


Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

Bob Dylan

Shadows in the Night

TALENT PASSION

Best Traditional R&B Performance

Lalah Hathaway “Little Ghetto Boy”

inspiration

Best Rock Performance

Wolf Alice

THE SESAC FAMILY PROUDLY CONGRATULATES OUR

“Moaning Lisa Smile”

GRAMMY NOMINEES! ®

Best Historical Album

Bob Dylan, Marcus Mumford

Bob Dylan and the Band - The Basement Tapes Complete: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11

We also celebrate our affiliates who contributed to GRAMMY® nominated projects. Geri Allen Best Historical Album

Jamie Grace Best Gospel Album

Matt Armstrong Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

Roosevelt Harrell III (Bink) Best Rap Album

Scott Avett Best Americana Album

Lalah Hathaway Album Of The Year & Best Rap Album

Seth Avett Best Americana Album Cary Barlowe Best Contemporary Christian Music Album & Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

Lauren Daigle How Can It Be

Darius Joseph Barner Best Rap Album Jameel Kirk Bruner Best Urban Contemporary Album Hayes Carll Best Country Solo Performance George Clinton Album Of The Year & Best Rap Album Thad Cockrell Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

Best Bluegrass Album

The Steeldrivers

The Muscle Shoals Recordings

Justin Ebach Best Contemporary Christian Music Album Bernard Edwards (Focus) Best Rap Album Jamie Floyd Best Country Album Bryan Fowler Best Contemporary Christian Music Album Antonio Rayo Gibo Best Latin Pop Album

Ayanna Howard Best R&B Album Jason Ingram Best Contemporary Christian Music Album & Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song David Leonard Best Contemporary Christian Music Album Luciano Luna Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) Paul Mabury Best Contemporary Christian Music Album Cuauhtemoc Mexueiro Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) Bart Millard Best Contemporary Christian Music Album VaShawn Mitchell Best Gospel Album Bishop Paul S. Morton Best Gospel Album PJ Morton Best Pop Duo/Group Performance, Best Jazz Instrumental Album & Best Gospel Album

Trees

sesac.com

Disclosure Caracal

James Napier Best Dance/Electronic Album Dacoury Natche (DJ Dahi) Best Rap Album Freddy Osuna Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) Arturo Valdez Osuna Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) Jose Alfonso Quiñones Best Tropical Latin Album

Best Country Song

Hayes Carll

“Chances Are” recorded by Lee Ann Womack

Miguel Ángel Romero Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) Jerry Salley Album Of The Year, Best Country Album, & Best Bluegrass Album Ernest Vaughan Jr. Best Gospel Album

Best Jazz Instrumental Album

Robert Glasper

Cole Walowac Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

Covered: The Robert Glasper Trio Recorded Live at Capitol Studios

Jon White Best Contemporary Christian Music Album Aaron Wilbur Best Bluegrass Album Dontae Winslow Best Rap Album Charli XCX Best Rap/Sung Collaboration

Best Children’s Album

Molly Ledford & Billy Kelly

Best Dance/ Electronic Album

SESAC · HFA · Rumblefish

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album

Michael League Sylva


NOMINATIONS 39

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album This award is given to the artist(s) and any producer(s) or engineer(s) responsible for at least 51% playing time of an album containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, contemporary Christian music, including pop, rap/hip-hop or rock recordings. (Subject to eligibility criteria.)

WHATEVER THE ROAD Jason Crabb [Reunion Records/ Provident Label Group]

HOW CAN IT BE Lauren Daigle [Centricity Music]

SAINTS AND SINNERS Matt Maher

[Essential Records/Provident Label Group]

THIS IS NOT A TEST Tobymac [ForeFront Records]

LOVE RAN RED Chris Tomlin [sixstepsrecords/ Sparrow Records]

40

Best Roots Gospel Album

This award is given to the artist(s) and any producer(s) or engineer(s) responsible for at least 51% playing time of an album containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, traditional/roots gospel music, including country, Southern gospel, bluegrass, and Americana recordings. (Subject to eligibility criteria.)

STILL ROCKIN’ MY SOUL The Fairfield Four [Fairfield Four Records]

PRAY NOW Karen Peck & New River [Daywind Records]

DIRECTIONS HOME (SONGS WE LOVE, SONGS YOU KNOW) Point Of Grace [Word/Curb]

LATIN

41

Best Latin Pop Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin pop recordings.

TERRAL Pablo Alborán

[Warner Music Latina]

HEALER Alex Cuba

[Caracol Records]

A QUIEN QUIERA ESCUCHAR (DELUXE EDITION) Ricky Martin [Sony Music Latin]

SIROPE Alejandro Sanz

[Universal Music Latino]

ALGO SUCEDE Julieta Venegas

[Sony Music Latin]

42

Best Latin Rock, Urban Or Alternative Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin rock, urban or alternative recordings.

AMANECER Bomba Estereo

[Sony Music Latin]

MONDONGO La Cuneta Son Machín

[Round Whirled Records]

HASTA LA RAÍZ Natalia Lafourcade [Sony Music Latin]

43

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new regional Mexican (banda, norteño, corridos, gruperos, mariachi, ranchera, and Tejano) recordings.

[Fonovisa]

YA DIME ADIÓS La Maquinaria Norteña

AND AM I BORN TO DIE Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn

MI VICIO MAS GRANDE Banda El Recodo De Don Cruz Lizarraga

[Fonovisa]

ZAPATEANDO Los Cojolites

[Round Whirled Records]

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

BORN TO PLAY GUITAR Buddy Guy

Track from: Born To Play Guitar [RCA Records/Silvertone Records]

TRADICIÓN, ARTE Y PASIÓN Mariachi Los Camperos De Nati Cano

Track from: Monterey [Anti-]

[Fonovisa]

[Smithsonian Folkways Recordings]

44

Best Tropical Latin Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new tropical Latin recordings.

TRIBUTO A LOS COMPADRES: NO QUIERO LLANTO José Alberto “El Canario” & Septeto Santiaguero [Los Canarios Music]

DALE Pitbull

PRESENTE CONTINUO Guaco

[Ruben Blades Productions]

[Latin Pulse/Sony Music Latin]

TODO TIENE SU HORA Juan Luis Guerra 4.40 [Universal Music Latino/ Capital Latin]

QUE SUENEN LOS TAMBORES Victor Manuelle

[Kiyavi/Sony Music Latin]

66

Track from: Béla Fleck And Abigail Washburn [Rounder]

REALIDADES — DELUXE EDITION Los Tigres Del Norte

SON DE PANAMÁ Rubén Blades With Roberto Delgado & Orchestra

[Mr. 305/Sony Music Latin]

45

Best American Roots Performance

For new vocal or instrumental American Roots recordings. This is for performances in the style of any of the subgenres encompassed in the American Roots Music Field including Americana, bluegrass, blues, folk or regional roots. Award to the Artist(s).

CAJA DE MÚSICA Monsieur Periné

[Sony Music Entertainment]

AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

CITY OF OUR LADY The Milk Carton Kids JULEP Punch Brothers

Track from: The Phosphorescent Blues [Nonesuch]

SEE THAT MY GRAVE IS KEPT CLEAN Mavis Staples

Track from: Your Good Fortune [Anti-]

46

Best American Roots Song

A Songwriter(s) Award. Includes Americana, bluegrass, blues, folk or regional roots songs. For Song Eligibility Guidelines see Category #3. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

ALL NIGHT LONG Raul Malo, songwriter (The Mavericks)

Track from: Mono [The Valory Music Co.; Publishers: Big Machine Music/Raul Malo Music]



NOMINATIONS THE COST OF LIVING Don Henley & Stan Lynch, songwriters (Don Henley & Merle Haggard)

Track from: Cass County [Capitol Records; Publishers: Wisteria Music (GMR) admin. by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./Matanzas Music]

JULEP Chris Eldridge, Paul Kowert, Noam Pikelny, Chris Thile & Gabe Witcher, songwriters (Punch Brothers)

Track from: The Phosphorescent Blues [Nonesuch; Publishers: Chris Thile Music, Money Baby Music, Noam Tunes, Silver Hammer Music, Paul Kowert]

THE TRAVELING KIND Cory Chisel, Rodney Crowell & Emmylou Harris, songwriters (Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell) Track from: The Traveling Kind [Nonesuch; Publishers: Criterion Music o/b/o Coolwell Music/Almo Music Corp. o/b/o Poodlebone Music/Chisel Publishing]

24 FRAMES Jason Isbell, songwriter (Jason Isbell)

Track from: Something More Than Free [Southeastern Records; Publisher: Songs Of Emchant]

47

Best Americana Album

THE PHOSPHORESCENT BLUES Punch Brothers

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental folk recordings.

Best Bluegrass Album

WOOD, WIRE & WORDS Norman Blake

48

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental bluegrass recordings.

POCKET FULL OF KEYS Dale Ann Bradley [Pinecastle Records]

BEFORE THE SUN GOES DOWN Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley [Compass Records Group]

IN SESSION Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver

[Mountain Home Music Company]

MAN OF CONSTANT SORROW Ralph Stanley & Friends [Red River Entertainment]

THE MUSCLE SHOALS RECORDINGS The Steeldrivers [Rounder]

49

Best Blues Album

[Southeastern Records]

MONO The Mavericks

[The Valory Music Co.]

[Rounder]

TOMORROW IS MY TURN Rhiannon Giddens [Nonesuch]

SERVANT OF LOVE Patty Griffin [PGM]

DIDN’T HE RAMBLE Glen Hansard [Anti-]

51

Best Regional Roots Music Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental regional roots music recordings.

GO GO JUICE Jon Cleary [FHQ Records]

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

[Vpal Music]

STRICTLY ROOTS Morgan Heritage

[CTBC Music Group]

WORLD MUSIC

53

Best World Music Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental world music

GILBERTOS SAMBA AO VIVO Gilberto Gil [Masterworks]

SINGS Angelique Kidjo [429 Records]

MUSIC FROM INALA Ladysmith Black Mambazo With Ella Spira & The Inala Ensemble [Ladysmith Black Mambazo]

HOME Anoushka Shankar

DESCENDANTS OF HILL COUNTRY Cedric Burnside Project

KAWAIOKALENA Keali’i Reichel

I HAVE NO EVERYTHING HERE (Zomba Prison Project)

[Cedric Burnside Project]

[Alligator Records]

[RCA Records/Silvertone Records]

[KEKO Records]

[Punahele Productions]

GET READY The Revelers [The Revelers]

GENERATIONS Windwalker And The MCW [MCW Productions/PK Productions LLC]

WORTHY Bettye LaVette

REGGAE

MUDDY WATERS 100 John Primer & Various Artists

Best Reggae Album

[Cherry Red]

[Raisin Music Records]

52

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new reggae recordings.

BRANCHES OF THE SAME TREE Rocky Dawuni [Cumbancha]

THE CURE Jah Cure

[VP Records] 68

ZION AWAKE Luciano

[Deutsche Grammophon]

BORN TO PLAY GUITAR Buddy Guy

SOMETHING MORE THAN FREE Jason Isbell

BÉLA FLECK AND ABIGAIL WASHBURN Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn

[Doctor Dread Presents]

LA LA LA LA Natalie Ai Kamauu

THE FIREWATCHER’S DAUGHTER Brandi Carlile

[Nonesuch]

[Plectrafone Records]

ACOUSTICALEVY Barrington Levy

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental blues recordings.

OUTSKIRTS OF LOVE Shemekia Copeland

THE TRAVELING KIND Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell

Best Folk Album

[Nonesuch]

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental Americana recordings.

[ATO Records]

50

Ian Brennan, producer [Six Degrees]

CHILDREN’S

54

Best Children’s Album For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new musical or spoken word recordings that are created and intended specifically for children.

¡COME BIEN! EAT RIGHT! José-Luis Orozco

[Smithsonian Folkways Recordings]

DARK PIE CONCERNS Gustafer Yellowgold [Apple-Eye Productions]

HOME Tim Kubart

[Tim And The Space Cadets]



NOMINATIONS HOW GREAT CAN THIS DAY BE Lori Henriques

[Human Puppy Records]

TREES Molly Ledford & Billy Kelly [Yay! Music]

SPOKEN WORD

55

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling) BLOOD ON SNOW (JO NESBØ) Patti Smith

[Random House Audio]

BRIEF ENCOUNTERS: CONVERSATIONS, MAGIC MOMENTS, AND ASSORTED HIJINKS Dick Cavett [Macmillan Audio]

A FULL LIFE: REFLECTIONS AT NINETY Jimmy Carter [Simon & Schuster Audio]

PATIENCE AND SARAH (ISABEL MILLER) Janis Ian & Jean Smart [Audible Studios]

YES PLEASE Amy Poehler (& Various Artists) [HarperAudio]

COMEDY

56

Best Comedy Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD Lisa Lampanelli [Comedy Dynamics]

BROOKLYN Wyatt Cenac

[Other Music Recording]

HAPPY. AND A LOT. Jay Mohr [Lolflix Inc.]

JUST BEING HONEST Craig Ferguson [Lionsgate Records]

70

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

LIVE AT MADISON SQUARE GARDEN Louis C.K. [Comedy Dynamics]

MUSICAL THEATER

57

Best Musical Theater Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings. Award to the principle vocalist(s) and the album producer(s) of 51% or more playing time of the album. The lyricist(s) and composer(s) of a new score are eligible for an Award if they have written and/ or composed a new score which comprises 51% or more playing time of the album.

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS Leanne Cope, Max von Essen, Robert Fairchild, Jill Paice & Brandon Uranowitz, principal soloists; Rob Fisher & Scott Lehrer, producers (George Gershwin, composer; Ira Gershwin, lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast) [Masterworks Broadway]

FUN HOME Michael Cerveris, Judy Kuhn, Sydney Lucas, Beth Malone & Emily Skeggs, principal soloists; Philip Chaffin & Tommy Krasker, producers (Jeanine Tesori, composer; Lisa Kron, lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast) [PS Classics]

HAMILTON Daveed Diggs, Renée Elise Goldsberry, Jonathan Groff, Christopher Jackson, Jasmine Cephas Jones, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Leslie Odom Jr., Okieriete Onaodowan, Anthony Ramos & Phillipa Soo, principal soloists; Alex Lacamoire, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Bill Sherman, Ahmir Thompson & Tarik Trotter, producers; Lin-Manuel Miranda, composer & lyricist (Original Broadway Cast) [Atlantic]

THE KING AND I Ruthie Ann Miles, Kelli O’Hara, Ashley Park, Conrad Ricamora & Ken Watanabe, principal soloists; David Caddick, David Lai & Ted Sperling, producers (Richard Rodgers, composer; Oscar Hammerstein II, lyricist) (2015 Broadway Cast) [Universal Music Classics]

SOMETHING ROTTEN! Heidi Blickenstaff, Christian Borle, John Cariani, Brian d’Arcy James, Brad Oscar & Kate Reinders, principal soloists; Kurt Deutsch, Karey Kirkpatrick, Wayne Kirkpatrick, Lawrence Manchester, Kevin McCollum & Phil Reno, producers; Karey Kirkpatrick & Wayne Kirkpatrick, composers/lyricists (Originial Broadway Cast) [Ghostlight]

MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA

58

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media

Award to the artist(s) and/or “in studio” producer(s) of a majority of the tracks on the album. In the absence of both, award to the one or two individuals proactively responsible for the concept and musical direction of the album and for the selection of artists, songs and producers, as applicable. Award also goes to appropriately credited music supervisor(s).

EMPIRE: SEASON 1 (Various Artists) Timbaland & Jim Beanz, compilation producers [Columbia]

FIFTY SHADES OF GREY (Various Artists) Mike Knobloch & Dana Sano, compilation producers [Republic Records]

GLEN CAMPBELL: I’LL BE ME (Various Artists) Julian Raymond, compilation producer [Big Machine Records]

PITCH PERFECT 2 (Various Artists) Julianne Jordan, Harvey Mason Jr. & Julia Michels, compilation producers

[Universal Music Enterprises/ Republic Records]

SELMA (Various Artists) Ava DuVernay, compilation producer [Paramount Pictures/ Pathé Productions]

59

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media Award to Composer(s) for an original score created specifically for, or as a companion to, a current legitimate motion picture, television show or series, video games or other visual media.

BIRDMAN Antonio Sanchez, composer [Milan Records]

THE IMITATION GAME Alexandre Desplat, composer [Sony Classical]

INTERSTELLAR Hans Zimmer, composer [WaterTower Music]

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING Jóhann Jóhannsson, composer [Back Lot Music]

WHIPLASH Justin Hurwitz, composer [Varèse Sarabande]

60

Best Song Written For Visual Media

A Songwriter(s) award. For a song (melody & lyrics) written specifically for a motion picture, television, video games or other visual media, and released for the first time during the Eligibility Year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

EARNED IT (FIFTY SHADES OF GREY) Ahmad Balshe, Stephan Moccio, Jason Quenneville & Abel Tesfaye, songwriters (The Weeknd)

Track from: Fifty Shades Of Grey [Universal Studios/Republic Records; Publishers: SONGS Music Publishing, LLC, o/b/o Songs Of SMP, Songs Of Universal, Inc. and Sing Little Penguin, Universal Music Corp, CP Music Group, Inc., Universal Pictures Music and UPG Music Publishing]


We proudly congratulate our 58th Annual GRAMMY Award Nominees ®

BEST CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM

BEST AMERICAN ROOTS SONG

SYLVA

RAUL MAUL

“ALL NIGHT LONG”

SNARKY PUPPY*

OF THE MAVERICKS†

BEST METAL PERFORMANCE

BEST AMERICANA ALBUM

“IDENTITY”

AUGUST BURNS RED BEST METAL PERFORMANCE

MONO

THE MAVERICKS

BEST REGGAE ALBUM

“512”

STRICTLY ROOTS

LAMB OF GOD

MORGAN HERITAGE

BEST ROCK ALBUM BEST WORLD MUSIC ALBUM

DRONES

SINGS

MUSE

ANGELIQUE KIDJO

BEST R&B PERFORMANCE BEST LATIN POP ALBUM

“BREATHING UNDERWATER”

HIATUS KAIYOTE

HEALER

ALEX CUBA

BEST RAP PERFORMANCE “ALL DAY”

BEST MUSIC VIDEO

KANYE WEST

*

ALRIGHT

KANYE WEST*

BRANDON BONFIGLIO* LUGA PODESTA* COLIN TILLEY*

BEST RAP SONG

COMEDY ALBUM

BEST RAP/SUNG COLLABORATION “ONE MAN CAN CHANGE THE WORLD”

BACK TO THE DRAWING BOARD

“ALL DAY”

KANYE WEST

*

LISA LAMPANELLI

WWW.UNITEDTALENT.COM

*Shared Nomination †International Representation


NOMINATIONS GLORY Lonnie Lynn, Che Smith & John Stephens, songwriters (Common & John Legend)

Track from: Selma [Def Jam Recordings/ARTium Records; Publishers: BMG Sapphire Songs/John Legend Publishing/Reach Music Songs/ Think Common Music Inc./ Universal — MGB Songs]

LOVE ME LIKE YOU DO Savan Kotecha, Max Martin, Tove Nilsson, Ali Payami & Ilya Salmanzadeh, songwriters (Ellie Goulding) Track from: Fifty Shades Of Grey [Republic Records; Publishers: MXM admin. by Kobalt, Wolf Cousin/ Warner/Chappell Music SCAND, Shellbeck Industries, Universal Pictures Music]

SEE YOU AGAIN Andrew Cedar, Justin Franks, Charles Puth & Cameron Thomaz, songwriters (Wiz Khalifa Featuring Charlie Puth) Track from: Furious 7 [Atlantic; Publishers: Artist Publishing Group West/J Franks Publishing/Andrew Cedar Publishing admin. by WB Music Corp./Wiz Khalifa Publishing admin. by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp./Charlie Puth Music Publishing/Artist 101 Publishing Group admin. by Warner Chappell Music, Universal Pictures Music, UPG Music Publishing]

TIL IT HAPPENS TO YOU Lady Gaga & Diane Warren, songwriters (Lady Gaga)

Track from: The Hunting Ground [Streamline/Interscope; Publishers: Diane Warren Trust d/b/a REALSONGS/Sony ATV songs LLC/House of Gaga Publishing Inc./GloJoe Music Inc.]

COMPOSING/ ARRANGING

61

Best Instrumental Composition

A Composer’s Award for an original composition (not an adaptation) first released during the Eligibility Year. Singles or Tracks only.

72

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

THE AFRO LATIN JAZZ SUITE Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra Featuring Rudresh Mahanthappa) Track from: Cuba: The Conversation Continues [Motema Music]

CIVIL WAR Bob Mintzer, composer (Bob Mintzer Big Band) Track from: Get Up! [MCG Jazz]

CONFETTI MAN David Balakrishnan, composer (Turtle Island Quartet) Track from: Confetti Man [Azica Records]

NEIL Rich DeRosa, composer (University Of North Texas One O’Clock Lab Band) Track from: Lab 2015 [North Texas Jazz]

GHOST OF A CHANCE Bob James, arranger (Bob James & Nathan East) Track from: The New Cool [Yamaha Entertainment Group Of America]

ALAGOAS Alex Trochut, art director (Alagoas)

63

BUSH Anita Marisa Boriboon & Phi Hollinger, art directors (Snoop Dogg)

Track from: Like It Is [Mama Records]

Best Arrangement, Instruments And Vocals An Arranger’s Award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BE MY MUSE Shelly Berg, arranger (Lorraine Feather) [Jazzed Media]

52ND & BROADWAY Patrick Williams, arranger (Patrick W illiams Featuring Patti Austin)

62

GAROTA DE IPANEMA Otmaro Ruiz, arranger (Catina DeLuna Featuring Otmaro Ruiz)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental Or A Cappella

An Arranger’s Award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BRUNO MARS Paul Allen, Troy Hayes, Dwight Streets Levens, Evin Martin & J Moss, arrangers (Vocally Challenged) [PMG Records]

DANCE OF THE SUGAR PLUM FAIRY Ben Bram, Mitch Grassi, Scott Hoying, Avi Kaplan, Kirstin Maldonado & Kevin Olusola, arrangers (Pentatonix)

Track from: That’s Christmas To Me [RCA Records]

DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR? Armand Hutton, arranger (Committed)

Track from: Home For Christmas [Mixed Bag Music Group, LLC.]

64

Best Recording Package

YOU AND THE NIGHT AND THE MUSIC John Fedchock, arranger (John Fedchock New York Big Band)

VESPER Marshall Gilkes, composer (Marshall Gilkes & WDR Big Band) Track from: Köln [Alternate Side Records]

PACKAGE

Track from: Home Suite Home [BFM Jazz]

Track from: Catina Deluna Lado B Brazilian Project Featuring Otmaro Ruiz [Catina DeLuna]

SUE (OR IN A SEASON OF CRIME) Maria Schneider, arranger (David Bowie)

Track from: Nothing Has Changed [Legacy/Columbia]

WHEN I COME HOME Jimmy Greene, arranger (Jimmy Greene With Javier Colon) Track from: Beautiful Life [Mack Avenue Records]

[Better Problems]

[Doggy Style/Iamother/Columbia Records]

HOW BIG, HOW BLUE, HOW BEAUTIFUL (DELUXE EDITION) Brian Roettinger, art director (Florence & The Machine) [Republic]

MY HAPPINESS Nathanio Strimpopulos & Jack White, art directors (Elvis Presley) [Third Man Records]

STILL THE KING: CELEBRATING THE MUSIC OF BOB WILLS AND HIS TEXAS PLAYBOYS Sarah Dodds, Shauna Dodds & Dick Reeves, art directors (Asleep At The Wheel) [Bismeaux Records]

65

Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package BENEATH THE SKIN (DELUXE BOX SET) Leif Podhajsky, art director (Of Monsters And Men) [Republic]

I LOVE YOU, HONEYBEAR (LIMITED EDITION DELUXE VINYL) Sasha Barr & Josh Tillman, art directors (Father John Misty) [Sub Pop]

THE RISE & FALL OF PARAMOUNT RECORDS, VOLUME TWO (1928–32) Susan Archie, Dean Blackwood & Jack White, art directors (Various Artists) [Third Man Records/ Revenant Records]


Hear it all

ery last emotional nuance of your creations. Digital wizard Ted Smith has created a device that earths all the detail and ambience from every format, from RedBook to hi-res PCM and DSD. rectStream’s FPGA-based architecture can be updated by downloading new rmware , and wil ver become obsolete. rectStream: used by Steve Hoffman, Cookie Marenco and Gus Skinas.PSP

You put your heart and soul into your work: so do we Our DirectStream DAC lets you hear every last emotional nuance of your creations. Digital wizard Ted Smith has created a device that unearths all the detail and ambience from every format, from RedBook to hi-res PCM and DSD. DirectStream’s FPGA-based architecture can be updated by downloading new rmware, and will never become obsolete. DirectStream D to A: used by Steve Hoffman, Cookie Marenco and Gus Skinas.

PS Audio Inc. 4826 Sterling Drive, Boulder, Colorado. www.psaudio.com


NOMINATIONS STICKY FINGERS (SUPER DELUXE EDITION) Stephen Kennedy & James Tilley, art directors (The Rolling Stones) [Universal Music Enterprises, A Division Of UMG]

30 TRIPS AROUND THE SUN Doran Tyson & Steve Vance, art directors (Grateful Dead) [Rhino]

WHAT A TERRIBLE WORLD, WHAT A BEAUTIFUL WORLD (DELUXE BOX SET) Carson Ellis, Jeri Heiden & Glen Nakasako, art directors (The Decemberists) [Capitol Records]

NOTES

66

Best Album Notes FOLKSONGS OF ANOTHER AMERICA: FIELD RECORDINGS FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST, 1937–1946 James P. Leary, album notes writer (Various Artists) [Dust-To-Digital/University of Wisconsin Press]

LEAD BELLY: THE SMITHSONIAN FOLKWAYS COLLECTION Jeff Place, album notes writer (Lead Belly) [Smithsonian Folkways Recordings]

LOVE HAS MANY FACES: A QUARTET, A BALLET, WAITING TO BE DANCED Joni Mitchell, album notes writer (Joni Mitchell) [Rhino]

PORTRAIT OF AN AMERICAN SINGER Ted Olson, album notes writer (Tennessee Ernie Ford) [Bear Family Productions]

SONGS OF THE NIGHT: DANCE RECORDINGS, 1916–1925 Ryan Barna, album notes writer (Joseph C. Smith’s Orchestra) [Archeophone Records]

74

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

HISTORICAL

67

Best Historical Album THE BASEMENT TAPES COMPLETE: THE BOOTLEG SERIES VOL. 11 Steve Berkowitz, Jan Haust & Jeff Rosen, compilation producers; Peter J. Moore & Mark Wilder, mastering engineers (Bob Dylan And The Band) [Columbia/Legacy]

THE COMPLETE CONCERT BY THE SEA Geri Allen, Jocelyn Arem & Steve Rosenthal, compilation producers; Jamie Howarth & Jessica Thompson, mastering engineers (Erroll Garner) [Columbia/Legacy]

NATIVE NORTH AMERICA (VOL. 1): ABORIGINAL FOLK, ROCK, AND COUNTRY 1966–1985 Kevin Howes, compilation producer; Greg Mindorff, mastering engineer (Various Artists) [Light In The Attic Records]

PARCHMAN FARM: PHOTOGRAPHS AND FIELD RECORDINGS, 1947–1959 Steven Lance Ledbetter & Nathan Salsburg, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer (Various Artists) [Dust-To-Digital]

SONGS MY MOTHER TAUGHT ME Mark Puryear, compilation producer; Pete Reiniger, mastering engineer (Fannie Lou Hamer) [Smithsonian Folkways Recordings]

PRODUCTION, NON-CLASSICAL

68

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical An Engineer’s Award. (Artists names appear in parentheses.)

BEFORE THIS WORLD Dave O’Donnell, engineer; Ted Jensen, mastering engineer (James Taylor) [Concord Records]

CURRENCY OF MAN Maxime Le Guil, engineer; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer (Melody Gardot) [Verve/Universal]

RECREATIONAL LOVE Greg Kurstin & Alex Pasco, engineers; Emily Lazar, mastering engineer (The Bird And The Bee) [Rostrum Records]

SOUND & COLOR Shawn Everett, engineer; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer (Alabama Shakes) [ATO Records]

WALLFLOWER Steve Price, Jochem van der Saag & Jorge Vivo, engineers; Paul Blakemore, mastering engineer (Diana Krall) [Verve Music Group/Universal]

69

Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical A Producer’s Award. (Artists names appear in parentheses.)

JEFF BHASKER

• Ain’t Gonna Drown (Elle King) (T) • Burning Doves (Mikky Ekko) (T) • Burning House (Cam) (T) • Grand Romantic (Nate Ruess) (A) • Last Damn Night (Elle King) (T) • Never Let You Down (Woodkid Featuring Lykke Li) (T) • Runaway Train (Cam) (T) • Uptown Special (Mark Ronson) (A)

DAVE COBB

• Delilah (Anderson East) (A) • Little Neon Limelight (Houndmouth) (A) • Smoke (A Thousand Horses) (S) • Something More Than Free (Jason Isbell) (A) • Southernality (A Thousand Horses) (A) • 3 (Honeyhoney) (A) • Traveller (Chris Stapleton) (A)

DIPLO

• B**** I’m Madonna (Madonna Featuring Nicki Minaj) (S) • Doctor Pepper (Diplo Featuring CL, Riff Raff & OG MacO) (S) • Golden (Travie McCoy Featuring Sia) (S) • Lean On (Major Lazer Featuring MØ & DJ Snake) (S) • Peace Is The Mission (Major Lazer) (A) • Skrillex And Diplo Present Jack Ü (Skrillex And Diplo) (A) • Where Are Ü Now (Skrillex And Diplo With Justin Bieber) (T)

LARRY KLEIN

• Currency Of Man (Melody Gardot) (A) • Freedom & Surrender (Lizz Wright) (A) • Heartland (Indra Rios-Moore) (A) • I’m Leaving You (Florence K) (A) • Parker’s Place (Parker Bent) (A) • Speaking In Tongues (Luciana Souza) (A) • Tenderness (JD Souther) (A)

BLAKE MILLS

• Sound & Color (Alabama Shakes) (A)

70

Best Remixed Recording, Non-Classical

A Remixer’s Award. (Artists names appear in parentheses.) Singles or Tracks only.

BERLIN BY OVERNIGHT (CFCF REMIX) CFCF, remixer (Daniel Hope) Track from: Berlin By Overnight [Deutsche Grammophon]

HOLD ON (FATUM REMIX) Bill Hamel & Chad Newbold, remixers (JES, Shant & Clint Maximus) [Intonenation Records]


A toast to all the winners and nominees. Stream all your music to this unique Bluetooth SoundFlask . SAVE 33 % plus free shipping with code MUSIC33. TM

ihome.com

iHome and SoundFlask are registered trademarks of SDI Technologies, Inc. Bluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG, Inc. All other marks are trademarks of their respective owners. Proudly Designed and Engineered in the USA


NOMINATIONS RUNAWAY (U & I) (KASKADE REMIX) Ryan Raddon, remixer (Galantis)

Track from: Runaway (U&I) Remixes [Big Beat/Atlantic]

SAY MY NAME (RAC REMIX) André Allen Anjos, remixer (Odesza Featuring Zyra)

Track from: Say My Name Remixes [Counter Records]

UPTOWN FUNK (DAVE AUDÉ REMIX) Dave Audé, remixer (Mark Ronson Featuring Bruno Mars) [RCA Records]

SURROUND SOUND

71

Best Surround Sound Album

Classical or non-classical. For vocal or instrumental albums in any genre. Must be commercially released on DVD-Audio, DVDVideo, SACD, Blu-ray or surround download and must provide a new surround mix of four or more channels. Award to the surround mix engineer, surround producer (if any) and surround mastering engineer (if any).

AMDAHL: ASTROGNOSIA & AESOP Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer (Ingar Heine Bergby & Norwegian Radio Orchestra) [2L (Lindberg Lyd)]

AMUSED TO DEATH James Guthrie, surround mix engineer; James Guthrie & Joel Plante, surround mastering engineers; James Guthrie, surround producer (Roger Waters) [Columbia/Legacy]

MAGNIFICAT Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer 76

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

(Øyvind Gimse, Anita Brevik, Nidarosdomens Jentekor & Trondheimsolistene) [2L (Lindberg Lyd)]

SHOSTAKOVICH: SYMPHONY NO. 7 Erdo Groot, surround mix engineer; Erdo Groot, surround mastering engineer; Philip Traugott, surround producer (Paavo Järvi & Russian National Orchestra) [Pentatone]

SPES Morten Lindberg, surround mix engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, surround producer (Tove Ramlo-Ystad & Cantus) [2L (Lindberg Lyd)]

PRODUCTION CLASSICAL

72

Best Engineered Album, Classical

An Engineer’s Award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

ASK YOUR MAMA Leslie Ann Jones, John Kilgore, Nora Kroll-Rosenbaum & Justin Merrill, engineers; Patricia Sullivan, mastering engineer (George Manahan & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra) [Avie Records]

DUTILLEUX: MÉTABOLES; L’ARBRE DES SONGES; SYMPHONY NO. 2, “LE DOUBLE” Dmitriy Lipay, engineer; Alexander Lipay, mastering engineer (Ludovic Morlot, Augustin Hadelich & Seattle Symphony) [Seattle Symphony Media]

MONTEVERDI: IL RITORNO D’ULISSE IN PATRIA Robert Friedrich, engineer; Michael Bishop, mastering engineer (Martin Pearlman, Jennifer Rivera, Fernando Guimarães & Boston Baroque) [Linn Records]

RACHMANINOFF: ALL-NIGHT VIGIL Byeong Joon Hwang & John Newton, engineers; Mark Donahue, mastering engineer (Charles Bruffy, Phoenix Chorale & Kansas City Chorale) [Chandos]

SAINT-SAËNS: SYMPHONY NO. 3, “ORGAN” Keith O. Johnson & Sean Royce Martin, engineers; Keith O. Johnson, mastering engineer (Michael Stern & Kansas City Symphony) [Reference Recordings]

73

Producer Of The Year, Classical A Producer’s Award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

BLANTON ALSPAUGH

• Hill: Symphony No. 4; Concertino Nos. 1 & 2; Divertimento (Peter Bay, Anton Nel & Austin Symphony Orchestra) • Rachmaninoff: All-Night Vigil (Charles Bruffy, Phoenix Chorale & Kansas City Chorale) • Sacred Songs Of Life & Love (Brian A. Schmidt & South Dakota Chorale) • Spirit Of The American Range (Carlos Kalmar & The Oregon Symphony) • Tower: Violin Concerto; Stroke; Chamber Dance (Giancarlo Guerrero, Cho-Liang Lin & Nashville Symphony)

MANFRED EICHER

• Franz Schubert (András Schiff) • Galina Ustvolskaya (Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Markus Hinterhäuser & Reto Bieri) • Moore: Dances & Canons (Saskia Lankhoorn) • Rihm: Et Lux (Paul Van Nevel, Minguet Quartet & Huelgas Ensemble) • Visions Fugitives (Anna Gourari)

MARINA A. LEDIN, VICTOR LEDIN

• Dances For Piano & Orchestra (Joel Fan, Christophe Chagnard & Northwest Sinfonietta) • Tempo Do Brasil (Marc Regnier) • Woman At The New Piano (Nadia Shpachenko)

DAN MERCERUIO

• Chapí: String Quartets 1 & 2 (Cuarteto Latinoamericano) • From Whence We Came (Ensemble Galilei) • Gregson: Touch (Peter Gregson) • In The Light Of Air — ICE Performs Anna Thorvaldsdottir (International Contemporary Ensemble) • Schumann (Ying Quartet) • Scrapyard Exotica (Del Sol String Quartet) • Stravinsky: Petrushka (Richard Scerbo & Inscape Chamber Orchestra) • What Artemisia Heard (El Mundo) • ZOFO Plays Terry Riley (ZOFO)

JUDITH SHERMAN

• Ask Your Mama (George Manahan & San Francisco Ballet Orchestra) • Fields: Double Cluster; Space Sciences (Jan Kučera, Gloria Chuang & Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra) • Liaisons — Re-Imagining Sondheim From The Piano (Anthony de Mare) • Montage — Great Film Composers & The Piano (Gloria Cheng) • Multitude, Solitude (Momenta Quartet) • Of Color Braided All Desire — Music Of Eric Moe (Christine Brandes, Brentano String Quartet, Dominic Donato, Jessica Meyer, Karen Ouzounian, Manhattan String Quartet & Talujon) • Rzewski: The People United Will Never Be Defeated! (Ursula Oppens) • Sirota: Parting The Veil — Works For Violin & Piano (David Friend, Hyeyung Julie Yoon, Laurie Carney & Soyeon Kate Lee) • Turina: Chamber Music For Strings & Piano (Lincoln Trio)

CLASSICAL

74

Best Orchestral Performance

Award to the Conductor and to the Orchestra.

BRUCKNER: SYMPHONY NO. 4 Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra) [Reference Recordings]


BLUESOUND IS THE SOUND OF MUSIC AS THE ARTIST INTENDED. #LivingHiFi

BLUESOUND IS THE PREMIUM WIRELESS HIGH RESOLUTION MULTI-ROOM HIFI SYSTEM DISCOVER LIVING HIFI AND THE ALL-NEW GEN 2 PRODUCT FAMILY AT BLUESOUND.COM

BLUESOUND IS THE PREMIUM WIRELESS HIGH RESOLUTION MULTI-ROOM HIFI SYSTEM. BLUESOUND.COM


NOMINATIONS DUTILLEUX: MÉTABOLES; L’ARBRE DES SONGES; SYMPHONY NO. 2, “LE DOUBLE” Ludovic Morlot, conductor (Seattle Symphony) [Seattle Symphony Media]

SHOSTAKOVICH: UNDER STALIN’S SHADOW — SYMPHONY NO. 10 Andris Nelsons, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra) [Deutsche Grammophon]

SPIRIT OF THE AMERICAN RANGE Carlos Kalmar, conductor (The Oregon Symphony) [Pentatone]

ZHOU LONG & CHEN YI: SYMPHONY “HUMEN 1839” Darrell Ang, conductor (New Zealand Symphony Orchestra) [Naxos]

75

Best Opera Recording

Award to the Conductor, Album Producer(s) and Principal Soloists.

JANÁČEK: JENŮFA Donald Runnicles, conductor; Will Hartmann, Michaela Kaune & Jennifer Larmore; Magdalena Herbst, producer (Orchestra Of The Deutsche Oper Berlin; Chorus Of The Deutsche Oper Berlin) [Arthaus]

MONTEVERDI: IL RITORNO D’ULISSE IN PATRIA Martin Pearlman, conductor; Fernando Guimarães & Jennifer Rivera; Thomas C. Moore, producer (Boston Baroque) [Linn Records]

MOZART: DIE ENTFÜHRUNG AUS DEM SERAIL Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor; Diana Damrau, Paul Schweinester & Rolando Villazón; Sid McLauchlan, producer (Chamber Orchestra Of Europe) [Deutsche Grammophon]

RAVEL: L’ENFANT ET LES SORTILÈGES; SHÉHÉRAZADE Seiji Ozawa, conductor; Isabel Leonard; Dominic Fyfe, producer (Saito Kinen Orchestra; SKF Matsumoto Chorus & SKF Matsumoto Children’s Chorus)

PAULUS: FAR IN THE HEAVENS Eric Holtan, conductor (Sara Fraker, Matthew Goinz, Thea Lobo, Owen McIntosh, Kathryn Mueller & Christine Vivona; True Concord Orchestra; True Concord Voices)

STEFFANI: NIOBE, REGINA DI TEBE Paul O’Dette & Stephen Stubbs, conductors; Karina Gauvin & Philippe Jaroussky; Renate Wolter-Seevers, producer (Boston Early Music Festival Orchestra)

RACHMANINOFF: ALL-NIGHT VIGIL Charles Bruffy, conductor (Paul Davidson, Frank Fleschner, Toby Vaughn Kidd, Bryan Pinkall, Julia Scozzafava, Bryan Taylor & Joseph Warner; Kansas City Chorale & Phoenix Chorale)

[Decca]

[Erato]

76

Best Choral Performance

Award to the Choral Conductor, and to the Orchestra Conductor if an Orchestra is on the recording, and to the Choral Director or Chorus Master if applicable.

BEETHOVEN: MISSA SOLEMNIS Bernard Haitink, conductor; Peter Dijkstra, chorus master (Anton Barachovsky, Genia Kühmeier, Elisabeth Kulman, Hanno MüllerBrachmann & Mark Padmore; Symphonieorchester Des Bayerischen Rundfunks; Chor Des Bayerischen Rundfunks) [BR Klassik]

MONTEVERDI: VESPERS OF 1610 Harry Christophers, conductor (Jeremy Budd, Grace Davidson, Ben Davies, Mark Dobell, Eamonn Dougan & Charlotte Mobbs; The Sixteen) [Coro]

PABLO NERUDA — THE POET SINGS Craig Hella Johnson, conductor (James K. Bass, Laura Mercado-Wright, Eric Neuville & Lauren Snouffer; Faith DeBow & Stephen Redfield; Conspirare) [Harmonia Mundi]

78

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

[Reference Recordings]

[Chandos]

77

Best Chamber Music/ Small Ensemble Performance

For new recordings of works with chamber or small ensemble (24 or fewer members, not including the Conductor). One Award to the ensemble and one Award to the Conductor, if applicable.

BRAHMS: THE PIANO TRIOS Tanja Tetzlaff, Christian Tetzlaff & Lars Vogt [Ondine]

FILAMENT Eighth Blackbird [Cedille Records]

FLAHERTY: AIRDANCING FOR TOY PIANO, PIANO & ELECTRON CS Nadia Shpachenko & Genevieve Feiwen Lee Track from: Woman At The New Piano [Reference Recordings]

RENDER Brad Wells & Roomful Of Teeth [New Amsterdam Records]

SHOSTAKOVICH: PIANO QUINTET & STRING QUARTET NO. 2 Takács Quartet & Marc-André Hamelin [Hyperion]

78

Best Classical Instrumental Solo

Award to the Instrumental Soloist(s) and to the Conductor when applicable.

DUTILLEUX: VIOLIN CONCERTO, L’ARBRE DES SONGES Augustin Hadelich; Ludovic Morlot, conductor (Seattle Symphony)

Track from: Dutilleux: Métaboles; L’Arbre Des Songes; Symphony No. 2, ‘Le Double’ [Seattle Symphony Media]

GRIEG & MOSZKOWSKI: PIANO CONCERTOS Joseph Moog; Nicholas Milton, conductor (Deutsche Radio Philharmonie Saarbrücken Kaiserslautern) [Onyx Classics]

MOZART: KEYBOARD MUSIC, VOL. 7 Kristian Bezuidenhout [Harmonia Mnudi]

RACHMANINOV VARIATIONS Daniil Trifonov (The Philadelphia Orchestra) [Deutsche Grammophon]

RZEWSKI: THE PEOPLE UNITED WILL NEVER BE DEFEATED! Ursula Oppens (Jerome Lowenthal) [Cedille Records]

79

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album

Award to: Vocalist(s), Collaborative Artist(s) (Ex: pianists, conductors, chamber groups) Producer(s), Recording Engineers/Mixers with 51% or more playing time of new material.

BEETHOVEN: AN DIE FERNE GELIEBTE; HAYDN: ENGLISH SONGS; MOZART: MASONIC CANTATA Mark Padmore; Kristian Bezuidenhout, accompanist [Harmonia Mundi]



NOMINATIONS JOYCE & TONY — LIVE FROM WIGMORE HALL Joyce DiDonato; Antonio Pappano, accompanist

PAULUS: THREE PLACES OF ENLIGHTENMENT; VEIL OF TEARS & GRAND CONCERTO Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer

[Erato]

[Naxos]

NESSUN DORMA — THE PUCCINI ALBUM Jonas Kaufmann; Antonio Pappano, conductor (Kristīne Opolais, Antonio Pirozzi & Massimo Simeoli; Coro Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia; Orchestra Dell’Accademia Nazionale Di Santa Cecilia)

WOMAN AT THE NEW PIANO Nadia Shpachenko; Marina A. Ledin & Victor Ledin, producers

[Sony Classical]

ROUSE: SEEING; KABIR PADAVALI Talise Trevigne; David Allan Miller, conductor (Orion Weiss; Albany Symphony) [Naxos]

ST. PETERSBURG Cecilia Bartoli; Diego Fasolis, conductor (I Barocchisti) [Decca]

80

Best Classical Compendium

Award to the Artist(s) and to the Album Producer(s) and Engineer(s) of over 51% playing time of the album, if other than the artist.

AS DREAMS FALL APART — THE GOLDEN AGE OF JEWISH STAGE AND FILM MUSIC (1925–1955) New Budapest Orpheum Society; Jim Ginsburg, producer [Cedille Records]

ASK YOUR MAMA George Manahan, conductor; Judith Sherman, producer [Avie Records]

HANDEL: L’ALLEGRO, IL PENSEROSO ED IL MODERATO, 1740 Paul McCreesh, conductor; Nicholas Parker, producer [Signum Classics]

80

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

[Reference Recordings]

81

Best Contemporary Classical Composition

A Composer’s Award. (For a contemporary classical composition composed within the last 25 years, and released for the first time during the Eligibility Year.) Award to the Librettist, if applicable.

BARRY: THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST Gerald Barry, composer (Thomas Adès, Barbara Hannigan, Katalin Károlyi, Hilary Summers, Peter Tantsits & Birmingham Contemporary Music Group) [NMC Recordings]

NORMAN: PLAY Andrew Norman, composer (Gil Rose & Boston Modern Orchestra Project) Track from: Norman: Play [BMOP/Sound]

PAULUS: PRAYERS & REMEMBRANCES Stephen Paulus, composer (Eric Holtan, True Concord Voices & Orchestra) Track from: Paulus: Far In The Heavens [Reference Recordings]

TOWER: STROKE Joan Tower, composer (Giancarlo Guerrero, Cho-Liang Lin & Nashville Symphony) Track from: Tower: Violin Concerto; Stroke; Chamber Dance [Naxos]

WOLFE: ANTHRACITE FIELDS Julia Wolfe, composer (Julian Wachner, The Choir Of Trinity Wall Street & Bang On A Can All-Stars) [Cantaloupe Music]

MUSIC VIDEO/FILM

82

Best Music Video

Award to the Artist, Video Director and Video Producer.

LSD ASAP Rocky Dexter Navy, video director; Shin Nishigaki, video producer [RCA Records/A$AP Worldwide/ Polo Grounds Music]

I FEEL LOVE (EVERY MILLION MILES) The Dead Weather Cooper Roberts & Ian Schwartz, video directors; Candice Dragonas & Nathan Scherrer, video producers [Third Man Records]

ALRIGHT Kendrick Lamar The Little Homies & Colin Tilley, video directors; Brandon Bonfiglio, Dave Free, Andrew Lerios & Luga Podesta, video producers [Top Dawg Entertainment/ Aftermath Records/ Interscope Records]

BAD BLOOD Taylor Swift Featuring Kendrick Lamar Joseph Kahn, video director; Ron Mohrhoff, video producer [Big Machine Records]

FREEDOM Pharrell Williams Paul Hunter, video director; Candice Dragonas & Nathan Scherrer, video producers [Columbia]

83

Best Music Film

For concert/performance films or music documentaries. Award to the Artist, Video Director and Video Producer.

MR. DYNAMITE: THE RISE OF JAMES BROWN (James Brown) Alex Gibney, video director; Peter Afterman, Blair Foster, Mick Jagger & Victoria Pearman, video producers [Inaudible Films]

SONIC HIGHWAYS Foo Fighters Dave Grohl, video director; John Cutcliffe, Dave Grohl, John Ramsay, James A. Rota, John Silva, Gaby Skolnek & Kristen Welsh, video producers [RCA Records/Roswell Records]

WHAT HAPPENED, MISS SIMONE? (Nina Simone) Liz Garbus, video director; Liz Garbus, Amy Hobby, Jayson Jackson & Justin Wilkes, video producers [Netflix]

THE WALL LIVE Roger Waters Sean Evans & Roger Waters, video directors; Clare Spencer & Roger Waters, video producers [Back Lot Music]

AMY (Amy Winehouse) Asif Kapadia, video director; James Gay-Rees, video producer [Universal Music Group]





The Recording Academy®

Special Merit Awards In addition to the GRAMMY Awards, The Recording Academy presents other notable honors. These awards recognize contributions of significance to the recording field that fall outside the framework of the GRAMMY Awards categories, and include the Lifetime Achievement Award, Trustees Award, Technical GRAMMY Award, GRAMMY Legend Award, GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Award, and Music Educator Award. The following pages recognize this year’s Special Merit Award recipients. A complete list of past recipients is available in The Recording Academy Awards section of GRAMMY.org.

Lifetime Achievement Award

Trustees Award

The Lifetime Achievement Award, established in 1962, is presented by vote of The Recording Academy’s National Trustees to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording.

This Special Merit Award is presented by vote of The Recording Academy’s National Trustees to individuals who have made significant contributions, other than performance, to the field of recording. The Trustees Award was established in 1967.

Technical GRAMMY® Award Presented by vote of The Recording Academy’s National Trustees, the Technical GRAMMY Award recognizes individuals and companies that have made contributions of outstanding technical significance to the field of recording. The Technical GRAMMY was first awarded in 1994.

GRAMMY Hall Of Fame® The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Award was established by The Recording Academy’s National Trustees in 1973 to honor recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance that are at least 25 years old. Inductees are selected annually by a special member committee of experts and historians from all branches of the recording arts with final approval by The Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees.

84

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Music Educator Award™ Launched by The Recording Academy and the GRAMMY Foundation in 2013, the Music Educator Award recognizes current educators (kindergarten through college, public and private schools) who have made a significant and lasting contribution to the field of music education and who demonstrate a commitment to the broader cause of maintaining music education in their schools. The recipient is approved by The Academy’s Board of Trustees.

GRAMMY Legend Award This Special Merit Award is presented on occasion by The Recording Academy to individuals or groups for ongoing contributions and influence in the recording field. The GRAMMY Legend Award was inaugurated in 1990.



Lifetime Achievement Award

Ruth Brown

By Rep. John Conyers Jr.

86

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

GI LLES PETARD/REDFERNS

R

uth Brown was born Ruth Weston in January 1928, and passed away on Nov. 17, 2006, and in between built one of the great rhythm and blues careers of all time. Born in Portsmouth, Va., to a choir director, she was a pure talent with a voice that could simultaneously convey sorrow, joy, pain, and hope. She never learned to read music because as she put it, “I woke up one morning and I could sing.” She began performing early, at just 4 years old, at the local Emmanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church where her father directed the choir. Known as Miss Rhythm, her bold performances on classics like “So Long,” “Teardrops From My Eyes” and “(Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean” brought her widespread acclaim in the 1940s and 1950s. But somewhere along the way, she fell on hard times, the victim of industry practices that took advantage of African-American artists. But like the tone of her songs, her story is one that moves beyond heartache and toward triumph. The woman who had helped build Atlantic Records may not have been able to afford a telephone at one point, but her voice was not going to be silenced. She became an activist for artists’ rights, helping to change industry practices and recover royalties for artists who were wrongfully denied the fruits of their genius. She was a tireless advocate for copyright reform, a driving force behind the Rhythm & Blues Foundation, and an example to other artists in her later years when her powerful voice once again returned her to stardom — winning a GRAMMY for Best Jazz Vocal Performance, Female for Blues On Broadway as well as a Tony Award for her part in “Black And Blue” in 1989. As a member of both the Congressional Black Caucus and the House Judiciary Committee, I worked with Ruth to

enact copyright reform and to promote and preserve rhythm and blues music. I was so affected by her personal story, her perseverance and empathy for her fellow R&B artists, that I sponsored a resolution in 2006 in the House of Representatives honoring her great legacy. An indomitable spirit, a brilliant singer, and good and decent person, Miss Rhythm made tremendous contributions to our world. Today,

we acknowledge these important contributions and remember how fortunate we all are to have been moved by Ruth Brown’s voice. John Conyers Jr. is currently serving his 26th term as a Democratic representative for Southeast Michigan and is the ranking member of the House Committee on the Judiciary. In 2001 he received the GRAMMYs on the Hill Award from The Recording Academy.


36 FOR 36

I produced my first GRAMMY® show in 1980, a two hour, eight performance live event done at the Shrine Auditorium. It was the beginning of a 36 year journey that has allowed me to achieve most of my professional dreams. Though by no means a complete list, below are 36 moments from the past 36 years that I hope will bring back the same positive memories for you as they have for me. 1980 1983 1985 1988 1991 1993 1994 1995 1998 1999 2001 2001 2002 2002 2003 2003 2004 2005 2005 2005 2005 2006 2008 2009 2009 2010 2011 2011 2012 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015 2015

Neil Diamond/Barbra Streisand — “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers” Marvin Gaye — “Sexual Healing” Tina Turner — “What’s Love Got To Do With it” Michael Jackson — “The Way You Make Me Feel”/“Man In The Mirror” Aerosmith — “Come Together” (tribute to John Lennon) Eric Clapton — “Tears In Heaven” Whitney Houston — “I Will Always Love You” Bruce Springsteen — “Streets Of Philadelphia” Aretha Franklin — “Nessun Dorma” (substitutes for Pavarotti) Ricky Martin — “La Copa De La Vida” Eminem/Elton John — “Stan” U2 — “Beautiful Day” Alan Jackson — “Where Were You (When The World Stopped Turning)” Mary J. Blige — “No More Drama” Springsteen/Grohl/Costello/Kanal/Van Zandt — “London Calling” (tribute to the Clash) Simon & Garfunkel Reunion at Madison Square Garden — “The Sounds Of Silence” Prince/Beyoncé — Medley Melissa Etheridge/Joss Stone — Janis Joplin Medley Usher/James Brown — “Caught Up”/”Get Up — I Feel Like Being Like A Sex Machine” Alicia Keys/Jamie Foxx — “Georgia On My Mind” (tribute to Ray Charles) Tim McGraw/Keith Urban/Lynyrd Skynyrd/Elvin Bishop — Southern Rock Medley Madonna/Gorillaz — first use of hologram on television Tina Turner/Beyoncé — “Proud Mary”/Medley Radiohead — “15 Step” Jay Z/Kanye West/T.I./Lil Wayne/M.I.A. — “Swagga Like Us” Pink — “Glitter In The Air” Mumford & Sons/Bob Dylan/Avett Brothers — Medley Mick Jagger — “Everybody Needs Somebody” Jennifer Hudson — Tribute To Whitney Houston Adele — “Rolling In The Deep” McCartney/Springsteen/Grohl/Walsh — Abbey Road Finale Justin Timberlake/Jay Z — “Suit And Tie” Bruno Mars/Rihanna/Sting/Marleys — Bob Marley Tribute Macklemore & Ryan Lewis/Madonna/Queen Latifah/Mary Lambert — “Same Love” Daft Punk/Stevie Wonder/Pharrell/Nile Rodgers — “Get Lucky” John Legend/Common — "Glory" Rihanna/Paul McCartney/Kanye West — "FourFiveSeconds"

KEN EHRLICH


Lifetime Achievement Award

Celia Cruz

By Marc Anthony

88

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

I

remember listening to Celia Cruz’s music blasting out of the windows in my neighborhood in East Harlem, N.Y., long before I started doing music professionally. By that time she was one of the greatest living legends of our time. My first interaction with Celia as a salsa singer was when I recorded my first album, Otra Nota. We were part of the same record label. From the moment we met, she welcomed me with open arms and became my professional godmother, always supportive and so protective of me. I’ll never forget the first time I was able to share the stage with her. I was so nervous! At that time I did not have a lot of experience performing on the big stages of the world, and yet there I was next to her and in the company of all of these great musicians. That night she embraced me in a very special way — the way only those who had the good fortune of being close to her presence could experience. Her mastery of voice and song and her powerful transformation onstage was one of her many qualities. She possessed a voice like no other and an undeniable way of conducting herself in front of her audience and her fellow musicians. A lady in a male-dominated world who handled her career with consistency, discipline and admirable class. She was so into details. Not even her intense work schedule and touring demands around the world would let her forget her friends and family’s birthdays, and her Christmas cards with her personal touch were a yearly event. We all wondered how in the world this woman, with so many responsibilities as a worldwide performer and wife, found the time to pause and devote personal attention to so many of us. And indeed she did. She also had a great sense of humor.

Celia took her responsibility on the stage very seriously. It was amazing to see her sitting backstage quietly and serenely before it was her time to go on. From the instant that orchestra played the first chord she became this gigantic presence. She never, ever disappointed her audience. Her legacy is so vast there is not enough space on this page, but the fact remains that her contribution to music will continue to have an impact worldwide for generations to come.

Marc Anthony is a two-time GRAMMY winner and five-time Latin GRAMMY winner. His most recent studio album, 3.0, won a Latin GRAMMY for Best Salsa Album for 2014. In 2003 Anthony co-hosted “¡Celia Cruz: Azúcar!,” an all-star tribute to Cruz featuring performances by Anthony, Gloria Estefan, José Feliciano, Paulina Rubio, and Arturo Sandoval, among others.



Lifetime Achievement Award

Earth, Wind & Fire

By Big Boi

90

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

E

arth, Wind & Fire were established by Maurice White in Chicago in 1969 with the vision of spirituality and universal love. From their 1971 self-titled debut album and classics such as 1975's That's The Way Of The World and 1976's Spirit to 2013's Now, Then & Forever, they have helped bridge the gap between the music tastes of all ethnicities. With songs like “Shining Star,” “September,” “Reasons,” and “Let’s Groove,” Earth, Wind & Fire moved the music world one song at a time. This funky talented group is not only considered one of the best in the R&B genre, but they incorporated elements of jazz, pop, disco, soul, and even rock into their timeless music, selling more than 90 million albums worldwide. Along the way, the gifted group became the first African-American act to sell out Madison Square Garden in New York. Maurice White, Verdine White, Philip Bailey, Ralph Johnson, Larry Dunn, Johnny Graham, Al McKay, Fred White, and Andrew Woolfolk collaborated to create this rich, eclectic sound, with a plethora of instruments and the goal of uniting all in peace and harmony. As we all know, this universally appreciated group has received numerous accolades for their relentless leadership in music, and I am honored to celebrate their Lifetime Achievement Award.

As one-half of the six-time GRAMMYwinning duo OutKast, Big Boi performed the group’s chart-topping hit “The Way You Move” with Earth, Wind & Fire at the 46th GRAMMY Awards in 2004. The following year he was featured on “This Is How I Feel,” a

track included on Earth, Wind & Fire’s album Illumination. Big Boi’s solo work includes 2012’s Vicious Lies And Dangerous Rumors. In 2015 he released Big Grams, a collaborative album with electronic rock duo Phantogram.


Valerie Bailey

Shelly Clark White

Susie Johnson

Congratulations from me and the family, Babe! Wow! Yet another recognition of your wonder-full, life-giving body of work. You are a true example of God’s light and love, on and off of the stage...You inspire us all!

Maurice and Verdine! Congratulations!! Words cannot express how proud we are of you!! Thank you for sharing your amazing vision, incredible talents and inspiring the entire world!! From your children, brothers, sisters and family members!! We love you!!

Ralph...our families are so proud of you for this lifetime achievement! Congratulations! This is an amazing event, and your sons and I are “Very Proud” to be a part of this milestone in your life...We “love and appreciate you” as an artist, husband and father.

Love All-Ways!

Congratulations & love from some of your friends & fans on this prestigious recognition! Rhonda Bedikian, Jeff Bender, Tina Cole, Tony Cochrane, Ray Crossley, The Emotions – Wanda, Pam & Sheila, Michael Garbe, Siedah Garrett & Erik Nuri, Douglas Gibbs, Tony Haynes, Pam Johnson, Ronald & Toni Johnson, Jay King, Freddie Ravel, Ken & Elizabeth Rose, The Scarboroughs - Alton, Candace, Marc, Tanya, Relana and Kurt, The Vaughns – Wanda, Wayne, Wendi, Wyann, Witny and Warren


Lifetime Achievement Award

Herbie Hancock

By Chick Corea

92

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

JIM MCCRARY/ REDFERNS

H

erbie Hancock was on the New York City jazz scene making some young musical noise a few years before I arrived in 1959, fresh out of high school in Chelsea, Mass. I remember seeing him live for the first time when I went to the old Birdland at 52nd St. and Broadway. It was a Monday night. Mondays were the jam session nights at this venerable old club, and there was Herbie onstage with Joe Chambers and some horn players sitting in. I distinctly remember being amazed by the free and creative approach he and the band were taking with the standards they were playing. They were changing the rules and not asking for a license to do it. Right away, I connected with Herbie’s sense of adventure and musical exploration, which I myself had just begun realizing. The amazing thing about this adventure of his is that for a whole lifetime the adventure hasn’t stopped. Miles set a powerful example for all of us — and Herbie was an integral part of that groundbreaking quintet that changed the face of jazz and music in general. But he has taken it several steps further by making full use of every new keyboard and sonic possibility, bridging new musical forms to combine the richness of our music’s past with the unknown of the new creative ideas from his seemingly infinite imagination. With his ongoing creativeness and successes in movie scores and both pop and classical music, he’s certainly never been afraid to explore and to change — and does so frequently and unabashedly. From his first solo albums Takin’ Off, Empyrean Isles and Maiden Voyage, to his reach-out-to-the-world collaborations such as Possibilities, River: The Joni Letters and The Imagine Project, his ever-evolving musical creativeness continues to inspire and soothe souls the world over.

Ever since I’ve known Herbie, he has always inspired me and the music world to be free and reach for greater heights of accomplishment. His validation of the artist’s imagination and his demonstration of its ultimate purpose through the amazing music he has created — and continues to create — are a touchstone for every future culture to aspire to. The world without Herbie Hancock is unimaginable. His contributions to

music and to humanity on this planet are immeasurable. Congratulations, Herbie. You are simply the best! Chick Corea is a 22-time GRAMMY winner, including two wins for 2014. His extensive discography includes 1978’s An Evening With Herbie Hancock & Chick Corea: In Concert, a live album featuring both artists playing acoustic piano. In 2015 Corea released Two, a collaboration with GRAMMY winner Béla Fleck.


CONGRATULATIONS

HERBIE

on the 2016 Recording AcademyÂŽ Lifetime Achievement Award! With love, your LA Phil family


Lifetime Achievement Award

Jefferson Airplane

By Patti Smith

94

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CEA/CACHE AGENCY

I

t is said we become whom we love. We who loved Jefferson Airplane shook off our postwar skins, said farewell to the ’50s and marched through the ’60s toward the new Jerusalem. It was a Blakean city that was as much a state of mind as architecture, one of unbridled freedom built on the ashes of nationalism, conformity and materialism. San Francisco was the emblematic meeting ground. Jefferson Airplane, the premiere standard-bearers of the Summer of Love, ushered us through its psychedelic gates. They were masters of their own ship, and their words and music reflected all the possibilities, kaleidoscopic chaos and tribal energy of the sea they were navigating. Their modular personnel issued the clarion call of Surrealistic Pillow, and it remains a testament to their depth. The core band of Jefferson Airplane entered the scene as a group of equals, exemplifying the electrifying rise in cultural consciousness. Paul Kantner’s science-fictional reaches for the cosmos. Jorma Kaukonen’s plugged-in virtuoso fingerstyle folk blues. Jack Casady’s fluid and stalwart bass lines entwining the propulsive creativity of Spencer Dryden’s drums. And there was vocal anarchy in the midst of mystical beauty, projected through the soaring combination of Grace Slick’s acerbic wit and fearless charisma and the romantic purity of Marty Balin. How Surrealistic Pillow served in the transformation of an entire generation is well documented. For myself, a 20-year-old girl in rural New Jersey, hearing the voice of Grace Slick on the

radio was a revelation. “Somebody To Love” and “White Rabbit” both contained the emotional trajectory of an aria. Make no mistake; we all owe her a debt. She was like no other and opened a door that will never close again. On my worktable is a small orange button with the words “Jefferson Airplane loves you” in green. It is nearly half a century old. How fortunate we were to be loved by them. Their banner was also our own. They gave us anthems of love. They gave us instructions for action — feed your head! Got to revolution! And within

Crown Of Creation, a requiem for a time all too brief. Yet their message enduringly calls, for all who listen, to unite once more through the collective consciousness of love. Three-time GRAMMY nominee Patti Smith recorded Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” on her 2007 covers album, Twelve. She’s nominated this year in the Best Spoken Word Album category for her reading of Jo Nesbø’s Blood On Snow. Smith’s latest book is M Train, a New York Times Top Books of 2015 selection.



Lifetime Achievement Award

Linda Ronstadt

By Aaron Neville

96

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

HENRY DILTZ/CACHE AGENCY

L

inda Ronstadt is one of the premier singers of any time, and also a beautiful person. I’m so glad to have her music to listen to. It soothes me on long flights. From her songs with the Stone Poneys and her songs with Nelson Riddle to her mariachi music and Cry Like A Rainstorm — Howl Like The Wind, you can feel every emotion. I’m thankful that we are on the planet at the same time and it was an honor and a privilege to record with her. She’s a strong singer who could belt it out, and then come down to the sweetest most intricate part of her voice. It’s like her voice is a painting meant to be here forever, and she made it so easy to sing with her. She told me that our voices were married. The first song we actually sang together was “Ave Maria” in harmony. The Neville Brothers were playing at Pete Fountain’s club during the World’s Fair in 1984 in New Orleans. After her show with Riddle, Linda came to see us. Someone told us that she was in the audience and I dedicated a song to her and called her up to sing some doo-wop. She told the press that it was the highlight of her tour. She felt like Cinderella at the ball because we were her favorite band. When I asked her to come back to New Orleans to join myself and Allen Toussaint for our annual concert to raise money for New Orleans Artists Against Hunger and Homelessness, a nonprofit I founded with Toussaint in 1985, she quickly agreed. We have so much respect for each other’s voices. She and Peter Asher said that we should record together, and now our songs are a part of history. I can

remember being at the studio to record with Linda and I couldn’t wait. I had fallen in love with the songs that we were going to record; I was ecstatic. It was five years from the night I called her onstage to sing with us in New Orleans. George Massenburg was the engineer and Asher and Steve Tyrell co-produced. Linda and I sang “Don’t Know Much” and when we finished I said to her, “Meet you at the GRAMMYs.” I was joking, and yet not joking because it was that great a song, and also a great performance. So, like I said, the rest is history.

I don’t know much, but I know that Linda deserves to be honored with The Recording Academy’s Lifetime Achievement Award. A co-founder of the GRAMMY-winning band the Neville Brothers, Aaron Neville has garnered four GRAMMYs, including two with Linda Ronstadt for Best Pop Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal for “Don’t Know Much” (1989) and “All My Life” (1990). Neville’s 1966 solo hit “Tell It Like It Is” was inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame in 2015.


“Linda lives in a place where art trumps commerce…where hard work and integrity trump fame and failure. She never wanted to be a star, she just wanted to make good music.” - Glenn Frey

Congratulations on your 2016 Recording Academy ® Life�me Achievement Award

KING, HOLMES, PATERNO & SORIANO, LLP


Lifetime Achievement Award

Run DMC

By Ice Cube

98

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

EBET ROBERTS/REDFERNS

I

became a rap music fan in 1979 when the Sugarhill Gang released “Rapper’s Delight.” I was also a fan of groups like Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five and Afrika Bambaataa & Soulsonic Force. Although those groups did great records, I could not relate to them as much as I could relate to three guys out of Queens, N.Y., who looked like the older homies from around my block. Black hats, black leather jackets and that confident attitude. The first time I heard “It’s Like That” I almost had a seizure it was so good, and on the B-side it was “Sucker M.C.’s.” My homie Sammy Dennis wore out his speakers playing that song relentlessly on repeat. By 1983 Run DMC released their second single, “Hard Times” and “Jam-Master Jay.” Then I knew there was a God and I had found my new favorite group. Run DMC were the first group that I obsessed over. Their debut album, Run-D.M.C., was the first album I ever saved up to buy with my own money. As a matter of fact, me and my friend Ronnie bought the record together. I would keep it four days; he would keep it three days. Our parents thought we were crazy when we took all the shoestrings out of our shoes. Run was my favorite MC. I thought he had 1,000 percent more swagger than any rapper of today. Ronnie loved DMC’s voice. He said nobody could ever sound like the Devastating Mic Controller. I remember the day that Dr. Dre played me the Raising Hell album. We knew we had to step our game up. Run DMC took hip-hop to rock star status. They showed us how to do everything, especially how to perform with songs like “Here We Go.” They showed us if you had a dope DJ you didn’t need no band, and that rappers from the hood could be the Kings of

Run DMC’s Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, Joseph “Rev. Run” Simmons and Jason “Jam Master Jay” Mizell

Rock too. I wouldn’t be a rapper today if Run DMC didn’t show me how to do it with class. In 1985 I went around to every movie theater I could find looking for a movie called Krush Groove because Run DMC were in it. In 1987 I saw them perform in Phoenix. After the show we went by their hotel and DMC needed a ride to the store. After buying 40 ounces with DMC, I thought I died and went to heaven. A few years back I had a bucket list moment when BET asked me to do a cypher with my two sons and Run with his two sons. There’s nothing like being on a rooftop in Brooklyn with a little alone time with one of my heroes. I had a chance to thank him for inspiring me to be great and showing me that it’s cool to rap about the world around you. It’s been a blessing getting to know these guys over the years as their

peers. I remember when someone said hip-hop was dead. I didn’t believe them until I heard that they killed Jam Master Jay. Then I believed them. A part of hip-hop died that night, but the spirit lives on. I will always love and be totally indebted to and grateful to the phenomenal Kings from Queens, Run DMC. (Jam Master Jay was shot and killed in Queens, N.Y., on Oct. 30, 2002.) Ice Cube is a rapper, producer, actor, and filmmaker. He is an original member of 2016 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees N.W.A, who were the subject of the 2015 biopic and box-office smash Straight Outta Compton. His solo work includes hit albums such as AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted and Death Certificate, and he recently starred in the film Ride Along 2.



Trustees Award

John Cage

By Thurston Moore

100

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

NEW YORK TIMES CO./GETTY IMAGES

L

ike his father, John Cage was an inventor, a moniker he preferred to that of composer, and one bestowed upon him by his music composition and theory teacher Arnold Schoenberg. It was Schoenberg, who had slight regard for his student as composer but considerable feelings for him as genius, to whom Cage had promised to devote his life to music. This promise of devotion to creative light and discipline is concurrent to Cage’s profound attraction to Buddhist philosophy. It is what defines him as the most significant pioneer in 20th century experimental music. When Cage introduced the notion of nonhierarchical interdisciplinary performance in 1952 at Black Mountain College, he not only created the first audacious “happening” event but also the liberation of the artist to employ his or her most organic means of “play” within the discipline of the score. This unification of both academic and wild creativity is — alongside the writing ideologies of Jack Kerouac, Diane di Prima et al., abstract expressionist visual art of Franz Kline, Lee Krasner et al., modern dance of Cage’s life partner Merce Cunningham, bebop jazz of Thelonious Monk, and the avant-garde jazz of Sun Ra and later John Coltrane — the true template for all that is radical and challenging in music and art today. John Cage, Sept. 5, 1912 – Aug. 12, 1992, is an influence nonpareil for perpetual generations of music and language, inadvertently creating a blueprint for the spirit of rock and roll, a reflection of nature and the human condition in both rebelliousness and meditation, a music which moves where the spirit takes it.

Thurston Moore is a co-founder of indie rock pioneers Sonic Youth, whose sound melded free-form noise experimentalism, post-punk avant-garde and no wave. Their 1999 album, SYR 4: Goodbye 20th Century, featured a cover of John Cage’s

“Six.” Moore has released four solo albums, including 2014’s The Best Day. He is a current member of Chelsea Light Moving, an alt-rock project referencing avant-garde artists and the 1960s counterculture movement.


a

Heartfelt congratulations to on receiving a 2016 Special Merit Award from The Recording Academy ÂŽ The John Cage Trust and

ASCAP Bard College Bennet H. Grutman C.F. Peters Crown Point Press Foundation for Contemporary Arts J.P. Morgan Private Bank Larson Associates Margarete Roeder Gallery Merce Cunningham Trust New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center Northwestern University Libraries Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Wesleyan University Press


Lifetime Trustees Achievement Award Award

Fred Foster

By Dolly Parton

102

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Fred Foster with Fred Carter (left) and Willie Nelson (right)

great hits. He also produced folks like Boots Randolph, Willie Nelson, Ray Stevens, Al Hirt, and many more that I don’t have time to mention here. Fred also co-wrote “Me And Bobby McGee” with Kris Kristofferson, a fact unknown by many. That song has been recorded by so many artists like Roger Miller, Janis Joplin and even me. It’s only fitting that Fred has been inducted into the Musicians Hall of Fame & Museum, as well as so many other awards and accolades that he has received through the years. I am proud to be one of the people to congratulate

Fred on receiving the 2016 Trustees Award from The Recording Academy. I have heard Fred Foster referred to as a genius all through the years and I couldn’t agree more. As far as my own thoughts, I will sum it up by using the title of one of my own songs. Fred, I will always love you. A seven-time GRAMMY winner, Dolly Parton was honored with a Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011. She has two recordings inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame, “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You.”

M ICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES/GETTY IMAGES

I

am happy to have the chance to say a few words about Fred Foster. He was like a foster parent (and a good one) to me when I first moved to Nashville in the early ’60s … just a teenage country sow’s ear that Fred tried to make into a silk purse. He never quite succeeded in that, but it was not from a lack of trying. He spent lots of time and money trying to groom me for the rockabilly genre, recording songs with me like the remake of “Happy, Happy Birthday Baby.” He even got me a spot on “American Bandstand.” I was a fish out of water at that time in that field, but Fred saw that after a short time and recorded me country. “Dumb Blonde” is still one of my most popular songs. It was my first chart record with Fred. Fred recorded my first country album, called Hello, I’m Dolly. It was Fred’s title and a clever one, I might add. He wrote the liner notes on the back of that album and to this day it’s one of the best album liners I’ve ever read. He began it by saying, “Sometimes you just know.” Well, Fred had a way of just knowing … just knowing talent when he saw it and just knowing exactly what to do with it. I am proud to be part of the discoveries that Fred made and nourished. He not only was the head of Monument Records and Combine Music Publishing, but was a great record producer as well. He recorded and produced Roy Orbison and his string of



Trustees Award

Chris Strachwitz

By Country Joe McDonald

104

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

J OHN FAGO

I

n the summer of 1965, having not prepared copy for a magazine I was publishing, it occurred to me that we could make a “talking issue” in the form of a 7-inch EP. One partner in the magazine knew Chris Strachwitz and said we could make the recording at his house. A small group of us went to Chris’ living room and gathered around a microphone hanging from a light fixture. This skiffle band recorded a few songs, one of them being “I-FeelLike-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag.” Chris offered to handle the publishing for my song in exchange for the recording. He administered the publishing for 12 years. The name Country Joe & The Fish was invented for the label of that EP. We sold 100 copies for 50 cents each at a local bookstore. Then four years later, I sang “I-Feel-Like-I’mFixin’-To-Die Rag” at the Woodstock festival. It was featured on the record and in the Academy Award-winning documentary Woodstock. Chris and I got some large royalties. I used the royalties to purchase a house and Chris bought a building in El Cerrito, Calif., to house Arhoolie Records. I went on to record hundreds more songs and make 35 albums. He went on to record thousands of songs and hundreds of albums by American roots music artists. Arhoolie Records brought the sound of American roots music to a national and international audience that never knew this style of music existed. Music recorded by Chris Strachwitz is now

the fabric and foundation for American popular music. Chris helped expose artists such as Mance Lipscomb, Charlie Musselwhite, Clifton Chenier, Flaco Jiménez, and Cajun band BeauSoleil. He’s been as important to the preservation of authentic American music as Alan Lomax. The money from Arhoolie’s releases supported the careers of hundreds of musicians for the next 50 years. It is hard to believe that it all happened just like that and that 50 years have passed. And now The Recording Academy

is presenting Chris Strachwitz with a Trustees Award to acknowledge the pioneering contributions he has made to American music. Congratulations Chris on a job well done. Country Joe & The Fish have been called the leading left-wing band of the ’60s. “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixin’-To-Die Rag” became an anthem of Vietnam War protests. McDonald continues to write and perform and has become a leading expert on Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.



Technical GRAMMY Award

EMT

By Chuck Ainlay

106

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION OF EMT STUDIOTECHNIK

I

n today’s age of digital workstation recording and mixing, it’s difficult to understand the immense impact EMT’s plate reverb made when it was first introduced in 1957. Today’s engineers and producers have at their disposal plugins that emulate just about every conceivable effect at the click of a mouse. In the late ’50s, the only effects were the ones engineers could dream up with the limited technology of the day. Elektro-Mess-Technik, or EMT as it is more popularly known, is a German company founded by Wilhelm Franz in 1940. They built professional audio products and were best known for their high-end turntables. EMT turntables established the gold standard in performance and reliability and were used throughout the world in recording studios and radio stations. The introduction of the 140 plate reverb was an overnight success and the sound of recordings changed dramatically. Fast-forward to the mid’70s when I experienced it firsthand, the EMT plate was still the most commonly used artificial reverb. I clearly remember the first time I turned up the knob to the EMT 140 plate and I heard that shimmering warmth of reverb wrapping around the vocal and making the drum kit explode. To me, it was close to heaven. Learning how to not overuse it was difficult indeed. In 1976 the company introduced the first digital reverb, which was designated the EMT 250. The chief engineer who spearheaded the development was Karl Otto Bäder who worked closely with Barry Blesser in developing the actual program. The robotic looking interface was the

most unusual thing I’d ever seen in a recording studio. In those days, that’s saying something! Looking back, the EMT 250 was probably the first digital multi-effects unit, as there were delays and chorus effects in addition to the stunning reverb program. To this day, the 250 has remained the most coveted of all of the digital reverbs. The unfailing appeal of the EMT 140 and 250 reverbs is evidenced by the recently modeled versions on the

UAD platform by Universal Audio. This brings these timeless effects full circle into today’s modern workstation age of recording. Chuck Ainlay is a multiple GRAMMY winning producer, engineer and mixer who has worked with Miranda Lambert, Lee Ann Womack, Willie Nelson, and Lionel Richie, among others. Ainlay is a current member of the Producers & Engineers Wing Advisory Council.



Technical GRAMMY Award

Dr. Harvey Fletcher

By Peter Asher

108

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

COURTESY OF SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY O F UTAH

O

ne morning in London in the late 1950s, I vividly remember excitedly positioning my radio 8 feet to the right of the family television, tuning them both in carefully and balancing the test tone being transmitted over these two separate channels. This was in anticipation of hearing “stereophony” for the very first time in my life, and it was thrilling beyond measure. The BBC was conducting experimental broadcasts and I thought at the time they were breaking wholly new ground. Little did I know back then that Dr. Harvey Fletcher had pioneered binaural recording and playback more than 20 years earlier, or that stereo sound far superior to what I heard in our living room that memorable day had been broadcast in New York in 1934, leaving the audience (according to The New York Times) “mystified” and “often terrified” — just how most of us probably feel halfway through a mix. And this was only one of Harvey Fletcher’s extraordinary feats. Somehow possessed of the intellectually contortional skills to be both a rigorous scientist and a devout Mormon, his remarkable brain contributed greatly to our knowledge in so many areas. From his work on the famous oil-drop experiment (for which he should properly have shared in the Nobel Prize awarded to Robert Andrews Millikan) to his work in anechoic (echoless) chambers, his leadership at Bell Telephone Laboratories and his commitment to Brigham Young University, his achievements were unequalled in importance and effect. For our industry in particular, his research in electrical sound recording moved the science of high-fidelity binaural recording (a method creating a 3-D stereo sound sensation for the

listener) forward by decades — he made more than 100 stereo recordings with conductor Leopold Stokowski starting as far back as 1931. And without the Fletcher-Munson curve (which delineates the various sensitivities of the human ear to different frequencies at different volume levels) we would not have had an excuse for the glorious “loudness” button on our boom boxes! Dr. Fletcher’s many honors (and this new one) are beyond well-deserved. When he was elected an honorary fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 1949 he was only the second person to be so named, after Thomas Edison 20 years earlier. And many more awards followed. For his work on telephone sound, on

hearing aids and for his advancement of science in general, Dr. Fletcher needs to be much more widely recognized (and not only by his peers) as a massively important contributor to the modern world in which we live — and listen. A current Recording Academy Trustee, Peter Asher is a three-time GRAMMY winner, including two wins for Producer Of The Year (1977, 1989). Following his recording career as one-half of the British pop duo Peter And Gordon, Asher produced recordings for artists such as Neil Diamond, Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor, and Robin Williams. In 2015 Asher was named Commander of the Order of the British Empire.



Music Educator Award

Phillip Riggs

By Sarah Stafford

110

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

ALEXANDRA LA NE

I

was lucky enough to be a student of Phillip Riggs. Mr. Riggs has left a legacy that I don’t think he realizes. His bands have consistently been the best in North Carolina, but that pales in comparison to who this man really is, what he has really done and why there’s nobody better to receive this award. Mr. Riggs makes students feel empowered, worthwhile, confident, and important. He not only taught us to fall in love with music and performing, but also grace, humility, and how to win and lose with class. These are traits we have carried into our adult lives, and you can see that through the numerous careers Mr. Riggs’ students have pursued. He inspired us to become military lieutenants, nurses, doctors, NASA engineers, lawyers, teachers, police officers, and pastors. We’ve watched him tearfully and beautifully lead a funeral for a fallen student. He grew his hair out numerous times for the charity Locks of Love and challenged us all to do the same. He always led donation drives for Toys for Tots. He spoke to the custodians the same way he spoke to the superintendents. Mr. Riggs always leaves people feeling better than he found them. He became an ordained minister at the request of his former students so he could preside over their weddings. Many of us have even named our children after him. Mr. Riggs has given us not only the gift of music, but the gift of a future. You see, many of his students grew up in low-income areas, with single parents and little passion. He gave these students something to live for.

So thank you, Mr. Riggs, from the bottom of my heart, for not only helping us earn numerous trophies, ribbons, grand champion awards, and superior ratings, but most of all, for changing the world.

Sarah Stafford is a former student of Phillip Riggs and currently is a band director at Granite Falls Middle School in Granite Falls, N.C.



Mild Lyrics Mild Suggestive Themes

© 2015 Ubisoft Entertainment. All Rights Reserved. Just Dance, Ubisoft, and the Ubisoft logo are trademarks of Ubisoft Entertainment in the US and/or other countries. Nintendo trademarks and copyrights are properties of Nintendo. “PlayStation” and the “PS” Family logo are registered trademarks of Sony Computer Entertainment America Inc. *THIS CONTROLLER APP REQUIRES PURCHASE OF JUST DANCE® 2016 FOR PLAYSTATION®4 SYSTEM, Wii U™, OR XBOX ONE. APP NOT COMPATIBLE WITH ANY OTHER GAME OR PLATFORMS.



C HAL K IE DAV IE S/G E T TY IMAG E S

C HR IS G AB R IN/R E D FE R NS

Blondie

2016

The Pretenders

GRAMMY Hall Of Fame

B

By Paul Grein

ands in which women were out front, or at least equal to their male colleagues, became much more prevalent in the 1970s and 1980s. So it stands to reason that recordings by four such bands were inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame this year. Joan Jett & The Blackhearts were honored for their 1982 smash “I Love Rock ’N Roll.” The Pretenders, fronted by Chrissie Hynde, were recognized for their 1980 debut album, Pretenders. Blondie, fronted by Debbie Harry, were saluted for their 1979 pop/disco hit “Heart Of Glass.” Fleetwood Mac, in which Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie were full creative partners with the guys in the band, were cited for their eponymous 1975 breakthrough album. Jett had been a member of the all-female rock band the Runaways, who made some noise in 1976 with “Cherry Bomb.” “I Love Rock ’N Roll” was co-written by Jake Hooker and Alan Merrill, both of the band Arrows, who recorded the song in 1975. Jett & The Blackhearts’ tough-as-nails version proved that femalefronted groups could rock every bit as hard as male groups.

114

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

The Pretenders and Blondie both emerged from the new wave scene of the late ’70s. The Pretenders received a GRAMMY nomination for Best New Artist for their work on Pretenders, which spawned the hit “Brass In Pocket (I’m Special).” Of the many pop and rock artists who cut disco records in the late ’70s, Blondie are one of the few whose nod to the dance floor didn’t seem to hurt their credibility. If anything, it enhanced their cool factor. Fleetwood Mac spawned the hits “Over My Head,” “Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win)” and “Say You Love Me.” The band had been turning out albums since 1968, but this was their first with the classic lineup that propelled them to stardom. The band’s 1977 follow-up, Rumours, was an even bigger success. It was inducted into the Hall in 2003. An all-female group from an earlier era was also acknowledged this year. The Andrews Sisters were cited for their iconic 1942 hit “Don’t Sit Under The Apple Tree (With Anyone Else But Me),” which they performed in the film Private Buckaroo. The song seems impossibly innocent today, but its admonition to remain faithful


Sony Music/Legacy Recordings Salutes Our 2016 Recording Academy ÂŽ Lifetime Achievement Award Recipients.

Earth, Wind & Fire Herbie Hancock Jefferson Airplane Run DMC


G AB AR C HIV E /R E D FE R NS

2016 GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Inductees

Fleetwood Mac

resonated at a time when millions of couples were separated by World War II. (Vic Schoen’s orchestra plays the brassy, swinging arrangement.) The sisters gave the song a feminist twist. They are the ones heading off to serve their country, telling their beaus to stay true “till I come marching home.” It’s the trio’s fourth Hall Of Fame recording, which is more than any other all-female group in history. (The Supremes are runners-up, with three.) Twenty-six recordings were inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame this year, which pushes the total number of recordings in the Hall past the 1,000 mark (to 1,013, to be precise). Pretenders is one of three debut albums to be saluted this year. The others are Randy Newman (1968) and Roberta Flack’s First Take (1969). Newman’s album included his oftrecorded “I Think It’s Going To Rain Today.” Flack’s album included “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” (which became a smash three years after the album’s release thanks to being featured in the film Play Misty For Me). It won GRAMMYs for Record and Song Of The Year. This is Flack’s second induction, following “Killing Me Softly With His Song.”

The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame was created in 1973 to honor recordings of lasting significance that were issued prior to the 1958 inception of the GRAMMY Awards. Consisting of more than 1,000 recordings, the Hall is now open to any recording that has been in release for at least 25 years. New submissions are voted on annually by a special member committee of experts and historians drawn from all branches of the recording arts. Their choices are subject to final approval by the Trustees of The Recording Academy. The GRAMMY Hall Of Fame is unique in that it is open to all genres of music — popular as well as specialized forms. AMERICAN BEAUTY Grateful Dead Warner Bros. (1970) Album THE BASEMENT TAPES Bob Dylan And The Band Columbia (1975) Album BOOM BOOM John Lee Hooker Vee-Jay (1962) Single CELEBRATION Kool & The Gang De-Lite (1980) Single

Joan Jett & The Blackhearts

116

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

DENIS O’REGAN/CORBIS IMAGES

COLD SWEAT — PART 1 James Brown And The Famous Flames King (1967) Single THE DARK END OF THE STREET James Carr Goldwax (1967) Single


CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF OUR NOMINEES

SONY MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT


Sir Douglas Quintet

ANT HO NY BAR B OZA/G E T TY IMAG E S

DON’T SIT UNDER THE APPLE TREE (WITH ANYONE ELSE BUT ME) Andrews Sisters Decca (1942) Single ELLA AND LOUIS Ella Fitzgerald And Louis Armstrong Verve (1956) Album GAB ARCHIVE/RE D FE R NS

Roberta Flack

Six of the recordings from this year’s class were the artists’ initial hit singles. In addition to the aforementioned songs by Blondie and Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, they are Fats Domino’s 1949 R&B hit “The Fat Man,” Little Eva’s 1962 hit “The LocoMotion,” the Zombies’ 1964 hit “She’s Not There,” and Sir Douglas Quintet’s 1965 hit “She’s About A Mover.” Domino and Dave Bartholomew co-wrote “The Fat Man,” which introduced Domino’s boogie-woogie style. Gerry Goffin and Carole King co-wrote “The Loco-Motion,” a simple but undeniable rock and roll classic. Rod Argent, the

HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES

Lead Belly

118

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Zombies’ organist, wrote “She’s Not There,” one of the most musically sophisticated of the British Invasion hits. Doug Sahm, the leader of Sir Douglas Quintet, wrote “She’s About A Mover,” which was many listeners’ first taste of Tex-Mex. These are the first inductions for all of these artists except Domino. It’s his fourth. Two Louis Armstrong recordings were inducted this year, which pushes his total number of entries in the Hall to a record-setting 17. He had been tied for most entries in the Hall with the Beatles, who are now in second place, with 15. Armstrong scored this year with “(What Did I Do To Be So) Black And Blue,” an early (1929) song about racism, and Ella And Louis, a 1956 collaboration with Ella Fitzgerald. “(What Did I Do To Be So) Black And Blue” originated in the musical “Hot Chocolates,” in which Armstrong made his Broadway debut. (Edith Wilson performed the song in the show.) Fats Waller co-wrote the songs for the musical with Harry Brooks and Andy Razaf. (The show also spawned Waller’s signature song, “Ain’t Misbehavin’,” which was inducted into the Hall in 1984.) Armstrong sings “… Black And Blue” with a weary sense of dejection due to the oppressive racism prevalent in that era. His recording, credited to Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra, was

THE FAT MAN Fats Domino Imperial (1949) Single FIRST TAKE Roberta Flack Atlantic (1969) Album FLEETWOOD MAC Fleetwood Mac Reprise (1975) Album FOR THE LOVE OF MONEY The O’Jays Philadelphia International (1974) Single HEART OF GLASS Blondie Chrysalis (1979) Single I LOVE ROCK ’N ROLL Joan Jett & The Blackhearts Boardwalk (1982) Single THE LOCO-MOTION Little Eva Dimension (1962) Single LUSH LIFE John Coltrane Prestige (1961) Album



G IL L E S PE TAR D/R E D FE R NS

James Carr

released a full decade before Billie Holiday’s “Strange Fruit,” another song about racism decades ahead of the civil rights movement. That classic was inducted in 1978. Ella And Louis is the second pairing of these jazz legends to be saluted. Their 1958 recording of Porgy And Bess was inducted in 2001. This is Fitzgerald’s eighth recording in the Hall, which extends her lead as the female artist with the most entries. (Judy Garland and Holiday are tied for second place, with six each.) Ella And Louis is one of two collaborations to be inducted this year. The other is The Basement Tapes, which consists primarily of songs recorded in 1967 by Bob Dylan And The Band. The album was belatedly released in 1975. It’s the ninth induction for Dylan; the third for the Band. The album has become a touchstone recording for alt-country and Americana artists. Several other of this year’s inducted recordings have proved influential. “Cold Sweat — Part 1” by James Brown And The Famous Flames (1967) has been called “the first funk masterpiece.” The Grateful Dead’s American Beauty (1970) helped form the template for acoustic jam bands. The Dead’s album, which blended rock, country, folk, and bluegrass, spawned the hit “Truckin’.” It’s the group’s second induction, following Workingman’s Dead. “Cold Sweat …” is Brown’s seventh. Two vastly different recordings by top R&B groups were inducted. The O’Jays

120

K ING CO L L EC T IO N/PHOTOSHOT/G E T TY IMAG E S

The Zombies

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

were honored for “For The Love Of Money” (1973), a warning about greed that reached more listeners than any Sunday sermon. (The song’s title comes from a famous Bible verse, 1 Timothy 6:10: “For the love of money is the root of all evil. …”) Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff produced the smash and co-wrote it with Anthony Jackson, who played the killer bass line. It’s arguably the funkiest of the many “Philly soul” hits. It’s the O’Jays’ second induction, following “Love Train.” Kool & The Gang were recognized for the warm and ebullient “Celebration,” which has been a fixture at parties, wedding receptions and bar mitzvahs ever since it was released in 1980. Brazilian jazz musician Eumir Deodato produced the smash in association with the group. It’s the group’s first induction. John Coltrane and Miles Davis each landed their 10th Hall Of Fame entries, a total topped by just two jazz artists: Armstrong (17) and Duke Ellington (13). Coltrane scored with Lush Life, which contains some of his first recordings as sole leader. The sessions were recorded in 1957–1958, but the album wasn’t released until 1961. In 1963 Coltrane re-recorded the famed title track with vocalist Johnny Hartman. That recording was inducted into the Hall in 2000. The Miles Davis Quintet (which featured Ron Carter, Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, and Tony Williams) were cited for the 1967 album Miles Smiles. The album helped define the post-bop progressive jazz style.

MARGARITAVILLE Jimmy Buffett ABC (1977) Single MILES SMILES Miles Davis Quintet Columbia (1967) Album PRETENDERS The Pretenders Sire (1980) Album RANDY NEWMAN Randy Newman Reprise (1968) Album ROCK ISLAND LINE Lead Belly Asch (1942) Single SHE’S ABOUT A MOVER Sir Douglas Quintet Tribe (1965) Single SHE’S NOT THERE The Zombies Parrot (1964) Single THIS TRAIN Sister Rosetta Tharpe Decca (1939) Single (WHAT DID I DO TO BE SO) BLACK AND BLUE Louis Armstrong And His Orchestra Okeh (1929) Single YOU ARE SO BEAUTIFUL Joe Cocker A&M (1974) Single



122

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Jimmy Buffett scored with his 1977 hit “Margaritaville,” a jaunty sing-a-long with an undercurrent of melancholy. James Carr was cited for “The Dark End Of The Street,” an old-school R&B hit from 1967 that ranks among the best Muscle Shoals recordings. These are the first inductions for both artists. This year’s inducted recordings span 53 years of music history, from “(What Did I Do To Be So) Black And Blue” to “I Love Rock ’N Roll.” As usual, the recordings have little in common beyond quality, impact and staying power. So what have we learned this year? The love of money can get you in serious trouble, but loving rock and roll is all good. So put another dime in the jukebox, baby. Paul Grein is a veteran music journalist and historian whose work has appeared in Billboard and the Los Angeles Times and online at Yahoo.com and Hitsdailydouble.com. Visit www.grammy.org/awards to see the complete list of inducted recordings.

MIC HAE L O C HS AR C HIV E S/G E T TY IMAG E S

The O’Jays

GAB ARCHIVE/REDFERNS

Three songs drawing on train imagery had their tickets punched. Sister Rosetta Tharpe was recognized for her 1939 recording of the traditional gospel song “This Train.” Lead Belly was cited for his 1942 recording “Rock Island Line.” Little Eva was saluted for the aforementioned “The Loco-Motion.” This is Tharpe’s second induction, following “Strange Things Happening Every Day.” It’s the fourth for folk legend Lead Belly. “Rock Island Line,” which was subsequently recorded by such artists as Johnny Cash and Lonnie Donegan, was influential in the folk movement of the 1950s. Joe Cocker’s poignant “You Are So Beautiful,” released in late 1974, was voted into the Hall. The late Billy Preston co-wrote the song and recorded it earlier that year as a soulful ballad with gospel accents. Cocker made it more dramatic and concise (his single clocks in at just 2:39). It’s one of the best examples of the emotional intensity of Cocker’s work. It’s his second induction, following his equally transforming cover version of the Beatles’ “With A Little Help From My Friends.” John Lee Hooker was recognized for his 1962 recording “Boom Boom,” his only recording ever to crack the pop chart. It’s his second induction, following “Boogie Chillun.”

AMES KRIEG SMANN/MIC HAE L O C HS AR C HIV E S/G E T TY IMAG E S

Andrews Sisters

Little Eva



WHEREVER THEIR MUSIC TAKES YOU WE’LL BE WAITING WITH OPEN DOORS.

HILTON.COM

GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards®, and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2016 The Recording Academy.


“GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2016 The Recording Academy”


126

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


Red-Carpet

Ready

Fitness, hair, makeup, and fashion all play into the art of crafting the perfect GRAMMY red-carpet look By Shannon Edwards

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards 127


Madonna at the 57th GRAMMY Awards in 2015 JEFF VESPA/ WIREIMAGE.COM

128

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

usic’s biggest stars. The hair, the makeup, the fashion, the glamour. These elements can only add up to one thing: the GRAMMY Awards red carpet, which will be celebrated with the first official CBS red-carpet show this year. For attending GRAMMY winners and nominees, the excitement and anticipation of the GRAMMY red carpet are timeless. What has changed in recent years, however, are the enhanced beauty and health rituals both men and women undertake, as well as the glowing spotlight that social media, tastemakers and pop culture websites shine on the ceremony. Given the vast media coverage of the GRAMMY red carpet, dissecting everything from hair and makeup to color schemes and accessories is almost as exciting as walking the actual red carpet. “It’s always a fun time watching the stars arrive to see who will wear what, and then what new viral memes will develop based on their looks,” says Lisa Sugar, Popsugar founder and editor-in-chief. With this increased media focus and heightened levels of preparation, the GRAMMY red carpet has evolved into a celebration of stylistic artistry and individuality. Aside from a chance to craft the perfect red-carpet look, the modern fanfare of the GRAMMY red carpet affords artists an opportunity to represent their distinct personal brand. While specific preparation regimens may vary, a combination of health, fitness, styling, and beauty rituals makes it achievable for artists to radiate on the red carpet for Music’s Biggest Night. Few industries understand the benefits of being strong and fit more than the music industry. Spending hours performing onstage and weathering the fast-paced, frenetic lifestyle takes not only a high level of stamina but a commitment to health that is arguably equal to top athletes. As the author of Star Quality: The Red Carpet Workout For The Celebrity Body Of Your Dreams and former trainer for celebrities such as Madonna, Rob Parr is a veteran of understanding fitness preparation for the red carpet. He believes artists who already have a great fitness foundation only need to make small adjustments to look and feel their best. “It’s really important to be in good shape prior to attending redcarpet events. It is hard to be at your best with little preparation,” says Parr, while adding that the bar has been raised by the pressures of social media. “Amateur photographers and gossip buffs with smartphones are now taking pictures along with the more conventional paparazzi. Smartphones have great resolution so every detail shows up. Being prepared is the best approach.” There is an upside to the added pressure, according to Parr. He thinks social media photos that show the results of a healthy lifestyle encourage an artist’s fans to emulate that behavior. Whether it’s Lily Allen doing sit-ups while her kids play in the background, Demi Lovato hitting the gym or Jennifer Lopez working out with her trainer, fans can get a personal window into an artist’s fitness regimen.


RED-CARPET READY

Ellie Goulding has emerged as an Instagram star when it comes to sharing fitness-inspired images — from trips to the gym, videos of training sessions and teaching a surprise class at the popular Barry’s Bootcamp facility in Miami Beach, Fla. “I definitely think that I train for life,” says Goulding. “I prefer to be my own competition and train to get stronger rather than train for a specific event or race.” Like a good fitness regimen, a disciplined nutritional approach is also critical to an artist’s livelihood. And luckily, clean eating and healthy living have become more mainstream, making prered-carpet event nutrition options more plentiful and accessible. According to Danielle and Laura Kosann, founders of the food, fashion and lifestyle website The New Potato, eating clean and local is the current trend. The zeitgeist has moved away from counting calories and instead toward eating whole foods — foods as close to their natural form — at all times. Having interviewed dozens of recording artists, nutritionists, chefs, and other food enthusiasts, including Nicole Scherzinger and Ziggy Marley, the Kosann sisters see a health-first focus on getting red-carpet ready. “Many [artists] seem to emphasize working out early in the day and then eating a wholesome and nutritious meal to keep them fueled for the craziness of the red carpet in the evening,” says Danielle Kosann. The Kosanns also think artists are now more cognizant of the importance of a long-term nutritional plan. “It’s not about crash dieting for a big event, it’s about overall fitness and health so that your body is always prepared for looking and feeling its best,” says Laura Kosann. A commitment to healthy eating is also something artists are keen to share with their fans. GRAMMY winners Beyoncé and Jay Z were so pleased with the results of eating vegan for a month the former launched 22 Days Nutrition, a vegan meal delivery service, in February 2015 in conjunction with her trainer Marco Borges. The transition from fitness and diet to the day-of GRAMMY look takes an enormous amount of planning. It’s also synergistic, as a healthy lifestyle can ensure glowing skin that provides the canvas for the night’s look. Makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury, who has helped contour the faces of GRAMMY winners such as Adele, Rihanna and Fergie, and whose products have been used on the GRAMMY red carpet, says the makeup process is definitely collaborative. “In terms of preparing before the red carpet, the hairstylist, stylist and myself will envision a look based on the style or cut of the dress and character that the celebrity wants to reference,” says Tilbury. “I consider the shape and style of the dress too — how does it flow, does it cling to curves or skim over the body? Therefore, what shall we play up? Can we afford to be bolder or should it be softer? I always consider the texture too — is it diaphanous and chiffony or is it strong, striking leather? Is it more

Ellie Goulding teaches a fitness class at Barry’s Bootcamp on Jan. 5, 2015, in Miami Beach, Fla. SETH BROWARNIK/ STARTRAKSPHOTO.COM

Rihanna at the 57th GRAMMY Awards in 2015 STEVE GRANITZ/ WIREIMAGE.COM

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards 129


Jennifer Hudson at the 57th GRAMMY Awards in 2015 STEVE GRANITZ/ WIREIMAGE.COM

Lady Antebellum’s Hillary Scott at the 52nd GRAMMY Awards in 2010 LESTER COHEN/ WIREIMAGE.COM

130

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

of a bombshell or a rock-chick look? I always look at their eye color and complexion to see what suits them, [and] what colors can make their eyes pop and what works with their skin tone.” The current trends Tilbury sees are dewy skin (resulting from equal parts good health and a deep moisturizer with illuminating primer) and matte lips. Given the prevalence of high-definition TV, the right powder is key for both men and women. “Powder is like good quality sheets — you want the maximum thread count so it doesn’t look cakey or dusty,” says Tilbury. Yet despite the hard work and precision, GRAMMY winner Hillary Scott of Lady Antebellum says perfect red-carpet makeup can come down to one key feature. “I’ve learned to never underestimate how much a smoky eye, bright lip or fun hair can totally change an outfit,” says Scott. “My rule of thumb is usually to pick one of those as an accent and then add sparkle. ... You can never have too much sparkle!” Unique to the GRAMMY Awards is a spectacular array of hairstyles. Some recent GRAMMY red-carpet looks represent artists’ experimental nature, including Sia’s enormous blond bob, Jennifer Hudson’s pixie cut, Iggy Izalea’s top braid or Katy Perry’s purple locks. But then there are others who have a signature look that needs to be replicated, from Gwen Stefani’s vibrant bleachblond color to Annie Lennox’s cropped ’do and the Haim sisters’ long flowing locks. Similar to makeup, getting hair-ready is a collaborative process that requires a well-oiled team. Celebrity hair stylist Neal Farinah, who counts Beyoncé, Mary J. Blige and Florence Welch among his clients, says inspiration for his team usually crystalizes after seeing the artist’s wardrobe. “Sometimes we’ll know months in advance and [for] others we have to come up with something spectacular on the spot,” says Farinah. “What ultimately completes the look is the marriage between you and the makeup/[wardrobe] stylist, so it needs to be a collaboration between all parties.” For all the preparation that can go into red-carpet hair, Farinah is also a fan of improvising. “Those who know me know that I am not a fan of perfect hair,” he says. “Give me messy, give me retro. Shake those curls loose — there’s beauty in imperfection.” Of course, there is the sartorial crowning glory of the red carpet to consider: what winners and nominees will choose to wear on the GRAMMY red carpet. During some red-carpet events, there is a color theme or look consistently represented among attendees, but the GRAMMY red carpet is more about individuality and taking chances. “The music industry and sartorial risk go hand in hand,” says award-winning costume designer Ellen Mirojnick. The individuality exuded on the red carpet is not limited to the realm of the overly bold and experimental, such as Lopez’s infamous green Versace dress at the 42nd GRAMMY Awards in


© MADISON BASS-TAYLOR

INSPIRING VISUAL ARTISTS SINCE 1945 BFA FILM

5301 N. Ventura Ave., Ventura, CA

BS VISUAL JOURNALISM

brooks.edu

BFA GRAPHIC DESIGN

805.585.8000

BFA PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY MFA PHOTOGRAPHY MS SCIENTIFIC & TECHNOLOGICAL IMAGING

Brooks Institute cannot guarantee employment or salary. Credits earned are unlikely to transfer. Find employment rates, financial obligations and other disclosures at www.brooks.edu/disclosures.


Pharrell Williams at the 56th GRAMMY Awards in 2014 KEVIN MAZUR/ WIREIMAGE.COM

Katy Perry at the 56th GRAMMY Awards in 2014 STEVE GRANITZ/ WIREIMAGE.COM

Aloe Blacc at the 57th GRAMMY Awards in 2015 STEVE GRANITZ/ WIREIMAGE.COM

132

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

2000, a pregnant M.I.A. on the red carpet in 2009 or Imogen Heap’s Twitter dress in 2010. Some statements can be more subtle, such as the Haim sisters’ cool elegance at the 57th GRAMMYs in 2015 or Zendaya’s pretty Emanuel Ungaro ensemble in 2014. Individuality aside, dressing for the GRAMMY red carpet has gotten much more glamorous over the years. The extra effort and engagement of top stylists are apparent, according to Andrea Linett, stylist, creative director and author of The Cool Factor: A Guide To Achieving Effortless Style, With Secrets From The Women Who Have It. “With high-end fashion becoming more accessible, at least visually, the personal brands of recording artists are becoming more sophisticated,” says Linett. For a star’s styling team, the process — which typically begins with contacting designers to find either existing ensembles or to request a custom look — can be a long one or love at first sight. Perry’s stylist Johnny Wujek cites her Valentino collaboration at the 56th GRAMMY Awards as his favorite example of fashion kismet. “Valentino did all three of her looks,” says Wujek. “The [redcarpet] couture music note gown, specifically, just screamed Katy to me and when I saw it I knew she would love it as well. And when I showed it to her, we both knew instantly.” GRAMMY winner Michelle Williams, formerly of Destiny’s Child, says a similar instinct usually dictates what she wears to a red-carpet event such as the GRAMMYs. “I’m not a person that likes to try on 100 dresses,” says Williams.



Imogen Heap at the 52nd GRAMMY Awards in 2010 LESTER COHEN/ WIREIMAGE.COM

“I can go through a rack of dresses and pick a few that literally speak to me. I pick a dress based off a feeling I get when I see it. I know instantly if it’s the one.” Finalizing a GRAMMY red-carpet-ready look certainly doesn’t end with the conventional hair, makeup and styling. From shoes to jewelry and various accessories, the red carpet has also become about the added extras, evidenced in recent years by Carrie Underwood’s $31 million diamond necklace, Madonna’s cane, Pharrell Williams’ hat or Aloe Blacc’s dapper footwear. However, the extra addition that has arguably gained the most in popularity is nail art. With the advent of the “mani cam,” “nails have become massive,” says Sophy Robson, who has worked her nail-art magic for the red carpet and for advertisements featuring artists such as Stefani. “Nails are a talking point and can make or break the outfit. Social media is a great platform for ‘nailfies.’” While fitness, fashion and beauty trends evolve year to year, the looks of the stars on the GRAMMY red carpet will continue to create seismic waves around the fashion, social and media worlds, influencing red carpets at other events. As Sugar plans to mobilize her dozens of Popsugar team members to cover the 58th GRAMMY Awards, she reflects on what makes the red carpet at Music’s Biggest Night the fairest — and most unpredictable — of them all. “[GRAMMY attendees] are enjoying sharing their glam team routine and behind-the-scenes looks as they prepare for the big event,” says Sugar. “Through their own social media we get to see what they ate, who is doing their hair and selfies from the limos. [But] you really never know what to expect until they get out of the limo and onto the red carpet.” Shannon Edwards is a Londonbased writer, entrepreneur, online shopping expert, and currently the CEO of “fashion discovery engine” Styloko.com. She has appeared on numerous television programs around the world, including “BBC Breakfast,” “The View” and CNN, to provide fashion insight and expertise. Este, Danielle and Alana Haim at the 57th GRAMMY Awards in 2015 LARRY BUSACCA/ GETTY IMAGES

134

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


We Applaud

THIS YEAR’S GRAMMY® AWARD WINNERS & NOMINEES

®

PEOPLE® IS PROUD TO BE THE EXCLUSIVE MAGAZINE PARTNER OF THE GRAMMYS® AND THE RECORDING ACADEMY®

©2016 Time Inc. GRAMMY® GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license. ©2016 The Recording Academy


MAKEUP

Building Their Brand At The GRAMMYs A look at how artists have used hair and makeup to stand out at the GRAMMY Awards and define themselves By Popsugar Senior Beauty Editor Lauren Levinson

T

here’s a reason actors rely on hair and makeup. A flick of a cat eye and swipe of a glossy red lip can instantly transform the girl next door into a bombshell. And a smudge of kohl eyeliner and long wig can turn a gentleman into a pirate. Beauty products help actors seamlessly play the part. Similarly, musicians often make calculated style decisions to transform into rock stars, rap legends, country crooners, and pop icons. Hair and makeup can shape how artists are perceived by fans and industry insiders, and complement their music. Whether it’s Lady Gaga’s use of vibrant wigs and Cirque du Soleil-inspired eyeliner to mirror her larger-than-life stage performances, or Beyoncé donning luscious lashes and feminine lip color to blend with her sexy, effortless brand, the right beauty move can help artists define themselves. And in some instances — as with Taylor Swift and Nicki Minaj in recent years — beauty transformations can rebrand an entire career. It’s no wonder stars put their best face and fiercest looks forward on Music’s Biggest Night. Take a look at how these artists and their respective glam squads have used the wonders of hair and makeup to enhance their personal style, ultimately allowing their look to speak as loud as their music at the GRAMMY Awards.

136

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


TU BLOOM DESIGNS

“GRAMMY AD”

Trim: 8.375” x 5.4375”

Bleed: 8.875” x 5.9375”

THE DISTILLERY PROJECT

01.19.


MAKEUP

Beyoncé 56th GRAMMYs 2014

DAN MACM EDAN/ WIREIMAGE.COM

M

onths after the surprise release of her GRAMMYwinning self-titled album, Beyoncé shocked fans again with her new beauty style at the GRAMMY Awards. The BeyHive had grown accustomed to seeing Mrs. Carter with her signature lengthy locks and using her mermaid waves for sassy “hairographed” head flips onstage. Rumor has it Beyoncé relies on wigs and extensions for her ever-changing mane, but there’s speculation that when she debuted this short, curly ombre bob at the GRAMMYs, she was actually revealing her natural roots. To accompany this ’do, Bey rocked brushed-up brows, smoky eye makeup and a cranberry lipstick — giving us a dose of the “Grown Woman” glamour she is known for. When it comes to makeup, Beyoncé is as consistent as her presence on the charts. She enhances her natural beauty with neutral tones, defined eyes and flattering lip colors such as champagne or deep red. On this night, Beyoncé opened the GRAMMYs with an intimate performance alongside husband Jay Z. Onstage, her eye makeup was even more smudged and her hair was wet thanks to a moisturizing whip applied by stylist Kim Kimble. It gave fans a raw view of the pop star in her element.



MAKEUP

Lady Gaga

57th GRAMMYs 2015

JASON MERRI TT/GETTY I MAGES

E

ver since Lady Gaga became a household name, she has continually pushed boundaries with her music and personal style. She has used her voice to empower others with songs such as “Born This Way” and made beauty and fashion choices to make statements about society. Whether rocking a dress made of raw meat, arriving at the GRAMMYs in an egg or wearing clownlike face paint, Lady Gaga isn’t afraid to look unique. But when she scaled back her over-thetop theatrics and appeared positively elegant alongside Tony Bennett on the GRAMMY red carpet in 2015, it was monumental. At first glance, Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett seem an unlikely pair. Bennett is known for his traditional pop standards while Gaga’s edgy dance music has made her a bona fide star. But she changed her look in support of their 2014 GRAMMYwinning Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album, Cheek To Cheek. To match her new sound, Lady Gaga replaced the costumes with a flattering silver wig, a medley of metallic eye shadows and lush eyelashes. Later, when she took the stage to perform with Bennett, makeup artist Sarah Nicole Tanno complemented the Fame Monster’s custom Brandon Maxwell beaded gown with an old Hollywood red lip, which further enhanced her classic jazz look.


Intel® is putting its most advanced technology in the hands of this generation’s most innovative artists. And it all begins with Lady Gaga. See how we made tonight’s performance possible at www.intel.com/music Intel, the Intel logo, the Intel. Experience What’s Inside logo and Intel. Experience What’s Inside are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. GRAMMY ®, GRAMMY Awards®and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license ©2016 The Recording Academy


MAKEUP

Adam Lambert 53rd GRAMMYs, GRAMMYs 57th 2011 2015

JASON MERRI TT/GETTY I MAGES

A

142

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

dam Lambert owned the Hollywood clubkid look in 2011 with his tanned skin, gelled hair and made-up face. He proved that smoky eyes were not just for ladies. Before Lambert, male rock icons such as David Bowie and Steven Tyler paved the way for men to confidently wear dark eye makeup while maintaining their sex-symbol status. These guys have even shown that nail polish can be masculine. At the 53rd GRAMMYs, Lambert rocked the guyliner trend when he paired smudged eyeliner with modern bold brows. Not only did the dark eye makeup seem edgy on Lambert, it also made his baby blues look just as electric as his glitzy breakout “American Idol” performances. Lambert’s broadly androgynous use of makeup has consistently reflected his avant-pop music style. His affinity for pushing boundaries made him a fitting addition to Queen, the legendary British rock band known for their iconic music and the manner in which they evolved their look to fit each genre shift they made throughout the ’70s and ’80s. Similarly, Lambert recently changed his glam-rocker digs to fit the pop sound of his 2015 album, The Original High.



MAKEUP

Nicki Minaj

57th GRAMMYs 2015

JASON MERRI TT/GETTY I MAGES

W

144

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

hile plenty of celebrities have toyed with rainbow hair and makeup, Nicki Minaj was one of the best at this colorful trend. In the earlier days of her career, the Queens, N.Y.-bred rapper appeared as if she stepped out of Candy Land, with shocking pink wigs, neon green eye makeup and Harajuku Girls-inspired nail art. With a 2010 debut album titled Pink Friday and followers who call themselves “Barbz” as a nod to the rapper’s sassy Barbie doll persona, Minaj’s style perfectly fit the feminine bad-girl mold. But in 2014 she embraced a “makeunder,” taking on a more neutral beauty palette of beiges and browns. When she stepped on the red carpet at the 57th GRAMMYs with glowing skin, contoured cheeks, defined brows, and shimmery champagne-hued eyes and lips, Minaj was demanding that the rap world see her for herself, not as a character. Clean black eyeliner applied just to the top lid and fluttery lashes enhanced her smoldering and confident stare. And her new, sophisticated redcarpet moment was completed with shiny sideswept strands — a reversal of the leopard-print wig she wore to the GRAMMYs in 2011. Minaj’s new look coincided with her first major film role in 2014’s The Other Woman and fit the tone of her GRAMMY-nominated album, The Pinkprint, which some critics noted is more personal than her previous efforts. Minaj’s rebranded image sent a message: take this artist seriously.


MOSCATO • MOSCATO & PEACH • MOSCATO & COCONUT • MOSCATO & MANGO


MAKEUP

Katy Perry 57th GRAMMYs 2015

JASON MERRI TT/GETTY I MAGES

T

here are many reasons Katy Perry’s beauty style at the 57th GRAMMYs was buzzworthy. Any time a celebrity makes a hair change — be it a fresh set of highlights or an edgy new cut — the news goes viral. This night, Perry surprised everyone when she hit the red carpet with a lavender lob (long bob), which sent the blogosphere into a frenzy. Though her candy-colored red-carpet hair was befitting of a California gurl, she went with a sleek and sophisticated style when she took to the GRAMMY stage to perform an emotional rendition of “By The Grace Of God.” She rocked a long dark ponytail to fit the somber tone of her performance, which was preceded by a message from President Barack Obama condemning violence against women and girls. As it turned out, her purple hair was actually a U-part wig that only revealed a sliver of her natural jet-black mane. Perry took risks with her hair, but she kept her makeup simple to complement both her loud and softer looks. The late makeup artist Jake Bailey highlighted Perry’s flawless skin with bold brows, taupe eye shadow, inky cat eyes, and a glossy neutral lip, which allowed her to transition to an understated look onstage with a simple hairstyle U-turn.


THE BIGGEST

EVENT

FAMILIES! FOR


MAKEUP

Rihanna 55th GRAMMYs 2013

STEVE GRA NITZ /WIREIMAGE.COM

B

148

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

efore Rihanna won the 2014 Fashion Icon Award from the Council of Fashion Designers of America, she was building her style cred at the GRAMMYs. When it comes to hair and makeup, Rihanna is a chameleon. She has tried everything from eyebrow-skimming lashes with vampy lips to sunset eyeshadow and a sherbet pout. While she never looks costumey, she isn’t afraid to take risks, which ultimately makes her appear high-fashion and current. Not only is she consistently relevant on the red carpet, Rihanna has produced hit after hit with every style change, paving the way to her becoming the best-selling digital artist of all time, according to the RIAA. At the GRAMMY Awards in 2013, Rihanna walked the red carpet with gorgeous long waves, jet-black liner all around her eyes and a vibrant red lip that matched her showstopping gown. It was impossible to find anything to criticize about her refined look, which made several best-dressed lists and proved the Barbadian trendsetter is always with — and more often than not, ahead of — the times.


HERBIE,


MAKEUP

Taylor Swift 57th GRAMMYs 2015

KEVIN MA ZUR/WI REI MAGE.COM

I

150

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

n 2006 a teenage country singer/songwriter launched her career with a guitar and voluminous curls. Flash forward to 2015: that country girl is hardly recognizable. Throughout her GRAMMY-winning career, Swift has slowly shed her cowgirl image to become a red-carpet stunner — the kind who hangs out with top models and dates handsome DJs. Over the years she has experimented with her hair, replacing her natural waves with everything from sleek strands to a shaggy bob and even blunt bangs. As she traded her Nashville charm for New York edge, Swift’s sound changed too. In 2014 she released 1989, marking her first unapologetic pop collection. On the GRAMMY red carpet in 2015, she appeared fully transformed as an “it girl” with smooth sideswept bangs, a tousled lob, emerald green eye makeup, and a rose-hued pout. The look had zero trace of country music’s big hair and doll-like eyelashes. It showed that a rebranded Swift was ready to compete with the world’s biggest pop stars on the red carpet as she already was on the charts.



MAKEUP

Carrie Underwood 55th GRAMMYs 2013

W

JASON MERRI TT/GETTY I MAGES

hen it comes to Southern beauty, it’s often said, “Go big or go home.” Oklahoma native Carrie Underwood certainly sticks to this mantra when it pertains to her red-carpet style. The GRAMMYwinning country star is rarely seen without voluminous curled hair and statement makeup. At the GRAMMYs in 2013, she stuck to her signature look: larger-than-life eye lashes and shimmery-sheer, neutral lip gloss. Sparkling eyeshadow highlighted the black liner and faux lashes, while her cheekbones were defined thanks to a romantic pink blush, helping her pull off a girl-next-door look. Underwood did, however, show a glimpse of the fiery persona she would later infuse into tracks such as “Something Bad” (alongside Miranda Lambert) with her bold nails. She rocked cherry red polish on every digit except her ring finger, which was accented with a metallic gold shade. The ultragirly look perfectly suited her powerful vocals and perhaps was a teaser for her GRAMMY-winning song “Something In The Water,” in which she sings about how she feels stronger than ever.

152

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Lauren Levinson is the senior beauty editor at Popsugar, where she writes about celebrities, makeup, hair, and other fun topics. Prior to Popsugar she was at Elle.com. Her work has appeared in New York Magazine, Time Out New York, MarieClaire.com, and Refinery29.



Building A Foundation

For musicians giving back, it takes ground-up planning and resources to meet the challenges of sustaining a successful charitable foundation By Bryan Reesman

B

eyond fulfilling themselves and their fans through their artistry, many musicians take up philanthropic work to further charitable causes close to their hearts. But like forging a successful music career, building a successful charitable foundation is easier said than done. According to a 2014 FidelityCharitable.org report, the nonprofit sector comprises 1.5 million organizations. Human service organizations, such as The Recording Academy’s MusiCares Foundation (see sidebar), account for approximately 33 percent of all public charities. Given these numbers and the competition for donor dollars, building and sustaining a successful charitable foundation that’s more than a pet project is contingent upon identifying clear aims and objectives, solid planning, fundraising, selecting qualified staff, and allocating resources efficiently, among other factors.

154

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

The initial building block of a charity is identifying a mission statement — a summary of the organization’s purpose. Creating a clear, concise mission helps a charity pattern its day-to-day operations and core goals, as well as form relationships with potential partners. Founded in 2013, Chicago-based Donda’s House has set a mission “to provide access to premium arts instruction to youth.” Co-founders Kanye West, Che “Rhymefest” Smith and Donnie Smith were inspired to create the foundation based on the lack of arts education in the United States, particularly in at-risk communities. They chose to name Donda’s House in honor of West’s late mother, Dr. Donda West, who was lauded for her work as an educator. “We want to get kids in high school, that young adult age range who are confused about where they are in life,” Donnie Smith, Donda’s House executive director, told Jet magazine in 2013.


Best Contemporary Instrumental Album

Watch for a summer 2016 release of “Frank Sinatra Suite,” arranged by Michael Abene and recorded by the Temple University Symphony Orchestra and Jazz Band on BCM&D Records. Terell Stafford (trumpet) and Dick Oatts (sax). Joel Moss, engineer. Terell Stafford

BCM&D Records has released three GRAMMY ®-nominated recordings. The label is housed in the Boyer College of Music and Dance at Temple University in Philadelphia. Robert T. Stroker is founder and producer of BCM&D Records.

temple.edu/boyer

Dick Oatts


“One challenge [EJAF originally] took on and surmounted beautifully was to decide not to create a huge infrastructure, but still find a way to get money out the door very quickly as grant awards,” says Scott P. Campbell, executive director of the Elton John AIDS Foundation. “[We] understood the importance of utilizing a solid grant application, review and awards process and realized it would take time, money and expertise [we] didn’t have then to build such a process from scratch. So instead [we] partnered with an existing grantmaking organization with an impeccable reputation, AIDS United, to provide the awards infrastructure needed for the vast majority of the foundation’s grants during Winners of the Herb Alpert Foundation’s 2015 Herb Alpert Award in the Arts (l-r) Maria Hassabi, those early years.” Taylor Mac, Sharon Lockhart, and Julia Wolfe, with Herb Alpert (center) COURTESY OF THE HERB ALPERT FOUNDATION Speaking of challenges, fundraising is near the top of the list of obstacles “We want to give them direction … so many people have just given charitable foundations face. Whether secured via grants, events up on that demographic.” or corporate donations, raising funds sustains the livelihood Actively involved in promoting arts education, with a focus of an organization so it can effectively carry out its mission. on jazz, the Herb Alpert Foundation funds sustainable in-school Once again, planning is the distinguishing element between programs for thousands of elementary school students while foundations that succeed and those that do not. According to a also supporting programs at the high school and college levels. 2013 CompassPoint national study on nonprofit fundraising, 31 Founded by Herb and Lani Hall Alpert, the foundation has percent of nonprofits with operating budgets less than $1 million endowed schools of music at UCLA and California Institute did not have a fundraising plan in place. of the Arts, among others, and has established a financial aid Part and parcel of a fundraising plan, and for that matter the endowment at the Harlem School of the Arts so the institution can overall administration of a charitable foundation, is the presence provide greater access to arts education for students and families of capable staff. Hiring qualified top-level management and in Harlem and across the greater New York area. Over the past 21 grooming staff from within helps an organization build a solid years, the Herb Alpert Foundation has distributed $135 million infrastructure, while providing valuable resources essential to in grants. A key ingredient to the foundation’s success was the the effective implementation of a charity’s mission. Smith brings decision to turn inward to identify core areas of focus as part of more than 10 years of experience as an educator and youth their planning process. advocate to her position at Donda’s House. Campbell has worked “When I stepped in to lead the foundation 11 years ago, the as a nonprofit executive in the field of HIV/AIDS for more than most challenging thing we needed to deal with was determining 20 years, including service with EJAF since 2005. Prior to our priorities and narrowing our focus in order to go deeply into becoming president of the Herb Alpert Foundation, Sebastian the areas the Alperts most cared about so that we would not dilute spent 16 years in senior leadership roles at the J. Paul Getty Trust, the impact we might have by spreading our support too broadly,” including more than a decade at the Getty Conservation Institute. says Rona Sebastian, president of the Herb Alpert Foundation. “Over time, EJAF developed the necessary experience, staff “Defining our core areas of interest was tough to do when there and processes to handle the grant awards process, and we have are so many needs out there that touch Herb and Lani’s hearts, been managing our own grant awards system now for over but in order to have the most impact in our grant making we a decade,” Campbell continues. “This was an incredibly wise needed to be disciplined in setting up those priorities and sticking decision made in the foundation’s infancy, and it has enabled to them.” [us] to function from the beginning with an extremely talented, Since 1992, the Elton John AIDS Foundation has worked tirelessly bare-bones staff, gradually develop the processes needed to raise more than $321 million for the treatment and prevention without increasing staff size, and thereby invest well over of HIV/AIDS, making it one of the world’s foremost AIDS charities. 90 percent of donor dollars throughout the foundation’s history In 2014 EJAF awarded more than $7.2 million in grants to 110 directly into grants and programs.” organizations across the United States, Canada and the Caribbean, In addition to staff, many charities engage the services of representing a commitment to, as Elton John has described, advisory board members who provide a range of additional “confronting HIV/AIDS where it exists.” Early on, one planning resources, from acting as public ambassadors to assisting with decision proved crucial in setting up the foundation’s success. fundraising efforts. The size of a foundation’s board can vary:

156

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


Bespoke Jewelry

Visit us at www.gemlok.com, call 1.800.221.4438 or follow us.


COURTESY OF SUN SHINE SACHS

EJAF’s board numbers more than 25; conversely, foundations such as Miranda Lambert’s MuttNation Foundation, which raises funds for the treatment, housing and adoption of homeless dogs all over the world, have a handful by design. “[We have] a very small board,” Lambert told Rolling Stone in 2014. “It’s five girls and we know where every dime goes.” No matter the size, most charitable foundations rely heavily on what some consider the true lifeblood of the industry: volunteers. According to Charity Navigator, 62.6 million Americans volunteered for charities in 2013, providing 7.7 billion hours of service equaling a total value of $173 billion. Resources such as Serve.gov, a federal initiative designed to “both expand the impact of existing organizations by engaging new volunteers in their work and encourage volunteers to develop their own ‘do-ityourself ’ projects,” provide a hub for potential volunteers to find possible service opportunities of interest. Engaging the services of volunteers is a win-win proposition: people are able to volunteer for causes that strike an emotional chord, and volunteers can improve the quality of services and programs a charity provides. An organization putting an interesting twist on the volunteer model is the Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation, which tackles the issues of hunger and homelessness, helping to provide affordable housing and feed families in need. The JBJ Soul Kitchen, one of the foundation’s flagship community-based programs, allows individuals and families in need to have a sit-down three-course meal for only $10. Not only does the kitchen have regular volunteers, but if someone is hungry and cannot afford to pay, they can volunteer an hour of their time in the kitchen in exchange for a meal. “Originally when we opened up our first Soul Kitchen in Red Bank, New Jersey, [the challenge] was just trying to get people to understand the model,” says Mimi Box, executive director of the Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation. “A lot of them were so used to the handout model that they really didn’t grasp it. When we started, we said the ideal mix of supportive and population to be supported

Jon Bon Jovi and Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Executive Director Mimi Box

would be about 50-50, and it took us about two years to get there on a consistent basis because in the beginning we had a ton of people that were just Jon Bon Jovi fans that wanted to come and support us, which is great. But we tried to encourage them to support like-[minded] organizations back in the community.” Building on its initial success, the JBJ Soul Kitchen will open a new location in Toms River, N.J., in spring 2016. To bring the Toms River kitchen up to speed, they have partnered with two existing community-based organizations, the Food Bank and People’s Pantry, “to educate right from the beginning and provide a service also to some of their clients,” says Box. “We really think the dynamics of the three organizations working together in the community is really going to make what we hope will be a replicable model in other communities.” “I’m a big believer in the power of we,” said Bon Jovi in a PSA for Serve.gov. “We can tackle the tough challenges we face and build community through service and volunteering.” For some charitable organizations with fewer resources, the “power of we” can be strong even on a modest scale. Sidewalk Angels Foundation, co-founded by GRAMMY winner Rob Thomas and his wife Marisol, is run by the couple and Maria Maldonado, Marisol Thomas’ mother. Founded in 2003, the organization relies heavily on volunteers around the country to help them in their mission to find homes for rescue pets, promote no-kill shelters, help animals during crises such as Hurricane Katrina, and help new and growing organizations with grants (ranging from $10,000 to $100,000 or more). Though their staff and board numbers less than 10, Thomas says the foundation receives an overwhelming amount of requests for help, which constitutes a formidable challenge. “The greatest challenge for [us] is figuring out the organizations in greatest need,” says Thomas. “We get so many requests and we don’t want to turn down any shelter or organization, but sadly it isn’t possible to help them all at once. I know that is a great emotional challenge for Mari and Maria. They are constantly torn about turning anyone away. So they’ve set up a system where every organization that comes their way that touches them, they keep on file, so that even if they can’t help this time around, they know they will remember them and follow them and make sure to help them out in the future.” Founded in 2004 by GRAMMY-winning singer/songwriter Emmylou Harris (and named after a former pet), Bonaparte’s Retreat is a rescue dog sanctuary located on her property in Nashville, Tenn., including a “bunkhouse” inside her house where animals live while awaiting adopted homes. Since Harris’ house can only handle four dogs at a time, many are taken in by temporary foster parents, allowing more dogs to be saved from euthanasia in the Nashville area. Additionally, Bonaparte’s Retreat has only two full-time staff members, a few paid employees who work four different shifts and a 30-year employee of Harris’ who works five days a week. “We’ve got a couple of fosters we can depend on now and we’re constantly trying to get more,” says Harris. “The more fosters we can get, the more dogs we can rescue and put on our website. Once they’re in the foster program, we take care of everything — the (continued on page 162)

158

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards



A World Where MusiCares

T

he Recording Academy-affiliated MusiCares Foundation has helped more than 80,000 music people since 2003 with a range of services spanning emergency financial assistance, addiction recovery and preventive care. Today, MusiCares is recognized as the music industry charity for music people. But this growth and acclaim didn’t happen overnight. Founded in 1989 as a program under the GRAMMY Foundation umbrella, MusiCares became a standalone nonprofit in 1990. It began with a handful of dedicated staff members, including current Vice President Dana Tomarken (hired as Managing Director in 1993), and an Advisory Council dedicated to advancing MusiCares’ mission of providing a safety net of critical assistance for music people in need. Initially, simply creating awareness was the tallest obstacle to overcome. MusiCares’ first promotional effort was a 1990 billboard campaign advertising a hotline number that featured substance abuse messages from artists such as Paula Abdul, David Crosby and Gloria Estefan. Finding a vehicle to help fund programming was another early hurdle for MusiCares. As a result, the Person of the Year benefit, honoring Crosby, was launched in 1991, netting $321,000. Designed to recognize artistic achievement and philanthropy, the annual gala gained momentum in the ’90s, honoring luminaries such as Tony Bennett, Quincy Jones, Luciano Pavarotti, and Bonnie Raitt. Eager to embrace MusiCares’ mission, The Recording Academy Chapters played a large role in championing the organization to their respective music communities. The first Safe Harbor Room — a dedicated sober support space — was launched at the 39th Annual GRAMMY Awards in 1997. Since then, Safe Harbor Room support has expanded to many major telecasts, festivals and events, further increasing MusiCares’ presence. As MusiCares grew, so did its staff and elected leadership. The 1998 hiring of Debbie Carroll, Senior Executive Director of MusiCares, located in Nashville, Tenn., marked nationwide outreach, followed by additional consultants and staff in Chicago, New York and Texas. By 2003, Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow also assumed the President/CEO role for MusiCares and an official Board of Directors was formed, adding credibility and a wealth of resources. MusiCares augmented its addiction recovery efforts in 2004, merging with the Musician’s Assistance Program. The resulting MusiCares MAP Fund, aided by an annual benefit concert, provides financial and supportive assistance for music people in need of addiction recovery services. With a sturdy foundation in place, one of MusiCares’

160

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

most significant milestones would soon come out of tragedy. When Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in 2005, MusiCares committed $1 million to support the region. This goodwill spurred a chain reaction — including an instrument replacement program launched by Gibson, Guitar Center and Musician’s Friend raising $2 million, and other donations from the music community — that resulted in providing more than $4 million in relief to more than 3,500 Gulf Coast music people. “We knew we wanted to respond to the Hurricane Katrina efforts in a profound way since so many music people were impacted by the storm,” says Carroll. “We still receive words of thanks from those we helped 10 years later. Our Hurricane Katrina relief effort catapulted MusiCares and our brand into a different realm as a relief organization.” Similar successful relief campaigns were replicated following the 2010 Nashville floods and New Jersey’s Hurricane Sandy in 2013. Following these efforts, and in combination with its ongoing commitment to transparency — its first publicly accessible Community Service Report was published in 1999 — MusiCares received (and maintains) a four-star rating from America’s premier charity evaluator, Charity Navigator. In 2011 MusiCares launched a 20th Anniversary Campaign fundraising effort, which received a generous $5 million matching grant from music industry leader Clive Calder. The results of the campaign, in combination with an endowment fund, will help ensure MusiCares’ ongoing financial health and positive impact. With a roster of recent honorees that includes Aretha Franklin, Carole King, Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen, Barbra Streisand, and 2016 honoree Lionel Richie, the annual Person of the Year benefit stands as MusiCares’ flagship fundraising effort, while emerging as one of the most highprofile, must-attend events during GRAMMY Week. The 2015 benefit honoring Bob Dylan raised a record total of more than $7.2 million to help fund MusiCares Foundation’s lifechanging programs. Now, in 2016, MusiCares has more than 25 staff members and a diverse, proactive Board. In 2015 alone, MusiCares provided $4.4 million in aid to more than 4,500 clients, double its service five years ago. Projections indicate this growth will continue, and the need will double again by 2020. “Music is one of the most primal and fundamental aspects of the human condition and culture,” says Tomarken. “A world without music would be unimaginable and a significant part of social communication would disappear. This reality signifies the importance of caring for music people in need and the services MusiCares provides.”


Gregory Bega and Lindsay Galbraith consistently exceed the expectations of their discerning real estate clients around the world. Real Estate Industry record breaking sales 2015. Top 1% Production Sotheby’s International Realty. Wall Street Journal National Top Agents Award 2015. Unsurpassed sales strategies and negotiating techniques. The Bega-Galbraith team and Sotheby’s International Realty are proud to represent the finest luxury properties in the world. Experts in the field of Residential and Commercial Real Estate.

LINDSAY GALBRAITH

310.916.8622

Lindsay.Galbraith@sothebyshomes.com

GREGORY BEGA

213.453.2020

Gregory.Bega@sothebyshomes.com

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.


CO URT E SY O F SAC KS & CO.

food, the vet bills, everything — and we coordinate with people who are interested in adopting dogs and take them for home visits. Really, the fosters only have to provide the time, the space and the love. If we could get more fosters, we could grow. We’ve rescued a few hundred dogs, and every one of them is important and special.” Even for foundations with resources in the millions of dollars, challenges can materialize based on the scope of their mission. “The truth is we already have everything we need to end [the AIDS] epidemic,” says Campbell of EJAF’s long-term goal. “If governments would allocate sufficient funding to provide universal access to the prevention, testing and treatment programs we already have, we could end this epidemic within a decade. What’s stopping us is a lack of political will to do the right thing, and the continuing stigma, distrust and discrimination that prevent people from accessing the programs they need. At EJAF, we work every day to challenge these attitudes and motivate governments to end AIDS in our lifetime.” Despite the challenges and obstacles inherent in charitable work, the spirit of camaraderie found within the nonprofit community extends outward. Although they may occasionally compete for grants, nonprofits are often open to exchanging ideas, information and even space. In doing so, foundations can better serve their interests altogether and better serve their clients collectively. As Thomas asserts, “Our motto has been that everybody has a little bit of broken fence that they [can] mend.” For the artists, while building and maintaining a charitable

Emmylou Harris

foundation can be taxing, it is clear the reward of making a difference is well worth it. “[Bonaparte’s Retreat] is a work in progress,” says Harris. “There are so many different things we didn’t know about at the beginning. I was flying by the seat of my pants and had no idea what this entailed on a practical level. It is a very expensive thing and something that you really have to be dedicated to. It’s my second career, and I wouldn’t change it for the world. It’s maybe the most satisfying thing that I’ve ever done.” Bryan Reesman is a New York-based freelance writer.

MICHAEL KOVAC/GETTY IMAGES

move Elton John here

Elton John, David Furnish, Anne Aslett, and Scott P. Campbell of the Elton John AIDS Foundation visit the AIDS Memorial Quilt in 2012 in Washington, D.C.

162

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


HEAR MORE OF YOUR MUSIC Blue headphones let you hear more of your music than ever before—detail that has been hidden from you by some of the biggest brands around. Whether you listen to MP3’s, lossless music, vinyl, or Spotify, you’ll hear new detail with Blue—the headphones with nothing to hide. Find out more at blue-headphones.com

MO-FI Powered High-Fidelity Headphones with Built-in Audiophile Amp

LOLA Sealed Over-Ear High-Fidelity Headphones

GALLANT Hear Gallant’s “Weight in Gold” on Spotify, and learn more at: SOUNDCLOUD.COM/GALLANT


d a i d n C

164

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


a r e m C a

Danny Clinch curates a gallery of unforgettable behind-the-scenes GRAMMY moments Photos and commentary by Danny Clinch

D

anny Clinch has been the official backstage GRAMMY portrait photographer since 2003. As one of the first people a freshly minted GRAMMY winner meets after walking offstage, Clinch has seen it all. “What’s great about photographing backstage at the GRAMMYs is that you get such a variety of people that come back there,” says Clinch. “You get people like Jay Z and Lady Gaga, and then you get the Best World Music Album winners such as Angélique Kidjo and Best Comedy Album winners such as ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic as well.” When he’s not capturing a winner’s GRAMMY portrait, or intimate images of two music icons meeting for the first time, Clinch has also been known to shoot unplanned moments in the days leading up to Music’s Biggest Night. His signature, natural style has produced unforgettable photos of performers as they prepare to hit the GRAMMY stage. Over the years, Clinch has amassed a collection of these priceless photographs. Here are 10 of his favorites, selected and annotated by the photographer.

B.B. King and Paul McCartney 51st GRAMMY Awards, 2009

Paul McCartney was at my portrait spot with the Foo Fighters when B.B. King walked in for his session. To my surprise, Paul had never met B.B. King and I had the honor of introducing them. 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards 165


Stevie Wonder 47th GRAMMY Awards, 2005

I’m always excited when a legend like Stevie Wonder comes to my portrait area. After doing some portraits on the backdrop, I noticed him silhouetted in the light bank I was using and asked him to stop for a moment. This became my favorite portrait of him.

166

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


Little Richard 50th GRAMMY Awards, 2008

Little Richard rehearsing “Good Golly, Miss Molly” for a GRAMMY jam with Jerry Lee Lewis and John Fogerty was an amazing chance to photograph rock and roll royalty!

Kanye West, T.I., Jay Z, and Lil Wayne 51st GRAMMY Awards, 2009

I worked really hard to track down these fellows before they hit the stage for “Swagga Like Us.” I couldn’t imagine missing the chance to get them all together — these opportunities don’t come very often. 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards 167


Madonna 48th GRAMMY Awards, 2006

When Madonna showed up to be photographed, she had her glam squad with her. As they prepared her for the photo shoot I asked her if I could take some shots of her getting prepared and she said sure, so I grabbed this one. Often these outtakes become my favorites.

168

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


Mickey Raphael, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, and Merle Haggard 56th GRAMMY Awards, 2014

When discussing this photograph, I usually just say, “Somebody pinch me.” To be in the room with these four gentlemen while they were rehearsing “Mamas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys” in honor of the legendary Highwaymen was beyond amazing. It also happened to be my 50th birthday.

Dave Grohl and Chick Corea

The Foo Fighters were rehearsing with Chick Corea for the GRAMMY telecast. I love these moments when two musicians who don’t always play together are collaborating. I was particularly excited about the reflection in Chick’s piano and the fact that they’re playing to an empty arena.

46th GRAMMY Awards, 2004 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards 169


Dr. John 55th GRAMMY Awards, 2013

Dr. John just got dressed to honor his classic Night Tripper character, and as he was walking toward the stage to perform with the Black Keys I managed to stop him for a couple seconds and got this portrait. Some entertainers are often acting the part. Dr. John is a real character.

170

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


Alison Krauss and Robert Plant 51st GRAMMY Awards, 2009

I had never photographed Robert Plant and was really excited when he and Alison Krauss won five GRAMMYs. They were really elated and in a great mood and Robert was so kind and respectful to Alison. I think it shows in this photograph.

Dave Grohl, Steven Van Zandt, Bruce Springsteen, and Elvis Costello 45th GRAMMY Awards, 2003

I heard there was going to be a tribute to Joe Strummer, who had recently died, and that there was a rehearsal down the hall. When I walked in the room I saw Dave Grohl, Steven Van Zandt, Bruce Springsteen, Elvis Costello, Tony Kanal from No Doubt, and Pete Thomas [Elvis Costello’s drummer]. They were sharing stories about Joe before they started to rehearse. I love these moments the best because they’re so real. 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards 171



253* AND COUNTING Berklee College of Music is proud to salute our 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards® Alumni and Faculty Nominees.

*Number of GRAMMY Awards® received by Berklee alumni and faculty.


ALAN SI LFEN FOR THEONLY.AGENCY

l i a S 174

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


n O g n i li

MusiCares Person of the Year Lionel Richie ref lects on his remarkable career in conversation with Pharrell Williams

Interview By Pharrell Williams

Lionel Richie was honored as the 2016 MusiCares Person of the Year on Feb. 13 at a special tribute performance and dinner in Los Angeles, recognizing his accomplishments as an artist and humanitarian. MusiCares’ mission is to ensure that music people have a compassionate place to turn in times of need while focusing the resources and attention of the music industry on human service issues that directly impact the health and welfare of the music community. You can learn more on page 196 and at the MusiCares section of GRAMMY.org.

THE RECORDING ACADEMY

A

s Pharrell Williams learned, or maybe already knew, the book of Lionel Richie’s music career is filled with many captivating chapters. There’s the tale of enrolling at Tuskegee University and getting together with fellow students to form the Commodores. There is the unique sonic character of the Commodores, a hybrid of funk, R&B, pop, country, and soul, and the group’s rise on Motown Records. There’s the emergence of Richie as a bona fide songwriter with a penchant for melodic songcraft. Of course, there is the Lionel Richie songbook, filled with Commodores gems such as “Easy,” “Three Times A Lady,” “Sail On,” and “Still,” and solo smashes such as “Endless Love,” “Truly,” “Hello,” “All Night Long (All Night),” and “Say You, Say Me.” There is Richie’s immensely successful second act as a solo artist (and third act as a legendary yet still active touring and recording artist).

Lionel Richie interviewed by Pharrell Williams at Richie’s home in Beverly Hills, Calif.

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards 175


MICHAEL OCHS ARCH IV E S/G E T TY IMAG E S

The Commodores and the Jackson 5 photographed backstage before a concert, circa 1974

Let’s go right back to the beginning, Lionel. What are your recollections of growing up in Tuskegee? It was an amazing place. The Tuskegee Airmen were there. All the people who knew Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver [were there]. It was a place of segregation and these wonderful men came home from the war and after liberating all of Europe [they] could not vote and were considered not secondclass but third-class citizens. Of course, we didn’t know that as kids growing up. Our families didn’t tell us. The reason that we had all these doctors and lawyers [at Tuskegee University] was because segregation was in and there was no place else for them to go and practice. So that’s why you have Howard University, Hampton University and Morehouse [College], because these are little hubs with education excellence where we in the black community could be educated. There were no universities available to us.

176

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

“We’re the black Beatles, dad, mom. And we’re going to take over the world.” “No, you’re an idiot.” What type of music were you exposed to in Tuskegee? There was no R&B music on the radio. There was country music on the radio, there was no pop music. Pop music was Elvis. If you wanted to hear real black music, you had to either [go to] Nashville, Tenn., [or] someplace out of Texas. We didn’t really have R&B for a very, very long time. There were no R&B stations. [Then] Motown came Tuskegee University graduation portrait along. Stax Records came along. Philly International [Records] came along. And then, of course, my grandmother in the house was a classical pianist. So, I’m living with Bach and Mozart and Chopin and I’m thinking to myself, “OK, well this is a melting pot of stuff.”

COURTESY OF LIONEL RICH IE

There are numerous accolades, including a GRAMMY for Album Of The Year, a Golden Globe and an Oscar. There’s the fascinating story of collaborating with Michael Jackson for “We Are The World,” a charitable clarion call that set the standard for music and philanthropy. Though he’s nearly 50 years into his career, Richie can’t slow down. He’s still writing new chapters such as receiving the prestigious MusiCares Person of the Year honor, which he describes as akin to winning the lottery. Next on the horizon, Richie will kick off his first Las Vegas residency, Lionel Richie: All The Hits, in April. “We are going to have the greatest time ever in Vegas,” says Richie. In conversation with fellow GRAMMY winner Pharrell Williams, Richie reflects on many of these chapters and more, while revealing why this riveting read of a career is “not done yet.”


s mber e m and cers s, CA), fi f o le he and t Los Ange rk City) s n a ( i ic 7 Yo f Mus ), Local 4 02 (New ir o n o i 8 e L t dera hicago, I nd Local ers on th e F an (C ,a mb ds. meric l 10-208 ville, TN) e our me and awar s A e h h ca T s at work ies. s l o n a u d L t o i e N t f a ( r a o ord an cong ® omin l 257 e rec ory comp s o Loca proudly AMMY n h w at GR rtists for sign a e 58th s d tho cor tulate ns who re a r g on ia lso c y music a e b W d porte p u s are

AFM musicians who record under our agreement share in the following funds:

The American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada • 1501 Broadway, Suite 600; New York, NY 10036 • www.afm.org


We met on the university campus as freshmen. The group that we formed was called the Mystics. And we didn’t know that when they had the freshmen talent show, it was for the upperclassmen to come and laugh at the freshmen. We went and killed it to the point where there’s another group on the campus called the Jays, [who were] seniors [and had] been playing there for the last four years. Well, they were going to break up. And so two members of the Jays called the rest of the members of the Mystics and said, “Let’s make a group.” And that was the formation of the Commodores. From there, it was one of those wonderful situations where we just played every university campus around the South.

What was that like, being in a band? Because we know how we feel when we listen to that music. But what was that like for you? Well, you think of a band when you first start out as four, five brothers. [In] the Commodores I had five brothers. The greatest motto we had [was] whether you’re all right or whether you’re all wrong, we were all together. So if somebody messed up, we’d go, “Dude, that’s the funniest thing I’ve ever heard in my life.” We grew up together, every experience that I could possibly think of. Traveling around the world with five brothers, you couldn’t mess that up. To me, the struggle was the fun part because [there] was always the possibility of “tomorrow, we could make it.”

What was one of the greatest early obstacles the Commodores encountered? I think the show where we actually realized, “Maybe we haven’t made it yet.” Someone booked us on a show — AC/DC and the headlining act, Queen. What were we doing on that show with no hit record? That’s not true. We had one hit record, “Machine Gun,” and it was an instrumental. So there [were] our fans in the audience and there’s our little sign, “We love you, Commodores.” And halfway through the set, we saw the sign crumbling, going down. We realized, “Our fans are getting beat up.” And that’s when I realized we’re in hostile territory because they didn’t want to see anything but Queen and AC/DC. That was the introduction [that] the road is going to be a little twisted from time to time.

But that made you guys better, right? Yeah. You know what’s missing today is the practice. Remember that every band was on every corner of every town in the world. And they had music on record. But man, live was everything.

“Someone booked us on a show – AC/DC and the headlining act, Queen. What were we doing on that show?” 178

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

ASSO C IAT E D PR E SS

Tuskegee University was the birthplace of the Commodores.

Dionne Warwick, Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, Michael Jackson, and Richie at the 28th GRAMMY Awards on Feb. 25, 1986

You could actually go and practice. Now, anybody can play a show when the crowd is looking at you. But can you get the crowd’s attention when everybody is talking? And of course, once we made it, the fun part was now that everyone’s looking this way, we can play the show because we’re used to getting your attention. It took us about [three] years of practice before we even went on tour with the Jackson 5 as their opening act. Then we actually met Benny Ashburn, our manager. And from there, he said, “I happen to know a lady at Motown, Suzanne de Passe. There’s a Jackson 5 group going out on tour; they need an opening act.”

So you hadn’t met the folks from Motown yet? We did not know one person from Motown, not one soul. Suzanne said, “We’ll take them on tour with the Jackson 5, on their first tour across America.” So we did every city across America and I’m still a junior in college. I’m still flying back, in and out, trying to do exams and then flying back out on the road. It’s crazy.

How was that working out? Terrible. But I would say I had a strong B, C average. But then after a while it got to the point where I said, “You know what, I got to lay out of school.” Now try to explain that to your mother and father. “We’re the black Beatles, dad, mom. And we’re going to take over the world.” “No, you’re an idiot.” But back then, it was the only shot to take. And of course, once we toured across America we went to the Hollywood Bowl and the entire Motown family was there. And once they took one look at what we were doing, the kids went back and said, “You guys, there’s a group called the Commodores you need to check out.” We signed with Motown but it was a year and a half to two years later before we actually found our spot because when we signed with Motown, I didn’t know I was a writer. All of these things we discovered in that year and a half to two years [were] wonderful. I call it Motown University. “Is that a Marvin Gaye session across the hall? Is that Stevie Wonder down the hall or in the other room? Smokey Robinson?” Everybody in the world was sitting by the coffee machine and we could hang out and ask questions. As time went on, I started asking serious questions like, “So, how do you



GAB ARCHIVES/REDFERNS

Commodores promotional photo, circa 1977

write, Mr. Gaye? What music school did you graduate from?” [He said,] “I hum and I doodle and I hum.” And I realize, “You can’t read or write music?” “Oh no, brother.” All of a sudden I found that, “You mean, you don’t have to get a diploma? This is the wild west of entrepreneurship.” That was my graduation.

melting pot of things that I told you before — my grandmother’s classical side, the country music side, the R&B side. Well, all of that is in the melting pot of this brain of mine.

Where did the songs come from?

It was my best discovery and my worst curse, because if you understand anything about being in a group, it is the safest place to be. I wasn’t excited about going solo. [But] then something amazing happened. I started writing [songs like] “Three Times A Lady” and “Sail On.” And you know, as long as Tommy [McClary] has a hit record, Lionel has a hit record, that’s good because we divide everything up and because we’re in the group. What keeps a group together is that we’re equal. As soon as you get too far [down] the line, then it gets tough. And so it was one song then two songs. Then I figured, “OK, I won’t get involved in the funk side. I’ll just get involved with [making] sure I have at least one song on the album.” As time went on it just got to the point where I’m writing songs [and] those are the singles. And of all things, it came down to Kenny Rogers. He called and said, “I need a ballad.” And it was that year the Commodores said, “We don’t want another ballad.” So I wrote “Jesus Is Love,” a church song just to kind of make it different from anything else we’d ever done. And Kenny got — at the time, it was “Lady” or “Baby” or something. By the time I finished up it was “Lady.” It was the national anthem at that time. I mean “Lady” took off [and] Kenny exploded. From there, Motown came along and said, “You need to do a

That’s a beautiful story but that’s the hard part. I didn’t really know. I spent about four years really quite puzzled, because I was hearing stuff and I didn’t quite trust myself. Remember, I grew up in an academic world, which is “there must be a logical reason.” And somebody had to teach this to you. Well, I’m receiving songs and I didn’t trust myself. Then I started writing one song and then two songs and then, well, “This is not a fluke.” Of course [I received] the wonderful coaching of James Anthony Carmichael. James was one of the master arrangers at Motown who always wanted to be a producer. And so, as his first group, he started [with] the Commodores. The joke was he didn’t want the Commodores. He wanted Diana Ross, but they gave him the Commodores. He taught us how to put songs together. But more importantly, he just gave us the confidence to say, “No, you’re right. That’s the right road.” I brought in “Three Times A Lady.” I was going to give that to another artist. And he said, “No, you’re going to do that with the Commodores.”

Wow. It’s [about] not being afraid of what to write because a lot of times, I kept thinking, “This does not fit [the Commodores].” But that little

180

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Being a songwriter, how did that play a role in you ultimately going solo?



It must have been even wilder when you won Album Of The Year for Can’t Slow Down.

CHRIS WALTE R /WIR E IMAG E .CO M

Yeah, that was amazing. If I’m not mistaken, two things happened that were amazing. One, Album Of The Year. Second, Producer Of The Year, [Non-Classical]. OK, now Album Of The Year was the “kaboom,” you know? From that point on, it was the rocket ship that just took off, never to come back. But just having that as a moment in time when all the stars were aligned — I remember turning around and there was a standing ovation and those were your peers. You know what I’m saying? It was a very big deal.

With Tina Turner at the 27th GRAMMY Awards on Feb. 26, 1985

solo album.” They didn’t say “go solo.” But I said, “Not yet. No, I don’t want to do that.” Then right after “Lady,” I was approached by Franco Zeffirelli and Dyson Lovell and a few other people [for their film] Endless Love that was coming out. “Would you do an instrumental?” “Sure.” And I gave [them] the instrumental. And they said, “In the movie, we only have one verse where she’s trying to sing the lyrics. Could you write the lyrics?” And I wrote the first verse: “My love, there’s only you in my life, the only thing that’s right. My first love, you’re every breath that I take, every step I make.” “Lionel, we don’t want an instrumental anymore. We want a duet and we’re thinking about Diana Ross singing the song. Who do you recommend to be the lead vocalist with her?” The answer [was], “Are you kidding me? I’m not going to give that away to somebody else.” So here I am now with [a schedule that is] from 10 to 6, Kenny Rogers; from 6 to 12, Commodores; and from 1 to 4 in the morning, “Endless Love.” It was chaos.

You couldn’t get away from that album. That album went all the way around the world several times, and then I didn’t realize the influence of the songs. Then I kind of tied everything together with the Commodores music and from there, of course, it went on to the next level, which was the “We Are The World” thing.

When you talk about “We Are The World,” I don’t think that anything has been able to rival the philanthropic side of what that song was able to do. You know, I think back, Pharrell, on that time in life where two things could happen. One, you could actually write a piece for the world. And two, you could surprise the world. In other words, they didn’t know it was coming. The cause was there, we knew what we wanted to do but we had time to mount the attack. And we had no Internet. So we surprised them. We surprised everybody. I remember Michael [Jackson] and I were on the phone, “Lionel, turn on the TV.” And they were singing “We Are The World” in Tokyo. And they were singing it in America and Europe. I mean we knew we were talking about something huge but we didn’t know it’s going to be like that. We became a movement unto ourselves. “We Are The World” was just beyond the scope of our imagination to the point where it was an anthem that the world will sing. To put all that together, it was just a masterful star alignment. The heavens opened up and it was just perfect.

It made us competitive. The difficulty of holding it together as a band is tough — all you need is a little bit of animosity, a little bit of [fear] because you’re thinking, “Lionel is going to leave.” But the band was everything to me. I mean that sincerely. I had no ego in terms of [leaving] the Commodores because I didn’t want that. But because of the nature of how the reviews were coming out, you heard people say, “And then finally, the lights went down and Lionel Richie came and sang his songs.” Well, I’m with the Commodores. Or I’m coming into a group interview and the [interviewer says], “Lionel, tell us all about how you formed the group?” And no more questions are directed to the Commodores. By the time [I] got [my] first GRAMMY, [it] was [for my solo song] “Truly.” So it was a very difficult time. I’m trying to hold myself together and at the same time enjoy this ride of creativity gone wild.

182

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

ASSOCIATED P RESS

Was trying to keep the group together after that difficult?

In the studio recording “We Are The World” with Daryl Hall, Stevie Wonder, Quincy Jones, and Paul Simon in 1985



You know, one of the things that I want to achieve in my writing [is] a meaningful lyric. In other words, easy like Sunday morning is easy like Sunday morning. I don’t care what year, what time. I [wanted] to make sure that I didn’t put a time on it.

Which made it timeless. Timeless, exactly. You know, people constantly need hope. We are living in a world where hope is sometimes hard to put your arm around. We live in a wonderful subliminal world where we get to enter [people’s] cars and their homes. Your song “Happy,” for example, puts a smile on anyone’s face, I don’t care how bad they’re feeling. That’s a smile song. “All Night Long” is a smile song. There are people who are dark in their lives. There are people who are bigots, there are people who are struggling in life and there are people who are successful. But not everyone is on the light side. And when you find a guy [who says], “Lionel, I love that song. That’s the greatest song in world. I got married [to] this song.” There’s no color. There’s no political value here. He likes that song for the message. I found that the more love you put into it, the more you find out what the world is striving to get their arms around.

Well, that’s the hope that you bring to so many people lyrically and musically. You lift their lives, and so it shouldn’t come as a surprise to you that MusiCares wanted to honor you. How does that feel? First of all, it was the greatest surprise ever. MusiCares is the top of the line. You know what it means? It means not only you have a body of work but you also survived the journey. When I got that call, Pharrell, it was as if someone had said I’ve won a lottery. Honestly, I started out with [looking up to] James Taylor [and] Bob Dylan. I mean, when you start thinking of [past MusiCares honorees], these are the people I [respect]. When I got the phone call, it was like, “Are you kidding me?” It’s bigger than even [a] GRAMMY. This is going one step further. I’m actually giving back again. Because here we are celebrating a body of work and all the great stories I will tell about my [career]. But there are also tragedies and hardships in our business, and MusiCares represents the safety net. It’s our safety net. I didn’t realize how deep MusiCares goes [in] helping people get back up on their feet financially. I didn’t realize that until I started doing my research. I mean, I think it was $4.4 million just last year in assistance.

184

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Wow. That’s amazing. That’s amazing. I mean, we’re not talking about little dollars. $4.4 million last year alone, to assist brothers and sisters, is a major accomplishment. But at the same time there’s much more to be done. If I have anything to do with it we’re going to try to break the [fundraising] record and keep on going. But I mean, I’m just honored to be here. That’s the most important thing you have to understand. I’m humbled by the acceptance but also I’m actually honored to step forward.

Honestly, I don’t know anybody who could be more deserving, because you’re gracious and just incredibly generous. The good part here is that you recognize just how fortunate you are. In fact, when I first met you, it was so humbling. And it totally makes sense, because you’re incredibly generous to the people who helped you get to where you are. And that’s what MusiCares is about, it’s about lifting others. At this stage in your career, what is left for you to accomplish? I think I’m blessed. [But] I can’t tell you how many times in the course of a day I’m asked the question, “So why are you doing this? When are you going to retire?” And my answer is, “Retire from what? I never had a job in my life. This is the best hobby.” I’m doing exactly what I love to do and that’s why you can’t get me to stop. And you know, I’ve been asked so many times, “Why don’t you write your book?” I said, “Because I’m not done yet.” Somebody else is going to have to write this book. A current four-time nominee, Pharrell Williams is a 10-time GRAMMY winner, including two wins for Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical. He is currently a coach on the reality television singing competition “The Voice.” In 2008 Williams founded From One Hand To Another, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing children with tools and resources to help them meet their unique potential.

Performing at the Glastonbury Festival in London in 2015

ALAN SILFEN FOR THEON LY.AGENCY

Your music, everything from “Zoom” all the way to “We Are The World” and beyond, there’s just so much hope. And one of the things I love about the music is beyond the melody, beyond the musicality, they were great songs that just colored so much of my life and times.


every child deserves a chance to

succeed

Step Up scholarships change lives for lowincome children and those with certain special needs.

S r o

Co r

St e

:

e g t a .or n d o n ts e 9 . d 99 now . u 1 t 9 n te

to tio dona ’ a o d ar don y als w a ‘a e a s m t k on a ti m ora

T t o ex

pU pF

Help make dreams a reality.

VIA

p


www.WildAnimalSanctuary.org Rescued Animals Are Rehabilitated & Released Into Large Acreage Habitats

Please Help Support Our Important Work

Over 400 Lions, Tigers, Bears, Wolves and other rescued animals living on a 720 Acre Refuge located on the open plains of Colorado!


Congratulations to all the GRAMMY ® nominees.

GildanOnline.com © Gildan USA, Inc. All Rights Reserved


THE RECORDING ACADEMY® TODAY

The Recording Academy’s headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif.

Membership & Industry Relations GRAMMY® Week GRAMMY Museum® MusiCares Foundation® GRAMMY Foundation® Advocacy & Public Policy The Latin Recording Academy® The Digital Academy GRAMMY Pro® The GRAMMY Awards® Process 188

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


YO U R D E S T I N AT I O N F O R T H E F U L L K I TC H E N A I D C R A F T CO F F E E CO L L E C T I O N


MEMBERSHIP & INDUSTRY RELATIONS

RECORDING ACADEMY MEMBERSHIP Membership in The Recording Academy is open to professionals who are actively working in all realms of the music recording industry. Through active participation in The Recording Academy and its initiatives, members have the ability to positively impact the lives of music creators and the music industry at large. Individuals may join The Recording Academy in three separate categories. Voting Members are professionals with creative or technical credits on six commercially released tracks (or their equivalent) or 12 tracks (or their equivalent) released through recognized online music services. These may include vocalists, conductors, songwriters, composers, engineers, producers, instrumentalists, arrangers, art directors, album notes writers, narrators, and music video artists and technicians. Associate Members are industry professionals whose careers are focused on music, or who are employees of companies involved in the recording industry, including writers, publishers, attorneys, business managers, artist managers, artist agents, executive producers, music educators, recording studio staff as well as record label employees. Creative and technical professionals with fewer than the required credits for Voting membership eligibility are eligible for Associate membership. Student Members are students enrolled in a college or trade school who are in a music-related field and are interested in pursuing a career in music. All student members are part of the GRAMMY University Network (GRAMMY U), The Recording Academy’s career development program. Through GRAMMY U, The Recording Academy encourages the next generation of Voting and Associate members, and helps to develop our future recording industry leaders. Voting and Associate members of The Recording Academy are involved in the GRAMMY Awards process. The GRAMMY is the only peer-awarded

190

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

honor for artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry. Member involvement is essential to the integrity of the GRAMMY Awards.

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Representing music markets across the country, The Recording Academy’s 12 regional Chapters work year-round building community through professional development programming, networking, advocacy, and philanthropy. Academy members are associated with the Chapter closest to their home city, and also have full access to the services and support of all 12 Chapters. The Academy serves its national membership through Chapters located in Atlanta, Austin (Texas Chapter), Chicago, Los Angeles, Memphis, Miami (Florida Chapter), Nashville, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Seattle (Pacific Northwest Chapter), and Washington, D.C. The Producers & Engineers Wing is a Recording Academy membership division created to serve the needs of producers, engineers, remixers, manufacturers, technologists, and other related musicrecording professionals. A network with more than 6,000 members, the P&E Wing comprises experts whose work spans all genres, regions and styles. As a powerful, organized voice for the creative and technical recording community, P&E Wing members address critical issues that impact the art and craft of recorded music. Sound quality, development of new technologies, technical best practices, education in the recording arts, and advocacy for the rights of music creators

are all part of the P&E Wing mix. In Washington, D.C., The Recording Academy serves as the voice of songwriters, performers and studio professionals, ensuring the creators’ voice is amplified on Capitol Hill. Through the GRAMMYs on the Hill and GRAMMYs in My District initiatives, Academy members influence policies and legislation that affect the music community. Members have an opportunity to gather with other members to directly lobby lawmakers on Capitol Hill during the annual GRAMMYs on the Hill Advocacy Day. GRAMMYs in My District is another opportunity for members to gather, this time to make a difference by visiting their congressperson’s local office. Whether fighting for free expression, copyright protection, music education, or fair pay for all creators across all platforms, The Recording Academy leads the charge to advance the rights of its members and of the entire recording community. GRAMMYPro.com is the digital home for members of The Recording Academy. Connecting and empowering Academy members from all backgrounds, genres and disciplines, GRAMMY Pro is home to a community of music professionals pursuing excellence in the business and craft of music. The staff headquartered in Santa Monica, Calif., as well as in the 12 Chapters, conducts the daily operations of The Recording Academy with guidance provided by the National Board of Trustees. The Trustees are elected by the Governors of each Chapter to provide vision and ensure effective corporate governance of The Academy.

For more information on Recording Academy membership, visit www.grammypro.com. Learn more about GRAMMY Pro on page 206 and The Academy’s Advocacy initiatives on page 200.


Congratulates 2016 Recording Academy ÂŽ Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

Through the transformative Spirit of your music, you have truly been our Shining Star! For this we share our deepest Gratitude and Devotion. Because of you, becoming a performer is no longer a Fantasy for students in Los Angeles. You give us Reasons to become Mighty Mighty ambassadors of music. Thank you. Yeah, That’s the Way of the World!


Flea and Nile Rodgers perform during the Producers & Engineers Wing’s annual GRAMMY Week gala on Feb. 3, 2015

W

ith GRAMMY Week, The Recording Academy takes advantage of the days prior to the highly anticipated GRAMMY Awards telecast to produce a colorful schedule of private and public programs that celebrate and illuminate the indelible place of music in our society. The Academy honors groundbreaking industry leaders with GRAMMY Salute To Industry Icons, celebrated during Clive Davis’ and The Recording Academy’s Pre-GRAMMY Gala, an exclusive event for which The Academy teams with the innovative music executive to produce this legendary annual GRAMMY party. The official GRAMMY Nominees Reception brings together GRAMMY nominees in a night of celebration prior to the GRAMMY Awards telecast. The Producers & Engineers Wing’s annual GRAMMY Week gala celebrates excellence in music and audio and the professionals working “behind the glass” whose visionary talents have significantly impacted the audio production landscape. The GRAMMY Foundation sponsors a number of events focused on music education and preservation throughout the week. The GRAMMY Career Day program provides hundreds of high school students with the opportunity to learn under the direction of teachers

192

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

based on careers-in-music lesson plans developed in partnership with the USC Thornton School of Music. Additionally, music industry professionals visit with participating schools to share insights and provide valuable career advice. The program culminates at GRAMMY In The Schools Live!, a celebration of music and education showcasing the activities of the GRAMMY Foundation through performances from young program participants with special guest artists. The fundraising concert supports a wide range of GRAMMY in the Schools music education programs for high school students and schools. Members of GRAMMY Camp — Jazz Session, comprising the nation’s top high school instrumentalists and vocalists, travel to the host city of the GRAMMY Awards and perform at key events, including the GRAMMY Celebration after-party, the GRAMMY Nominees Reception and more. The Entertainment Law Initiative aims to promote future careers in entertainment law by inviting the nation’s top law students to participate in a legal writing contest and scholarship competition. ELI is toasted with a high-profile luncheon and awards ceremony attended by students, music attorneys, executives, and members of The Recording Academy.

MusiCares hosts the prestigious Person of the Year tribute dinner and concert two nights before the GRAMMY Awards. The event honors individuals (the most recent honorees include Bob Dylan, Carole King, Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney, and Barbra Streisand) for their philanthropic and creative achievements. Funds raised from the annual Person of the Year tribute benefit MusiCares’ human service programs and the event draws attention to the important work of the organization. The GRAMMY Charity Online Auctions, which raise money for the GRAMMY Foundation and MusiCares, are held in conjunction with the GRAMMY Awards via www.ebay.com/grammy. Finally, the week ends with the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony, GRAMMY Awards telecast and the GRAMMY Celebration after-party, a glamorous post-show affair. It’s an entire day of celebrating not just the 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards nominees and recipients, but also the spirit and importance of music in everyone’s lives.

LARRY BUSACCA/GETTY IMAGES

FRAZER HARRISON/WIREIMAGE.COM

GRAMMY® WEEK

Taylor Swift and Smokey Robinson attend Clive Davis’ and The Recording Academy’s Pre-GRAMMY Gala on Feb. 7, 2015

The Recording Academy’s full calendar of GRAMMY Week programs differs slightly each year. For complete news and information on GRAMMY Week, visit www.grammy.com.


The Jerry Garcia Foundation, a 501c3 nonprofit organization, serves to support meaningful causes through the beauty of art and music.

j e r r y g a r c i a f o u n d a t i o n . o r g

RAISE YOUR VOICE FOR MONARCHS! Monarch butterflies, bumble bees, and other pollinators are at the heart of a healthy world, and they need help. The Xerces Society protects these animals, and you can, too.

Join in at BringBackthePollinators.org

Monarch on milkweed © Bryan E. Reynolds

PROTECTING THE LIFE THAT SUSTAINS US


T

he GRAMMY Museum has served as a dynamic educational and interactive institution dedicated to the power of music since opening its doors in December 2008. The 30,000-squarefoot facility is part of L.A. Live, the premier sports and entertainment destination in downtown Los Angeles. A joint venture of The Recording Academy and AEG, the Museum serves the community with an array of public and education programs. The GRAMMY Museum explores and celebrates the enduring legacies of all forms of music; the creative process; the art and technology of the recording process; and, of course, the history of the GRAMMY Awards, the premier recognition of accomplishment in the recording arts. Four floors of cutting-edge exhibits, interactive experiences and films provide a one-of-a-kind visitor experience — engaging, educational, celebratory, and inspirational. In addition to more than two dozen exhibits that explore GRAMMY-winning music, the Museum is also home to the Clive Davis Theater, an intimate 200-seat venue. The GRAMMY Museum houses a living archive of the GRAMMY Awards’ colorful history. Dedicated computer databases contain information on more than 50 years of GRAMMY recordings and artists, and rare artifacts connect visitors to the legendary recordings and artists that have been honored by the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame and The Recording Academy’s Special Merit Awards. The Museum also shares the process through which GRAMMY winners are selected as well as how the telecast comes together. Since its inaugural year, the Museum has presented exhibits including a Michael Jackson memorial retrospective; an expanded Latin GRAMMY Awards exhibit; Blue Note Records: The Finest In Jazz; The Comedic Genius Of Rodney Dangerfield; Donna Summer: Four Seasons Of Love; Good Vibrations: 50 Years Of The Beach Boys; John Lennon, Songwriter; and Whitney! Celebrating The Musical Legacy Of Whitney Houston.

194

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

The Museum’s more recent exhibits include All Eyez On Me: The Writings Of Tupac Shakur; George Carlin: A Place For My Stuff; Joan Rivers: Can We Talk?; Legends Of Motown: Celebrating The Supremes; Ravi Shankar: A Life In Music; Sinatra: An American Icon; and The Taylor Swift Experience. The Museum also hosts a wide range of public programs in the Clive Davis Theater, including artist interviews, live performances, film screenings, lectures, continuing education classes, and more. The past year has seen an exciting lineup of critically acclaimed programs with Bryan Adams, Jack Antonoff, Courtney Barnett, Leon Bridges, Pat Boone, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Dead Sara, Haim, Beth Hart, Tori Kelly, Milk Carton Kids, Mark O’Connor, Of Monsters And Men, Melissa Rivers, Mavis Staples, James Taylor, Joy Williams, and Mary Wilson of the Supremes, among others. The Museum’s Education Division offers a variety of multidisciplinary programs to inspire, teach and engage students, teachers and families. The education staff uses music as a gateway to learning by providing hands-on experiences that allow students to deepen their understanding of music, culture and history. From education workshops that are developed based on state and national educational content standards, to digital music production, DJ and photography workshops emphasizing various career pathways, and outreach programs designed to bring music to disenfranchised communities, the Museum aims to build students’ knowledge of the world around them through music. The Music Revolution Project, an annual program that offers talented youth the opportunity to engage in musical discourse and performance with their peers, was

COURTESY OF GRAMMY MUSEUM

GRAMMY MUSEUM®

held for the first time at California State University, Los Angeles in July 2015. To celebrate the intersection of music and education, the Museum hosted its second annual Jane Ortner Education Award event on Nov. 3, 2015, featuring award recipients Jackson Browne and Southern California educator Kylie Ko. Additionally, the Museum commemorated the Frank Sinatra centennial celebration by honoring the GRAMMY-winning icon at the 2015 Architects of Sound gala in conjunction with the opening of the Sinatra: An American Icon exhibit on Oct. 21, 2015. GRAMMY Museum Mississippi is expected to open in Cleveland, Miss., on March 5. The 27,000-plus-square-foot facility is intended to be one of the most technologically advanced music-themed museums in the world. The Mississippi Museum will feature a combination of public events, educational programming, engaging multimedia presentations, and interactive permanent and traveling exhibits, including a Mississippi-centric display that will introduce visitors to the impact of Mississippi’s songwriters, producers and musicians on the traditional and modern music landscape. Membership dues and donations support the Museum’s public and educational programs as well as maintain the Museum’s cutting-edge exhibits. There are a variety of membership packages available, including corporate packages. All members enjoy exclusive access to the Museum and its programs.

To learn more about the GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live and its various programs, or to become a member, visit www.grammymuseum.org or call 213.765.6800. For more information on GRAMMY Museum Mississippi, visit www.grammymuseumms.org or call 662.641.1494.


Home to GRAMMY Museum® Mississippi — the only GRAMMY Museum ® outside of Los Angeles — Delta State University is preparing the next generation of difference makers in everything from music to health care. Check out our world-class recording studios, entertainment industry program, Delta Blues courses and nationally recognized programs in aviation, geospatial technology, nursing and education.

CLEVELAND, MISSISSIPPI • DELTASTATE.EDU • 1.800.GO.TO.DSU


MICHAEL KOVAC/WIREIMAGE.COM

MUSICARES FOUNDATION®

E

stablished in 1989 by The Recording Academy, MusiCares provides a safety net of critical assistance for music people in times of need. MusiCares’ services and resources cover a wide range of financial, medical and personal emergencies, and each case is treated with integrity and confidentiality. Since its inception, MusiCares has developed into a premier support system for music people and its innovative programs and services are designed to meet the specific needs of its constituents. Last year MusiCares distributed more than $4.4 million in direct financial assistance to more than 4,500 music people in need. MusiCares also earned its second consecutive four-star rating from charity evaluator Charity Navigator. Only 21 percent of charities have earned this top rating for at least two years running.

EMERGENCY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM With a commitment to providing help to those in need as quickly as possible, the Emergency Financial Assistance Program provides assistance for basic living expenses including rent, utilities and car payments; medical expenses including doctor, dentist and hospital bills; psychotherapy; and treatment for HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, hepatitis C, and other critical illnesses. The program is open to music people who are able to document at least five years of employment in the music industry and/or credited contribution to six commercially released recordings or videos, and who can demonstrate proof of need. MusiCares operates toll-free phone lines in the West region (800.687.4227), East region (877.303.6962) and South region (877.626.2748).

HEALTHY ESSENTIALS SERVICES Proactive services can often prevent our community members from falling into crisis. MusiCares has developed a slate of Healthy Essentials maintenance and preventative services, including dental and medical screenings and clinics; workshops on financial, legal and health issues; and panels at industry conferences and festivals. In addition, MusiCares helps music professionals understand and access medical insurance options available under the Affordable Care Act.

ADDICTION RECOVERY The MusiCares MAP Fund, launched when MusiCares joined with the

196

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Musicians’ Assistance Program, has become a leading force in the effort to identify and address the problems of addiction in our industry by utilizing a pool of resources set aside specifically to provide members of the music community access to addiction recovery treatment and sober living. The MusiCares MAP Fund benefit concert is held annually to generate resources for our addiction recovery services. Staffed by qualified chemical dependency and intervention specialists, the MusiCares Safe Harbor Room program, which is sponsored by the Bohemian Foundation and RBC Capital Markets, offers a support network to those in recovery while they are participating in the production of televised music shows and other major music events. In addition, MusiCares offers weekly addiction support groups for people in the music industry to discuss how to best cope with the issues surrounding the recovery process, and the MusiCares Sober Touring Network provides a resource of individuals across the United States who take music people to recovery support meetings while on the road. MusiCares and the GRAMMY Foundation hold an annual Teens Make Music Contest in partnership with DrugFree.org, which invites teen musicians to create songs or videos about the importance of healthy choices or the dangers of drug abuse. The contest is open to young musicians ages 14–18, and the first-place winner receives two tickets to the GRAMMY Awards.

PERSON OF THE YEAR TRIBUTE The annual MusiCares Person of the Year

2015 MusiCares Person of the Year Bob Dylan with former President Jimmy Carter and Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow

tribute gala takes place during GRAMMY Week. Each year, the event honors a recording artist who has made important contributions to the world of music and has demonstrated extraordinary humanitarian and philanthropic efforts. Launched in 1991, the event generates significant financial support for MusiCares and draws attention to the critical work of the organization. The 2016 honoree is Lionel Richie; the previous honorees are Tony Bennett, Bono, Natalie Cole, Phil Collins, David Crosby, Neil Diamond, Bob Dylan, Gloria Estefan, Aretha Franklin, Don Henley, Billy Joel, Elton John, Quincy Jones, Carole King, Paul McCartney, Luciano Pavarotti, Bonnie Raitt, Paul Simon, Bruce Springsteen, Sting, Barbra Streisand, James Taylor, Brian Wilson, Stevie Wonder, and Neil Young.

HOW CAN I HELP? Your help is more important now than ever. Please consider MusiCares for your personal or professional charitable contribution. Your contribution can make a real difference in the lives of the members of our music family. Throughout the year, the GRAMMY Charity Online Auctions raise funds for MusiCares programs by bringing exclusive VIP experiences and autographed memorabilia to the public through various partners, including Charitybuzz, eBay, Julien’s Auctions, and Prizeo.

To learn more about MusiCares’ programs and services, visit www.musicares.org or call 310.392.3777.


Congratulations!

Congratulations to EWF from Gallagher Staging

Congratulations from your Jonas Productions Family!

Congratulations on this monumental honor! Arthur, Betty, Wendy & Ascot Travel Services

Ba de ya de ya de ya A GRAMMY® golden dream So Dance the Night Away Congratulations! Ken

Well deserved! It’s about time. Rhonda, DCat, George and AD

LA’s Premier Rehearsal and Backline Facility

Our Dear Friends with Earth, Wind and Fire, keep making the music and we’ll be honored to keep bringing it.

Congratulations on your many years of success and here’s to many more!


ANGELA WEISS/WIREIMAGE.COM

GRAMMY FOUNDATION®

T

he GRAMMY Foundation was established in 1988 to cultivate the understanding, appreciation and advancement of the contribution of recorded music to American culture. The Foundation accomplishes this mission through programs and activities designed to engage the music industry and cultural community as well as the general public. The Foundation works in partnership year-round with its founder, The Recording Academy, to bring national attention to important issues such as the value and impact of music and arts education and the urgency of preserving our rich cultural legacy. An important part of this mission includes the direct involvement and interaction of music professionals.

EDUCATION PROGRAMS In collaboration with The Recording Academy, the GRAMMY Foundation presents the Music Educator Award to recognize current educators who are making a significant and lasting contribution to the field of music education. Under the banner of GRAMMY in the Schools, the GRAMMY Foundation achieves its goals in music education through programs that bring students together with working professionals for “real-life” exchanges of information and inspiration; and recognizing excellence in musical achievement nationwide among individual students, teachers and school music programs. GRAMMY In The Schools Live! is a special concert event presented each year during GRAMMY Week to showcase these programs. GRAMMY Camp is a residential summer camp for high school students with a focus on the many careers in the music industry. In 2015 GRAMMY Camp was presented in Los Angeles, New York and Nashville, Tenn. Installments of GRAMMY Camp — Weekend, a one-day nonresidential music industry experience, were presented in Atlanta; Bellevue, Wash.; Chicago; Dallas; Denver; Jersey City, N.J.; Minneapolis; and Washington, D.C. GRAMMY Career Day is a program that brings music industry professionals together with high school students to give them an introductory look into the many careers available in the music industry. GRAMMY Camp — Jazz Session selects top high school players and singers to form a band, choir and combo. They receive an all-expenses-paid

198

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

trip to Los Angeles during GRAMMY Week to perform at GRAMMY-related events, record an album and attend the GRAMMY Awards. Qualified Jazz Session members are offered approximately $2 million in scholarships from our college partners and participants annually. GRAMMY Signature Schools provides awards and grants to public high school music programs in two categories: need and excellence. Using the model of the GRAMMY Signature Schools program, the GRAMMY Foundation created the GRAMMY Signature Schools Community Award, which provides grants to high school music programs across the United States.

PRESERVATION & ADVANCEMENT The GRAMMY Foundation’s preservation and advancement initiatives are designed to foster dialogue about the compelling issues facing the music industry, support projects that increase the understanding of music and its role in society, and raise public awareness about the urgent need to preserve our nation’s recorded sound legacy. The Entertainment Law Initiative is comprised of a legal seminar series, a national scholarship essay competition for law students and a high-profile luncheon during GRAMMY Week. Moving into its 18th year, ELI has awarded more than $180,000 in scholarships and prizes since its inception. Winners’ essays are also published in professional law journals. The GRAMMY Foundation Grant Program, with funding generously provided by The Recording Academy, awards grants each year to organizations

Hunter Hayes and 2015 Music Educator Award recipient Jared Cassedy at the GRAMMY Foundation’s GRAMMY In The Schools Live! benefit concert on Feb. 4, 2015

and individuals in two categories: scientific research and archiving and preservation. The Grant Program has awarded more than $6 million over the life of the program. The GRAMMY Foundation Living Histories program preserves on visual media the life stories of key recording industry professionals and visionaries who helped create the history of recorded sound. This footage is available for research and educational purposes. To date, the Foundation has completed more than 200 interviews with artists, producers, executives, and technology pioneers. The GRAMMY Foundation was instrumental in writing and successfully passing the National Recording Preservation Act in 2000. This legislation created a National Recording Preservation Board that works with the Librarian of Congress and the public to select entries for the National Recording Registry, ensuring the preservation of these designated historic recordings. To date, 425 recordings have been added to the Registry. Throughout the year, the GRAMMY Charity Online Auctions raise funds for programs by bringing exclusive VIP experiences and autographed memorabilia to the public through various partners, including Charitybuzz, eBay, Julien’s Auctions, and Prizeo. For more information on the GRAMMY Foundation, visit www.grammyfoundation.org. For more information on its education programs, visit www.grammyintheschools.com.


WHEREVER MUSIC TAKES YOU DELTA TAKES YOU THERE, TOO. Music has the ability to transport you to somewhere else. So does Delta. In fact, your next opportunity is only a flight away. Just ask the 170 million passengers who choose to fly to one of our 326 destinations.

GRAMMY®, GRAMMY Awards® and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy® and are used under license ©2015 The Recording Academy.


PAUL MORIGI/WIREIMAGE.COM

PAUL MORIGI/WIREIMAGE.COM

ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY

The Band Perry’s Reid Perry, Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), the Band Perry’s Kimberly Perry and Neil Perry, Reps. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), and The Academy’s Daryl P. Friedman at the GRAMMYs on the Hill Welcome To Congress Celebration on Jan. 13, 2015

ADVOCACY The GRAMMYs on the Hill Awards and Advocacy Day is an annual celebration where Academy members, lawmakers and music industry professionals honor music creators and legislators who have improved the overall environment for music, followed by a day of grassroots lobbying on Capitol Hill. GRAMMYs in My District is a unique localized grassroots lobbying campaign in which Academy members nationwide visit the local offices of congressional members. The GRAMMY Creators Alliance is a collective of successful music makers that works to identify new issues and advise policymakers on long-term pathways to a sustainable music marketplace. Recording Academy leaders also serve as expert witnesses before key congressional hearings determining music policy.

200

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

EDUCATION The Advocacy office’s education efforts include the Recording Arts and Sciences Congressional Caucus, where The Academy jointly produces events with members of Congress on Capitol Hill to educate policymakers about the issues facing music makers. In addition, online and social media engagement includes an Advocacy Action tool that allows members to advocate directly for pro-music policies with government officials, as well as

dedicated Facebook (GRAMMYs on the Hill) and Twitter (@GRAMMYAdvocacy) pages, regular blogs, and news bulletins to give Academy members real-time updates on policy matters.

DIALOGUE Events include GRAMMY Town Hall, a series of congressional briefings to educate Academy members on key policy matters, GRAMMY Industry Roundtable, a series where policy leaders and music professionals discuss critical issues in a private, off-the-record setting, and the Music Leaders Retreat, a semiannual gathering co-founded and co-hosted by Recording Academy President/CEO Neil Portnow for leaders of every major music association to discuss common legislative goals and important community issues.

LEIGH VOGEL/WIREIMAGE.COM

T

he only membership organization representing all types of music creators, The Recording Academy was dubbed the “supersized musicians lobby” by Congressional Quarterly. The Academy’s Advocacy & Public Policy office in Washington, D.C., partners with Academy members from across the country to present a powerful lobbying corps for music creators’ rights.

Neil Portnow and first lady Michelle Obama present Alicia Keys with the Recording Artists’ Coalition Award at the 2015 GRAMMYs on the Hill Awards on April 15, in Washington, D.C.

Academy advocates (l-r) Kirk Whalum, Daryl Friedman, Jennifer Blakeman, Laurie Mahoney, Jerry Blair, and Eddie Money meet with Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) (second from right) during the 2015 GRAMMYs on the Hill Advocacy Day

For more information about Advocacy & Public Policy at The Recording Academy, visit www.grammy.org/advocacy.


C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S T O A T R U E L E G E N D

HERBIE HANCOCK

PHOTO: DOUGLAS KIRKLAND

THE RECORDING ACADEMY ® LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 14 GRAMMY AWARDS ® ACADEMY AWARD © WINNER KENNEDY CENTER HONORS RECIPIENT AND STILL GOING STRONG

los angeles

·

new york

·

monterey

·

nashville

·

austin

·

london


THE LATIN RECORDING ACADEMY®

KEVIN WINTER/WIREIMAGE.COM

®

Paula Fernandes and Alejandro Sanz perform with Mariachi Sol De Mexico at the 16th Latin GRAMMY Awards on Nov. 19, 2015, in Las Vegas

I

n 2015 The Latin Recording Academy celebrated its 16th year of honoring the best in Latin music. Established in 1997 as the first international venture launched by The Recording Academy, The Latin Recording Academy is a unique membership-based association dedicated to improving the quality of life and cultural condition for Latin music and its creators. The Latin Recording Academy Board of Trustees drives the organization’s efforts in staging the annual Latin GRAMMY Awards and many ancillary events while fulfilling The Latin Academy’s mission. The Latin GRAMMY Awards aims to recognize artistic and technical excellence, not sales figures or chart positions, and the nominees and winners are determined by their peers — the qualified voting members of The Latin Recording Academy. Latin GRAMMY nominees and winners are chosen through a process similar to the GRAMMY Awards, with a few important differences: membership and voting are international, the eligible releases can be issued both inside and outside the United States, and the recordings are primarily in Spanish or Portuguese. Culminating a week full of Latin

202

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

GRAMMY-related events, the 16th Latin GRAMMY Awards telecast aired on the Univision Network live from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas. More than 8 million viewers tuned in to all or part of the live three-hour broadcast. The telecast positioned Univision as the No. 2 broadcast network in the United States for the entire night among adults 18–34. Additionally, the telecast ranked as the No. 1 social TV broadcast of the entire night based on the number of unique tweets. The Latin Academy continued another long-standing tradition when Roberto Carlos was celebrated as the 2015 Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year. The Latin Recording Academy also recognized the impressive long-lasting careers of Leandro “Gato” Barbieri, Ana Belén and Víctor Manuel, Angela Carrasco, Djavan, El Gran Combo De Puerto Rico, and Pablo Milanés as 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award

recipients; and Federico Britos, Humberto Gatica and Chelique Sarabia as 2015 Trustees Award recipients. In 2014 The Latin Recording Academy, with the support of The Recording Academy, announced the creation of the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation as a means to further awareness and appreciation of the significant contributions of Latin music and its creators through scholarships, fellowships, grants, and educational programs. In April 2015, the Cultural Foundation announced the first recipient of the Enrique Iglesias Scholarship, awarding $200,000 to Berklee School of Music student Itzel Salinas. In August 2015, an additional $600,000 in scholarships was awarded to 33 students in various Latin American countries, Spain and the United States. Additionally, the Cultural Foundation awarded $20,000 in grants to institutions from various countries for the purpose of research and preservation of Latin Music. In total, the Latin Cultural Foundation committed nearly $1 million in contributions during its first year of operation. LatinGRAMMY.com continues to be the preferred communication tool with members, media and Latin music fans. In addition, the Latin GRAMMYs’ Twitter account has more than 2.3 million followers and the organization’s presence on Facebook provides a connection for nearly 1 million constituents and fans. The active, generous and selfless participation of The Latin Recording Academy’s Trustees, various ad hoc committees and active members around the world, along with the help of its sister organization, The Recording Academy, ensures that programs and activities are current and relevant to the Latin music community.

For more information, visit www.latingrammy.com, or contact The Latin Recording Academy’s headquarters in Miami at 305.576.0036 or the Awards office in Santa Monica at 310.581.8689.



THE DIGITAL ACADEMY

A

s The Recording Academy has grown its programs and services to meet the needs of the 21st century music community, the organization’s digital initiatives continue to expand to communicate and advance our mission and the GRAMMY brand. GRAMMY.com has been the exciting online extension of the GRAMMY telecast for nearly two decades. While helping to build awareness for and drive viewership to the GRAMMY Awards, the site is an engaging destination celebrating music and its cultural impact that connects with music fans in an accessible and conversational voice. And with www.grammypro.com, the online component of the GRAMMY Pro initiative, GRAMMY websites continue to provide a 24/7 connection for all Recording Academy members. For the 58th GRAMMY Awards, GRAMMY.com offered more video, more photos and a more live and interactive “second-screen” GRAMMY experience than ever before. For the seventh year, The Recording Academy presented GRAMMY

204

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Live — a live video stream of GRAMMY activities that included a live webcast of the GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony and special behind-the-scenes action and backstage coverage during the GRAMMY telecast, including red-carpet interviews and exclusive GRAMMY Week content. More than 70 categories of awards are presented during the Premiere Ceremony, and until 2008 the presentation was only available to those in attendance. Social engagement, live event coverage, real-time video, and photos enhanced the lively GRAMMY dialogue on the site. The mobile-optimized GRAMMY.com accommodated the nearly 60 percent of visitors who access the site on smartphones and tablets. Additionally, The Academy continues to expand its digital presence for both the GRAMMY Awards and the organization’s year-round initiatives by sharing unique content on YouTube and social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and Instagram where users can interact with the GRAMMY brand in a meaningful

and authentic way. The success of this engagement led to the 57th GRAMMY Awards generating 20.9 million tweets and 1.6 billion views globally, marking television’s biggest social event for entertainment specials in 2015. The GRAMMY Pro website provides Academy members with exclusive professional development video and articles, easy online membership management tools, and an improved members-only social network where they can share, connect and learn from one another. All Academy members can access the website for unique content and post status updates as well as audio, video, photos, and more. For 2016 The Academy once again launched GRAMMY Amplifier presented by Hyundai. Centered around an interactive online platform, the program invited emerging artists to share their songs via SoundCloud for a chance to have their music vetted by a panel of artist curators, who narrowed talent based on criteria such as quality and “amplification” — the amount of shares/likes they achieved. Ultimately, three winners were selected from the finalists by the Amplifier ambassadors. Year-round, GRAMMY.com offers music fans a rich destination to explore the music and artists who are impacting the culture through a variety of content types, including performance video, interviews and more. GRAMMY.org is a platform dedicated specifically to our mission — the work of The Academy (including our advocacy efforts and the Producers & Engineers Wing), as well as the MusiCares and GRAMMY Foundations. The Academy also continues to grow its commitment to providing Voting members with the ability to listen to full tracks of nominated music in a streaming, on-demand format. The streaming quality was increased to 320Kbps this year, resulting in greater fidelity for this powerful tool that supports our GRAMMY Awards process. The Academy is continually innovating its digital initiatives for the best engagement and communication with music fans and Academy members.


#immerseyourself

Discover Selfeo – the newest social media platform that allows you to Immerse Yourself in the Latest Breaking News, Viral Videos and Hottest Trends live.

http://www.selfeo.com


GRAMMY PRO®

Recording Academy members can enjoy access to GRAMMYPro.com online and via their smartphones and tablet devices

G

RAMMY Pro is The Recording Academy’s Membership & Industry Relations initiative designed to provide tools to help members grow in their careers creatively and technically. Through online content, events, community engagement, and collaborations with industry partners, GRAMMY Pro offers a wide range of professional development resources to expand the knowledge base and networks of today’s music professionals. Representing the diverse interests of membership, GRAMMY Pro continues to evolve with the changing needs and feedback of Recording Academy members. GRAMMY Pro’s members-only website, www.grammypro.com, gives Academy members 24/7 access to exclusive online content. The website features a library of videos and articles exploring the business

206

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

and craft behind music. Quick tutorials provide tips and techniques from industry veterans while in-depth interviews with professionals from various backgrounds deliver insight into the latest topics, trends and technologies shaping the music industry. Marketing, branding, social media, production, engineering, singing, songwriting, touring, management, and licensing are among the array of topics covered through the site. In addition, coverage of professional development events presented by The Recording Academy’s 12 Chapters bring local programming directly to members nationwide. The website also serves as members’ gateway to the GRAMMY Awards process with links to balloting and telecast ticket information, as well as an online listening function; a one-stop shop for membership

management, allowing for easy sign-ups and renewals; one-click access to Membership staff; and a community where members can build business relationships, collaborate creatively or simply connect socially with other artists and music professionals across the country. In addition to on-demand resources via the website, GRAMMYPro.com offers live-streamed programming with a range of professional development offerings, including up-close-and-personal conversations, engaging presentations and a variety of activities to serve Recording Academy members of all backgrounds and experience levels.

For more information, please visit www.grammypro.com.



GRAMMY AWARDS® PROCESS

T

he Awards process is complex and involved. Each entry is subjected to verification, screening and multilevel nominating procedures, ensuring fairness and integrity. Each year, from early July through August, The Recording Academy receives more than 20,000 entries, which are processed and verified by Academy staff for eligibility. Next, over a two-week period each fall at the annual GRAMMY Awards screening meetings, hundreds of music experts from around the country gather in Los Angeles to sort entries for placement in their appropriate categories. The genres include Alternative Music,

American Roots Music, Children’s, Classical, Country, Dance/Electronic Music, Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music, Jazz, Latin, Metal, Music For Visual Media, New Age, Pop/Rock, R&B, Rap, Reggae, Regional Roots Music, Traditional Pop, and World Music. During the screening process, a great deal of care is taken to ensure each entry has been fully vetted for eligibility and placed into its appropriate category. These screening meetings are one of many vital steps in the complete GRAMMY Awards process. Once the screening process is complete, the entry list is created and sent with the first ballot to all Voting members of

® 208

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

The Recording Academy. In addition, 25 craft committees with experts in the fields of packaging, album notes, historical, surround sound, remixing, composing/ arranging, producing, and engineering meet to determine the nominees in these respective specialty categories. When the first ballot has closed, the initial results are tallied by The Recording Academy’s independent accounting firm and the nominations list is created. This list is determined by the first-round vote of Academy Voting members in good standing. In some categories, the top five nominees are determined by this vote. In the General Field and in several of the specialized genre fields — such as Jazz, Classical and American Roots — the initial list is brought down to the top 15 to 30 vote recipients in each category, and is then voted on by special national nomination review committees — by genre — comprising Voting members from each of The Academy’s Chapter cities and approved by the National Board of Trustees. These committees, much like the screening committees, gather for multiday meetings to determine the top five nominees in each category. The votes are cast by secret ballot and are, once again, tabulated by our independent accounting firm. The top five vote recipients in each category become GRAMMY nominees. The nominations are generally announced in early December. Approximately two weeks later, final ballots are sent to the Voting members of The Academy, who select the GRAMMY winners. The accounting firm again tabulates the votes and the sealed results are opened for the first time on the GRAMMY Awards telecast and GRAMMY Awards Premiere Ceremony. A group of specialists representing every genre of music meets in April to determine the necessity, integrity and feasibility of Awards-related proposals submitted throughout the year. Any proposals approved by The Recording Academy’s Board of Trustees will be implemented immediately for the upcoming Awards year.


THE BIGGEST HITS FROM MUSIC’S BIGGEST NIGHT

®

Available Now

A portion of the proceeds benefit the MusiCares ® and GRAMMY Foundations. 2016GRAMMYALBUM.COM

GRAMMY and the gramophone logo are registered trademarks of The Recording Academy and are used under license. P C 2016 The Recording Academy. ®



Now part of the DIRECTV Residential Experience for Hotels Transform the in-room experience into every guest’s favorite destination with the ultimate entertainment library from DIRECTV CINEMA

BENEFITS TO YOUR PROPERTY:

viewing experience for your guests without taxing your hotel infrastructure — leaving hotel Internet bandwidth for the other things guests want to do on your WiFi network ■

BENEFITS TO YOUR GUESTS:

On-premise video caching server reduces long-term broadband costs and minimizes Internet congestion occurrences from video streaming application

entertainment viewing experience to your guests — your competition can’t!

DIRECTV CINEMA provides instant access to the newest movie releases plus hundreds of movie titles at a much more desirable price point New movies are added every week and select new titles are available nearly a month before guests will find them on Netflix® or Redbox® DVR functionality with up to eight hours of recording capacity, instant replay, pause and rewind give your guests the ultimate moviewatching experience that fits their schedule High-

Call DIRECT VIDEO ENTERTAINMENT at 1.800.709.8731 today to get the best TV experience at our best prices ever. DIRECTV CINEMA HD movies starting at $5.99. Requires DIRECTV Residential Experience Plus system with Guest Welcome Screen. Dedicated Internet Connection and Property Management System integration required. 3mbp Internet bandwidth requirements only for off-hour refresh of movies. Actual number of titles will vary. DIRECTV CINEMA content requires an enhanced DRE HD Receiver (H25 or later) with DVR capability. Programming, pricing, terms and conditions subject to change at any time. Taxes not included. Movies expire 24-72 hours after you have begun to watch them. DIRECTV CINEMA purchases are non-refundable. Visit directv.com/hotels for details. Netflix and the Netflix logo are trademarks of Netflix, Inc. REDBOX and the REDBOX design are registered trademarks of Redbox Automated Retail, LLC. ©2015 DIRECTV. DIRECTV and DIRECTV CINEMA are registered trademarks of DIRECTV, LLC. AT&T, the AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective owners.


THE RECORDING ACADEMY®

EXECUTIVE STAFF

NEIL PORTNOW President/CEO

WAYNE ZAHNER Chief Financial Officer

NEDA AZARFAR Vice President, Marketing Communications

BRANDEN CHAPMAN Executive In Charge Of Production & Chief Business Development Officer

RICK ENGDAHL Chief Information Officer

BILL FREIMUTH Senior Vice President, Awards

DARYL P. FRIEDMAN Chief Industry, Government & Member Relations Officer

GAETANO FRIZZI Chief Human Resources Officer

EVAN GREENE Chief Marketing Officer

JASON JAMES Chief Digital Officer

DAVID KONJOYAN Vice President, Creative Services

NANCY SHAPIRO Senior Vice President, Special Projects

CHUCK ORTNER National Legal Counsel

BOBBY ROSENBLOUM Deputy General Counsel

GARY SMITH Managing Partner, Deloitte & Touche

ADVISORS

JOEL KATZ General Counsel

212

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


1 9 0 0

A T T O R N E Y S

|

3 8

L O C A T I O N S

W O R L D W I D E˚

Shining STARS

Greenberg Traurig congratulates

Earth, Wind & Fire

Amsterdam +31 (0) 20 301 7300 | Atlanta 678.553.2100 | Las Vegas 702.792.3773 | London* +44 (0) 203 349 8700 | Los Angeles 310.586.7700 Miami 305.579.0500 | New York 212.801.9200 | San Francisco 415.655.1300 | Silicon Valley 650.328.8500 | Washington, D.C. 202.331.3100

G R E E N B E R G T R A U R I G , L L P | AT T O R N E Y S AT L A W | W W W . G T L A W . C O M Greenberg Traurig is a service mark and trade name of Greenberg Traurig, LLP and Greenberg Traurig, P.A. ©2016 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. Attorneys at Law. All rights reserved. Contact: Richard I. Leher in Los Angeles at 310.586.7700 / Joel Katz in Atlanta at 678.553.2100. °These numbers are subject to fluctuation. *Operates as Greenberg Traurig Maher LLP. 26818


THE RECORDING ACADEMY® NATIONAL TRUSTEE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

TRUSTEE OFFICERS

JOHN POPPO Chair Of The Board

RUBY MARCHAND Vice Chair

ERIC SCHILLING Secretary/Treasurer

GEORGE J. FLANIGEN IV Chair Emeritus

TRUSTEES

214

MINDI ABAIR Los Angeles

KEN ABDO Chicago

PETER ASHER Los Angeles

JEFF BALDING Nashville

JENNIFER BLAKEMAN New York

CLAUDIA BRANT Los Angeles

MAURETTE BROWN CLARK Washington, D.C.

HELEN BRUNER Philadelphia

BRANDON BUSH Atlanta

GREG “STRYKE” CHIN Florida

MIKE CLINK Los Angeles

LINDA LORENCE CRITELLI New York

FLETCHER FOSTER Nashville

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

BETH COHEN Florida



THE RECORDING ACADEMY® NATIONAL TRUSTEE OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

BILL GIBSON Pacific Northwest

MATT HENNESSY Chicago

DANIEL HILL Nashville

TAMMY HURT Atlanta

DAVID IVORY Philadelphia

ERIC JARVIS Texas

CHANDRA LAPLUME Nashville

JEFF LEVENSON New York

GLENN LORBECKI Pacific Northwest

SUSAN MARSHALL Memphis

ANN MINCIELI New York

KUROSH NASSERI Washington, D.C.

CHERYL PAWELSKI Los Angeles

NICK PHILLIPS San Francisco

GINO ROBAIR San Francisco

NILE RODGERS New York

MICHAEL ROMANOWSKI San Francisco

KEN SHEPHERD Memphis

KAREN SHERRY New York

PATRICK STUMP Chicago

GILBERT VELASQUEZ Texas

CHRIS WALDEN Los Angeles

PAUL WALL Texas

DAN WARNER Florida

HARVEY MASON JR. Los Angeles

216

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


FEATURING SLEEK SMOOTHER™ WEAR YOUR OWN BRA ROMPER

It’s whats underneath that matters

GET ALL-OVER CONFIDENCE WITH OUR TARGETED SHAPING SYSTEM

©2015 Hanesbrands Inc. All rights reserved.

TOP SOLUTIONS

TUMMY SOLUTIONS

BOTTOM SOLUTIONS

ALL- OVER SOLUTIONS


NATIONAL STAFF

Thank You To The Dedicated Staff Of The Recording Academy ADVOCACY & PUBLIC POLICY Janine Coveney Todd Dupler Lindsey Taylor

AWARDS Michael Almanza Joanna Chu Brian Clasby Nick DiFruscia Jacquelynn Dygert Jennie Freeburg Lisa Goich-Andreadis Jeriel Johnson Angela Jollivette Tracy McKee Marc Mutnansky Ralph Olivarez Sean Riley Tahsan Scott Julie Smith Linda Wilvang

BUSINESS AFFAIRS Eric Burnett Miranda Eggleston Daniel Lopez Alan Matkovic Ann Meckelborg Todd Parker Adriana Preciado Lani Simmons Michael Sticka Charlotte Williams

CREATIVE SERVICES Kiana Butler Renée Fabian Tim McPhate Philip Merrill Iman Saadat Woodley

218

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

DIGITAL MEDIA Kevin Colligan Rachel Fentz Frances Inomata Trisha Mitra-Nedic A.J. Roach Frank San Filippo Adrian Tosh Kali Weissman

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS Logan Benjamin Andie Cox Lindsay Gabler Chris Gertz-Rombach Marisa Kurtz Lourdes Lopez Patton Jerry Sharell

EXECUTIVE OFFICE

MEDIA PRODUCTIONS

Claudine Little Laura Sibigtroth

Paul Madeira Hillary Melin Scott Petersen

FACILITIES & OPERATIONS Jose Cardenas Jr. Brian Klinsport Troy Lillestol Esperanza Ramirez Tim Whalen

HUMAN RESOURCES & DEVELOPMENT Stacey Adams Shonda Grant Lila Mayes

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY David Mar Joseph Melendez Kiyumi Nishida Stephen Salazar Justin Shover Jonathan Tol

MARKETING & STRATEGIC ALLIANCES Jim Cannella Monica Dozier Shumetris Halford Alex Messianu Benjamin Moore Adrienne Reed Simona Vackova

MEMBERSHIP & INDUSTRY RELATIONS Rob Accatino Christee Albino Jessica Allen Stacy Anderson Lyn Aurelius Grace Baca Erin Baxter Nicole Brown Michele Caplinger Jamieson Chandler Wendi Cherry Marta Clark Ashley Coleman Michael Compton Kenny Cordova Lacy Cowden Laura Crawford Neil Crilly Nick Cucci Kayenecha Daugherty Yasmin de Soiza Maureen Droney Ashley Ernst Virginia Faddy Yvonne Faison John Farrey Brian Fox Annika Frank Sara Furrer

Jenna Goode Frank Guillen Tera Healy Shannon Herber Nate Hertweck Brittany Hoover Jon Hornyak Sarah Jansen Theresa Jenkins Andrea Jones Maurice Kalous Leah Larocco Christen McFarland Daniel Mendoza Brittany Presley Kelley Purcell Nathan Pyle Paul Raksit Laura Rodriguez Mark Schulz Laura Segura Mueller Ashley Sheehan Bri Stewart Susan Stewart Alicia Warwick Courtney White Reid Wick Michael Winger Candice Yang Matthew Young Lisa Zahn

PRODUCTION & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Kate Blair Adrian Diaz Ivan Diaz Casey Immoor Nora Luna Leigha Nettleton Rex Supa Clay Upton


the studios at the sunset Marquis hotel and Villas

Jed leiber and the staff of nightBird Congratulate our Clients and GraMMy® nominees BoB Dylan • Carrie UnDerwooD • Diplo • Drake • FlorenCe + The MaChine JaCk ü (Skrillex anD Diplo) • JereMih • JiM Beanz • John legenD • JoSh groBan JUSTin BieBer • kanye weST • keiTh UrBan • kelly ClarkSon • Max MarTin • Maroon 5 pharrell williaMS • roger waTerS • Taylor SwiFT • The weeknD • TiMBalanD • wiz khaliFa

1200 Alta Loma Road • West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-8405 ph • (310) 854-0506 fax • www.nightbirdrecordingstudios.com


NATIONAL STAFF Foundations Staff And Boards EXECUTIVE STAFF

SCOTT GOLDMAN Vice President

HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES Danielle Bowker Brett Bryngelson Debbie Carroll Stefanie Curtiss Shireen Janti Reid Erica Krusen Jennifer Leff Nicole Oliva Harold Owens Anita Ramsarup Myah Stone

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS Hannah Berryman Christina Cassidy

PROGRAMS & EVENTS Kate Allen Kelly Darr

PRESIDENT/CEO Neil Portnow

Ryan Seacrest

CHAIR

Tim Bucher

VICE CHAIR

DEVELOPMENT

SECRETARY/TREASURER

EDUCATION Dawn Coraci Joseph Langford Julie Mutnansky Thomas Piland David Sears

EVENTS

Dorit Kalev Dina Morales Ana Serrato Wynnie Wynn

220

HONORARY CHAIR

Ryan Donahue Carol Flores Roger Tang

Loren Fishbein Kristen Jennings LaShon Malone VanAn Tranchi

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Neil Portnow

LUIS DOUSDEBES Chief Financial Officer

HONORARY CHAIR John Branca

CHAIR

Bill Silva

VICE CHAIR

Alexandra Patsavas

SECRETARY/TREASURER

DAVINA ARYEH Vice President, Business Development

Arnie Herrmann

Scott Pascucci

GRAMMY Foundation Board of Directors

BUSINESS AFFAIRS

PRESIDENT/CEO

CHAIR EMERITUS

DANA TOMARKEN Vice President

JUDY WONG Vice President, Finance

MusiCares Foundation Board of Directors

Geoff Cottrill

Rachna Bhasin

CHAIR EMERITUS Rusty Rueff

Pamela Alexander Darrell Brown Troy Carter Dan Cherry Greg “Stryke” Chin David Dorn George J. Flanigen IV Ethiopia Habtemariam John Hamm Michal Katz Amanda Marks Elizabeth Moody John Poppo David Webster will.i.am

John Burk Rod Essig Pete Fisher Susan Genco Jody Gerson Olivia Harrison James Higa Mike Knobloch Kevin Lyman Michael McDonald Alissa Pollack John Poppo Kirdis Postelle Scott Powell, M.D. Stasia Washington

Latin Recording Academy Staff And Boards EXECUTIVE STAFF

AIDA SCORZA Vice President, Awards

AWARDS

Diana Alvarado Uziel Colon Roberto Isaac Claudia Santos

BUSINESS AFFAIRS Karine Bello

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Melanie Garcia Caitlin Marino

DIGITAL MEDIA Adriano Haubenthal Nicolette Neves

EXECUTIVE OFFICE Grace Santa-Ana

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS Teresa Romo

MEMBER SERVICES GABRIEL ABAROA JR. President/CEO

Lina Borda Livys Cerna Bernarda Reyes


Irving Azoff By the time you see this you will have already received the President’s Merit Award. We are very proud of you, please don’t be mad we took an ad out to prove it.

Love, Shelli, your Children, Grandchildren, Jim and all of your family at AMSGE


NATIONAL STAFF

®

Latin Recording Academy Board Of Trustees

Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation

MARKETING, SOCIAL MEDIA, WEB & VIDEO PRODUCTION Alyssa Hankins

GRAMMY Museum Mississippi

EXECUTIVE STAFF

OPERATIONS

EXECUTIVE STAFF

PUBLIC PROGRAMS & ARTIST RELATIONS

EMILY HAVENS Executive Director

RITA GEORGE Deputy Executive Director

BOX OFFICE/ RETAIL

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Laura Tesoriero

CHAIR

MANOLO DIAZ Vice President

VICE CHAIRMAN

ADMINISTRATION

Marcelo Castello Branco

TREASURER

Coralys Julian Nannette Velez

Crystal Larsen

SECRETARY Neil Portnow

TRUSTEES

Luis Balaguer Fernando Barbosa Carla Estrada George J. Flanigen IV Maria Cristina Garcia-Cepeda Oscar Gomez Eduardo Hutt Sebastian Krys Terry Lickona Cris Morena John Poppo

CHAIRMAN EMERITUS Luis Cobos

TRUSTEE AD HONOREM Andy Garcia

LEGAL COUNSEL

Jorge Hernandez-Torano Joel Katz Bobby Rosenbloum

Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation Board of Directors CHAIR

Luis Cobos

VICE CHAIR Neil Portnow

SECRETARY/TREASURER Raúl Vazquez

PRESIDENT

Gabriel Abaroa Jr.

DIRECTOR

Mireya Cisneros

GRAMMY Museum Staff And Boards GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live EXECUTIVE STAFF

DEVELOPMENT & MEMBERSHIP Michelle Camacho Bryan Orpinela Valentina Martinez

EDUCATION

Adam LeBow Schyler O’Neal Kaitlyn Stuebner Nader

EXECUTIVE OFFICE Ana Estrada

EXHIBITS

Jerry Buszek Athena Dryden Ali Mehiel Hillary Morimoto Chris Morrison Nwaka Onwusa

PRODUCTION, INTERACTIVE DESIGN & MULTIMEDIA Eric Stock

FINANCE

Lora Bartolome Nicole Bilicki Tyrone Chan Warren Chen Michael Holert Mas Matsumoto Jayne Quon

GROUP SALES Aaron Kaniecki Bryan Schiller

BOB SANTELLI Executive Director

222

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Rosalie Sanchez Lynne Sheridan Stacie Takaoka-Fidler

ADMINISTRATION Chace Holland

EDUCATION & PUBLIC PROGRAMS

COMMUNICATIONS

Luis Villanueva

Johnny Ventura

Alejandra Aceves Shaun Carter Cindy Flores Eric Forcen Greg Goldberg Nayelli McChesney Karla Perez Erin Walsh

Erlin Frausto Israel Galvez Sergio Galvez Pablo Garces Benjamin Guzman Tony Lehr Maria Pacheco

Jane Marie Dawkins

GRAMMY Museum at L.A. Live Board of Directors CHAIR

Neil Portnow

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS Vickie Jackson

OPERATIONS Jack McWilliams

SALES

Carlee Calderon

VICE CHAIR/ TREASURER

Dan Beckerman

SECRETARY

Charles B. Ortner

ASSISTANT SECRETARY Ted Fikre

John Branca Branden Chapman Ken Ehrlich Giselle Fernandez-Farrand Todd Goldstein Jimmy Jam Joel Katz Terry Lickona Jay Marciano Mattie McFadden-Lawson Carolyn Powers Brian Sheth Wayne Zahner

GRAMMY Museum Mississippi Board of Directors Mississippi

PRESIDENT

Lucy Janoush

VICE PRESIDENT

Sen. Willie Simmons

TREASURER Calvin Dye

ASSISTANT TREASURER James I. Tims

SECRETARY

Wilma Wilbanks Gov. Phil Bryant Scott Coopwood Thomas “Eddie” Guillot Jr. Jon Hornyak Carol Puckett Nan Sanders Tricia Walker Blake A. Wilson



CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF East Region

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Tera Healy

Ashley Sheehan

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, EAST REGION/NEW YORK CHAPTER

Brittany Presley

Matt Young

Chicago

New York

Philadelphia

Washington, D.C.

Justin Roberts

David Frost

Dyana Williams

Tom Goldfogle

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER STAFF

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

Ken Abdo Matthew Hennessy Patrick Stump

Jennifer Blakeman Linda Lorence Critelli Jeff Levenson Ann Mincieli Nile Rodgers Karen Sherry

Nick Cucci

Helen Bruner David Ivory

Maurette Brown Clark Kurosh Nasseri

PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT

Dyana Williams

Tom Goldfogle

VICE PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

Stacy M. Anderson

Matt Cappy

Carl “Kokayi” Walker

MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

SECRETARY

SECRETARY

Yasmin de Soiza

Stephanie Seiple

Chelsey Green

GOVERNORS

GOVERNORS

Ivan Barias Marcus Baylor Adam Blackstone Sarah Dash Louis DeLise Lauren Hart Sarah Janiszewski Jeri Johnson Lori Landew Melvin Lewis Khari Mateen Ryan Moys Phil Nicolo Mutlu Onaral Ted Reid Brent “Ritz” Reynolds Ritchie Rubini Ashley Scott Kathy Sledge Andrew “Pop” Wansel

Diane Blagman Deborah Bond Al Caldwell Sean Glover Jake Grotticelli Tracy Hamlin Lorenzo Johnson Carolyn Malachi James McKinney Lora Moinkoff Elise Perry Ric Peters Kevin Powe Lita Rosario Omar Sharif Carl “Chucky” Thompson Paul Thornley Verny Varela Von Vargas Janine Wilson

ADVISORS

ADVISORS

Jason Berger Laiya St. Clair

Mike Mowery Sean Robinson

CHAPTER STAFF

CHAPTER STAFF

SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Mark Schulz

Wendi Cherry

MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

Ashley Coleman

Kayenecha Daugherty

PRESIDENT

Justin Roberts VICE PRESIDENT

Miss Alex White SECRETARY

Andrew Barber GOVERNORS

William Beckett Jimmy Chamberlin Brian Deck Bonny Dolan Steven Gillis Mark Hubbard Stephen Hutton Kem James “Stump” Mahoney Andre Mayon Mary Mazurek Gabe McDonough Daxx Nielsen Jessica Reedy John Stirratt Andrea Troolin Dessa Wander Paul Wertico Malik Yusef ADVISORS

Vin Dombroski Zak Jablow

CHAPTER STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Sarah Jansen MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

Maurice Kalous PROJECT COORDINATOR

Jenna Goode

PRESIDENT

David Frost VICE PRESIDENT

Ben Allison SECRETARY

Judy Tint GOVERNORS

Carlos Alomar Jonatha Brooke Tom Chapin Norman Chesky Ray Chew Joe D’Ambrosio Lauren Davis Charlie Feldman Pete Ganbarg Gloria Gaynor Sharon Isbin Scott Jacoby Bashiri Johnson Martha Mooke Riggs Morales Cathleen Murphy Deirdre O’Hara Neeta Ragoowansi Elliot Scheiner Maria Schneider Justin “Just Blaze” Smith Kathy Sommer Richard Stumpf Andy Tavel Darryl Tookes Philip Traugott Debra White Mark Wilder ADVISORS

Jonathan Daniel Jessica Rivera

224

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Zahn MANAGER, CHAPTER ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS



CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF South Region

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

Susan Stewart

MANAGER, ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, SOUTH REGION/NASHVILLE CHAPTER

Lyn Aurelius

Ashley Ernst

Nathan Pyle

Atlanta

Florida

Memphis

Nashville

Thom “TK” Kidd

Melanie Masterson

Scott Bomar

Shannon Sanders

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER STAFF

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Brandon Bush Tammy Hurt

Greg “Stryke” Chin Beth Cohen Dan Warner

Susan Marshall Ken Shepherd

Alicia Warwick

PRESIDENT

Scott Bomar

Jeff Balding Fletcher Foster Daniel Hill Chandra LaPlume

PRESIDENT

Thom “TK” Kidd VICE PRESIDENT

Matt Still SECRETARY

Lyn Schenbeck GOVERNORS

Tai Anderson Charlie Brusco Kristian Bush Dot Bustelo Jorel “Jfly” Flynn Wes Funderburk Michael Graves John Driskell Hopkins Gwen Hughes Billy Johnson Peggy Still Johnson Kevin Leahy Lisa Love Melissa Love Al “Butter” McLean Stephen Moretti Neal Pogue Shani Sammons Miles Walker Chaka Zulu ADVISORS

Joe Fitz Traci Hale

CHAPTER STAFF SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Michele Rhea Caplinger SENIOR MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

Erin Baxter

Melanie Masterson VICE PRESIDENT

Lee Levin SECRETARY

Lauren Reskin GOVERNORS

Carlos Alvarez Chad Bernstein Daniel Betancourt Vincent di Pasquale Jimmy Douglass Doug Emery Rene Flores Javier Garza Regina Kelland Gloria Lemmey Radha Mehta Marianne Mijares Carlos Perez Leesa Richards Chris “C-Rod” Rodriguez Andres Saavedra Ana Rosa Santiago Tommy Torres Pete Wallace Angel Zamora

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT

Kim Stephens SECRETARY

Erin Frankenheimer GOVERNORS

Chris Bell Scott Billington Lahna Deering Garry Goin D.A. Johnson Tim Kappel Yvette Landry Kim Bledsoe Lloyd Vicki Loveland Jim McCormick Shannon McNally Justin Merrick Lawrence “Boo” Mitchell Johnny Palazzotto Matt Ross-Spang Lester Snell Jody Stephens Jay Weigel Rueben Williams Pat Mitchell Worley

PRESIDENT

Shannon Sanders VICE PRESIDENT

Robert K. Oermann SECRETARY

Allen Brown GOVERNORS

Marta Clark

Lori Badgett Mark Bright Joanna Carter David Corlew John Esposito Trey Fanjoy Tim Fink Ben Fowler Leslie Fram Garth Fundis Tracy Gershon Kevin Griffin Jeff Hanna Lisa Harless Terry Hemmings Brett James Allison Brown Jones Julian King Jim Lauderdale Frank Liddell Martina McBride Scott McDaniel Daniel Miller Kevin “Keb’ Mo’” Moore Erika Wollam Nichols Tree Paine Nick Palladino LeAnn Phelan Michael Rhodes Alan D. Valentine

PROJECT MANAGER

ADVISORS

ADVISORS

Alex J. Campos Melissa Exposito

CHAPTER STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kenny Cordova SENIOR MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

Jessica Allen

226

SENIOR PRODUCTION MANAGER

ADVISORS

Justin Fisher Gebre Waddell

CHAPTER STAFF SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Jon Hornyak SENIOR MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

Reid Wick

Phil Thornton Jessica Tomasin

SENIOR MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR

Laura Crawford PROJECT COORDINATOR

Courtney White CHAPTER ASSISTANT

Bri Stewart


THERE IS SO MUCH TO EXPLORE ON OUR THREE BEAUTIFUL ISLANDS. ( IT’S OKAY, THERE’S ALWAYS TOMORROW. )

Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman

GRAND CAYMAN

LITTLE CAYMAN CAYMAN BRAC ONLY 1 HOUR FROM MIAMI

FIND YOUR CAYMANK

ND

www.caymanislands.ky


CHAPTER BOARDS AND STAFF West Region

REGIONAL DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Neil Crilly

Paul Raksit

Los Angeles

Pacific Northwest

San Francisco

Texas

John Burk

Sue Ennis

Michael Starita

Carlos Alvarez

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

CHAPTER BOARD

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

TRUSTEES

Bill Gibson Glenn Lorbecki

Nick Phillips Gino Robair Michael Romanowski

Eric Jarvis Gilbert Velasquez Paul Wall

PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT

Michael Starita

Carlos Alvarez

VICE PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

Piper Payne

Freddie Krc

SECRETARY

SECRETARY

Sarah Jones

Andrea Villarreal

GOVERNORS

GOVERNORS

Laura Bergmann Tony Brooke Laura Dean Chris Dugan McKay Garner David Glasser Cliff Goldmacher Caren Kelleher Camilo Landau Greg Landau Kitty Margolis PC Muñoz Tom Murphy Robbie Percell Lia Rose Sam Smith Kylee Swenson Gordon Alex Theory Ben Van Houten Wayne Wallace

Chip Adams Christine Albert Rodney Alejandro Ricky Anderson Gary Hickinbotham Harvey House Danny Jones Nick Landis David Messier Paul “Pappy” Middleton Lisa Morales Laura Mordecai Nakia Donnie Nelson Rick Orozco Lupe Rosales Kevin Russell Joseph Stallone Mark Stansberry Teresa LaBarbera Whites

Daniel Damien Pak Catherine Harris-White

CHAPTER GOODWILL AMBASSADOR

ADVISORS

CHAPTER STAFF

Ledisi

Tre Nagella Abelardo Rivera

ADVISORS

CHAPTER STAFF

CHAPTER BOARD TRUSTEES

Mindi Abair Peter Asher Claudia Brant Mike Clink Harvey Mason Jr. Cheryl Pawelski Chris Walden PRESIDENT

John Burk VICE PRESIDENT

Evan Bogart

CHAPTER GOODWILL AMBASSADOR

Verdine White ADVISORS

Aureo Baqueiro Om’Mas Keith

CHAPTER STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kelley Purcell SENIOR MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

Yvonne Faison

Qiana Conley

MANAGER, CHAPTER ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS

GOVERNORS

Nicole Brown

SECRETARY

Adam Anders John Beasley Edie Lehmann Boddicker Ed Cherney Mamie Coleman Wendy Goldstein Jeff Greenberg Lalah Hathaway Rodney Jerkins Booker T. Jones Eman Kiriakou Mike Knobloch Christopher Lennertz Gavin Lurssen Orly Marley Julia Michels Marcus Miller Stephan Moccio Lana “MC Lyte” Moorer Loretta Muñoz Robin Nixon Daniel Rojas Harmony Samuels Rafa Sardina Jason Schweitzer Rachel Stilwell Christopher Tin Lindsay Tomasic Jojo Villanueva Tremaine Williams

PROJECT MANAGER

Shannon Herber

PRESIDENT

Sue Ennis VICE PRESIDENT

Tim Bierman SECRETARY

Kris Orlowski GOVERNORS

Nick Blasko Ishmael Butler Charles R. Cross Tom Dyer Steve Fisk Dave Gross Sean Horton Mike Jones Andrew Joslyn Pali Ka’aihue Ben London Geoff Ott Chris Porter Nancy Rumbel David Sabee Portia Sabin Tyler Stone Will Wakefield Victoria Wimer Contreras Alan Yamamoto ADVISORS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Michael Compton

Alexander Brose Julie Schuchard

MEMBERSHIP & PROJECT MANAGER

CHAPTER STAFF

John Farrey

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Michael Winger SENIOR PROJECT MANAGER

Christen Pocock McFarland MEMBERSHIP MANAGER

Brian Fox 228

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Theresa Jenkins PROJECT MANAGER

Christee Albino MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR

Brittany Hoover


celebrate with pure notes of joy!

mix it up with cocktail recipes at gsake.com Crafted by SakĂŠOne | Forest Grove, OR

sakeone.com | Please drink responsibly


PAST CHAIRS

JAMES B. CONKLING ACTING NATIONAL CHAIRMAN 1957–1961

GEORGE AVAKIAN

ROBERT L. YORKE

JOHN SCOTT TROTTER

NESUHI ERTEGUN

PETE KING

MORT L. NASATIR

IRVING TOWNSEND

WESLEY H. ROSE CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1971–1973

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1973–1975

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1962–1963

F.M. SCOTT III

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1965–1966

BILL LOWERY

JAY L. COOPER

J. WILLIAM DENNY CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1977–1979

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1979–1981

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1981–1983 CHAIRMAN 1989–1991

WILLIAM IVEY

MICHAEL MELVOIN

MICHAEL GREENE

ALFRED SCHLESINGER

RON KRAMER

HENRY L. NEUBERGER III

JOEL A. KATZ

PHIL RAMONE

LESLIE ANN JONES

GARTH FUNDIS

DANIEL CARLIN

TERRY LICKONA

JIMMY JAM

CHAIRMAN 1987–1989

CHAIRMAN 2001–2003

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

CHAIRMAN 2003–2005

JAY S. LOWY

CHAIRMAN 1993–1995

CHAIRMAN 2005–2007

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1969–1971

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1964–1965

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1967–1968

CHAIRMAN 1991–1993

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1968–1969

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1963–1964

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1966–1967

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1975–1977

230

PAUL WESTON

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1961–1962

CHAIRMAN 1995–1997

CHAIR 2007–2009

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1983–1985

CHAIRMAN 1997–1999

CHAIRMAN/PRESIDENT 1985–1987

CHAIRWOMAN 1999–2001

GEORGE J. FLANIGEN IV CHRISTINE ALBERT CHAIR 2009–2013

CHAIR 2013–2015


Before a new idea can become a way of thinking. Before one detail can flip the narrative. Before anything that matters can change the world, it must, above all else,

be known. This is our duty at the Ohio University Scripps College of Communication: to bring forth the people who bring forth knowledge. By word or sound or data stream. And in every medium and by all means, we succeed.

Make it loud. Make it clear.

Make it known.

TM

Schoonover Center | 1 Ohio University | Athens, OH 45701-2979 | www.ohio.edu/scrippscollege


IN MEMORIAM Al Aarons Emerson Able Al Abrams Roy Neill Acuff Clifford Adams Willie Akins Nick Alexander Van Alexander Mihai Alexandru Jo Alfidi Karolyn Ali Mitch Aliotta Habil Aliyev Daevid Allen Susan Allen Archie Alleyne Jaime Almeida Jorge Álvarez Shone An Alisa Anderson aka Alisa B Gladstone Anderson Lynn Anderson Edna Anderson-Owens Sam Andrew Julio Ángel René Angélil Otis “Killer” Ray Appleton Cristiano Araújo Bill Arhos Alfredo “Chocolate” Armenteros Chuck Atkins Audrey Auld Phil Austin Slavko Avsenik Thomas Ayad Mark B Paul Bacon Alcy Benjamin “Shug” Baggott Jr. Bobbie Bailey Jake Bailey Jim Bailey Dave Ball Sherwood Ball Robert Balser Richard “Bass” Barish Bobby Barker Ortheia Barnes-Kennerly Inezita Barroso Harold Battiste Jr. Ray Batts Robert E. Bays Guy Béart Bob Belden Robert “Wolfman” Belfour Marcus Belgrave Roy C. Bennett Gloria Bently John Berg Jim Berk Sharon “La Hechicera” Bermeo John Berry Joy Beverley Leon Bibb Wayne Bickerton Miriam Bienstock Theodore Bikel

232

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

John Bilezikjian Cilla Black Dave Black Hugo Blanco Sergio Blanco Paul Bley Billy Block Camille Bob aka Lil’ Bob Jack Body Milan George Bogdan Marcos Félix Bojórquez Luc Bondy Buddy Boudreaux Pierre Boulez David Bowie Cephas Bowles John “Brad” Bradbury Gary Brain Fernando Brant Graham Brazier Luc Brewaeys Miriam Brickman Ronnie Bright Jerry Brightman Robert “Robban” Broberg Pauline Brockless Nora Brockstedt Peter Broggs Arthur Brooks Bobbi Kristina Brown Errol Brown Floyd David Brown Jeremy Brown Jim Ed Brown Michael Brown William Brown Allan Browne Audrey Bryant Oleg Bryjak Perry “Buddy” Buie Al Bunetta Michael Burgess Bob Burns Hoss Burns George Burt Mervyn Burtch Elmer Bush Billy Butler Erol Büyükburç Sydney Byrd Juan Carlos Cáceres Nicholas Caldwell Ariel Camacho Scott Cameron Guy Carawan Gladys “Havana” Carbo Flower Hugh Carden Brandon Carlisle Michael Carlucci Brian Carman Chris Carney Marvin Carr aka Capo Pachy Carrasco Ronnie Carroll Wayne Carson Bud Carter Jack Carter Jimmy Case

Nico Castel Boomer Castleman Ben Cauley Asberry “John” Warden Chaffin Don Chapel Diane Charlemagne Ray Charles Samuel Charters Shawn Tyler Chavez Aldo Ciccolini Noel “Peachy” Cintron Gavin Clark Otis Clay Scott Clendenin George Cleve Dave Cloud Howard Coble Natalie Cole Dewayne Coleman aka MC Supreme Ornette Coleman Augusta Lee Collins Serge Collot Vince Combs Robert Commanday Billy Constable Alex Cooley Jerome Cooper Keith Copeland Michael Cord Jean Cornett Stan Cornyn Roel Cortez Brian Couzens Don Covay Richard Cowan Simon Cowe Robert Craft Hulon Crayton Luigi Creatore Nicholas R. Crisostomo Richard Crooks B.J. Crosby Suzanne Crough Bruce Crump Joe Bill Culp Alan Curtis Eddie Cusic Emiliano da Cruz Toni Dae Anita Darian Billy Davis Don Davis Ross Dawson Joseph de Pasquale Aurélie de Peretti Guillaume B. Decherf Jacques Delécluse Michel Delpech Elsa Delplace Milton Delugg Michael Deputato Scott DeWitt Jim Diamond Marujita Diaz Robert Diaz aka Pumpkinhead Charlie Dick Aaron Dilks

Dottie Dillard Joe Dobbs Mattiwilda Dobbs Sam Dockery Tod Dockstader Theodore Emile “Bo” Dollis Val Doonican Stella Doufexis Peter Dougherty Donna Douglas Roy Douglas Ervin Drake Robert Drasnin Duncan Druce John Duffy Romain Dunay Andre Durand John Eaton Sharon Eaves Fernando Echavarria Dolores Dinning Edgin Boudjemaâ El Ankis Patricia Elliott Jack Ely Bobby Emmons Buddy Emmons Andrei Eshpai José Ángel Espinoza Aragón aka Ferrusquilla Jack Eubanks Lucy Fabery Alexander Faris William Edward Farley Hussein Fatal Wilton Felder Rob Fernandez Dennis Ferrante Al Ferrier Daniel Ferro Garrison Fewell Monroe Fields Kent Finlay Everett “Vic” Firth Dale Fitzgerald Frankie Ford Gregory Fosse Kim Fowley John Fox Andy Fraser Stan Freberg Paul Freeman Glenn Frey Heinz Fricke Rocky Frisco Zhanna Friske Edgar Froese Allan Fryer Larry Fullam Brad Fuller Richard Furman Jorge Galemire Jorge Garbett John Garner Snuff Garrett Hal Gaylor Mtshengiseni Gcwensa aka Indidane Michael Gehrke Steven Roy Gerber

Rafael Gil aka Ray Girado Derrick Gilbert aka D-Knowledge Ronnie Gilbert Julie Gilbert-Cahil Brian Gill Doug Gilmore Johnny Gimble Frank Glazer Zach Glickman Herbie Goins Steven Goldmann Wolfgang Gönnenwein Celina González Tyrone González aka AK Canserbero Coleridge Goode Lesley Gore Vera Gornostaeva Lari Goss Joseph Grado Albeth Paris Grass Tiffany Elizabeth Green Josh Greenberg Dennis Greene Edward Greenfield Jimmy Greenspoon Max Greger Don Griffin Craig Gruber Rickey Grundy Joe Guercio William Guest Mahmoud Guinia Rutger Gunnarsson Nkululeko “Flabba” Habedi Hal Hackady George Hadjinikos Gobinda Halder Audrey Hall aka Sister Scully Dixie Hall Rinto Harahap Eddie Hardin Chris Hardman aka Lil’ Chris Evelyn Starks Hardy Julie Harris Ted Harris Ton Hartsuiker Mariem Hassan Oscar Hayes Mary Healy Billy Ray Hearn Johnny Helms Stuart Hemingway Labreeska Hemphill Russell Henderson Jon Hensley Torsten Thassilo Herbert Bobby Hill Travis “Trumpet Black” Hill Dave “Hobbsy” Hilsden Joan Hinde Edward “Fast Eddie” Hoh Jack Holder Wendell Holmes Will Holt John “Hoppy” Hopkins James Horner Richard Horowitz



IN MEMORIAM Glenn Amos Houle Joe Houston Randy Howard Tyzen Hsiao Shannen Hudson aka Young Ready Greg Humphrey “Long John” Hunter Ben Hutto Mike Hyland Ron Hynes Gary Ignacio Jørgen Ingmann Dan Iordăchescu Robert “Jack” Irvin Stan Irwin Rick Ivy Christopher Jackson Melvin Jackson Paul “Bomber” Jackson Ravindra Jain Bobby Jameson Labh Janjua Kyle Jean-Baptiste Paul Jeffrey John Jennings Wade Jessen James Johnson Jr. aka Swagg Huncho Jillian Johnson Joseph “Smokey” Johnson Louis Johnson Bob Johnston Walt Johnston Albert Jolson Corey Jones Dean Jones Frankie Lee Jones Peggy Jones aka Lady Bo Peter Jones Ramona Jones Rusty Jones Terry Jones Timothy “DJ Timbuck2” Jones Guru Josh Don Joyce Margaret Juntwait Jouni Kaipainen Krishna Kalle Michael Kandel aka Tranquility Bass Peter Katin Jerzy Katlewicz Kayahan Martin “Kiddie” Kearns Johnny Keating Orrin Keepnews Daniel Keighley Bill Keith John-Edward Kelly Helen Kemp Johnny Kemp Wayne Kemp Ray Kennedy Kirk Kerkorian Patricia Kern Ron Kerr Gary Keys Masabumi Kikuchi

234

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

Lemmy Kilmister B.B. King Ben E. King Paul King Armin Kircher Martin Kitcher Waldemar Kmentt Griffin Kolinski Jim “Sadist” Konya Kool DJ AJ Javier Krahe Kenneth Krause Smokin’ Joe Kubek John Kuker Takeharu Kunimoto Slyvia Kunin Andriy Kuzmenko aka Kuzma Kyoko Ezra Laderman Carey Lander Helen Landis Red Lane Richard W. LaSalle Darcy Miller Lashinsky James Last Thé Lau Bogdan Lavinius Ida Frances Lawrence Cynthia Layne Raphy Leavitt Guy LeBlanc Christopher Lee Nikolaus Lehnhoff Christophe Lellouche Michael Leonard Joan Leslie Wally Lester Neil LeVang Marvin David Levy Ken Lewis Monica Lewis Sal Licata Biff Liff Lois Lilienstein Seymour Lipkin Mosie Lister Bill Littleton Benjamin F. “Tex” Logan Denise Lor Bonnie Lou Eddy Louiss Fred Love Justin Lowe Margot Loyola Katherine Ludwig Bruce Lundvall Mick Lynch Marque “Tate” Lynche Edmund Lyndeck Steve Mackay Jason Mackenroth Flora MacNeil Lou Maglia Julia Mainer Tom “The Jazzman” Mallison Riichiro Manabe George Manney James S. Marcus

Ernie Maresca Mary Ellen Mark Gary Marker Gary Paul Marmitt Nick Marsh Rick Martin Ramadhani Masanja aka Banza Stone Red Mascara Darryl Mason aka Dot-A-Rock Sandy Mason Scott Mason Michael Masser Jorge Massías A.J. Masters Kurt Masur Joe B. Mauldin Mingiedi Mawangu Charmayne “Maxee” Maxwell Leroy May aka Red Dragon Doug Mayes Alan Mayor Albert Maysles Ammouri Mbarek John McCabe Charles McCann Jim McCann “Mighty” Sam McClain Keith McCormack Mack McCormick Rose Marie McCoy Danny McCulloch Herb McCullough Lester Virgil McCumbers Lenny McDaniel William Thomas McKinley Ian A. McKinney Rod McKuen Bob Meador Johnny Meeks Gilberto Mendes Nimal Mendis Bryn Merrick Billy Meshel José Messias Garrett Miller Anthony Mills aka Zin Darius Minwalla Alan Mirikitani aka BB Chung King Claudia Mize Dieter Moebius Jackie Moffit Margot Moir Aniceto Molina Manuel Molina Kemal Monteno Johnny Montgomery Nancy Montgomery Peter Seth Moore Ivan Moravec Carlos “Buddy” Moreno Jaime Morey Joe Moscheo Joe Moss Marie Mosser Shiina Mota Donald Mulvaney Rita Munsey

DeVaughn Murphy John Murphy Mark Murphy Pithukuli Murugadas Zane Musa Paul Myers Marty Napoleon Mansour Nariman Bashar Nawaz Anne Naysmith Bruce Nazarian Hanq Neal Logan Neill Franz-Ferdinand Nentwig Dominic Newton aka The Jacka Patrick Ngcobo Reed Nielsen Leonard Nimoy Magali Noël Gene Norman Daron Norwood Mats Olausson Lincoln Olivetti Manuel Oltra Dex Osama Charles “Honeyboy” Otis Harold Ousley Tommy Overstreet Carlos Païta John Palladino Martin Parker Bob Parlocha Phil Parnell Alex Pascu Marty Pasetta Patachou Pat Patrick Lester “Rusty” G. Paul Louis Paul Donald Maurice Pears aka The Last Mr. Bigg Nat Peck Vince Pellegrino Maggie Penn Israel Perales Ortiz aka Mexicano 777 Manu Perez A.J. Pero Mark D. Perry Marion Petard-Lieffrig Csaba Petocz Don Pfrimmer Jordan Phillips aka J Capri Robert Phillips aka Koopsta Knicca Yosi Piamenta Lionel Pickens aka Chinx Norman C. Pickering De’Von Pickett Jamecy “Black Alex” Pierre David Pike Harry Pitch Ruth Poe Kirill Pokrovsky Ray “Butch” Pool Mac Poole Mike Porcaro Frank Porretta

Andrew Porter Steve Pouchie Stasys Povilaitis Gene Power Richie Pratt Jaime Prefontaine aka Brooklyn Sean Price Peter Prier Claudio Prieto J.B. Prince Joshua Prince aka Dust La Rock M.L. Procise Brianna Lea Pruett Chuck Pyle aka Zen Cowboy Gary Quackenbush Daniel Rabinovich Maria Radner Jim Ragland Chris Rainbow V. Ramakrishna N. Ramani Christian Ramos aka Syko “El Terror” Elizabeth Ramsey Vithal Rao Hugo Rasmussen Carmino Ravosa Rex Ray Michael Rayner Shane Redway Usnija Redzepova Margo Reed Raul Rekow John Renbourn Don Rendell Eddie “The Kydd” Rendini Angie Crabtree Reynolds Delores Rhoads Tandy Rice Slim Richey Gary Richrath Anthony Riley Lynn Ripley aka “Twinkle” Jean Ritchie Preston Ritter Don Robertson Cynthia Robinson J.D. Robinson Joseph Robinson Jr. McNeil Robinson II David Rodriguez Rico Rodriguez Steven Rodriguez aka ASAP Yams Jack Rollins Ronnie Ronalde Doudou N’Diaye Rose Richard Rosebrough Larry Rosen Adam Roth David Roth Demis Roussos Doug Rowe Bruce Rowland Billy Joe Royal Guillermo Rubalcaba Howard Rumsey



IN MEMORIAM Shahir Sable Benny Sadel Chuck Sagle Kheireddine Sahbi Gene Saks Victor Salvi Hank Sasaki Doug Sax Dean Schachtel Günther Schneider-Siemssen Heiko Schrepel Wes Schuck Gunther Schuller Norbert Schwefel John Scott Norman O. Scribner Joan Sebastian Pía Sebastiani Ambros Seelos Dan Sembello Müzeyyen Senar Ronald Senator Mario Sereni Ralph Sharon Lee Shaw Ron Shawger Dennis Sheehan Barbara Shelley Billy Sherrill Jimmy Shields Troy Shondell Aadesh Shrivastava

Ryan Shutler Joseph Silverstein Red Simpson Charanjit Singh Bruce Sinofsky Tom Skinner Johnny Slate Percy Sledge P.F. Sloan Roger Smalley Rolf Smedvig Daniel Smith Irvin Smith Václav Snítil Michael Solfiell Lew Soloff David-Troy Somerville Faye Speer Chris Squire Ryan Stanek Bob Stegall Steven Stern Michael Stevens Ronald Stevenson Andy M. Stewart Robert Stigwood John “Dawk” Stillwell David Stock Bernard Stollman Patsy Stoneman Steve Strange Ettore Stratta

Sarah Streeter aka Big Time Sarah Natalia Strelle Craig Strickland Larry Sturm Jazz Summers Joe Summers Elizabeth Swados Ward Swingle Chris Tambling Sharon Tandy Dallas Taylor John Taylor Pat Taylor Phil “Philthy Animal” Taylor Tut Taylor Vlad Telea Sid Tepper Jean Ter-Merguerian Clark Terry Arthur “Art” Thieme Nguyen Thien Dao Radhika Thilak J. Karen Thomas Shaquon Thomas aka Young Pappy Bill Thompson Delroy “Spider” Thompson Robbin Thompson Ernest Tomlinson Joeseph Torregano Allen Toussaint

John Tout Jackie Trent Paul J. Truesdell George Tutko Namık Uğurlu Gloria Van Aerssen Tony Van Frater Roy Van Hoy Jacques van Oortmerssen Milton Vanicor David VanLanding Jon Vickers Cirilo Vila Castro M.S. Viswanathan Mel Waiters Ed Walker Jeff Walker Steve Waller Bengt-Arne Wallin Hazel Waltman Trevor Ward-Davies aka Dozy David Ward-Steinman Ray Warleigh Terry Graham Warren Frank Watkins Alan Watson Richard Eddy Watson Scott Weiland Jerry Weintraub Walter Weller Cory Wells

Elbert West Richard Wheatly Ron Whitaker Andy White Gert Wilden Ronald A. Wilford David Willcocks Richard Williams Hal Willis Dan Wilson Jr. Jimmy “Spider” Wilson Joe Wilson Julie Wilson Thom Wilson Sammy Winston Phil Woods Arthur G. Wright Hugh Wright Stevie Wright Eric Wrixon Al Wyntor Ol’ga Yakovleva aka Origa Bill Yates Israel Yinon Susama Yokato Sam Zaman aka State of Bengal Gail Zappa Luis Felipe Zschoche Valle (List through Jan. 18, 2016)

She’s the Next Big Thing

Mentor. Support. Reconnect. 236

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards

213-213-0123 � www.girlscoutsla.org


GRAMMY winners record here, ®

play here, and eventually sleep here.

NightBird Recording Studio at Sunset Marquis.

Congratulations to all the nominees and winners at this year’s GRAMMY Awards.

®

And a special thank you to everyone who’s made the Sunset Marquis, Morrison Hotel Gallery and NightBird Recording Studios part of your musical journey.

1200 Alta Loma Road, West Hollywood, CA 90069 • 310 . 657.1333

SUNSETMARQUIS.COM


I

n celebration of nine-time GRAMMY winner Frank Sinatra’s iconic legacy and 100th birthday, The Recording Academy produced “Sinatra 100 — An All-Star GRAMMY Concert,” which aired on CBS Dec. 6, 2015. Taped at Wynn Las Vegas’ Encore Theater, the two-hour primetime entertainment special honored the Chairman of the Board with performances by some of music’s biggest acts.

2

3

1

6 5

4 238

58th Annual GRAMMY Awards


7

8

10 1. Garth Brooks performs “The Lady Is A Tramp”

9

2. Carrie Underwood, Zac Brown and Seth MacFarlane perform a Sinatra medley 3. Adam Levine performs “The Best Is Yet To Come”

11

4. Tony Bennett performs “I’ve Got The World On A String” 5. Trisha Yearwood performs “I’ll Be Seeing You” 6. Nick Jonas performs “In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning” 7. Usher performs “That’s Life” 8. Katharine McPhee and John Legend perform a medley of Sinatra songs 9. Lady Gaga performs “Theme From New York, New York”

13

10. Alicia Keys performs “I’ve Got A Crush On You” 11. Harry Connick Jr. performs “Luck Be A Lady” 12. Juanes performs a medley from the album Francis Albert Sinatra & Antonio Carlos Jobim 13. Celine Dion performs “All The Way” PHOTOS: GETTY IMAGES AND WIREIMAGE.COM

12 58th Annual GRAMMY Awards 239


Our mics knew Frank well. His voice made an indelible impression on them. And on the world of music.

UnitedRecordingStudios.com




Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.