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37 LESSONS AT A GLANCE LESSON

TO PICS CO VERED

EXAM PLE SENTENCES

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Subjects, Verbs, & Sentences

Rex barks.

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Verb Phrases & Helping Verbs

Rex will bark.

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Questions (Interrogative Sentences)

Will Rex bark?

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Review: Subjects (Nouns), Verbs, & Parts of Speech

Review Sentences & Quiz 1

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Pronouns & Commands (Imperative Sentences)

He barks. Go.

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Adjectives

Crazy Rex barks.

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Adverbs

He howled loudly.

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Review: Subjects, Verb Phrases, Adjectives, & Adverbs

Review Sentences & Quiz 2

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Prepositional Phrases (Adjective)

The girl with the blue shirt smiled.

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Prepositional Phrases (Adverb)

The boy ran across the field. Walk up the stairs.

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Review: Prepositional Phrases (Adjective & Adverb)

The dog with the loud bark ran into the house. Review Sentences & Quiz 3

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Transitive Active Verbs & Direct Objects (Noun Job)

We won the game.

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Coordinating Conjunctions (Compound Subject & Verb)

Maria and Martha sat. Maria and Martha sat and thought.


LESSON

TO PICS CO VERED

EXAM PLE SENTENCES

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Coordinating Conjunctions (Compound Adjectives & Adverbs)

The black and white dog ran quickly and quietly.

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Coordinating Conjunctions (Compound Verb & Prepositional Phrases)

Maria will sit and wait. I ran across the field and over the hill.

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Coordinating Conjunctions (Compound Sentences)

I will teach, and you will learn.

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Review: Subjects, Verbs, Adjectives, Adverbs, Prepositions, Coordinating Conjunctions, & Correlative Conjunctions

Review Sentences & Quiz 4

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Transitive Active Verbs & Indirect Objects (Noun Job)

Mrs. Jacobson taught the class history.

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Interjections & Nouns of Direct Address

Wow, we won! Elizabeth, we won.

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Review: Intransitive Complete Verbs vs. Transitive Active Verbs, Subjects, Verbs, Adjectives, & More

Review Sentences & Quiz 5

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Transitive Passive Verbs

The ball was kicked by Jack.

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Linking Verbs (Predicate Adjectives & Predicate Nouns)

The soup tastes salty. Mr. Black became a teacher.

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Linking Verb or Action Verb?

Maria tasted the soup. The soup tasted salty.

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Review: Verb Types & More

Review Sentences & Quiz 6

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Review of Noun Jobs: Subject, Direct Object, Indirect Object, Object of the Preposition, & Predicate Noun

John baked Gerry and Tom a cake. Tom ate the cake with glee. John is a baker.

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LESSON

TO PICS CO VERED

EXAM PLE SENTENCES

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Independent Clauses vs. Dependent Clauses (Adverb Clauses)

The kittens ran home after they lost their mittens.

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Dependent Clauses (Noun Clauses)

I knew the students would learn.

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Review: Subordinating Conjunctions, Dependent Clauses (Noun & Adverb), Verb Types & More

Review Sentences & Quiz 7

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Dependent Clauses (Adjective Clauses)

The scarf that I want is black.

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Review: Dependent Clauses (Adverb, Noun, & Adjective), Verb Types & More

Review Sentences & Quiz 8

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Gerunds

Painting is fun.

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Gerund Phrases

Painting pictures is fun.

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Participles

He ate the burnt toast.

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Participial Phrases

The shoe filled with mud was heavy.

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Infinitive

I want to run.

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Infinitive Phrases

I want to run the race.

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Review: Everything!

Review Sentences & Quiz 9

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Bonus! Excerpts from Stay Smart : 188 Advanced Sentence Diagramming Exercises

Everything!

Multiple

Answers for Extra Diagramming Practice Lessons 20, 22, 26, 27, 29, 32, 34, 36

Multiple

Quizzes: Blank Quizzes & Answer Keys

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LESSON 1: SUBJECTS, VERBS, & SENTENCES * Each lesson includes a video component as well as a written lesson. This preview only shows you the written portion of the lessons. Sentence diagrams give us a way to sort our words. They give us specific places to put each type of word, and they show us how those words are related to each other. In order to have a sentence diagram, we need to have a sentence! Have you ever thought about what a sentence is? A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought.

In order for a sentence to express a complete thought, it needs to have two parts: a subject and a verb.

1. Subjects tell whom or what the sentence is about. 2. Verbs tell what the subject is or does.

Every single sentence needs to have those two things because every single sentence is basically a statement about someone or something (subject) doing or being something (verb). Here is how you diagram those two basic parts of a sentence.

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Lesson 1 Sentence Diagramming Exercises Diagram the following sentences. Be sure that you can identify each part. 1. Fish swim.

Every sentence in this book has a chart like the one below. Some of the spaces in each chart are left blank. Fill in the blanks with the correct word(s). I've filled in this chart as an example for you. Key sentence

Fish swim.

subject (what the sentence is about)

Fish swim

verb (what the subject does)

2. Teachers teach.

        Key Teachers teach. subject (whom the sentence is about) verb (what the subject does)

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3. Dogs bark.

Key sentence subject (what the sentence is about) verb (what the subject does) 4. Cats meow.

Key sentence Cats meow 5. Babies cry.

Key Babies cry. subject (whom the sentence is about) cry

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LESSON 2: VERB PHRASES & HELPING VERBS Sometimes verbs are made up of more than one word. The words work together to perform one job: the job of a verb. When more than one word is acting as the verb, all of the words together are called a verb phrase. Verb phrases are two or more verbs acting together as one verb. They are made from one main verb and one or more helping verbs. Examples: will run, might have jumped, had painted

Verb phrases must have a main verb. The main verb is the one that carries the most meaning. There are many, many main verbs. (teach, jump, skip, climb, learn…) Verb phrases must also have one or more helping verbs. Helping verbs help the main verb. They express certain tenses or conditions of main verbs, and they can’t stand on their own. If you have a helping verb, then you must also have a main verb. Examples: will run, might have jumped, had painted, would study, could learn There are only 24 helping verbs. You must memorize all 24 helping verbs or your head might explode! Well, not really, but memorizing them is necessary for learning grammar. You just have to do it. If you learn them now, you'll save yourself a lot of confusion later on. Here is a list of the helping verbs.

Helping Verbs be, am, is, are, was were, been, being, have, has, had could, should, would, may, might must, shall, can, will, do, did does, having

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One easy way to memorize these words is to sing them to the tune of a song. You can listen to me sing the helping verbs to the tune of "The Witch Doctor" by David Seville on the following webpage if you'd like. Check under the section labeled Helping Verbs. www.English-Grammar-Revolution.com/list-of-verbs.html You might know this song as "Ooo Eee Ooo Ah Ah Ting Tang Walla Walla Bing Bang." Diagramming Verb Phrases To diagram a verb phrase, put all of the words in the verb phrase in the place where the verb goes. Always write the helping verb(s) first and the main verb last.

Students will learn.

Be sure to take a few moments over the next few days to review the 24 helping verbs. Say them (or sing them) out loud.

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Lesson 2 Sentence Diagramming Exercises 1. Bella might have smiled.

Key sentence subject (whom the sentence is about) verb phrase (what the subject does) helping verb (helps the main verb) helping verb (helps the main verb) main verb (shows what the subject does)

2. People were singing.

Key People were singing. People were singing were singing

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3. Kids might laugh.

Key Kids might laugh. subject (whom the sentence is about) might laugh helping verb (helps the main verb) laugh

4. Garbage can smell.

Key sentence Garbage

subject (what the sentence is about) verb phrase (what the subject does) helping verb (helps the main verb) main verb (shows what the subject does)

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5. Pens might leak.

Key Pens might leak. subject (what the sentence is about) verb phrase (what the subject does) helping verb (helps the main verb) main verb (shows what the subject does)

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LESSON 3: QUESTIONS (INTERROGATIVE SENTENCES) So far, you have been diagramming the most common type of sentence: statements. Statements are sentences that state, or declare, facts or opinions. The fancy name for a statement is a declarative sentence. Declarative sentences make statements. They end with periods. Examples: We walked. Maria will skip. Children play. Now you'll learn how to diagram another type of sentence: questions. You know what questions do, right? Questions ask something. The fancy name for a question is an interrogative sentence.

Interrogative sentences ask questions. They end with question marks. Examples: Are you singing? Will you be dancing? Did he run? Diagram interrogative sentences the same way that you diagram statements. Put the subject on the left and the verb or verb phrase on the right. The tricky thing about interrogative sentences is that they are typically in a strange order. This can make it difficult to find the subject. Before you diagram questions, rewrite them as statements. Then, it will be a snap to find the subject! Turning Questions Into Statements Question

Statement The subject is underlined.

Is Katya singing?

Katya is singing.

Will Lisa be dancing?

Lisa will be dancing.

Did James run?

James did run.

Be sure to retain the original capitalization of the questions in your sentence diagrams.

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Words like who or what are sometimes the subjects of interrogative sentences. When this happens, the sentence is already in the standard word order.

Question

Statement

Who is singing?

Who is singing.

What happened?

What happened.

Remember…

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Subjects tell us whom or what a sentence is about.

Verbs tell us what the subject is or does.

Be sure to continue reviewing the helping verbs!

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Lesson 3 Sentence Diagramming Exercises 1. Who will be playing?

Key Who will be playing?

sentence - question

Who will be playing.

sentence - statement subject (whom the sentence is about) verb phrase (what the subject does) helping verb (helps the main verb) helping verb (helps the main verb) main verb (shows what the subject does)

2. Is Luc reading?

Key sentence - question sentence - statement subject (whom the sentence is about) verb phrase (what the subject does) helping verb (helps the main verb) main verb (shows what the subject does)

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3. Did Tina eat?

Key sentence - question sentence - statement subject (whom the sentence is about) verb phrase (what the subject does) helping verb (helps the main verb) main verb (shows what the subject does)

4. Are they winning?

Key Are they winning? They are winning. they Are winning Are winning

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5. Can alligators smile?

Key sentence - question sentence – statement subject (what the sentence is about) verb phrase (what the subject does) helping verb (helps the main verb) main verb (shows what the subject does)

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LESSON 4: SUBJECTS (NOUNS), VERBS, PARTS OF SPEECH, & QUIZ Here is a review of what you have learned so far. Lesson 1 •

A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought.

Sentences need to have a subject and a verb.

Subjects tell whom or what the sentence is about.

Verbs tell what the subject is or does.

Lesson 2 •

Verb phrases consist of a main verb and one or more helping verbs.

Main verbs tell us the main meaning of the verb.

Helping verbs help the main verb.

Lesson 3 •

Statements (declarative sentences) end with periods. They state facts or opinions.

Questions (interrogative sentences) end with question marks.

Turn questions into statements before you diagram them.

You’ll have one more lesson right now, and then you’ll have a quiz on the material that we’ve covered so far. Lesson 4 Every single word that we use belongs to one of eight word groups or parts of speech. Just ponder that fact for a minute. We use thousands of words, and they can all be separated into just eight groups. Isn't that cool? You'll be learning about all eight parts of speech in this course. We're not going to study all of them right now, but you should be aware of these eight categories.

The Parts of Speech

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1. Nouns

2. Pronouns

3. Verbs

4. Adjectives

5. Adverbs

6. Prepositions

7. Conjunctions

8. Interjections

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You have already learned about two of the parts of speech. You know that every sentence needs a verb. Verbs are one of the parts of speech. They are words that express an action or a state of being. You have also learned that subjects are whom or what a sentence is about. Did you notice that subjects was not listed on the parts of speech list? A subject is not a part of speech, but only certain kinds of words can be subjects. These words are nouns. Nouns are one of the parts of speech. Nouns are words that name people, places, things, or ideas. Examples: student, Joe, Paris, classroom, pencil, freedom

Nouns can perform many jobs in sentences. Right now, the only noun job that we have studied is the job of subjects. Later, you’ll learn more jobs that nouns can perform. For now, just remember the definition of a noun and that nouns can be the subjects of sentences. So, you've already learned about verbs and nouns. Let's look at that parts of speech list again and see the parts that you have already studied. The Parts of Speech 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Nouns name people, places, things, or ideas. Nouns can be subjects. Pronouns Verbs tell us what the subject is or does. Adjectives Adverbs Prepositions Conjunctions Interjections

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Lesson 4 Sentence Diagramming Exercises 1. Dolphins swim.

Key sentence subject (noun) verb

2. Do bears climb?

Key Do bears climb? Bears do climb. bears Do climb Do climb

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3. People will clap.

Key People will clap. People will clap will clap

4. Crickets chirp.

Key Crickets chirp. Crickets chirp

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5. Can Lisa go?

Key Can Lisa go? Lisa can go. Lisa Can go Can go

Extra Practice: Identifying Nouns The only nouns that you have learned to diagram so far are subjects, but you know that nouns can perform many jobs in sentences. It’s important to be able to identify nouns no matter what job they are performing. Right now, don’t worry about diagramming the following sentences. Only focus on finding the nouns within the sentences. Remember, nouns are words that name people, places, things, or ideas. 1. Underline the nouns in the following sentences. a. That cute bird in the tree sang a song for me. b. Jack and Jill went up a hill to fetch a pail of water. c. Mary had a little lamb. I have a little dog. d. Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall. e. My mom loves the roses and daffodils near the window. 2. Give three examples of nouns. ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Get ready. It’s time for a quiz!

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Name ____________________________________ Date _______________

GET SMART GRAMMAR QUIZ # 1 Basic Diagramming (Subjects & Verbs) 1. List all 24 of the helping verbs. ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ 2. Name and describe the two basic parts of a sentence. ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________   3. What are these examples of? will run, might have jumped, had painted ______________________________________________________________________   4. What is the definition of a noun? What noun job have you learned so far? ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________   Directions: Diagram the following sentences and fill in the chart. 5. Plants grow.

Plants grow. sentence subject (noun) verb

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Get Smart! Daily Diagrams Grammar Quiz # 1

6. David can jump.

David can jump. sentence subject (noun) verb phrase helping verb main verb

7. Will Mark run?

Will Mark run? sentence - question sentence - statement subject (noun) verb phrase helping verb main verb

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LESSON 5: PRONOUNS & COMMANDS (IMPERATIVE SENTENCES) In this lesson, we’re covering two seemingly different topics: pronouns and commands. Pronouns are a part of speech, and commands are a type of sentence. You’ll soon see how they are related. Pronouns You remember that nouns are words that name people, places, things, or ideas, right? You also know that nouns can perform many jobs in sentences. Right now, the only noun job that we have studied is nouns as subjects. You probably also remember that all of our words can be categorized into eight groups called the parts of speech. Pronouns are one of the eight parts of speech. They are words that take the place of nouns. Pronouns can do anything that nouns can do. That means they can be subjects. Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. Examples: it, he, she, them, you, they, we

The Parts of Speech 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Nouns name people, places, things, or ideas. Nouns can be subjects. Pronouns take the place of nouns. Pronouns can be subjects. Verbs tell us what the subject is or does. Adjectives Adverbs Prepositions Conjunctions Interjections

We use different pronouns to take the place of different nouns. Noun

Pronoun

Susie

she, her

book

it

Mrs. O’Brien (Put your own name here.)

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I, me

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Commands You now know how to diagram two types of sentences: declarative sentences (statements) and interrogative sentences (questions). Now you’ll learn how to diagram another type of sentence, commands. The fancy name for commands is imperative sentences. Here are some examples of commands. Go. Stay. Sit. Did you notice how short those sentences are? All three of them are made of only one word, a verb. What is the subject of those sentences? The subject in all imperative sentences is implied. That means that it is not written or said. It is just understood. When you give a command, you are always addressing someone or something. You are telling them to do something, and you have to address them if you’re going to tell them to do it, right? The subject of a command is the person or thing you are talking to. So, we say that the subject of commands is you understood. We write you understood like this: (you) Since the word you is not written or spoken in the sentence, it goes in parentheses.

Imperative sentences give commands. The subject of imperative sentences is you understood or (you). Examples: Go. Stay. Sit.

(You) is a pronoun. It is taking the place of the noun that names the person or thing you are talking to, and it is always the subject of commands. Diagramming Commands Diagram commands just like you diagram other sentences. Put the subject, (you), in the place where the subject goes.

Imperative sentences end with periods or exclamation marks.

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Lesson 5 Sentence Diagramming Exercises 1. Go.

Key Go.

sentence (command/imperative sentence) subject (pronoun) verb

  2. Stay.

Key Stay. (you) Stay

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3. He sat.

Key He sat. He sat 4. Sit.

Key Sit. (you) Sit

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5. Eat!

Key Eat. (you) Eat

Extra Practice: Identifying Pronouns The only pronouns that you have learned to diagram so far are subjects, but you know that pronouns can perform many jobs in sentences. It’s important to be able to identify pronouns no matter what job they are performing. Right now, don’t worry about diagramming the following sentences. Only focus on finding the pronouns within the sentences. Remember, pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. 1. Underline the pronouns in the following sentences. a. I wanted the book, so he bought it for me. b. I would like a glass of milk. Please ask the waitress if she has any. c. John lost the key. Have you seen it? d. The neighbors are selling candy. Did you buy the chocolates from them? e. How often do they walk to the park?

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Get Smart Grammar Program Student Preview (Written Lessons)  

Teach or learn grammar and sentence diagramming in ten minutes a day! You don't need to know any grammar to get started with this program. w...

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