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Valley News August 9, 2018

www.grainvalleynews.com

Vol. 1, No. 8

FREE

Voters Give A Resounding “No” to Proposition A Missourians rejected a measure on August 7th which would have upheld the contested legislation making Missouri a “right to work” state. Missouri became a right-to-work state when the legislature passed Senate Bill 19 in 2017. This legislation directed that no person can be required to join a labor union or pay dues to a labor union as a condition of employment. The road for this bill to become law gained steam with the 2016 election of former Republican Governor Eric Greitens. He replaced sitting Democrat Jay Nixon, and

Nixon had opposed and vetoed a previous attempt to pass right-towork legislation in Missouri. Greitens election along with the Republican majority in both the Missouri Senate and House of Representatives led to the Show-Me -State becoming the 28th right-towork state in the union. The current issue was presented to voters as part of the referendum process in Missouri. With 37.7% of registered voters in Jackson County casting ballots, a resounding “no” was heard, with 70.58% of voters in Jackson County

voting against Proposition A. In addition to Proposition A, local voters cast primary ballots to narrow the field in a number of races. In Missouri Senate District 8, Mike Cierpiot defeated Leonard Hughes IV, a former Missouri House Representative, in the Republican primary. Cierpiot will face Democrat Hillary Shields of Lee’s Summit in the November election. Senate terms are four years. For the Missouri House District 32 seat, Democrat Janice Bill will face Republican Jeff Coleman. District 33

has been narrowed down to Republican Donna Pfautsch and Democrat Pat Williams. Other local House districts include District 20, in which Democrat Jessica Merrick will face Republican Bill Kidd, and District 53, in which voters will choose between Republican Glen Kolkmeyer and Democrat Connie Simmons. The general election will be held November 6, 2018.

Good News Church’s Gift Benefits District Students by Cory Unrein

Pastor Jason Williams and members of Valley Community Church pulled up to Prairie Branch Elementary on Wednesday, August 8th, hauling a trailer brimming with school supplies for the district’s Kindergarten students. For the second year, all incoming Kindergarteners at each of the four elementary schools in the Grain Valley School District will have their school supplies provided by the church. All items on each school’s supply list will be provided for Kindergarteners, except for student backpacks and lunch boxes. The church works with each individual school to coordinate the drop-off of supplies the first few weeks of August, enabling teachers to organize supplies in their classrooms well before the first day of school. Jolaina Lawler, a Kindergarten teacher for the past 13 years at Prairie Branch Elementary, and a total of 22 years in the district, was the first recipient of supplies on delivery day. As Williams unloaded case upon case of binders and facial tissue in her room, Lawler marveled at the supplies and praised the project. “We are just so thankful because there are a lot of families in the district who cannot afford to

purchase needed supplies. This starts everyone on an even playing field.” Lawler says the project benefits the teachers as well, as teachers often purchase many supplies from their own pockets. “It’s so helpful. It makes the kids so excited, which helps us as well.”

“We are just so thankful because there are a lot of families in the district who cannot afford to purchase needed supplies. This starts everyone on an even playing field.” Jolaina Lawler, teacher Prairie Branch Elementary

The church plans to continue the program as a part of their overall mission to serve the community. For more information on Valley Community Church and their annual school supply effort, visit http:// www.grainvalley.church.

Prairie Branch Elementary Kindergarten teacher Jolaina Lawler, receives supplies for all of her students through a program sponsored by Valley Community Church.


Local News

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Car Show Raises $10,000 for Purple Peace Foundation Vintage cars and hot rods took over Armstrong Park on Sunday, August 5th for a good cause and raised a record amount to support those with epilepsy. Stacey Mudd Perry, organizer of the annual car show, is beyond pleased with the turnout and support of this 4th Annual event. Perry estimates at least 500 people attended this year’s car show. Perry says, “Last year, we had 125 participants. This year was a whopping 220. We went through approximately 200 hamburgers, 140 hot dogs, 80 brats, 320 bottles of water, 300 cans of soda, and 20 pies. What people don’t realize is that their hot dog purchase really does directly impact someone with epilepsy.” The final figure is still being tallied, but at least $10,000 was raised to support programs of the Purple Peace Foundation. The Purple Peace Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, was established in 2012, in memory of Amanda Brady. Amanda was a student at Grain Valley South Middle School when she died on September 22, 2011 following a seizure. Amanda’s family started the Purple Peace Foundation in her honor to provide hope and resources to other families impacted by epilepsy. Perry says that funds raised will

provide a number of programs that support those with epilepsy and their families, including a new program to provide transportation to and from doctor’s appointments, utilizing services such as Uber and Lyft. Perry explains that transportation is a major barrier for those with epilepsy, as the disorder prevents many from being able to drive. Many patients miss medical appointments and struggle with keeping medications filled due to transportation issues. This program will help ease the burden on caregivers and ensure that individuals with epilepsy can attend medical appointments. The Foundation also assists patients in obtaining assistive devices such as Smart Monitor Watches. These devices will detect if a patient has had a seizure and calls up to six contacts for emergency assistance. Perry also stresses the importance of meeting other families impacted by epilepsy and sharing resources. Understanding the value of making these connections, the Foundation will provide the opportunity to attend Epilepsy Awareness Day at Disneyland to three families impacted by epilepsy. Applications and details regarding this program

220 participants brought their vintage cars and hot rods to Armstrong Park on Sunday, August 5th for the 4th Annual Cruise for Consciousness. are available on the Foundation’s website and Facebook page. For more information on Amanda

Brady and the Purple Peace Foundation, visit www.purplepeacefoundation.org.

Movie in the Park Friday at Armstrong Park Grab your lawn chairs and head to Armstrong Park this Friday evening for a free family movie. Grain Valley Parks and Recreation will host Movie in the Park starting

Valley News Grain Valley News is a free community paper, published weekly on Thursdays online at www.grainvalleynews.com and on the 1st and 3rd weeks of the month in print. Cory Unrein | Co-Owner/Publisher John Unrein | Co-Owner/Production Manager Cathy Allie | Staff Writer, Proofreader Diana Luppens, Switch Focus Studios | Contributing Photographer Mail: PO Box 2972 Grain Valley MO 64029 Phone: 816.809.7984 Email: news@grainvalleynews.com Sign up for our weekly emails and join us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (@grainvalleynews).

at 7:30pm on Friday, August 10th at the Armstrong Park Pavilion. Free family fun begins at 7:30pm with face painting, bounce house, games, and concessions.

The evening’s movie, Despicable Me 3, will begin approximately 8:30pm. There is no cost to attend; the concession stand will be open throughout the evening.


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GVPD Hosts National Night Out Event Residents of Grain Valley came out in force on August 7th to support the Grain Valley Police Department’s (GVPD) National Night Out Event. The event, held at Armstrong Park, was an effort to educate the public on the functions of the GVPD and

several partner agencies in attendance. Bomb squad and K-9 units from multiple agencies held demonstrations. A dunk tank, bounce houses, balloon animals, free food, and raffles added to the festive atmosphere.

Residents enjoyed a number of activities at the National Night Out event hosted by Grain Valley Police Department, including (clockwise from top) a dunk tank, a meet and greet with KC Wolf, an impaired driving simulator, and visits with local law enforcement and fire services.

Police Blotter

The following information is derived from the Grain Valley Police Department daily calls for service log for the week of July 25-31, 2018. July 25, 2018 Main St & Cannon 700 Block Main St 700 Block Main St 700 Block Main St Eagles Pkwy & Blue Branch Dr 700 Block Main St 700 Block Squire Ct 100 Block Elizabeth St Silvertone & Long

Area Check Traffic Complaint Citizen Contact Citizen Contact Motor Vehicle Accident Citizen Contact Alarm Harassment Agency Assist (CJC)

July 26, 2018 600 Block Yennie 900 Block Stone Brook Ln 400 Block Main St 400 Block Front St 700 Block Main St 700 Block Main St 1300 Block Golfview Ct 700 Block Woodland Cir 700 Block Main St BB Hwy near Duncan Rd 500 Block South St

Area Check Area Check Check the Well Being Disturbance Suspicious Activity Fingerprints Parking Complaint Parking Complaint Ex Parte Violation Motorist Assist Alarm

July 27, 2018 700 Block Main St 1400 Block Buckner Tarsney 700 Block Main St 40 Hwy & Main St 400 Block Greystone Dr 800 Block SanKar 1100 Block McQuerry Rd 1100 Block Scenic Dr 1200 Block Foxtail Dr 1800 Block Walnut 1200 Block Foxtail Dr 1100 Block McQuerry Rd 1300 Block Walnut Ct

Warrant Surrender Disturbance Citizen Contact Motor Vehicle Accident Disturbance Suspicious Activity Suspicious Party Suspicious Vehicle Suspicious Activity Civil Standby Area Check Suspicious Person Civil Standby

July 28, 2018 100 Block Garden St 1200 Block Ashley Ln 800 Block SanKar Albatross & Scenic Dr 600 Block Jefferson St Sni-A-Bar and Sni-a-Bar 25 MM at I-70 East Bound 600 Block Montana Ridge Dr

Agency Assist (DFS) Disturbance Disturbance Animal at Large Alarm Open Door Agency Assist (MSHP) Agency Assist (CJC)

600 Block Yennie 700 Block Main St

Disturbance Warrant Confirmation

July 29, 2018 1900 Block Eagles Pkwy 700 Block Scenic Dr 1300 Block Blue Branch 200 Block Salem Dr 1200 Block Phelps Ct 1100 Block Scenic Dr 700 Block Main St 1200 Block Persimmon Dr 800 Block Mulberry 1300 Block Jefferson St 1000 Block RD Mize Rd 500 Block Lakeview 400 Block Creek Ridge

Burglary Property Damage Agency Assist (DFS) Agency Assist (OGPD) Stealing Suspicious Activity Citizen Contact Alarm Suspicious Vehicle Alarm Disturbance Suspicious Person Alarm

July 30, 2018 200 Block Pebblebrook 1400 Block Buckner Tarsney 500 Block Centurion Ct 1300 Block Jefferson St 700 Block Main St 700 Block Main St 800 Block Highland Ave 1200 Block Minter Way 1200 Block Phelps Dr 1600 Block Eagles Pkwy 700 Block Main St 1000 Block Blue Branch Dr 700 Block Main St Main St & I70 700 Block Main St 700 Block Main St 600 Block Scenic Ln

Stealing from Auto Alarm Civil Matter Alarm Citizen Contact Harassment Disturbance Suspicious Party Attempt to Contact Burglary Citizen Contact Agency Assist (CJC) Citizen Contact Area Check Citizen Contact Citizen Contact Citizen Contact

July 31, 2018 Clover & Crosscreek 700 Block Main St 1000 Block Stonebrooke 700 Block Main St 1100 Block McQuerry Rd 1100 Block Valley Ridge 1100 Block Long Dr BB Hwy & Duncan Rd RD Mize Rd & OOIDA 700 Block Main St

Fireworks Citizen Contact Open Door Citizen Contact Suspicious Activity Abandoned Vehicle Property Damage Motor Vehicle Accident Area Check Citizen Contact


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Jackson County Food Inspections Jackson County Public Works Environmental Health Division inspects all restaurants, grocery stores, schools, mobile food and temporary food establishments in the City of Grain Valley. The following violations were reported in the last 30 days: El Maguey Mexican Restaurant, 102 Buckner Tarsney Road The soda nozzles were dirty. Corrected. The can opener blade had an accumulation of build-up. Corrected. Observed serving using bare hand to keep chips in basket when filling chip basket. Corrected. Employee was observed putting raw chicken and then raw shrimp on the grill without washing hands in between. Corrected. Employee washed hands. Inspector allowed the shrimp to be served because it had a final cooking temperature of 171*F. There was a large accumulation of black grease that had spilled out of the motor housing onto the base of the unit and the splash guard below. Failed to provide valid food handler permits for the following employees: Alejandro, Fabian. Correct by 8/30/2018.   Lin's Kitchen, 111 SW Eagles Parkway Hand washing sink had a dish stored in the basin. Corrected. The rear screen door was propped open. The gasket/seal on the reach-in coolers had a black build up. There was food boxes stored on the floor of the freezer.

Price Chopper #325 – Bakery, 1191 NE. McQuerry Rd. A handwashing sign was not available at the front portion of the bakery. Corrected on site. Price Chopper #325-Grocery/Dairy/ Produce, 1191 NE. McQuerry Rd. The ceiling fan in the produce prep area/coolers had an accumulation of dust on them. Correct by 10/2/2018.   Price Chopper #325-Meat/Seafood, 1191 NE. McQuerry Rd. The handles on a piece of meat cutting equipment had a buildup of residue on it. Correct by 10/2/2018. In the meat prep area, a blue chemical was in an unlabeled bottle. Corrected on site. Price Chopper #325 -Kitchen /Deli/ Salad Bar, 1191 NE. McQuerry Rd. One side of a salad bar was found out of temperature during this inspection. The external thermometer was at 54*F. Ham was at 49*F, turkey was at 48*F, cantaloupe was at 50*F, and pineapple at 51*F. Reinspection required. All potentially hazardous foods were discarded. A hot holding case was also found out of temperature. The external thermometer was reading at 123*F. Ribs were at 115*F, Chicken was found at 112*-132*F. Reinspection required.  Debris and wet residue were observed behind the fryer's in the kitchen on the floor. A brown liquid was observed under a storage rack in the walk-in cooler.

Baby/Toddler Contest Returns to Grain Valley Fair Back by popular demand, the Grain Valley Fair will once again host a Baby Grain Valley Fair Baby/ Toddler Contest. There are 4 age categories: 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 12-24 months, and ages 2-4. To register a child, email your child's non-copyrighted photograph to gvfair@gmail.com. Include in your email the child's name, age, parent's name(s), and phone number. Registrants should also include a statement that gives the fair organizers permission to share your child's photograph on the Grain Valley Fair Facebook page. The registration deadline is August 24, 2018. During the hours of 2:00pm— 10:00pm on Friday, September 7th and 11:00am—5:00pm on Saturday, September 8th, voting buckets with

each child's photo will be placed at the fair’s information tent. Attendees may vote for their favorite by placing money in the child’s bucket. Winners will be announced at 6:30 PM on Saturday, September 8th on the main pavilion stage. The winner in each category will be determined by the amount of money raised in their bucket. The winner in each category will receive a 2019 Grain Valley Community Pool Family Yearly Pass. All participants will receive a participation ribbon. Winners do not need to be present to win. All contestants can participate in the parade on Saturday. Information about parade participants will be sent out at a later date to all registered participants.


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Bring Your Pooch to Dog Paddle Day The Grain Valley Aquatic Center will go to the dogs on September 4th. Dog owners are invited to beat the heat, ride the slide, and just have a ‘dog gone’ good time at the Grain Valley Aquatic Center on Tuesday, September 4th from 6:00pm— 8:00pm. The event is $5.00 per dog and all attendees must follow the following guidelines: x Aggressive dogs are not allowed. x Humans are not allowed in the water. x All dogs must have current vaccinations with rabies and city license tags worn and displayed at all times.

x Please pick up after your dog, even outside the pool area. x Children under the age of 10 are not allowed without an adult. x Dogs may not be left unattended and should be under voice control at all times. x Dogs must be leashed while on city premises until inside the pool area. The Grain Valley Aquatic Center is located at 713 S. Main Street. This program is held annually before the pool is drained for the season.

Dogs are welcome to go for a swim at the Grain Valley Aquatic Center on September 4th from 6:00pm—8:00pm.


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Education & Youth

Prairie Branch to Welcome Dr. Kevin Carroll, Principal by Cathy Allie Prairie Branch Elementary will welcome Dr. Kevin Carroll as Principal as the school year begins. Carroll has most recently worked as an administrator in the St. Joseph School District and is enthusiastic about his new role. “There is a warm, welcoming feel to this building and the whole school district,” Carroll said. “I am ready to get started and excited about what we can accomplish.” Carroll has administrative experience at the elementary and middle school levels, and last year led an elementary building of nearly the exact same size as Prairie Branch. The phenomenal growth the Grain Valley School District is experiencing is exciting to Carroll, whose personal roots are in Cameron, Missouri. “I like the feel of a small town like Cameron, where I grew up, that Grain Valley has, but I love the challenge of growth, the potential that lies in it, and forward planning,” Carroll said. Preliminary meetings with Prairie Branch staff have been very encouraging for Carroll, who considers one of his strengths his ability to build relationships with staff and with families. He hopes to promote personal learning with staff, through having them sharing an area of interest related to their teaching and then allowing them to explore it. “If a teacher really wants to study technology and how it relates to achievement or to better understand

different levels of interventions we can make for students, I hope to support the teacher in that learning. I know it can be nerve-wrecking for a staff to have a new leader, especially following a strong one like Mrs. Gross. But the shared interest in doing what is best for students makes our transition a little easier one.” Carroll believes a successful building has shared leadership,

The school district’s professional development opportunities on tap for teachers are ones Carroll is excited about for Prairie Branch. There will be a focus on Multi-Tiered Systems of Supports (MTSS) with deliberate academic, social, and attendance interventions and then Carroll’s favorite, Number Talks, which will feature discussion about math strategies. “I wasn’t a fan of math as a

“I want my teachers to be featured. I need to be the one who points them in the right direction, provide them opportunities to succeed, and the encouragement and the nudges to do so,” Dr. Kevin Carroll, Principal Prairie Branch Elementary

where the teachers serve as the subject matter and teaching experts and have the chance to collaborate with one another and deliver good instruction. “I want my teachers to be featured. I need to be the one who points them in the right direction, provide them opportunities to succeed, and the encouragement and the nudges to do so,” Carroll said.

student, but as a teacher, I really came to appreciate the many ways you can put math in front of students that cements their learning and helps them get a really good understanding of it. I have become a real math student myself!” Math isn’t the only interest for Carroll. As an instructional coach in St. Joseph, he was able to visit lots of classrooms to observe and assist teachers and determine what he

believes works and to interpret student data. Couple that with a wife and brother-in-law who are also educators, and Carroll practically has his own in-house professional development network . “My brother-in-law and I created a podcast where we just talked about all kinds of educational issues because we like bouncing ideas off one another and then sharing what we have talked about with others, just trying to help where we can.” Carroll has had some extensive training and experience in implementing technology such as 1 to 1 devices for students, which is the direction Grain Valley is moving with devices currently in middle schools and moving toward elementary. “We will for sure be ready for that when it gets to the elementary level,” Carroll said. “I already have teachers who have great ideas for integrating technology and I am equipped to help them.” Carroll earned his Bachelors in Education from Missouri Western University, his Specialist in Elementary Administration from William Woods University, and his Doctorate in Educational Leadership from St. Louis University.

Collins family will host International Student Through the AFS High School Exchange Program, the Collins family will host Gemma from Spain. Gemma will attend Grain Valley High School for one full academic year, and is most excited to “learn from a new culture and speak a new language.” The Collins family is a second-year host family with AFS, and they are eager to have a new family member join their household this school year. Each year the Kansas City Metro area hosts over 60 international high school students who come to the U.S. to experience American culture as part of AFS High School Exchange program. Students attend local high schools, live with American host families, and participate in athletics

and extracurricular activities organized by AFS volunteers. Founded in 1946, AFS-USA’s mission is to work toward a more just and peaceful world by providing international and intercultural learning experiences to individuals, families, schools and communities through a global volunteer partnership. AFS-USA honors the legacy of its founders - volunteer WWI and WWII American Field Service ambulance drivers - who emerged from the wars with a bold mission: to help prevent future conflict through education and cross-cultural exchanges. More than 70 years later, AFS Mission continues to respond to the

needs of an increasingly complex world, offering programs abroad in more than 50 countries and hosting international students from more than 80 countries. Families interested in hosting an international exchange student can contact Kate Maricle, AFS Team Development Specialist, at kmaricle@afsusa.org or visit www.afsusa.org to learn more about the program.

Gemma, a foreign exchange student through the AFS High School Exchange Program, will attend Grain Valley High School this school year.


Community Voices Looking Back Grain Valley’s Oldest Building by Marcia Napier Grain Valley Historical Society Built in 1889 on land purchased in the Finnell’s Addition from Mary Kirby Wright and her husband J.B. Keshlear at a cost of $135, the former United Methodist Church at 512 Capelle is the oldest continuously used building in Grain Valley. The lumber and other material for the church were purchased from the sale of Pleasant Valley Methodist Church in the Stoney Point community. The original building was a large one room structure heated by a wood stove. The ceiling, sides, and windows with the curved, pointed tops pointing toward heaven remain a part of the sanctuary today. The Pink Hill Methodist Church, established in 1871, was the “mother church” of Oak Grove, Oakland, and Grain Valley Methodist churches. These churches were served by “circuit rider” ministers who alternatively preached at these churches until the practice was disbanded in the 1990’s. The original United Methodist Church at 512 Capelle, is the oldest continuously used building in Grain Valley. The building is now owned by Laurie Hatfield who operates Acquaint Gathering, an event venue. Photo credit: Diana Luppens, Switch Focus Studios

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Business News

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Businesses To Celebrate Downtown on August 11th Downtown businesses have planned a celebration event to highlight the new and existing businesses working to improve Grain Valley’s downtown area. Businesses along Main Street between Walnut Street and Front Street will be featured on Saturday, August 11th from 11:00am—4:00pm. The event will include familyfriendly entertainment, games, and food, and is intended to be an opportunity for residents to get to know the businesses downtown. Randomly Beautiful, a DIY, makeand-take home décor boutique

located at 101 W. Walnut Street, will hold its grand opening. A ribbon cutting is scheduled for 11:00am. Owner Regina Woods will offer a 25% discount for all who sign up that Saturday for any group event held in the month of August. Acquaint Gathering, 512 Capelle Street, will host a “Back to School Bash” from 11:00am—3:00pm. The event will include a number of vendors, photobooth mini sessions, a bounce house for children, and teacher appreciation discounts. Tacos El Sombrero, a local food truck, will also be on site at the event.

Randomly Beautiful, owned by Regina Woods, will hold a grand opening celebration on Saturday, August 11th, with a ribbon cutting at 11:00am.

Business News is provided weekly by the Grain Valley Partnership, whose mission is to be a leader in the growth of Grain Valley. The Grain Valley Partnership is located at 1450 SW Eagles Parkway, and can be reached by phone, 816-443-5162 or via email at info@growgrainvalley.org.

www.growgrainvalley.org


Sports & Fitness

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Rating Major League Players: Looking at Potential Future Kansas City Royals by John Unrein Ever wonder how major league baseball scouts rate players? Curious how the next wave of Kansas City Royals prospects in their farm system rate? First let’s look at how major league baseball prospects are evaluated. The scouting scale runs numerically from 20-80 (with 20 being the lowest and 80 being the highest) on tools that players possess. For pitchers, they are assessed based on the pitches they throw (fastball, changeup, slider, etc.), their control and overall grade. Position players are based on five tools along with an overall appraisal. Ability to hit for contact, for power, running (think speed), arm (for throwing with strength and accuracy), fielding (range and quickness of hands), and overall appraisal. Thus, the endless search for a five-tool player that gets bantered around major league baseball. Think of Carlos Beltran and Bo Jackson as former Royals with this distinction. Or an Ace who takes the mound every fifth day, someone the likes of a Bret Saberhagen or David Cone. According to Fangraphs, “the invention of the scale is credited to Branch Rickey and whether he intended it or not, it mirrors various scientific scales. 50 is major league average, then each 10-point increment represents a standard deviation better or worse than average. In a normal distribution, three standard deviations in either direction should include 99.7% of your sample, so that’s why the scale is 20 to 80 rather than 0 to 100. That said, the distribution of tools isn’t a normal curve for every tool, but is somewhere close to that for most.” It’s fascinating that Rickey’s contributions as owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers extend past just

breaking the color barrier of major league baseball with the integration of Jackie Robinson. He provided a tool for evaluating players that has stood the test of time. That’s not to say that Major League Baseball hasn’t added to Rickey’s idea. For example, scouts may want to look further into the peripheral numbers of a pitcher. Spin rate (spin of the seams on a baseball generated when pitching), release point distance from the plate to pitchers’ hand, consistency of delivery, how fast they are to home plate out of the stretch with runners on base, and quality strikes thrown (where they end up in the strike zone). These are all enhancements to the original foundation of the scouting report that was Branch Rickey’s brainchild. However, scouts are interested in more than just numbers when it comes to evaluating talent. Sometimes numbers can’t tell you if

an outfielder chooses to hit the cutoff man consistently with their throws. Whether a pitcher is visibly rattled on the mound after giving up a big hit. These intangibles along with a player’s passion for the game are commonly what’s known in big league circles as a player’s makeup. It has significant weight as well when evaluating a baseball player. Teams want players with talent as well as positive makeup within the organization. Below is a breakdown of the Royals top prospects as ranked by mlb.com or MLB Pipeline. While the Royals may not have an abundance of the Top 100 prospects in Major League Baseball (Brady Singer is the organization’s lone representative at #65), they are not without talent in the farm system that may make contributions at the big-league level in the future. Keep in mind that all the players listed on this chart are extremely young.

Staumont is the eldest at age 24. Matias is the baby at age 19. It’s hard to want to base how a player will perform in the show based on scouting evaluations of men this young. This scale has stood the test of time within baseball for a reason, though. It’s been fairly accurate in its predictions. Newly acquired Royals such as Brett Phillips, Brian Goodwin, Rosell Herrera, and Jorge Lopez can look to a future where solid contributors are not far away from the next wave of talent to hit Kansas City.

Position Players: Player

Position

Hit

Power

Running

Arm

Fielding

Overall

Khalil Lee

OF

50

55

55

60

55

50

Seuly Matias

OF

45

60

55

70

55

50

MJ Melendez

C

45

50

40

60

60

50

Nick Pratto

1B

55

55

40

55

60

50

Nicky Lopez

2B/SS

55

30

55

60

55

50

Player

Throws

Fastball

Slider

Curveball

Changeup

Control

Overall

Brady Singer

RHP

60

60

NA

50

55

55

Jackson Kowar

RHP

60

NA

50

60

50

50

Daniel Lynch

LHP

55

55

50

55

50

50

Kris Bubic

LHP

55

NA

50

60

50

50

Josh Staumont

RHP

70

NA

60

45

40

45

Pitchers:


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Season Begins for Grain Valley Girls Golf The Grain Valley Girls Golf team began practice this week at Adams Pointe Golf Club. Eight girls have joined this year’s team, including four returning members and two freshmen. Head Coach Randy Hughes is returning for his third year with the team, his first as head coach. This is the first year for Assistant Coach Robin Jones. Hughes says one of the team’s goals is to get at least two girls to Sectionals this year. Last year, one girl qualified for Sectionals and two others were within a couple of shots of qualifying. “We will work to build on that, by working to get better every day. It is our goal to show the girls that they are good enough to get to that level.” The team’s first tournament will be August 27th at Platte County.

Grain Valley High School's Girls Golf Team practices at Adams Pointe Golf Club. Head Coach Randy Hughes (middle) and Assistant Coach Robin Jones (right) instruct girls in proper putting technique.

Just Breathe by Sally Whitaker Remembering to breathe. Sounds easy enough. Our bodies are pretty good about breathing for us. Deep, lung-clearing breaths, however? Not so much. A 2015 article from Harvard Medical School found that “Shallow breathing limits the diaphragm's range of motion. The lowest part of the lungs doesn't get a full share of oxygenated air. That can make you feel short of breath and anxious. Deep abdominal breathing encourages full oxygen exchange — that is, the beneficial trade of incoming oxygen for outgoing carbon dioxide.” By emptying the lungs fully you will feel more relaxed overall, your resting heart rate will decrease and it may even help lower blood pressure. Breathing exercises are just as important as other forms of exercise. By breathing deeply you will help strengthen the diaphragm, the main muscle involved in the breathing process. With daily practice your respiration muscles will get stronger and breathing fully will get easier.

How to Practice Begin by finding a quiet place you can relax. You may be seated or lie down. Take 2-3 regular breaths, allowing your shoulders and the muscles in your face to relax. If you would like, you may place one or both hands on the abdomen. Cleansing Breaths Inhale slowly through the nose, filling the lungs completely. It is helpful to visualize the lungs as inflating balloons. Exhale slowly through the nose, allowing the lungs to empty completely, visualizing deflating balloons. When you feel like you can’t exhale anymore air through the nostrils, begin to blow out a little more through the lips. This will be slightly uncomfortable as our body doesn’t like to feel like it is running out of air. Repeat this 2 more times, to do a total of 3 full inhales and exhales. Timed Breathing You may find that using a clock or timer that allows you to hear a tick each second helps with this exercise. The counts that you will be inhaling, holding and exhaling to should be no

more than 1 second apart. * Inhale through your nose for 4 counts. * Hold your breath for 6 counts. * Exhale through your mouth for 8 counts, allowing the jaw and face to relax. * Repeat 3 more times, to make a total of 4 cycles. If the 6 second hold is too much, hold just for 3 counts in the beginning. You may feel a bit lightheaded in the beginning. If that feeling does not go away within a couple minutes or if you feel dizzy, contact your doctor.

You should consult your physician or other health care professional before starting this or any other fitness program to determine if it is right for your needs. Do not start this fitness program if your physician or health care provider advises against it. If you experience faintness, dizziness, pain or shortness of breath at any time while exercising you should stop immediately. Sally Whitaker is a Pilates and Yoga instructor with 15 years of experience teaching group classes and private clientele, primarily in Independence, MO. During the summer months you can find her teaching Sunset Yoga at Armstrong Park in Grain Valley.


Puzzles

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Answers to Last Week’s Puzzles


Community Calendar August 10, 2018 Movie in the Park: Despicable Me 3 7:30pm (movie begins approx. 8:30pm) Armstrong Park Pavilion Grab your lawn chairs, kick back, relax, and enjoy a free show with Grain Valley Parks and Rec! Family fun begins at 7:30pm with a bounce house, face painting, games, and concessions. August 11, 2018 GVHS Booster Club Pancake Breakfast 7:00am—10:00am Grain Valley High School August 11, 2018 Family Fishing 9:30am—11:30am Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center 1401 NW Park Road, Blue Springs Registration required. 816-228-3766 www.mdc.mo.gov August 11, 2018 GVHS Booster Club General Meeting 11:00am Grain Valley High School August 13, 2018 Board of Aldermen Meeting 7:00pm Grain Valley City Hall 711 Main Street August 13, 2018 Grain Valley Schools Meet the Teacher Night Each school hosts a Meet the Teacher Night the evening of August 13. See the Grain Valley Schools app or website for specific times for your child’s school. August 15, 2018 First Day of School Grain Valley Schools Check the Grain Valley Schools app or website for bus routes and start and end times for your child’s school.

August 15, 2018 Storytime at the Library 10:00am Mid-Continent Public Library, Grain Valley Branch www.mymcpl.org/events

August 22, 2018 Storytime at the Library 10:00am Mid-Continent Public Library, Grain Valley Branch www.mymcpl.org/events

September 3, 2018 Labor Day City Hall closed Grain Valley Schools closed Check with your trash service re: service delays.

August 16, 2018 Storytime at the Library 10:00am Mid-Continent Public Library, Grain Valley Branch www.mymcpl.org/events

August 25, 2018 Nature Tales: Rockin’ & Readin’ 11:00am—Noon Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center 1401 NW Park Road, Blue Springs Walk-in; no registration required. 816-228-3766 www.mdc.mo.gov

September 4, 2018 Dog Paddle Day 6:00pm—8:00pm Grain Valley Aquatic Center 713 S Main ST $5 per dog.

August 16, 2018 Beyond Cable TV 6:30pm—7:30pm Mid-Continent Public Library, Grain Valley Branch www.mymcpl.org/events Learn the different devices and services you can use with your internet connection to start cutting the cord today. August 16, 2018 Grain Valley School Board Meeting 6:00pm Visit www.gvr5.net for agenda and location. August 18, 2018 Film Screening: “I Can Only Imagine” 6:00pm—8:00pm Faith United Methodist Church 1950 SW Eagles Parkway No cost to attend; no RSVP required. August 18, 2018 Citizen Scientist Saturday: Butterflies and Moths 1:00pm—2:00pm Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center 1401 NW Park Road, Blue Springs No registration required; all ages. 816-228-3766 www.mdc.mo.gov August 21, 2018 Park Board Meeting 7:00pm Grain Valley Community Center, 713 S Main

August 25, 2018 Nightshift’s Bug Busters 1:00pm—2:00pm Burr Oak Woods Conservation Nature Center 1401 NW Park Road, Blue Springs No registration required; all ages. 816-228-3766 www.mdc.mo.gov August 25, 2018 Now Playing for Kids: “Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb” 2:00pm Mid-Continent Public Library, Grain Valley Branch www.mymcpl.org/events August 27, 2018 Board of Aldermen Meeting 7:00pm Grain Valley City Hall 711 Main Street August 28, 2018 Curriculum Night at Grain Valley Elementary Schools See the Grain Valley Schools app or website for specific times for your child’s school. August 29, 2018 Storytime at the Library 10:00am Mid-Continent Public Library, Grain Valley Branch www.mymcpl.org/events

September 5, 2018 Senior Citizens’ Luncheon 11:30am—1:00pm Grain Valley Community Center, 713 S Main ST Call 816-847-6293 to RSVP. September 7-8, 2018 Grain Valley Fair Carnival midway opens at 4:00pm on Friday. September 8, 2018 Grain Valley Fair 5K 8:00am Grain Valley City Hall 711 Main Street September 8, 2018 Grain Valley Fair Parade Noon Downtown Grain Valley November 19, 2018 Bowling for Purple Peace 2:00pm—5:00pm Lunar Bowl, Blue Springs www.purplepeacefoundation.org

Post your group’s community event online at www.grainvalleynews.com.

Valley News: August 9, 2018  
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