Page 11

A Call for Change Tennessee’s High Infant & Maternal Mortality Rates By MELANIE KILGORE-HILL

America’s Health Rankings recently released sobering statistics on rising infant and maternal death rates, and state officials are taking note. Since 2016, severe maternal morbidity, an indicator of poor maternal outcomes that is comparable across states, paints a concerning picture. The most recent severe maternal morbidity rate in Tennessee was 181.1 per 10,000 delivery hospitalizations in 2014, compared to a U.S. rate of 171.7 per 10,000 delivery hospitalizations. The national infant mortality rate (deaths under one year of age) was 5.9 in 2016, while Tennessee’s rate was 7.4 – an increase from 6.8 in 2013.

A Public Health Epidemic

“From the public health perspective, we’re looking at what we can do to address the top causes of both issues,” said Tennessee Department of Health Assistant Commissioner Morgan McDonald, MD, who serves as the agency’s director of Family Health and Wellness. “The health Dr. Morgan McDonald of a woman before pregnancy is key to health during preg-

nancy, and we’re trying to optimize the time before, during and after that period for both mother and baby.” Recent findings also prompted investigation by the Tennessee Justice Center (TJC), a Nashville-based non-profit advocating for the healthcare of Tennesseans though policy and social changes. The agency released their Infant and Maternal Mortality Policy Brief in late September, addressing key areas of concern and suggestions for change. “We wanted to learn about underlying causes and see if we could bring issues to people’s attention,” said TJC Director of Children’s Health Kinika Young. “This information is alarming, and most people don’t realize rates are so high compared to other similarly developed countries. The U.S. just Kinika Young isn’t faring well.” According to the brief, a pregnant woman in the U.S. is three times as likely to die in the maternal period as a pregnant woman in Canada, while most European countries average maternal morbidity rates of six or less. “We’re well off in the U.S. when it comes to resources, but our priorities just aren’t there,” Young said. “We’re not sup-

porting public health issues among the most vulnerable parts of our society.”

Smoking & Pregnancy

According to the brief, the heightened rates of mothers who smoke, have poor health and struggle with substance abuse help explain the high rates of premature and low birth weight babies statewide. “While the national average percentage of women who smoke while pregnant is approximately 8 percent, Tennessee’s average was a hefty 12.9 percent in 2016, with several counties’ rates reaching higher than 27.1 percent. This is a huge issue, as approximately 32 percent of Tennessee infant deaths in 2016 were linked to mothers who smoked while pregnant,” the TJC brief outlined.

Opioids

Tennessee’s opioid crisis – especially problematic in East Tennessee – is another driver of the state’s higher-than-average neonatal abstinence syndrome rates. In fact, some counties report stats eight times higher than the national average. According to the brief, a mother who suddenly quits taking opioids places her baby at a high risk of severe consequences that include death. That’s why Young is passionate about educating providers about addiction recovery and birth control options for high-risk patients.

“If a doctor sees a woman of childbearing age who might be struggling with opioid abuse, they can provide information about safe ways to recover from addiction,” Young said. “Doctors can make sure they’re not going it alone and that they’re not afraid to have that open conversation about what’s going on.” In 2018, Gov. Bill Haslam unveiled the TN Together plan, which includes various modes of support for opioid abusers, including prevention education. The plan also aims to improve and expand drug treatment services and has tightened the reins on prescription drug monitoring. “We’re very focused on supporting mothers and families affected by the opioid crisis, as we recognize that prevention has to focus even more upstream,” McDonald said. “Once someone’s been identified as being affected by substance abuse, we need to get them into treatment quickly.” The state also is partnering with agencies to reduce and mitigate adverse childhood experiences, especially since early experiences carry a lasting impact on health behaviors and health outcomes.

Asking More Questions

The TJC brief also cites obesity and weight-related health problems as a cause for premature births and maternal death rates, noting Tennessee’s high rate of (CONTINUED ON PAGE 14)

It’s time to get back to your bucket list. F

or more than 45 years, NHC has provided quality, rehabilitative care to people of all ages. With skilled therapists and decades of experience providing compassionate post-surgical care in locations close to home, you can get back to what’s important to you. So what’s first on your list?

Discover NHC and get back to life. Visit NHCcare.com to learn more about our rehabilitative care services, to explore our full range of services and to find the NHC nearest you. To learn more about our homecare services, visit MyNHChomecare.com.

NHCcare.com ©2017 NHC 23664

CONTINUING CARE • REHABILITATION • ASSISTED LIVING • HOMECARE • RESIDENTIAL LIVING HOSPICE • LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE

nashvillemedicalnews

.com

NOVEMBER 2018

>

11

November 2018 NMN  

Nashville Medical News November 2018

November 2018 NMN  

Nashville Medical News November 2018