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FOCUS TOPICS ORTHOPEDICS • PEDIATRICS • HEALTH LAW • RURAL HEALTH

August/September 2021 >> $5 ON ROUNDS

Surgical Techniques May Change Through the Years, but the Body Does Not Orthopedic surgeon Riley Jones, MD, traces improvements in the OR After graduation from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine in 1972, orthopedic surgeon Riley Jones, Riley Jones MD, managed to find just enough money and a few hours each week during his internship to take flying lessons.

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Back to School with COVID Delta Undoes Progress as Pediatric Cases Rise By CINDY SANDERS

As summer break began, it seemed like the worst of the pandemic was behind us. After a tough year of virtual learning, parents, teachers and students were all eagerly looking forward to returning to the classroom in the fall. Unfortunately, the Delta variant has allowed COVID-19 to take root again, particularly in communities with lower vaccination rates, just in time for the new school year. Decisions in Tennessee – from the firing of a vaccination official to fights over mask mandates – have made national news. While Gov. Bill Lee used an executive order under emergency powers to give parents a way to opt out of school mask mandates for their children, pediatric COVID rates hit new highs across the state. On Aug. 19, there were more than 1,000 new cases of COVID-19 in children 10 and under and more than 1,800 new cases in the 11-20 age group. The day before, there were 2,500 new cases in the two youngest age groupings and 2,000 the day before that. In just that one threeday period, 7,300 young Tennesseans were confirmed to have the virus, with nearly 3,000 of them being age 10 or (CONTINUED ON PAGE 4)

Supporting Value in Healthcare for All

HealthcareLeader

In July, major healthcare organizations signed a letter of support for the recent reintroduction of a bipartisan bill to support accountable care orgaSuzen DelBene nizations (ACOs) and other alternative payment models (APMs), while also addressing an unintended consequence of the ACO formulary, known as the ‘rural glitch,’ ...

Growing Future Treatments in the Garden of Clinical Trials St. Jude’s Dr. Elizabeth Fox oversees clinical trials for children worldwide By JAMES DOWD

When Dr. Elizabeth Fox moved to Memphis from Philadelphia nearly two years ago to accept a leadership role at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, she soon discovered several differences between the City of Good Abode and the City of Brotherly Love. Such as a local hunger for BBQ rather than Philly Cheesesteak. And fan fervor for the

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ONLINE: MEMPHIS MEDICAL NEWS.COM

Memphis Grizzlies instead of the Philadelphia 76ers. And even occasional news reports about efforts to preserve the Liberty Bowl, not the Liberty Bell. But one facet of Memphis life that particularly resonated with the senior vice president of clinical trials research at St. Jude was the ability to practice her love of gardening in the fertile soil surrounding her new home. Her previous (CONTINUED ON PAGE 8)

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PhysicianSpotlight

Surgical Techniques May Change Through the Years, but the Body Does Not Orthopedic surgeon Riley Jones, MD, traces improvements in the OR By LAWRENCE BUSER

After graduation from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine in 1972, orthopedic surgeon Riley Jones, MD, managed to find just enough money and a few hours each week during his internship to take flying lessons. He would seem to be an unlikely candidate to be traveling high above the operating room with single-engine, multiengine, and instrument ratings. “I have a fear of heights,” Jones confessed. “I cannot go to the edge of something and look over without starting to get that funny feeling in my stomach, but at one time I could take an acrobatic plane and spin it and roll it over and not feel a thing because I have control of the airplane. It’s really a control issue.” For some 43 years now, he has surgically restored control to patients with all manner of joint problems in their knees and shoulders. As a former small-college basketball player, Jones liked sports medicine and helping injured athletes return to competition. As a medical student, he read a book by a New York obstetrician that had Jones thinking of that field as a career option. After helping deliver 40 babies, though, he decided he would be better at sports medicine and repairing fractures “because I could put things back together pretty well.” Today he does more work-related injuries, and generally sees older patients, including many with familiar faces. “Some of them I’ve seen for more than 40 years, and in some cases, they have grandkids who are patients of mine,” said Jones of OrthoSouth. “They don’t want me to retire.” Much has changed in the field of orthopedics since he started his career with the former Memphis Orthopedic Group on Jan. 2, 1978, two days after completion of his residency at the Campbell Clinic. “When I first started learning about arthroscopy, I was a resident and we were using a Japanese-designed scope that was 7.8 mm,” Jones recalled. “It was like a huge trocar that you had to put into the knee and get down and look directly through the lens. “It was bulky and cumbersome, but as science and computers improved, we began doing this with a little color TV monitor that we look up at while working inside a memphismedicalnews

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knee or a shoulder with 4-mm instruments, sometimes 2 mm, and using high-speed 10,000 rpm burrs to shave things. We’ve come a long way from opening people with incisions that are two or three inches long and having them stay in the hospital four or five days to now doing ambulatory surgery with 4mm openings and letting them go home immediately.” Total knee replacements require bigger openings to insert titanium and plastic implants that must be big and sturdy enough to support weight and handle strain. “We still put scars when we do a total knees and total hips, but just not as big,” he said. “You can’t quite get away from that.” Jones remembers the first total-joint implants “looked like small Tinker Toys” and required a large amount of bone cement to hold them in place. Better-fitting joint replacements can be created now and require no cement, “so we’ve made unbelievable changes that would last five years in the past and now lasting 15 to 20 years.” Over the past four decades, the science and technology involved in diagnosing an injury has improved as well, he says. “When I began, we had diagnostic tools like x-rays and bone scans, but then CT (computerized tomography) came along which does a great job on bones, tumors and things like that. Then you had

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Back to School with COVID, continued from page 1

younger. Although serious illness and death remain relatively rare among minors, there has been an increase in such cases nationwide. Since the beginning of the year, the state has seen more than a 60 percent jump in hospitalizations in the age 0-10 category, a group not yet eligible for vaccinations. As parents seek answers, pediatricians are stepping up to dispel myths and share the facts on vaccination efforts and mitigation measures.

Vaccines & Cardiac Concerns

Stuart Berger, MD, FAAP, chair of the Section of Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery for the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), spoke with Medical News to address multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) and parent concerns over Stuart Berger reports of myocarditis or pericarditis linked to vaccination in children 12 and up. “There seems to be, indeed, an association with the MRNA vaccination and myocarditis. When it’s seen, it’s typically in the 16-24 age range and in boys more than girls,” he noted. “Having said that, it’s still relatively uncommon to see it … and when it is seen, it’s very, very mild disease,” Berger continued. He added the rare number of

children who have been diagnosed haven’t been very sick, and the inflammation has gone away fairly quickly. “Thus far, it has not required any treatment other than one to two days of pain management such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.” Typically, the self-limiting condition requires no intervention at all outside of rest and OTC pain relievers as needed. “This is now in stark contrast with myocarditis that can be seen from an acute COVID infection or in association with MIS-C,” explained Berger, who is the division head of Cardiology at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. “Those patients can be very sick and often end up in the hospital and can get a very severe form of myocarditis requiring treatment and a fairly intense therapy for a period of time.” He added, “Many of those patients can require therapy in the Intensive Care Unit and can have morbidity and mortality if they get this.” Berger said data is also being gathered on possible residual issues these children could face over the long term. “In my experience with seeing COVID and MIS-C in young patients and my experience in seeing patients post-vaccine, it is a no-brainer to me that getting the vaccine is critical and what is best for every individual and for society in general,” Berger concluded.

Mitigating Risks

Anna Morad, MD, FAAP, president

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On the Front Line with Parents “There’s a lot of misinformation out there,” said Anna Morad, MD, FAAP. While every parent won’t be convinced to vaccinate their child, Morad said pediatricians have a unique opportunity to debunk myths and share evidence-based information. The first step, she said, is to listen. “You need to hear what their concerns are,” Morad noted of not discounting parents’ fears. One of the biggest is that the vaccines were rolled out too quickly. She said it’s important to explain there was no ‘cutting corners’ when it came to clinical trials and evidence. The speed, she continued, came from streamlining the usual bureaucracy and a collegial work environment in the face of a crisis where researchers shared data and joined forces. Similarly, she said the concerns over myocarditis are often disproportionate to the actual risk. Morad said it’s important to provide context both in terms of actual cases following a vaccine and potential consequences of contracting COVID. Finally, she said pediatricians need to be willing to open the conversation. “In clinic, I routinely ask the family: Have you gotten the vaccine? Do you have any questions for me about the vaccine?” she said. “You need to direct them to reliable sources.” Go online to MemphisMedicalNews.com for links to resources for both providers and parents.

of the Tennessee Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (TNAAP), said AAP guidelines call for masking children in the school setting. “We know a significant number won’t be vaccinated,” she said. “We have a fairly large population of unvaccinated teenagers, and the Anna Morad ones under age 12 aren’t even eligible, yet.” Therefore, she continued, “The bulk of people entering these schools will be unvaccinated.” Even if more were vaccinated, Morad pointed out most schools don’t have a robust system in place to determine vaccination status. And evidence continues to mount that vaccinated individuals with breakthrough infections can spread the Delta variant more easily than initially thought. “It makes sense to provide that layered approach to mask everyone to protect vulnerable populations,” she explained. “You don’t know the health background of every child in that school. You don’t know their vaccination status. But what we do know is Tennessee has incredibly low vaccination rates so everyone should be masking in school,”

Morad continued. As important as it is to keep kids and teachers well, it’s equally important to keep them in class. Many students had a tough time last year emotionally, socially and academically. Morad noted, “Kids do well with routine, and kids do well with having their peers around them.” She also pointed out virtual learning has a disproportionate impact on kids who don’t have reliable internet access or a parent who can be home during the day to help. “The most important thing we can do is get our kids back in school,” she stated. Without masks and other mitigation measures, in-person learning could quickly become another victim of the Delta surge. Within two weeks of returning to class, several districts in Georgia and Mississippi had already returned to remote learning. Florida’s Hillsborough County, which includes Tampa, has already seen more than 10,000 students be isolated or sent home to quarantine. In Nashville, it took four days for 1,000 students to be sent home for the same reason. Masks have become highly politicized, although Morad said they simply should be viewed as an effective, evidence-based strategy to prevent the (CONTINUED ON PAGE 10)

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In July, major healthcare organizations signed a letter of support for the recent reintroduction of a bipartisan bill to support accountable care organizations (ACOs) and other alternative payment models (APMs), while also addressing an unintended consequence of the ACO formulary, known as the ‘rural glitch,’ that punishes rural hospitals even when they achieve savings. The Value in Health Care Act 2021 was reintroduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on July 20 by Reps. Peter Welch (D-Vermont), Suzan DelBene (D-Washington), Darin LaHood (R-Illinois) and Brad Wenstrup (R-Ohio). That same day, 14 healthcare stakeholders praised the bill, which looks to increase shared savSuzan DelBene ings rates, update risk adjustment rules, eliminate an artificial barrier to participation, fix the rural glitch and restart the ACO Investment Model. The bill also extends the 5 percent Advanced APM incenDarin LaHood tive payments for an additional six years and authorizes a study looking at overlap between Medicare alternative payment programs. Additionally, The Value Act mandates the Government Accountability Office (GAO) produce a report on health outcomes and racial disparities comparing Medicare patients cared for by ACO participants with those cared for by traditional Medicare programs. The bill comes as participation rates have declined over the past few years. There were 477 ACOs participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program at the beginning of 2021, compared to a high of 561 in 2018. Since launching in 2012, ACOs had seen steady growth up until late 2018 when the Trump-era “Pathways to Success” policies took effect. “Since 2012, Medicare ACOs have saved $8.5 billion in gross savings and $2.5 billion in net savings,” Allison Brennan, vice president with the National Association of ACOs (NAACOS), said during a virtual briefing on The Value Act. “Unfortunately, we have seen a decline in terms of the number of ACOs, providers and beneficiaries covered.” She added policies enacted in late 2018 and early 2019 that sped up the risk profile and cut the share of savings available to ACOs seem to have impacted participation. “On balance, I think it has had the effect of chilling new ACO growth.” Brennan said the reintroduced bipartisan bill once again incentivizes ACO growth as participants would “get to keep more of the savings they help generate.”

It also gives ACOs three years before they must take on risk and provides some upfront funding for those who need help in setting up their ACO. Sponsor Rep. DelBene cited the importance of finding cost savings while improving care coordination and quality. “Our healthcare system should be as healthy as we want our patients to be,” she stated. “The need for this level of care was made clear by the pandemic. Across our health system, we should be incentivizing care coordination and quality. ACOs show the ability to do that.” Fixing the Rural Glitch The Value Act and a separate bill introduced in the U.S. Senate last fall – The Rural ACO Improvement Act (S.2648) and companion bill in the House (H.R.5212) – focus on making financial targets more equitable in rural areas. Introduced by Sens. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nevada) and Pat Roberts (R-Kansas), the bill changes the benchmark calculation so rural ACOs aren’t punished for geographic location in areas that are more sparsely populated. In 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began aggregating spending from other providers in the ACO region to calculate an ACO’s benchmark. The adjustment was created to reward ACOs with costs below the regional mark and includes an ACO’s own beneficiaries in the calculation. In rural areas, however, ACOs often either had no peers for comparison or were penalized by making up the bulk of the market, thus being compared to themselves. With a lower spending benchmark, rural ACOs often receive smaller savings bonuses compared to their urban counterparts where there are more providers and patients in the pool. To address the unfair adjustment, both bills look to remove an ACO’s assigned patients from the regional comparison to get a truer picture of whether the ACO is creating cost savings compared to other providers in the area. While all ACOs will benefit from the change, the issue is known as the rural glitch because rural ACO participants have been negatively impacted the most by the current spending target methodology. “When ACOs lower their spending, Medicare spending for the entire region also falls,” noted NAACOS President Clif Gaus, ScD. He added the bills correct an unintended flaw that penalizes those who make up the bulk of their market. “Our health system needs to find ways to incentivize the adoption of alternative payment models like ACOs.” Value Act sponsor Rep. LaHood, who represents a mostly rural area, said supporting value-based efforts in healthcare is critical to ensuring access and coordination. “As we continue the transition to valuebased care, there are always challenges to address and ways to improve. The Value in Health Care Act is a common-sense proposal to do that.” memphismedicalnews

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New Stark Rules for Physician Compensation Within Group Practices New Stark Law rules governing physician compensation within group practices go into effect on  January 1, 2022.  Physician groups should be close to finalizing a review of their compensation policies to make sure they are compliant by January 1, 2022.   On November 20, 2020, the Department By DENISE BURKE of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a sweeping set of final rules to revise regulations under the federal physician self-referral law, commonly referred to as the Stark Law. The Stark Law prohibits a physician from referring a patient to an entity with which the physician (or an immediate family member) has a financial relationship, for the furnishing of designated health services (DHS) for which payment may be made under the Medicare program, unless an exception applies. DHS includes, among other services, lab, imaging, physical therapy, DME and outpatient prescription drugs. Physician practices primarily rely on the Stark Law’s in-office ancillary services exception to protect DHS referrals within the practice. Significant changes/clarifications to the in-office ancillary services exception were included in the final rules.  Important details about Physician Compensation Under the New Stark Law:  If a physician group practice wishes to share “overall profits” from DHS with any of its physicians, it must: (1) aggregate all DHS profits from the entire group, or (2) aggregate all DHS profits from any component of the group that consists of at least five physicians.  Many practices have historically maintained separate profit-sharing pools of at least 5 physicians by ancillary service type (lab, imaging, infusion).  Such “split pooling” is no longer acceptable after January 1, 2022.   Once pooled, overall DHS profits should be divided in a reasonable and verifiable manner that is not directly related to the volume or value of the physician’s referrals of DHS (per capita, by seniority, based on the practice’s revenues that are not attributed to DHS, etc.)  Separate pools of five physicians

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within a group are not required to utilize the same distribution methodologies to distribute shares of the overall profits from, so long as the profits from all the DHS referred by the physicians within the pool are aggregated. However, the same methodology for distributing overall profits must be applied to every physician within the pool.  A group practice is not required to distribute all of the DHS to physicians.  It may choose to retain some of the profits.   There is an exception for profits from DHS that are directly attributable to a physician’s participation in a value-based enterprise which can be distributed directly to the participating physician, without having to aggregate the profits with the overall profits of the group practice or a pool of five or more physicians within the group practice. This would include downstream compensation derived from payments made to a group practice that relate to the physician’s participation in a value-based arrangement (whether or not the group practice participates in the value-based arrangement).  After years of conflicting guidance, CMS clarified that DHS does not include Medicaid.   The in-office ancillary services exception is an extremely long, detailed and complex exception to the Stark law. This article only discusses a single element of the in-office ancillary services exception. Despite the complexity of the law, the Stark Law is a strict liability statute and violations and/or alleged violations can lead to significant penalties and/or government and whistleblower actions. Physician groups should promptly work to review their compensation arrangements with trusted advisors to ensure that any needed changes to compensation policies can be adopted and implemented prior to the January 1, 2022 compliance date.  The opinions expressed in this article are intended for general guidance only. They are not intended as recommendations for specific situations. As always, readers should consult a qualified attorney for specific legal guidance.

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Taking the steps to finance your retirement Once you have some ideas about your desired retirement lifestyle, it’s time to plan financing strategies. While this sounds intimidating, it doesn’t have to be! Let’s break it down into some manageable steps to help you think through the process. 1. Max out your tax-deferred savings options. Through employer-sponsored plans or an individual retirement account, you lower your annual income tax intuitively. Chirag Chauhan, While these accounts are generally the most efficient AIF®, CFP® way to save, it’s worth noting that they are regulated in different ways. First, the investment options will be limited to a few that have been vetted by administrators. There may also be restrictions about when you can change your asset allocation. And while these accounts are exempt from capital gains taxes and allow you to defer income tax, you will have to pay income tax on distributions from the account. You will also have to pay a penalty if you access this money before you’re 59 ½. 2. Open additional savings and investing accounts. If you are fortunate enough to be able to make the maximum contribution to your tax-deferred contributions, you can still save more. Additional savings can be a simple savings account at your bank that earns interest or brokerage accounts that allow you to buy individual stocks and bonds, mutual funds or index tracking funds. 3. You won’t get the pre-tax benefit, but your savings can benefit from compounding returns over time. These accounts also provide maximum flexibility because they are not bound by the same regulations. For example, you can open an account wherever you like and you can tap into this savings pool at any time. 4. Make a plan for your Social Security benefits. While most people don’t solely rely on Social Security for retirement, it can still provide a meaningful income. The amount you’re entitled to receive is based on the income you earn over time. You can start receiving Social Security payments as early as 62, but you receive larger payments if you wait until you’re 70. Since there are numerous variations on benefits for spouses and widows, get to know the rules so that you (and your spouse) can figure out the optimal time to start receiving distributions. 5. Think about whether home ownership is right for you. Home ownership can be viewed as a way of saving. If you steadily pay off your mortgage, you end up with a valuable asset – one that might even appreciate over time. If you plan to move when you retire, especially if you plan to downsize, you can pocket the difference between your current home and the one you buy. While this can be an efficient strategy for some, remember it can also come with significant costs and risks. 6. Consider additional savings options for dependents. While college savings plans and life insurance don’t finance your retirement, they may help with costs that occur during retirement years. 529 college savings plans allow you to save because capital gains that accrue in the accounts over time will not be taxed. Life insurance is slightly different because it can’t help with your expenses during your retirement, but it can provide for dependents. As you prepare to set up your personal retirement plan, remember that life changes over time, and so should your retirement plan. Bluff City Advisory Group can help execute your plan. Contact us today at admin@bluffcityadvisory.com or 901-365-3447. Chirag Chauhan, MBA, AIF®, CFP®, is the Managing Partner & Director of Financial Services of Bluff City Advisory Group, LLC in Memphis, Tennessee. For more info, please visit bluffcityadvisory.com.

Growing Future, continued from page 1 efforts had been limited by space and climate. “In Philadelphia I lived in the Center City District that’s filled with skyscrapers, so my gardening was confined to containers,” Fox explained. “But Memphis gets a lot of sun and I have a small yard where I can spread out with a larger variety of plants and help them grow.” Fox’s passion for growth plays out in myriad ways every day at St. Jude, where she oversees teams of researchers focusing on therapeutic clinical trials for childhood cancer. There are more than 160 clinical trials in various stages at St. Jude and Fox is committed to the success of these investigative efforts. “Childhood cancers are fundamentally different from adult cancers because they aren’t driven by environment or habits. The children we treat are incredibly inspiring to their families and to all of us at St. Jude because they don’t see themselves as sick. They are resilient and they’re optimistic and they bounce back,” Fox said. “I continue to be inspired by the power of clinical trials that have led to a remarkable survival rate of more than 80 percent for children with cancer. Our job every day is to work to cure cancer so that these children can have healthy lives, and we’re succeeding.” Leaders at St. Jude share Fox’s passion for research, and medical personnel are pursuing aggressive methods that are yielding dramatic results in the fight against childhood cancer. “Moving discoveries from the laboratory to frontline therapy requires clinical trials. To accelerate progress for children with cancer, we’re committing substantial resources to advance clinical testing of new therapeutic agents,” said James R. Downing, MD, St. Jude president and CEO. “Under Dr. Fox’s leadership, we will expand large-scale, collaborative clinical trials to reach more children with cancer in the U.S. and around the world. The number of patients on St. Jude-led protocols may grow as much as 30 percent during the next six years.” Charles Roberts, MD, PhD, executive vice president and director of the St. Jude Comprehensive Cancer Center, agreed. “Dr. Fox’s work is invaluable to the

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implementation of our ambitious strategic plan to help more children as we expand our infrastructure to run clinical trials around the world. Dr. Fox has a remarkable intellect coupled with exceptional experience in leading clinical trials for childhood cancer,” Roberts said. “She also has a deep commitment to both collaboration and mentorship — essential components as we strive to increase survival rates for children around the world who are afflicted with pediatric cancer and catastrophic blood diseases.” Fox’s academic and medical training provided her with a depth of experience that is uniquely suited to her role at St. Jude. She earned a bachelor’s degree in Laboratory Sciences from Northeastern University, a master’s in Clinical Research from Duke University College of Medicine, with an emphasis on research management, database development and statistics, and a Medical Degree from Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency in pediatrics at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NY, and received fellowship training at the Pediatric Oncology Branch of the National Cancer Institute. Currently there are a number of trials focusing on children with brain tumors, and many others dedicated to children with leukemia. Doctors want to explore the minimum amount of chemotherapy or radiation needed to treat childhood cancers and Fox said the teams of researchers take great satisfaction in the knowledge that their work is having a positive global impact. “We are delighted with Dr. Fox serving at the helm of our Clinical Trials Research operations in this period of rapid growth,” said Ellis J. Neufeld, MD, PhD, Clinical Director and Physician-inChief at St. Jude. “Her calm and informed leadership guides the collaborations of our physicians and scientists on campus, and around the world, as we work together to achieve breakthroughs in pediatric therapies.” Despite challenges in 2020 due to COVID-19 that caused the research teams to temporarily prioritize treatment trials, that work is now back to normal, Fox said, and clinical trials continue unabated. St. Jude implemented a policy requiring all employees to be vaccinated against COVIC-19 by early September, similar to medical care facilities across the country with such requirements for workers. “Our goal is to protect our children and their families,” Fox said. “This is one more way we can help do that.” When she’s not busy directing clinical trials, Fox often can be found at local farmers markets, or checking out new restaurants, or caring for her garden with a sense of optimistic dedication. When she considers the time and effort spent tending her plants, Fox prefers to take a long-term approach that is perhaps reflective of the lifesaving work she conducts at St. Jude. “Annuals are lovely when they’re blooming, but I tend to favor perennials,” Fox said. “I like their longevity. I love it when they come back.” MEMPHISMEDICALNEWS

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GrandRounds Arlington Native Dr. Tyler Fraser Joins OrthoSouth as Newest Foot & Ankle Surgeon OrthoSouth welcomes Dr. Tyler W. Fraser to the practice as its newest orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon. He will see patients at the group’s clinics in Memphis (Primacy Parkway location), Germantown, and Bartlett. A native of Arlington, Fraser earned his B.S. in Chemistry from Rhodes College and his medical degree from University of Tennessee Health Science

Center. He completed his orthopedic residency at University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Chattanooga and his Foot and Ankle Fellowship at UC Davis/Reno Orthopedic Clinic before moving back to Shelby County this year to begin his specialty practice at OrthoSouth. He has authored a number of research papers on foot and ankle issues, including hindfoot and midfoot arthritis, turf toe, toe deformities, and related surgical techniques.

West Cancer Center Oncologist Sends Oxygen Concentrators to Fight COVID in Nepal Dr. Mike Martin is no stranger to philanthropy work here in the United States and across the world. Notable oncologist at West Cancer Center & Research Institute in Memphis, Martin spends a majority of his time serving others. From patient advocacy and care to frequent mission work all over the globe, he works tirelessly to share his work and expertise with others. On Martin’s last trip overseas, he visited Uzbekistan to meet, mentor and teach chemotherapists, surgeons, professors, residents and medical students about cancer care and treatments done here in the U.S. Afterwards communications continued and resulted in a request for help. Dr. Dulal of Nepal, Province 1 simply asked Dr. Martin for help with oxygen. Within 24-hours, Martin worked alongside the Grace Fund and his personal network of friends and family to raise $90,000. They worked together to overcome incredible logistic obstacles in communicating with the American Cancer Society (ASCO) / HVO in Nepal, then with the US Embassy in Uzbekistan, to ultimately purchase and deliver 171 oxygen concentrators to COVID patients in need. West Cancer Center is grateful to have Dr. Martin and many other dedicated physicians like him on our team. If anyone would like to offer support or partner with Dr. Martin on future international projects like this, please contact support@westclinic.com.

McDonald Murrmann Welcomes Robbie McDaniel as Advanced Nurse Injector McDonald Murrmann Center for Wellness & Health 360° recently welcomed Robbie McDaniel as Advanced Nurse Injector at the McDonald Murrmann Center for Laser and Aesthetics. Robbie is a highly respected registered nurse with a proven background of experience and achievements in several areas of aesthetic medicine. Robbie graduated from Methodist Hospital School of Nursing and has a well-rounded approach with experience in direct patient care, patient/family education, and aesthetic/cosmetic practice. Having practiced medical aesthetics for over 13 years, Robbie’s expertise Robbie and personalized attention supports the McDonald Murrmann McDaniel Beautiful Medicine Beautiful You philosophy through a combination of injection techniques as well as skincare, lasers, chemical peels, and skin-tightening procedures. As a registered nurse, she also received specialized training in advanced injection techniques and creative facial rejuvenation. The McDonald Murrmann Center for Wellness and Health 360° is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year and is located at 7205 Wolf River Blvd. Suite #150 Germantown, Tennessee. Patients may schedule an appointment by booking online at https://mmcwh360.com. memphismedicalnews

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has an Emergency Medicine Residency Core Faculty Position OPEN This position is responsible for teaching, research and service activities as they relate to the Department of Emergency Medicine and the Emergency Medicine Residency Program at Magnolia Regional Health Center. Core faculty members must have a significant role in the education and supervision of residents and must devote a significant portion of their entire effort to resident education and/or administration, and must, as a component of their activities, teach, evaluate, and provide formative feedback to residents.

EDUCATION, LICENSURE & EXPERIENCE • Current Board Certification by the ABEM –American Board of Emergency Medicine or AOBEM American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine. • A graduate of an Accredited Emergency Medicine Residency Program • Possess a full and unrestricted Mississippi Licensure • Appropriate Medical Staff Appointment • Evidence of ongoing involvement in scholarly activity, including peer-reviewed publications.

COMPENSATION & BENEFITS • Emergency Medicine Residency Core Faculty title and benefit of working in a supportive academic environment • Relocation Expenses Covered up to $15K • Health, Dental, Vision and Retirement Plan • Tuition Loan Reimbursement up to $125,000 • Sign-on Bonus

ABOUT US

Magnolia Regional Health Center is a 200 bed community hospital, jointly owned by the City of Corinth and Alcorn County, Mississippi, that serves a 7 county service area of over 130,000 people.

ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY

Located in Northeast Mississippi, Corinth is a city of contrast that attracts people from all walks of life with history, tradition, community spirit, hospitality and excellent quality of life. Corinth offers convenient access to Memphis, Nashville and Birmingham and is located just 20 minutes away from Pickwick Lake, a beautiful recreational lake with over 90 miles of shoreline. With some of the best public schools in the area, Corinth is an ideal location to raise your children. Corinth is not just for individuals or couples with children (small or grown) but for anyone. Our town is growing and with many young adults moving into the area, there are many things to do. Our community and hospital have a “family sense” about them and it’s comforting to know that we live in what most compare Corinth to as “Mayberry.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION Please contact Sara Beth Rowland, Physician Recruiter. 662-808-7308 or srowland@mrhc.org

WWW.MRHC.ORG

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Surgical Techniques, continued from page 3 MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and that opened up a whole new world for looking at soft tissue, not just for orthopedics but for all of medicine.” While surgical procedures have become more precise and less invasive, the most modern equipment and skilled medical care still have their limits. “You still have to deal with the way God made you,” Jones said. “Bone takes six weeks to heal. We haven’t been able to modify that. The body hasn’t changed. As I tell my patients, ‘We’ve got just a little scar here, but on the inside, it’s still going to take six weeks to heal. I can’t get around that, but pray hard and maybe we can get something done.’” Growing up in Munford, Tenn., where his father was mayor and both parents were bankers, Jones’ early interests were in science and math. During his sophomore year of high school, he was selected to attend a National Science Foundation Institute program in Asbury, Ky. The curriculum was so state-of-the-art that the course materials consisted of galley sheets for new upcoming editions of college textbooks in chemistry, biology, and physics. Dr. Jones majored in biology at Southwestern at Memphis – which became Rhodes College in 1984 – but had no clear designs yet of becoming a physician. “Then someone invited me to hear a pre-med talk and I said ‘Yeah, I guess so,’” he recalled. “I was playing basketball and

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having a good time, but I went to the talk and then thought I can aim toward premed and if I need to change, I’ll still have all the math and science so I can become an engineer or whatever. So, I ended up going to medical school. “Going to Rhodes was the best thing that ever happened to me. I can remember the football team, and all the linemen now have a master’s degree and most have doctorates. The quarterback became a dentist and two of the running backs, the center, and one of the tackles became general surgeons. We had a big tight end who’s a radiologist. Everybody on the basketball team, too, has at least a masters.” Rhodes also is where he met his wife, Diana, although it took some effort and planning. “She was coming out of French lab, and I was going in to German lab, and one of my fraternity brothers was right behind her so I asked him who she was,” Jones said. “I ended up calling her without her knowing who I was, and our first date was going to be after our basketball game. So I had to have one of my friends pick her up and bring her to the game. She had to go through the school annual to figure out who I was. That was our first date. It could have been a disaster, but it worked out.” With their son and two daughters, they will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Sept. 25.

Back to School with COVID, continued from page 4 spread of COVID-19. While parents have become incredibly passionate about their children’s ‘right’ to be mask free, most kids aren’t terribly bothered by wearing them. “Our experience is most students tolerate mask-wearing beautifully,” she said. Unfortunately, parental passion has boiled over at several heated school board meetings. TNAAP recently released a statement condemning violent rhetoric and aggressive actions towards medical providers following a Williamson County School Board meeting. In part, the statement read: “Everyone should step back and question if this is the behavior we want to model for our children. As parents, we teach our children to have calm conversations and to respect others. The healthcare professionals who attended the meeting were

there to provide recommendations based on evidence-based guidelines to allow for in-person schooling while also keeping children healthy and safe.” The statement also said it’s a false narrative to point to low death rates among children from COVID, and those arguments completely discount severe illness, rising hospitalizations, MIS-C, long-term health effects not yet fully understood, and transmission to other vulnerable populations at home or in the community. “The mortality rate for children is not as high as for adults,” agreed Morad. “But these are children … we should not be talking about mortality among children.” She concluded, “No child deserves to have a vaccinepreventable disease because people around them refused to wear masks or get vaccinated.”

The Impact of COVID on Tennessee Families Earlier this year, the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy released “The Vanderbilt Child Health Poll,” which looked at the impact of COVID on Tennessee families. The disruption extends well beyond catching the virus, and the poll outlines economic impacts, access to care concerns, learning loss, mental health concerns, socialization and attitudes toward vaccination. To read the report, go to vumc.org/childhealthpolicy/child-health-poll or access the final report through our website at MemphisMedicalNews.com.

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GrandRounds AMA Announces CPT Code Set Ready for Third Doses of COVID-19 Vaccines The American Medical Association (AMA) announced that the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT®) code set is ready for the rollout of third doses of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. The CPT Editorial Panel has expedited approval of a new administration code that is unique to a third dose of the current COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna. A new administration code for a third dose of the current COVID-19 vaccine from Pfizer was announced by the AMA on July 30. The two vaccine administration codes are effective for immediate use as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized third doses of COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna for certain people with weakened immune systems. “Given that CDC data shows some immunocompromised patients lack the antibodies needed to fight COVID-19 infection, adding an additional dose to the primary series for this population can help protect these individuals from unnecessary hospitalizations and deaths” said AMA President Gerald Harmon, MD in a statement responding to the FDA’s authorization. “It is important to keep in mind that this recommendation is for a limited population and an additional dose of COVID-19 vaccine is not recommended for all fully vaccinated people at this time.” For quick reference, the CPT codes and long descriptors assigned to third dose administration of the current Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are: Pfizer 0003A - Immunization administration by intramuscular injection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease [COVID-19]) vaccine, mRNALNP, spike protein, preservative free, 30 mcg/0.3 mL dosage, diluent reconstituted; third dose Moderna 0013A - Immunization administration by intramuscular injection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease [COVID-19]) vaccine, mRNALNP, spike protein, preservative free, 100 mcg/0.5 mL dosage; third dose These CPT codes and descriptors are used to report the actual work of administering the vaccine, in addition to all necessary counseling provided to patients or caregivers and updating the electronic record. Short, medium and long descriptors for all the new vaccine-specific CPT codes can be accessed on the

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AMA website, along with several other recent modifications to the CPT code set that have helped streamline the public health response to the SARSCoV-2 virus and the COVID-19 disease. To help ensure accurate coding and reporting of COVID-19 vaccines and immunization services, the AMA offers a code finder resource to help identify the appropriate CPT code combination for the type and dose of COVID-19 vaccine provided to each patient. Changes to the CPT code set are considered through an open editorial process managed by the CPT Editorial Panel that collects broad input from the health care community and beyond to ensure CPT content reflects the coding demands of digital health, precision medicine, augmented intelligence, and other aspects of a modern health care system. This rigorous editorial process keeps the CPT code set current with contemporary medical science and technology so it can fulfill its vital role as the trusted language of medicine today and the code to its future. Questions on CPT coding and content should be directed to the CPT Network, the authoritative source for CPT coding answers. Also consult the AMA online library of COVID-19 CPT coding and guidance.

OrthoSouth Adds Dr. Marcus Biggers, Fellowship Trained Sports Medicine Orthopedic Surgeon, to Its Team OrthoSouth is proud to announce that Dr. Marcus Biggers has joined the practice and will see patients at the group’s clinics in Bartlett, Germantown, and East Memphis. Biggers joins a growing team of patient-focused and com- Marcus Biggers munity-oriented providers dedicated to the continual improvement of the patient experience in orthopedic healthcare. Biggers is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon, fellowship trained in sports medicine and arthroscopy at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. As a fellow, Biggers served as an associate physician for the University of Alabama, Birmingham Barons (Chicago White Sox AA affiliate), WWE professional wrestling association, and Birmingham Ballet. He also treated multiple professional and collegiate athletes from across the country. He has practiced in the Memphis area since 2016.

is seeking an Associate Academic Professor of Internal Medicine This position entails a 7 on/7 off hospitalist scheduling structure, working full-time with resident physicians. The candidate must be highly interested in teaching/medical education and committed to patient safety. Prior academic experience is preferred but not required.

BENEFITS & COMPENSATION Competitive Salary • Relocation Expenses Covered up to $15K Extra shifts available if desired. • Health, Dental, Vision & Retirement Plan Tuition Loan Reimbursement up to $125,000 • Sign-on Bonus Associate Professor of Internal Medicine title and benefit of working in a supportive academic environment Annual Base Salary: Day Shift (6:00 am-6:00 pm): $1,600.00/shift with 26 weeks worked in 7 on 7 off. ($291,200/year)

Our Internal Medicine program was established in 2008 as an AOA-accredited osteopathic program. Since that time, it has been increasingly successful and scored third in the nation on the osteopathic annual in-service exam the final year our residents took the osteopathic version. In 2015, Magnolia Regional Health Center was the first Osteopathic Graduate Medical Education Program nationally to go from AOA accreditation to ACGME accreditation, which allows MRHC to begin training MD credentialed physicians, in addition to DO credentialed physicians. This accomplishment has afforded us the opportunity to train a more diverse population of residents and has attracted national attention to our program. We have a strong didactic as well as clinical experience for our residents and are looking for a Core Faculty member committed to continued excellence in education. MRHC is expanding the Graduate Medical Education Department that currently has 19 Core Medical Students, 20 Internal Medicine Residents, 12 Emergency Medicine Residents and 6 Cardiology Fellows. All of our GME training programs are ACGME accredited.

ABOUT US

Magnolia Regional Health Center is a 200 bed community hospital, jointly owned by the City of Corinth and Alcorn County, Mississippi, that serves a 7 county service area of over 130,000 people.

ABOUT OUR COMMUNITY

Located in Northeast Mississippi, Corinth is a city of contrast that attracts people from all walks of life with history, tradition, community spirit, hospitality and excellent quality of life. Corinth offers convenient access to Memphis, Nashville and Birmingham and is located just 20 minutes away from Pickwick Lake, a beautiful recreational lake with over 90 miles of shoreline. With some of the best public schools in the area, Corinth is an ideal location to raise your children. Corinth is not just for individuals or couples with children (small or grown) but for anyone. Our town is growing and with many young adults moving into the area, there are many things to do. Our community and hospital have a “family sense” about them and it’s comforting to know that we live in what most compare Corinth to as “Mayberry.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION Please contact Sara Beth Rowland, Physician Recruiter. 662-808-7308 or srowland@mrhc.org

WWW.MRHC.ORG

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Connecting your Vision to the Bottom Line (V2B®) D

aSilva Consulting is a data-driven and innovative consulting company designed to add value to businesses through its various service lines. Our mission is to connect your Vision to the Bottom Line by implementing our proprietary V2B Strategic Plan and HIGH-PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK through our fractional operational support program – Virtual COO. DSC HPF® Our High-Performance Framework consists of tackling six management pillars: Leadership: Evaluate and develop appropriate leadership structures aligned with your product/ services lines People: Identify gaps in staffing structure based on the strategic plan Process: Assessment and simulation of different scenarios to enhance efficiency Customer: Evaluate current sales, onboarding, patient experience, and marketing processes Profitability: Identify and realign companies profit centers to achieve the V2B Execution: Provide ongoing guidance and leadership to the management team to ensure process alignment Our solution guarantees a 360º approach for our healthcare clients.

Al Da Silva, MHA MBA RN CEO Seasoned, data-driven results-oriented, operational executive leader with 15+ years of experience in business and healthcare market, focusing on connecting clinics and hospitals Vision to the bottom line through evidence-based management practices.

Process Simulation DaSilva Consulting is launching a new process simulation service to decrease the risk of process changes and implementation failures. The recent pandemic has exposed several process weaknesses across the healthcare system that was already strained. Considering this new reality, how do hospital and clinic decision makers best evaluate their current systems and plans to adapt to the post pandemic realities to meet patient care needs, community, and financial performance objectives? Healthcare needs an easier, more quantifiable, and reusable way of visualizing current practices, analyzing potential process & policy changes and planning the patient experience, future service lines and new strategic directions. Our highly-skilled Master Black Belt, Lean Six Sigma, and Data Scientists enable healthcare organizations to test their ideas and scenarios for cost reduction or other performance objectives in a virtual environment BEFORE they are implemented, reducing the risks of implementing costly and ineffective initiatives. Get in touch and join the select group of companies that use data to predict the future and make the best decisions! www.dsbusinessconsulting.com 5100 POPLAR AVE FL 27, MEMPHIS TN Phone: +1 855-501-9372

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GrandRounds SOMAVAC® Medical Granted US Patent SOMAVAC® Medical Solutions, Inc. announces the granting of US Patent (11,078,898) covering its SOMAVAC® SVS smart surgical drain management platform. The SOMAVAC® SVS is the ONLY smart surgical drain pump that has been cleared by the FDA to prevent seromas in plastic and general surgery. The SOMAVAC® SVS applies continuous suction at the end of a surgical drain to remove fluid effectively and may reduce the risk of seromas or hematomas. Seromas and/or hematomas can lead to complications like infection, delayed wound healing and revision surgery. SOMAVAC® SVS is now available in select regions in the US and is most commonly used for mastectomies, breast reconstructions, hernia repairs, tummy tucks and complex orthopaedic procedures. Since the 1970s, manual JP bulbs and accordion-style suction devices have been connected to surgical drains for fluid removal. These manual suction bulbs are cumbersome and inconsistent in applying suction and removing fluid leading to stagnation and fluid build-up; i.e., seroma or hematoma. Seromas are associated with complications like infection and delayed wound healing, thus leading to poor outcomes. The smart continuous suction and one-way valve of the SOMAVAC® SVS minimize stagnation and backflow, respectively. The longer the surgical drains and bulbs remain in place; the higher the risk of infection becomes for the patient. For patients with a mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction with tissue expanders, the risk of infection increases to almost 25 percent, indicating 1 in 4 patients will get an infection after 3 weeks with drains. SOMAVAC® SVS delivers the robust suction that has been shown to shorten time with drains. Each year in the US, there are over 1 million patients being discharged from hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers to their home with surgical drains; approximately 20 percent experience seromas, leading to complications and requiring painful and costly interventions. These interventions add an estimated $6 Billion to the U.S. healthcare system. In addition to its health benefits, the SOMAVAC® SVS can be discretely worn under clothing and can help patients return to normal activities while recovering.

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital Announces Major Expansion Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital has announced the largest building expansion since the hospital opened in 2010. The four-story, $95.4-million addition will allow Le Bonheur to continue on their sustainable, long-term growth trajectory. The expansion includes enlarging the cardiovascular and neonatal floors, in addition to the surgery recovery area and main floor. The 128,575 square foot construction and renovation will extend the west side of the hospital to the sidewalk of Dunlap Street, between Poplar and Washington avenues. Updated plans include an additional two stories to an expansion that was first announced in 2019. That version was put on hold during COVID-19. The additional infrastructure will support an expansion of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for premature babies bringing 14 new beds to the existing 60-bed unit and will include eight additional surgery recovery bays. Le Bonheur will also convert 12 existing beds to critical care use immediately to ease capacity needs during construction. This expansion also will bring additional beds to the Heart Institute to create a 31-bed dedicated Cardiovascular Unit by adding 10 additional Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit beds to the existing 10-bed unit and creating room for an 11-bed step-down cardiac unit. A new MRI-guided catheterization lab will be added for a total of three catheterization labs. Le Bonheur’s Heart Institute has experienced significant growth in the past five years, adding 21 new cardiologists since 2015. The Heart Institute is recognized as a top program by U.S. News & World Report, as an elite pediatric cardiac surgical program by Society of Thoracic Surgeons and is a leader in transcatheter closure of Patent Ductus Arteriosus in premature infants. Plans for a groundbreaking and other timing for construction milestones will soon follow. memphismedicalnews

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GrandRounds Russell Named Vice Chancellor for Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs at UTHSC Cynthia Russell, PhD, RN, has been named vice chancellor for Academic, Faculty and Student Affairs (AFSA) at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Russell has served as the interim vice chancellor for AFSA Cynthia Russell since December 2020. With almost three decades of service to the university, Russell has also served as the associate vice chancellor for Faculty Affairs, and holds a faculty appointment as a professor in the Department of Acute and Tertiary Care in the UTHSC College of Nursing. Russell joined the faculty of the UTHSC College of Nursing in 1993, and practiced as an adult nurse practitioner at the Memphis Veterans Affairs Medical Center until 2000, when she was promoted to director of Distributive Programs for the college. Through the years, she has held numerous leadership positions in the college, including interim associate dean and chair of Advanced Practice Doctoral Studies. She joined AFSA in 2008, as director of the Faculty Resource Center, was named assistant vice chancellor of Faculty Affairs and Educational Technology in 2010, and became associate vice chancellor for Faculty Affairs in 2012. Russell graduated from the Holzer Medical Center School of Nursing in Gallipolis, Ohio. She earned her BSN from Ohio University, a master’s degree in Nursing from West Virginia University, and a PhD in Nursing Science from the University of Arizona.

Baptist Memorial Names Two New Vice Presidents, Promotes Chief HR Officer Baptist Memorial Health Care has recently promoted its chief human resources officer and named two new vice presidents to their senior leadership team. The two new vice presidents will replace Scott Fountain, the organization’s senior vice president and chief development officer, who retired on July 2. Nancy Averwater has assumed the role of Baptist Memorial’s senior vice president and chief human resources officer. In addition to maintaining her current duties, she will develop and implement the Baptist Center for Nancy Career Development. Averwater The center will help people accomplish their professional

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and career goals at Baptist through career counseling, career pathing and upskilling. Nancy began her Baptist career in 1993 and has served in several clinical and operational leadership positions before assuming her current role. Robbie Johnson, a 10-year Baptist employee, has been promoted to vice president and chief development officer, where he leads Baptist Memorial’s fun- Robbie Johnson

draising activities systemwide. Before assuming this new role, Robbie was the executive director of the NEA Baptist Foundation in Jonesboro, Arkansas, where he successfully oversaw and managed foundation funds, which helped support many needed programs and projects in that community. Ayoka Pond now serves as Baptist Memorial’s vice president and chief marketing and communications officer. She leads the organization’s corporate communications department, which includes marketing, digital mar-

keting, public relations, creative services and internal communications. She has spent her entire 22-year Baptist career in corporate communications, most recently as Ayoka Pond its public relations and internal communications director.

Compass Intervention Center

for Children and Adolescents Ages 10 to 17 Celebrating 25 years of Helping Children If you know a child who needs extra support, call 888-266-7279 or email compass.referral@uhsinc.com Residential – Outpatient – Specialty Programs

7900 Lowrance Road | Memphis, TN 38125 | compassinterventioncenter.net With limited exceptions, physicians are not employees or agents of this hospital. For language assistance, disability accommodations and the non-discrimination notice, visit our website. Model representations of real patients are shown. Actual patients cannot be divulged due to HIPAA regulations. 210721-0917 04/21

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GrandRounds Regional One Health Announces Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccination for Employees Regional One Health has announced a mandatory COVID-19 vaccination policy for all employees. This mandate aims to protect patients, staff and the community from the transmission of COVID-19, particularly the surging Delta variant. All Regional One Health employees are required to be fully vaccinated by October 31, 2021. Similar to the flu vaccine and other required vaccina-

tions, being fully vaccinated against COVID-19 will be a condition of employment for Regional One Health employees. This decision follows several weeks of analyzing research, watching growing case numbers in the community, and listening to the guidance of organizations such as the American Hospital Association, the American Medical Association and America’s Essential Hospitals. The evidence is clear that COVID vaccines for individuals working in a health care setting protect the health of the worker, patients

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MID-SOUTH MEDICAL GROUP MA AGEME T ASSOCIATIO

MID-SOUTH MEDICAL GROUP MANAGEMENT A S S O C I AT I O N

WHO WE ARE The Mid-South Medical Group Management Association (MSMGMA) formed in 1987 when a group of practice managers across Memphis started meeting to discuss common experiences in their offices. The group has now grown to include more than 100 members from the Memphis area. MSMGMA is the premier association for professionals who lead Medical Practices. Through regular in-person and/or virtual educational meetings, networking events, and access to statewide webinars and conferences, our group serves as a powerful resource for Practice Executives.

WH MID SOUTH MGMA ? Healthcare is one of the most complex industries in the country. MSMGMA offers resources to every type of practice manager, whether you are in a private office or a hospital system. MSMGMA offers opportunities to learn from other practice executives and mentor those newly in their roles. We provide education opportunities, bringing in speakers from across our region to discuss applicable topics to your practices.

MID-SOU T Hmiss M out E DonI our C Aupcoming L GRO UP Don’t meetings/speakers, webinars and TMGMA conferences renew M A N A G E M E N T A S S O C I A T I Oyour N membership today! Mid-South MGMA I 1067 Cresthaven Rd, Memphis, TN 38119

B E N E F I T S O Fmsmgma@mdmemphis.org MEMBERSHIP Education & Information

Resources

Monthly meetings and annual spring and fall conferences Bi-monthly newsletter

Networking Membership Database & Members Only section on our website Monthly networking luncheons with educational speakers included

Easy access to industry news, job postings, and scholarship information Active guidance toward certification and fellowship in the American College of Medical Practice Executives

Advocacy

State and national information about legislative issues that impact your practice

MEMBERSHIP LEELS & DUES ACTIVE: $350

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AFFILIATE: $400

Includes state-wide Tennessee Medical An affiliate Member is a vendor/supplier which supplies products or services to Group Management Association medical groups and will be entitled to a membership and local MSMGMA limited membership with no voting membership. Active Members are engaged in membership or leadership of privileges, but will be permitted to AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2021 attend meetings and participate in a medical group practice formally organized for the purpose of healthcare other activities of the MSMGMA. It is the hope of the MSMGMA that the delivery or individuals that provide MSMGMA and the affiliate member will administrative or related support services to one or more medical group each benefit mutually in the exchange of information, ideas and economic practices, such as management support. The MSMGMA does not in any companies, consultants, billing, etc. way endorse the products, supplies or services of an affiliated member.

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STUDENT: $50 A student Member is a person who is currently enrolled full time through an accredited postsecondary college or university in a baccalaureate or masters level program that enhances or corresponds to the profession of medical practice management. Student members will be entitled to a limited membership with no voting privileges and cannot hold office but will be permitted to attend meetings and participate in other activities of the MSMGMA.

and community. Since the vaccines were first made available in December 2020, Regional One Health strongly encouraged employees to receive the vaccine and made them available at the hospital. Vaccines will remain available to employees on campus. Vaccination sessions will be increased to accommodate the employees’ work schedules. In addition, those who are vaccinated off the hospital campus will be allowed to present proof of vaccination.

Adam S. Arthur, MD, Named Chair of Neurosurgery at UTHSC Adam S. Arthur, MD, MPH, has been named chair of the Department of Neurosurgery in the College of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Arthur has been the director of cerebroAdam Arthur vascular and endovascular neurosurgery for Semmes Murphey Clinic and the UTHSC Department of Neurosurgery since 2009. In addition, Dr. Arthur also has more than a decade of distinguished service as a neurosurgeon at major hospitals in Memphis. He has served as the chief of interventional neuroradiology for Baptist Memorial Hospital since 2010, the director of vascular and endovascular neurosurgery for Methodist University Hospital since 2010, and chair of Neurosurgery at Methodist University Hospital since 2018. Dr. Arthur has also been fellowship director of the UTHSC/Semmes Murphey Clinic Fellowship in Open and Endovascular Neurosurgery since 2011. In joining the executive leadership of the UTHSC College of Medicine, Dr. Arthur said he plans to continue to work to improve patient care, to increase his focus on educating the next generation of neurosurgeons, and to build clinical research. A 1998 graduate of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Dr. Arthur did his internship in general surgery at the University of Utah, where he also received a master’s degree in public health and completed his residency in neurosurgery. He completed fellowships in interventional neuroradiology and cerebrovascular neurosurgery at UTHSC and the Semmes Murphey Neurologic and Spine Clinic in 2006. Initially, neurosurgery was not his first choice in medical school, Arthur said. However, from an early age, he had been interested in how things work. He became interested in the neurosciences as he grew older, primarily to understand “why and how we are what we are,” he said. Arthur is a member of numerous

surgical, neurological, and neurosurgical societies and organizations. He is chair of the Annual Meeting Committee for the 2022 Annual Meeting in Philadelphia of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. He has held visiting professorships at numerous universities, including New York University, the Cleveland Clinic, and the University of Southern California. A funded researcher, Dr. Arthur has given 140 invited lectures, made 42 peer-reviewed presentations, written 20 books and book chapters and more than 230 peer-reviewed journal articles.

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Time for your kids’ check-ups? Check in on their mental health, too Getting ready to return to school may bring a host of emotions for some kids. When you take your children and teens for their physicals, make sure your pediatrician asks about their mental health. If your child is dealing with emotional setbacks, we can help. Our inpatient and outpatient behavioral health programs can help them regain lost coping skills. Lakeside also offers a fully accredited school program for youth up to age 17 so students can maintain their studies while in treatment.

Don’t let anxiety or depression prevent your child from having a successful school year. Find out how we can help by calling 901-377-4733 today.

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Physicians are on the medical staff of Lakeside Behavioral Health System, but, with limited exceptions, are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Lakeside Behavioral Health System. The facility shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. Model representations of real patients are shown. Actual patients cannot be divulged due to HIPAA regulations. For language assistance, disability accommodations and the non-discrimination notice, visit our website. 210138-0612 6/21

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August-September 2021 Memphis Medical News  

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August-September 2021 Memphis Medical News  

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