Page 1


contents M ay 2018 Production Media Digital Source Chief Executive Officer Eliot Garza Co-Publisher Jessie Moore Project Manager Alejandra Bermea Account Executives Rebekah Washington Patrick Guerra Digital Marketing Coordinators Kristy Pierce Jaime Gage Assistant Project Manager Sarah Washington Creative Services Designer Aurora Balderas Editor Jody Marmel Writers Rudy Arispe Jody Marmel Edmond Ortiz Contributors Dr. Pradeep Mohan Dr. Jennifer Walden Nicole Cowart Bettina Piotrowski Karen Reed

Cover Feature

Post Acute Medical Opens New Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH Cover Feature

7th Annual Gulf Coast Multidisciplinary

Photographers Trinity Greer Russel Williams FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL 210.373.2599 OR EMAIL HELLO@MDMONTHLY.COM FOR EDITORIAL COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS, EMAIL EDITOR@MDMONTHLY.COM

Pharmacotherapy Conference

MDMonthly.com 6

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

7


contents

20 | Women’s Health

Get Your Body Back With A Mommy Makeover by Dr. Pradeep Mohan

44 | Childrens Health

Here’s How Your Child Should Be Flossing by Kennedy Dental Care

48 | Women’s Health

Cover Feature

Dr. Wayne Lee Knocks Out One Orthopedic Challenge At A Time

10 | Women’s Health

Isn’t Microneedling Something That Can Be Done At Home? by Dr. Jennifer Walden

12 | Senior Health

The Best Foods to Eat For Women 50 Years Old and Beyond by Josh Elizetxe

14 | Childrens Health

How Does Breast Cancer Start? by Dr. Maria Palafox

50 | Informed Patient

5Tips For Maintaining Mental Health After An Injury by Sara Gillberg

52| Informed Patient Health Effects of Noise Pollution

Ear, Nose & Throat Clinics of San Antonio

56 | MD NEWS

Tips For Parents To Help A Teenager With Depression

Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital Recognized. Among Top 10% in Nation

by Nicole Cowart

by Bettina Piotrowski

18 | Health & Wellness

Do Pilates Exercises Relieve Back Pain? by Cryo Body Perfections 8

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

9


WOMEN’S HEALTH | AUSTIN

Isn’t MIcroneedlIng soMethIng that can Be done at hoMe? Provided By Dr. Jennifer Walden

T

he value of microneedling treatment has become increasingly apparent in the past few years. This is largely due to the openness of various celebrities who have revealed the non-surgical treatments they rely on to keep their skin smooth and radiant. In reality, microneedling is not a new technique. According to historians, the use of tiny needles pre-dates our modern abrasion therapies such as chemical peels and microdermabrasion with minute crystal particles. Dermal rollers were also developed years before the automated microneedling we know today. It is here where confusion may occur.

WHAT IS A DERMAL ROLLER? An early form of collagen induction therapy, dermal rolling is a mechanical technique that is performed either by an esthetician or on your skin. Because dermal rollers are easy to acquire and relatively easy to use, this method of skin rejuvenation may sound appealing. But the mechanical rolling of the skin is

10

MD Monthly

not without drawbacks. The first flaw in self-treating with a dermal roller is the issue with comfort. The fact of the matter is, even tiny punctures to the skin’s surface can be uncomfortable without proper protocol. Dermal rollers are limited regarding needle size, as well, which means more treatment is necessary to obtain the desired outcome. When self-treatment is uncomfortable, consistency in performance is likely to fall short of the intended goal.

PROFESSIONAL MICRONEEDLING Following the same principle of collagen induction using a dermal roller, professional, automated microneedling treatment seeks to increase collagen proliferation by making micro-wounds in the uppermost layers of dermal tissue. Professional treatment differs from mechanical dermal rolling in two significant ways. First, treatment is conducted after a topical numbing cream has been allowed to permeate

the epidermis for several minutes. This makes the process much more comfortable (and what is more comfortable is easier to comply with). The second notable difference found with professional microneedling is the ability that we have to adjust the depth of needle penetration. This adjustability is meaningful because skin thickness varies across different parts of the face and body. Many of the cosmetic concerns that are expressed by our patients have to do with the way the skin ages. Microneedling supports a more graceful process and is gentle enough to become part of your long-term beauty regimen. In just 45 minutes, your skin can be on the road to rejuvenation. We’re happy to schedule a consultation with you in our friendly Austin cosmetic surgery office. Call 512-328-4100 for assistance.

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

11


SENIOR HEALTH | REGIONAL

The Best Foods to Eat For Women 50 Years Old and Beyond by Josh Elizetxe

W

omen’s bodies undergo different changes as time passes by. Apparently, these changes have huge impacts on health and wellness. At the age of 30, every woman’s metabolism begins to decline. The same is true for bone density and hormone levels. So, imagine your overall health condition in your fifties and sixties. In totality, it is not only your preference for music and clothes that change as you get older. You must understand that your body is no longer functioning as efficiently as it was when you were 20 or 30. And being much more selective to the food you are eating is a must. Hence, here are the best foods to eat when you are in your fifties.

1

Oats Heart diseases are very common for older people - 45 and above. Women

12

MD Monthly

normally have a much higher risk of getting such diseases starting at the age of 55. So, including cholesterollowering foods and snacks is a great move. Now, oats are natural cholesterollowering foods. And eating this regularly will not only help you lower your risks of heart diseases, but they can also decrease the risk of dying at an early age. Essentially, oats contain high levels of beta-glucan which is a soluble fiber that decreases cholesterol levels. A cup of this every morning will do the work effectively.

2

Apples Apples are a great choice of fruit too when aiming for a clean and healthy diet. They are rich in fibers that are great for keeping your heart healthy. Also, eating more apples every day can largely decrease the risks of immobility as you age. Alongside these benefits, apples

have a lot of antioxidants that fight free radicals which are usually the causes of immunity decline.

3

Berries For your brain improvements, berries are the greatest option to choose along with the other dark-colored berries. They contain phytochemicals that increase the blood flow to the brain and reduce inflammation. As a result, these fruits can help you improve your brain functions and decrease the risk of having the common short-term memory loss tendencies.

4

Walnuts You may want to resort to nuts as well, instead of munching on crackers and chips for your snacks. Recently, studies show that nuts, especially walnuts and peanuts, reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke, and death by 28%. In addition, they improve brain functionality which is great for women over 50.

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


SENIOR HEALTH | REGIONAL

Try to have at least one cup of walnuts or peanuts per day. You may include fruits while munching on them.

5

Lean Meats & Fish As you reach the age of 50 and older, you must be very careful in counting your calories. Instead of focusing on calorie-dense foods, switch to foods that are nutrient-dense such as lean meats and fish meats. These kinds of foods are very rich in protein and fiber that are significantly needed for your body in these age groups.

6

Soy Milk Your hormones may act strangely and differently during this stage in life. As you get older, the menopausal stages and symptoms that you experience are evident. You will want to choose to consume foods that are high in isoflavones since they mimic how estrogen hormones function. Soy milk, tofu, and miso are the most appropriate choices for your hormonal concerns at this age. However, be mindful of consuming too many soybeans especially when you are a cancer survivor. It is essentially advisable that you consult with your doctor first before consuming such foods.

7

Yogurt Another common concern of every mid-aged woman today is their bone health. During this stage of life, the bone apparently gets thinner making it very susceptible to fractures and osteoporosis. Hence, the need for vitamin D and calcium is much higher. The green varieties of yogurt are great sources of fiber. As for milk yogurts and non-dairy types, they are quite rich in calcium. And they are the

best foods to eat regularly to help and strengthen the bones in totality.

8

Broccoli Today, there are a lot of “green superfoods” to choose from. But, one of the best choices in this line of food is broccoli. You could actually gain a lot of benefits from eating broccoli on a daily basis. A daily serving of this green can help you improve brain functions and health due to its antioxidants and anti-inflammatory contents. Also, the calcium contents of broccoli are significant and makes it great for your bone health as well.

Nevertheless, they are found to be helpful not only in strengthening your immune system, but also in decreasing the risk of having physical impairment due to aging.

10

Eggs Eggs are another great food to add to your diet and meal plans. They are high in protein and this helps you maintain a great shape and figure. Also, they contain significant numbers of nutrients which are beneficial to your overall health and wellness especially when you reach 50 and above. Try to eat one or two eggs per day.

9

Oranges An orange a day can keep you active and well-functioning even at an older age. Also, the antioxidant that they contain slows the aging process which preserves your younger health states. Apparently, the benefits of eating oranges are already established.

All of the foods listed above are not the surprising and unique kinds. They are the ones you always hear or read about when it comes to having a healthy lifestyle. But, even though there’s not a major “wow-factor” in these foods, they can effectively help you manage your fitness states and health conditions during your mid-ages. 2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

13


CHILDRENS HEALTH | REGIONAL

s To

Tips For Parent

ger a n e e T A p l e H With Depressi on by Nicole Cowart

E

very parent wishes their children the best and provides them with everything they need on a daily basis. However, sometimes, being busy with a career and earning money for daily living expenses, can leave parents with less time to spend with their children. As a result, they do not notice that their kids suffer from depression symptoms. It is good if you have noticed it on time, but what about parenting a depressed teenager whose depression lasts for a while? Is helping a child with depression an easy task and can you cope with it yourself, without expert help? Here you can find a list of tips that can help parents deal with the mental health of their kids.

Dealing with a Depressed Child What is a teen depression and is this a serious problem? Depression in kids is not only connected with teenage mood. This is a much deeper problem which influences all the aspects of her/his life greatly. It can lead to such consequences as problems at home and school, drug addiction, self-abhorrence or even be a cause of

14

MD Monthly

suicide. However, there are many tips that can help parents and friends cope with this serious problem.

• Reveal the problem on its early stage There are numerous misunderstandings on what a teen desolation de facto is. On early stage of development, many kids can be quite aggressive, are difficult to communicate with, and try to be rebels and search for independence. They also suffer from fast mood changes and can be sad regularly. However, that does not mean that they have such a problem as depression. Desolation destroys the child’s individuality and leads to such consequences as sadness, disparity or anger. It is very important for parents to take part in a child’s life, no matter how independent he/she is to find the initial symptoms of this disease in its early stage.

• Give a hand to your child Statistics says that the number of cases of teen depression all over

the world rises each year. This disease strikes the mental health of teens more often than we think. And, despite the fact that teenage depression can be cured, experts say that only in 1 out of 5 cases, teenagers get an adequate level of help. Unlike the adults, who can ask for help from specialists themselves, children can only rely on teachers and parents who can notice this condition and help to overcome it. That is why it is important for parents to know its symptoms and be aware of what to do if you find them in your kid’s behavior.

• Be aware of the symptoms An average teenager faces different cases of pressures from the adult side, starting from school grades to parent control at home. In this case, we can say that their hormones are totally out of whack and they usually start defending their independence. They can sometimes exaggerate the situation and treat it as a drama, while adults will only smile. That is why adults who are used to seeing teens in this state sometimes

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


CHILDRENS HEALTH | REGIONAL

cannot differentiate this from real depression. Here are the symptoms that are the signs of depression: 1.Sadness or hopelessness for a long period of time 2. Impatience, anger and hostility 3. Crying 4. Refusal of friends and family 5. Losing interest in any activity 6. Bad appetite and sleep 7. Insecurity and excitement 8. Lack of enthusiasm and motivation 9. Fatigue and lack of energy 10. Thoughts about suicide and death

group therapy. However, there is also an option of family therapy. You should understand that drugs, in this case, must be prescribed only if there is no other variant and they are a part of complex therapy, but not a panacea. Any type of psychological therapy for treating depression can help when dealing with it in an early stage. On the contrary, antidepressants should be included in the treatment course only when the situation is difficult. Unfortunately, many parents think that taking pills is the only way to fight this problem. However, they are wrong; there is an individual approach to every case.

• If you can’t cope with it yourself, get an expert to help If you are not sure that your kid has symptoms of depression, then the best option is to ask for expert help from a psychologist. There are several options on how to deal with teenage desolation condition. The first one is individual or

• Listen to your kid You should listen to your kid without judgment. A teen always resists the attempts of the adults to criticize and judge once he/she starts speaking. The fact that your kid communicates with you is already a success. However, you should avoid giving an unwanted piece of advice and making an ultimatum.

Do not even try to tell a teen that oppression is silly, even if you really think it is. Just understand the troubles they face and they will understand that you treat them seriously as adults. Teenage depression is a common disease today. Some parents underestimate its power or simply do not notice its symptoms. However, it can lead to very serious consequences. That is why it is very important to diagnose it in its early stage, and take appropriate measures on time. Ignoring this disease can change a child’s destiny and will lead to many bad consequences in the future.

Nicole Cowart is a prolific writer who works for https://customwriting.com/. She is a mother of two sons, and she knows exactly what teen depression is from her own experience. However, she always tries to find a positive side of whatever happens. Amidst her hobbies are psychology, traveling and reading.

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

15


CHILDRENS HEALTH | CORPUS CHRISTI

16

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


CHILDRENS HEALTH | CORPUS CHRISTI

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

17


HEALTH & WELLNESS | MCALLEN

DO PILATES EXERCISES

Relieve Back Pain? by Cryo Body Perfections

ilates exercises help to build beautiful abdominal muscles, but can they relieve back pain too? Even some physical therapists and chiropractors recommend Pilates for chronic back pain. Can Pilates training take the edge off of lower back discomfort?

Pilates also helps to stretch out achy lower back muscles and reduce tightness and spasm. Although some people are reluctant to exercise with back pain, controlled stretching exercises are one of the best ways to relieve back discomfort. Studies show that bed rest and lack of activity actually makes back pain worse, not better.

P

Pilates for Back Pain: Does It Help? According to a study published in the Journal of Sports Rehabilitation, Pilates exercises help to ease back pain. Participants who took part in 15 Pilates training sessions had less back pain and were able to walk better after completing this training. The most remarkable fact is that these 39 adults who took part in this program still had less back pain a year later. The results are great abs and less back pain. Pilates training has its advantages.

Why Do Pilates Exercises Work? Pilates training strengthens core muscles, the group of muscles that

18

MD Monthly

work in unison to stabilize the spine. Pilates focuses on all of the core muscles so the spine is more balanced and stable, which helps to reduce stress on the back. Focusing on only the abdominal muscles without strengthening the muscles of the back, as some exercise classes do, can destabilize the spine and worsen back pain. Pilates exercise also improves posture and spinal alignment, creating a neutral spine where the three natural curves of the back are in proper alignment. This greatly reduces stress on the back and spine and even helps expand the lungs better during breathing.

Pilates for Back Pain: The Bottom Line? Pilates for back pain has many benefits. It helps to strengthen core muscles that support and stabilize the spine and improves posture and flexibility. It also reduces the risk of further back injury by strengthening the muscles that support the spine. Another bonus? You could end up with a six-pack too.

For more information visit: www.cryobp.com 956.627.1231 facebook.com/cryobp

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


INFORMED PATIENT | CORPUS CHRISTI

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

19


WOMEN’S HEALTH

GET YOUR BODY BACK WITH A

Mommy Makeover

growing trend in plastic surgery is the mommy makeover. This is a collection of plastic surgery procedures designed to correct the flaws that occur as a result of going through pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding. While these body changes once served a purpose, there is no reason you shouldn’t be able to get your pre-baby body back.

A

by Dr. Pradeep Mohan of Veda Medical

is excess skin in the upper abdomen, the surgeon may make a second incision around the navel.

Mommy makeovers are highly unique to the woman. Not all women will require the same procedures. Some women may need only a few, while others may need more.

Skin, fat and tissue are removed through the incisions. Since abdominal muscles are often loosened or separated during pregnancy, they are also repaired. For mothers with only a small pooch and no need for repair or strengthening of the abdominal muscles, the surgeon may opt for a mini tummy tuck. For this procedure, there is no incision around the navel and the incision at the bikini line is generally smaller.

A common lament of mothers is the loss of their abs. Whether they’re hidden by a layer of fat or the muscles have turned to mush, a tummy tuck can help. Sometimes called an abdominoplasty, a tummy tuck involves an incision along the bikini line. If there

The breasts are another problem area for women seeking a mommy makeover. Excess weight gained during pregnancy can lead to sagging. If the mother breastfed their child, the breasts may also appear deflated. Mastopexy (breast lift) or augmentation

20

MD Monthly

mammoplasty (breast augmentation) are options for these women. In some cases, both procedures may be needed to return breasts to their youthful appearance. There are three incisions commonly used for breast lifts. The degree of sagging and the surgeon’s preference will determine which is used. The first is a circling incision around the areola. The second is like the first, but with the addition of a vertical incision from the areola to the natural breast crease. The last option adds a third incision horizontally across the crease beneath the breast. Once the incisions are made, the surgeon will remove extra skin to lift the breasts. The breasts are reshaped during the procedure using deep sutures to help them retain shape. Since the nipple and areola are often out

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


WOMEN’S HEALTH

of place after lifting, they are sometimes moved to be more aesthetically pleasing. The surgeon may elect to reduce enlarged areolas as well. Breast augmentation incisions can also be varied. If done as part of a breast lift procedure, the surgeon can use the existing incisions rather than make additional ones. If only the augmentation is to be done, the surgeon will make an incision either on the lower side of the breast, at the armpit or partially around the areola. The type of incision depends on the implants, the patient’s body and the surgeon’s preference. The implants may be placed either beneath the pectoral muscles or between the muscle and breast tissue. Layered sutures and tape are used to close the incisions. Liposuction is a common component of a mommy makeover. Unlike diet and exercise, liposuction can spot reduce fat. It is sometimes combined with other plastic surgery procedures. For instance, liposuction can help sculpt the abdomen during a tummy tuck. A small incision is made in the desired area. A tube called a cannula is inserted through the incision to loosen fat deposits. Finally, a surgical vacuum or syringe is attached to the cannula to literally suck out the fat. A buttock lift, or gluteoplasty, is sometimes included in a mommy makeover. An incision is made across the top of the buttocks. The skin and tissue are pulled up and any excess is removed. Since this sometimes results in a flat appearance, augmentation may be needed. Augmentation may be through fat injections or implants. If fat injections are used, it is referred to as a Brazilian butt lift. Using liposuction, fat is

removed from another area of the body, purified, and then injected into the butt. While fat injections give more flexibility with shaping, the fat tends to dissolve over time, as much as 30 percent. With implants, a small incision is made in the middle of the buttocks. The implants are inserted through this incision, generally being placed between the layer of fat and muscle. In some cases, the implant may be placed in the main buttock muscle. The incisions are then stitched closed. In recent years, many moms, especially those who have had a vaginal birth, are opting for genital rejuvenation procedures as part of their mommy makeover. Giving birth to a child can stretch the genitals, both the visible areas and the areas inside. Genital rejuvenation procedures include labiaplasty and vaginoplasty. Labiaplasty treats the visible external areas. During the procedure,

the surgeon will use a scalpel, special scissors or a laser to reduce the size of the labia majora and/or labia minora, better known as the vaginal lips. In some cases, liposuction may be used to remove excess fat. The incisions are then closed with dissolvable stitches. Vaginoplasty treats the internal area where only you and your partner feel the difference. The stretched vaginal muscles are pulled taut at the end of the vagina and secured with dissolvable stitches. Any excess skin and tissue is removed. As a parent, you give up a lot of things for your children. Your body doesn’t have to be one of those things. With a mommy makeover, you can enjoy your children and be the hottest mom on the block.

For more information: www.vedamedical.com 2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

21


22

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

23


24

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


PAM Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH of Corpus Christi

C

orpus Christi residents in need of out-patient and in-patient rehabilitation services for stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury and Parkinson’s disease, among others, can now receive treatment and services at PAM Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH of Corpus Christi which opened May 1, 2018. PAM Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH of Corpus Christi, 345 S. Water St., will offer physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy, as well as rehab programs and services specifically for amputation, heart failure, fibromyalgia, oncology, pain, and osteoporosis, to name a few. “We’ll be working with patients who need therapy to get them back to their highest level of function, so they can return home,” said Barbi Balliet, Director of Rehabilitation. “No one wants to be sick or injured and in the hospital. We provide the best support for people to get them back to where they were before their illness or injury.”

individual treatment plans, patient and family education and counseling, nutritional management by a registered dietitian, on-site dialysis, on-site pharmacy, comprehensive outpatient services, and post discharge follow up and support.

Specialty services also will be provided for brain injury, hand therapy, lymphedema, spasticity management, tracheostomy care, and wound care. Other program highlights include

A neuropsychologist will play an important role in working with patients who have neurological disease or disorders, said Melinda Olinick, Director of Strategic Initiative & Integration,

PAM Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH of Corpus Christi. “One of the main things we’re focusing on as a strong neuro component is spinal cord injury,” she said. In addition, football players and other athletes who have concussions can be seen and treated at PAM Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH of Corpus Christi. “We are working with local universities to let them know what we are bringing to Corpus Christi and how we can 2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

25


help our city’s athletes, as well as the growing population of elderly,” Olinick said. Patients will participate in therapy services for three hours, five times per week, Balliet explained, and benefit from the hospital’s advanced rehab equipment, such as the Bioness Integrated Therapy System (BITS). BITS assesses the physical, visual, auditory, and cognitive abilities of individuals, including those with deficits resulting from traumatic injuries and movement disorders, according to the BITS website. Its interactive touchscreen and program selections challenge patients through visual motor activities, visual and auditory processing, cognitive skills and endurance training. KoreBalance is another stability training program that patients will use to help improve their balance through a variety of velocities, angles, and directions that force the body to make balance corrections automatically, as stated on the company’s website. Also, two bariatric rooms with mounted ceiling lifts are available for rehab patients. “There is a ceiling lift not only to protect staff, but also to get patients up and standing sooner, giving them the confidence that they will be able to succeed,” Balliet said. A major component of the

26

MD Monthly

Michael Pierce

rehabilitation hospital is a Parkinson’s Rehabilitation Program. The goal of the program is to improve outcomes in balance and flexibility, self-care activities, and vocal loudness and pitch range through the collaborative care of the program’s interdisciplinary team. “Resources for Parkinson’s patients in Corpus Christi are limited, so we have a speech language pathologist who has experience with Parkinson’s patients,” Balliet said. “We also have a physical therapist who has her LSVT Big certification, and we’re working with a neurologist and a neurological psychologist to meet the needs of Parkinson’s patients in Corpus Christi.”

Barbi Balliet

LSVT Big and LSVT Loud are two treatment approaches that have proven effective with people with Parkinson’s, Balliet explained, in helping them with their mobility, balance, coordination and speech. Hector Bernal, CEO of PAM Specialty Hospitals of Corpus Christi, believes PAM Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH of Corpus Christi, will have a tremendous impact on the community.

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


Now that PAM Rehabilitation Hospital of Corpus Christi will offer treatment plans and services to area residents, Balliet is excited about what the future holds for helping patients, who she said often had to go to San Antonio, Austin or Houston for rehabilitation. Eventually, the rehab staff will include two physical therapists and four physical therapy assistants, two occupational therapists, four certified occupational therapy assistants, and two speech language pathologists.

Melinda Olinick

Hector Bernal

“We will help elevate the expectations of a rehabilitation hospital,” he said. “We’re bringing a lot of awareness about rehab and what types of patients can qualify for rehab. We feel it is underutilized in Corpus Christi, so through our expertise we can add value to the community and help keep patients in the area opposed to traveling to San Antonio for specialty rehab. We’re also going to work on getting some disease specific certifications for rehab.”

PAM Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH of Corpus Christi is unique, Bernal added, in that it will include a freestanding, 19-bed Long Term Acute Care Hospital within the rehab facility. “A lot of times when patients are ready to leave the hospital because they no longer meet the acute care criteria, they are still too ill to go to rehab,” he said. “So it will be more convenient for patients and will provide them with a better continuum of care because if they are still too sick for rehab, we can continue to treat them at LTACH and then transfer them to rehab, all for better outcomes.”

“We have a wide range of therapists with those who have more than 20 years of experience,” she said, “and with some having a year of experience, so there will be mentoring. Those who have a year of experience come straight out of school with knowledge of recent research and the latest in technology and treatment techniques that will be of great benefit to our patients. This is something I’m really excited about.”

PAM Rehabilitation Hospital & LTACH of Corpus Christi is part of the Post Acute Medical network of hospitals and outpatient clinics that specialize in postacute care and rehabilitation services. For more information, visit www. postacutemedical.com or call (361) 5000700.

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

27


28

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

29


30

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


by Edmond Ortiz

T

he seventh annual Gulf Coast Multidisciplinary Pharmacotherapy Conference will be held June 1-3 at Del Mar College-West Campus in Corpus Christi. The conference is presented by the Coastal Bend Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists (CBSHP), Del Mar, and UT Health-San Antonio (formerly University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio). Many pharmacists, nursing and medical professionals along the Gulf Coast and around the Rio Grande Valley are expected to attend the symposium. The conference offers educational opportunities to pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, physicians, physician assistants, nurses, and advanced practice nurse practitioners, as well as for fellows, residents, students and other healthcare professionals. There will be a variety of professionals providing lectures, each of which will consist of a PowerPoint presentation, and a brief question-andanswer session. Every participant will be required to take pre-tests and post-tests given through an audience response system. Dr. George Udeani, president of CBSHP, is the conference chairperson. He is the clinical pharmacy manager,

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

31


residency program director at Corpus Christi Medical Center, and visiting professor, Texas A&M Health Science Center. Some of the other scheduled presenting faculty and planning committee members include Dr. Thomas Alexander, cardiac catheterization laboratory and cardiology fellowship program director at Corpus Christi Medical Center; and Dr. Donna Huddleston, associate professor and Nursing Success Center faculty coordinator at Del Mar College. Alexander is board-certified in interventional cardiology and cardiovascular medicine. He received medical school training and his bachelor’s degree in India in the 1980s before moving to the United States, where he was an internal medical resident through the Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. He completed a fellowship in interventional cardiology at Temple University. Huddleston received a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Purdue University, and master’s and doctorate in nursing both from the University of IllinoisChicago. At Del Mar, she has taught courses on health assessment, pharmacology, foundations, and caregiver skills. According to symposium organizers, recent advances in health care, technology and increasing social demands are affecting disease management, and healthcare delivery systems. The end of the conference will provide participants with up-to-date data on overriding topics, such as pharmacotherapy, new state pharmacy laws, and the opioid crisis. Speakers will touch upon subtopics such as infectious diseases, psychiatry, sleep apnea, pain management, anticoagulation therapy,

32

MD Monthly

cardiovascular therapeutics, and oncology.

Additional subjects will include immunology/ immunotherapy, neuromuscular blockade/ reversal agents, Ebola virus outbreaks, and snake bites. Furthermore, attendees will be encouraged to work in interdisciplinary teams to make certain that each of their patients is managed based on best practices and current guidelines. Some other program objectives at the June conference are: • Discuss existing guidelines for management of pneumonia • Describing the prevalence and management of Zika virus in the community

• Outlining the extent of antibiotic resistance and alternatives in managing multidrug-resistant microorganisms • Describing approaches to treating and preventing Clostridium difficile, the bacterium that causes diarrhea and more significant intestinal conditions such as colitis • Comprehending new treatment options for schizophrenia in daily practice • Understanding the use of PCSK-9 inhibitors in managing hyperlipidemia • Providing a framework for a practice model that ensures provision of safe, effective, efficient, accountable and evidence-based care for all patients • Determining successful implementation of new pharmacy practice models and identifying opportunities and challenges in a changing environment Dr. Udeani, in his position, oversees the clinical use of drugs introduced into his hospital. The work of Dr. Udeani and his colleagues focuses on optimizing drug therapy to achieve positive patient outcomes, while minimizing adverse events. This is achieved via application of concepts in therapeutic drug

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


monitoring and clinical decision support systems. He said conferences such as the one taking place in June can help healthcare professionals brush up on cutting edge concepts in pharmacotherapy as well as Up To Date guidelines in medicine.

“I have to do a literature reviews to determine whether a drug has advantages or is better than the drugs we already have,” Dr. Udeani said. “Our industry has moved to becoming more clinical. You account for all of the drugs a patient consumes. You know what a given drug is supposed to do for a given patient, thus it is essential to work hard at modulating positive outcomes pharmacologically.” There is, indeed, much for a pharmacist to consider when managing the flow of drugs to patients. “We work in an interdisciplinary manner with departments to monitor parameters for drug efficacy, and toxicity,” Dr. Udeani explained. A pharmacist registered in Texas and Illinois, Dr. Udeani attended a British boarding high school in Cameroon, West Africa, which ran the University of London Syllabus towards the General Certificate of Education (GCE). During that period, he developed an extreme

interest in chemistry. “I figured pursuing pharmacy was the next logical step,” Dr. Udeani recalled. He moved to the United States in 1980. He enrolled at the University of Minnesota, where he earned bachelor and doctoral degrees in pharmacy. He completed a 6-year post-doctoral training in cancer research – drug discovery and development with the National Cancer Institute – National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, and Program for Collaborative Research in the Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago. During this period, his research team discovered and developed four anti-cancer drugs. Dr. Udeani also taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and practiced clinical pharmacy in the area of hematologyoncology at the University of Illinois Hospitals and Clinics. He went on to obtain a higher doctorate in cancer research from the Warnborough College in Ireland. Dr. Udeani stated that he admired some of the MD-PhD’s that taught and others that he worked with and their ability to draw into their work expertise

from both their basic and clinical sciences background. This influenced him to pursue a second doctorate hoping that he could someday apply that in pharmacy, as several others in medicine have done. In 2010 came such an opportunity, when he was recruited to come work in South Texas, where he has been able to apply both his basic and clinical science degrees in practice, academia and research. Dr. Udeani said he enjoys being part of an organization such as CBSHP, which ensures he and his colleagues and counterparts stay atop issues affecting pharmacists. During his tenure, Dr. Udeani has seen CBSHP membership expand up to 146 for an organization which had no membership in 2010. There are 11 Texas chapters of the Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists, with over 1800 members. CBSHP members meet each month. The organization has enhanced the amount of educational opportunities for pharmacists, physicians, nurses, and pharmacy technicians in the Coastal 2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

33


collaborating to care for a patient, as well as patient outcomes.

Bend region. Dr. Udeani was one of the co-founders for the Gulf Coast Multidisciplinary Pharmacotherapy Conference.

Dr. Udeani will speak at the symposium about managing Ebola virus. A 2014 outbreak of the illness in West Africa sparked fears that it would spread in the United States after four people stateside were reported with symptoms. “It’s one of the great global ailments we have to pay attention to,” Dr. Udeani said.

“It’s sort of being an advocate for our profession,” Dr. Udeani said. “There are issues that also deal with pharmacy technicians. There’s a movement to ensure that technicians earn a bachelor’s degree, and help them to form their own advocacy society.” Overall, for now, there are no formal training requirements for becoming a pharmacy technician other than graduating with a high school diploma. Many technician positions offer training on the job, while other employees want prospective technicians to graduate from a one- to two-year pharmacy technology program. But requiring aspiring pharmacy technicians to earn at least a

34

MD Monthly

Costs to register for the symposium vary depending on one’s professional or student status, and there are options to attend one or two days. Pre-registration is due May 22. bachelor’s degree would allow them the chance to train to work in not only pharmacy operations, but also in clinical areas, such as medication reconciliation. This, Dr. Udeani said, would improve communications among the healthcare providers

The conference will also include a June 3 golf tournament, whose proceeds will benefit CBSHP. Proceeds from a June 2 dinner will benefit people directly affected by Hurricane Harvey. Visit http://cbshpharm.org for details.

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

35


DR. WAYNE A. LEE

HILL COUNTRY ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY & SPORTS MEDICINE

Improving Quality of Life… One Orthopedic Challenge At A Time by Jody Joseph Marmel

D

r. Wayne A. Lee was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. During his middle school years, his dream was to become an astronaut. After doing research, he discovered that a physical requirement was to have 20/20 vision. Since he wore glasses at an early age, he knew that his first dream was not going to be a reality. Dr. Lee always enjoyed building different models and liked working with a “hands-on” approach, so he began exploring different avenues to ensure he would have a fulfilling future. Dr. Lee was involved with community service at church, and the Boy Scouts. During his Boy Scout years, he had partaken in a mentorship at the Coroner’s Office. Dr. Lee explains, “I had a chance to talk to the Coroner and it sparked my curiosity. It made sense for me to put an emphasis in the sciences. From that point on, I knew that my goal was to become a doctor.” In 1982, Dr. Lee graduated from Xavier University in New Orleans with a B.S. in Chemistry. He then went to

36

MD Monthly

Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee and received his medical degree in 1986. From 1986 to 1987, Dr. Lee attended Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C. and completed an Internship in General Surgery. “I started in General Surgery because I knew it encompassed a broad spectrum and I was able to use my hands and help people. It was the perfect place for me to begin my journey into medicine.” Dr. Lee then studied at A.I. Dupont Institute in Wilmington, Delaware – Research Fellow and accomplished one year of spinal cord research. From 1989 to 1990, he went to St. Louis University Hospital and completed his Internal Medicine Resident program. In between his hard work, studies and acquired medical knowledge, Dr. Lee realized he wanted to specialize in Orthopedics. If something was broken, he could fix it. Not only that, but the patients would feel great again and be able to have their quality of life back. The emphasis on positive results was a recurring theme throughout Dr. Lee’s life and he knew he wanted to give back by helping people return to their normal function as quickly as possible.

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

37


From 1990 to 1996, Dr. Lee attended King/Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles, California and achieved an Orthopaedic Surgery Residency. He was the Chief Resident from 19951996. During his Chief residency year, he spent three months in Lecco, Italy in a fellowship on limb lengthening and fracture management using the Ilizarov fixation method.

“I finished my residency program and moved to San Antonio and worked with a multi-specialty group. I was with the group for four years and then I decided to leave. I wanted to open my own practice.”

And that is the beginning of Hill Country Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine. The doors of Dr. Lee’s solo practice have been opened in San Antonio for over two decades and he has been helping patients ranging from high school age to mature patients and geriatrics while leaving a positive impact on his patient’s lives and the community at large. Dr. Lee provides care to the shoulder, hip and knee. He has gone beyond his practice and been involved in orthopedic medicine for high school football, USA boxing, professional boxing, professional Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) as well as amateur sports. Hill Country Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine is a boutique “feel” practice without the costly retainer. The practice’s mission is-Improving your quality of life…one orthopedic challenge at a time. Dr. Lee and his staff provide

38

MD Monthly

their patients with comprehensive, compassionate, and top-notch care. “All of this is achieved by having close contact with the patient, their primary care physician, the therapist, and home health care if needed. When you actually think about it, seeing me is only one aspect of your care. There is a team approach so that you can return to your ‘normal’ lifestyle.” Dr. Lee says, “I am here to make sure that we can get you back to your lifestyle as quickly as possible.”

Advances in Orthopedic Surgery Dr. Lee highlights the main advancements that have taken place in orthopedic surgery and how each step has provided faster relief for the patients via different techniques. • Regional Anesthesia (Blocks) This allows for longer pain relief. Therefore, the patient can use the

affected extremity quicker for range of motion and possible early weight bearing. Examples of this include total joint replacement, sports medicine and fracture management. Overall, this allows for shorter hospital stays or same day surgery. “I can do a knee replacement and my patients can go home in a couple of days. This is because the blocks give the patient the needed pain relief and we can get them back home to their natural environment. When patients are home, they get better a lot quicker and they can regain a normal level of activity faster.” • Regenerative Orthopedics This stimulates the body’s natural repair mechanisms to heal and in some instances, damaged cells can be replaced. Using your own cells that have the ability to help repair certain affected areas has been a major change in orthopedics. Platelet Rich Plasma

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


(PRP) can be injected into the affected area and it reduces inflammation. This can accelerate recovery and promote healing. Bone Marrow has cells that have no “title”; these cells are unassigned and can be placed into other areas to repair whatever may be causing the medical problem. Fluid can be injected; Dr. Lee states, “I tell my patients that they can still run a half a marathon, but not a full one yet.” He sets realistic goals for each one of his patients so that they maintain their strength and can go back to enjoying their life as quickly as possible. Bone Marrow aspiration can accelerate recovery and promote healing from acute and chronic injuries.

• Ultrasound This is used both in the hospital setting and in the office. Dr. Lee details this, “We can see joints, the structures in joints and the inflammations. It gives us a view in order to see where the joint

space is for injections of medications that will help the patient in the safest way for the best outcome.” • Improved Management This allows for smaller incisions coupled with better technology. Minimally invasive procedures can be performed resulting in an earlier return of function. • Limb Salvage This decreases the number of potential amputations. 60 percent of the amputations on a yearly basis are related to diabetes. Following an amputation, up to 50 percent of people with diabetes will die within two years. Limb salvage is life changing. “We are able to give our patients an opportunity to have the best quality of life as possible.”

Two Highlights of Dr. Lee’s Countless Success Stories Dr. Lee details two patient outcomes that stand out as major

accomplishments, although he has a multitude of patients with positive results. In fact, all of his patients have confidence in Dr. Lee’s knowledge and experience at Hill Country Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine. “I was on call and I was taking care of a 62 year old male with severe diabetes with an advanced ulcer and abscess on the bottom of his foot that extended up to the midway of his leg. When I met him and his two daughters, both were nurses, I told them that he had more than a 50 percent chance of an amputation. I consulted a vascular surgeon because having a team of physicians working together is key to an integrated medical approach with the best results. After four surgeries and grafting, the patient was able to keep his leg. The patient could not thank me enough for helping him keep his leg. It’s all about helping people and getting them back to what they want to do as quickly as possible.”

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

39


Dr. Lee shares another amazing story about a 104 female patient. “She was an independent woman and was in excellent health. One day she tripped over a dog and broke her hip. I took her into surgery, used blocks and advanced techniques and when the surgery was complete, she was alert and she was able to go to a rehabilitation facility and get back to life.”

40

MD Monthly

As Dr. Lee says, “It’s not the mileage on the car that matters, but it’s how the car runs. In terms of physiology, this makes a big difference.”

Boxing & Other Sports Medicine Accomplishments Dr. Lee is the Chairman for the State of Texas Combative Sports Advisory Board. The goal of the advisory board is to make recommendations for the medical, health, and safety of combative sports. This includes boxing, MMA, kickboxing and more. “I have been a ringside physician for approximately 15 years. I have covered amateur boxing, MMA and professional boxing events with Canelo Alvarez, Manny Pacquiao, Oscar Diaz,

and James Kirkland. I have also been involved with UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) with Donald Cerrone, Dos Santos, and Rafael dos Anjos.” Dr. Lee continues, “I became a ringside physician to provide community service for boy’s and girl’s clubs in amateur boxing. Actually, one of my patients asked if I could help out so that the kids could box on weekends. They couldn’t do the events without a physician and I decided to help.” Dr. Lee had ringside medicine training at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. He has treated cuts, concussions, fractures, and major injuries in the ring. He explains, “This is one of the few sports where all play is stopped if the athlete is injured. The ringside doctor has to make

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


a quick assessment and determine if the athlete can return to play. It is a tremendous responsibility and I take pride in helping the athletes return to their sport as quickly as possible.” Dr. Lee is also a member of the Texas Orthopedic Association, a member of the American Association of Professional Ringside Physicians and the Bexar County Medical Society. In addition to this, he is a member of USA Boxing. Furthermore, Dr. Lee has written several articles. The most recent ones include a November, 2017 article in “The Wound Care Journal” and in the Spring of 2017, Dr. Lee published an article in “The Chronicles of Incision Management”.

A Personal Glimpse of Dr. Lee Outside of His Practice Dr. Lee has two daughters that are excelling in their career paths. “One of my daughters is a Chef and she is in management at a Disney Restaurant. My other daughter does marketing in

Austin. I am extremely proud of both of my daughters and they mean the world to me.” His hobbies include photography, mountain bike riding, cooking and listening to jazz music. Dr. Lee’s long term goals include taking photography vacations such as the Balloon Festival in Albuquerque and the Temples of Machu Picchu, Peru and the Grand Pyramids in Egypt, to name a few. “I want to have as many memories stored when I get older and I can revisit these beautiful moments through my photography.” Dr. Lee enjoys both his professional and personal lifestyle and he certainly has a wonderful outlook in all walks of his life.

“I enjoy that I was given a gift to help people and ease their pain; I get immense pleasure in helping my patients return to where they were before they were injured.” Dr. Lee concludes, “And that’s the end of their care. When my patients are discharged, I tell them I will only see them at HEB.” His positivity is contagious and his patients, family, and friends appreciate all that he does for them. The result is a happy ending. It doesn’t get much better than that.

For More InformationVisit www.Hillcountryortho.com Office # 210-491-4125 Fax # 210-491-4138 Email: lee_frontdesk@yahoo.com

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

41


42

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

43


CHILDRENS HEALTH | CORPUS CHRISTI

HERE’S HOW YOUR CHILD

SHOULD BE FLOSSING Provided by Kennedy Dental Care

F

lossing is an important part of getting a healthy smile and keeping cavities and gum disease away. Yet, it is entirely possible to floss the wrong way and damage sensitive gums in the process. Below, we cover why flossing is important, and a few common flossing mistakes.

Brushing Only Does So Much Flossing removes plaque buildup in the places where toothbrushes can’t reach; the most important area is between teeth. Brushing alone only covers about 1/3 of the total tooth surface area in the mouth, which leaves a lot of space for plaque and cavities to thrive. Flossing helps fix this by removing food and other debris in between teeth that causes plaque accumulation. Plaque accumulation leads to oral disease and cavities. Flossing helps completely clean the mouth to help avoid oral disease.

Quick Flossing Tips It’s never too late to begin flossing. Here’s a basic guide to flossing your children’s teeth.

1 2

Begin flossing your children’s teeth when any two teeth touch.

Use about 12-18 inches of dental floss. If that is too difficult, try using flossing tools like soft flossing picks.

3

Use wide, flat dental tape to floss your children’s teeth. The width of the floss helps with the larger spaces in children’s teeth.

4

Be gentle when flossing children’s teeth, and avoid applying too much pressure on their gums.

5

Floss both sides of the teeth, and make sure to gently dip beneath the gum line. For more detailed flossing pointers, check out this handy flossing guide

44

MD Monthly

provided by the ADA.

4 Common Flossing Mistakes

1

Moving Too Quickly If your child moves too quickly from tooth to tooth, then they risk not fully cleaning the tartar buildup on their teeth. Remember that flossing cleans debris from between teeth and helps remove a thin, damaging layer of plaque that can lead to cavities. We suggest spending about 10 seconds flossing each side of the tooth.

2

Bleeding Gums May Happen If your child hasn’t flossed in a while, they may bleed a bit when they begin flossing again. Bleeding gums often indicates oral disease which is caused by plaque and bacteria buildup. And this is exactly what flossing helps to prevent! In order to fight oral disease, your child actually needs to continue flossing. Eventually, their

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


CHILDRENS HEALTH | CORPUS CHRISTI

gums will become less swollen and no longer bleed.

3

Flossing Too Often Flossing too often can damage gum tissue and prolong gum sensitivity. To clean properly without hurting gums, floss once per day, right after brushing. We suggest having your child floss right before bed, since it provides ample time for flossing.

4

Missing Both Sides Of The Tooth A lot of people only floss one side of each of their teeth and focus on the gaps between teeth as singular spaces to be cleaned. Again, flossing fights plaque buildup on teeth, so have your child focus on flossing each side of their teeth below the gum line.

Children Should Floss Regularly A full flossing routine should include cleaning teeth below the gum line; this is where dental plaque can go unseen and unreached by toothbrushes. If left untreated, plaque buildup near the root of teeth can lead to gingivitis and tooth loss. Bleeding gums when brushing or flossing is often an early sign of gum disease. If your child has tender, swollen gums that bleed when they brush or floss, then it’s time to schedule an appointment and evaluate their oral health. Click here to use our pediatric dentist locator and find a dentist in your neighborhood today.

To learn more visit online www.paulkennedydds.com

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

45


46

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

47


WOMEN’S HEALTH | SAN ANTONIO

How Does

Breast Cancer Start?

by Dr. Maria Palafox of South Texas Breast Surgery

B

reast cancer technically starts the same way other cancers start, when one of the 100 million cells in our body mutates and begins to multiply too quickly. The key here is two-fold: 1. You have to have a mutated cell 2. That cell has to begin multiplying out of control

Cancers First Step - A Mutated Cell The truth is, most of us have cells that are damaged in some form or fashion but they don’t typically cause too many problems all on their own. We call these “mutated” cells. Unless babies inherit a specific genetic mutation from their parents, they typically have super healthy cells because their tiny bodies haven’t been exposed to very much “bad”. But over time, our exposure to outside forces cause gene damage - the sun, cigarette smoke, other chemicals, a poor diet, radiation, and even some

48

MD Monthly

infections can cause genetic mutations. Thus, we get a greater number of mutated cells as we get older. This is why our risk of cancer increases as we age - simply because we have more mutated cells that have a “risk” of multiplying.

Cancers Second Step - Multiplication Each of the 200 different types of cells in our body divide, multiply, and die according to what our body needs to survive. So, if everything works perfectly, we always have exactly the right number of liver cells, white blood cells, and all of the other types of cells to keep us alive and healthy. The problem occurs when a set of these cells starts to multiply out of control cancerous cells multiply exponentially and don’t die off like other cells. The technical definition of a cancer cell is a cell that has become “immortal”. So if you go back to your high school

math class, one cell turns into two, those two cells turn into four, those four into 16, the 16 into 256, and the 256 into a whopping 65,536 mutated cells! Now it begins to be a little easier to understand how cancer can affect people so quickly. By the time each of the 65,536 cancerous cells multiply only once, a person has over 4 billion cancer cells in their body. So depending on how quickly those cells are multiplying, cancer can spread very, very quickly. This is why we try to see patients immediately after a breast cancer diagnosis - to stop these immortal cells from multiplying before they invade other parts of the body.

So Where Does Breast Cancer Start? Most breast cancers begin in our lobules, or the glands and ducts in our breasts responsible for milk production. Why? Because this is where your breast “cells” are located; most of the rest of your breast is made up of

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


WOMEN’S HEALTH | SAN ANTONIO

cancer because all of the affected systems have to be treated. Thus, our goal is to try to diagnose breast cancer at its earliest possible stage and completely remove every single cancerous cell from your body. The earlier we catch the cancer, or tumor, the less breast tissue we have to remove. This is why sometimes we can remove a breast cancer tumor with lumpectomy (breast conserving surgery where we simply remove the tumor itself), and sometimes we have to perform a full mastectomy (removal of the entire breast because the entire breast contains cancerous cells). fatty tissue, connective tissues, and lymphatic tissues. As breast cancer grows, it takes over more of the surrounding breast tissue, and can even break through the tissue to completely separate systems of the body. When this happens, for example, when breast cancer spreads and begins to travel

through your blood or lymph vessels, we say that it has “metastasized”.

Catching Breast Cancer Early Makes A Huge Difference Metastatic breast cancer is even harder to treat and control than localized breast

For more information: http://www. mariapalafoxmd.com

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

49


INFORMED PATIENT | REGIONAL

5Tips For Maintaining

Mental Health After An Injury by Sara Gillberg

P

eople who are active run the risk of sustaining a physical injury. Some of these are minor joint pains that heal in hours or days. However, there are injuries that can take quite a long timeweeks or months to mend, so that the person can return to the same level of activity. Sometimes these injuries require surgery which can sideline a person as the injured body part heals itself. Active people often have a difficult time adjusting to life without their favorite exercises, whether it is weightlifting, jogging, swimming or another activity. Being stuck to the couch can cause people to experience depression, anxiety, or loneliness. However, there are some sciencebacked tips to help people who have suffered an injury adjust to their new daily routines or lack of usual activities. Eat and Drink Healthier No more exercise means no more burning calories in mass quantities.

50

MD Monthly

It also means the body won’t be accustomed to burning the majority of fat slowly throughout the day. People who become less active often gain weight in the process. The injury is often something outside a person’s control. However, a diet is well within their control and is manageable. Eating healthier, drinking fewer high-calorie sodas and alcoholic beverages, and focusing on a healthy lifestyle in new ways can improve one’s overall mental health. Feeling good about oneself can prevent depression and anxiety and preserve positive vibes throughout the healing process. Stay Social Some people design their social lives around physical activity. They participate in running groups, lift weights at the gym with friends, play basketball and softball with work colleagues or attend regular yoga classes. When an injury occurs, these activities

often stop. If so, loneliness can set in and that could lead to depression. People who have broken bones or torn ligaments don’t need to revolve their lives around just Netflix and sleep. Stay in contact with friends digitally and invite them to do other things such as dinner, movies, video games at home, or a happy hour event at a nearby restaurant or bar. Doing this can keep relationships alive and networks strong even if the routine activities go on a healing-from-injury break. Keep a Journal A lot of times, people who are experiencing a change in their lifestyle that is out of their control choose to keep their thoughts to themselves. Some people begin counseling or therapy as an avenue to open up about their feelings. Another option is to keep a journal, which can provide some of the same support as speaking with a therapist. Many medical experts suggest that people use a journal to write their thoughts as a way to release emotions and negative energy built up during the day.

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


INFORMED PATIENT | REGIONAL

taken from them because of the injury. Additionally, there is a physical change in the body’s chemical makeup because exercise releases endorphins.

Focus on Rehab Sometimes people feel down about their injury and the reduced number of activities they can do. However, there is one activity that can become the center of their focus.

“If you’re all of a sudden injured and can’t work out every day, you’re experiencing a major dip in endorphins,” says Barbara Walker, Ph.D. a psychologist at the Center for Human Performance.

Rehabilitation is an important aspect of healing from a serious physical injury. Without it, the body never regains its muscle strength around the area where the injury and surgery took place. Additionally, people can focus on their rehab exercises and make it a positive for mental health as well. Staying determined and making rehab into a challenge can become a motivational tactic. This can help people avoid complacency and listlessness.

was physically active before getting sidelined. Professional and college athletes suffer from the same feeling — sometimes it forms into depression — when they suffer a long-term injury and have to undergo a lengthy and stressful healing process.

Understand That Feeling Bummed is Normal Feeling down about the injury is a natural occurrence, and it happens sooner or later to everyone who

Feeling upset about the injury and the long path to physical recovery is not a negative reflection of a person’s character. Things that they loved to do, like exercise or play a sport, have been

However, the omission of activity is temporary. Knowing that things will eventually return to normal can be a morale-booster for people. Even if an injury occurs, there are ways to keep your morale high. Stay focused on your rehabilitation, keep an active social life, and practice healthier habits and dietary planning. These tips, among others, will help prevent longterm depression and unhealthy habits stemming from a fluke physical injury.

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

51


INFORMED PATIENT | SAN ANTONIO

Health Effects of Noise Pollution Article provided by Ear, Nose & Throat Clinics of San Antonio

E

ven if you’re a relatively health conscious person, there’s a chance you take your hearing for granted. Imagine what it would be like if you lived in total silence; after thinking about that, you’ll be better able to appreciate the important role hearing plays in everyday life. Life would lack dimension if you couldn’t hear a robin sing or a newborn baby’s impassioned cry. But over time, the subtle effects of noise pollution can gradually take its toll on your hearing and result in other negative health effects as well. What are the effects of noise pollution and why should you be concerned? It doesn’t require exposure to extremely loud noise to cause hearing loss over time. It might surprise you to learn that noise levels above the eighty decibel range, equivalent to the noise level created by a subway speeding by, can result in deterioration of hearing. If you live in a large city, you can imagine the effect noise pollution

52

MD Monthly

may be having on your ability to hear. Even if you live in a quiet, peaceful area, the noise generated by simply mowing the lawn can do damage to your ears. The effects of noise pollution extend beyond just hearing. Chronic exposure to noise has been shown to cause physical and mental problems such as anxiety, aggressive behavior, hypertension, indigestion, sleep disturbances, memory problems, and even coronary artery disease. Not to mention the fact that loud noise when you’re trying to concentrate can be downright annoying. No wonder they say “silence is golden”. Silence may also be healthier. Although some level of noise is inescapable and a life of complete silence would hardly be a recipe for happiness, there are certain precautions that should be taken to protect yourself from the effects of noise pollution.

Starting with your home, take steps to cushion the inside of your living quarters from the effects of noise pollution. This includes soundproofing the windows and walls. Ask your favorite hardware store clerk about materials you can use to do this. Avoid using loud appliances as much as possible and don’t turn indoor music up full blast even if it is your favorite song. Use a self propelled lawn mower instead of a gas one which produces noise levels of up to ninety decibels. If possible, choose to live in a quiet area away from airports and heavy traffic. When you are forced to engage in noisy activities, always wear earplugs to protect your hearing. Above all, stay away from rock concerts where the noise level can reach up to 150 decibels. Keep in mind that not only are the effects of noise pollution harmful to your hearing, but noise can affect your overall health and mood. When you

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


INFORMED PATIENT | SAN ANTONIO

get a chance, escape from the effects of noise pollution by visiting your local library where the average noise intensity is only thirty decibels and read that book you’ve always wanted to read in relative silence.

About ENT of San Antonio ENT Clinics of San Antonio, P.A. is dedicated to the prevention and alleviation of human suffering in patients with medical and surgical disorders in the field of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. A family of residency trained board-certified physicians, nurse practitioners, and numerous highly specialized ancillary employees are dedicated to the delivery of compassionate, quality, state of the art, and cost-effective healthcare www.entclinicsofsa.com Edited by Jody Marmel on 5-7-2018

2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

53


54

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

55


MD NEWS | CORPUS CHRISTI

Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital Recognized Among Top 10% in Nation

C

by Bettina Piotrowski

orpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital has been named in the Top 10 percent of inpatient rehabilitation facilities in the United States. The hospital’s care was cited as being patient-centered, effective, efficient and timely. “We strive to deliver this higher level of care as our standard,” says Nicholas Nilest, CEO of Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital. “We have graciously been recognized as a top performing facility for three years now, but we never take it for granted. Our staff is exceptionally passionate about helping patients reach their full potential through the care we provide. We work daily to ensure patients are reaching their highest levels of ability and independence.” Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital was ranked in the Top 10 percent from among 870 inpatient rehabilitation facilities nationwide by the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation (UDSMR), a non-profit corporation that was developed with support from the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation

56

MD Monthly

Research. The UDSMR maintains the world’s largest database of rehabilitation outcomes.

practices for patients. “This helps elevate rehabilitative care for everyone across the United States,” Fuentes says.

“If you take into account that a national study has previously shown that inpatient rehabilitation facilities provide better long-term results for patients, being ranked at the top of that group validates the quality of care we provide,” says Dr. Michael Fuentes, Medical Director of Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital. Dr. Fuentes’ comment is referencing a study commissioned by the ARA Research Institute that showed patients treated in inpatient facilities experienced improved quality of life as compared to skilled nursing facilities.

Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital provides specialized rehabilitative services to patients who are recovering from or living with disabilities caused by injuries, illnesses, or chronic medical conditions. This includes, but is not limited to, strokes, brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, orthopedic injuries, cerebral palsy, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease.

“To provide the highest level of rehabilitative care available in the United States to our own community is truly rewarding,” Fuentes says. “This means our family, friends, and colleagues don’t need to leave the area to receive the best care available.” Through the UDSMR, Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital will also collaborate with peers throughout the nation to share information and establish best

Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital provides specialized physical rehabilitation services to patients recovering from or living with disabilities caused by injuries, illnesses, or chronic medical conditions. The hospital is ranked among the Top 10% in the nation, and its Stroke Rehabilitation program has been certified by The Joint Commission. For more information, visit CCRH.ernesthealth.com. 5726 Esplanade Dr • Corpus Christi, Texas 78414 • (P) 361.906.3700 • (F) 361.906.3797

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


2018 - MAY

MD Monthly

57


58

MD Monthly

MAY - 2018

MDMONTHLY.COM


Revista md monthly issuu 3  
Revista md monthly issuu 3  
Advertisement