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GRAFFITi BEACH

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

2013

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ART I S S U E

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I n s p i r i n g

Featuring

Fo Porter

America’s Next Top Model Cycle 12

C r e a t i v i t y


GRAFFITI BEACH MAGAZINE From an early age I watched my talented father, flamenco guitarist Thomas Michaud, struggle to get into the public eye. While today he is a successful entrepreneur and thriving musician, I found he wasn’t the only person to face this challenge when starting a creative career. In fact, this is usually the case for creatives in any industry— art, fashion, music. So I made it my life’s mission to support these talented individuals. My first initiative began in 2009 when I leased a temporary space to open a pop-up store in which emerging brands and artists could sell their products to the local community. Through this concept I developed a strong following and customer base, allowing me to expand Graffiti Beach in March 2012. I launched Graffiti Beach’s first boutique in the South Park neighborhood MELANIE MICHAUD OWNER / FOUNDER OF GRAFFITI BEACH GraffitiBeach.com

of San Diego (2220 Fern St., San Diego), an e-commerce website (GraffitiBeach.com) and created Graffiti Beach’s first magazine.

My passion and talent for art started at a young age and flourished from there. As a teenager I would cut up magazines such as Seventeen or Cosmo and rearrange letters and images to form new graphic collages. In the years that followed, I completely developed a design style and an appreciation for the arts. I’m currently Creative Director and partner of Graffiti Beach Magazine and continue to work with other professionals as a designer under my own company name, ART+DESIGN+LOVE=ME (brandiemata.com). Further pushing my art career, I attend local craft and art fairs selling art prints and handmade goods throughout Southern California. You may find me at LACMA, Amoeba Music, Wacko Soap Plant or various monthly art walks around Los Angeles. Brandie mata Creative Director / GB Magazine Partner brandiemata.com

Christine Pasalo - Writer / Copy Editor

Giovanna Avila - Beauty Director

Eilleen Doñiego de France - WRITER

christinepasalo.com

giovanna@giovannaavila.com

eileen@oheyemusing.com


Dreaming of your next masterpiece is the first step. Acting on your dream and creating your art piece is the next. Sharing your work with the world finalizes the process. These steps are easy to say and write, and so much harder to do. But the artists, designers and musicians within these pages have done just that, and we at Graffiti Beach aim to support the bravery, inspiration and dreams of these Creatives by sharing their work with the world. This issue is Graffiti Beach’s Street Art Issue and the first-ever printed edition. Many have asked us, “Why print in a world where digital is taking over?” We believe that having a tangible and beautiful magazine is a piece of art in itself. We also believe that the stories within these pages are worth reading, and that a digital issue just isn’t enough to communicate these amazing stories and visuals that we want you to see and experience. We were inspired by the innovation, passion and creativity of unconventional street artists from around the globe. These are individuals who are striving to educate our communities about how street art can be ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

used to create a positive impact on the world. We hope that you feel inspired, moved and happy while you are reading this issue. Please continue to support emerging Creatives because they are the innovators and muses of the world. The more we can help them succeed, the more they can continue to inspire the world around us!

G et in s p ire d !

Melanie Michaud Brandie Mata //

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Erik Cardona - Writer erik@carsonbros.com Sonya Calderon - Designer sonya_calderon@yahoo.com Marcy Kraft - artist facebook.com/CrochetGrenade

Heather Gildroy - Photographer heathergildroypictures.com

Rhoel Paghunasan - Designer aguynamedrho.com

teresa Hernandez - Photographer pinkzebradesign.com

myrrh raguro - Videographer chapterfold.us Corrinne Bollendorf - writer corrinnebollendorf.com

Linda Zirkus - Hair & Makeup lindazirkus.com

joel parker - Writer insertwit00@yahoo.com Alexa Mangrum - Writer alexamangrum.com

Emma Michaelson - Writer littlebirdsbigworld.tumblr.com


james lee wall - Photographer jamesleewallphoto.com

Yves Truong - photographer yveshuytruong.com sophia f. mclane - writer baltus40@yahoo.com vanessa broin - Makeup beepretty.net

francesca roth - Fashion Stylist francescaroth.com

Monarose Ryan - Designer thepinklibrarian.com Samia Lavenant - Fashion Stylist samiastyling.com

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

Andrea Reitman - Writer abreitman07@gmail.com

Hailie Stevens - writer zmemusic.com/author/hailiehay

miguel “M.i.G.” martinez - Photographer migmartinez.com

crystal washington - writer crystalvioletw@gmail.com

Blaire Babyak - Stylist blairebabyak@gmail.com

Lucas Passmore - photograper lucaspassmore.com JAY BARTLETT - Photographer jaybartlettphoto.com SOREYA YANN - Hair soreyayann.com Aliana Moss - Makeup alianamoss.com

Garone Africa - PHOTOGRAPHER garoneafrica.com

Wendy Diaz - Hair wendyjdiazhair.com JAVIER GARCIA - DESIGNER jgarcia008@gmail.com

Vanessa D’Amico - Writer vdamico@lion.lmu.edu

Andreia Hurley - Makeup andreiahurley.com

Kallah Oakes - Writer Kaloakes@gmail.com

Danielle Roxanne - writer danielleroxanne.webs.com

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GRAFFITi BEACH

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m a g a

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n e

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MEET THE TEAM

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THE PERFECT STUD

3

Letter to Readers

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Dressed in Yesteryear

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CONTRIBUTORS

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Let’s Get Personal

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SPECIAL THANKS

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Colorful Trends OF SUMMER

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GRAFFITI BEACH FASHION SHOW

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Dreaming a Fairy tale

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INSPIRATIONAL Quote

by Crystal Washington

by Andrea Reitman

by Garone Africa

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CAPTURE RESOLUTION BY Alexa Mangrum

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BIRD CITY SAINTS

THE ART OF FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY

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GAME ON

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COSMIC NATIVE

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GEEKING OUT WITH FO PORTER

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Break Away

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Emerging Bikini Designers

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WILD AT HEART

62 68

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SOUTH PARK SAN DIEGO

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CHARMING HOT SPOTS

by Corrinne Bollendorf

by Kallah Oakes

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by Kallah Oakes

by Crystal Washington

114

BY Sophia F. McLane

By Sophia F. McLane

BY Eileen DoÑiego de France

NO COMPLY BY EMMA Michaelson

UNCONVENTIONAL STREET ART

Erik Cardona AND MELANIE MICHAUD

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PAINTING THE TOWN

Summer Jewelry Trends

148

MUSIC FESTIVALS ON THE FRINGE

DIY - HALO BRAID

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EMERGING MUSICIANS

by Crystal Washington

by Vanessa D’Amico

by DANIELLE ROXANNE

summer

004

I n s p i r i n g

BY Christine Pasalo

BY JOEL PARKER

By Hailie Stevens

on the covers Photographer: Lucas Passmore Stylist: Blaire Babyak Beauty Director: Giovanna Avila Hair: Soreya Yann Makeup: Aliana Moss Models: Fo Porter from Nous Model Management

C r e a t i v i t y

Body Chain by Beatrice Holiday

earrings by MUKEE


A SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR

SUPPORTING BRANDS Graffiti Beach has been supported by a handful of emerging brands since its inception. While there are many brands we are thankful to, these brands

BEATRIC E HOL I DAY b eatr i c e h o l i day. c om

Ch i m e c him e j ewe lr y. c o m

Mu kee et sy.c o m/ sho p / Mu kee

Conti nu ous t hec o nt inu o u sli ne.com

Paper B ird C re at io n s sho ppa pe rbi rd. c o m

Ka n da l s k a nd a ls . c om

Kovey k ovey.c o

Fleet Collection fleet c o llec t ion.com

th e s e b r a n d s are avai labl e at Graffi ti B each 2 2 2 0 F e r n S t. , S a n Di eg o Ca 92104 / Graffi ti B each .com

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

played an important role in helping this issue come to life!

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Holi day FAS H ION S how Photos by Jose G. Perez (JGPS) Fashion Show Coordination by Robert Nguyen, BLAIRE BABYAK and Estella Park Hair and Makeup by Vanessa Broin, Linda Zirkus, Chelsea Conklin and Tiffany Talarski Floor Management by Michael Richmond, Lauren Adams and Susanna Liang Sponsored by Stila Cosmetics, Chime, Beatrice Holiday, Continuous, Fleet Collection, Paper Bird Creations, Mukee and Kandals


No great artist ever sees things as they really are. If he did, he would cease to be an artist.”

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

- Oscar wilde

Artist: HENSE Photographer: Miguel “M.i.G.” Martinez / migmartinez.com

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Graffiti Beach is a concept created by owner Melanie Michaud to provide a platform for emerging designers and artists to sell and market their products to the public. The brick-and-mortar store, which launched in March 2012 in the South Park neighborhood of San Diego, sells merchandise from hundreds of up-and-coming creatives across the nation. Help support these creatives by shopping in store at 2220 Fern Street, San Diego, or online at GraffitiBeach.com.

GRAFFITI BEACH 2 2 2 0 F ER N S T . , S A N D IE G O , C A 9 2 1 0 4 P: 858.433.0950

W: GRAFFITIBEACH.COM

ph o t o s b y La r a T i s h l e r


local

S o uth Park S A N D IE G O

Photo by Larry Catt

2 Buona FORCHETTA

1 Salon on 30th 2225 30th Street, San Diego, CA 92104 salonon30th.com

3 Just Skin

3001 Beech Street, San Diego, CA 92102 buonaforchettasd.com

1531 Fern Street, San Diego, CA 92102 justskinbylo.com

S

outh Park is a charming and historic San Diego neighborhood

located in the heart of San Diego, at the southeast corner of Balboa Park just up the hill from Downtown, between Golden Hill and North Park. The main business area is along Beech Street between 28th and 30th, along 30th and Fern north of Beech up to Laurel Street, and on Juniper between 31st and Fern.

4 Make Good 2207 Fern Street, San Diego, CA 92104 themakegood.com

More info: SOUTHPARKSCENE.COM

5 Goldline 3009 Beech Street, San Diego, CA 92102 goldlinesalon.com

Photo by Luci Dumas for South Park Scene

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6 Gingerly Wax 2226 Fern Street, San Diego, CA 92104 gingerlywax.com

7 Studio Maureen & The Next Door Gallery 2963 Beech Street, San Diego, CA 92102 studiomaureen.com

8 Alchemy Cultural Fare 1503 30th Street, San Diego, CA alchemysandiego.com


local - CHAR M I N

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HOT

S P OT S

Kalmia St.

30th St.

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Photo by Garone Africa

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E S

Juniper St.

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11 6

1

10

Fern St.

30th St.

Dale St.

2209 Fern Street, San Diego, CA 92104 junclifeandstyle.com

9 4

Ivy St.

Hawthorn St.

Fern St.

To Grape St. Dog Park

30th St.

Fern St.

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Grape St.

Fir St.

10 GRAFFITI BEACH 2220 Fern Street, San Diego, CA 92104 shopgraffitibeach.com

Church

Elm St. To Balboa Park Golf

Cedar St.

Fern St.

30th St.

11 Progress South Park 2225 30th Street, San Diego, CA 92104 progresssouthpark.com

Dale St.

Photo by Chad Thompson Photography

Date St.

3 8

Beech St. 7

2

5

To 94

Ash St. Albert Einstein Academies

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Ready, Set, Sho ot! A F R I D AY I N T H E L I F E O F F O U R D I S T I N C T LY D I F F E R E N T FA S H I O N P H OTO G R A P H E R S T RY I N G TO S TA N D O U T I N A N I M A G E S AT U R AT E D W O R L D : L U C AS PASS M O RE , GAR O NE A F R I C A , H EAT H ER G I L D R O Y AN D YVES H U Y TR O U NG . In fashion photography, you are what you shoot. If you want to break out as the next Richard Avedon or David LaChapelle, you’re going to need a lot more than talent. You’re going to need the gear, the drive and the commitment to put 100% into everything you do or you’re going to fail miserably. If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to be a freelance fashion photographer for a day, read on as four Los Angeles-based upand-coming photographers share their take on the incredibly fastpaced and intensely gratifying world of fashion photography.

Written by: Corrinne Bollendorf

Designed by: Brandie Mata


art

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F eaturing E merging F ashion P hotographers

Yves

Garone

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Heather

Lucas

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Lucas

6:00 AM As the sun rises over the rusted skyscrapers of downtown L.A., the alarm goes off and Lucas Passmore tosses in his bed, still tired from the anticipated excitement of the day’s shoot. He studies the light coming in through his bedroom window, noting the shadows and flickers of dust floating in the rays of light. Passmore describes his work as mysterious, sensual and a play on light and shadow. He did not start off like most budding photographers with an amateurish camera, shooting shaky portraits of awkward family members and friends. No, that’s not his style. Instead, he impulsively dropped $10,000 on camera gear that any camera geek would die for. However, he quickly learned that fancy gear does not make a photographer. He learned that hard work and perseverance are what separate hobbyists from professionals; talent and gear come second. For the past three years, Passmore has shot photos as an editorial fashion photographer, finding inspiration in the beauty of the womanly form.

8:00 AM Passmore chugs coffee in his car on the 405 Freeway on his way to the photo shoot location. He mentally prepares himself, going through a checklist in his head of the first people he needs to touch base with once on set: the lighting crew, then the stylist, followed by hair and makeup, and lastly the models. According to Passmore, the connection and moment created by the interactions between photographer and muse must provoke an emotional response within both parties to create a compelling image.


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Garone 11:00 AM Garone Africa has been on set for a few hours, setting up in an open, grassy field near the San Gabriel Mountains. His crew already unpacked his gear and set up the lighting. Everything looks ready to go. Time to get his feet wet! He takes his camera and composes a few test shots to make sure everything is just right. Once everything is perfect, he jumps in. Africa feels one step closer to defining his artistic voice with every shot he completes. His style is edgy and a bit raw, but he’ll tell you that he’s still working on his artistic sense, chipping away at it every day. It takes practice, experimentation and relentless repetition to discover one’s own unique take on the world. He is constantly visualizing new concepts and techniques to try, feeding off his own surroundings and striving to create the perfect shot.

11:15 AM As Africa takes the first shots of the day, his adrenaline rises with every click. A naturally shy and modest guy, working as a freelance fashion photographer has taught him how to break out of his shell. ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

Photography challenges Africa professionally and personally, and how could it not? The relationship between photographer and subject is a very intimate and life-altering phenomenon.

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Heather

1:00 PM Heather Gildroy and her team just finished taking an hour for lunch. Mexican food was delivered to them so that no one had to leave the set. After tossing back some much needed food and chatting with the models and stylist about how the next four looks will unfold, Gildroy takes her camera and messes with the settings while testing the light.

1:45 PM

works quickly to get the cinematic pictures she wants, flying by the seat of her pants, feeling the moment out and going with the natural flow. Growing up with hippies in Montana, Gildroy learned to take life as it comes. It’s an attitude she developed early on in life and often reflects in her work. Her inspiration comes from traveling, the campy movies of the ‘60s and ‘70s, and Kate Moss. She would love to photograph Kate Moss one day because Moss has a versatile yet alien and wonderful face.

With the sun harsher at this time of the day, the

What is most important for Gildroy during a

lighting will have to be changed. A renegade

shoot is to stay true to the story or theme of it.

fashion photographer, Gildroy shoots anywhere

The theme is a foundation on which to build

at anytime, no permits, no limits, no fear. She

amazing images that work together.


3:00 PM

art

Yves

GB

Yves Huy Troung bobs his head along with the loud thumping music that echoes throughout the small studio. Although the day is winding down, his energy is not. There’s about two more hours left until he has to be out of the L.A. studio his client rented for the shoot. On set, his crew and the models mingle together as the loud music unites them and pushes everyone’s energy up. Troung thrives on the collaboration between the stylists, models and set designers. He got his first camera when he was 6 and has always been curious about the intricacies of shutter speed, aperture and ISO. Eventually, what started out as a hobby became a full-fledged career flip. Tired and unsatisfied with the corporate world, Troung fled to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA, to pursue his passion. Building on the skills learned as a child, he developed a strong portfolio and shared his creativity in hopes of inspiring others. In order to get creative feedback and an honest exchange of ideas, Troung feels it’s all about building solid relationships with the people he works with.

5:00 PM Troung takes a quick break to see how his images are looking on his digital contact sheet. He clicks through the hundreds of images from the day’s shoot, trying to nail down if he has “the shot” along with ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

everything else he had previously envisioned and planned out weeks earlier. After an exhausting day of working in the studio for about eight hours, he finally sees the concept, imagery, theme and feeling come together and yells to his team, “We got it!”

That’s a wrap!

6:00 PM

It’s clear that all four of these photographers share the same passions but have completely different styles when it comes to how they work towards “the perfect shot.” Each has their own way of getting to that place where vision comes to fruition through a model, location or moment. To be up-and-coming in the fashion photography industry, one has to be a self-starter, a hard networker

photos by: Colleen Ordonio

and must dedicate their life to shooting all day every day for the next decade. The career might be daunting to newcomers but the recognition and credit that comes with it is a magical thing that few will ever know.

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fashion BIKINI Kovey Top $65 Bottom $48


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ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

fashion

Photographed by: Yves Truong Designed by: Brandie Mata Beauty Director: Giovanna Avila Stylist: Francesca Roth Asst. Stylist: Colleen Ordonio Model: Makaela Sandoval

Available at GraffitiBeach.com or in-store 2220 Fern St, San Diego Ca

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fashion

(LEFT) TANK Neoclassics $34 SHORTS Chelsea B $65 DRUM CYMBAL BRACELETS Chime $54 - $56 (Right) DRUM CYMBAL EARRINGS Chime $48 TANK Neoclassics $34

buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

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BRACELET Paper Bird Creations $35 NECKLACE Paper Bird Creations $25 SWEATSHIRT MNKR $26

buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


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F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


fashion

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ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

BRACELET Paper Bird Creations $35 NECKLACE Paper Bird Creations $25 SWEATSHIRT MNKR $26 SHOES Kandals $34

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buy now

F eatured I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 2 2 2 0 Fern St, S an Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


RINGS Paper Bird Creations $20 - $25 BRACELET Paper Bird Creations $28 ONE-PIECE SUIT Kovey $130 YARN BOW (men’s bow tie) Bows by Bros $18

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F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


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fashion

(LEFT) TEE Neoclassics $36 INNER TUBE TIRE NECKLACE Beatrice Holiday $44 SHOES Kandals $34 (Middle) RINGS Paper Bird Creations $20 - $25 BRACELET Paper Bird Creations $28 14k CUSTOM HAND STAMPED NECKLACE Paper Bird Creations $55 - $75 ONE-PIECE SUIT Kovey $130 YARN BOW (men’s bow tie) Bows by Bros $18 SKIRT Gentle Fawn $54 (Right) TEE Neoclassics $36 INNER TUBE TIRE NECKLACE Beatrice Holiday $44

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BREAK AWAY

WHY NEOCLASSICS’ RICHARD BAO GAVE UP INVESTMENT PORTFOLIOS FOR LOOKBOOKS WRITTEN BY: KALLAH OAKES DESIGNED BY: SONYA CALDERON


N eoc lassics. org

“Whether you’re bound by habit, money or stereotypes, make sure you tune everything out and march to the beat of your own drum.” These words jump out from the archives of Richard Bao’s blog for his brand Neoclassics. He had recently leaped into this lifestyle for himself, leaving white-collar stability behind in order to branch out as a designer.  “I started in April 2010 while I was still working in the finance industry as a private banker/investment consultant,” Bao says. “Clocking in day and night in a suit and tie just wasn’t doing it for me anymore. The money was good and life was comfortable but my mind was on cruise control. I was completely bored.  Ever since I was a kid I’ve always been sketching and a student of art, so I figured I’d go back to my roots and give it a shot as a lifestyle.” Bao’s daring choice flowed into the creation of the clothing line Neoclassics. The clothes, which are designed against the canvas of high quality made-in-theUSA tops, stand out for themselves with their seamless blend of fresh Cali-cool and forgotten old-school. Sporting bold designs that draw from ancient myths and psychedelic patterns, there is a grungy ‘70s feel to the modern cut of Neoclassics clothing. “We pride ourselves on our creative process,” Bao says. “Most of our designs start on traditional canvas, normally hand drawn originals on paper.” The result? Clothing that looks fresh and wildly organic, as if it grew out of the sandy ground and salty air of the West Coast.

Individuality is embedded into the brand effortlessly in its look off the shelves as well as in lookbooks. Bao muses that his typical clients are a lot like himself. “They’re definitely open-minded individuals, concert-going, art-appreciating and anti-institution.” So far, the most inspiring of these fans is Michael Costello, featured fashion designer on “Project Runway All Stars.” “[Michael is] simply a gifted and talented mind in the fashion industry,” Bao raves. “When he reached out to me and told me he was a fan of my work, it really gave me a lot of encouragement.” When the season aired on TV just a few weeks later, Bao was blown away to see that Costello sincerely meant every word that he said. “He wore my shirts in almost every episode! It was awesome.” This kind of rapidly-growing success for a true artist isn’t easy. “One thing I’ve learned is that you can’t force it,” says Bao about his creative process. “I would give myself timelines and deadlines but, at the end of the day, it’s all about being in the right mindset.” Still, Bao admits there is one thing that consistently gets the juices flowing: a good soundtrack. The rebel beats of Hendrix, the White Stripes and Glitch Mob are just a few that pound in the background, helping Bao create clothing that inspires kindred spirits to march to the beat of their own drum and be unafraid to admit they want something more.

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g n i k a m written by: Crystal Washington

Designed by: Brandie Mata

Available at GraffitiBeach.com or in-store 2220 Fern St, San Diego Ca

A fleeting idea. Accruing days of vacation time. Passing on

Melanie Michaud, owner and founder of Graffiti Beach,

lattes for months to save up. Passport. Tickets. Shots. Pack.

once traveled down that path as the marketing director of

Re-pack. Itinerary. Scratch that. Map. Lose it. Re-pack again.

a swimwear company. “Since I was young, I always felt the

Goodbye kisses at the airport. A dash through the terminal

drive and passion to be an entrepreneur,” she says. “What

with a hastily packed backpack. Three movies, a mini bottle

my specialty has always been is marketing. So I have always

of wine or two, and a seemingly never-ending restless nap.

wanted to find the perfect way to start a company and utilize

Please remain seated with your seatbelts fastened until the

my skills as a marketer.”

captain has turned off the seatbelt sign. Fashion design is a difficult industry to get started in and Then finally: paradise!

marketing plays a key role, almost equal to design itself. “My experience in a mid-sized beachwear company helped

The most essential element of an anxiously awaited

me develop my skill set and also taught me that there was

vacation to an exotic faraway shore or a jaunt to a local

a major need for someone to create a platform for new

beach is the swimsuit. From the soft frothy mist where the

designers that were just starting out,” Michaud explains.

water dances with the sand to the punishing waves, there are few roads less traveled than the sea, especially where

The evolution of the swimsuit through the years has taken

fashion is concerned.

us from under- to overexposed and everything in between.


s e v a w

Photo Courtesy of PilyQ Suit by PilyQ

Recently, there has been a demand for styles that translate off

known designers are now swimwear designers.” Though a

the runways and onto the sand, as well as sexy showpieces for

challenging industry to embark upon, there is a fresh crop of

the beach bunnies that prefer to bask in the sun. The mark of

designers taking on the task, many of whom are undeniably

a great swimsuit, whether a modest one-piece or a scandalous

talented. “It all makes sense,” she continues. “Who doesn’t

barely-there bikini, is in the way it fits. No article of clothing

like seeing models in sexy swimwear, strutting their stuff down

can provoke as much fear as an ill-fitting swimsuit. With the

the runway?”

endless options and innovations, the liberated suit is now one of the most beloved pieces in a summer wardrobe and

Graffiti Beach Magazine touched base with the people behind

certainly in one’s suitcase.

four of its favorite emerging brands: Beach Riot, PilyQ, Boys+Arrows, and Kovey. Each line incorporates styles that

“When I entered the industry back in ‘07, beachwear had

translate off the pages and onto the beach. While each brand

already come a long way,” Michaud recalls. “I was lucky

varies vastly in aesthetics, they each share a ferocious drive to

enough to have a mentor that had seen the industry from

design and a love for the adventures and amazing times that

when it had just started to take shape into what it is today.

await those wearing a bikini.

While swimwear started out as being a rare commodity with same-sized tops and bottoms and a few styles to choose from,

Here’s a look into the lives and vision of the masterminds behind

now bikinis are taking center stage! Some of the most well-

Graffiti Beach’s favorite emerging bikini brands for 2013.

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N AV I G AT I N G T H E E M E R G I N G SWELLS IN SWIMWEAR WITH GRAFFITI BEACH’S OWN MELANIE MICHAUD


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Photo by James Lee Wall (LEFT) Kyla Brennan Sales Manager, Beach Riot (RIGHT) Nicole Hanriot Owner / Designer, Beach Riot


BEACH RIOT Form-fitting silhouettes, bold colors and mesmerizing prints: The designs of Beach Riot are straight off of a fashion week runway and onto the coast. Fashion forward yet completely wearable. The Beach Riot girl is both the girl next door and the It girl. She finds the latest trends boring, so she invents her own. She can remake herself on the outside, over and over, while managing to stay true to who she is on the inside. “Beach Riot is a California beach babe swim brand… a mix between contemporary chic and surfer girl,” declares Nicole Hanriot, owner and founder of Beach Riot, on the diary page of BeachRiot.com. With an existing fan base and rave reviews, the creation of Beach Riot was long awaited and sincerely welcomed by the fashion-savvy crowd. “I have been following designer Nicole Hanriot for years!” says Michaud. “Back when I was a marketing director, I loved her styles! Then, she was the swimwear designer for Tavik [Swimwear]. She, in fact, was a major inspiration for me to start Graffiti Beach.” ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

In the fashion world, unexpected and jaw-dropping styles are a prerequisite. Swimwear, on the other hand, has often been treaded upon with caution. “Nicole has always been ahead of the curve in design,” Michaud recalls. “This can often be a challenge for young designers because they have to convey their vision to buyers that are often looking for tried and true styles that are a ‘safe bet.’ I think Nicole not only creates innovative designs, but she is also able to translate her vision through her lookbooks which ooze with great style.” Hanriot’s creative and hip vision has allowed her to skyrocket as a designer in the swimwear industry. “She has made it through a competitive market and rocked the pages of the coveted swimsuit edition of Sports Illustrated and even has her line sold in Urban Outfitters,” says Michaud. “For any emerging brand, those are two huge accomplishments!”

Company name: Beach Riot Date started: 2012 Website: beachriot.coM

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PHOTOS BY Joseph Tran

Q& A GRAFFITI BEACH: WHAT MAKES YOUR LINE UNIQUE FROM THE OTHER SWIMWEAR BRANDS OUT THERE? NICOLE HANRIOT: I felt the biggest thing that separates

our brand from other swim brands is our unique prints and bold silhouettes. Our designs are bold and edgy just like the Beach Riot girl and that sets her apart from everyone else! GB: HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN IN THE SWIMWEAR INDUSTRY AND WHAT DID YOU DO PRIOR TO BEACH RIOT? DID YOU ALWAYS WANT TO BECOME A FASHION DESIGNER?

fashion school but actually dove into it in 2009 when I launched my license with Tavik Swimwear. I always knew I wanted to work in the fashion industry. I had multiple internships during college and really found what I loved and wanted to pursue during that time. I’ve always been a beach girl and live in bikinis in the summers, so designing swimwear came really naturally. GB: WHAT TYPE OF GIRL DO YOU SEE WEARING THE SWIM LINE? NH: The Beach Riot girl is a mix between your

bohemian beach babe and California surf girl. There NH: I have been designing swimwear since I was in

are styles for every girl which is great. The Beach Riot


girl is bold and isn’t afraid to rock her look from the beach to the street!

Nicole has always been ahead of the curve in design.”

NH: I grew up in Georgia and Texas. Those places

will always have a special place in my heart. GB: FOR 2013, WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MAJOR INSPIRATION? NH: My inspiration for spring 2013 was cabin fever.

It’s inspired by camping and has that whole woodsy feeling. There are a lot of animal prints, plaid and pretty ditsy florals. For summer 2013, I was inspired by one of my favorite movies, “True Romance.” That collection is very ‘80s/‘90s inspired with lots of bright neons, florals and color blocking. GB: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PIECE IN YOUR COLLECTION? NH: My favorite piece in the collection is the Puma

one-piece. It’s named after my nickname, “The Puma.” My boyfriend is a little younger, so instead of “cougar” I was tag named “The Puma.” It’s a great piece you can pair with denim shorts and cute booties. GB: YOUR DESIGNS ARE SOLD IN BOUTIQUES ACROSS THE GLOBE AS WELL AS ONLINE. WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO EXPAND TO NEXT? DO YOU WANT TO EXPAND THE LINE TO OTHER TYPES OF CLOTHING ARTICLES? NH: I would love to expand to the Australian market.

I am obsessed with their style and trends and think our suits would do really well over there! As of right now, I am just sticking to bikinis but we have some exciting collaborations coming out in 2014!

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GB: THE BRAND HAS MASTERED THE CALIFORNIA BEACH BABE VIBE EVEN THOUGH YOU’RE ORIGINALLY FROM THE SOUTHEASTERN SEABOARD. WHICH OTHER BEACH COMMUNITIES AROUND THE WORLD HAVE A PLACE IN YOUR HEART?


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PilyQ “ViX Swimwear is a household name

the art of sexiness in swimwear form,

while flattering the parts she wants

for the swimwear industry. One of

the brand branched out to offer off-

to expose, chances are you will not

the key components that have made

the-beach resort wear, footwear and

succeed as a swimwear designer.”

the brand successful—aside from the

even children’s swimsuits. The brand

With PilyQ’s precise cuts and

amazing designs—is their marketing,”

has received publicity from models

luxurious fabrics imported from

says Michaud. “Well, [PilyQ] co-owner

and celebrities adorned in their styles,

Italy, the hardest work you’ll have

Amber Delecce was the VP of ViX and

from Jessica Alba and Eva Longoria

won’t be getting the nerve to take off

the mastermind behind their marketing.

in their famed sandals to Kendra

your pareo; it’ll be working on your

She ventured off a couple years ago to

Wilkinson and Audrina Patridge in

tan. We interviewed co-owner and

team up with Pily [Queipo] to start a

their sexy suits.

merchandiser Amber Delecce on how

line that has equally amazing designs and marketing!”

to “Vive La Vida!” the PilyQ way. “But the biggest thing that makes PilyQ such a great brand is that they

PilyQ designs would fit in quite

know how to create designs that

nicely amongst the jet-set crowd. The

compliment a women’s body,” says

sensual, sophisticated pieces are what

Michaud. “Fit is what makes the

you might wear while lounging under

swimwear industry so challenging. If

a breezy cabana, sipping sangria under

you cannot design a line that helps

the Mediterranean sun. Once the sun

cover up the flaws in a women’s body

sets, all you’d need to do is throw on a chic cover-up and continue the party with the beautiful people at a posh seaside nightclub. “No one can deny that PilyQ features wearable and sexy bikinis on some of the world’s hottest swimwear models,” Michaud continues. After mastering

Photo by Jay BARTLETT Amber Delecce Co-Owner / Merchandiser, PilyQ

Company name: PilyQ Date started: 2010 Website: pilyq.com


Q& A

Photo courtesy of PilyQ Suit by PilyQ

GRAFFITI BEACH: HOW DOES YOUR LINE DIFFER FROM OTHER SWIMWEAR BRANDS? AMBER DELECCE: PilyQ strives for a designer look

with exceptional fabrics for an exceptional price. Given that the fabrics are from Italy and the details are from Spain, they should retail around $200 but we retail closer to $130 and our customers really value good quality. Also, we offer lots of padding and construction that our clients love for more security and support. GB: HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR OVERALL FASHION STYLE? DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE FASHION ICONS?

AD: I have been to Positano, Italy, four times and have

loved every trip. The clubs by the beach, the lounge attire, the beautiful boats and what people wear are

AD: We love the femininity of Isabel Marant and

just fascinating to watch. The beaches there are to DIE

the strides that are taken with Stella McCartney’s

FOR!

designs. These fashion icons inspire us, but our clients while wearing at the beach. GB: HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN IN THE SWIMWEAR INDUSTRY AND WHAT DID YOU DO PRIOR TO PILYQ? WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A FASHION DESIGNER? HOW DID YOU AND PILY ORIGINALLY MEET AND DECIDE TO COLLABORATE IN A BUSINESS VENTURE? AD: Before PilyQ, I was the VP at ViX Swimwear

and before that worked at one of the largest swim companies out of LA. I have been in swim for almost 16 years and am still learning with each season. I don’t design; I merchandise and I love it. I have always loved Pily’s style when she was the designer for OndadeMar and we met at shows, year after year. Once we both left our prior companies, we were excited to embark on a new adventure together. GB: PILYQ HAS A BEAUTIFUL GLOBETROTTER AESTHETIC. WHICH LOCALES INSPIRE YOU THE MOST? WHAT IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BEACH YOU’VE TRAVELED TO?

GB: FOR 2013, WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MAJOR INSPIRATION? AD: Pily and I traveled to Spain last year and decided

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motivate us to create something they feel beautiful in

focus on color and basics! We came up with some amazing brights and simple treatments that everyone is loving so far. GB: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PIECE IN YOUR COLLECTION? AD: My favorite piece is our solid braided gold suit.

I love simplicity and the color is amazing. It is called “Sangria.” GB: PILYQ DESIGNS SWIMWEAR AS WELL AS RESORT CLOTHING FOR OFF OF THE BEACH. DO YOU PLAN TO EXPAND THE BRAND EVEN FURTHER IN ANY WAY? AD: We currently have sandals, kids [attire], swim

and resort. Eventually we will expand into some accessories because people are asking us to, but our growth is so much at the moment we need to focus on our key categories!

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B OYS + A R R O W S There is a sweet nostalgic vibe to the world of Boys+Arrows. The designs are clean with a single bold embellishment to take a wearable piece and make it special, whether in the form of fringe, figure-enhancing ruching and twists, or an eye-catching pattern to induce double takes. It’s the bikini you wore while stealing your first kiss by the pier during that youthful spring break vacation. “This line is every boho girl’s dream,” Michaud says of the inspiring collection. “Boys+Arrows really made its name with a unique fringe bikini. Not like every other fringe bikini out there, but


This line is every boho girl’s dream.” a native-inspired design that is less ‘in your face’ and has more of a carefree style. The swimwear line features great low rise bottoms and flattering bandeaus. While I still think the fringe bikini is my favorite piece in the collection, a close favorite are the scrunch-back bottoms that are sure to add some curve to any girl’s bottom.” Meagan Scott, who hails from picturesque Ventura County, California, runs the brand with her sister Samantha, who works behind the scenes, and a dedicated band of kindred spirits. There is playfulness and whimsy down to the last thread. Even the name, which is a play on “bows and arrows,”

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

Photo by Heather Gildroy Meagan Scott Owner / Designer, Boys+Arrows

reminds you of your secret crush at summer camp ages ago. The old adage of too much work and no play creating dull boys doesn’t apply to this line, which blends a love of impulsive travel, beers and bikinis with hard work and excellent marketing to succeed. The first year alone had skyrocketing sales and the brand continues to look ahead and across the sea for the next market and the next unforgettable memory.

Company name: Boys+Arrows Date started: 2011 Website: boysandarrows.com

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Q& A GRAFFITI BEACH: WHAT MAKES YOUR LINE UNIQUE FROM THE OTHER SWIMWEAR BRANDS OUT THERE? MEAGAN SCOTT: I mean I could

Photos Courtesy of Boys+Arrows Suits by Boys+Arrows

go into the development of each piece, the top of the line materials, construction and fit, but at the end of the day, Boys+Arrows swimwear is set apart because each design is pure and original, just hoping to put huge smiles on the consumer’s face when they are creating memories staying out too late in a foreign land and sleeping in their Boys+Arrows bikini, because why take it off! We are proud to be an all-American brand whose product resembles just that. GB: HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN IN THE SWIMWEAR INDUSTRY AND WHAT DID YOU DO PRIOR TO BOYS+ARROWS? WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO BECOME A FASHION DESIGNER? MS: I have been in the swim industry

since the launch of Boys+Arrows in 2011! But I have been researching swimwear itself since 1983. Before the B+A launch, I was a buyer for an innovative boutique in Santa Barbara [California] called Blue Bee. I love everything about what being in a bikini represents. That’s why we are here. Pure love for the memories and escapades bikinis can create. GB: WHAT IS YOUR ABSOLUTE FAVORITE BEACH ON THE PLANET? FAVORITE MEMORY SPENT IN A BIKINI? MS: My absolute favorite beach on the

planet is Playa Hermosa in Costa Rica! If you go to the “tall tales” section of my website you’ll see why. Pretty much


black sand beaches, tequila and constant tunes will make you fall madly in love with this beach. Really, it’s not the beach; it’s what you do at the beach that makes you love it. I went there with ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

my then boyfriend, now fiancé. It doesn’t get better than being on a beautiful beach in a faraway land with the one you love. GB: FOR 2013, WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MAJOR INSPIRATION? MS: My major inspiration has been my own recent adventures and wild animals. I find that if I

haven’t taken a trip or caused some sort of trouble, I am not as inspired to design and create. And wild animals are just radical, so they always help out when it’s time to develop a Boys+Arrows collection. GB: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PIECE IN YOUR COLLECTION? MS: I am always a sucker for simple, so right now it’s the new “Peggy the Party Animal Tri-Top”

in charcoal or emerald and, of course, “Carm the Conwoman” bottoms. GB: YOUR DESIGNS ARE SOLD IN BOUTIQUES ACROSS THE GLOBE AS WELL AS ONLINE. WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO EXPAND NEXT? STATES? COUNTRIES? MS: Right now we are really focusing on our international sales. It’s extremely satisfying when you

get to add another country to the “stocklists” page [of boysandarrows.com]!

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KOVEY Where the sun meets the sand and the water meets the shore is where fashion meets function. When you’re chasing waves, running along the surf and playing an intense game of beach volleyball, the last thing you want is an ill-fitting suit. Kovey caters to the beach beauties who are tomboys at heart. The girls who climbed trees higher than the boys. The girls who aren’t fazed by a scraped knee. The adventurers. The thrill seekers. Those who consider battling waves in the brisk morning air, then watching the sun set into the sea by a warm bonfire, to be the definition of a perfect day.


Who needs a flattering and functional suit more than the active girl on the beach?”

Fittingly, Huntington Beach, California, aka Surf

designs were a game changer for the industry.

City USA, is home to the active swimwear brand.

“One of my favorite one-pieces for 2013 is the

“Kim Luong the owner and designer of Kovey,

‘Swimzie.’ This is a super cute one-piece with a

is one of the freshest faces in the industry,”

super low back. I think this is going to be a key

Michaud says of the line’s creator. “She caters

selling item that will help brand Kovey,” says

to the active beach girl which I think is a market

Michaud. “The ‘Swimzie’ to me is her key piece

most swimwear designers are missing. Think

that separates her from the rest. However, she

volleyball players, swimmers, surfers... the list

offers a lot of great fitting styles that will become

goes on. Who needs a flattering and functional

a staple in women’s closets this year.”

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Photos by James Lee Wall Makeup by Cathy Tann Kim Luong Owner / Designer, Kovey

suit more than the active girl on the beach?” In the past, swimwear for active girls was very limited, consisting of standard one-pieces and

Company name: Kovey Date started: 2012 Website: kovey.co

separates cut with suppressed sex appeal. Kovey’s

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buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


Q& A GRAFFITI BEACH: WHAT SETS YOUR LINE APART FROM OTHER SWIMWEAR BRANDS OUT THERE? KIM LUONG: We are an activewear and lifestyle brand that

fuses fashion and function. All our Swimzies are proudly made in Southern California. It’s just me building the brand, without any corporate or company backing. In other words, the line is not mass-produced overseas nor widely distributed. I personally designed, drafted, hand-

started surfing. With my passion for surfing, fashion and swimwear, it was just natural to want to start my own women’s surf brand. It’s not just going to be swimwear; I plan to have ready-to-wear, accessories and more for Kovey. It’s a lot of work for just one person but I love it. It’s a daily relentless fight with endless obstacles, but the battle is worth every bit when I remind myself I’m so lucky to do what makes me happy: surf and make bikinis!

cut, fit and tested all my designs.

GB: WHERE ARE YOUR FAVORITE SURF SPOTS?

GB: HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN IN THE SWIMWEAR INDUSTRY AND WHAT DID YOU DO PRIOR TO KOVEY?

KL: Flagship, Texas. Matagorda, Texas. 17th Street,

California. San Onofre, California. KL: I’ve been in the swimwear industry for seven years.

It all started when I first worked at a local surf shop

GB: FOR 2013, WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR MAJOR

in Houston when I was 17, still in high school. Then

INSPIRATION?

I worked at a Brazilian swimwear shop and later transitioned onto bigger brands and chain swimwear

KL: For my first line, I wanted it to be a representation

boutiques such as Everything But Water [in San Diego]

of my simple, clean, classic surfing lifestyle. Cheeky, yet

and Zingara Swimwear through college. I graduated from

modest.

the University of Houston with a bachelor’s degree in full-time after. I decided in order to pursue my dream of

GB: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PIECE IN YOUR COLLECTION? DO YOU PLAN ON EXPANDING THE LINE AND VENTURING INTO OFF-THE-BEACH WEAR?

starting my own swimwear line, I needed more technical skills, so I moved to California to attend FIDM [Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising]—and conveniently got to surf whenever I wanted! When I moved to California, I got an internship for a swimwear line in which I worked studiously for while attending FIDM, and later became an assistant designer right before graduating in 2012. After my graduation, I decided it was time to

KL: That’s a hard one but I’ll say my favorite is The

Surf Suit. It’s pretty much a wetsuit turned swimsuit. Speaking of wetsuits, I do plan on expanding the line, not necessarily off-the-beach (since why would you ever want to leave the beach?), but as mentioned earlier, sportswear and accessories are definitely planned for Kovey’s future!

take the plunge and pursue my dream! GB: DID YOU ALWAYS WANT TO BECOME A FASHION DESIGNER? HOW HAS THE JOURNEY BEEN SO FAR? KL: Honestly, not always. At some point in middle school,

I seriously wanted to become a fashion designer. But as any kid, my career choices changed often—crocodile hunter-Steve Irwin, scientist, archaeologist, nutritionist, you name it. Some things never changed though. I’ve always been carefree, adventurous and in love with the ocean. My obsession for swimwear started when I

Whenever an inspirational breeze of wanderlust consumes your thoughts or an impromptu drive to the nearest beach highlights your weekend, these new brands are the ones to watch this season for perfectly suiting your adventures. From Kovey to Boys+Arrows, and PilyQ to Beach Riot, these innovative designers have started a swimwear renaissance, creating not only splashes in the world of fashion but making bold, beautiful waves.

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consumer science and merchandising in 2009 and worked


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Wild at

Heart

Photographer: Lucas Passmore Designed by: Brandie Mata Hair & Makeup: Stacy Rosas Stylist: Kristina Van Dyk Model: Mia Kerr at Next LA

Available at GraffitiBeach.com or in-store 2220 Fern St, San Diego Ca


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BIKINI Beach Riot Top $76 Bottom $71 INNER TUBE TIRE CUFFS Beatrice Holiday $24 - $28 NECKLACE Ardent Reverie $38

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buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


NECKLACE Ardent Reverie $38

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ONE-PIECE Beach Riot $153

buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


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fashion BIKINI Boys+Arrows Top $99 Bottom $86

buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


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F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


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BIKINI Kovey Top $59 Bottom $48 NECKLACE Hyper Haute $40 BRACELET Ardent Reverie $25

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BIKINI Kovey Top $59 Bottom $48 NECKLACE Hyper Haute $40 BRACELET Ardent Reverie $25 DRUM CYMBAL EARRING Chime (sold as set) $48

buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


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THE

BEST - of

2013

S U MMER

J EWELRY T RENDS

Written by: Vanessa D’Amico

Designed by: Brandie Mata

Available at GraffitiBeach.com or in-store 2220 Fern St, San Diego Ca


Y

our greatest memories of summer can be seen in

pictures you’ve taken during the season. It’s the time of year when you look your best and smile your brightest, when you’re quite obviously having the time of your life. Graffiti Beach Magazine sat down with four different jewelry designers to find out what they have in store to help you stand out during the sun-kissed months. Each has their own unique taste and style, creating designs for every occasion you could possibly imagine. This year, go green with jewelry made from upcycled materials. Beatrice Holiday has a soft line of earrings made from recycled inner tubes, often shredded to look slightly feathery, and a hard line of necklaces and bracelets made from bicycle chains. When asked ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

who her jewelry is made for, owner and designer Alison Franson says, “The girl that likes accessories that aren’t the norm or the trend.” Beatrice Holiday jewelry gives off a cool and sexy rocker girl vibe. Franson’s must-have item? “I wear the Tripod Finger Harness almost every day,” she admits. “For me, it just feels natural, sexy and substantial. It’s a must. I almost feel naked without it.”

Photos by Garone Africa Jewelry by BEATRICE HOLIDAY Made from bike chain and inner tubes

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I, personally, am a fan of the clash bracelets with the smooth metal discs linked together in a chic chain-mail type fashion.” - Leslie Barrett Owner / Designer Chime Jewelry

Photos by Yves Truong (above) Jewelry by CHIME Made from drum cymbals (RIGHT)ves Truong Jewelry by PAPER BIRD CREATIONS Hand stamped with love, Customize your Necklace Online at GraffitiBeach.com

buy now

Following the same eco-

delicate look. “The cymbals

and beach cruisers,” Barrett

conscious vain is Leslie

are cleaned, cut, buffed and

says. “I’d like to think that

Barrett of CHIME Jewelry

polished to create a clean

CHIME Jewelry fits with that

who offers the clean-

and sleek finish,” shares

aesthetic during my favorite

looking geometric trend

Barrett. “When worn, the

season of the year!” Some of

popular this summer. All of

Crash earrings give a pleasant

her latest releases for summer

CHIME’s earrings, necklaces,

chime.” The bracelets are

2013 include earrings dubbed

bracelets, key chains and

made for stacking and,

Echo, Crescendo and Reverb.

belt buckles feature thin

with the musical essence

“I, personally, am a fan of

metal discs made of recycled

of CHIME’s line, all of the

the clash bracelets with the

drum cymbals. These loud

pieces are perfect for outdoor

smooth metal discs linked

rocker instruments create

events. “Summer to me means

together in a chic chain-mail

a surprisingly beautiful,

music festivals, barbeques

type fashion,” she says.

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


For your lazy summer days at the beach and by the pool, simplicity is key. “This summer, I am definitely doing more delicate gold-filled pieces, things that you can wear all day in the water and in the sun,” says Michelle Villarroel, owner and designer of Paper Bird Creations. The Costa Mesa-based business offers delicate necklaces, rings and customized bracelets. “Definite must-haves are mid-knuckle rings and post earrings,” she says. In terms of her own styling, Villarroel explains, “I love stud earrings paired with a couple of layered necklaces, thin bangle bracelets and thin delicate mid-finger rings. I also love seeing girls wear multiple rings. When

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it comes to delicate jewelry, you can never over accessorize.”

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Photo by Lucas Passmore Jewelry by HYPER HAUTE Made from hinges

buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


If your summer is more likely to be

covered sliding chain lock attached

spent walking Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue

to crystal chains that lay under the

or Beverly Hills’ Rodeo Drive, you’ll

bustline and wrap around the side of

be excited to dive into this season’s

the body, behind the arm to the back of

trend for extreme high fashion and

the collar, leaving two chains that drape

statement pieces. Erica Dunk, designer

on the shoulder blade.” Although you

of the jewelry line Hyper Haute, creates

can get these dramatic statement pieces

make you stand out anywhere. The pieces often feature a signature gold hinge, giant stones and stunning chain links. She is able to mix all of these elements together to create an eclectic but

all year round, Dunk

says, “For summer,

For summer, I usually take a little bit more of a minimal approach...”

incredibly beautiful and inimitable work of art. Confidence is required to carry

I usually take a little bit more of a minimal approach and will incorporate lighter weight materials and some easy everyday pieces.” This season, her Spinal Chic necklace and Brass Bracelet will offset

-Erika Dunk Owner / Designer Hyper Haute

your tan nicely while still giving you the edge ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

edgy looks that will

you need.

off these styles. Dunk’s favorite piece from her runway

All of these lines allow you to be in style

line epitomizes the drama of her entire

and on trend in whatever you’re doing

collection. “It is an asymmetric crystal

and at any exotic destination you choose

necklace with an exaggerated collar,”

to escape to this summer. Each designer

she says. “The collar folds over and has

is able to capture a personality in their

a hand-sewn lining of crystals made

pieces. Whether you chose a statement

from a repurposed vintage crystal purse

ring, dangle earrings, a collar necklace or

and broken necklaces. It has a crystal-

stackable bracelets, you will shine.

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Designed by: Brandie Mata

HALO BRAID WITH SIDE BUN Tutorial by Danielle ROXANNE Check out her blog at DANIELLEROXANNE.BLOGSPOT.COM

STEP 1. Make a side part. STEP 2. Tightly French braid one side. STEP 3. When the braid is 3/4 around your head, tie it off with a rubber band. STEP 4. Do the same to the other side until the braids meet. STEP 5. Hold both ends and remove smaller rubber bands.

FINAL FRONT

STEP 6. Twist hair into a bun and fasten with rubber band and bobby pins. STEP 7. Pull your braid out a bit to give it a looser look and more volume. Pin and spray.

1.

2.

3.

FINAL BACK

4.

5.

6.

7.


Photograph of Fo Porter by: Lucas Passmore Designed by: Monarose ryan Special thanks to Nous Model Management

T H E PE R FECT ST U D

d WATCH tren

WATCH WATCH

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

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“

I think what Fleet really excels at is highlighting an element of vintage...�


Written by: CRYSTAL WASHINGTON Designed by: RHOEL PAGHUNASAN photos by: Garone Africa

Dressed in Yesteryear:

F leet Collection

How friends Eileen Chai and Lisa Hsieh turned designs they’d want to wear into clothing and accessories every woman wants to wear

Somewhere between a walk down memory lane and a stroll along the Champs-Élysées is where you will find Fleet Collection. The line is comprised of whisper-soft Georgette Crepe fabrics, cleverly placed bows and pleats, and a mix of both crisp lines and romantic draping. Each piece is a statement on its own yet never detracts from the wearer’s own natural beauty. “We design things we would want to wear ourselves while ensuring the garments are comfortable, wearable and practical for women,” explains co-owner Eileen Chai of the company’s

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

Imagine that feeling that overwhelms you while gazing through an old family photo album hidden deep within a time-worn attic. Every page, delicate from age yet sturdy with craftsmanship familiar to days gone by, is dripping with enchanting nostalgia. Sepia-tinged photographs, like miniature time portals, offer a glance into a moment frozen and unchanged by the passing years. Vacations. A wedding. Well-dressed, sophisticated people smile back from the pages and unknowingly inspire another generation. philosophy. The versatile pieces are fitting for everyday wear but are a far cry from being nondescript or casual. Each hand-finished item is an excuse to dress up and make an ordinary day absolutely remarkable. “We want Fleet Collection items to be that go-to dress in the closet.” Their designs are a nod to the days of handwritten love letters and the warm hum of a vinyl record. “I think what Fleet really excels at is highlighting an element of vintage, such as a 1940s-inspired illusion neckline, and creating a balanced design that’s

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feminine, sophisticated and at the same time modern,” says Chai. The creations draw from that once-loved but since-forgotten feeling, like a vintage find tucked away in the corner of an obscure thrift shop. But while Fleet Collection achieves an unmistakable sense of familiarity and unison among the collection, it does so without predictability. “Our creative process is very organic and I believe that is reflected in the garments,” she says. In addition to the bevy of apparel, the collection also features a growing assortment of handmade jewelry, from dainty gold-filled necklaces with personalized charms to natural gemstone pendants. In an era where “bold,” “edgy” and “over-the-top” are the adjectives that dominate women’s fashion, charming chains and baubles beautifully compliment the clothing rather than compete against it, adding a sweet finishing touch to the refined, ageless clothing styles. Sewing and making jewelry in co-owner Lisa Hsieh’s small apartment in Southern California, the former UC San Diego college roommates founded Fleet Collection in 2011. “We started on Etsy and the demand for our dresses skyrocketed,” recalls Chai. “We are trying to keep up with demand by constantly designing new styles to add depth to the collection.” “Lisa is in charge of the company’s creative direction and the development of a visual aesthetic for our brand,” Chai adds. “She also takes and edits all

the photos, creates graphic design and develops our jewelry line. The both of us design the clothing and handle everything else that needs to be done for the company together.” Chai is the business guru of the partnership, directing business development and handling all of the company’s finances and operations. She also sews the finishing touches for the designs. The company, which is a well-oiled machine that blends both business and creativity, is the brainchild of a beautiful friendship. “When Lisa and I were roommates, all throughout college we’d always say that the two of us should start a company together,” Chai says of her longtime friend. “We took the leap and decided to start a clothing brand, creating things that we love but can’t find on the market. There seemed to be a void in the clothing market for beautiful garments at accessible prices and, as young women nearing our thirties, it was increasingly difficult to find age-appropriate garments that didn’t cost upwards of $100. It just seemed like the right time to create something we could see benefiting people in similar life stages as ourselves and our friends.” It often takes decades for something to be considered timeless but, in barely two years, Fleet Collection has already proven itself to be unforgettable for many years to come. Being relevant and relatable to their target audience has made them quite successful. “We’re a very new business so we’re trying to take our growth one step at a time,” says Chai.


ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

We design things we would want to wear ourselves while ensuring the garments are comfortable, wearable and practical for women.”

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LET’S GET P E R SO N A L Written by: ANDREA REITMAN Photos by: Yves Truong Designed by: SONYA CALDERON Beauty Director: Giovanna Avila Stylist: Francesca Roth Asst. Stylist: Colleen Ordonio Model: Makaela Sandoval

What do you get someone who has the newest technological

right. “Usually, if I’m lucky, I get the name stamped straight and

gadgets, the hippest clothes and shoes, the coolest knick-knacks?

centered the first time,” she says. “The slightest crookedness will

The answer, often, is to get personal.

drive me nuts!” So she stamps until it’s right.

Personalization is an ever-growing trend. Within the past

Paper Bird Creations stamps more than names. Letters, numbers,

five years, we’ve gone from “personalization” to “deep

emoticons and hearts can also be added to a personal message. “I

personalization” to “hyper-personalization.” Tees can be

usually get a lot of the simple one-name requests,” says Michelle,

personalized, teddy bears can be personalized, champagne flutes

but she also gets requests for “‘he loves she,’ ‘she loves he,’ and

can be personalized, social media pages are worse! But what if you could go one better and give Mr. or Ms. Impossible-to-ShopFor a fantastic piece of jewelry that had their name on it? Or their children’s name? Or their newly taken last name? The list goes on! Enter artist Michelle Villarroel. She had created jewelry for years but stopped when major boutique-type shops first began carrying jewelry and selling it at rockbottom prices. Figuring that she could not compete as a sole proprietor using fine materials, she started Paper Bird Creations

PBC Jewelry’s busiest time of year is during

Having something customized is unique, it’s personal, and it’s from the heart.”

in 2005 and made custom invitations,

the winter holidays, as can be expected. “I have people who order all of their Christmas gifts through me,” Michelle says, and “brides love giving personalized pieces as gifts to their bridesmaids.” Customization is also popular for Valentine’s Day gifts, anniversary gifts and as a special gift for new parents. “Having something customized is unique, it’s personal, and it’s from the heart. Whatever it is that someone wants to have stamped has some kind of meaning and history that is special only to that person.” Michelle has stamped many different sayings but the most touching one, and perhaps the most

adding personalization to the first step of any soirée. Jewelry,

important, was for a very personal fundraiser. When her best

though, was still in Michelle’s heart and her opportunity to return

friend Carmela Ocampo, nicknamed “La,” was diagnosed with

to it came with the 2005 wedding of a close friend.

cancer, Michelle and a group of her close friends got together and created a pendant stating “WE HEART LA.” Proceeds from

While Michelle was creating custom invitations for her friend’s

the sales were dedicated to funding Carmela’s treatment. The

wedding, she was asked to also make personalized bridesmaid’s

group is now branching out and is in the process of becoming a

gifts. Not long after, Michelle closed shop on the invitation

nonprofit that will provide financial assistance to patients with

biz to go back to her true love—custom jewelry making. And

life-threatening conditions.

customization was something the mall stores didn’t do.

Michelle Villarroel makes customized jewelry with heart. She has

Hand stamping is no small feat. It’s a labor-intensive process of

done many things from personalized invitations to personalized

cutting, stamping, drilling, sanding and polishing. But Michelle

jewelry. “This life was given to me to follow this specific dream,”

loves doing it and is committed to getting every stamp just

she says, “and I am 100% in love with what I do!”

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automatically personalized…for better or

even ‘he loves he.’”


Photography: Heather Gildroy Designed by: Javier garcia Hair: Wendy Diaz Makeup: Vanessa Broin Model: Elizabeth Twaits

COLOR FU L TR E N DS OF

(ON MODEL) Sunglasses Solo $74 Earrings MUKEE $26 Â Suit Kovey Top $57 Bottom $48 (ABOVE) Sunglasses Solo $74 JammyPack $48 Shoes Kandals $34 Watches Radar Mix & Match Wristbands! $34.95 each

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t r e ndwatch

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FLOWER CROWN Ardent Reverie $48 DRESS Fleet Collection $74 Photographed by: garone africa Designed by: Brandie mata Videographer: Myrrh Raguro – Chapterfold Productions Beauty Director: Giovanna Avila Hair: Wendy Diaz Model: Lily McCune

Available at GraffitiBeach.com or in-store 2220 Fern St, San Diego Ca


ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

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FLOWER CROWN Ardent Reverie $48 DRESSes Fleet Collection $48 - $74

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"A dream is a wish your heart makes." Cinderella

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

From the Disney animated movie "Cinderella"

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ONE-PIECE Kovey $130 DRUM CYMBAL NECKLACE Chime $120

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" W hat if it's not everything I dreamed it would be?" Rapunzel From the Disney animated movie "Tangled"

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EARRINGS Hyper Haute $40 DRESS Fleet Collection $68

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"Life itself is the most

wonderful fairy tale." ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

Hans Christian Andersen

FLOWER CROWN Ardent Reverie $48 DRESS Fleet Collection $48

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Written by: Alexa Mangrum

Designed by: Brandie Mata

Title: Hungry Fish Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 24” x 18”

C A P T U R E R E SO L U T I O N JUNK & PO’S KRISSY FERNANDEZ S H A R E S A PA N O R A M I C V I E W O F T H E MEANING BEHIND HER WORK For fashion photographer and visual artist

my interest,” she recalls. “I was 18 and

Fernandez traces her creativity back to

Krissy Fernandez, art is the lens by which

I realized I was an adult who could do

the age of 3 and her childhood babysitter

reality comes into focus. Her soft yet vivid

whatever the hell she wanted. My main

who happened to be an artist. “I took her

images carry a subtle complexity, evoking

goal—and I remember writing this down—

watercolor set and watched the blocks of

a mysterious quality that hints at a greater

was ‘Be independent.’”

colored chalk dissolve under water,” she

narrative.

says. “It was the first time I saw color and So, without thinking twice, Fernandez

light interact. I was amazed by it.”

Born in the Philippines and raised in Guam,

booked her ticket as soon as graduation

Fernandez moved to San Diego almost

hit. “I think I maybe had $200 in my back

But with both parents working full time,

immediately after high school. “I had a

pocket. I just thought, ‘I’m going to do it

the young Fernandez grew up feeling she

cousin out in San Diego who sparked

and figure it out as it goes along.’”

had to figure out the world on her own.


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JUNKANDPO.COM

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She became frustrated at things she couldn’t understand and, because she kept to herself, spent most of her days drawing in a sketchbook. Then, when she was 10, her parents divorced. “It was a relief but it sort of tore my existence apart,” Fernandez explains. “Since then, I’ve struggled with issues of love and religion—I grew up Roman Catholic—and the hypocrisy that exists between both. To me, art became self-therapy.” Today, Fernandez explores those personal experiences and feelings through her paintings. Much of her canvases are painted in shades of gray and feature a young woman facing the viewer. For the most part, that young woman is herself. “A figure facing front—no profile or angles—is the most confrontational stance,” she says. “That represents me confronting an experience and reliving it.”

forward-looking person Fernandez has become. “While I look at everything in a positive light now, I was an

(above) Title: Love Butter Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 24” x 18”

(below) Title: Cat Rescuer Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 18” x 24”

angry kid. I would never deny that,” she admits. “I think I would tell myself back when I was a kid to lighten up and find a little humor in everything.” Beyond her painting, Fernandez takes photos under the brand Junk & PO, a fashion and portrait photography business she launched in San Diego in 2011. The name is a play on “Jan Ken Po,” the Japanese term for the children’s game rockpaper-scissors. It represents her personal philosophy of viewing every moment in life as an opportunity for play time. Ever tenacious, the full-time artist loves to challenge herself, both in the varied mediums she uses and her ethos surrounding the work she makes. She also draws energy from San Diego’s creative community. “People are so supportive of each other!” she says. “The fact that we’re not constantly in a competitive state like other cities, the fact that we acknowledge that we’re all artists, means we’re collectively growing together. That’s really important.” A true creative spirit dedicated to her artistry, her creations are not only a product of love but for the greater community. “As an artist, you owe it to leave something behind on this earth to generations after you!”

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The melancholy in the portraits is quite a shift from the


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Written by: SOPHIA F. MCLANE Designed by: SONYA CALDERON

F E A T U RI N G S T REE T A R T IS T J OSE P H “ SE N T RO C K ” P EREZ

Joseph “Sentrock” Perez discovered his artistic voice through the sights, sounds and movement of the street. He credits hiphop culture for playing an integral role in his identity–for his name (a breaking/break dancing nickname) and for introducing him to a multisensory language of expression. The four tenets of hip-hop culture according to Wikipedia are D.J.-ing, MC-ing or rapping, breaking and graffiti–all of which provide a stylistic and conceptual foundation for Sentrock’s art. The DJ provides the sound, beats, backbone breaks; the MC calls out the spoken word that responds to the turntable truth; break dancing battles are the arena for dialogue and statement through dance and movement; and lastly, graffiti is the visual expression in color and paint that, Sentrock enthusiastically explains, allows one the opportunity to GO BIG! Line weights are thick and heavy in Sentrock’s compositions. On a larger scale, the graphic affect reads bold, clear and clean like that of woodblock prints or linocut stencil works. Sharpie sketches and cartoons evolve into strong statements on walls in colorful paint and, more recently, in acrylic on canvas or wood. The artist’s subject matter speaks to rising above life challenges, finding strength and hope. In his artwork, Sentrock also alludes to important individuals in his life as saints as a way to immortalize and honor influential people who have passed through his life.

info

Artist: SENTROCK

website: BIRDCITYSAINTS.COM


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There is a parallel between the mythical firebird

Particularly striking are the eyes of his figures. The

known as the phoenix, the name of Sentrock’s

eyes look back at the viewer in a disconcertingly

hometown in Arizona (Phoenix), and his

knowing and familiar way. They are unsettling

determination to rise up and see possibility in places

and intriguing. Sentrock doesn’t consciously assign

he lives.

meaning to the eyes he paints, though it is fair to note

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

I S S U E

that we rely on our eyes to protectively keep a watch Hooded animal heads factor frequently in his

on the world. Our eyes are the lens through which

compositions. Birds are the most prevalent. As the

we translate the physical world in addition to being

artist notes, birds have the power to fly away, fly

thought of as a mirror back into the soul.

above, to soar, to rise above their environment. It will be exciting to see how Sentrock’s open A bird’s eye view of anything means stepping back or

expression, which began out in the public domain,

up from something in order to gain perspective. From

translates to indoor venues as with new gallery

this vantage point, we are better positioned to take in

commissions and formal academic study in his newly

and consider context and a larger picture, and to see

adopted hometown of Chicago.

how our experience of a situation relates to something bigger than ourselves. In doing so, we’re able to see

He assures me he will always stay connected to

where we could go and what we can become.

hip-hop culture. He continues to dance and attend breaking competitions, though a little less often. No

Wolves also show up in his art. Pack animals find

doubt he intends to keep it real and will bring us

strength in numbers and alliance. For Sentrock, these

back out and above our limited view of the world as

animals represent strength and transcendence in the

firebirds are wired to do.

struggle for survival.

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Game On

Int r o duc i ng th e VI D EO G A M E i n s p i r e d a r t o f M r B e nja Written by: Sophia F. McLane Photographed by: Benjamin Johnson Designed by: Brandie Mata

In today’s world of hyper technology and

publications such as National Geographic

electronic social connectivity, mixed media

and Life magazine. He pastes clippings from

artist Mr Benja invites us in to a tactile,

their pages in his work because he believes

tangible, non-virtual world to remember what

that incorporating history into his art—

it’s like to play and wonder.

physically including a record of something that has happened—anchors the composition

Through paint, print and plastic, Mr Benja’s

in reality.

collage compositions give us permission and space to toggle between fantasy and reality by

His creative process involves the assimilation

layering the visual and social world of games

of visual information, allowing thoughts

with images from our collective cultural

and memories to pour out of his mind and

past and everyday lives. His motivation: the

on to a surface or sculpture. In a series he

desire to create new ways of bringing people

contributed to the 2012 art show, “Deck the

together in play.

Halls: a custom skate deck art show” Mr Benja painted and placed tiny skateboards

Drawing from a lifetime of experience

in standard picture frames. The series

playing, making and then programming

“Symbols of Life” is defined within acrylic

games, Mr Benja keeps this motivation

and magazine-collaged canvases. His most

in mind because, as he explains, making

recent works include wooden heart containers

something people can touch forces them to

(symbolic indications of a player’s health and

interact outside of a gaming console; the art

character longevity in a game) and toy art.

becomes the conduit between reality and the world of possibility.

Currently, the toy figures take the form of statuesque characters that have stepped out

Using language and source material from

of a make-believe world into ours. These

his past, Mr Benja continues to program

personality-filled avatars stand 10 inches tall

an experience. He uses images and icons

on platforms made of retired game cartridges.

of gaming, ranging from Nintendo’s Super

Collaged in attributes, these metaphoric

Mario Bros. and the gaming font of “Pac-

statues echo the worlds they represent and

Man” to the crossword puzzles and j

reflect our own.

umble/scramble creations that harken back to the “funny pages” and cartoon section of a

On creating in San Diego, Mr Benja reflects

newspaper.

that a major benefit is that he doesn’t have to make art in a particular way. There is room to

Mr Benja also draws inspiration from the

experiment in the city without anyone looking

documented worlds featured in popular

over his shoulder; a “whatever, man” attitude.

artist

Showcase

V IS IT M R B E N JA’ S N E X T S H O W C AS E AT G R A F F I T I BE A CH S ee E vent C a l en d ar at G raffiti B each. com


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m rbenja . com

This extends to how an artist exhibits his work. For

Katrina New Orleans for teaching him that the setting of

example, Mr Benja loves the intensity of “one night only”

the artwork is as important as the subject. Mr Benja’s art

events like those hosted by Graffiti Beach in San Diego’s

direction still remains subtle enough that there is room for

South Park neighborhood. He sees them as opportunities

viewers to delight in their own personal connections and

to create what he calls “poison gas moments,” a desired

assign their own meaning to the work.

GB

and all-consuming reaction by viewers. Mr Benja notes that there is an amazing freedom in the idea that his art

Experience his art for yourself. Accept his invitation to

will be seen for one night only because it gives him a no-

jump in and play.

holds-barred permission to experiment. Conceptually, he can throw the dice.

It’s all a game.

Of course, there is always thought and preparation to Mr

Mr Benja hosts quarterly art shows at Graffiti Beach. For

Benja’s meticulously programmed environment, down to

dates on upcoming shows, visit shopgraffitibeach.com/

the careful selection of the music played in the gallery. He

pages/event-calendar.

credits seeing the work of street artist Banksy in post-

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

(Skateboard piece) Grow Up and Skate (Underneath) Symbols of Life: Language (Statue) Detached from the Violence

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BIKE CHAIN NECKLACE Beatrice Holiday $24 TIRE CUFF Beatrice Holiday $24 RINGS Paper Bird Creations $10 - $20 CIRCUIT BOARD STUDS Mara Saxer $17 TEE & VEST Model’s Own


PROFILE

- Geeking Out With -

Fo Porter

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

Model Fo Porter had just turned 19 when she appeared on “America’s Next Top Model.” Like most people beginning their careers just out of high school, Fo had no idea where her life would take her. She only knew what was in front of her and somehow a reality show and a modeling career became part of the equation, giving her previously unscripted life a direction. Now 23, Fo is still in the modeling game and having the time of her life! We got to know Fo beyond ANTM and, as it turns out, she’s the woman we all wish we could be—or at least could be friends with! Crazy-fun and refreshingly geeky, Fo shares with us her life as both a model and a geek girl.

Written by: Eileen DoÑiego de France Designed by: Brandie Mata Photographed by: Lucas Passmore Stylist: Blaire Babyak Beauty Director: Giovanna Avila Hair: Soreya Yann Makeup: Aliana Moss Models: Fo Porter from Nous Model Management and Jack the Dog

Available at GraffitiBeach.com or in-store 2220 Fern St, San Diego Ca

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Q& A GRAFFITI BEACH: YOU WERE IN ANTM CYCLE 12 IN 2009. SINCE THEN, YOU’VE BEEN IN TV SPOTS AND PRINT CAMPAIGNS. HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE PATH YOU’VE BEEN ON SINCE THE SHOW? FO PORTER: I wouldn’t necessarily call it a path but a roller coaster

ride! From growing up in the slums of Albuquerque, NM, living in a trailer with my mom and little brother, to being flown to Vegas, NYC, and Brazil for ANTM, I’m experiencing a whole new world I never even imagined existed! It’s been beautiful. GB: WHAT’S BEEN YOUR BIGGEST JOB SINCE? FP: I’ve had some really amazing campaigns with print:

Abercrombie & Fitch, Adidas, Nike, Billabong. I’ve even worked and lived in Cape Town, South Africa, to shoot for Cosmo, Elle Magazine, and Glamour. But my biggest job wasn’t in print: It’s a commercial with Lowe’s Hardware that’s still airing. It’s one thing to see yourself in store windows. But commercials? That’s a whole other ballpark! Being just a pretty face and resting on your laurels is half assed and mediocre in LA. If you’ve got the whole package, there’s no telling what you can achieve! GB: HAVE YOUR GOALS CHANGED SINCE THE SHOW? FP: It’s funny to say “goals.” I had none coming into this. Three months

out of high school, I was a preschool teacher who was trying to find herself. Once I was offered the spot on ANTM, my life flipped. After ANTM, I joined Nous Models and that’s when staying true to who I am—being happy with accomplishments and remembering where I came from–was the number one goal I had. It’s easy to lose yourself with such power and vanity. I see girls and dudes lose themselves to competition, the pressure to be perfect, and jealousy. That’s something from day one I told myself I would never do. GB: HOW WOULD YOU SAY YOU’VE GROWN AS A MODEL AND A PERSON SINCE 2009? FP: Pshhhh!! I’m a completely different person from the

girl the audience watched every week on ANTM. I’m stronger with criticism, more independent, and I know what and who I want to be in life:


PROFILE

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

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PROFILE simply happy. I remember my first shoot after

With Graffiti Beach, I had a blast doing what I do

ANTM and how scared and driven to please I

best: being a geek and letting it shine!

was. Now I find myself pairing with young girls at their first shoot, working with them in a way that I had wished a fellow model had worked with me. I pass it on because I know they’re probably just as scared as I was on that first shoot. I’d like to think I have a good strong head on my shoulders. I know what’s good and what a “no-no” is now. As I progress, I’ll develop and flourish. There’s no telling where I’ll go! GB: WHAT ADVICE CAN YOU GIVE ASPIRING MODELS WHO WISH TO BE ON ANTM?

GB: WHO ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT PEOPLE IN YOUR LIFE? FP: First, my boyfriend Nico. He’s helped me

overcome some inner demons in work and life. I have a tendency to beat myself up sometimes when I feel I could’ve done better. He keeps me believing in myself and is all the family I have in Los Angeles I admire him and his strengths. I would be honored to be his wife someday.

FP: When it all comes down to it, it’s still reality

soul mate. I love her for raising me and my three

TV. It’s over the top and nothing like the real

brothers on her own, for the independence that

industry. In some aspects, it teaches you to take

comes along with that, and for her unconditional

harsh criticism, how to use your face and body, and

love for anything and anyone. She’s so gentle and

it’s one hell of a good time! A great crash course

has struggled so much to make sure we had the

for someone who’s never modeled. I’m extremely

best of everything even when she couldn’t afford

thankful for where it’s taken me. But once the

it. She raised me to have a big heart and to never

real world hits and you want to be a true model,

judge. I confide in her, telling her everything

then do like the rest and submit yourself to actual

from how stressful life gets to my sex life. There’s

agencies all over the world. You don’t need ANTM

nothing I couldn’t tell her. She’s the most beautiful

to tell you, “Yes, you are a model!” If you believe

being I’ve ever laid eyes on.

in yourself enough to submit to ANTM, then you sure as hell can take your beautiful self to any agency and do it all on your own. I’ve lost jobs just for being on ANTM. Some clients want fresh faces

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

And, of course, my mama. She’s my best friend and

GB: I KNOW YOU HAVE A SUPER CUTE DOG, JACK, THAT MADE AN APPEARANCE ON THE PHOTO SHOOT. HAVE YOU ALWAYS BEEN A DOG LOVER?

not “so-and-so from ANTM.” Sometimes clients like the idea. It all just depends on who you’re

FP: Yes and no. Jack is my boyfriend’s dog who I

working with.

adopted. My “Jacky Boy.” I love him to death! But I love, love cats! So independent and not needy!

GB: I CHECKED OUT YOUR SHOOT WITH GRAFFITI BEACH. YOU SEEMED TO HAVE A LOT OF FUN! A CERTAIN ENERGY AND SPUNK COMES ACROSS IN YOUR WORK. HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR YOUR OWN PERSONALITY TO SHINE THROUGH YOUR WORK?

I grew up with cats so it’s in my blood. I feel if you don’t like cats because they’re not like dogs, then you don’t like independent

FP: That’s 85% of how I book my jobs and

women

commercials. I’m not the skinniest model around

and that’s

by any means, but when you have personality,

me all the

clients could care less. They want you for you!

way!

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profile

Ahhh!

buy now

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


PROFILE

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

TEES MNKR $28 - $34 LEGGINGS Leg Candy $30 SHOES T.U.K. $75 - $105 ACCESSORIES: (Left) SKATEBOARD JEWELRY Mukee $26 each piece  (Middle) DRUM CYMBAL NECKLACES Chime $56 - $64 (Right) CROSS EARRINGS Paper Bird Creations $18 COLLAR NECKLACE Ardent Reverie $48

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profile GB: HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONAL FASHION SENSE? FP: Geeky. My everyday attire consists of

comic tees, comfy leggings, boots, a beret, and some hoop earrings. I like to keep it simple and cute. When I go out, I love to clean up well and shock the hell out of people! I’m all about that one signature conversation piece, whether it be my shoes or an elegant dress, something vintage or whatever to feel and look stunning. That’s what women are all about and look forward to on date night! GB: WHAT ARE SOME OF THE STAPLE ITEMS IN YOUR CLOSET THAT YOU CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT? FP: My Dr. Martens 14-

hole boots. I was lucky enough to receive a dope pair of T.U.K. boots from the Graffiti Beach shoot that I wear everyday

FP: I’m a flaming geek. There’s no “in the

closet” here! I’m a sucker for “Star Wars” and pretty much any comic. Yet X-Men is my favorite! I also geek out over “The Walking Dead” graphic novels and TV show, so much to the point where my BF and I quiz each other on what we would do if a zombie apocalypse hit the human race. We have this e-card that we laugh about that states: “Before you marry someone, ask yourself, ‘Will they be a good killing partner during the zombie apocalypse?’” GB: IF YOU COULD STAR IN A MAJOR BLOCKBUSTER SUPERHERO MOVIE, WHO WOULD YOU WANT TO BE? FP: I want to be a Jedi

who can fly. Jedi Fo

“I’m a sucker for ‘Star Wars’ and pretty much any comic. Yet X-Men is my favorite!”

would be the character’s name! GB: WHAT ARE SOME MUST-SEES AT COMIC-CON? FP: Anything and

now! My black beret, my

everything! There’s no

Wolverine X-Men tee,

way I would be able

and my See You Monday skeleton leggings.

to point out a few things to check out. If you have an interest in comics, the San Diego

GB: YOU WERE ASKED TO BRING IN SOME ITEMS THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO WEAR ON THE SHOOT. YOU BROUGHT IN AN X-MEN SHIRT. WHO’S YOUR FAVORITE CHARACTER? FP: Ororo Munroe, aka Storm. Nico and I just

rescued a little doggy off the street. She’s black as night and a badass bitch—no pun intended— so we went with “Ororo” or “Oro” for short! GB: SO WOULD YOU CALL YOURSELF A CLOSET GEEK? ARE THERE OTHER COMICS, MOVIES, OR SUBJECTS YOU GEEK OUT OVER?

buy now

Comic-Con has to be on the bucket list! The fancy schmancy folks have their art museums and cathedrals. I have Comic-Con! GB: GRAFFITI BEACH HAS A FONDNESS FOR STREET ART. WHAT’S YOUR OPINION ON STREET ART? DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE ARTIST OR STREET ART LOCATION? FP: There’s a mural [in LA] on La Brea just

north of San Vicente that I’ve admired for years now that changes every three or four months. The one thing I cannot stand, though, is the

F eature d I tem s Available at GRA F F I T I BE A CH 22 2 0 Fern St, San Diego | 85 8 . 4 3 3 . 0 9 5 0 | Graffiti Beach. com


PROFILE

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

. . . h h Psh

BIKE CHAIN NECKLACE Beatrice Holiday $24 TIRE CUFF Beatrice Holiday $24 RINGS Paper Bird Creations $10 - $20 CIRCUIT BOARD STUDS Mara Saxer $17 TEE, VEST & LEGGINGS Model’s Own

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profile I want to be a Jedi who can fly.


PROFILE (Left) BIKE BODY CHAIN Beatrice Holiday $180 SKATEBOARD EARRINGS Mukee $26 BOOTS T.U.K. $90 DRESS Stylist’s Own (Right) CROSS EARRINGS Paper Bird Creations $18 COLLAR NECKLACE Ardent Reverie $48 TEE MNKR $34 LEGGINGS Leg Candy $30

ghetto gang bombing. It’s hideous and it’s just a group of people with huge egos trying to prove they can “rep their set” in our communities when, in retrospect, it’s a waste of spray paint. GB: HAVE YOU TRIED TO CREATE YOUR OWN STREET ART? FP: When I was in high school, I used to “bomb” this

Gwen Stefani profile stencil I made. They didn’t last very long, but I think one of them is still up in my hometown! If I had the supplies and skill, I sure would make some sick art to contribute. GB: SINCE MOVING TO LOS ANGELES, WHERE’S YOUR

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

FAVORITE PLACE TO GRAB A QUICK BITE TO EAT? FP: Bloom Cafe on Pico. The best organic restaurant

ever! I sometimes just go for the Wi-Fi and the great coffee. GB: FAVORITE UNDERRATED PLACE TO DANCE/LISTEN TO GREAT MUSIC?

GB: LAST BUT NOT LEAST, WHAT IS A FETISH OF YOURS THAT READERS MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT YOU?

FP: I love Harvard and Stone on a Friday or Saturday.

It’s a really cool whiskey bar that has some amazing

FP: I am a total comic and “Star Wars” fan. I collect

bands that play.

original action figures and posters. Every time I whip out my wallet or cell phone, both decked out in “Star

GB: FAVORITE PLACE TO UNWIND?

Wars” gear, I always get the “You like ‘Star Wars’?” look. I guess being a model and being obsessed with

FP: The Silver Lake Reservoir. It’s a great place to get

“Star Wars” and comics is rare. At the end of the stare

some fresh air, go on a walk, and relax. Not to mention

down of disbelief, I get quizzed on all my “Star Wars”

there’s a really awesome dog park, too!

and comic knowledge and I live up to my geeky title.

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The stand-apart philosophies behind skate-inspired brands Mukee Design and The Continuous Line

(left) TANK JEDIDIAH SKATEBOARD JEWELRY MUKEE SHORTS SHEGREETSTHEDAY WATCH RADAR (middle) TEE CONTINUOUS WATCH SWAE SKATEBOARD BELT BUCKLE MUKEE (right) TEE CONTINUOUS SKATEBOARD BELT BUCKLE MUKEE


Written by: Emma Michaelson photography: James lee wall stylist: samia lavenant hair & makeup: ANDREIA hurley Photo Assistant: Ricardo Cuevas Designed by: RHOEL PAGHUNASAN

fashion

GB

Available at GraffitiBeach.com or in-store 2220 Fern St, San Diego Ca

I

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had an early lust for streetwear. A desire to stand out at a young age was only further inspired by my older brother and his decade-long obsession with skateboarding. Call it a phase or my way of trying to fit in with a crowd that I clearly didn’t belong to, but I began to dress the part of a sponsored rider.

The market at that time was mostly tailored for men, so the lines that carried women’s clothing were generally picked over and maintained a rather basic fitted selection. I didn’t let my lack of choices deter me from belonging to this culture, though. I worked with what I had and borrowed the rest of my attire from my brother’s wardrobe. My favorite piece of clothing was my brother’s pants—can you believe those were actually marketable? They were so ridiculously enormous that I’m not even sure how my brother was able to successfully ride his skateboard while wearing them. At the time, I was pretty self-conscious but I felt so cool wearing those pants. I felt like I was expressing myself in a way that wasn’t emotionally exhausting for my ego.

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Skateboarder

Tyler Aghas San Diego, Ca

Fashion has always been about self-expression. Some

Design and The Continuous Line—have successfully

of the most innovative trends have stemmed from

weaved the ingenuity of fashion with the art of living

an attitude of wanting to break the mold and push

an active lifestyle, specifically through the medium of

boundaries. Recently, though, the most replicated and

skateboarding.

sought-after trends reflect a more carefree and active form of self-expression.

Whereas Derek Keenan, founder and creative mind behind Mukee, began using broken skateboards as the

Skateboarding, while once a more underground

centerpieces of his designs as a way of recycling and

culture, has noticeably influenced the designs of both

reusing previously purposed material, The Continuous

men’s and women’s apparel. Designers are looking

Line got its start with a metaphorical version of

for more ways to incorporate the philosophy of active

recycling by marketing a line that reflects a lifestyle co-

self-expression into their lines, and some of the most

owners Jessie Castro, Gail Gonzales, Mike Gonzales

innovative of these minds are just beginning to make

and Erwin Abcede once belonged to.

their marks. Two such up-and-coming brands—Mukee


fashion

GB

The people who live and breathe these sports are all about being an individual...” Kim Woozy Founder of MAHFIA

The winding unbroken line used as the brand for

wear gives each piece its own unique character in its

Continuous reflects the owners’ philosophy and the

present form.”

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

(above) tee continuous (left) hat yellow 108 tee continuous Skateboard Belt Buckle MUKEE Watch SWAE

way they found their footing. “It was about finding a connection where these people and how they live

The art of skateboarding is undoubtedly centralized

validate that [continuous image],” says Castro.

around the idea of presence: riders must remain focused with what they are doing at that time. Tyler

Both Mukee and The Continuous Line believe in

Aghas, Tyriece Bovain and AmeeJay Papelera are

actively pursuing and living in the present, and that

all riders for Continuous and their styles mirror

perspective is manifested in each of their designs.

this concept.

“Being present in the moment is important to me,” confirms Keenan when asked about his brand’s mantra.

“I don’t really even consider it a style,” Aghas says.

“All these pieces have a past life because they were cut

“I’d say it’s whatever I feel like I’m most comfortable

from what used to be a skateboard. You can see all the

wearing and skating in.”

scratches that tell a story from that life, but now that

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fashion (left) SWEATSHIRT CONTINUOUS OPPOSITE PAGE (LEFT) SKATEBOARD JEWELRY MUKEE TANK JEDIDIAH (RIGHT) SHOES KANDALS

Continuous is all about never giving up and continuing to persevere.” Skateboarder

AMEEJAY PAPELERA Lakewood, Ca


When I asked them about how they’ve seen

unique and different than the general mainstream.

skateboarding influence fashion, the response was

Action sports are driven by non-conformity; there are

pretty unanimous: the lifestyle has become more

no rules to how to ride your board, which means there

popular and more people are beginning to replicate the

are also no rules on how to dress. Skateboarders like

carefree style in response.

being individuals and embrace being different which I think can translate to setting trends, not because they

“So many different types of people are becoming

aim to but because they stand out from the crowd.

interested in it,” Bovain says of skateboarding’s impact

Authentic trendsetters don’t set out to be trendsetters.

on the fashion industry. “They are mixing their styles

They just do what they do because they feel like it and

with skateboarding and coming up with new ideas for

that’s exactly what action sports culture is about.”

fashion all the time.” Mukee and The Continuous Line consistently impart Kim Woozy, founder of a crew of professional female

this sentiment into their brands with the way they

athletes, artists and action sports influencers known

draw from a culture that wants to stand apart. Their

as MAHFIA, has also witnessed how the culture of

designs are original and innately constructed to appeal

action sports is influencing the fashion industry.

to a way of life, not a specific demographic.

“The people who live and breathe these sports are all

Many challenges that a brand faces are maintaining a

about being an individual and expressing themselves

connection with the culture they are marketing for. “It’s

on and off their board,” explains Woozy. “Everything

a constant soul search for how you can adapt and react

from the way we dress to the music we listen to is

to the market and still stay relevant,” Castro reveals.

GB

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fashion

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fashion

Skateboarder

tyriece bovain San Diego, Ca


fashion

GB

tees CONTINUOUS WATCHES SWAE SKATEBOARD BELT BUCKLES MUKEE HAT YELLOW 108 BUTTON UP JEDIDIAH

Yet both Mukee and Continuous share a sense of perseverance that pushes them forward. “For years I’ve been selling directly to my customers, so I’ve had tons of feedback and I’ve learned what shapes women are looking for,” Keenan says on one way he maintains relevancy. “People have all kinds of ideas about what goes best with their sort of face, so I try and have something for everyone.” “Continuous is all about never giving up and continuing to persevere,” says Papelera about her relationship with the brand. “For me personally, the Continuous slogan is inspirational and helps me mentally to never give up when I am in doubt of myself. I just continue to move forward and believe in myself.” Looking back, I finally understand what those ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

elephant pants meant to me. Much like the stories behind Mukee and Continuous, I didn’t have to conform to a specific style and I didn’t necessarily have to understand or know how to ride a skateboard to be a part of the culture. The elephant pants represented more than a desire to fit in with my brother or a way to stand apart from the crowd. They symbolized a lifestyle that encouraged me to express myself in a way that seemed limitless.

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Artist: HENSE Photographer: Miguel “M.i.G.� Martinez / migmartinez.com Installation: Washington, DC Info: Private Commission, painted with house painT AND Aerosol

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ART I S S U E

unconventional

street art around the globe

AS THE MEDIA USED IN URBAN A R T E V O LV E S , S O D O E S S O C I E T Y ’ S PERCEPTION OF THE GENRE

Street art is visual art, either sanctioned or guerrilla, developed in public ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

spaces. This breed of artistry creates artwork in traditionally non-art contexts. Street artists don’t aspire to change the definition of pre-existing environments but rather to question the existing environment within its own language. In doing so, these artists soon find their exhibitionistic tendencies reinforced by the large scale audience of voyeurs that flock to their work in a complicated but highly rewarding union.

Written by: EriK Cardona and Melanie Michaud

Designed by: Brandie Mata

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The marriage makes sense. As a society, we like to

Such is the appeal of Alex Brewer. An Atlanta-based

watch. We like to be watched: Look up “Harlem

street artist better known as HENSE, Brewer began

Shake” on YouTube. However, a street artist’s

working in the street art field in the early ‘90s. His

medium is bolder than a 30-second video satirizing

notoriety surged alongside street art’s skyrocketing

a Baauer song with a misinterpretation of a dance

popularity and he left his mark across the United

from the 1980s. Their canvas isn’t confined to a

States and as far abroad as Spain, Japan and Mexico.

museum of arts. Instead, they use urban landscapes

He has hosted street art exhibitions professionally

and living, breathing parts of our world as the

and has scores of working credits with various

backdrop for their creations. It’s in our face, in front

industry giants including Adidas, Toyota and Sprite.

of our nose and right over our heads. They layer

But before HENSE’s fame and social acceptance,

their artistry on top of structures, creating while

there were late night sessions where nothing existed

appropriating, rarely bothering to ask permission

but the overpass, the old building, the railroad car

for their public displays. This avant-garde method

and the vigilant moonlight above. It was in these

of creation fuels the fire ablaze for street artists: the

times that HENSE brought to life the passion that

danger, the thrill, the rush, the high-risk, high-reward, notfor-everyone philosophy. Other artists prefer the solace and friendly confines of a studio. Private, personal, controlled. But street artists are different. They aren’t wooed by the thumbs-up of a teacher, a parent or an art curator. They want the eyes of the world on their creations. At its start, street art was far more

flooded his veins. The illogic of wanting to be seen but having to hide in the shadows gave way

a unique and strangely peaceful platform for the eyes and mind...”

underground and controversial.

to the large scale reward of an entire building shape-shifted by sheer imagination and steadfast will. Even HENSE could hardly wrap his head around the magnitude of the footprint he was able to leave by coloring outside the lines. Ted Elmore, a reporter from RVA News in Richmond,

Graffiti in the form of obscenities and spray-painted

VA, captured HENSE’s work best. “The works

genitals are easy to quantify as anti-social behavior. But

that result from this unfolding do not serve as

what happens when the same wall is spray-painted with

an interpretation, but rather as a presentation—

an innocent child floating aimlessly into the sky on the

an unconditional gift, an invitation with no

heels of several helium balloons? Yes, it’s spray paint

destination,” Elmore is quoted to say on HENSE’S

on a wall, but it’s also pleasant, attractive, thought-

website, hensethename.com. “HENSE’S manic

provoking. In fact, the wall looks better than it did

marks, scribbles, drips and splashes produce an

before its “defacing.” The allure of the genre was the

agitated tangle of shapes, symbols and figures that

challenge of breaking the law without upsetting anyone

offer the viewer a unique and strangely peaceful

too much for doing so and the talent and reputation

platform for the eyes and mind. His slick stylizing

of a street artist was often measured by the reluctance

may send observers on a roller coaster ride of

of public officials to paint over it. A combination of

emotions, perturbed to peaceful, angry to inspired,

talent, wit and moxie to waltz across the tightrope of

always travelling at the command of the individual’s

legality, to shape shift between criminal and creator,

own subconscious collection of experiences.”

between social hero and social scum, transformed these community vandals into Robin Hoods.

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ART H E N SE

I S S U E

Specialty: Large-Scale Murals Based: Atlanta, GA hensethename.com

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Artist: HENSE Photographer: Miguel “M.i.G.” Martinez / migmartinez.com Installation: Washington, DC Info: Private Commission, painted with house paint and aerosol

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street art Another interesting aspect to the street art movement

daybreak broke their cover. But as the street art

is the tools behind the artistry and the role of public

movement grew, so did its comprehension. Now,

perception behind the movement’s growth. There

street art is not only valued, hanging next to Monets

was a time when street art was perceived as nothing

and Rembrandts in some of the most renowned

more than glorified graffiti. Perhaps the origin of

museums worldwide, but in most places it’s legal

such thought came from the rogue, renegade style

and sanctioned. With time on their side and the

portrayed by street artists in the genre’s earlier

law off their back, the field is wide open for artists’

stages, when the hooded misanthrope snuck out to

imaginations to blister in the sun. And what once

do his devious deeds by the cover of dark sky. At

was a game that extended no further than Krylon

that time, a spray can wasn’t necessarily the tool

is inundated by a bevy of creative media including

of choice but one of necessity as these antiheroes

LED art, mosaic tiling, murals, stencil art, sticker

raced against the clock and exposure from the

art, origami wall art, wheat pasting, wood blocking,

morning sun, hustling to finish their effort before

floating umbrella art and yarn bombing.


ART

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I S S U E

M A D E M OISELLE M A U RI C E Specialty: Origami Art

Based: Paris, France mademoisellemaurice.com

(Left) Artist: Mademoiselle Maurice Installation: Paris, France Info: Spectrum series featuring origami street art (Right) Artist: Mademoiselle Maurice Installation: Paris, France Info: Spectrum Hexagon featuring origami street art

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//


ART

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I S S U E

With street art becoming more alive and present to the world around (Left) Artist: Mademoiselle Maurice Installation: Paris, France Info: Spectrum Hexagon featuring origami street art (Right) Artist: Mademoiselle Maurice Installation: Lyons, France Info: Lyonnaise small installations featuring origami street art

us, the schism between human beings and their environment has new opportunity to mend. Mademoiselle Maurice, a 28-year-old Paris-based artist, echoes this sentiment through her street art exhibits. An origami specialist, Mademoiselle Maurice seeks out the open air confines of the street for some of her more provocative pieces. The extended freedom allows her creativity to blossom far beyond the quaint quarters of her small studio workplace. Using a myriad of contrasting colors opposite dull, stagnant structural city pieces, Mademoiselle Maurice draws her audience into a world overlooked. By blending beauty and drear, she strengthens the link between nature and the individuals who form the human network we frequent every day.

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street art

Street art’s public stage is also a powerful platform for community outreach. In June 2012, Stephen Duneier showed us how to transform yarn bombing into a message to be heard on high. Together with other yarn bombers, Duneier, who also happens to be the founding partner of an investment firm based in Santa Barbara, CA, hiked up Santa Barbara’s Cold Spring Trail to the most popular eucalyptus tree in Southern California. Once there, his team meticulously wrapped the arbor attraction from base to branch in a rainbowcolored medley of yarn that would make a J.Crew sweater model jealous. The eucalyptus tree-turnedfashionista became an instant beacon for the beauty of the Santa Barbara trails and the concept of enjoying art for art’s sake, all while drawing attention to what Duneier called “the benefits of a purely analog activity in a digital world.”

S T E P H E N D U N EIER Specialty: Yarn Bombing Based: Santa Barbara, CA 12for2012.wordpress.com

Artist: Stephen Duneier Installation: Santa Barbara, CA Info: Yarn bomb for a New Year’s resolution


ART I S S U E

C RO C H E T G RE N A D E

With great opportunity comes even greater responsibility. Street artists may not be superheroes but they do voice social issues that would otherwise be more comfortably swept under a politically-safe rug. But their method isn’t to simply point out the elephant in the room, stomping, hooting and dropping land mines all over the carpet (see Banksy’s “Elephant in the Room”). It’s to ride it. Bareback. One in particular, Marcy Kraft aka Crochet Grenade, rides for Graffiti Beach. Kraft, a San Diego local and

Artist: Marcy Kraft aka Crochet Grenade Photographer: Corrinne Bollendorf / corrinnebollendorf.com Installation: Graffiti Beach – 2220 Fern St., San Diego Ca Info: Yarn Bomb raising awareness about the launch of this issue

stand out street artist, exploded onto the scene after her brilliant exposé at the Westfield Mission Valley Yarn Bomb Project. What started as a simple invitation for Kraft to share her gift with summer shoppers quickly morphed into an international campaign of yarn bombing. Enamored by Kraft’s talent and ingenuity, various artists from around the world contributed pieces to help Kraft complete her vision. In March 2013, she also bombed Graffiti Beach’s brick-and-mortar store in San Diego with an array of knitted colors, patterns and designs. She made the storefront a little easier on the eyes, helping raise awareness of Graffiti Beach’s mission to put the power of design and creativity back in the artist’s hands.

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Specialty: Yarn Bombing Based: San Diego, CA facebook.com/CrochetGrenade


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street art

M U N I C I PA LI T Y O F Á G U E D A Place: Águeda, Portugal

Artist: Municipality of Águeda Photographer: Patrícia Almeida / flickr.com/photos/vento-na-praia Installation: Águeda, Portugal


ART

S U Z A N N E T I D W ELL

I S S U E

Specialty: Yarn Bombing Based: Seattle, WA suzannetidwell.com

//

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Artist: Suzanne Tidwell Photographer: Katya Palladina Installation: Redmond, WA Info: In celebration of the City of Redmond’s 100th anniversary, Suzanne was invited to Yarn Bomb the historic Anderson Park

To call a street artist complex is to severely understate the obvious. They fearlessly toe the line between social acceptance and persecution. They thumb their nose at conventional jurisprudence, vacillating between legal and criminal behavior. When you experience their art with your mind and body racing from their maverick storytelling, you hesitate defensively, experiencing the natural wave of fear one takes on when presumptions are challenged. But rather than turn away, you venture further into the water, excited to see and experience more. On pages 124-133, you will see some of the artists Graffiti Beach feels are using the most unconventional ways to translate what street art is today. While this is only a handful of artists, we hope that after reading this article and seeing the new art world that is out there, you will embrace street art and explore what these amazing artists have to offer.

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K ELLY G OELLER Specialty: Installation Art Based: Brooklyn, NY kellotron.com

Artist: Kelly Goeller Photographer: Kelly Goeller / kellotron.com Installation: NYC Info: Pixel Pour Original was installed April 2008 on 9th st. and 2nd Ave. in NYC

Artist: Kelly Goeller Photographer: Benjamin Norman / benjaminnorman.com Installation: NYC Info: Pixel Pour 2.0 was installed on Mercer St. and Howard in NYC


ART

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I S S U E

MEGX Specialty: Large-Scale Street Art Based: Schwesterstrasse Wuppertal, Germany megx.de

Artist: Martin Heuwold aka megx Photographer: rolf dellenbusch Installation: Wuppertal, Germany Info: Colored panels that sprawl across approx. 250 square meters on a bridge to mimic legos

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LEO N K EER Specialty: 3D Street Art Based: Utrecht, The Netherlands streetpainting3d.com


ART

//

(Left) Artist: Leon Keer Photographer: Leon Keer Installation: Sweden Info: 3D street painting at Way Out West festival in Sweden

(Above) Artist: Leon Keer Photographer: Leon Keer Installation: Venlo, The Netherlands Info: 3D street painting inspired by the video game Pac-Man

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I S S U E

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street art PA I G E S M I T H Specialty: Geode Graffiti Based: Los Angeles, CA acommonname.com

Artist: Paige Smith Installation: Los Angeles, CA Info: Geode street art made as a 2D platform using paper and resin


ART I S S U E

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Artist: Dihzahyners Photographers: Nadim Kamel + Dihzahyners Installation: Beirut, LebanoN Info: Stair art from the Paint up series aimed at making Beirut brighter and more beautiful, through color

D I H Z A H Y N ERS Specialty: Stair Art Based: Beirut, Lebanon dihzahyners.tumblr.com

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Artist: Anna Garforth Installation: London Info: A moss graffiti process created by Anna searching for hidden, wild spaces around London (Right and lower) Artist: Anna Garforth Installation: London Info: COMMISSIONED INSTALLATION FOR THE LONDON FESTIVAL OF ARCHITECTURE IN WHICH PAGES OF THE YELLOW PAGES ARE FOLDED AND ADORNED TO A STEEL WALL ON WICKLOW ST.


ART I S S U E

A N N A G A R F OR T H ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

Specialty: Installation Art Based: East London annagarforth.co.uk

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street art Invader, Shepard Fairey, Os Gêmeos: These are just a few

Designed by: Brandie Mata

THE TOWN

of the internationally known street artists showcasing their

Written by: Christine Pasalo

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A LO O K I N TO T H E P A S T, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF SAN DIEGO STREET ART

work on structures in San Diego. Their pieces can be seen in Downtown’s Gaslamp Quarter, East Village and Little Italy; in the neighborhoods of Normal Heights, North Park and South Park; and even in La Jolla. To understand why they’ve chosen to become a part of San Diego’s diverse urban art landscape, one must first look back a little more than 30 years ago. The 1980s are often regarded as the decade San Diego’s street art movement began to take shape. Whether it was the NO ART stencil of a Palomar College art and photography student known as Saint Marko or the colorful lettering and characters of graffiti writers (and kings) like Quasar, Sake, Zodak and Dyse, it was equal parts talent and rebelliousness that made the everyday business owner, and occasional city official, pay attention to the voices of these pioneers. Over time, that attention morphed into appreciation and an understanding that these artists were doing something positive, something that could enhance the city, and if given the avenue to bring their art from the underground to the light of day, these artists wouldn’t disappoint. Maintaining the stage set by such legends are San Diego artists Persue, whose mentorship by Quasar during the 1980s helped him establish a style and an aesthetic that would heavily influence the skateboarding industry in the 1990s; Gloria “Glow” Muriel, whose solo pieces and collaborations with renowned artists including Persue inject a feminine fluidity and a holistic emotional power to the San Diego street art scene; and Monty Montgomery and Jason Feather of KREASHUN, whose work over the past three years has consistently taken center stage at a variety of design and fashion events, including PROJECT MVMNT and POOLTRADESHOW of the fashion trade show giant MAGIC. Persue, Glow and KREASHUN represent a small sample of the talented artists in San Diego today, inspiring those who visit and live in America’s Finest City to look beyond the purpose of a wall as a boundary maker and consider the murals on it as boundary breakers. Unlike a gallery, there are no rules to view art in the street, no timeframe, no need for hushed tones. Their art is simply there to shake us, confuse us, make us smile, make us wonder, and make us feel.


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SAN D I EG O STREET ARTIST MAP

PACIFIC BEACH

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SERRA MESA

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MISSION VALLEY

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10 1112 805

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NORMAL HEIGHTS 15

13 14 15

MISSION HILLS

NORTH PARK

OCEAN BEACH

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ARTWORK BY PERSUE

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ARTWORK BY KREASHUN

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19 5

ARTWORK BY GLOW

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STREET ART

5 6

SAN DIEGO

SOUTH PARK

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8 9 15

POINT LOMA

THE FRENCH GOURMET 960 Turquoise St San Diego, CA 92109

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THRUSTERS LOUNGE 4633 Mission Blvd San Diego, CA 92109

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Exterior mural by KREASHUN 3

1202 Kettner Blvd San Diego, CA 92101

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G St & 3rd Ave San Diego, CA 92101

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(1) Exterior mural by Os Gemeos on south wall of Horton Plaza parking structure. (2) Exterior mural by Chor Boogie located on level 7 of the Horton Plaza parking structure 5

VIN DE SYRAH SPIRIT & WINE PARLOR 901 5th Ave San Diego, CA 92101 Exterior stairwell by KREASHUN

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VISUAL ART SUPPLY 3524 Adams Ave San Diego, CA 92116 Exterior mural by various artists on west-facing wall

ANIMAL HOUSE PET STORE 2726 University Ave San Diego, CA 92104 Exterior mural by Dabs Myla and PJ on west-facing wall

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BLACK ANVIL TATTOO SHOP 3439 Adams Ave San Diego, CA 92116 Exterior stencil art on east-facing wall, unknown artist

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K St & 16th St San Diego, CA 92101 Exterior mural by Sake on the short wall behind Undisputed Downtown

3539 Adams Ave, San Diego, CA 92116

16 CIRELLO GALLERY

Exterior mural by various artists, including Glow, Isaias Crow, Topaz and Infer; starting on east wall facing Wilson Ave and continuing behind Mega Dollar 17

HIVE241 241 14th St San Diego, CA 92101 Exterior mural by Mike Maxwell

2nd story exterior mural by Shepard Fairey on north wall of parking structure 4

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2nd story exterior mosaic by Invader on the back of The Art Center building

Exterior mural by Glow 2

1250 G St San Diego, CA 92101

WANG'S NORTH PARK 3029 University Ave San Diego, CA 92104 Exterior mural by Mad Steez on west-facing wall

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HOUSE OF HAIR 3074 University Ave San Diego, CA 92104

3803 Ray St San Diego, CA 92104 Exterior mural by Glow and Maxx Moses on southfacing wall 30th St & Gunn St San Diego, CA 92104 Exterior mural by Maxx Moses, Glow, KREASHUN and others

18 2202 30th St

San Diego, CA 92104 Exterior mural by Shepard Fairey on north-facing wall

19 2219 Fern St

San Diego, CA 92104 Exterior mural by Persue, Reyes and Steel on north-facing wall

Exterior mural by Persue, Rime and Dabs Myla on west-facing wall of House of Hair in Grim Ave alley

HART LOUNGE 734 Park Blvd San Diego, CA 92101 Exterior mural by Persue, Monstrinho and Glow

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street art

Location: Bay Area, CA Photographer: Alli Bautista

info

Artist: persue

website: itsbunnykitty.blogspot.com


ART I S S U E

#19 on Street Art Map Location: San Diego, CA (South Park) Collaboration: Persue, Reyes, Steel

THE PURIST: DAVE PERSUE If you’ve walked or driven south on Fern Street just past the Juniper Street intersection in San Diego, you may have spotted her: a gray cat with green eyes and thick eyelashes dressed in a white bunny jumpsuit. She’s lying in a field awash in a colorful haze through which steely graffiti letters pop out. You may not be able to read what’s written, but she’s as clear as day. Her name is Bunny Kitty and her maker is Dave Persue. Persue (pronounced “per-sway”) helped set the ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

scene in San Diego for the purist form of street art: graffiti. Introduced to the art through San Diego’s Filipino hip-hop community, he started painting decades before the documentary “Exit Through the Gift Shop” turned the masses on to graffiti, back in 1988 when store owners were prone to view spray painted lettering as a blight on property. And, oh yeah: He hails from a planned community in San Diego’s North County. “I was raised in Rancho Bernardo of all places,” Persue says. The middle child in a group of six, Persue was mostly raised by his mother and grandmother. His interest in art was encouraged from the

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onset because being a creative professional ran in

affected me to where I stopped drawing all together.

the family. A late uncle was a fine artist and portrait

When I told her why I stopped, she was outraged.

painter knighted in Austria whose work showed

So she told the teacher what type of family I came

at the Smithsonian. Another uncle was Frank

from and if I felt like drawing on my homework, as

Satenstein, director of the American TV classic

long as the homework was done, then it shouldn’t

“The Honeymooners.”

bother her. I didn’t have any problems after that.”

“My mom likes to tell this story of a teacher telling

At 17, Persue began taking bus trips into the urban

me to stop drawing on my homework,” he says. “It

parts of San Diego to meet up with a graffiti writer


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called Peng and (illegally) paint walls in places

there was no internet or mobile phones then—

dubbed Euclid Pits and TDK yard. Eventually,

and they’d be all, ‘Wanna hang out?’”

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Persue’s talent began to precede him. From there, he was mentored by Quasar. “He’s “Peng showed me techniques that I applied to

probably one of the most important graffiti

my painting,” he explains. “Then, the kings at

artists in San Diego history and I was his

the time saw that some guy called ‘Persue’ was

protégé,” says Persue. “He pushed me. It was

doing these really interesting paintings. So, they

mentally and physically challenging to create a

started calling me at my grandmother’s place—

big piece within a certain amount of time. You’d

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street art be at a wall for nine hours straight—picking up paints, up and down a ladder—in an effort to make this very bold, beautiful statement that would echo across the scene.” And it did. As the 1990s settled in, the skate industry began to break out. Owners of thenfledgling companies wanted to infuse their brands with a street aesthetic and many turned to Persue. He designed for 8 Ball, Dub, Droors, DC Shoes, Osiris and C1RCA, and essentially helped create what is now known as street wear. But he didn’t stick around for the long haul and acknowledges that he missed opportunities in the skate industry— ownership of Osiris, stake in DC Shoes—that would have provided him a little more security today, especially now that he’s raising a daughter. Still, he considers himself rich in culture. His work in the skate industry gave him access to the nation and the world. He travelled with skateboard teams and while they were out skating, he was out painting. In this way, he built a rich network of friends and collaborators while cultivating a worldwide audience, becoming one of the most internationally known graffiti writers from San Diego. Some of the San Diego artists he’s excited about today include Sergio Hernandez, aka Surge MDR, Neko Burke and Gloria “Glow” Muriel, and his mission is to keep artists like them in San Diego. “A lot of talented artists feel they have to leave to be creative,” Persue says. “I want to create opportunities for the artists to stay.” First step? Teach store owners to invest in the right talent in San Diego. “Just because an artist uses spray paint doesn’t mean they’re going to paint something the business and the community is going to be happy with,” explains Persue who is a store

What’s rad about Bunny Kitty is that little kids, 3 or 4 years old, gravitate to the character. That’s the thing about graffiti: It bridges cultures.”


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owner himself, running HOME in SD’s North

connections. This brings us back to Bunny Kitty,

Park neighborhood with his brother, Adrian

a character Persue has drawn for 10 years. “I

Ross.

wanted to do something that people of all ages

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I S S U E

could understand and digest,” says Persue. It also requires a willingness to pay what good

“What’s rad about Bunny Kitty is that little kids,

artists are worth. “People would rather go to

3 or 4 years old, gravitate to the character. That’s

Ikea and buy some bullshit mass-produced

the thing about graffiti: It bridges cultures.”

canvas as opposed to supporting an artist that’s trying to make it,” says Persue. “They should

The Fern Street mural painted by Persue, Reyes

invest in these young artists. All of these artists

and Steel was featured on the cover of Issue 2 of

have lives that they live.”

Graffiti Beach Magazine. See the mural in person across the street from the Graffiti Beach store on

And getting there begins with making positive

2220 Fern Street in San Diego.

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THE SURREALIST: GLORIA MURIEL I met Gloria Muriel, aka Glow, at an industrial work space next to Montgomery Field in the Kearny Mesa community of San Diego. She was borrowing it from a friend to work on a commissioned piece for Solace & the Moonlight Lounge, a restaurant in the coastal beach city of Encinitas in San Diego County. “I didn’t have room at my house,” she told me. “So, I asked my friend if I could paint here. We’re doing a good trade for the space.” Expertly sawed two-by-fours of different lengths were piled up throughout the small warehouse. Apparently, the friend makes custom-sized stretched canvases for artists around San Diego. Evidence of his interest for making music was also found: A drum kit occupied a stage set furthest away from the rolled up storage door. Glow’s work in progress hung opposite the stage, on a wall next to an upright piano covered in fine

#16 on map Location: San Diego, CA (North Park) Collaboration: Glow, Maxx Moses Photographer: Teresa Hernandez

sawdust. Like much of Glow’s work, the painting is of a big-eyed girl wrapped in thick, flowing locks that both issue from and turn into elements

We sat on a towel placed on the plastic tarp set

of nature, suggesting that the girl creates and is

underneath the painting. I noticed a dry blotch of

part of a natural order.

bluish-green paint on the top of Glow’s right hand. “Ah, this is my palette,” she said as she rubbed the

“Her name is Solace,” said Glow as we looked

stained skin between her thumb and index finger.

up at the piece painted on parachute cloth. Using

“I’m too lazy to grab a tray. So, I just do it here.”

acrylics in colors Glow mixed herself, Solace stood 11 feet tall and is intended to greet patrons

Born in Mexico City and raised in Mexicali,

as they enter the restaurant.

Glow grew up around extended family. Memories of going on little adventures with her


info

Artist: glow

ART I S S U E

ISSUE 004 SUMMER 2013 // SHOPGRAFFITIBEACH.COM

We’re always moving. We’re not perfect. We’re not symmetrical.”

website: gloriamuriel.com

cousins reside with recollections of being a

“Exactly,” replied Glow as she laughed and

quiet loner who liked to get away with things.

hugged her knees. All she provided was a

In fact, she still keeps secrets.

cryptic clue. “All of those little things I did as a

“Is there something you’re getting away with

kid reflect in my art.”

here?” I asked in reference to Solace. Another aspect of Solace sometimes seen in the Glow smiled coyly. “For sure!”

girls Glow paints is the way the left side of the portrait is almost a mirror image of its right

“But the secret will stay with you?”

side. Almost.

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“We’re always moving. We’re not

include manga, particularly

Finest Charter School on El Cajon

perfect. We’re not symmetrical,”

by Hayao Miyazaki, and the

Boulevard in San Diego.

she explained.

American animated television series “Adventure Time.” “I’ve never

Because of her many ventures,

Glow moved to San Diego from

taught them anything. They’re just

Glow doesn’t attend every event

Tijuana in 2002 with her husband

on it,” said Glow. “They have very

exhibiting her work. But when she

and two daughters, but not in

good taste, actually.”

does, she’s most affected by the

search of art opportunities. “My

little girls who gravitate toward

youngest daughter was diagnosed

As she recalled leaving graphic

her art. “The new generations of

with autism,” she shared. “And

design behind in 2008 to pursue

powerful women coming up, they

in Tijuana, you can’t get a lot

art full time, the muffled whir

connect pretty fast,” she said. “It’s

of services.” So, Glow put her

of a Cessna plane taking flight

pretty cool.”

painting on hold in order to

echoed in the workroom. Today,

focus on the therapies that would

when Glow isn’t working on solo

Then there are the young artists

help her daughter. Now, she can

projects, she’s collaborating with

who approach her and ask, “Why

speak of her daughter’s autism

artists like world renowned graffiti

do you paint like that?”

in the past tense. “She’s doing

writer Pose II aka Mr. Maxx

awesome,” said Glow.

Moses, painting with the all-female

“I don’t have a good answer for

Both daughters have a flair for

graffiti writing collective Few and

that. I never do,” said Glow with a

illustrating. Their influences

Far, and teaching art at America’s

smile. “I mean, why do you eat?”


T H E M U LT I M E D I A A R T I STS : K R E AS H U N “Wasn’t the first time at Claire de Lune?” asked Jason Feather, aka JFeather, to Monty Montgomery. The artists, known in the art scene as KREASHUN, were seated in the part lobby,

ART I S S U E

part studio of JFeather’s in the City Heights community of San Diego. Together, they’ve created multimedia installations since 2010 but began going by their group name in the summer of 2011. Examples of their work, which are branded “KREASHUN,” can be seen in a mural on Gunn Street at the 30th Street intersection in SD’s North Park neighborhood (the same mural that Gloria “Glow” Muriel contributed to) and in the stairwell leading down to the entrance of Vin De Syrah in Downtown.

info

Artist: kreashun

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#17 on Map (LEFT & BELOW) Location: San Diego, CA (North Park)

website: Kreashun.com

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At the moment, JFeather and Monty were trying to

JFeather and Monty individually navigated San

remember if the first time they formally introduced

Diego’s art scene as early as two years prior to their

themselves to each other was at Clair de Lune Coffee

collaboration at Thread. On their own, JFeather’s

Lounge in North Park.

pieces share his loose and instinctive approach to art using a myriad of media—aerosol, acrylics, digitally

“Yeah, we just ran into each other in the coffee line, I

printed patterns, wheat paste—whereas Monty’s use of

think, three years ago,” confirmed Monty.

simple iconography, bright colors and black lines are inspired by his upbringing in the Blue Ridge Mountains

“He recognized my tattoo,” JFeather said as he turned

of Virginia. In theory, pulling their perspectives together

his left arm to show me a feather in grayscale lying

should create something incoherent, like mashing Play-

amongst red roses on his forearm.

Doh into pizza dough and baking it. In reality, their styles intertwine like an infusion of oil and vinegar.

“Then we started crossing paths more through shows

and mutual friends,” said Monty.

“Our whole this is merging everything as much as we can,” said JFeather. “It’s fun.”

Eventually, JFeather was asked to curate art for Thread, a travelling pop-up fashion show, in 2010 and he asked

The yin and yang of their partnership is mirrored

Monty if he would be interested in showing art at the

in their personalities. Monty has an exuberant,

event when it showed up in San Diego. Eager to have

infectious laugh and is a stream-of-consciousness

something going on besides a gallery, JFeather decided

speaker. JFeather chuckles, smiles mischievously and

to paint live over the course of the one-day show.

answers questions succinctly yet thoughtfully. This past

February, they were commissioned by MAGIC, one

“I think I did it once and then I asked Monty, ‘I need

of the fashion industry’s top trade show organizers, to

to do a 20-foot wall. Can you help me out? We’ll do it

live paint at PROJECT MVMNT in Las Vegas. At the

together,’” JFeather recalled. “We’ve done every show

end of each day, Monty preferred to kick it in his hotel

together since.”

room after spending nine hours painting the side of a corrugated shipping container; JFeather had the desire

Originally from Wisconsin and Virginia respectively,

to hit the craps tables and partake in a few cocktails.


(opposite page) #2 on map Location: San Diego, CA Photographer: Teresa Fernandez

ART I S S U E

So the way they bridge their differences largely depends on their ability and willingness to communicate. “We kind of have our own language now,” Monty said. “We joke all the time. We say, ‘Man, we need to have mics here and someone needs to record this whole process.’” “People always ask us, too, before we start a project, if we have everything planned,” added JFeather. “The only thing we have planned is the scale of it and the large image.” From there, they embrace the unknown and talk through it as they go. And they’ve been happy with

“Just looking at it, this is like Mars and Jupiter. It’s so different,” Monty said. “But having those differences is what makes KREASHUN. It’s what makes these things turn out the way they do. It would never look the way it does if it was just one of us.” It’s that shared viewpoint that informs what they call themselves and their unconventional way of spelling “creation.” “KREASHUN was just something I wanted to use and be throughout my life,” explained Monty. “To create something but not the normal way. And that’s why our brand is simple. It enables us to take it where we want to take it, from our color choices to our imagery to our thoughts. It’s truly wide open and that’s what we want to be.” #5 on Map Location: San Diego, CA Photographer: Teresa Fernandez

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each resulting installation.


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calendar

MUSIC FESTIVALS ON THE FRINGE Th e t o p t h r e e i n di e f e s t i v a l s y ou do n o t w a n t t o mi s s i n 2 0 1 3 Written by: Joel Parker Designed by: Brandie Mata Photographed by: Sam Heller / samhellerphotography.com

Every do-it-yourself endeavor has an audience that will appreciate it, whether it’s home-fermented sauerkraut, upcycled fashion or, in this case, a sustainable culture of live performance. What follows is a small taste of American independent music festivals that should not be overlooked this year. In a nation as youthful as our own, any personalized culture should be embraced openly. Keep creating your vision knowing that somewhere there are others yearning to share it.

» BottleRock Music, Food, Wine, Comedy & Beer BottleRockNapaValley.com May 8-12, Napa, CA Line-up: The Shins, Alabama Shakes, Flaming Lips, The Avett Brothers, Kings of Leon This festival will take place along two square miles of the Napa River, a memorable setting in its own right. Mix the psychedelic mélange of the Flaming Lips, a bevy of artfully crafted beer and wine, and mid-70-degree temperatures and the steep ticket price ($399 for a 4-day pass) justifies itself. That said, this event will probably be dominated by wine enthusiasts who are unaccustomed to music festivals. So be prepared to envy. Select audience members will get to enjoy acoustic performances at choice wineries with venues that include—wait for it—caverns! Still, some old Deadheads-turned-environmental-attorneys will keep things crunchy and one can guarantee there will be guerrilla grilled cheese sales and a minimum of flat brims and nitrous.


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» Telluride Blues & Brews Festival TellurideBlues.com September 13-15, Telluride Town Park, CO Line-up: Mumford & Sons, Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell, Richard Thompson, Steep Canyon Rangers This festival is held inside the historic mining town of Telluride where hotel accommodations,

» High Sierra Music Festival HighSierraMusic.com July 4-7, Quincy, CA Line-up: Primus, Thievery Corporation, moe., Steel Pulse, Leftover Salmon

late night juke joints and campgrounds are all only a few steps away from the event grounds. If you’re unwilling to exercise your credit on a pricey stay at a Telluride hotel, you can either flex your couch-surfing muscles, chance last minute price reductions on cancellations, or camp. Should you camp, be prepared for any and all types of weather since you are 8,750 feet above sea level.

town now sustains a population of about 5000. However, for the last 22 years, Quincy has politely accommodated as many as 10,000 families, freaks and first-timers attending HSMF over the Fourth of July weekend. The festival, which included everything from The Lumineers to Sound Tribe Sector 9 in 2012, oozes eclecticism in both line-up and attendees, consistently providing fertile ground for collaboration since the artists are basically “stuck” in this remote wonderland. The festival’s “artist playshops” are the truest embodiment of this sentiment. One example? A Levon Helm tribute in 2012 brought together members of Railroad Earth, Elephant Revival and ALO, just to name a few. Also, it isn’t uncommon to catch a “lower-tier” show in the early hours of an increasingly warm day and find yourself jamming alongside a performer who you may have lost your shirt and mind to a few beer-drenched hours ago.

With one stage for all acts, there is zero overlap. So once you’ve committed, you’ll enjoy a string of back-to-back performances. Beyond the music, you’ll also have the opportunity to sample Telluride’s brew. Saturday lends itself to endless pouring from 50 microbreweries, all for the price of admission. Since this takes place within the main stage grounds, it helps to stake your plot early in the day. Just remember to remain civil to the people and environment around you. The producers of the festival have taken great efforts to make composting and recycling accessible. After all, the event’s natural setting is a big part of why we show up, so treat the area like your home or better.

I love this festival so much that I’m a little hesitant to bring additional attention to it. But I figure if you find yourself inspired enough to make the trek, you deserve it.

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Nestled away in a coniferous valley in California, this gold-rushed


tunage

Written by: Hailie Stevens

Designed by: Brandie Mata

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Idea the Artist

In the Valley Below

Folk Rock/Indie Folk San Francisco, CA Idea the Artist, brainchild of Bay Area native Inés Beltranena, puts forward a dreamy, strikingly springtime-esque brand of indie folk by combining acoustic rhythms, note-by-note accentuation on the electric guitar, the nostalgic cry of violin strings and the soft, almost nonexistent (yet all-important) beat of the drums. Topped off with Beltranena’s powerful yet controlled pre-1970s country-like vocals, Idea the Artist is a breath of fresh air in the urban maze of modern indie folk. Download: The Northern Lights Are On… (Album) ideatheartist.com

Indie Pop/Alternative Los Angeles, CA Los Angeles-based duo In the Valley Below asks listeners in with a call-and-response quality reminiscent of English indie band The xx, and keeps us close with the constant building of drum machine, guitar and synthoriented instrumentation. The pair evokes a sultry and bittersweet feeling last felt on an endless summer night spent with a great love or a good friend, a sentiment that stays with you, begging to be heard again. Download: In the Valley Below (EP) inthevalleybelow.com

Nightmare Air

Bulletins

Alternative/Indie Rock Los Angeles, CA Blending dark, surf-esque riffs reminiscent of the raw days of the Pixies with the ethereal intertwining of distant male and female vocals, Nightmare Air is loud for good reason. This group has the power to cover Los Angeles in an iridescent wave of sound sure to satisfy. Download: High in the Lasers (Album) nightmareairmusic.com

Indie Pop/Dream Pop/Shoegaze San Diego, CA San Diego born-and-bred Bulletins is playful yet serious, innocent with a twinge of allknowing allure. Their keen mix of bright synth, distorted bass, raw guitar and semi-complex beats create a sound that is incomparable to anything to date. Download: “Demos” (Single) bulletinsmusic.bandcamp.com


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Branches

Alison May

Folk Rock/Indie Folk Livermore, CA Crossing at the intersection of Lucy Rose and Seattle-based the Head and the Heart, Branches sound as though they are traveling from the cold North, far from the moderate, seasonless California they call home. A certain mysticism that is bright albeit semi-melancholic can be heard with every strum of the guitar, pluck of the banjo and arch of the delicatelyexecuted vocal harmonies. Download: Thou Art the Dream (Album) branchesmusic.com

Indie Folk Oakland, CA With honest lyrics and somber acoustic rhythms, Alison May’s debut album Earnest Keep (Jan. 22, 2013) is breathy and distant yet powerfully accessible. Like the demure energy that would be created by crossing Joni Mitchell with the softer side of Hey Rosetta!’s Tim Baker, May evokes feelings of folk from days gone by while managing to retain a current taste of cunning indie style. Download: Earnest Keep (Album) alisonmay.bandcamp.com

Oh Boy Les Mecs

Lauren O’Connell

Indie Pop/Experimental Los Angeles, CA Thick with darkly sensual synth and evened out by Tracy Marcellino’s pleading vocals, Oh Boy Les Mecs places the listener into a seemingly infinite immersion, controlling every high and low with stunningly intuitive precision. Much like the union of the Knife and Phantogram, OBLM has the ability to lock anyone in for the ride. Download: “Helium” (Single) ohboylesmecs.com

Indie Folk/Alternative Country San Francisco, CA Lauren O’Connell brings back a form of folklike country that has been forgotten in recent years. With a slight hint of the Hank Williams era present in her otherwise layered and current indie sound, O’Connell tells her tales with an effortlessly melodic voice, creating unforgettable plot lines along landscapes in the listener’s mind. Download: Quitters (Album) laurenoconnell.com

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Graffiti Beach Magazine - Street Art Issue - Summer 2013 - Issue 004  

Graffiti Beach Magazine reveals emerging creatives around the globe. This issue is our Street Art Edition which focuses on showcasing unconv...

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