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Heritage assessment AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Figure 1 east elevation of house

Figure 2 location plan (Google)

CONTENTS

Heritage assessment AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud...................... 1 CONTENTS..................................... 1


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud Background ...................................... 3 Policy base for heritage assessment and management .... 3 Existing heritage status in the planning scheme ......................... 3 Environmental history ............................. 3 Statement of Significance for the Shire .. 4 Other heritage recognition ...................... 4 Consultation with the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery .................... 5

Description ....................................... 6 Integrity ................................................... 8 Context.................................................... 8

Conclusion from the inspection ... 9 Brief development history of the site ............................................... 9 Conclusion from site history ...... 10 Comparative analysis ................ 10 AM Boyd houses ................................... 11 AMB Boyd houses ................................ 12

Assessment against National Estate Register criteria .............. 13 Proposed Statement of Significance ............................... 13 What is significant ................................. 13 How is it significant? ............................. 14 Why is it significant ............................... 14 Implications of the Statement of Significance........................................... 14

Appendix 1: Chronology ......................... 15 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud historical chronology........................................... 15 Brief Bibliography .................................. 26

Appendix 2: Proposed Statement of Significance for the Mornington Peninsula Shire ....................................................... 28 Appendix 3: Report assessment criteria . 32

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Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Background This report was commissioned by the Shire of Mornington Peninsula as an independent heritage assessment of the above property.

Policy base for heritage assessment and management This action draws from the local heritage planning policy laid out in clause 22.04-3 of the Mornington Peninsula Planning scheme: Objectives that include: To recognise and apply the principles of the Burra Charter (the Australia ICOMOS charter for the conservation of places of cultural significance) in the practice of local heritage protection. To ensure that the significance of a site, involving the aesthetic, historic, scientific or social value of a place to past, present and future generations, is assessed and used to guide planning decisions. To conserve, manage and enhance identified sites and places of cultural heritage cultural heritage significance. 22.04-5 Policy reference …. Shire of Flinders Heritage Study History and Heritage (Context Pty Ltd; Kellaway, C & Lardner, H; 1992) Shire of Flinders Heritage Study Caring for our Heritage (Context Pty Ltd; Kellaway, C & Lardner, H; 1992) Shire of Flinders Heritage Study Inventory of Significant Places (Context Pty Ltd; Kellaway, C & Lardner, H; 1992 (Updated 1997))

Existing heritage status in the planning scheme The house is not recognised in the Shire of Mornington peninsula planning scheme (schedule to clause 43.01) or its referenced documents as listed above. None of the above Flinders histories deals

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with the theme of artworks or art communities on the Peninsula. Environmental history The 2008 Environmental History for the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council provides some background to the site and art community on the Peninsula under the heading CREATING VISUAL ARTS and summarised as follows: The Peninsula as an art Mecca? From early times, the Peninsula has been the favoured destination for many famous Australian artists, with many seaside locales used as informal painting schools when they were in a more pristine state. The 1999 Mornington Regional Art Gallery exhibition, The artists’ retreat: discovering the Mornington Peninsula 1850s to the present provided a catalogue of this artistic involvement with the Peninsula as described below by curator and author, Rodney James. Artists have been keen observers and recorders of the Mornington Peninsula. They have responded to the many different facets of Peninsula life: documenting the environment, the people and the way of life… Many of the artists … clearly have strong relationships with metropolitan cities and regional centres elsewhere. It is usually beyond the Peninsula that they have trained, developed professional connections and established networks of support and patronage, and developed in the formative stages of their careers. Even so, the artists attracted to the Mornington Peninsula have left us with a series of indelible impressions of this particular region. The proximity of the Peninsula to the urban centre of Melbourne and its port was an obvious destination for the art community where the land and seascapes could be interpreted and recorded to create great art. The Boyds and their associates were among the Impressionist wave of landscape painters who lived and camped at various beachside locations on the Peninsula, in Arthur‘s case starting another wave of Expressionist landscape painting that he would continue after receiving international fame. This house is referred to in the history as follows (see my bold): The titles and subjects of watercolours and sketches of Emma Minnie and Arthur Merric Boyd indicate that the artists ranged the length and breadth


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud of the Peninsula from the early part of the 20th century up until the mid 1930s. The two artists owned a holiday house at Rosebud and this became the setting for the Boyd fraternity to visit and stay. Emma Minnie and Arthur Merric had a special affection for the sea and coastal landscape - evident in the many works they produced near the family home at Sandringham in Melbourne and the Williamstown dock area. This love of dense mists punctuated by sunny breaks and the scrubby foliage of banksia and ti-tree hugging the coastal shoreline of Port Phillip and Western Port Bays can be seen in their respective watercolours, The Nobbies from Shoreham 1923 and Victorian coastline 1922… The young Arthur Boyd was a frequent visitor to the Mornington Peninsula. Between 1936 and 1939, Boyd lived in idyllic circumstances with his grandfather Arthur Merric at the latter's Rosebud cottage. It was during this time that Boyd experimented with painting techniques and learnt a great deal traversing the Peninsula on painting excursions with family and friends such as John Perceval. Much of Arthur Boyd's Peninsula work from the 1930s to the 1980s involves the layering of memory of particular locations with specific incidents, observations and associations. Laycocks Jetty c.1958, for example, depicts an area Boyd explored as a child around the Sisters headland and front beach at Blairgowrie. The role of memory in Boyd's painting also embraces sites painted by his father and grandfather up to 40 years before. Works such as Merric Boyd painting at Rye c.1960 record Arthur's memory of his father working outdoors and his own development as an artist during the years Arthur later recounted as being 'some of the happiest of my life'...

Significance of theme The Peninsula has been the destination for many of Australia's most famous artists largely because of its natural beauty and proximity to Melbourne. Unlike parts of the urban fringe, captured by the same artists, the landscape scenes painted here in the 19th and 20th centuries can often still

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be seen as they were then on the Peninsula. Implications of theme Conservation and enhancement of well-preserved artworks and their subjects, and associated documentation, with oral history programmes to interpret them, particularly the latter period. Statement of Significance for the Shire The following is taken from Graeme Butler & Associates 2008 Environmental History for the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council (see Appendix 2: Proposed Statement of Significance for the Mornington Peninsula Shire) as a proposed Statement of Significance for the Shire. The Statement of Significance provides the basis for assessment of places that could contribute to the Shire‘s cultural value and includes the following. 

as the domain of many important figures from the art and scientific disciplines;

destination for many of Australia's most famous artists largely because of its natural beauty and proximity to Melbourne. Unlike parts of the urban fringe, captured by the same artists, the landscape scenes painted here in the 19th and 20th centuries can often still be seen as they were then on the Peninsula; and

Other heritage recognition This house is not included on: 

the Victorian Heritage Register and Inventory;

Register of the National Estate or the Australian Heritage Database,

The National Trust of Australia (Victoria) register.


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud Consultation with the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery Communication to Rodney James, Senior Curator, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery has produced the following response on the merits of the Rosebud cottage (he has not inspected the place): .. From all accounts it was quite a humble little place, which in itself was very much in keeping with the Boyd family fortunes and demeanor. However, as a setting for the coming together of the Boyd family during the interwar period and the place where Arthur Boyd reputedly learnt to paint under the tutelage of his grandfather between 1936-39, it is quite significant. Along with some important selfportraits and many interesting landscapes of the Rosebud foreshore and hinterland close by, the interior of the house is depicted by Arthur in a number of works which were included in Arthur Boyd: The emerging artist: Mornington Peninsula and Port Phillip Bay, MPRG 2001 such as Interior living room, Rosebud, (1936) National Gallery of Australia, Canberra1. Rodney James was the author of Arthur Boyd: The emerging artist: Mornington Peninsula and Port Phillip Bay, MPRG 2001 and has a vast knowledge of the Peninsula and its artists.

1

Rodney James to Graeme Butler 26 September, 2011

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Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Description (The property was inspected by Graeme Butler with the owner October 2011)

w

w b

sh

carport

Verandah (enclosed)

bathroom, laundry, WC

former door

Bedroom 2

Bedroom 1 Verandah

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g.d.

V Kitchen S

FP

Living

ST

Figure 3 Approximate plan of house: with gable main roof over the two bedrooms and living room, skillion over rear: the dotted envelope is the 1920s-30s core of the building that should be the focus of any conservation actions for the place.

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Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud Figure 4 Google plan of allotments showing house site (NTS)

This is a modest weatherboard (sawn hardwood?) clad and timber framed weekender cottage typical of the informal dwellings that were scattered around the Peninsula and adjacent mountain ranges to Melbourne such as the Dandenongs. These weekenders became popular once the increase in motorcar ownership created a market for suburban escapees to journey into the wild on weekends.

Window openings on the south have bracketed timber window hoods with scalloped end boards: this may have been also the case for some other windows.

The house has a gabled corrugated iron clad main roof and rear skillion housing kitchen and bathroom facilities, since upgraded. As was typical of this type of dwelling, the main entry is directly into the living area rather than a passage or hall as would be typical for permanent houses of the period. External doors are clad with vertical v-joint boarding, with indications of Bungalow mid green on the front door. External architraves are either bullnose (added?) in section with the typical pi-sign overlapping architraves across the top of the opening, or lambs tongue profile. Internal architraves are typical inter-war lambstongue profile. Figure 6 window hoods over openings south elevation

The wall and ceiling finishes are strapped sheet with the ceiling appearing to be ply with red pine or western red cedar cover straps- these would shave been originally stained but have been painted over.

Figure 7 Living room east end, similar view to that seen in Boyd painting Interior, living room of 1936

Figure 5 front door, v-joint boarding

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Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud this verandah has been enclosed on the west side as an adjunct to bedroom 2. A concrete slab has been poured in the bathroom area and new cladding applied. The windows in the front elevation appear to have been like the remaining windows in the rear, being double-hung sash windows, but are now casement.

Figure 8 Living room west end

At the end of the living area is a fireplace (added mantle) which backs onto the stove housing of the adjoining kitchen. A red brick chimney is over this arrangement (bricks painted). Two bedrooms open directly from the living area.

Figure 10 Likely original form of double windows on street elevation with lambs tongue or chamfered architraves.

The eastern opening to bedroom 1 has been refitted with a timber framed glass door with bullnose architrave and a new opening created in the north wall (?). All of the bedrooms may have had external doors which fitted with the use as a beach house allowing independent access for a beach house group as well as easy access to the outdoors, often favoured then as `sleeping out‘ (on the verandah) in the heat of the summer. Kitchen and bathroom fittings have been added, as has the living room mantle and window pelmets. Roof drainage is new. Figure 9 Typical original internal door and brass knob furniture (into kitchen), as 3 panel with top panel glazed.

The garden setting is typical of the area, as mixed native and exotic, with one note that the old gum that once stood in the front yard in the Boyd era had been removed. Integrity The external integrity is fair and the internal integrity of main rooms good. The front verandah appears rebuilt but may have replaced a similar verandah:

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Concrete paving has been added at the rear and a fibre cement sheet clad carport in the front drive. Context The house is part of the Edwardian-era Rosebud private subdivision, sold as a beach resort estate, which is sprinkled with more typically suburban and permanent inter-war houses. The former Boyd block to the south once held a 1960s brick house but was vacant in the Boyd period: now unit development overwhelms the cottage.


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Brief development history of the site (See Chronology, Appendix 1) The following provides a history of the site's development as derived from official sources, as part the 1909 subdivision of part of Crown Portion 17 at Rosebud Parish of Wannaeue, known as the Rosebud estate. Figure 11 altered `fibro’ and weatherboard clad interwar house or beach house in Rosebud Parade, more typical of the early houses in the subdivision.

Figure 12 Google view of 1960s brick house that once stood on the formerly vacant Boyd corner block to the south. This lot now holds units.

Figure 13 adjoining unit development

Conclusion from the inspection The house is modest is befits its original intended use and has been altered in detail but sufficient contributory fabric remains to clearly express its origins and the time of the Boyd ownership. Specifically the view painted by Boyd of the interior remains unchanged, albeit now stripped of fittings and furnishings, with new detailed elements such as added light fittings and window pelmets.

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Arthur Merric Bloomfield (Arthur) Boyd was born at 8 Wahroonga Crescent Murrumbeena in 1920, the son of Doris Lucy Eleanor Bloomfield (potter and daughter of Evelyn Gough) and (William) Merric Boyd (1888-1959). The Merric Boyd family included Lucy (1917-), Arthur (1920), Guy (1923-), David (1924-) and Mary (1926). Merric Boyd was noted for his pottery produced at Murrumbeena, his best works being after his return from Britain in the 1920s and 1930s. Merric Boyd‘s parents were also noted artists, being Arthur Merric and Emma Minnie (nee à Beckett) Boyd. Many of the family members went on to become major figures in Australian art history and in Arthur‘s case internationally. The weekender may have been built, perhaps speculatively, by Sandringham builder, Edward Adolph Mattner on lot 44 of section F after he acquired the land only in 1923. However, it was Arthur Merric Boyd who was the first to be rated by the Shire as owning a house on the allotment in 1924 and had also acquired another adjoining allotment 42/F, at the Barry Street corner. Boyd was the first owner and may have commissioned the previous owner, Mattner, to build the cottage: this is highly probable given that AM Boyd had commissioned one of his previous houses at 4 Wahroonga Crescent in 1916 and appears to have no shortage of funds. The Rosebud weekender was used by the greater Boyd family (AM Boyd and Merric Boyd families) and their many artist associates from the 1920s to its sale in 1940 after AM Boyd‘s death. The Rosebud weekender was the setting for the emergence of Arthur Boyd as major painter and a place that gave great pleasure to the greater Boyd family while also allowing them to pursue their art in a rural seaside environment. Arthur Boyd has recalled on at least two instances that the period of his life he spent living in this cottage with his grandfather (c1936-1939)


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud was the happiest of his life while art observers such as Boyd‘s official biographer have noted that the artworks created here by Arthur (landscapes) showed an expressive style that lifted them above the prevailing art milieu of the time and foreshadowed his development into major expressionists works. Boyd held his first solo exhibition while living at Rosebud (1937) and was to return to the Peninsula after he had gained notoriety to recapture his memories of sketching with Merric and his grandfather. The Merric Boyd family was centred at their house, Open Country, in Wahroonga Crescent over a long period but this complex of buildings was replaced by a block of flats in the 1960s. Other buildings associated with the family included the Rosebud AM & Emma Boyd weekender cottage and their permanent homes at 4 Wahroonga Crescent and Edwards Street, Sandringham: both of these houses are protected in a local planning scheme.

cladding, timber framing and open plan, presenting as a typical weekender type as seen in other beauty spots associated with Melbourne.

Comparative analysis The house, as former weekender, aligns with many other inter-war houses that survive on the Peninsula as associated with the minor boom led a rise in by motor car ownership. Like this house, many have since become permanent homes and are now in a suburban setting. What distinguishes this house however is the historical association with the art community. The level of the Boyd family association is not matched by many other houses in the Shire, despite the role played in artistic endeavours within Australia by the Peninsula. The integrity to this period tempers the association but it is still apparent. The comparison does not include the more numerous recent art studios set up on the Peninsula. Examples include:

Conclusion from site history This cottage has historical value to the Shire for its association with the renowned Merric and AM Boyd families, specifically Arthur Boyd who became internationally famous. He formulated his painting style at Rosebud and this was to serve him as he developed into a world figure. His painting of the living room and his drawing of his grandfather sitting by the fireplaces situated at the west end of the room are both tangible links with life in the simple cottage. This association in turn fits within the significant theme of the peninsula as an artist‘s Mecca explored in the recent thematic history of the Shire.

The eccentric manners of the rustic McClelland artist complex in Palm Court, Frankston which, as built for studio and beach house uses, links directly with the Rosebud cottage and Arthur Boyd‘s painting trips with one of the McClelland family.

The historical value of the cottage is reflected physically in: 

Its fair integrity to the Boyd ownership period and original weekender use, specifically that of the living room as the subject of one of Arthur Boyd’s paintings in that period; it siting close to the beach in one of the early Rosebud private estates and in one of the key through fares of this estate, with the local cinema sited at its corner with Point Nepean Road; its small scale, gabled corrugated iron clad roof, simple weatherboard

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Figure 14 The Barn, McClelland house, Frankston, in heritage overlay.

McCrae cottage (McCrae Homestead 6 -8 Charles Street and 11 Beverley Road McCrae), owned from 1844 onwards by lawyer-pastoralist Andrew McCrae and his wife Georgiana, the house is valued as an important example of early Victorian


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud homestead, occupied by artist and writer, Georgiana McCrae. The building has lost its pastoralist setting and its original sue but has a good integrity to the period when Georgiana sketched and lived there. It is on the Victorian Heritage Register (H0291). It represents an important but different era of development and artistic endeavour to the Rosebud cottage.

Figure 16 Mulberry Hill house (Heritage Victoria)

Gareth Samson who lives in Diamond Bay Road Sorrento, is another more recent art figure on the Peninsula. He was the winner of the recent National Works on Paper award. His award-winning work Life after Bacon was done on sheets of sketching paper torn from blank books he had picked up at a Sorrento newsagent. (The Age July 8, 2006)

Figure 15 McCrae Homestead, 1844-

Mulberry Hill, 385 Golf Links Road Langwarrin South, Frankston City, on the Victorian Heritage Register: remembered as the home of Sir Daryl (1889-1976) and Joan Lindsay (d.1984) and as a place frequented by other members of the famous Lindsay family and some of Australia's most illustrious businessmen, politicians and artists. Sir Daryl was well known as an artist, gallery director and as a founder and early leading figure in the National Trust of Australia. It was also used in part as a studio by artist Rick Amor who was born in Frankston in 1948. After a short spell at Dunmoochin the Amors moved into a cottage attached to Mulberry Hill where he worked on his paintings in between carrying out odd jobs around the property for the elderly pair. His first solo exhibition was in early 1974. Among many other accolades, Rick won the prestigious McClelland Award for Sculpture in 2007, the largest cash prize for sculpture in Australia. His work is represented at Mulberry Hill, along with Arthur Boyd and many others.

Nothing is known of his house, if it was built for him or the length of tenure or association. AM Boyd houses Arthur Merric and Emma Minnie Boyd were accomplished professional painters, trained at the National Gallery School in Melbourne and exhibiting regularly at the Victorian Artists Society and elsewhere. Their houses at Sandringham and Rosebud were family centres for their grandchildren where artistic endeavour was encouraged and fostered2. Among the house associated with the AM Boyd family are: AM Boyd house, c1916-1921, 4 Wahroonga Cr, Murrumbeena, built for the family but occupied for a brief period while Merric Boyd stayed on at 8 Wahroonga Cr, Open Country (demolished).

2

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See VHD: 5 Edward St, Sandringham citation


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Figure 17 AM Boyd house, 1916, 4 Wahroonga Cr, Murrumbeena

Former AM Boyd House (c1921-1936), 5 Edward Street, Sandringham, is a Federation style timber villa constructed in 1906. It was purchased by Arthur Merric (1862-1940) and Emma Minnie Boyd (1858-1936) in 1921. They lived there with their youngest daughter, Helen Boyd, later Helen Read. . The Boyd grandchildren were constant visitors, spending Christmas holidays there, a few doors from the beach where they learned to swim. The five children of the potter Merric Boyd (1888-1959), Arthur, David, Guy, Lucy and Mary, as well as Robin and Pat, sons of the painter Penleigh Boyd (1890-1923), visited here. Guy Boyd (1923-88) was the most frequent guest as a small child, and became particularly attached to the house. Here Emma Minnie Boyd taught them all to paint: Arthur Boyd recalled her lessons in the Edward Street garden. A remnant of coastal ti tree in the back garden may have been used in these lessons. He also remembered the powerful influence of her reading the Bible to them on the Edward Street back verandah. Arthur Merric's timber studio survives in the back garden. The Algerian oak in the front garden was painted by Arthur Boyd c. 1939 and the work is now held by the National Gallery of Victoria3.

Figure 18 5 Edward Street house (1906) 2011

This house has some fond associations for members of the Merric Boyd family and for Arthur Boyd the biblical inspiration in his later work. His association with his grandparents extended to his time with AM Boyd at Rosebud so the two houses are complementary. All of the above houses are not outstanding in an architectural sense but have been protected principally for their link with the Boyd family. The Rosebud cottage has similar associations. AMB Boyd houses Arthur Boyd lived and worked at Open Country at 8 Wahroonga Crescent for an extended period: tragically this house has been demolished.

Figure 19 Open Country at 8 Wahroonga Crescent, Murrumbeena- modest weatherboard Bungalow style house, complementary to the simple weatherboard Rosebud cottage.

His association with the Rosebud house (c1923-1940) has been discussed but there was another house that Arthur & Yvonne Boyd owned and occupied at 26 Surf Avenue, Beaumaris. In 1954 Arthur Boyd had acquired the weatherboard house of Stacha Halpen at 26 Surf Avenue Beaumaris, as the first house purchased for his family: this too has been demolished. 3

Heritage Victoria citation for5 Edward Street, Sandringham

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Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud significant within the history of the nation, State or region (or locality4).

Figure 20 26 Surf Avenue, Beaumaris site of recent development

Assessment against National Estate Register criteria (See Appendix 3: Report assessment criteria) The following is an assessment against relevant criteria evolved for the National Estate Register (NER) that forms the basis of a provisional Statement of Significance. A.4 Importance for association with event, developments or cultural phases which have had a significant role in the human occupation and evolution of the nation, State, or community. The Rosebud cottage reflects a significant phase of the Peninsula‘s history when because of its natural beauty and its proximity to Melbourne it became an art Mecca for some of Australia‘s most important landscape painters who erected or rented beach houses or weekenders or camped on the beach front to facilitate their art. B.2 Importance in demonstrating a distinctive way of life, custom, process, land use, function or design no longer practised, in danger of being lost, or of exceptional interest. The cottage has significance to Rosebud as an early example of one of the first wave of weekenders to be built in the area at the end of World War One and the beginning of widespread car ownership and the consequent ease of travel to reach rural beauty spots such as the Peninsula or the Dandenongs. This type of temporary house was the start of today‘s urban development.

Rosebud cottage is significant at least within the Mornington Peninsula because of its close link wit the Merric Boyd family and their associates, AM & Minnie Boyd and the internationally famous painter, Arthur Boyd. No other surviving building has such a close association given that all of the other houses where Arthur Boyd lived and worked have been demolished and Boyd‘s own nostalgia for the time spent there and the observation by art critics that the work he produced there was a major step in his development as a painter and distinctive among other painters of the time..

Proposed Statement of Significance What is significant The weekender at 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud was first rated to the painter Arthur Merric Boyd as owning a house on the allotment in 1924, with an adjoining allotment, at the Barry Street corner. The Rosebud weekender was used by the greater Boyd family (AM Boyd and Merric Boyd families) and their many artist associates from the 1920s to its sale in 1940 after AM Boyd‘s death. The Rosebud weekender was the setting for the emergence of Arthur Boyd as major painter and a place that gave great pleasure to the greater Boyd family while also allowing them to pursue their art in a rural seaside environment. Arthur Boyd has recalled on at least two instances that the period of his life he spent living in this cottage with his grandfather (c1936-1939) was the happiest of his life while art observers such as Boyd‘s official biographer have noted that the artworks created here by Arthur (landscapes) showed an expressive style that lifted them above the prevailing art milieu of the time and foreshadowed his development into major expressionists works. Boyd held his first solo exhibition while living at Rosebud (1937) and was to return to the Peninsula after he had gained notoriety to recapture his memories of sketching with Merric and his grandfather.

H.1 Importance for close associations with individuals whose activities have been 4

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my inclusion


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud The Merric Boyd family was centred at their house, Open Country, in Wahroonga Crescent over a long period but this complex of buildings was replaced by a block of flats in the 1960s. The historical value of the cottage is reflected physically in: 

Its fair integrity to the Boyd ownership period and original weekender use, specifically that of the living room as the subject of one of Arthur Boyd’s paintings in that period; it siting close to the beach in one of the early Rosebud private estates and in one of the key through fares of this estate, with the local cinema sited at its corner with Point Nepean Road; and its small scale, gabled corrugated iron clad roof, simple weatherboard cladding, timber framing and open plan, presenting as a typical weekender type as seen in other beauty spots associated with Melbourne

How is it significant? The weekender at 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud is historically significant to the Mornington Peninsula. Why is it significant The weekender at 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud is locally significant because: Historically The Rosebud cottage reflects a significant phase of the Peninsula‘s history when because of its natural beauty and its proximity to Melbourne the Peninsula became an art Mecca for some of Australia‘s most important landscape painters who erected or rented beach houses or weekenders in the area or camped on the beach front to facilitate their art. The cottage has significance to Rosebud as an early example of one of the first wave of weekenders to be built in the area at the end of World War One and the beginning of widespread car ownership and the consequent ease of travel to reach rural beauty spots such as the Peninsula or the Dandenongs. This type of temporary house was the start of today‘s urban development.

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Rosebud cottage is significant at least within the Mornington Peninsula because of its close link wit the Merric Boyd family and their associates, AM & Minnie Boyd and the internationally famous painter, Arthur Boyd. No other surviving building has such a close association given that all of the other houses where Arthur Boyd lived and worked have been demolished and Boyd‘s own nostalgia for the time spent there and the observation by art critics that the work he produced there was a major step in his development as a painter and distinctive among other painters of the time. Implications of the Statement of Significance Conservation and enhancement of the above values. The house should be entered on the schedule to clause 43.01 of the planning scheme with paint and interior control (living room only), with emphasis on fabric from the 1920s-30s (see Figure 3) and any later fabric that visually relates to that period.


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Appendix 1: Chronology 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud historical chronology Summarising the events surrounding the house:  Built by contractor Edward Mattner in 1923 probably speculatively but perhaps for Boyd on lots 42 and 44/F Rosebud Estate;  Sold to artists AMB Boyd soon after completion as a weekender (1920s-), with the AMB Boyd family still owning and using the house at 5 Edward St;  Used as main residence (c1936-39) and painting base ( c1923-1939) by AM Boyd, and the home of grandson, Arthur MB Boyd for this time;  Look upon by Arthur MB Boyd in 1986 as the key formative period in his pursuit of painting as a profession;  Sold after AM Boyd’s death in 1940;  The only residence closely associated with Arthur Boyd to survive in Victoria and  With the demolition of 26 Surf Avenue, Beaumaris and The Grange (a’Beckett- Boyd) one of the few structures to reflect the a’Beckett-- Boyd family history within the state. Date

Event

Source

1860

After, a‘Beckett family settled at The Grange in Harkaway in the 1860s. One of Emma a‘Beckett‘s daughters, Minnie a‘Beckett, married into the Boyd family, .. Emma‘s grandson, Martin Boyd, recalled the area in his book ‗The Cardboard Crown‘ and later lived at The Grange commissioning his nephew Arthur Boyd to paint a mural there (since demolished but the mural saved by Dr Joseph Brown). This also began an association with rural estates around the deg of Melbourne for the a‘Beckett family and their descendents.

Casey Heritage Study 2004: 13

1871

Rosebud government township survey, all 31 blocks sold by 1874

Moresby

1874

McCrae or Eastern Shore lighthouse built

Moresby

1884

Rosebud State School erected

Moresby

1886

Arthur Merric Boyd married Emma Minnie à Beckett, artist (daughter of the renowned barrister William Arthur à Beckett and his wife Emma); they settled at Brighton but later travelled to England living at the à Beckett seat, Penleigh House, near Westbury, Wiltshire. They both exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1891, the moved to Paris and then to Melbourne in 1894 when they lived at Sandringham

ADB: AM Boyd

1888

Rosebud government jetty erected, rebuilt nearby 1940

Moresby

1898

Arthur Merric Boyd & Emma Minnie à Beckett works included in the Exhibition of Australian Art in London at the Grafton Galleries 1898. Arthur exhibited regularly with the Victorian Artists' Society, with some of his best work painted in Tasmania.

Victoria Heritage Database (VHD) citation for 5 Edward Street; Niall: 76

1898

Major Arthur Haywood St. Thomas a‘Beckett (1868-1939), had BALLANTRAE 190 a‘Beckett Road, Bunyip. He was the youngest son of the Hon. William Arthur C. a‘Beckett, a solicitor, and the grandson of the Chief Justice of Victoria.

Graeme Butler & Associates Cardinia

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Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event

Source Shire Heritage Study, 1996: 27

1903

Arthur Merric Boyd (Arthur‘s grandfather) listed at Bay Rd . Sandringham with wife Emma

ER1903

1909

PLAN OF SUBDIVISION OF PART OF CROWN PORTION 17 AT ROSEBUD PARISH OF WANNAEUE COUNTY OF MORNINGTON VOL 3352 FOL 336 (Lodged Plan 5134)

VTO

This estate contained Spray, Foam, ocean and Rosebud as street names. 1912

Thomas Walter Wilson, a military clerk of 6 St Vincent Place North, Albert Park (part of the 1870s Buckingham Terrace) purchased the land where 62 Rosebud Parade exists today, being lot 44 of Block F (125x41 feet).

VTO

1913

Plein air artists, Arthur and Minnie Boyd purchased lots 11, 12 & 14 and built a brick Federation Bungalow style house at 4 Wahroonga Crescent in 1915 but in 1913 purchased land and erected a weatherboard house at 8 Wahroonga Crescent, Murrumbeena for their son Merric (then aged 25): this was to become Merric‘s son, Arthur Boyd‘s home and studio (named Open Country as its setting was then) along with the greater Merric Boyd family and their associates. By then Merric had shown aptitude in pottery and the land held good deposits of clay. Arthur and Minnie lived next door.

Bungey: 2-; Heritage Overlay 143 Heritage Study Glen Eira – City of Glen Eira Heritage Management Plan, Andrew Ward, Architectural Historian, 1996 citation: cites Caulfield City Rate Books: 191516,191617,191819,1927-28.

Merric built a simple weatherboard Bungalow with, at its centre, the Brown Room where the extended family spent most of their time. The house had two bedrooms, a kitchen, bathroom and laundry and a studio, kilns and workshop in the garden. Merric used the clay out from the site mixed his own glazes.

1914

Edward Adolph Mattner listed as a contractor in electoral rolls, later rolls have him as labourer

ER1914 Dromana

1914

A.M.Boyd listed at 86 Esplanade, Brighton

ER1914

1915

1915-1918 Merric and Doris also an accomplished artist built up a ceramics business at 8 Wahroonga Crescent, Murrumbeena. The properties on either side were owned by Merric‘s parents Arthur and Minnie, and Doris‘ mother, Evelyn Gough (Granny Gough). Evelyn spent her last years living at Open Country with Merric and Doris Boyd.

Bungey ABC dynasties archives

The land at number 6 (between number 8 and the Arthur Merric Boyd house) was later sold to their neighbours the Hurleys who built a tennis court there but it was later sold to a builder who built a house on it. 1915

October 13 Doris Lucy Eleanor Bloomfield Gough (potter) married (William) Merric Boyd.

See Bungey: 3

1916

Evelyn Gough (Arthur‘s maternal grandmother) resides at Green

Flinders

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 16


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event Pastures, Wahroonga Crescent, Murrumbeena, also with a block at Rosebud since c1905. Remains so into the 1920s. Evelyn Gough is said to have had `a rare understanding of epilepsy and was closely involved in the treatment of epileptics across Melbourne‘: Merric was an epileptic.

Source Shire RB cited by Ray Gibb

1919

A.M.Boyd listed at Tralee Wahroonga Crescent., Murrumbeena

ER1919

1920

Arthur Merric Bloomfield Boyd born 8 Wahroonga Crescent Murrumbeena, 24 July, son of Doris Lucy Eleanor Bloomfield Gough (potter and daughter of Evelyn Gough) and (William) Merric Boyd (1888-1959, also brother of Theodore Penleigh Boyd 1890-1923, artist). The Merric Boyd family include Lucy (1917-), Arthur (1920-), Guy (1923-), David (1924-) and Mary (1926). Merric Boyd was noted for his pottery produced at Murrumbeena, his best works being after his return from Britain in the 1920s and 1930s. Works use trees and branches, gum leaves and gum nuts and native animals sculpted into thrown works such as jugs, vases, bowls and pots. He was described in one newspaper article as ‗the King of Melbourne Potters‘. In the 1920‘s, Merric and Doris joined the Christian Science Church.

Wikipedia; Hougton Mifflin dictionary of biography

He died at Murrumbeena on 9 September 1959 and Doris 13 June 1960. 1921

Arthur Merric Boyd (1862-1940) and Emma Minnie Boyd (18581936) purchased 5 Edward Street, Sandringham, a Federation Bungalow style timber villa constructed in 1906. They had sold the Wahroonga Crescent house.

Figure 21 % Edward St, 2011, surrounded by a mature garden with a large oak

Arthur Boyd recalled Emma‘s art lessons in the Edward Street garden and the powerful influence of her reading the Bible to them on the Edward Street back verandah. Arthur Merric‘s timber studio survives in the back garden. After being sold, it was repurchased by Guy Boyd In 1980, the family staying at the house until the death of Guy‘s wife, Phyllis, in 2001.

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 17

Victoria Heritage Database (VHD) citation for 5 Edward Street, Sandringham


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event

Source

1921

"The painting is of my mother, walking down (from Open Country) to Granny Gough's home, which was 'Green Pastures'. She is carrying Arthur in her arms and I'm running towards the gate. The girls standing on each side of the gate are Edna and Myra Keys. Their parents rented Green Pastures from Granny Gough. She built two little places out the back of Green Pastures, which you can see in the painting. She lived in one and rented out the other." Lucy Boyd 2003 1922

Flinders rate books 1923-4 list Thomas W Wilson of 16 Davies St, East Malvern, replaced by AM Mattner of Sandringham for lot 44/F: the NAV is ₤2 for land only

Flinders rate books 19223, 2855 (VPRO)

1922

Bernard Mitchell of 41 Elgin St, Hawthorn owner of lots 19 and 42/F valued at ₤2.

Flinders rate books 19223, 2759 (VPRO)

1923

Edward Adolph Mattner, labourer of Rosebud acquires property from Wilson.

VTO

Flinders rate books 1923-4 show the name EA Mattner of Rosebud crossed out for CA44/F with a NAV of ₤2 for land only

Flinders rate books 19234, 2861 (VPRO)

1923

November – Arthur Merric Boyd (Arthur Boyd‘s grandfather) artist of 5 Edward St, Sandringham (heritage overlay Bayside PS) acquires the Rosebud Parade property.

VTO

1923

Bernard Mitchell of 41 Elgin St, Hawthorn is rated for lots 19 and 42/F with a NAV of ₤2 for land only. His name is crossed out in favour of Mrs Jameson (CA19/F)

Flinders rate books 19234, 2865, 2975 (VPRO)

1924

Arthur Murray(sic) Boyd artist of Sandringham listed in rate books as the owner of lots 42 and 44/F with buildings with a NAV of ₤20

RB1924

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 18


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event

Source

Figure 22 62 Rosebud Parade., 2011

Figure 23 64, 62 Rosebud Parade. (Google, c2008?) with cream brick house at 64 on Barry St corner of assumed 1960s date.

1924 c194 0

During the summer months Merric Boyd family visit Arthur M & Emma Boyd newly acquired house at Sandringham and their new beach house at Rosebud which was close to Evelyn Gough‘s cottage. Guy Boyd later recalled how enjoyable these years were. `Summer holidays at Rosebud were enjoyed by successive generations of Boyds. Lucy's earliest recollection of going there was in about 1920, when the road was still little more than a track and she and her mother had traversed Port Phillip Bay in the old paddle-wheel steamer Hygeia as far as Dromana, where her father, who had driven down from Murrumbeena in the phaeton, picked them up and took them the rest of the way to Rosebud. Lucy has memories of moonlight picnics on the beach, the billy boiling, the damper cooking, and outside the circle of firelight the horses dimly seen against the darkness of tall trees. Guy remembers first going when he was about five years of age. By then the road had been tar-sealed and he travelled in the late model motor car with his Boyd grandparents whose cottage was among teatrees and gums on a sandy rise a few hundred yards from the water. At Rosebud everyone painted and drew—the grandparents, the parents, the children and the grandchildren. The gently sloping sand was clean, the water clear and sparkling. The shallows deepened to

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 19

Bertouch: 25-28


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event small channels where rowing boats lay, and rose again to sandbanks before darkening to the deeper water of Port Phillip Bay. The thin piles of a jetty and the reflections of mooring posts gurgled and shifted on the water then as now. Four generations of Boyds have painted Rosebud.‘

Source

Figure 24 Day of My Delight 1965 first edition cover with Rosebud 1939 (detail)

`The 1974 edition of Martin Boyd's Day of My Delight* has reproduced on its cover Rosebud, a painting signed 'Arthur Boyd '39'. It could have been painted today. Not far behind where the painter stood is Granny Gough's house recognisable still (thought on lot 3 of Rosebud Fishermen‘s estate). 'The Oaks' after which it was named are gone but the garden is still a tangle of trees, shrubs and lavender, some probably from her original plants. From the back of the house across the grass the small green gate leads to the sand down which as a girl Guy's mother went to swim. Nearby is the old-fashioned hotel where Guy and his own wife Phyllis spent their honeymoon. A little way up the hill past Hancock's, where they used to buy fresh fish and cook it on the fuel stove, is the Boyd grandparents' house, much changed now. The tea-trees and cape wattles have gone. So has the great gum tree from the front. Behind the house there is still a tap-hole in the wall where the tank stood, but the back has been built in. (I done this around here. The weather kept beltun the door off.') The boat that Arthur built has long since gone. The rooms are empty of painters and paintings. But you can still walk along the beach on the coarse dry sand past the small green gate through which Doris Gough came for a swim, and sit for a while in the rotunda adrift with sand and sheltered against tall banksias. Near the jetty, a new one now, a man is wading, trousers rolled to the knee, and beyond him, over the fretted grass points, rowing boats tug at their ropes. The sound of birds lightly etches the still, warm, peaceful afternoon and at the edge of the sand, overhanging the beach and lining the road, magnificent ancient banksias praise the past and bless the future. 1924

Arthur Merric Boyd (Arthur‘s grandfather) and wife Emma (dead 1936) listed at 5 Edward St., Sandringham 1924 – c1937

ER19241937

1924

George Sprent Edwards, a gentleman of Mordialloc, acquires the

Ben Boyd

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 20


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event adjoining lot (64 Rosebud Parade) and lot 19/F in February from Bernard Mitchell. AM Boyd buys part of it (lot 42) by March 1924, with the other part (lot 19) going to Jane E Jamison in April.

Source (son of Guy Boyd) cites VTO V3352, F670336

1924

Heart of Rosebud Estate among others advertised by the THE MELBOURNE SUBDIVISIONS COMPANY 440 LITTLE COLLINS STREET, -MELBOURNE

`The Argus‘: Monday 21 July 1924

1928

LAND YOURSELF- Down at Rosebud During Those ‖Red-hot‖ Weekends This Summer- time! Don‘t be worn out by the grime, rush, and roar of the city. Buy a SEASIDE BLOCK and

`The Argus‘: Saturday 1 December 1928

THRIVE! Yes, you can afford one! And tip-top lots they are, too, almost on the sea- shore and-Just over Beach road; nice roomy Iots, fanned by those healthful ocean breezes that tend to tone you up so. They are on HEART – OF -, ROSEBUD – ESTATE, HEART – OF – ROSEBUD – ESTATE ROSEBUD, GLORIOUS ROSEBUD. We can sell you some of the nicest lots down there at £70 each: some even less. And if you want terms-well-what about a Fiver Deposit and the balance easy over 5 years. However, Here‘s Something for Nothing A PLAN POSTED FREE FROM COGHILL and HAUGHTON, 79 Swanston Street, Melbourne. 1934

To gain additional income, both Doris and Merric worked for a few months throwing and decorating pots at a porcelain factory in Yarraville.

Niall: 139, 168

1935

Flinders Shire rate assessment in December has Arthur Murray (sic) Boyd of 5 Edward St, Sandringham as owner of lots 42 and 44 and buildings in the Rosebud Estate, West Riding, valued at ₤20 NAV

Assessment 2150, RB1935-6 (p.150)

1935

Arthur Boyd studies at National Gallery Art School, Melbourne, Vic

1936

September 14: death notice "Boyd - On the 13th September, at Sandringham, Emma Minnie, beloved wife of Arthur Merric Boyd" "Boyd - The Friends of MR. ARTHUR MERRIC BOYD are respectfully informed that the funeral of his beloved wife, Emma Minnie, will leave his residence, no. 5 Edwards street, Sandringham, THIS DAY (Monday, September 14), at 2 p.m., for the Melbourne Crematorium, Fawkner. J. MONKHOUSE and SON, funeral directors, 44 Bay road, Sandringham. Tel XW2592."

The Argus 14 Sep 1936 p1

Her husband, Arthur Merric Boyd sells the Edward St house and moves to Rosebud Parade 1936

Arthur Merric Bloomfield Boyd (aged 16) lives and studies painting with his artist grandfather Arthur Merric Boyd in Rosebud Parade after the death of his grandmother Emma Minnie (13 September 1936) until c1939; he described as the three most happy years of his

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 21

R James, Heritage Victoria; Bungey;


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event life. He is thought to have painted 10 works in that period. ‌In 1936 Minnie Boyd died at the age of seventy-eight. Helen, who had married naval officer Neven Read in 1934, was living in Sydney, and Arthur Merric Boyd was alone in the Sandringham house, which was far too big for him. He did not want to go to Sydney, nor to move into Open Country. His solution was to take his grandson Arthur to live with him in the little cottage at Rosebud, on the Mornington Peninsula, where he and Minnie used to spend painting holidays. This began a happy time for the two of them. Arthur drove his grandfather's 1928 Dodge tourer and did the cooking. Arthur Merric paid for his grandson's painting supplies and gave advice and encouragement. To him it must have seemed a restoration of the pleasure he had once had in painting with his son Penleigh. Writing home to Doris from Rosebud, Arthur said that he and his grandfather were `as cosy as can be..’ Arthur Merric Boyd survived his wife by four years. The time at Rosebud was a wonderful gift to his grandson, a fertile and peaceful time of innocence after the premature experience of the factory. Now the young Arthur took possession of a familiar landscape. As Franz Philipp suggests, the works of this early period, painted when Arthur was sixteen or seventeen, are not mere apprentice pieces but have a distinctive vision of their own, serene but not arcadian, 'sparse, parsimonious, windswept, with the high cloudy sky of the coastal region'

Figure 25 Arthur Boyd, front Living Room 62 Rosebud Parade, 1936. This room has not changed greatly since but the double-hung sash windows have been replaced by casements. The main bedroom (gran pa’s?) is entered from the left of the space.

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 22

Source Niall: 189191


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event

Figure 26 this is the same view

…As he sat behind the easy chair, out of his grandfather's line of vision, doing a pen and ink sketch of Gramps in his dressing gown… The evenings were very quiet, apart from those times when Gramps approved him going to the local cinema at the bottom of Rosebud Parade. The cottage was in the top of the hill, back from the road, and sat solitary, surrounded by trees and bracken. Most nights the silence would be broken only by the tap of Gramps's pipe against his boot, or his wrestling with the crinkly pages of the Argus, or the wireless crackling away along with the fire….

Figure 27 Arthur Boyd’s Gran Pa, at 62 Rosebud Parade. June 1937

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 23

Source


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event

Source

Figure 28 Rosebud Broadway Theatre (1928) where Arthur attended in the 1930s.

1937

Arthur Boyd‘s first solo exhibition

1938

Self Portrait

Bungey: 78

`Buoyed by the security of Rosebud, Arthur knew he would be a painter. The self-portrait done in 1938, wearing the red shirt that flags his independence, is as direct, determined and unflinching as the selfportrait three years previously. The essential difference is that it contains an ingredient, easy to read on any face: certainty. Arthur saw Rosebud as 'the first serious stage into trying to make [painting] into a proper job (14). After Rosebud, Arthur considered painting 'an automatic business trying to make a living' and 'communicating'. 1938

Robin Boyd, then 19 years old and a student at the Melbourne University Architectural Atelier (MUAA), designed and oversaw the construction of a combined studio and residence for his cousin Arthur Boyd (1920-1999) in the back garden of the Merric Boyd house at 8 Wahroonga Crescent, Murrumbeena.

P Goad, From Art To The Everyday: Robin Boyd And The ‗Window Wall‘

1939

Arthur Merric Boyd thought to have returned to Open Country at Murrumbeena due to ill health

Niall: 192

1939

Arthur and brother David Boyd tour north-east Victoria painting, cut short by the death of his grandfather.

1940

Arthur Merric Boyd dies 30 July, probate to John Turnbull Melbourne solicitor

VTO

1940

"Boyd - On July 30, at 8 Wahroonga crescent, Murrumbeena, ARTHUR MERRIE [sic]" "Boyd - The funeral of the late MR. ARTHUR MERRIE [sic] BOYD, will leave No. 8 Wahroonga crescent, Murrumbeena, THIS DAY (Wednesday 31st July), at 10.30 a.m., for the New Melbourne Crematorium, Fawkner. J. MONKHOUSE and SON, Funeral Directors, 124 Carpenter Street, Brighton. Phone XA1162."

The Argus 31 Jul 1940 p4:

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 24


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event

Source

Cremated, their ashes are in the Fawkner Crematorium & Memorial Park, the details being:

1940

December – Frank Alway of 270 Dandenong Rd, East Malvern, estate agent now owns the property

1940

Early in, Hatton Beck established a pottery in former butcher's shop in Neerim Road Murrumbeena, making jugs and other utilitarian wares.

1941

Arthur Boyd conscripted, discharged in 1944; thought to have met John Percival who married his sister Mary.

1943

Arthur Boyd takes over Hatton Beck‘s (his brother-in-law via Lucy) pottery shop at 500 Neerim Rd Murrumbeena as an outlet for the family pottery- naming it the Arthur Merric Boyd Potteries, aided by finance from Peter Herbst and John Perceval. This shop has since been redeveloped.

Bungey: 175

Guy Boyd goes to Sydney and established the Martin Boyd Pottery joined by David Boyd and made a successful business with many of the ―Boyd‖ ramekins in household collections today being from this pottery. 1944

Mary Boyd married the artist John Perceval, who had worked with Arthur at the cartographic warehouse during the war: they lived in one of the studios at the bottom of the Wahroonga Cr garden with their three children until the mid 1950s.

1945

Arthur Boyd marries Yvonne Lennie in March and for the next eleven years they lived in Arthur‘s studio at 8 Wahroonga Cr with their first two children.

Niall: xxiii

1946

Doreen Benson of St Kilda, is new owner of Rosebud Parade.

VTO

1948

1252 building permits issued at Rosebud 1948-1954

Moresby

1949

A.M.B.Boyd listed 8 Wahroonga Crescent. Oakleigh (as a Ceramist) 1949 & 1954 (see Gough family connection with this street)

ER1949, 1954

1950

Mabel Catherine Warner, married woman of Stoney Point, has 62 Rosebud Parade, title registered in March.

1954

50 shops erected at Rosebud 1927-1954, 28 since c1949.

1954

William & Jean Wright of Glen iris new owners of Rosebud Parade

1954

Arthur Boyd acquires the weatherboard house of Stacha Halpen at 26 Surf Avenue Beaumaris, as first house purchase for family (demolished since)

Bungey: 2734

1957

Aerial view shows house and vacant block to south.

SOMP

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 25

Moresby


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Date

Event

Source

1959

Merric Boyd dies at 8 Wahroonga Cr, Murrumbeena after a long illness. Within a year his wife Doris also died. A & Y Boyd leave for London.

Niall: 325

1963

Cedric W Duncombe, Mornington Caravan Park owner, acquires Rosebud Parade property.

VTO

1959

1959- 1971 Arthur Boyd family at Sussex, England

1963

Jack (electrical engineer) & Ellen Tremain (married woman) of Mitcham are new owners of Rosebud Parade.

VTO

1964

The Merric & Doris Boyd house Open Country at 8 Wahroonga Cr, Murrumbeena, the centre of Arthur Boyd‘s early life, was sold and the block redeveloped. This house was also the centre of the greater Boyd family creative circle including the Tuckers, Percivalls, Burstall, etc.

Bungey: 410

A large, red brick block of twelve flats was erected in its place. 1968

Kate Gabriel of Chelsea is new owner of Rosebud Parade, followed by Ruby L Bone, of Clifton Hill, a dressmaker.

VTO

1971

1971- 1993 Arthur Boyd family live at Bundanon, Shoalhaven, NSW, later to be bequeathed to the NSW government.

Niall: 369-

1978

Arthur Boyd settles at Bundanon near the Shoalhaven River, donated as an 1100 hectare estate to the people of Australia in 1993.

Niall: 369-

1979

Arthur Boyd awarded the Order of Australia services to Art and elevated to Companion of the Order in 1992.

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1986

Arthur Boyd recalls‌ that the single most formative part of his experience, both spiritually and artistically, was the time in Rosebud where he had experienced 'pure contact with the landscape'.

Bungey: 245

Brief Bibliography Bungey, Darleen 2007. ARTHUR BOYD, A Life, Allen and Unwin, Sydney.

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 26


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud Hoff, Ursula, 1986 The art of Arthur Boyd [text] with an introduction by T. G. Rosenthal. London : Andre Deutsch. McKenzie, Janet, 1956- 2000. Arthur Boyd [text] : art & life, London : Thames & Hudson, 2000. Moresby, Isabelle 1954 Rosebud Flower of the Peninsula, Mornington Regional Art Gallery exhibition catalogue (James, R), 2001 ARTHUR BOYD: THE

EMERGING ARTIST - Mornington Peninsula and Port Phillip Bay Mornington Regional Art Gallery exhibition catalogue (James, R), 1999 The artists’ retreat: discovering the Mornington Peninsula 1850s to the present

Niall, Brenda, (1930-) 2002. The Boyds [text] : a family biography: Imprint: Carlton South, Vic. : Miegunyah Press, Melbourne University Press,. Philipp, Franz 1967. Arthur Boyd, London, Thames & Hudson Von Bertouch, Anne, Hutchings Patrick 1976, Guy Boyd. VTO- Victoria Titles Office Acknowledgements Ray Gibb; Ben Boyd; Rodney James; Jennifer Thompson [jennifer@bundanon.com.au] and Mary Preece of Bundanon Trust; Greg Sullivan; Simon Lloyd; Nick Nicholson [Nick.Nicholson@nga.gov.au] NGA; Judy Walsh Further work Contact Polly (Arthur‘s daughter) or Yvonne Boyd (his wife).

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 27


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Appendix 2: Proposed Statement of Significance for the Mornington Peninsula Shire The following is taken from Graeme Butler & Associates 2008 Environmental History for the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council as a draft Statement of Significance for the Shire. The Statement of Significance provides the basis for assessment of places that could contribute to the Shire‘s cultural value. Relevant aspects of the Statement of Significance to this report are: 

The highly notable, largely Victorian-era marine mansions individually and as groups at Mornington, Mt Eliza, Flinders, Sorrento and Portsea. Because of the architectural skill shown, the extensive nature of these marine properties and their high integrity, the sub-theme of marine villas and gentlemen‘s farms is particularly significant for the Peninsula, making this relatively small coastal strip and the villas built there at a high level of importance, with no equal among other similar groups in the State

the State‘s best beach houses from two main development eras, with the Bay side mansions of the mid to late Victorian-eras, paralleled with the experimental Modernism of the Post Second war period and onwards,

The inter-war and post WW2 beach houses, architect designed by important figures such as Boyd, Roy Grounds and Chancellor & Patrick that have created new fashions in house designs across the State.

The Mornington Peninsula Shire is culturally significant to the State in many ways.

These include: 

Picturesque and rich farm landscapes, with their undulating terrain, mature conifer tree rows, and bay view backdrops. These include the strong visual structure of the conifer rows, enclosing undulating agricultural plots that may have once been planted with crops and fruit or might now be grape vines or olives. They also embrace the coastal grazing lands of the south. Each has its associated built content, like former farm buildings, product storage and distribution networks;

The physical containment of these and other natural landscapes within a narrow promontory and their frequent integration with distant or close water views, the Peninsula presents many significant cultural landscapes, particularly where rural character promotes an image of what might have been glimpsed at first European contact or at least a century past.

Surviving exotic and natural landscapes as the foci of a strong community and individual interest in associated environmental factors, culminating with the numerous landscape classifications by the National Trust of Australia (Vic).

West and south Peninsula coasts because of their clear evidence of key geological phases, often demonstrated in a picturesque and dramatic manner. This expression has in turn linked the area‘s geology with creative endeavour as artists sought to capture the wild beauty of cliffs and distinctive outcrops like Pulpit Rock, as well as scientific study;

The natural values of coastal areas as recognised internationally;

The site of one of the State's 1840s Aboriginal protectorates at Tuerong Park – this and other sites on the Peninsula provide the physical setting

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 28


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud for interpretation of the extensive documentation of Aboriginal life after contact, using the Thomas papers and those of early pastoralists such as McCrae and other journals describing contact with indigenous population, 

Evidence of the pastoral phase – so significant to the Peninsula for creating the first means of permanent settlement, paving the way for the more intensive farming practises that followed. Because the pastoralists were often wealthy and educated, they left behind a good record of their conquests in the form of letters and diaries, thus providing an important picture of how the land stood soon after Colonisation. McCrae‘s station homestead, and the literature that surrounds it, is perhaps the most important of the physical expression of this theme, along with the Briars;

The homesteads they created became, in turn, the centres of later settlements and their bullock tracks the paths of major roadways. The pastoral leases, held back from land selection, provided options for the government survey of township sites to serve a new population, as land not yet alienated from the Crown5 The present-day Baxter Township and the Mulberry Hill property at Golf Links Road, Baxter, are located within the old Carrup Carrup run.

The pre-emptive rights created from each pastoral lease were the focus of the grazier‘s activity, the sites of their best paddocks, fences and buildings. The Pre-emptive Rights are also potentially significant, some as mere surveyed lines on old maps, others having great archaeological potential.

sites of early fishing villages, supplying Melbourne‘s first development era;

strong evidence of stone and lime suppliers aiding Melbourne‘s first development era. As well as surviving kiln sites, there are the homes of the early lime burning families, small sections of limestone roads and a large number of houses built of limestone. Many of these structures have won recognition for their important heritage value but fresh discoveries continue to be made of previously unknown limestone treasures. When Melbourne was developing, in the Regency and early Victorian-eras, Peninsula lime served a key role in allowing sound masonry construction as well as export to Sydney. Lime making sites and local buildings, works or structures utilising lime from that period have significance in the State context, particularly those from the early to mid Victorian-era and earlier;

The source of high quality granite for use in prestigious buildings across the nation, with Dromana granite foremost in that group from the 1920s to World War

site of the Colony's first and early settlement attempts;

the State‘s most significant Colonial defences along with key Second war period sites such as Balcombe. Living memory still recalls the huge influx of troops and the dramatic change to life style and, in some cases, the physical terrain for those living on the Peninsula during WW2;

the role of the Flinders telegraph complex as of State importance when it was operational;

evidence of Water transport and its associated structures as highly significant to the Peninsula for both industry and tourism. Tourism down the Bay and Western Port was in turn highly significant to Melbourne‘s metropolis, for all classes of tourists, until the 1920s. Linked with this form

5

Gunson: 56: When H.B. Foot surveyed the Cranbourne and Lyndhurst district in 1852, the Township of Cranbourne was reserved out of the pastoral runs of Towbeet, Mayone and Barker's Heifer Station

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 29


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud of tourism, are the many ancillaries: the boats, the jetties, piers, the access ways, landscaping, the boats crews, and entertainers; 

evidence of key localised industrial sites such as the septaria works and the Western Port industrial complex near Hastings;

For the Moorooduc Two Bays Orchard & Nursery sites, being among the largest orchard and fruit tree nurseries in the State early this century, as evocative of the peninsula, which was then the most significant orchard area in Victoria;

the unique 'promenade' reservation along the coast from Mornington to Mt Martha, from the pier to, the Colonial governor, La Trobe's intended marine residence, as now shown by Mount Martha Park and the Harris Scout Camp being early plantations of ornamental trees on the governor's planned marine residence site,

the bayside resorts, hotels and Victorian-era tourism infrastructure created at strategic points down the west coast from the mid 19th century - the State‘s earliest and most significant resort hotel concentration, architecturally and historically. The coffee palaces and guest houses are also significant, with the latter also including many domestic scale examples that have since become private houses;

the highly notable, largely Victorian-era marine mansions individually and as groups at Mornington, Mt Eliza, Flinders, Sorrento and Portsea. Because of the architectural skill shown, the extensive nature of these marine properties and their high integrity, the sub-theme of marine villas and gentlemen‘s farms is particularly significant for the Peninsula, making this relatively small coastal strip and the villas built there at a high level of importance, with no equal among other similar groups in the State

as the favoured summer destination by motor car and mass camp site for many typical Victorians from the early 20th century- the State‘s most frequented family bathing beaches and beachside camping areas, as developed mainly in the inter-war period: the camping areas include mature exotic landscape and inter-war built facilities. Legends have grown from the memories of generations of camping holidays at locations like Rosebud.

many community retreats and seaside camps, some (such as Lord Somers Camp) being significant within Victoria.

the State‘s largest and best collection of bathing boxes and boat sheds built along its foreshore, with some early examples from the Edwardianera as well as the mass building of the inter-war and immediate post WW2 eras.

the innovatory town planning ideals which embodied the Mount Martha Estate, Griffin‘s Ranelagh Estate concepts and the Saxil Tuxen coastal towns at the Shire‘s south coast- State‘s more distinctive beachside housing estates, including the Victorian-era estates at Sorrento and Mt Martha and the First War and inter-war estates at Dromana, Mt Eliza and Somers.

the State‘s best beach houses from two main development eras, with the Bay side mansions of the mid to late Victorian-eras, paralleled with the experimental Modernism of the Post Second war period and onwards,

the inter-war and post WW2 beach houses, architect designed by important figures such as Boyd, Roy Grounds and Chancellor & Patrick that have created new fashions in house designs across the State;

as the domain of many important figures from the art and scientific disciplines;

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 30


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud 

destination for many of Australia's most famous artists largely because of its natural beauty and proximity to Melbourne. Unlike parts of the urban fringe, captured by the same artists, the landscape scenes painted here in the 19th and 20th centuries can often still be seen as they were then on the Peninsula; and



the State‘s best golf courses, some of which contain significant early landscape, architecture or layouts that are the result of well known course designers. Most have been developed since the 1980s. There are also parts of an early 4-hole course at Flinders that predates most surviving courses in the State.

Many places evocative of the above qualities remain unprotected or have not been identified. With increasing development in this much sought after area, there is an urgent need for all planning scheme limitations and opportunities to be in place to avoid disadvantaging both the historic environment and property owners

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 31


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

Appendix 3: Report assessment criteria Planning and Environment Act - heritage values and thresholds Section 4(1) (d) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 lists the following heritage values for use in heritage assessment within the Shire Planning Scheme: 

scientific,

aesthetic,

architectural or

historical interest or

other special value (includes social or spiritual interest.)

The thresholds applied in any assessment of significance are: 

State Significance and

Local Significance.

Local Significance includes those places that are important to a particular community or locality. Assessment criteria used in this report This Report uses the above heritage values, as assessed under the National Estate Register criteria, and as guided by the Application Guidelines 1990 (Australian Heritage Commission).

The National Estate Register criteria consist of eight criteria that cover social, aesthetic, scientific, and historic values for future generations as well as for the present community.

The criteria for addition to the National Estate Register (NER), as evolved by the Australian Heritage Commission, have been used nationally in heritage assessment over a long period and have become the de-facto standard in Heritage Victoria study briefs (see also Applying the Heritage Overlay VPP Practice Note).

Inclusion of places in the National Estate Register (NER) is based on meeting at least one of the criteria. Places are assessed within the context formed by comparison, under the criteria headings, with other similar places in a defined, typically geographic area. National Estate Register The National Estate Register is a Commonwealth statutory list of natural, indigenous and historic heritage places throughout Australia. Following amendments to the Australian Heritage Council Act 2003, additions or changes to the National Estate Register (NER) ceased 19 February 2007 The National Estate Register will have a statutory role until February 2012, guiding the Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts (the Minister) when making some decisions under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). This transition period also allows states, territories, local and the Australian Government to complete the task of transferring places to appropriate heritage registers where necessary and to amend any legislation that refers to the National Estate Register. The NER will be maintained after this time on a non-statutory basis as a publicly available archive6.

6

See http://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/rne/index.html

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 32


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud Burra Charter In addition to the National Estate Register criteria, the ICOMOS Burra Charter sets out broad heritage assessment considerations. The Burra Charter 1999 (1.2) defines Cultural significance as aesthetic, historic, scientific, social or spiritual value for past, present or future generations, adding an extra cultural group (or groups) to qualify the significance of the place when compared with the NER criteria‘s present or future generations. Cultural significance is defined as embodied in the place itself, its fabric, setting, use, associations, meanings, records, related places and related objects.

The Local Government Heritage Guidelines 1991 added Architectural Value to the above values, under the Aesthetic Value heading. National Estate Register criteria summary The National Estate Register sub-criteria used are identified by their alpha-numeric code and briefly described broadly as follows:

A.3

richness and diversity of cultural features

A.4

demonstrates well the course and pattern of history, important historic events

B.2

rarity

C.2 place

research potential, usually because of high integrity or good documentation of the

D.2

good example of a recognised type

E.1 aesthetic importance to the community or cultural group, typically judged as representing an architectural style F.1 design or technological achievement, typically with emphasis on some technical or design achievement as apart from aesthetic compliance as E1 G.1 social importance to the community, as demonstrated by documentation or sustained community expression of value for the place H.1 association with important person or group, where the place reflects in some way the significance of the person or group. Application of the National Estate Register criteria The table below sets out the relevant National Estate Register (NER) criteria and the relevant Application Guideline in column 1. In the second column is the interpretation used in this report of how that National Estate Register criterion is relevant in the context of the assessment at the local level.

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 33


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

National Estate Register criteria Application Guideline 1990 extract

Use of NER criteria in this report

HISTORIC VALUE

The contribution a place might make to the public understanding of the historical development of the localities and the Shire.

A.4 Importance for association with event, developments or cultural phases which have had a significant role in the human occupation and evolution of the nation, State, or community Explanatory notes This criterion applies where the contribution of an event, development or phase to the broad patterns of Australian history or prehistory can be clearly demonstrated, or where the place epitomises elements of those patterns.

The property must reflect closely the period in which it was created and the associated phase of historical development in the Shire.

Inclusion guidelines Places associated with events or developments which contributed to or reflect long-term changes in prehistory or history.

Places representing 'landmark' cultural phases in the evolving pattern of prehistory and history.

A place eligible for its association with a significant scientific theory must have a clear and important relationship to the development of that theory or its early application in Australia.

A place eligible for its history of science associations must have a strong connection with the work of a historically significant scientific figure or with a historically significant scientific exploration/ undertaking, or methodological development. Exclusion guidelines Places which do not demonstrate a particular contribution to, or allow an understanding of, the broad evolutionary patterns of Australia's natural history, prehistory or history.

Places where claimed associations with events, development or phases cannot be verified.

Places are not eligible if they have been altered so that the aspects of the environment important to the association have been seriously degraded.

B.2 Importance in demonstrating a distinctive way of life, custom, process, land-use, function or design no longer practised, in danger of being lost, or of exceptional

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 34



Rarity within an established cultural phase;


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

National Estate Register criteria Application Guideline 1990 extract interest.

Use of NER criteria in this report 

Rarity because of great age and the small number of surviving places representing an early phase for the region or locality;

Rarity because of the use of uncommon building materials, such as carved and dressed stone, which represent a now rare skill of execution within a recognised vernacular or style for the region or locality;

Rarity as an unusual combination of linked types (say garden and house design) within an established style or vernacular (i.e. Arts and Crafts design).

Explanatory notes This criterion applies particularly to places which characterise past human activities which are rare, endangered or uncommon by virtue of their being: 

few in number originally;

few in number due to subsequent destruction;

susceptible to rapid depletion due to changed practices or other threats; or

outstanding example of uncommon human activity.

Inclusion guidelines Scarcity may be the result of historical process (i.e. few of such places were ever made) or of subsequent destruction or decay. However, rarity must be demonstrated to be more than simply absence of survey information.

Rarity in some cases may apply to the survival of the combination of characteristics and the place as a whole may lack integrity.

Rarity at a regional or State level must be assessed in the context of its distribution and abundance in other regions or States. Rarity in one location when compared with abundance in another may or may not give the place national estate significance, depending on the cultural context. Exclusion guidelines Rarity at local, regional or State level does not necessarily confer national estate value, unless such rarity has particular cultural significance.

Places deemed to be uncommon due to lack of research/survey may subsequently be found not to be eligible under this criterion. Evidence of rarity will normally be required.

D.2 Importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of the range of human activities in the Australian environment (including way of life, custom, process, land-use, design or technique). Explanatory notes A place must clearly represent the period, method of construction, techniques, way of life, etc of its Type... as determined by comparison of the place to its Type as a whole, analysing such factors as: 

Condition and integrity, including consideration of minimum area for long term viability;

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 35

The use in this report has been aimed at: 

a Type of building design, or

Type of building use, as qualified by the style name and the use definition (medium sized 19th century suburban villa,


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

National Estate Register criteria Application Guideline 1990 extract 

Abundance and distribution of the Type;

Degree of homogeneity or variability of the Type over its range.

The presence of unusual factors (which may be assessable against other criteria) may be relevant in determining significance under this criterion.

Scope Historic Places representative of the diversity of historic places, both by Type and by region. Inclusion A place may be entered in the register for its representative value if one or more of the following apply: 

It can be regarded as a particularly good example of its Type, or a significant variant of the Type equally well;

It is one of a number of similar places which are all good examples of the Type, but has a higher national estate value by virtue of its integrity, condition, association with other significant places or setting;

It is part of a group of places which collectively include a range of variation within the Type;

It represents the seminal or optimal development of the Type.

Exclusion A place may not be eligible under this criterion if it is not representative of the characteristics which make up the established Type

E.1 Importance for a community for aesthetic characteristics held in high esteem or otherwise valued by the community. Explanatory notes The aesthetic values of the place must be able to be assessed with sufficient rigor to allow the basis for registration to be stated clearly. Inclusion guidelines A place is eligible if it articulates so fully a particular concept of design that it expresses an aesthetic ideal (e.g. a place which epitomises the design principles of an architectural style, landscape ideal, etc.) or if the place, because of its aesthetic characteristics, is held in high esteem by the community.

To be eligible, a place must have a high degree of integrity so that it fully reflects the aesthetic qualities for which it is

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 36

Use of NER criteria in this report tennis club pavilion, stylistic representative).

The place had to clearly represent the period, method of construction, techniques, way of life, etc involved with the defined Type... as determined by comparison of the place to other examples of its Type in terms of condition and most importantly, integrity.

Relative high integrity within a recognised Type was a prerequisite for significance under this criterion, the high integrity (compared to others of the Type) yielding the most visual information about the physical appearance of the type and hence its understanding within the overall scope of cultural Types That the Type should be recognised culturally is the main factor, the significance of the Type itself under other criterion (such as A4) being a consideration. Used to denote a successful design within a recognized style, within the accepted community stylistic framework. Recognition in established architectural magazines or by professional criticism adds another facet to the significance, that of recognition by a community group. 

The place expresses a particular concept of design, epitomizing the


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

National Estate Register criteria Application Guideline 1990 extract

Use of NER criteria in this report

nominated.

The values of landscapes, townscapes and streetscapes must be demonstrated using accepted standards of assessment in those fields. Places which contribute to such values in a wider area might also be eligible.

design principles of an architectural style, landscape ideal, or 

because of its aesthetic characteristics, is held in high esteem by the community (as demonstrated by inclusion in a national architecturally based periodical, recognition by the National Trust of Australia (Vic) or within a professional assessment).



To be eligible, the place must have a high degree of integrity to a major or key design phase.

Exclusion guidelines A place is not eligible if the design concepts or aesthetic ideals are not expressed in a way that is better than that of other places within its Type, i.e. if it is not outstanding.

A place is not eligible simply because it is the work of a highly regarded architect, artist or engineer. It must be outstanding for aesthetic reasons.

F.1 Importance for its technical, native, design or artistic excellence innovation or achievement

Explanatory notes Creative or technical achievement can mean artistic excellence or technical excellence, innovation or achievement in many fields. Such achievements can only be judged by comparison with contemporary and subsequent developments in the same fields. Some creative or technical achievement may be apparent in virtually any type of humanly created or influenced place or structure. Inclusion guidelines A place is eligible if it demonstrates clearly a particularly appropriate solution to a technical problem using or expanding upon established technology, or developing new technology, that solution being outstanding due to its conceptual strength. This might occur, for example, in the fields of engineering, architecture, industrial design, landscape design, etc.

A place may be considered to be outstandingly creative if it results from the innovative departure from established norms in some field of design or the arts.

To be eligible, a place must have a high degree of integrity so

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 37

Used to denote a design that is considered now to be an early or successful or innovatory creation, potentially within the framework of a recognized style: this does not include popular recognition at the time of creation as in Criterion E as a good example of a style. Technical significance can be expressed by similar innovatory achievement outside aesthetic achievement.


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

National Estate Register criteria Application Guideline 1990 extract

Use of NER criteria in this report

that it fully reflects the aesthetic or technical qualities for which it is nominated Exclusion guidelines A place is not eligible simply because it is work of a highly regarded architect, or engineer. It must be outstanding for creative or technical reasons.

H.1 Importance for close associations with individuals whose activities have been significant within the history of the nation, State or region (or locality7). Explanatory notes The individuals might be important in the arts, sciences, politics, public life and many other areas of the life of the nation and its history.

The association should be with the person's productive life only, unless there are few other places available which illustrate the person's contribution, or unless their formative or declining years are of particular importance to their contribution. This applies to birthplaces and graves as well.

The length of association of person and place is usually important8, especially if the association has been transitory or incidental, or if other places exist with longer and more meaningful associations. The association of the place with a particularly important and short-term event affecting the person may be one of the exceptions to this condition. The extent to which the association affected the fabric of the place, and the extent to which the place affected the person or events associated with the person, can be important.

This criterion also applies to places which have been used by historically important scientists. The scientists may be important for their continuing standing in their disciplines or for their importance in Australian scientific history generally. For example, a number of pioneering Australian scientists were better known as explorers, e.g. Leichhardt, Cunningham. In view of this perception, places identified with such historic figures will usually be significant against Criterion A4. Inclusion guidelines The person's contribution must be established sufficiently by historical documentation or other firm evidence, and the association of person with place established clearly in a similar way.

7

my inclusion

8

my bold

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 38

The importance or prominence of the associated person must extend within a defined locality such as Mornington or across more than one locality (Shire or as defined) to extend to a defined `region‘ or group of localities.

Association with the noted designer has been on the basis of it being a key example of his/her work, not an incidental or minor commission.

The historical association with residents or owners (including designers if they have this status) is taken on the basis of: 

them commissioning the design, this being a key indication of the person‘s tastes and public status, or

a long term occupation (not an incidental or fortuitous association) in a period when they were active in their prescribed field.


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

National Estate Register criteria Application Guideline 1990 extract

Use of NER criteria in this report

A building designed by a prominent architect may be eligible under this criterion if it expresses a particular phase of the individual's career or exhibits aspects reflecting a particular idea or theme of her/his craft. It is possible that several places may represent different aspects of the productive life of an important person. Similarly, several examples of a person's work may be registered because a different combination of criteria are satisfied, e.g. Criteria A4, B.2, D.2, E, F.

What the fabric may tell you of the person may be simply that the house fits your preconceptions of the person but, even if this is so, it is still vital evidence of the lifestyle of the person, whether predictable or not.

In general, the association between person and place needs to be of long duration, or needs to be particularly significant in the person's productive life. Places which contain fabric that is a direct result of the person's activity or activities, or where the place car: be demonstrated to have influenced the person's life or works, are eligible, and such places are more eligible than places which lack such direct and personal associations.

For a place to be eligible for its association with a prominent scientist: 

the importance of the scientist must be established, scientifically or historically;



the place must have a clear, direct and important link to the work of that scientist; it cannot be simply a campsite or collecting locality.

The scientist may be an amateur naturalist, providing that person does have a confirmed historical standing. Exclusion guidelines A place is not eligible if it associated with relatively undistinguished persons within a given theme, or a person whose importance did not extend beyond the local context.

A place is not eligible if the association with the prominent person is tenuous or unsubstantiated.

A building is not eligible simply because it was designed by a prominent architect.

A place is not eligible simply because a prominent scientist worked there.

In general, brief, transitory or incidental association of person and place, for which there is little surviving direct evidence,

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 39


Heritage assessment report, AM Boyd house, 62 Rosebud Parade, Rosebud

National Estate Register criteria Application Guideline 1990 extract would not make a place eligible for the Register.

Graeme Butler & Associates, 2011: 40

Use of NER criteria in this report

Arthur Merric Boyd summer house, 62 Rosebud, Rosebud  

Commissioned by the Shire of Mornington Peninsula as an independent heritage assessment of the Arthur Boyd family summer house . The weeken...

Arthur Merric Boyd summer house, 62 Rosebud, Rosebud  

Commissioned by the Shire of Mornington Peninsula as an independent heritage assessment of the Arthur Boyd family summer house . The weeken...

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