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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Heritage Assessment & record of Farm Complex, 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Figure 1 Goss house, McCoy cottage at rear and underground tank, view from east

Figure 2 Aerial view of farm complex 2015 (Google Earth, NTS north up page)

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Heritage Assessment & record of Farm Complex, 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook .............................................. 1

HUNTERS ROAD DAIRY, 105W HUNTERS ROAD, SOUTH MORANG .................................. 42

Farm Complex, 1145 Donnybrook Road Donnybrook .............................................. 4

Drinkwater’s house, Cnr. Wedge & Davisson Sts. Epping ................ 43

Town planning status ................... 4

STIMSONS HOUSE (BICKLEYS), 700 Epping Road WOLLERT .... 44

Summary of findings ........................ 4 Background ...................................... 4 This report.................................... 5 Heritage Status of the place ........ 5 Previous heritage assessments ....... 5 Conclusion from previous studies 6 Historic heritage assessment (HHA) at 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook, 1305 Donnybrook Road, Woodstock and 1185 Merriang Road, Woodstock (2015) . .................................................... 6 Place description .............................. 8 Bernard Goss house c1883-...... 10 McCoy stone kitchen, cottages, pepper trees, c1853- ................. 13 Underground tank one ............... 17 Farm landscape ......................... 18 Brief development history of the place............................................... 19 Conclusion from place history ... 21 Victorian Historical Themes ....... 22 Brief comparative analysis ......... 22 Assessment against HERCON criteria ........................................ 23 Culturally significant? ................. 24 Appendix 1: Report assessment criteria and assessment...................................... 25 Planning and Environment Act heritage values and thresholds.. 25 Assessment criteria used in this report ......................................... 25 Appendix 2: chronology .......................... 26 Appendix 3: Comparative examples ....... 40 1850s- ............................................ 40 DAREBIN CREEK AND RURAL LANDSCAPE ENVIRONMENT . 40 Lyndoch Park, 73 Laurel Street, Whittlesea .................................. 41

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1850s-1860s .................................. 46 Black Braes Farm, 60 CRAVENS ROAD, MERNDA ...................... 46 1853- ............................................. 47 EUGLEBAR HOMESTEAD, 235 Bridge Inn Road MERNDA ....... 47 1854-?? ......................................... 48 TIMMS HOUSE, 130 Bindts Road (east side) EPPING ................... 48 1856- ............................................. 49 Creed's Farm, 47 Farmhouse Boulevard, Epping, former 265E Harvest Home Road EPPING ... 49 1856-, 1865-?? .............................. 51 Wuchatschs Farm 74 Robert Street, Lalor .............................. 51 1860s- ........................................... 52 KAROOL FORMERLY FAIRVIEW, 305-307 Bridge Inn Road MERNDA................................... 52 1860s- ........................................... 53 KIAMA, 2215 Plenty Road YAN YEAN ........................................ 53 1860s-, 1887? ............................... 54 BUNG BONG or PEWSEY VALE, 1785 DONNYBROOK ROAD WOODSTOCK .......................... 54 WOODSTOCK MANOR, 910 Epping Road WOODSTOCK .... 56 Lochaber, 45A Harvest Home Road, Epping ............................ 57 1860s? ........................................... 58 Tower Hill, 145 SELKIRK ROAD WOODSTOCK .......................... 58 1860s? ........................................... 59 Macauliffes House 795 Epping Road Wollert ............................. 59 1860s? ........................................... 60 Lowry Farm, 521 Craigieburn Road East Wollert ..................... 60


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook 1860s-1870s? ................................ 62 Farm, 110 & 130 Springs Road DONNYBROOK ......................... 62 1866-1880s .................................... 63 PINE PARK FARM, 286A Epping Road, Wollert ............................. 63 Description .......................................... 63 1870s- ............................................ 64 Ewert Farmhouse , 90-100 Bindts Road Wollert .............................. 64 McCormack's house, 960 Epping Road WOODSTOCK ................. 66 1870s- ............................................ 67 Ewert Farmhouse , 90-100 BINDTS ROAD WOLLERT .. Error! Bookmark not defined. 1870s? ........... Error! Bookmark not defined. Unmack’s Farm, 90C Harvest Home Road, Wollert .................. 67 1880s ............................................. 69 Wildwood farm, 425 Wildwood Road WHITTLESEA .................. 69 1880s (1850s cited)? ..................... 70 Bluestone cottage, 1 Cottage Boulevard EPPING .................... 70 1881? ............................................. 71 ROCKBANK, 355 MASONS ROAD, MERNDA ....................... 71 1885-? ............................................ 73 Stone house, 30 Harvest Home Road, Wollert ............................. 73 1886-90? ........................................ 74 PAYNES HOUSE OLD BODYCOAT FARMHOUSE, 715 EPPING ROAD, WOLLERT ...... 74 Appendix 4: Heritage record key plan .... 77 Plan: with photographic image key 77 Appendix 5: Heritage record photographic log ........................................................... 78 Photographic log ........................ 78 Appendix 6: Heritage record contact sheets ..................................................... 87

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Farm Complex, 1145 Donnybrook Road Donnybrook

contributory to the significant development period; Italian cypress is outside of the significant period (inter-war) but provide potential valuable mature landscape elements in the area.

Local Government (Council): WHITTLESEA

Background

Part Crown Portion 21, Kalkallo Parish Plan

Graeme Butler & Associates was commissioned to provide this heritage place assessment and record by Archaeology At Tardis Pty Ltd. who had prepared the initial historic heritage assessment (HHA) at 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook, 1305 Donnybrook Road, Woodstock and 1185 Merriang Road, Woodstock 2015 for DFC (Woodstock) Pty Ltd.

Directory Reference: VicRoads 78 B2

Town planning status Planning Zone: URBAN GROWTH ZONE (UGZ) Planning Overlay:

ENVIRONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE OVERLAY (ESO) part covering Little Bald Hill.

Summary of findings The place does possess cultural significance within the local context of the Donnybrook and Woodstock districts within the City of Whittlesea as the remains of a long-term farm complex that is expressive of various key stages of farm development from first land settlement of the area in the 1830s, the farm use and development of the 1850s-1860s and prosperity of the 1880s, both led by population increases in the Colony and the need for higher food production near the main population centre, Melbourne. The Victorian era is the key period of farm development in the area and hence the contributory structures at this place representing these eras have been identified as follows. Early Victorian-era 

Stone farm cottage with farm buildings (cow shed, stable?), later homestead kitchen and cottages (C) and pepper trees x 2;

The Archaeology At Tardis Pty Ltd assessment found that the Homestead, 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook, had local historic and social significance, lowmoderate scientific significance and high archaeological potential. Brief from Archaeology at Tardis In order to manage the site through the Consent process with Heritage Victoria, our aim is to understand the intrinsic nature of the standing structures and the components of the site, and also their comparative representativeness in a local and regional area context. For example, we are interested in understanding the following for the stone cottages and later homestead: 

When were the structures built and by whom?

were the stone cottages built at the same time or where they added to over time?

What evidence is there of renovations (eg later chimneys, blocking of windows, doorways, etc).

What can you say about the materials used- are they typical of being locally sourced e.g. bricks made from clay on the property, origin of glass, slate, mortar etc ?

Any additional history and function of the site and its features.

Victorian-era    

Stone house (H) Underground tanks 1, 2 Bluestone flooring, footings area potentially of farm stables, cow shed, dairy; Mature landscape on the site(elms x3) has been identified as

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Provide a detailed photographic record of all architectural and archaeological features on the site. Response to the brief

The following lists the response to the brief that forms the basis for this report:  

 

Site survey by architectural historian and horticulturalist; Using the outline survey from Archaeology At Tardis, detailed measurements were carried out to allow preparation of a vector plan (AutoCAD dwg format) showing the cottages, house and trees, along with other identified elements of the site already surveyed; detailed schedule of the contributory elements on the site (see also photographic record key Appendix 4: Heritage record key plan and Appendix 5: Heritage record photographic log); chronology of events and people that relate to the property and district, using verified data obtained from Archaeology At Tardis and primary sources such as municipal rate books, land titles, newspaper accounts, births, deaths and marriages records (see Appendix 2: chronology); preparation of family trees for Bernard Goss and Peter McCoy placed in www.ancestry.com.au; survey of identified comparable Victorian-era farm complexes in the City of Whittlesea, checking their current condition and heritage status, to provide an historical and architectural context for this farm complex (see Appendix 3: Comparative examples).

. It provides both an architectural appraisal and archival or heritage record of the place as per the brief and response. In addition to the requirements of the above brief and following the initial inspection, further limited research has been undertaken to provide more accurate construction dates for the structures, using municipal rate records. Heritage Status of the place Public heritage registers

This place is not included on: 

the Victorian Heritage Register and Inventory;

Register of the National Estate or the Australian Heritage Database,

The National Trust of Australia (Victoria) register;

This place is included on: 

Previous heritage assessments This locality has been cited or assessed in the following: 

Archival record of place: The record included cottages and house, with tanks, plus trees, basalt paved areas and remnant timber scatters, using digital, 21 mega pixel 24 bit photography keyed to map of site from above task. Equipment included Canon 6D and 650D DSLRs, using prime lenses and GPS tagging via in-camera GPS WGS84. This report This report deals with Farm Complex, 1145 Donnybrook Road Donnybrook

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Victorian Heritage Database Heritage Places Inventory H79220495. MONTALTO HOMESTEAD COMPLEX,

Meredith Gould Architects (MGA 1991) prepared the City of Whittlesea Heritage Study. The study identified heritage places in the municipality. Places were assessed according to a grading system. Grade ‘A’ places were considered to be of National or State significance, ‘B’ of regional significance and ‘C’ of local significance. All of these places were recommended for inclusion on the Heritage Overlay. Since this time, only a few have been added. This property was not identified. Context (2010a) prepared a heritage study for the City of Whittlesea. The study reviewed places assessed by MGA (1990) as Grade ‘D’ and below. This property was not identified; Context (2010b) prepared an archaeological Study to identify archaeological sites in the


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

municipality. This property was not identified; Context (2013a) prepared a historic heritage assessment for the Donnybrook Precinct Structure Plan (PSP) 67 immediately west of the Woodstock PSP (Context 2013b, see below). The desktop assessment formulated the following site prediction model: Post-contact sites that may be identified within the study area are likely to be associated with the pastoralist expansion of the nineteenth century or the early agricultural phase of Victoria’s history, and include relic vegetation, post and rail fencing, the remains of agricultural structures, such as stock pens and yards or on farm basalt quarries. Traditionally basalt floaters which were removed from paddocks during land clearance were then used to construct, or reinforce, boundary fence lines and other structures. Dry stone walling is expected to have been employed in the Precinct, and some may survive within the Study Area.' Context (2013b) prepared a historic heritage assessment for the Woodstock PSP which includes this site but it was not considered part of the Study Area as it was not able to be surveyed. The following site prediction model was formulated: `The early pastoral and squatting runs were subdivided a number of times during the late nineteen and early twentieth centuries into smaller parcels of land for closer settlement and farming ventures. However, the majority of the Study Area remains open farmland, predominantly used for grazing. Post contact sites that may be identified within the study area are likely to be associated with the pastoral expansion of the nineteenth century or the early agricultural phase of Victoria’s history, and include relic vegetation, dry stone walling, post and rail fencing, the remains of agricultural structures, such as stock pens and yards or on-farm basalt quarries. Traditionally

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basalt floaters which were removed from paddocks during land clearance were then used to construct, or reinforce, boundary fence lines and other structures, and dry stone walling is expected to have been employed in the precinct, some of which may survive within the Study Area.'; Conclusion from previous studies All of these reports have identified similar farm complexes to that of the Little Bald Hill property, with some in a more ruinous condition, but most have been assessed as locally significant and appropriate for the heritage overlay under clause 43.01 of the Whittlesea Planning Scheme. . Historic heritage assessment (HHA) at 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook, 1305 Donnybrook Road, Woodstock and 1185 Merriang Road, Woodstock (2015) . Archaeology At Tardis Pty Ltd. prepared an historic heritage assessment (HHA) at 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook, 1305 Donnybrook Road, Woodstock and 1185 Merriang Road, Woodstock (2015) this study found the farm complex at 1145 Donnybrook Road (subject site) to be locally significant historically and socially representing the historic theme `transforming and managing land and natural resources – grazing and raising livestock, farming'. The main elements included: 

Stone cottages, line of bluestone cottages abutting each other and aligned approximately north to south. 1853 to 1880s;

Brick (sic) homestead 1880s

Cistern 1 (underground tank) 1880s

Cistern 2 (underground tank) 1880s.

Statement of Significance for the place:

What is significant? The homestead at 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook contains the ruins of a mixed farming concern that illustrates rural life in the Donnybrook locality from the early 1850s onwards.


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook It contains the ruins of a linear complex of bluestone cottages that likely represent the first established residence on the mixed farm after the squatting period came to a close and freeholders and or lessees settled and worked the land. The later ruined brick (sic) homestead, likely built in the 1880s, reflects the success and increasing wealth and social status of a well-known local family, the Goss’s. The property passed through various hands from the 1930s onwards. The homestead was occupied up until about the 1970s, after which it was abandoned and owners / occupiers lived in modern houses built on the property. The homestead fabric was likely relatively intact until the early 1980s when it was destroyed in the bush fire. The fire has destroyed almost all the wooden and metal elements in the homestead. The bluestone cottages are in a ruinous state with some walls preserved to roof height along with chimneys and associated cooking and heating installations. Associated with the cottages and homestead are the foundations of various outbuildings, the driveway to the homestead, two cisterns, tree plantings, the foundations of dry stone walls and other minor features indicative of the use and development of the site. How is it significant? The homestead at 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook is of local historic and social significance, and lowmoderate scientific significance. Why is it significant? The homestead is of local historic and social significance for its association with well known families who lived in the locality from the mid-1800s to the 1970s. The place has low-moderate scientific significance for its archaeological potential which may elucidate the phases of the occupation and use of the site, in particular, from the 1850s to the 1930s.

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Place description

Figure 3 Aerial 2015 view of complex (Google Maps)

cow shed, stables, yards

hedge row, dry stone wall, north yard boundary

underground tank 1

stone cottages, Italian cypress, pepper trees x2

stone house, elms

Figure 4 Aerial detail 1968 (Tardis) shows

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Figure 5 Site plan complex(NTS, north up page) )

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Graeme and Lesley Butler made a brief inspection of this property November 2015. The surveyed parts of the complex include the following stone house, trees, stone cottages, and underground tanks with measurements in millimetres unless otherwise stated. Bernard Goss house c1883Figure 9 west and south elevations

Figure 6 Goss house, assumed as built in the 1880s with front and rear verandah and built in rooms at rear as was typical, NTS (north up page) Figure 10 House plan (NTS)

Elements include:    

Figure 7 east elevation

  

 Figure 8 north elevation

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5 room plus passage stone house, without roof, floor or opening joinery; assumed bedrooms along south side; Colonial Georgian derived styling; coursed rubble basalt stonework, quarry faced, high cement ratio to mortar, similar to that of the cottage complex and Wollert State School 1877- stone available locally as field stone or quarried such as in Quarry Hills basalt quarry Bindts Rd on the Darebin Creek west of Quarry Hill; symmetrical east (front) façade; one window per room; four rooms with fireplaces, assumed once with timber mantels and slate hearths (typically 1370 x 420 x 40); north-south internal partitions of pressed red single brick (bricks typically 220x110x70); east-west partitions (passage walls) coursed basalt rubble 340350 thick;


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook 

east façade openings trimmed externally as quoining by cream or fancy white dry pressed bricks (typically 230 x 110 x 70) from Northcote brickworks; other openings trimmed externally and internally by red dry pressed bricks from Northcote Brick Company, splayed reveals;

     

Figure 11 window head, timber lintols internally, splayed reveals, outer pressed red brick quoining

Figure 12 rare NBC or Northcote Brick Company pressed brick with reversed stamp located in house

    

timber lintols (c130 x 60mm soft wood) internally over openings, with dressed stone lintels externally; dressed stone sills, some with margins (variable 360 x 150, 330 x 160); cast-iron air brick (230 x 85) to 220 x 150 sub floor vents in stone; assumed house roof formed in a typical M-hip profile of the Victorian-era; roof clad with slate, with remnants throughout house; front and rear verandah (assumed simple skillion or concave roof profile) joinery and roof gone (remnants in front of house -230 x 60 and 150 x 60 soft wood);

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30 thick internal plaster remnants, may be Keene's cement (no sign of paper, hard but weathered smooth finish) two chimney shafts red dry pressed face brick (220x70x90) with chimney tops formed as two corbels, flashing lines evident; arched fireplace openings, brick arches and wrought iron arch bars; dressed stone thresholds to external doors, front door 290 x 200; front door had side lights and panels; assumed timber (soft wood) double-hung sash windows, sash weights survive in house; soft wood T&G flooring 130x30mm on 120x50 sawn HW joists @ 500mm ccs.; rear room (H5) converted to kitchen (assumed inter-war), evidence of rooms on rear verandah used for bathroom, with claw foot cast-iron bath detached at rear;

Figure 13Room H5, converted fireplace


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Figure 14 Plan Room H5

  

one-fire cast-iron stove fitted into fireplace in H5, assumed interwar; evidence of dado in room H5; 3 x mature elms east of house.

Figure 15 Room H3, fireplace, window, floor remnants, soft wood grounds on right for fixing dado lining

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook McCoy stone kitchen, cottages, pepper trees, c1853-

Figure 17 Plan C1, former cottage later house kitchen

This cottage complex appears to have been originally a farm house (later used as kitchen for c1883 house) with adjoining farm structures that were unified and upgraded in the 1880s to house growing the Goss family. The east elevation of the group presents two butting structures (C1+C2 and C4) each with a central door and windows either side, abutting the kitchen farm house on the south.

Figure 16 McCoy complex with cottage at the south end and farm structures adjoining (stables, cow shed?) showing slit windows later changed to small residential windows, later converted to residential use. Assumed cottage came first with added farm buildings attached to north.

Figure 18 former farm cottage 1850s, from south end

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Figure 19 former farm cottage 1850s, from west showing corner of original cottage abutting long west wall to farm structures on north.

The complex includes: Former farm cottage (C1) of approx. 3.9x7.2m set at slight angle to other structures to north; with 

 

   

large fireplace group at the north end, assumed oven enclosure on west and open fire with suspended spit rod on east, built from slop moulded bricks and stone rubble; corbel-top chimney built from slop moulded bricks over with remnant gabled parapet attached; wrought iron 40mm diam. pipe spit rod for suspending cooking utensils with raising/lowering mechanism east end; Wrought iron arch bars over each fireplace opening, charred mantel shelf-beam 3 x MS arch bars over brick section, 2 x 80x15 arch bars over stone section. Chimney bricks 220x110x70mm.

Figure 21 western fireplace, assumed colonial oven location or similar.

Abutting rubble stone rooms on the north, assumed also built in the 1850s but modified in the 1880s to form better residential accommodation, some perhaps having been farm structures. Early detailing of east wall openings with stone reveals and timber lintols, is typical of the 1850s-60s. Brick trim to the west wall C2-C4 lancetlike openings is of dry-pressed bricks (with traces of internal stucco) similar to the c1883 house but on the west wall only (exposed to weather, as repairs?). These openings are assumed to have been once be slits as is seen in other early stone farm outbuildings in the area.

Figure 22 detail from cow shed at farm at Epping, Harvest Home Rd 2015 (HO80)

Figure 20 spit in eastern fireplace

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All joinery is gone except for lintols over doorways (burnt). Walls are of local basalt and some brown stone rubble with traces of internal stucco and white-wash or lime wash finish on the east (sheltered wall). Heavy gauge (24g ?) corrugated iron sheets are inside the cottages as perhaps an indication of the roofing, formerly gabled in profile.


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook stone threshold, construction joint at north corner, suggests free-standing.

The northernmost room (C4) may have been another cottage with a chimney at the north end, absorbed into the structures on the south. Two old pepper trees are close by to the east. The rooms include:

Figure 23 window opening east wall, C2- showing assumed form of windows throughout until the brick trimming of the 1880s.

  

room C2 approx. 3.3 wide x4.3m room C3 approx. 3.3x3.85m; room C4 approx. 3.3 wide x approx. 11m (north end collapsed) with possible chimney base and brick heart at the north end;

A brick on edge inter-war fireplace and narrow chimney have been formed in the south-east corner of C2 as an evident addition with a cast-iron base remnant, presumably for a stove. The north wall of C2 has collapsed and the eastern doorway is low at 1.78m above ground, with two small windows about 690 wide.

Figure 24 head detail, D8, typical of 1850s-60s.

Room C3 has infill of openings in the east wall and a construction joint at the north end. The latter, with the construction joint at the south end of the C2 east wall, suggesting that C2, C3 were once freestanding but the west wall is continuous C2-C4. There is also a gabled north end wall remnant over the dividing wall C2, C3. C3 has two windows and one door (D9 filled in).

Figure 25 Eastern wall C2-4 with stone reveals and white-wash or lime wash finish.

Figure 27east wall of C1, C2- vertical joint indicates c2 was free-standing but chimney faces south.

Figure 26 doorway (D8) in C2 east wall, wide but low height, timber lintol over, stone reveals, dressed

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Room C4 is one long space with the north end collapsed but potentially a fireplace at the north end (archaeological investigation needed). The corbelled chimney and fireplace central to the space on the west wall is largely built of the c1883 dry pressed bricks (220x110x75) used elsewhere and is centred on two small lancet like windows either side of the fireplace, a feature typically found in interwar houses. It has a wrought iron suspension cooking rod. Figure 28 C2, C3 east wall- door filled in to C3 but wider than C2 door, gabled north end wall to C2 visible as is the construction joint at the north end of C3.

Figure 31 View of C4 from north-east, chimney built of pressed bricks

Figure 29 Plan room C2

Figure 30 Plan C3

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Figure 32 Plan C4


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook The wide door (1.16m, D10) in the east wall of C4 suggests farm use rather than residential and s roughly central to W12 and W15. Mortices in the stonework jamb suggest use of timber beams to control entry or bar the door.

Figure 35 cow shed at early farm in Harvest Home Road, Epping- showing mortices.(HO80)

Underground tank one

Figure 33 Mortices in the stonework jamb

Figure 36 view from south-west

This tank is assumed to have been created to take water from the cottage and house roofs. potentially it was built with the house inc1883. The second underground tank to the south is noted in the 1908 description but not in 1885.

Figure 34 Door reveal at cow shed at early farm in Harvest Home Road, Epping- showing mortices.(HO80)

Figure 37 from east

The 5.5m diameter tank is formed from stone and covered with timber framed corrugated iron clad housing set on a rubble bluestone base: rafters 75x50 hardwood @ 800ccs, 140x20mm soft wood ridge; 160mm soft wood weatherboards (painted), 60x65mm hardwood studs, 100x40mm bottom plate with mortises for studs @ 600mm ccs. A ledge & brace soft wood door leaning against west end. Probable hardwood

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook pump stand suspended over tank on soft wood beams. Overflow stone lined drain to east.

Farm landscape The archaeological examination has identified stone pitched flooring as the base for what appear to be timber clad outbuildings (stables, cowshed) all collapsed. This assessment has not dealt with these elements. Remnants mature trees on the site from the Victorian-era include the 2 x pepper trees near the cottage group, the 3x mature elms east of the house. Italian cypress are dotted along the west boundary of the yard and in the cottage itself as probable inter-war plantings.

Figure 38

The roof is clad in part with screw-fixed Redcliffe Crown brand corrugated iron - In 1888 the Redcliffe Crown Galvanized Iron Company of St Philip's, Bristol, applied to register two trademarks in Victoria, the Redcliffe and the Redcliffe Crown. Miles Lewis notes that Lysaght was marketing the Redcliffe brand as its second quality iron, using the version of the brand containing the words 'trade mark' by 1902. Dr Dirk HR Spennemann, in his thesis on corrugated iron, estimates the date as between 1874 and 1882.

Figure 39.

Figure 40 second underground tank, south of the house.

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Figure 41 Three mature elms to east of house


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Brief development history of the place (Refer to Appendix 2: chronology) In 1840 John Hunter Patterson, (18101859) pastoralist, acquires this site as part of Crown Portion 21 to form part of his Woodstock farm. Crown Grants of CPs 49, 15-23, 27-30 (most 640 acres each) from the Kalkallo Parish Plan. The Parish Plan shows the area as `open forest and plains destitute of water'... `Soil middling, thinly timbered with stringy bark trees'. This was among of the earliest freehold farming land holdings in Victoria.

Figure 42 John Hunter Patterson (Victoria Parliament)

Patterson arrived at Hobart Town 1 March 1822 on the 'Castle Forbes', became landowner; visited Melbourne December 1836; returned to Van Diemen's Land to settle his affairs and arrived Port Phillip 1837; took up Greenhills station, 25 miles north of Williamstown and an outstation at Bacchus Marsh the same year; on run near Heathcote 1843-1853 and held other properties in other parts of the colony. He was elected MLC for the North Western Electorate serving 1st Nov 1856 to his 1 death . Peter McCoy senior, owner 1853-1864

In 1853 Peter McCoy grazier and hotel keeper (c1809-1864) purchased the Little Bald Hills property, CP21- along with other land in the Woodstock district in the 1850s. McCoy had arrived in Port Phillip in 1842 and lived most of his life at Belmont Farm in the Parish of Keelbundora and appears to have leased out his Woodstock land. Married to Catherine (nee Donnolley), later Margaret Sufferin 1806 –

1

Victoria Parliament web site

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Figure 43 McCoy complex with 1850s cottage at the south end and 1850s-60s farm structures adjoining (stables, cow shed?) showing slit windows later changed to small residential windows, later converted to residential use. Assumed cottage came first with added farm buildings attached to north. NTS (north up page)

Their family included: 

William McCoy 1835 – 1863

 

Catherine McCoy 1837 – 1906 Frances McCoy 1840 – 1906, married John Patrick McCormack 1858 Hugh Donnelley McCoy 1842 – 1864 Ann McCoy 1845 – Peter Paul McCoy 1846 – 1916 (local councillor and hotel owner) Margaret McCoy 1847 – 1853 John McCoy 1849 –

    

In 1859 McCoy advertised a `section of LAND', situate about 20 miles from Melbourne, admirably suited for farming,


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook dairy, or grazing purposes. `A snug cottage on the ground'. Capitally supplied with water, good fences, and … on a good road. This could have been CP21. Bernard Goss stated in 1885 that he had known the property since c1860 `as at present fenced and occupied'. Patrick McCormack, lessee 1864-1869

Peter McCoy leases the CP21 to relative Patrick McCormack in 1864 for 5 years from April, months before McCoy's death. McCoy's daughter, Frances (1840 – 1906), married Patrick's brother, John Patrick McCormack, in 1858 - John arrived in Port Phillip aged 18 on the ship `Frances' as a labourer with others from the same county in 1841. He was born in Thurles, Tipperary, Ireland. Payne states McCormack purchased the `Little Bald Hill' property and like Goss was a goldfields carrier and then a tenant farmer at Craigieburn. Bernard Goss, lessee 1872, owner 1885-

Bernard Goss was born 1838 in Ballinakill, County Queens, Ireland and had married Catherine Lillis in 1860. Bernard & Catherine Goss family:

  

      

Richard Goss Birth 24 May 1861 in Thomastown, death 1944 in Tooronga, Victoria; Michael Joseph Goss birth 06 Jan 1863 in Darebin, Victoria, death 23 Apr 1957 in Fitzroy; Catherine Goss birth 05 Jun 1864 in Thomastown, Victoria, death 14 Oct 1953 in Moonee Ponds, Victoria; John Goss, birth abt. 1867, death 9 Jan 1949 in Coburg, Victoria; Mary Goss, Birth 1867 in Victoria, death 1937 in East Melbourne; Margaret Goss Birth 1868 in Woollert, Victoria, death 9 Jan 1949 in Coburg, Victoria; Bernard Goss junior born in the Donnybrook area (described as at Woollert), death 1950 in Fitzroy; William born 1872 Woodstock, Death 1952 in Broadmeadows East; Bridget born 1875 in Woodstock, Victoria, death 16 July 1945 in Ararat, and Patrick born 1876, in Woodstock, Victoria, death 1967 in Fitzroy.

By the time the house was built (c1883) Goss had 10 children living on the farm, demanding considerable accommodation. His oldest son Richard shared property tenure with him by 1880.

Figure 44 Goss house, assumed as built in the 1880s with front and rear verandah and built in rooms at rear as was typical, NTS (north up page)

From 1872 Bernard Goss family lease a `farm' 640 acres, Donnybrook from P McCoy. The farm was rated at ₤160 annually, a similar value to McCormack's tenure, until a major increase to ₤200 in 1878-9. other identical acreages in the area attracted a much smaller valuation. By 1879-1880, as well as CP21, Bernard Goss & Son lease 320 acres (NAV ₤85) at Kalkallo; Bernard Goss & Son lease 300 acres (NAV ₤99) at Kalkallo from D O'Sullivan; Bernard Goss lease 320 acres farm (NAV ₤50) at Kalkallo from J Butler.

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Miss Margaret McCoy, a Benalla spinster, (later Margaret Shee after her marriage in 1884 to Frederick) leases the property at CP21 to Bernard Goss Woodstock farmer `together with the dwelling house and buildings thereon' for ₤225/yr for 7 years from 2 June 1883. Also, within 6 months of the lease date, Goss was to expend a minimum of ₤260 (replaced by ₤460 in a later September 1883 amendment to the agreement) in `improving and repairing the dwelling house…in a substantial and durable manner to her satisfaction …' the sum expended to be repaid to the lessee at the end of the lease, allowing Goss to improve the farm while not the owner'. All other items on the farm were to be also maintained with allowance for the lessor to inspect at any time.


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook So this underscores the probability that the 5 room stone house was built c1883 and Goss safeguarded the value of his improvements by this agreement until he could acquire the freehold. The existing cottage and farm buildings adjoining became the detached kitchen for the house, as was commonly done, and the adjoining buildings were concerted into a cottage for his son or sons. The same pressed bricks used in trimming the house openings were used to do the same in the old stone cottage and buildings to convert them to residential use. The bricks were from the Northcote Brick Company that had commenced in 1882. By 1885 the property was offered for sale, with Goss as the successful purchaser. It was described as: `All that block of land being Crown Portion No. 21, parish of Kalkallo, county of Bourke, having an area of 645 acres, at present in the occupation of Bernard Goss, Esq. on which is erected a six-roomed BLUESTONE HOUSE, slate roof, substantially built, outhouses, and stabling tor eight horses, &c. There is a large tank and permanent water on the property. The land is subdivided into three paddocks, and fenced with stone wall and post and rail. Note.-This land is without doubt the choicest block in the whole of this highly favoured district.

The Goss family were well known in the district for the dairying and horse breeding, winning acclaim at agricultural shows as contenders and Bernard Goss as a judge. For example in 1900, at the Royal Melbourne Show, the draught horse stock category winner was Young Champion exhibited by Bernard Goss, of Donnybrook. `This colt was first as a yearling last year, and he is now a splendidly balanced colt, on good legs, with beautiful head...Another Sir Percival colt, Sir William, also shown by Mr. Goss, was selected as the ''Reserve Number" exhibit.' When Bernard Goss died in 1908 with probate granted to Richard, Patrick & James Goss. Value of real estate a massive ₤12,674 and personal estate ₤932 where real estate includes All that piece of land containing 640 acres known as Bald Hill being allotment 21 with: 

640 acres

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 21

        

a 5 room stone house, slate roof, kitchen dairy, six-stall stable, 2 loose boxes, cow shed, 40 bails, 2 underground tanks (increase of 1 since 1885) 3 paddocks, watered by dams and a spring; 100 acres fit for cultivation, rest grazing..

Fences    

north by part 6 wire fence, part stone wall; south all stone wall; west stone wall and wire, bad state of repair; east top rail and 5 wires.

Other Goss properties included: LOT 2 320 acres, Gellibrand's farm with 5 room weatherboard house, iron roof, dairy, cow shed of 12 bails, 2 stall stable with loose box. 4 paddocks etc. LOT 3 156 acres 12 roomed cow shed of 10 bails, 2 stall stable etc. There was a lengthy list of stock, horses, cattle, extensive implements, drays, buggy, cart, wagons etc. showing what a large farming enterprise it was. Very little has been added of the original complex since that date with various events meaning dilapidation of the two stone buildings and collapse of the timber farm structures to the north. Conclusion from place history The property owners at the key development eras evident at the property, McCoy and Goss, were both prominent in the area's history while the stages of building, emerging prosperity post gold for McCoy and the boom of the 1880s for Goss, present two major growth era in the area. The farm complex is described in 1885 and 1908, the later in detail in terms of the farm stock and machinery, provide a basis for interpretation of the remnants of the two building groups. The combination of fabric and documentation allows for a


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook historical association with the two key figures in the property's history. Victorian Historical Themes The Victorian Historical Themes represented include: 4.1 Living off the land 4.3 Grazing and raising livestock 4.4 Farming

to or altered. Nevertheless previous heritage assessments have identified them as of local historical significance and they are now in heritage overlays where future development must account for their heritage values. These often ruinous complexes are fast being overtaken by unrelated residential development but form a fragmented group representing the strong farming origins of the Whittle seas district.

6.7 Making homes for Victorians Brief comparative analysis (Refer Appendix 3: Comparative examples) The following analysis relies on existing sources where inspection of each place was outside of the scope of this project, this has been carried out where practical. Hence it is unknown if all of these structures are as identified but given most are in the heritage overlay it is assumed they are.

Figure 45 Hunters Road Dairy 1850s? (HO124, Context)

Figure 47 Stimson's House 1850s? (HO169, Context)- potentially similar to the ruinous cottages at CP21

Figure 48 Lyndoch Park homestead 1850s? (HO142, Context)

Repeating elements seen in the complexes include:      Figure 46 Timms' House c1854? (HO162, Context)

Many similar complexes from the development era of CP21 are similarly depleted in terms of original fabric, with many in a ruinous state and others, like Lyndoch Park homestead (HO142), added

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 22

stone homesteads or residences; stone or timber barns and outbuildings; pepper trees, Monterey pine wind rows; dry stone walling enclosing paddocks, yards; stone paved yards.


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Importance to the course, or pattern, of our cultural or natural history. Criterion B: Possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of our cultural or natural history. Criterion C: Potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of our cultural or natural history. Criterion D: Figure 49 Creed's Farm, c1856-, in 2009 (HO103, Context)

Importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a class of cultural or natural places or environments. Criterion E: Importance in exhibiting particular aesthetic characteristics. Criterion F: Importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period. Criterion G:

Figure 50 Creed's Farm, c1856-, in 2015 (HO103) showing the reconstruction of the verandah and stone wall, reroofing

Reconstructed complexes include Creed's Farm, c1856-, in 2009 (HO103) and Hawkstowe or Le Page farm complex 1850s-1860s, presenting a more complete picture of the theme and type but their authenticity is uncertain. The complex Wuchatschs Farm 74 Robert Street, Lalor has been identified as one of the most complete complexes and is on the Victorian Heritage Register but a recent inspection of this place also reveals ruinous and altered structures so the threshold is not a high one for places that represent this important era in the City of Whittlesea. Assessment against HERCON criteria The following is an assessment against relevant criteria that forms the basis of a provisional Statement of Significance. The HERCON criteria were adopted at the 1998 Conference on Heritage (HERCON) and are based closely on the Australian Heritage Commission criteria for the Register of the National Estate. Criterion A:

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Strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons. This includes the significance of a place to Indigenous peoples as part of their continuing and developing cultural traditions. Criterion H: Special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in our history Evaluation of cultural significance against relevant criteria

Criterion A: Importance to the course, or pattern, of our cultural or natural history. The property owners (McCoy, Goss) and the farming activities at the key development era evident at the property represent the significant theme highlighted in the thematic histories being Victorianera freehold farm settlement. The limited integrity of the structures express the evolution of farming in this locality from the Crown sales in the 1830s. The complex represents the broad theme of primary production within the local area. The known farming history of the Goss family is remarkable as well as typical of that of other allotments in the locality.


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Criterion B: Possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of our cultural or natural history. The complex has early and distinctive structures in a local context including the rubble stone cottage, later stone masonry homestead, stone stable and cow shed flooring and underground tanks. These construction forms are specific and characteristic to this area and uncommon in other parts of the State. Criterion D: Importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a class of cultural or natural places or environments. The low integrity to the significant period of the collective elements deters any strong demonstration of a specific class characteristic within a specific period or era other than of a damaged farm complex in the area. It has the characteristics of two key farming eras exemplified by incomplete buildings such as the cottages, the house and the tanks, with other related structures of a lesser integrity. Criterion H: Special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in our history Associations with important local figures, McCoy and Goss, are represented by the two building groups, cottages and the house, plus tanks, paved areas, trees, surrounding house yard and fences. Culturally significant? The property was has not been previously identified as potentially significant in a number of studies of the City of Whittlesea. From this report’s assessment and given the known historical background and physical condition of the identified elements at this property, the place does possess cultural significance as a farm complex, judged within the local context of the Donnybrook and Woodstock districts within the City of Whittlesea. The complex is expressive of two key stages of farm development from first land settlement of the area to the prosperity of new markets brought by gold in the 1850s1860s and the 1880s when the population

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the Colony and its need for farming produce increased rapidly. This farming theme has been identified as individually significant for this specific area and the complex is expressive of the area’s key theme of early freehold farm settlement. Although physical condition is not a determinant of cultural significance, the significance of the identified elements is qualified by their condition and relative age, with most being in fair to poor condition that would necessitate renewal or change of these elements to meet the proposed or existing uses in the area which would, in turn, potentially affect their integrity to their construction dates.


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Appendix 1: Report assessment criteria and assessment Planning and Environment Act heritage values and thresholds Section 4(1)(d) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 lists the following heritage values for use in heritage assessment within the Municipality Planning Scheme:  scientific,  aesthetic,  architectural or  historical interest or  other special value (includes social or spiritual interest.) The thresholds applied in any assessment of significance are:  State Significance and  Local Significance. Local Significance includes those places that are important to a particular community or locality. Assessment criteria used in this report This Report uses the above heritage values, as assessed under the Victorian Planning Provisions (VPP) Practice Note, Applying the heritage overlay 2012 which cites the following criteria as briefly described below: A place may have: A importance to the course or pattern of our cultural or natural history (historical significance); B uncommon rare or endangered aspects of our cultural or natural history (rarity); C potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of our cultural or natural history (research potential); D importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a class of cultural or natural places or environments (representativeness); E importance in exhibiting particular aesthetic characteristics (aesthetic significance); F Importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical

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achievement at a particular period (technical significance); G. Strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons. This includes the significance of a place to Indigenous peoples as part of their continuing and developing cultural traditions (social significance); H Special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in our history (historical association). Burra Charter

In addition to the Register of the National Estate criteria, the ICOMOS Burra Charter sets out broad heritage assessment considerations. The Burra Charter 1999 (1.2) defines Cultural significance as aesthetic, historic, scientific, social or spiritual value for past, present or future generations, adding an extra cultural group (or groups) to qualify the significance of the place when compared with the NER criteria’s present or future generations. Cultural significance is defined as embodied in the place itself, its fabric, setting, use, associations, meanings, records, related places and related objects.


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Appendix 2: chronology Date

event

source

1824

Captain W.H. Hovell and Hamilton Hume were the first Europeans (who recorded their Context 2013: 8 journey) to travel overland from Sydney to Port Philip Bay. The first description of the area now occupied by the City of Whittlesea appeared in their journal on 14 December 1824. Having passed through the first plain… myself and Mr Hume ascended a high but single hill. In front from which we saw a very gratifying sight. This was a very extensive plain extending from west to south east for several miles with patches of forest which appear to separate one plain from another. But the whole appeared in front, say south, to be level but in parts in the plains some hills arose of a conical shape, with only here and there a few trees upon them. And all the soil of best quality.

1839

first land sales in the City of Whittlesea area, a year after the survey of the area had been Context 2013: 10 completed by Hoddle- most purchasers were speculators, and had little long-term interest in the future of the district. They subdivided the land and either sold or leased the lots. The resulting smaller lots attracted small scale farmers, and the character of the district quickly began to change. Early developments appeared in Kinlochewe (near Donnybrook) (1839), Merriang/Beveridge (1840) and the Medlands Estate (c1853) followed by Woodstock (c.1853), the Township of Whittlesea (1853), Egglestone Estate (near Hazel Glen/Doreen) (1853) and Wollert (1853). As a result, by the mid 1850s the Plenty district had established itself as a major pastoral and agricultural district, dotted with small towns. It was feted in Parliament as the “second most important district in the colony”.

1840

John Hunter Patterson, (1810-1859), pastoralist, acquires Portion 21 as part of his Woodstock farm. Crown Grants of CPs 4-9, 15-23, 27-30 (most 640 acres each) from the Kalkallo Parish Plan in April 1840- CP21 is the subject site. Parish Plan shows the area as `open forest and plains destitute of water'... `Soil middling, thinly timbered with stringy bark trees' .

1840s-

Dairying practised in the area with the local Morgan’s farm one of the largest dairy farms Context 2013: 17 in the Colony in the 1870s. transport of the produce to Melbourne was by horse and cart, along the Epping Road. The arrival of the railway in 1889 provided local farmers with a far easier way to transport their produce to market, and assisted the growth of the industry. Subsequent improvement of grazing pastures, allowed the full potential of dairying in the district to be realised.

1841

William Forlonge acquires Woodstock farm including Portion 21

1841

Present City of Whittlesea included in what was termed the “settled districts” of Context 2013: 9 Melbourne (a strip of land that ran within 40 kilometres of Melbourne, 24 kilometres of Geelong and 16 kilometres of Portland and Alberton in Victoria, and where farming development was encouraged and colony services provided). The district was quickly settled by small scale agriculturalists. Subsequent selection Acts further eroded what remaining tenure the squatters possessed as smaller farms were developed and the land was aggressively cleared for more intensive land-use.

1849

Rocky Water Holes or Kalkallo was a hive of activity by 1849, according to `The Argus' of 12 Ford December that year, with ‘a fine store ... two first rate inns, a post office, watch-house etc.’ The traffic was ‘very great ... no less than 98 drays loaded with wool touched at this place last week’

1849-

The first factories in the area were flour mills, grinding grain grown by local farmers. Ford cites Argus These were Barber and Lowe’s flour mill at Cambellfield, on the Merri Creek (shown on the December 1849 Geological Survey of 1857) working from 1849 until the 1850s, and a flour mill, at Rocky Water Holes ( later known as Donnybrook or Kalkallo), reported to be ‘in course of erection’ in 1849.... This may have been the steam flour mill at Kalkallo, run by William Gadd, 1857-64. As elsewhere, the flour mills were related to the rise and decline of wheatgrowing in the area. .... An early flax mill is thought to have been operating in the Kalkallo area.

1850s

Gold discovery had a major impact on the district- the large numbers of people flooding on Context 2013: 12 to the goldfields meant that there was a surge in the demand for meat and agricultural products. The prices of wheat, beef and hay all rose sharply.27 The Plenty Road was also one of the major routes to Victoria’s north-eastern gold fields. It quickly filled with diggers, traders and those carting goods to and from the goldfields. The steady flow of people through the district generated income but also encouraged settlement. As miners returned from the goldfields, some stayed in the area, swelling the population of the settlements. (Note that both the Goss, McCormack familles were carters on the gold routes.)

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Kalkallo Parish Plan, County of Bourke

Tardis


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

event

source

1852

Donnybrook area surveyed for sale of Crown Lands, known to European settlers as Rocky Context, 2013: 2: 5 Water Holes when populated by small farmers, and a number of small businesses and tradespeople had begun operating in the township…an abundance of travellers’ lodgings appeared, suggesting Donnybrook was a frequent stopping place for people on the road to Sydney or the goldfields. In 1872 the railway came to Donnybrook, a factor that partially contributed to the decline of the township as it reduced the opportunity for passing trade on the road

1853

Catholic church constructed in Woodstock, followed by Westgarthtown (Lutheran, 1856) and Morang (Presbyterian, 1860).

Context, 2013: 51

1853

Peter McCoy (c1809-1864) purchased the Little Bald Hills property, CP21- along with other land in the Woodstock district in the 1850s. McCoy had arrived in Port Phillip in 1842 and lived most of his life there at Belmont Farm in the Parish of Keelbundora and appears to have leased out his Woodstock land. Married to Catherine (nee Donnolley), later Margaret Sufferin 1806 – Their family included:

Tardis: Montalto, 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook; Ancestry.com McCoy family tree

       

William McCoy 1835 – 1863 Catherine McCoy 1837 – 1906 Frances McCoy 1840 – 1906, married John Patrick McCormack 1858 Hugh Donnelley McCoy 1842 – 1864 Ann McCoy 1845 – Peter Paul McCoy 1846 – 1916 Margaret McCoy 1847 – 1853 John McCoy 1849 –

1853

Survey of the Epping township, Robert Mason set aside 17 acres for a cemetery and EPPING CEMETERY recreation reserve. Cemetery trustees were subsequently appointed ; on 22 May 1858, Hermes No 28381 Place tenders were called for the enclosure of the cemetery area (The Argus, 22 May 1858) and Citation Report on 11 June 1858 regulations were formally gazetted.

1853-

Woodstock district developed c.1853, around the same time a Catholic church was Context, 2013: 2: 8 established there. Sir Henry Barkly Hotel 1855 and a post office and store 1858 . The Woodstock Roads Board was established in 1857 to promote the management and improvement of roads in the area, and was consequently one of the first local government bodies in the district. ... Following this short period of growth in the 19th century, Woodstock dwindled. A state school opened in 1875 but closed due to a shortage of pupils in 1901.

1854

Roman Catholic Reserve at Kalkallo township in Hawkey St (now Hume Highway)

1854

Bernard Goss, farmer, arrives at Port Phillip: Name: Bernard Goss Estimated birth year: abt. 1835 Age: 19 Arrival Date: Jun 1854 Arrival Port: Melbourne, Australia Departure Port: Liverpool Ship: Saldanha Nationality: English

18541870s

Donnybrook an important coaching stop on the Sydney Road and near the Merri Creek, the largest town in the Whittlesea Shire- population 43 men, 19 women in 1854, flourishing during the 1850s - travellers to the gold-fields

1856

COUNTRY ROADS- The Argus gives the following account of the state of two of out colonial Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. roads:—" The Rocky Water Holes are about, twenty miles from Melbourne, on the : 1855 - 1918) Friday 11 Sydney-road, and near Donnybrook. A creek crosses the road. This creek has never been July 1856 bridged over, and on each side the approaches to the place where it is intended to have a bridge some time or other, have been left wholly unformed. The consequence is, that owing to continued traffic and the wet weather, this small portion of the road is next to impassable, and the difficulties are so great that traffic is nearly suspended. The crossingplace at the creek is disgracefully dangerous, and accidents occur daily. Our informant stated that he had himself witnessed several accidents of a. most serious kind which occurred during one day, and that it was not safe, to attempt crossing on horseback, even in broad daylight. At night none are so foolhardy as to attempt doing so, and drays are camped on one side or other, if they happen to reach the creek after dark. In the day-time, the creek is occasionally impassable, and persons in vehicles or on horseback have to trespass upon private property or put an end to their journey. This, be it remembered, is the condylion of-a spot within twenty miles of Melbourne-and on the main line of road to

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Parish Plan

Jones: 79


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

event

source

Sydney, leading through an extensive agricultural district, and through many fast improving1 townships. 1857

Belmont Hotel (owned at one time by Peter McCoy) as offices for the Epping District Road `The Argus': February Board- February tenders to be left with the Chairman of the Epping District Road Board at 1857 cited by `Darebin the Belmont Hotel. Heritage' web site

1857

Wesleyan Reserve at Kalkallo township in Hawkey St (now Hume Highway), adjoining Public Purposes Reserve of 1857

Parish Plan

1858

Woodstock Road District created, later absorbed into Darebin Shire 1870

Payne: 108-

1859

TO be LET, a section of LAND, situate about 20 miles from Melbourne, admirably suited for farming, dairy, or grazing purposes. A snug cottage on the ground. Capitally supplied with water, good fences, and jutting on a good road. Apply to Mr McCoy, Martin's section. Woodstock

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Friday 11 March 1859 p 8 Advertising

1859

Formation of the Whittlesea Agricultural Society to encourage the “advancement of agriculture and horticulture,” “improve the breed of stock”, “make examination and trial implements” and to collect and disseminate seeds, plants and information. The WAS held its first show in 1859- indicative of importance of the Whittlesea area as an agricultural district (The first -The Port Phillip Farmers Society, was established in 1848)

Context 2013: 16

1859

Bernard Goss application for carrier's license, aged 21.

`The Argus' 1.7.1859

1860

Cemetery established around this time at Donnybrook, shown on Parish Plan as one of four reserves in Kalkallo Township on the east side of the town reserve

Ford; Parish Plan

1860

Bernard Goss (Born 1838 in Ballinakill, County Queens, Ireland) married Catherine Lillis

Tardis:

18611876

Bernard & Catherine Goss family: Australia, Birth Index, Richard Goss Birth 24 May 1861 in Thomastown, death 1944 in Tooronga, Victoria; 1788-1922 Michael Joseph Goss birth 06 Jan 1863 in Darebin, Victoria, death 23 Apr 1957 in Fitzroy; Catherine Goss birth 05 Jun 1864 in Thomastown, Victoria, death 14 Oct 1953 in Moonee Ponds, Victoria; John GOSS, birth abt1867, death 9 Jan 1949 in Coburg, Victoria; Mary GOSS, Birth 1867 in Victoria, death 1937 in East Melbourne; Margaret GOSS Birth 1868 in Woollert, Victoria, death 9 Jan 1949 in Coburg, Victoria; Bernard Goss junior born in the Donnybrook area (described as at Woollert), death 1950 in Fitzroy; William born 1872 Woodstock, Death 1952 in Broadmeadows East; Bridget born 1875 in Woodstock, Victoria, death 16 July 1945 in Ararat, and Patrick born 1876, in Woodstock, Victoria, death 1967 in Fitzroy.

1863

Presbyterian church at Donnybrook, Yan Yean, Janefield: Kalkallo reserve gazetted 1870; population of Woodstock Road District 700, peaking for the Victorian-era

Jones: 79; Parish Plan

1864

Funeral Notice. THE Friends of the late Mr. PETER McCoy, of Woodstock, and of his eldest son HUGH DONNELLY McCoy, are respectfully invited to follow their remains to the place of interment, Melbourne General Cemetery. The funeral to move from the residence of Mr. John Devine, Belmont Hotel, Thomastown, on Wednesday, 16th inst., at 12 o'clock. JOHN DALY, undertaker, Latrobe and Spring streets, Melbourne.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 14 November 1864 p 8 Family Notices

1864

Peter McCoy barman of Keelbundora dies 30 Nov 1864 (described as late of Belmont farm, County of Bourke), and was buried at Melbourne General Cemetery. Probate documents- probate to executor Thomas Rawlings of Rawley Lodge Epping gentleman, also John O'Shannessy MLA and Motherwell, farmer. His real estate was considerable, but his debts included one of ₤4500. (In 1875 This property was described as freehold 640 acres CP21 and valued at ₤3520, comparing with another of his properties, 640 acres `Martin's Section' valued at ₤2560considerably less than CP21. His will of 1858 devised that Margaret McCoy, the younger daughter of his son, William McCoy, should receive this property. McCormack is recorded as renting the property 1871-1872 for ₤205, Goss 1872-1874 for ₤393 and on to 1875; Goss appears to have received a ₤550 `deposit' from McCoy which he paid interest on. Other properties included

VPRO: 5/214 VPRS 28/P0, unit 54; VPRS 28/P1, unit 10; VPRS 7591/P1, unit 21

John Whitty's half section' part CP20 326 acres Kalkallo, valued at ₤1467rented to Cummins in the 1870s;

Freehold property, parish Keelbundora part CP22 144 acres, known as Belmont Farm and valued at ₤1500 - to be given to his son, Peter McCoy.

Disbursements included a ₤10 fee to Mr Johnston architect for the Shamrock Hotel, with other works on The Belmont Hotel, also stone walling and railing on Belmont Farm, ₤20,

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 28


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

event

source

1864

McCoy,-On the 13th inst., at the Clare Hotel, Little Bourke-street west, Melbourne, of abscess in the throat, Hugh Donnelly McCoy, aged twenty-two years. Also, on tho 13th inst., at the same place, of disease of the heart, Mr. Peter McCoy, of Woodstock, father of the above, aged fifty-five years.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Monday 14 November 1864 p 4 Family Notices

1864

Peter McCoy leases the CP21 to Patrick McCormack for 5 years from April, months before his death. McCoy's daughter, Frances (1840 – 1906), married Patrick's brother, John Patrick McCormack, in 1858 - John arrived in Port Phillip aged 18 on the ship `Frances' as a labourer with others from the same county in 1841. He was born in Thurles, Tipperary, Ireland.

Tardis: Montalto, 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook cite RGO SN 19237; Darebin Shire Rate Books, VPRO; Payne: 108; Advertiser (Hurstbridge, Vic. : 1922 - 1939) Friday 12 November 1937

also fencing by R Hill )

Payne states McCormack purchased the `Little Bald Hill' property, having arrived in the colony c1850 and like Goss was a goldfields carrier and then a tenant farmer at Craigieburn. He married Bridget Larkin.) OTHER PIONEERS FAMILIES STILL IN DISTRICT article of 1927: Mr. Patrick McCormack, the father of the genial Cr. "Bat." McCormack, without whose presence no meeting of the Whittlesea Shire Council would be complete, came to Australia from Limerick, Ireland, in 180, and who, for a while was engaged in the carrying business to the :Bendigo gold-fields, but later took up land at Craigieburn, and then Woodstock. 1865

Population of Woodstock Road District 600

Payne

1865

Foundation stone of St. Peters Catholic church Epping was laid by Bishop Goold on 5 November 1865, following the celebration of Mass in a marquee. Opened on 13 January 1867. St Peter's is now believed to be the second oldest Victorian catholic church outside the inner Melbourne suburbs (Keilor being the oldest). Mass had first been celebrated in the district, then known as Darebin Creek, as early as 1849. Between 1849 and 1865, catholic masses were held at the home of Alexander MacKillop (whose daughter, Mother Mary Mackillop founded the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Sacred Heart) and a catholic denominational schoolhouse, constructed in 1852.

Hermes No 28393 Place Citation Report

1869

WOODSTOCK-DISTRICT BOARD.-At the meeting held on Saturday, September 4th, there were present — Messrs. Bodycoat, Gorman, Mulkhinagh, Stewart, and the newly-elected members, Messrs. McCoy (Peter junior) and O'Sullivan. Tenders were accepted for the fencing embankments at Chandlers' and Barwon Hills, from Mr. Mitchell per rod, 5s. 4d.; also the fencing at the Northern end of the district, at per rod, 5s. 9d. Tenders were also opened for the cutting of a sideling for Grant's road, but deferred accepting until the Surveyor supplied the quantities of excavating necessary. Messrs. Lalor and Spencer applied for payments on their several contracts, and on the motion of Mr. O'Sullivan, seconded by Mr. Bodycoat, cheques were drawn for the several amounts certified by the Surveyor. That officer was instructed to have the bridges in Cunningham road repaired. It was also resolved to divide the district into three divisions, for the convenience of the day labour. The Surveyor was also instructed to extend Mr. Lalor's contract for the construction of five chains in Bodycoat's road. The following correspondence was received:— From the Treasury, accompanied by a voucher, for a portion of the endowment for the current year. From the Wallen and Donnybrook District Board, respecting opening a road from this district to Beveridge. After a discussion of the matter, Mr. Gorman and the Surveyor were instructed by the Board to confer with the owners of property which the proposed road will pass through, and to report at the next meeting of the Board.

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Saturday 25 September 1869 p 12 Article

1869

WOODSTOCK DISTRICT ROAD BOARD.—At the last meeting held there were present Messrs. Gorman (Chairman), McCoy, Mutchinagh, O'Sullivan, and Stewart. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed. Mr.Mutchinagh proposed, and Mr. Gorman seconded, that 5 chains on Grant's Road be metalled and a culvert constructed. The Surveyor was instructed to make a survey of the proposed Killockue Road, and to have the bridges repaired in Cunningham's Road. Mr. Mutchinagh withdrew the notice of motion for pitching and metalling Rowan Hill main road. Correspondence, from the Roads and Bridges Departments requesting the names of the Chairman and Treasurer to be sent to the office ; from the Epping Road Board respecting a conditional promise from the Roads and Bridges Departments to place a sum on the estimates for the re-building a bridge over the Darebin Creek in the Boundary road. After some discussion the Board agreed to accede to the request of the Epping Board to contribute their share of funds for there building the same. A letter was also received

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Friday 24 December 1869 p 6 Article

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 29


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

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respecting the opening of a road at the North end of the district, and the surveyor was instructed to report on it at the next meeting of the Board. 1869

Bernard Goss leases 632 acres Section 20 Wallen from J S…s as the only Donnybrook entry Epping District Rate NAV ₤180 (also 1868) Book 1869, Woodstock riding 574

1869

Church of England Reserve gazetted at Kalkallo township in Hawkey St (now Hume Highway)

1870

After much lobbying and discussion, the Victorian Government finalised plans for a railway to the north-east of Victoria. It was to pass via Essendon, along a reconstructed section of railway which had been developed ten years earlier by a private company, and would pass through Broadmeadows, Craigieburn, Donnybrook, Beveridge and Wallan Wallan Wallan and on to Seymour. This first section was completed by August 1872 and fifteen months later, had reached Wodonga. Decline in traffic with the end of the gold boom and the opening of the railway to Wodonga.

1870

Epping, Morang and Woodstock districts form a single Shire appeared in the Government Gazette. On 26 September 1870, the Shire of Darebin was created.

Context 2013: 47

1870-2

Patrick McCormack rated 1870-1 for this farm but moved with his family from Little Bald Hill (Montalto) to a house previously occupied by John Whitty, southeast of the Post Office. Reports of McCormack clearing sale, including dairy cattle in `The Argus' 29 February 1872. The McCormack family were well known in the Kilmore Donnybrook area.

Tardis: cite Darebin Shire Rate Books, Payne: 108

1870-71

Patrick McCormack leases a farm 640 acres, Donnybrook from P McCoy's executors, rated Darebin Shire Rate Book NAV ₤162 reduced to 158 (also Martin Cummings leases 326 acres from McCoy's executor 1871, Woodstock riding at Yan Yean ₤70 ; Peter McCoy (junior) owner-occupier of a farm 636 acres, Kalkallo rated 598NAV ₤135 )

1870s

Payne states that the Woodstock area `repopulated' by 1870 with old families replaced by Payne: 108new ones. Patrick McCormack and his family moved from Little Bald Hill (CP21) to Whitty's south-east of the post office, being replaced by Bernard & Catherine Goss. In the 1870s Goss, McCoy, Ryan, O'Sullivan, Andrews, Richardson, Bodycoat and George McCormack (councillor, builder of Bournefield Park) all built in stone as what Payne called the `more substantial homes' built in the district. Large families included McCormack, Goss, Richardson, Andrews and Payne- all with 11 children each.

1871

Township of Broadmeadows had 95 dwellings and a population of 517 ( 271 males, 246 Ford: 23 females). Up at Donnybrook or Kalkallo there were 53 houses and a population of 288, the majority (190) being male and only 98 female. In the township of Campbellfield there were 42 dwellings and almost equal numbers of males and females (97 male, 98 female). Woodstock Road District absorbed into Shire of Darebin

1871-72

Patrick McCormack leases a farm 640 acres, Donnybrook from P McCoy's executors, rated Darebin Shire Rate Book NAV ₤162 reduced to 158 (also Martin Cummings leases 326acres from McCoy's executor 1872, Woodstock riding at Yan Yean ₤70 ; Peter McCoy owner-occupier of a farm 636 acres, Kalkallo rated NAV 589₤135 )

1872

station at Donnybrook opened on 14 October 1872, with a single platform on the west Context 2013: 29 (down) side. In 1882 an ‘up’ platform was provided and three years later a small signalling frame installed. The goods shed was erected in 1888…existing station building was opened 1900.

1872-3

Bernard Goss rated as the tenant on the property, valued at £160.

Tardis: cite Darebin Shire Rate Books

1872-3

Richard Goss family lease Bald Hill (now 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook) rated at ₤160 annually

Tardis: Montalto, 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1872-73

Bernard Goss leases a farm 640 acres, Donnybrook from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤160 (Peter Darebin Shire Rate Book McCoy owns a farm 640 acres, Kalkallo rated NAV ₤135 ) 1873, Woodstock riding, 246, 247

1874-

Peter McCoy junior (councillor and Darebin Shire president 5 times) took over from Michael Larmer as owner-licensee of his Belmont Hotel. Later run by his niece, Miss McCormack.

1874-75

Bernard Goss leases a farm 640 acres, Donnybrook from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤160 (Peter Darebin Shire Rate Book McCoy owner-occupier of a farm 636 acres, Kalkallo rated NAV ₤135 ) 1875, Woodstock riding, 45, 46

1875

Whittlesea Roads Board and the Morang riding (part of the Shire of Darebin) were merged Context 2013: 48 to form the Shire of Whittlesea. In 1915, the Shires of Epping and Whittlesea were merged to form the Shire of Whittlesea

1875

Valuation of McCoy property for probate lists considerable property including CP21 value

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Parish Plan

Payne: 75, 174

VPRO McCoy probate


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

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₤3520 (₤5.5/acre) ; also `Martin's Section, 640 acres CP16 at Kalkallo, value ₤2560 files (₤4/acre much less than CP21); CP20 of 326 acres known as John Whitty's half section ' value ₤1467 (₤4.5/acre) - cites rents received for CP21 McCormack from 1871-2 ₤205; Goss March 1872- Sep 1874 2.5 years ₤160/yr; also 1874-5; interest on ₤550 deposit received. List of outgoings of the 1870s to 1875 with expenditure on the Shamrock Hotel, Belmont Farm etc. 1875-76

Bernard Goss leases a farm 636 acres, Donnybrook from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤152 (Peter Darebin Shire Rate Book McCoy owner-occupier of a farm 636 acres, Kalkallo rated NAV ₤135 ) 1876, Woodstock riding, 36, 28

1876

Bernard Goss (and P McCormack) among subscription list for the O'Grady memorial Fund organised by Mr J M Brady architect etc of Sandhurst

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Saturday 27 May 1876

1876-77

Bernard Goss leases a farm 640 acres, Donnybrook from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤152 (compared with W Gardiner's farm 634 acres Toowong ₤71.)

Darebin Shire Rate Book 1877, Woodstock riding, 32

1877

The Kilmore club- held their opening meeting of the season on Wednesday last, under Leader (Melbourne, Vic. rather disadvantageous circumstances. The weather was far too warm for coursing : 1862 - 1918) Saturday purposes, while the ground selected to carry on operations was of such a tussocky 17 March 1877 description as to render the spins limited in number — nine only being the sum total of the first day's coursing, and these unsatisfactory in character. The meet was fixed for the Donnybrook Hotel, where a fair gathering of visitors put in an appearance at 9.30 a.m., and then a move was made to the Bald Hills paddock, the property of Mr. W. J. Clarke. Hare were found wanting during the earlier portion of the day, and when a halt was made for luncheon only, three courses had been obtained. A move to fresh ground was made towards the afternoon..,

1877-78

Bernard Goss leases a farm 634 acres, Donnybrook from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤152 (compared with W Gardiner's farm 634 acres Toowong ₤71.)

Darebin Shire Rate Book 1878, Woodstock riding, 32

18781879

Valuation of the farm at CP21 remained between £152 and £160 until 1878-79 when it increased to £200

Tardis: cite PROV, VPRS 14601/P1, Unit 4, Shire of Darebin

1878-79

Bernard Goss leases a farm 640 acres, Kalkallo from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤200 - a major Darebin Shire Rate Book increase in value (compared with W Gardiner's farm 634 acres Toowong ₤82); also leases 1879, Woodstock riding, farm (NAV ₤85) at Kalkallo; lease 300 acres farm (NAV ₤99) from D O'Sullivan at Yan Yean 30-32

1879-80

Bernard Goss leases a farm 640 acres, Kalkallo from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤200; Bernard Goss & Son lease 320 acres (NAV ₤85) at Kalkallo; Bernard Goss & Son lease 300 acres (NAV ₤99) at Kalkallo from D O'Sullivan; Bernard Goss lease 320 acres farm (NAV ₤50) at Kalkallo from J Butler

Darebin Shire Rate Book 1880, Woodstock riding, 21-23

1881

Bernard & Richard Goss lease a farm 640 acres, Kalkallo from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤200; Michael Goss leases 320 acres (NAV ₤85) at Kalkallo, from W Gardiner

Darebin Shire Rate Book 1881, Woodstock riding, 19-20

1881

Market report in the Bacchus Marsh Express (19 February 1881) noted the sale of potted butter from the “well-known dairy of Mr B. Goss of Woodstock”

Tardis

1882

November CP21 sold by Duncan Robert McGregor wine & spirit merchant of Queen St, Melbourne to Margaret McCoy (junior, spinster of near Benalla) as beneficiary of Peter McCoy's 1858 will (of Belmont farm, Keelbundoora parish) where CP21 had gone in trust to son William McCoy with payment of ₤200 to another son, Hugh Donelly McCoy (d 1864). Margaret was William's (d 1863) only issue and turned 21 in 1882.

VPRO SN

1883

Miss Margaret McCoy, a Benalla spinster, (later Margaret Shee after marriage 26 Feb 1884 VPRO SN to Frederick) leases property at CP21 to Bernard Goss Woodstock farmer `together with the dwelling house and buildings thereon' for ₤225/yr for 7 years from 2 June 1883, also within 6 months of the lease date- to expend a minimum of ₤260 (replaced by ₤460 in September 1883 agreement) in `improving and repairing the dwelling house…in a substantial and durable manner to the satisfaction of…' the sum expended to be repaid to the lessee at the end of the lease, allowing Goss to improve the farm while not the owner. All other items on the farm were to be also maintained with allowance for the lessor to inspect at any time.

1883

Bernard & Richard Goss lease a farm 640 acres, Kalkallo from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤200; Michael Goss leases 320 acres (NAV ₤85) at Kalkallo, from W Gardiner

1884

Bernard Goss & Sons lease a farm 640 acres, Kalkallo from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤200; also Darebin Shire Rate Book leasing 320 acres (NAV ₤85) at Kalkallo, from W Gardiner 1884, Woodstock riding, (1884 B Goss listed as occupier of land on the east of CP21 owned by W Gardener, 24-25; VPRO SN Glenvale)

1884-

The Goss Bald Hill property had increased in rated value to £230, and in 1890-91 was

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Darebin Shire Rate Book 1883, Woodstock riding, 25-26

Tardis cite: PROV, VPRS


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1891

valued at £288

14601/P1, Unit 5, Shire of Darebin rate book, 1884-1891

1884-5

Bernard Goss & Richard Goss, lease a farm 640 acres, Kalkallo from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤230; Michael Goss leases 320 acres (NAV ₤94) at Kalkallo, from W Gardiner

Darebin Shire Rate Book 1884-5, Woodstock riding, 31-32

1885

Bernard Goss farmer of Bald Hill, Woodstock, purchases the Donnybrook Road property VTO: V1749, F 349686 after brief tenure October to December by Margaret McCoy (by then Margaret Shee of Albert Rd, South Melbourne). Existing incumbrances included the 7 year lease to Bernard Goss of the property since March 1883. Mortgage for ₤1000 taken out in 1884 from Margaret Shee to Johanna Teresa Hughes (Walpole St, Kew) with power of sale- security included `all and singular the erections, edifices, buildings, fences, ways, rights of way, …'; Equitable mortgage from 1885 from Margaret Shee and her husband Frederick John Shee to Charles & John Gavin Duffy to secure ₤500 interest; charge of 1885 from Margaret Shee and her husband Frederick John Shee to Johanna Hughes to secure ₤100 interest . All but the Goss lease had been removed from the title by December 1885 at transfer to Goss. Goss immediately takes out a mortgage until 1894 from Job Smith, and another 1894-1905

1885

BALD HILLS, `WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14. 1.1/2 Miles from Donnybrook Railway Station. To Farmers, Speculators and Gentlemen Requiring a Country Residence Within a Short Distance of the Metropolis. LOUIS C. WILKINSON has received instructions from the owner to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION, at his rooms 63 Collins street west, on Wednesday, 14th October at twelve o'clock, All that block of land being Crown Portion No. 21, parish of Kal Kallo, county of Bourke, having an area of 645 acres, at present in the occupation of Bernard Goss, Esq. on which is erected a six-roomed BLUESTONE HOUSE, slate roof, substantially built, outhouses, and stabling tor eight horses, &c. There is a large tank and permanent water on the property. The land is subdivided into three paddocks, and fenced with stone wall and post and rail. Note.-This land is without doubt the choicest block in the whole of this highly favoured district.' Title certificate, particulars of which can be obtained at the office of Messrs. .Duffy and Wilkinson, …Terms, liberal, declared at sale.

The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 10 October 1885 p 47 Advertising

1885

Application for Torrens title for this property by Margaret Shee (wife of civil servant VPRO SN19237 Frederick John Shee) included Bernard Goss (farmer of Woodstock) statement: he was the existing occupier and had been so for 13 years (i.e. c1872-) and had known of the land for apprx. 25 years (i.e. c1860-) for which time it has been fenced and occupied `as at present fenced and occupied' (i.e. with a house).

1886

Bernard Goss & sons, lease a farm 640 acres, Kalkallo from P McCoy, rated NAV ₤230; Michael Goss leases 320 acres (NAV ₤94) at Kalkallo, from W Gardiner

Darebin Shire Rate Book 1886, Woodstock riding, 32-33

1887

Bernard, Richard and Michael Goss run a farm owned by B Goss & sons, 640 acres, Kalkallo, rated NAV ₤230; Bernard, Richard and Michael Goss lease 320-330 acres each (NAVs ₤94, ₤94, ₤100) at Kalkallo, from W Gardiner

Darebin Shire Rate Book 1887, Woodstock riding, 25-26

1887, 1888

WOODSTOCK COURSING CLUB The opening meeting of the Woodstock Coursing Club will be held at the (W. J. Clarke's) Bald Hill Estate, Donnybrook, on Wednesday, the 11th May. 1887 WOODSTOCK COURSING CLUB. The Woodstock Coursing Club held a most successful match. on Thursday last,. On Sir W. J. Clarke's Bald Hill Estate,. Donnybrook, The weather was fine, the attendance fair, and game being plentiful. Three dogs divided, Abbott and M'Kee's Pyrite and Half Cast and Mr J. Mason's Victor. Mr James Ahearn as judge, and Mr Riordan as slipper gave every satisfaction. Pyrite ran through her courses unchallenged 1888 (Peter McCoy junior's horses Daylight, Merrijig were typically a contender).

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Monday 2 May 1887 p 6 Article; Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 - 1954) Thursday 3 May 1888 p 3 Article

(see also Seymour Express and Goulburn Valley, Avenel, Graytown, Nagambie, Tallarook and Yea Advertiser (Vic. : 1882 - 1891; 1914 - 1918) Friday 30 August 1889) 1888

An account of 1888 reports: In the Broadmeadows Shire are Broadmeadows, Campbellfield, Mickleham, Somerton, and Tullamarine, all general and dairy farming and grazing townships, having much cultivated land surrounding them. Tullamarine was described as an ‘agricultural and pastoral centre’ while Donnybrook was the centre of a ‘large agricultural and pastoral neighbourhood’

1888

Bernard, Richard and Michael Goss run a farm owned by B Goss, 640 acres, Kalkallo, rated Darebin Shire Rate Book NAV ₤230; Bernard Goss leases 316 acres (NAV ₤94) at Kalkallo, from W Gardiner; John 1888, Woodstock riding,

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Ford


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

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& Bernard jnr Goss lease 3 farms of 330 acres each from Parnell, NAV ₤100 each

24-25

1890

Bernard, Richard and Michael Goss each run farms owned by B Goss, 640 acres each, Kalkallo, rated NAV ₤230 each; Bernard Goss jnr leases 316 acres (NAV ₤94) at Kalkallo, from W Gardiner; John Goss leases farm from Parnell, NAV ₤100

Darebin Shire Rate Book 1888, Woodstock riding, 24-26

1890

`At between 7 and 8pm on Tuesday 8th August 1890 a fire broke out at the Belmont Hotel. Darebin heritage web The hotel’s owner, Peter McCoy (junior), as well as the licensee, Selkirk escaped, however site Belmont Hotel the main building was lost. The Preston Volunteer Fire Brigade had arrived at the fire but the only water was at a nearby dam and the firemen were forced to use buckets to try dowse the flames. The fire was blamed on a boy carelessly dropping a lit match into a bucket of gasoline. At the time of the fire the hotel was described as “a very old twostorey iron building, with wooden lining”. McCoy rebuilt the hotel as was to remain there for many years. He died in 1916, leaving assets of £1,800 and real estate with a value of over £500.

1890

EPPING LICENSING COURT. Wednesday 3rd December. Before Messrs Hare, Wyatt and O'Meara. Inspector's Thomas and Scanlon were in attendance. All the hotel licenses were renewed. TRANSFER OF LICENSE. P. Riordan was granted the transfer of the licence for the Woodstock Hotel. TEMPORARY LICENSE. P. McCoy's temporary license for the Thomastown Hotel was extended for six months, the applicant's solicitor Mir. Wilkinson, promising that a first class brick building (in lieu of the one burnt down) would be erected within the next six months.

Mercury and Weekly Courier (Vic. : 1878 1903) Thursday 4 December 1890 p 3 Article

1890

MONDAY, 31st MARCH. At 2 o'clock. At the National Agricultural Society's Rooms, Kirk's Bazaar. 470 ACRES FIRST CLASS AGRICULTURAL and GRAZING LAND, being part of Little Bald Hill, within 1 mile of Donnybrook railway station, and 20 miles of Melbourne. ABBOTT and Co. have received instructions from Mr. John Abbott, who is giving up farming, to sell as above His well known property. The land is of the most superior description ; is securely fenced, and upon -it is erected a new and comfortable homestead, stables, &c.

Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918) Saturday 8 March 1890 p 23 Advertising

1891

Bernard Goss, farm 640 acres, Kalkallo, rated NAV ₤288; also Richard Goss leases 326 acres Darebin Shire Rate Book at Kalkallo (NAV ₤96) from w Gardiner, Michael Goss leases 357 acres (NAV ₤105) at 1891, Woodstock riding, Kalkallo, Bernard Goss leases 357 acres (NAV ₤105) at Kalkallo 32-34

1893

County of Bourke atlas shows Kalkallo Parish Plan (mainly as `open plains') - with B Goss 640 acres, CP21; W Gardiner, W Baker on CP20; T Baker, R H Abbott CP22; P McCormack CP18; P McCoy CP16; W Baker CP15

State Library of Victoria

1895

KILMORE The Governor, accompanied- by Lady Brassey and a party from Government house, attended this show on Thursday, November 28...There were a few good draught horses paraded, Mr. J. Lowden, of Kilmore, being first for a Clydesdale stallion with the well bred Clifton, by Botanist Mr. John Macdonald showed a splendid brood mare, with a good filly foal at her side, and Mr. R Goss, of Donnybrook, was first for a dry mare…

The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 30 November 1895

1897

BACCHUS MARSH AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL SOCIETY. THURSDAY, Oct. 21. JUDGES :-- The Bacchus Marsh Draughts-T. Wilkinson, Melbourne; B. Goss, Donnybrook; J. Bell, Express (Vic. : 1866 Kangaroo Ground… 1918) Saturday 23 October 1897

1898

PRESENTATION TO MR; EDMUND SHEFFIELD. On Saturday evening, 26th ult.., Mr. Edmund Sheffield was honoured by his old employers, the Epping Shire Council, with a banquet and presentation, the-"occasion" being his severing his connection with the Shire, after 35 years of faithful service... "Your connection with the Municipal Government of this district, as Surveyor of the Woodstock Road Board, and again holding office when the Epping, Woodstock, and Morang Districts were erected into the Shire of Darebin ; also, in the Shires of Jika and Preston, and now holding office as Surveyor, Treasurer, and Valuer of this Shire, from which you are retiring, covers a period of 34 years of meritorious municipal service. In conveying to you this slight memento of our deep regard and high esteem, we hope and pray that many years of peace and true happiness may be vouchsafed to you and that at eventide It may be light. We are, Sir, Yours very truly, JOHN R. MORGAN, President. THOS. BODYCOAT, COUNCILLOR. JOHN BUTLER, PETER McCoy, NEILHANSON,

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Evelyn Observer, and South and East Bourke Record (Vic. : 1882 1902) Friday 23 December 1898 p 2 Article


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

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BART. McCormack JAMES RYAN, SECRETARY. Shire Hall, Epping, 26th Nov., 1898." 1899

ROYAL AGRICULTURAL SHOW...DRAUGHT HORSES...Mr. B. Goss's Young Champion had secured an easy win for first place.….

Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918) Saturday 9 September 1899

1899

ALEXANDRA P AND A ASSOCIATION ANNUAL SHOW...THE FOLLOWING IS THE PRIZE LIST..Class A.-DRAUGHT STOCK. Judge-Mr Goss, Donnybrook.

Alexandra and Yea Standard, Gobur, Thornton and Acheron Express (Vic. : 1877 1908) Friday 1 December 1899 p 2 Article

1900

ROYAL SHOW...HORSES. DRAUGHT STOCK.….The winner was Young Champion, 1 year 10 months old, by Sir Percival, the exhibitor being Mr. B. Goss, of Donnybrook. This colt was first as a yearling last year, and he is now a splendidly balanced colt, on good legs, with beautiful head...Another Sir Percival colt, Sir William, also shown by Mr. Goss, was selected as the ''Reserve Number" exhibit.

The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 8 September 1900 p 5 Article

1900

AT THE SHOW...Some consistent exhibitors of good stock at these annual displays are Mr. The Australasian Arthur B. Trotman, Glenroy; Mr. Watson, of Gisborne: Mr. B. Goss, of Bald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 Hill, Donnybrook… - 1946) Saturday 15 September 1900 p 8 Article

1900-

Josephine Maddern helped run the Sir Henry Barkly Hotel. James, son of Bernard Goss, married her so that Bernard reputedly purchased it for them- he was described as `a farmer of considerable scale'

Payne: 176

1901

McCormack.-The Friends of the late Mr. PATRICK McCormack are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, Melbourne General Cemetery The funeral will leave his late residence, Kilmanna (or Kilmanagh) farm, Woodstock (1937 recollection stated: `Mr. Patrick McCormack, the father of the genial Cr. "Bat." McCormack, without whose presence no meeting of the Whittlesea Shire Council would be complete, came to Australia from Limerick, Ireland, in 1850, and who, for a while was engaged in the carrying business to the :Bendigo gold-fields, but later took up land at Craigieburn, and then Woodstock.' (Advertiser (Hurstbridge) Friday 12 November 1937)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 26 October 1901 p 9 Family Notices; Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Saturday 19 October 1912 p 29 Family Notices;

1901

growth in the status and popularity of the Whittlesea Show attracted the Governor General, Lord Hopetoun and a host of politicians

Context, 2013: 57

1901

WHITTLESEA SHIRE RIFLE CLUB. The annual. Rifle competition of the above club will he held on the Morang range on Boxing-Day, 26th December. 1901. -Valuable prizes have been donated by the following gentlemen, viz :-Mr. Renard, of the Renard Fertilising Co., Melbourne; R. Goss, Esq., Donnybrook ; A. Trotmain, Esq., Glenroy

Evelyn Observer, and South and East Bourke Record (Vic. : 1882 1902) Friday 20 December 1901 p 2 Article

1903

First Commonwealth Electoral roll shows the Goss family were involved in farming in the area. Josephine Goss was also recorded as a licensed victualler- as Josephine Maddern she had run the Sir Henry Barkly Hotel with friend, Agnes Ralston, but when Josephine married James Goss, his father “a farmer on considerable scale” bought the hotel for them (no direct connection?)

Tardis cite: Australian Electoral Rolls, Mernda division, Yan Yean subdivision, 1903, www.ancestry.com.au, accessed online 11 March 2013

1903

WESTERN MARKET results…50 ewes W Goss Donnybrook

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 25 February 1903 p 8 Article

1906

McCormack.—DEATH On the 4th September, at her late residence, "Bally Patrick," Merrijig, Mansfield, Frances, dearly beloved wife of John McCormack, and sister of Peter McCoy (jnr), of Thomastown, late of Woodstock. (she was the daughter of Peter McCoy, owner of CP21)

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Thursday 6 September 1906 p 1 Family Notices

1908

Bernard Goss dies. Probate granted to Richard, Patrick & James Goss. Part of the allotment VPRO is leased to Catherine Goss. Value of real estate a massive ₤12,674 and personal estate ₤932. Real estate includes: this property being: LOT 1 (Bald Hill)

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

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       

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640 acres a 5 room stone house, slate roof, kitchen dairy, six-stall stable, 2 loose boxes, cow shed, 40 bails, 2 underground tanks

3 paddocks, watered by dams and a spring; 100 acres fit for cultivation, rest grazing.. Fences

   

north by part 6 wire fence, part stone wall; south all stone wall; west stone wall and wire, bad state of repair; east top rail and 5 wires.

LOT 2 320 acres, Gellibrand's farm with 5 room weatherboard house, iron roof, dairy, cow shed of 12 bails, 2 stall stable with loose box. 4 paddocks etc. LOT 3 156 acres 12 roomed cow shed of 10 bails, 2 stall stable etc. Lengthy list of stock, horses, cattle, extensive implements, drays, buggy, cart, wagons etc 1908

EPPING.— The death to announced of Mr. Bernard Goss, of "Bald Hill," Donnybrook, the well known judge anal successful breeder of draught horse.. He took many prize, including a first and champion at the Royal Agricultural Show. He was one of the largest land owners in the "Woodstock district. Mr. Goss was born in Hallinkill, Queen's county, Ireland, where his relations wire all noted breeders of draught and blood stock. He leaves a large family

1908

DEATH OF MR. BERNARD GOSS. We regret to announce the death of Mr. Bernard Goss, of "Bald Hill." Donnybrook, the well known judge and successful breeder of draught horses. He took many prizes, including as first and champion at the Royal Agriculture Show. He was one of the largest land owners in he Woodstock district. Mr Goss was born in Ballanakill Queens Country Ireland, where his relations were all noted breeders of draught and blood stock. He leaves a large family R.I.P

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Saturday 4 July 1908 p 23 Article; The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Monday 29 June 1908 p 6 Article

1908

Sale of bald hill estate. A SUM OF £56,812 REALISED. Messrs. Edward Trenchard and Co. (in conjunction with Messrs. W S. Koast and Co.). Under instructions from tile executrix and executor of the late Sir W .J. Clarke, Bart., report having held a successful sale of the above estate on Saturday last. The estate comprised 6401 acres, and was subdivided into 18 lots, the whole of which were disposed of by auction. There was a splendid and representative attendance of buyers from all parts of the State, and the bidding was unusually brisk.

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Monday 7 December 1908 p 8 Article

1909

Richard Goss, Patrick and James Goss executor after death of father Bernard. Richard Goss, Patrick and James Goss levy a charge to Catherine Goss 1909 and lease part to her. Transfer to Richard Goss, Patrick and William.

VTO V 1779 F 777

1910

HUNTING. THE FINDOH HARRIERS...we crossed3 some stony: -rises, Leader (Melbourne, Vic. and then ran between Woody- Hill and the Bald Hill in the direction of Donnybrook.- After- : 1862 - 1918) Saturday .. passing through the Goss Estate. we entered- Baker's property… 16 July 1910 p 16 Article

1911

COURSING. The Whittlesea and District Coursing Club ran off their Hutton Cup Stakes on Wednesday and Thursday, 9th and 10th inst., when 16 dogs competed. The cup was presented to the club by Messrs R. Hutton and Hutchinson. The weather was perfect for coursing on both days, but hares were very scarce owing to shooting, and thus the Stake could not he run off in one day as anticipated but it is gratifying to know that in future all shooters and trespassers of all kinds found on the Little Bald Hill property where the coursing eventuated will be jealously prosecuted. The Messrs Goss Bros., who own the property, are the finest sports to be met with, and did all in their power to find hares for the club, and they have the thanks of everyone interested in coursing for their efforts to keep the

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Evelyn Observer and Bourke East Record (Vic. : 1902 - 1917) Friday 25 August 1911 p 3 Article


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

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good old game going. Mr R. G. Edwards officiated as judge, and gave general satisfaction, while Mr A. Gilligan excelled himself with the slips, Some splendid trials were witnessed. .. 1914

Richard Goss farmer of Woodstock owner of one-third of Bald Hill 21 July

VTO: Vol. 3825 Folio 836

1914

ANNUAL ELECTION. FOR WOODSTOCK RIDING. Notice is hereby given that the following Candidate, has been nominated for the office of Councillor, viz.— McCormack, Bartholomew And as the number of Candidates nominated does not. exceed. The number of Councillors to be elected I therefore declare the said Bartholomew McCormack duly elected as a Councillor for the Woodstock Riding of the Shire of Epping. THOMAS M. BROWNE, Returning Officer for the Woodstock Riding. '

Northcote Leader (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Saturday 29 August 1914 p 5 Advertising

1914

EPPING SHIRE COUNCIL… Present :-Crs. Dea (president), McCoy, McCormack, Wuchatsch, Browne and Goss,.. Constable Woodhouse reported (to shire) as follows:-"I visited Woodstock and Merriang on the 16th inst.-- I found some of the holdings at Woodstock infested with briar and thistles, but Merriang was fairly free from them. I have given some of the land-holders notice at Woodstock, and during the week will serve notices on the remaining ones, and also a few at Donnybrook. If notices are not complied with I will take proceedings…

Preston Leader (Vic. : 1914 - 1918) Saturday 24 January 1914 p 4 Article

1914

Epping Shire Council: Preston Leader (Vic. : `Councillor. (Bartholomew) McCormack was of opinion that abutting property owners 1914 - 1918) Saturday should pay share of cost of such work as the channelling asked for by Cr. McCoy, in the 25 July 1914 p 6 Article Woodstock riding ladies had to put on high-topped boots to get through the mud, but at Thomastown they could put on white shoes and skip along. (Laughter)…' `After a discussion the engineer was instructed, on the motion of Crs. McCoy and Goss, to have work done at Jolly's crossing and Craigieburn lane.'

1915

McCormack. - On the 28th September, at her residence, "Kilmanna Farm," Woodstock, Bridget, widow of the late Patrick McCormack, and loved mother of Sister Jerome, Thomas, Catherine, Bartholomew, Mary, Denis, Margaret, Bridget, Ann, Patrick, and Hanorah, aged 82 years. Requiescat in pace.

1916

WHITTLESEA SHIRE NEWS. Preston Leader (Vic. : THE LATE CR, McCoy. 1914 - 1918) Saturday The president (Cr, L. W. Clarke) prior to business being proceeded with on Monday, said 15 April 1916 p 3 Article that since their last meeting Cr. McCoy had been removed by death. On account of ill health he had had three months' leave of absence, which term expired peculiarly enough on the very day that he died, Practically Cr, McCoy had died in harness, for a message had come from him, through Cr. McCormack, about some requirement at Thomastown, to the last meeting of the council. He had a most honourable record as a councillor and citizen of Epping, and had made a friend of almost every one he came in contact with. He (the president) had never heard a word spoken against him, which speaks volumes for his character and disposition. He felt highly gratified that the residents of the shire had paid such a magnificent tribute to the memory of Cr. McCoy on the occasion of the funeral at the Melbourne Cemetery. As a mark of respect he moved that they adjourn till after lunch and that a letter of condolence be sent to the relatives. Cr. Thomas seconded the motion, remarking that the late Councillor. McCoy and himself had been boys together. He was always the same simple, open hearted, cheery man. There were few like him and they were all sorry to see his like pass away. Cr. McCormack said he had known him since he was a boy and was sure there was no better living man in Victoria,. He was the friend of everybody, and especially of those in need, and he was one of whom it could be said, in the matter of charity that he never let his left hand know what his right hand did. He was familiarly known throughout the shire as "Uncle Peter," and now that he had passed away he would be sadly missed, Cr. Wuchatsch having spoken in a similarly appreciative and eulogistic strain, the motion was carried.

1925

GOSS — On 6th December, 1925, at her residence, Bald Hill, Woodstock, Catherine, widow Advocate (Melbourne, of the late Bernard Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Goss; aged 88 years. R.I.P. Thursday 31 December 1925 p 19 Family Notices

1927

Monday, 31st October-Important clearing sale account Messrs Goss Bros., at Bald Hill, Donnybrook. IMPORTANT

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The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Wednesday 29 September 1915 p 1 Family Notices

Kilmore Free Press (Kilmore, Vic. : 1870 1954) (about)Thursday


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Date

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Realising Sale. 27 October 1927 At "Bald Hill" Woodstock Road, Donnybrook. "MONDAY. 31st OCTOBER, 1927 Commencing at 10.30 a.m. sharp. 1600-Sheep and Lambs-1600 Dairy Cows- 140-Dairy Cows Horses-1 4-Horses Machinery, Implements, Vehicles, Dairy Utensils, Harness, Farm Tools, Plant & Sundries, OSBORN & HUDSON, Salesmen, Kilmore and Branches, under instructions from Messrs Goss Bros, (owing to their having leased their property), will sell by public auction on the above date WITHOUT RESERVE SHEEP and LAMBS. 220 crossbreed and comeback ewes, 4 & 6 tooth with 220 lambs at foot by Border Leicester rams 200 crossbred and comeback ewes, 6 & 8 tooth, with 200 lambs at foot by Border Leicester rams 180 crossbred and comeback ewes, 8 tooth, with 180 lambs at foot by Border Leicester rams 215 crossbred and comeback ewes, 4 and 6 tooth. dry, good order 185 crossbred and comeback ewes, 6 and 8 tooth, dry DAIRY HERD. 70 milkers 70 forward and backward springers. 1 shorthorn bull 1 Friesian bull HORSES. 10 draught horses, 5 to 8 years, broken to all work 4 delivery horses, and hacks, broken to saddle and harness Machinery Implements, Plant, &c. International 10 H.P. Portable oil engine in perfect order, Cliff and Bunting', portable ; chaffcutter-double dumper, "Lugton" 4 H.P., steam boiler, "Massey Harris" reaper and binder S6ft; Massey-Harris" reaper and binder, 5ft; McKay" 12 disc-hoe seed drill, " Interna-; tional" disc harrows, "Mitchell" D.F. disc plough (new), " Mitchell" D.F. mould board plough, "Mitchell" 3 furrow mould board plough, "Grant" S.F. plough, garden plough, set 3 leaf harrows, " Hunter and Sons" manure distributor, scarifier, potato scarifier, 2 iron farm rollers, 1 iron spike roller, winnower, maize and pea sower, onion drill, harrows, skimmer and grader, sledge, 4 sets of swingles, rope plaiter, heavy farm lorry and pole, tip dray, spring cart, milk wagon, jinker in good order, D.S. Abbott buggy, rubber tyred phaeton, S.S., buggy, water cart, ' Felix" separator 80 gals. "De Laval" separator 80 gals., " Laidlaw" separator 50 gals., " DeLaval" steam separator 150 gals., 25 milk cans 30, 40 and 50 quarts, 3 cream cans, 6 milk buckets, "Ulax" patent strainer, "Hunt" milk cooler and vat, 6 milk vats, 3 sets dray harness, 1 set cart harness, 1 set jinker harness, 6 draught collars and harness, s.c. collar and harness, jinker collar and harness, spider, 8 winkers, 2 gents' saddles and bridles, 4 sets plough chains, 3 drag chains, 2 trollys, 2 ladders, 2 wagon jacks, cocklifter, hay knife, 6 forks, rake and needle, blacksmith's forge, anvil, bellows, vice, grindstone and tools, iron chimney, feed boiler, c.i. feed better image needed, double dog kennel, 2 petrol drums, engine tank, 2 wheel barrows, steel drill, steelyards, farm tools of every description, and sundries. TERMS.-For amounts of £25 and over 3 months A.B. free of interest, or cash less 7 per cent per annum, discount.. Luncheon. Provided.. 1927

HUNTING. FINDON HARRIERS By. Stonewall... The meet on Friday. September 9. was at the 17th mile post, Woodstock ...properties adjoining Mann's our quarry crossed the Donnybrook lane into a cultivation, then swinging to the left ran close up to Larmer's homestead, but just before reaching there doubled and ran through Goss's in the direction of the Bald Hill, at the foot of which she veered to the east. We had a nice gallop over some excellent hunting country before crossing the main Beveridge road…

The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 17 September 1927 p 38

1928

McCoy's Belmont Hotel sold: `BELMONT HOTEL, THOMASTOWN. After having been owned by members of the same family—it is said for 90 years—the Belmont Hotel, Thomastown, has been sold to Mr. David Scott, of Epping. The hotel, built by Mr. Peter McCoy early in the settlement of Victoria, is only 13 miles from Melbourne. It was sold by Mrs. Bridget McCormack. Mr. Scott already owns the hotel at Epping, and he intends to improve the Belmont Hotel.'

Advertiser (Hurstbridge, Vic. : 1922 - 1939) Friday 21 December 1928

1929

Patrick & William Goss farmers of Woodstock, tenants in common of 638 acres part CP 21, VTO V 3825 Folio 836

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1933

DISPUTE ABOUT COUNTRY HOTEL. Court Makes an Order. An action by Bridget McCormack, of Ridgeway-avenue, Kew, and Robert Lamer, of Woodstock, as executors of the will of the late Peter McCoy, against David Scott, of Belmont Hotel, Thomastown, was decided by Mr, Justice Lowe in the Third Civil Court yesterday. There were originally two defendants named in the writ, Robert Scott, being the second. But he was killed in an accident two days after the issue of the writ. Plaintiffs claimed possession of Belmont Hotel, and an account of all profits, since 28th February last. Mr. Magennis (instructed by Messrs. Shaw and Turner) appeared for plaintiffs. David Scott was not represented by counsel. Mr. Magennis said Miss McCormack was residuary legatee under the will of McCoy. She was in possession of the hotel, and 143 acres of. Land until 1928, when the property was sold for £20,000 to Robert Ernest Lowe. Lowe sold the property to David Scott. The latter made default under his sub-contract, and Lowe's contract had been cancelled by agreement. Scott had been asked to give up possession of the property, but he had refused to do so. His Honor made an order that Scott should give up possession of the property, and that be should pay plaintiffs as mesne profits £3 /10/ a week, from 28th February last, to the date of delivery of possession. Scott was also ordered to pay costs.

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Thursday 21 September 1933 p 6 Article

1934

John Ambrose, James Leo, Bernard Vincent and Ewan Patrick Laffan graziers of Wallan, own 638 acres part CP 21, Kalkallo Parish Plan fronts Donnybrook Rd

VTO V 5585 F 1116857

1939

Findon Harriers `The meet yesterday was at the 18th mile post, Woodstock road Heavy rain had fallen over-night, with the result that much of the lower Iying country was water-logged In Spite of which another fine day's sport was recorded It was not until Simpson's cultivation was reached that a hare was found, from where the line was east and then south through Larmer's extensive holding, and after circling round Howat's the quarry ran Into Draper's, then back Into Larmer s, where ewes and lambs Intervened just when a kill seemed certain It was a beautiful run, during which some fine hound work was shown Later Simpson's crop was again tried And a second hare was found which took a line that would have done credit to a fox, for after crossing the Donnybrook lane and heading north right through Forrest' and Paynes, the quarry ran to Beveridge before circling back through Laffin's then across the Donnybrook lane Into Larmer's, and eventually entered a cultivation dead beat, and was left for another day Hounds hunted right up to their beat standard and with the least bit of luck would have recorded two kills Threatening skies, kept many of the regulars away,..'

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 5 August 1939 p 15 Article

1943

Leslie Hayes farmer of Tooborac acquires the property

VTO V 5585 F 1116857

1944

DEATHS GOSS.—At a private hospital, Essendon, Richard Goss, late of the Bald Hill, Woodstock, husband of the late Ellen, and brother of Michael, Kate, Mary (dec.), John, Maggie, Bernard, William, Bridgie, Patrick and James. Requiescat in pace.

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Wednesday 1 November 1944 p 21 Family Notices

1946

Findon Harriers Meet At Wollert, on Saturday afternoon, the opening. meet of the Findon Harriers was attended by. several hundred people, and more than 60 riders followed the hounds. The Master (Mr. Noel Mason) led the hunt and later, with Mrs, Mason, welcomed members and their friends to an informal gathering for afternoon tea in the Woodstock hall. The hunt moved off from Wollert soon after lunch, and led by the master and the whippers-in wearing the traditional green coats of the club crossed the paddocks for ten miles...Whlppers-in were Messrs. Ken Batten, Vance Batten, Bill Pratt, Keith Campbell, A. Yann, R. GilIon and Ted McCoy

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Monday 10 June 1946 p 5 Article

1951

MRS. FANNY GOSS Mrs. Fanny Goss, who died at her residence, 6 Flower-street, Essendon, on March 29, was the mother of 17 children, four of whom entered religion. One is a priest of the Redemptorist Order and three daughters are Sisters of Charity. - Her death, at the age of 63, took place in the house where she was born and followed an illness lasting several years. Only 15 minutes before her death she received Holy Communion, and her passing was peaceful. ' The deceased was the wife of the late John Goss (wellknown farmers of the Bald Hill Estate in the Woodstock region). Mr. Goss was.. one of 10 children of a pioneering family of the area, while Mrs. Goss was one of five children of the late Mr. and Mrs. MacFarlane, of Essendon. "Mr. Goss died in January, 1949. The deceased

Advocate (Melbourne, Vic. : 1868 - 1954) Thursday 12 April 1951 p 14 Article

Kalkallo Parish

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was an exemplary Catholic and her practical interest in all works of charity made her known far and wide. Her house play was always open for friends, religious and workers for charity. A large and representative gathering attended St. Teresa's Church, Essendon, on March 31, when her son, Rev. Gerald Goss, C.SS.R. (Pennant Hills, N.S.W.), celebrated Requiem Mass. He was assisted by Rev. J. Green, C.S.S.R., deacon, and Rev. C. Reis, subdeacon. Chanters were Revs. G. Coughlan, J. A. Kelly, C. Miller and M. Rafter. Members of religious orders, parishioners and relatives of the deceased were in the congregation. After Mass the large funeral left for the Epping Cemetery, where the late Mrs. Cross was buried in the family grave beside her late husband, and their infant daughter, Ursula. Prayers at the graveside were recited by Father Goss, assisted by Rev. J. Bailey, P.P., Epping, and a large number of priests. Children of the late Mrs. Goss "Sre John, Ursula (dec.), Nellie (Mrs. Ryan), Kathleen, Nancy (Mrs. O'Loughlin), Winifred (Mrs. Anderson), Bernard, Gerald (Rev. Father Goss, Redemptorist Monastery, Peniiant Hills, N.S.W.), Mary (Sister Mary Declan, St. Columba's Convent, Essendon), Thomas, Richard, Sheila (Sister M. Clement, St. Vincent's Convent, Potts Point, N.S.W.), Clare (Sister M. Jeanette, St. Thomas's Convent, Lewisham, N.S.W.), Carmel, John, William and Leslie. Sister M. Ursula, of St. Joseph's Convent, is a sister of the deceased. 1966

William J & Bernard M Walsh of Station View, Westmeadows own Bald Hill

VTO V 5585 F 1116857

1967

South Morang graziers, Kenneth A McDonald and Kenneth William & Dorothy Jean McDonald acquire the property

VTO V 5585 F 1116857

1968

Aerial photographs indicate land had recently been subject to grass fire, as shown by ignition points in the northwest and fires spreading to the southeast. Fires were stopped along Donnybrook Road by the dry stone walls. Only the 1880s homestead is evident

1987

Graziers, Kenneth A McDonald and Kenneth William & Dorothy Jean McDonald all of Donnybrook Rd, Woodstock- share a 3 lot subdivision dividing the CP21 vertically.

VTO

1994

Premier Bay Pty Ltd acquire the property

VTO

Principal references          

Meredith Gould Architects (MGA 1991) prepared the City of Whittlesea Heritage Study. The study identified heritage places in the municipality. Context (2010a) heritage study for the City of Whittlesea. The study reviewed places assessed by MGA (1990) as Grade ‘D’ and below; Context (2010b) archaeological Study to identify archaeological sites in the City of Whittlesea municipality; Context (2013a) historic heritage assessment for the Donnybrook Precinct Structure Plan (PSP) 67 immediately west of the Woodstock PSP; Context (2013b) historic heritage assessment for the Woodstock PSP which includes this site; Archaeology At Tardis Pty Ltd. 2015 historic heritage assessment (HHA) at 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook, 1305 Donnybrook Road, Woodstock and 1185 Merriang Road, Woodstock (2015); Newspapers as cited; Victorian Titles Office (VTO); Registrar General Search Notes (SN) Darebin Shire Rate Book, VPRO.

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Appendix 3: Comparative examples The following farm complex examples, arranged in date order, were used for comparative analysis of the heritage values identified at this place, being an early Victorian-era farming complex in a district that pioneered farming practice in the Colony. Black and white images are from Meredith Gould Architects (MGA 1991) City of Whittlesea Heritage Study and colour images from Context (2010) heritage study for the City of Whittlesea or place reports from the Hermes database.

1850sDAREBIN CREEK AND RURAL LANDSCAPE ENVIRONMENT Cooper St to Memorial Drive, Epping.

Figure 51

Description DAREBIN CREEK AND RURAL LANDSCAPE ENVIRONMENT Elements trees, peppercorns, pine wind rows, rural fencing, farmhouse home enclosure, dry stone walls, creek. - trestles for railway (1914) - early bridge pylons - pine row adjoining railway HO? changed source Gould 1990: 1.15

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Lyndoch Park, 73 Laurel Street, Whittlesea

Figure 52

Description Lyndoch Park homestead (HO142 Lyndoch Park 73 Laurel Street, Whittlesea – Timber residence, mature trees. ) erected over a long period from the 1850s by local builder, David Johnston. In c1900 a return verandah was erected around the house. Pioneer George Sherwin is remembered for his community activities. An educated, articulate man, Sherwin was instrumental in having the Plenty Road laid out from Melbourne to Whittlesea, and amongst other positions, was also the first chairman of the Whittlesea District Road Board, established in 1862. Lyndoch Park comprises an early Victorian (c.1850s) single storey rendered brick house with a hipped slate roof featuring decorative terra cotta ridge tiles and several render and brick chimneys. The house has undergone extensive alterations to the main block, and a new matching wing has been built forward and to the side of the main house. Why is it significant? Lyndoch Park is historically significant for its associations with the region's first European settler, George Sherwin first chairman of the Whittlesea District Roads Board. (Criterion H). Lyndoch Park is historically and aesthetically significant for its early date of construction in the mid 1850s, and its reflection of mid nineteenth century building forms. This includes the original hipped roof portion clad in slate, masonry walls, the typical Victorian sash windows and cellar lined with bricks (Criteria B & E). Extensive alterations to the building include the return verandah, gable porch to the front door and the large wing built forward of the early house. These have been executed in a manner that reflects a late Victorian/Edwardian design. Despite being quite extensive they do not wholly conceal the earlier house. The combination of the early architecture, additions and the garden setting make it a particularly substantial example of a mid 19th century home(Criteria D &E). The mature trees (pinus sp.) at the front boundary of Lyndoch Park are aesthetically significant for the way in which they provide a setting to the property. (Criterion E) Significance Level Local HO? HO142 source Context 2013: 10; Hermes No 29411 Place Citation Report

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook HUNTERS ROAD DAIRY, 105W HUNTERS ROAD, SOUTH MORANG

Figure 53

Description Hunters Road Dairy is associated with the earlier period of development in South Morang. The property is situated on the northern part of Lot 1 of Crown Portion 15 in the Parish of Morang. It originally comprised 320 acres and in 1852 was sold by William Cleeland (the original grantee) to Thomas Popple for 640 Pounds. (Common Law Land Memorials, Book S, number 707). Popple was born in Goadby, Leicestershire and arrived in Melbourne on board the Abberton in 1844. He initially farmed on the present site of the Northcote High School before, in 1852, purchasing the above land together with several other blocks in the township of Separation and the Medland Estate. Popple named the property at 105W Hunter's Road, 'Goadby Lodge' after his home town. It was subsequently used as a dairy. Popple leased out the land that he owned in the Separation settlement in 1863 (The Argus, 24 December, 1863), presumably to focus upon his other properties, including Goadby. The Hunters Road Dairy site features a small vernacular building constructed of stone in a variety of sizes, and which probably dates to the 1850s. The building has a hipped roof, and openings lined with brick including a doorway, window and wall vents. Rubble and the subsurface remains of a building foundation in the near vicinity of the structure suggest it was once part of a larger building, or was one of a complex of buildings. The use of granite in the construction of these buildings is unusual in Whittlesea, being only an occasional feature of the local landscape. Why is it significant? Hunters Road Dairy is historically significant for its early date of construction and its long association with the Popple family, who were early settlers in the district and owned the property for more than 100 years. (Criteria H) The vernacular building constructed of granite and the granite sub-surface deposits are historically significant for the rarity of stone as a building material across Whittlesea. The spatial relationship of the building and remains with the fence and exotic plantings close by further help to articulate the way living spaces were designed on a 19th century farm. There are relatively few dairies identified in this study and this one is unusual in its design. (Criteria B & C) Hunters Road Dairy has archaeological significance due to the potential for sub-surface deposits that may yield information relating to construction of buildings and the life of the farm. (Criterion C) Significance Level Local HO?

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook HO124 source Hermes No 156723 Place Citation Report Drinkwater’s house, Cnr. Wedge & Davisson Sts. Epping

Figure 54

Description (demolished) Drinkwater’s house stands in Davisson Street, Epping on land first purchased from the Government in 1857 by Fr. Charles O’Hea of the Catholic Church. The house may have been built by the Catholic Church. Fr. O’Hea is likely to have bought the property, along with the adjoining lot, as the site for a future house. The land was located only two hundred metres from the Catholic School in Coulstock Street - a timber building with attached school masters residence constructed during the 1850s. Later, during the 1860s St. Peters Catholic Church was erected opposite the Davisson Street block, on the corner of Wedge Street. The date of construction of Drinkwater’s house is not clear. It was certainly erected by 1875 when the Shire of Darebin rate book records Fr. O’Hea as the owner of a house and two acres at Epping… principal elevation .. faces the Creek .. Incorporates five pairs of French doors here opening onto the garden, rather than the typical central front door and double hung window arrangement … Drinkwater's house is of local significance for its historical association with the Catholic Church in Epping and as a vital component of the old centre of the Epping township abutting the creek. It is of Statewide significance architecturally as a substantially intact middle class house from the late 1850s utilizing an unusual arrangement of French doors on a small home. HO? demolition source Gould 1990: 1.08

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook STIMSONS HOUSE (BICKLEYS), 700 Epping Road WOLLERT

Figure 55

Description

Stimson's House is located in Section 7 of the Parish of Kalkallo, on land first granted to John Hunter Patterson in 1839. By 1853 it formed part of Daniel MacKenzie's Medland Estate, which Mackenzie subdivided and sold on 13 March 1853. At that sale, two settlers William Dods and John Tydeman together purchased 331 acres. Dods and Tydeman's land was bisected by the main Epping to Merriang Road. Tydeman's portion was divided so that 104 acres lay to the east of the road and 60 acres to the west. He subsequently sold the eastern 104 acres to Lammas Fairbrother who in turn sold it to Gustav Miehe in about 1875. Miehe farmed it until 1893 when Shire of Darebin rate records list Leonard Stimson as leasing it. The Stimson family was originally from Gledhill in Bedfordshire and Leonard's parents George and Martha had settled in Wollert as early as 1873 when they were listed as signatories to a petition seeking the establishment of a new primary school at Wollert. Shire of Epping rate records for 1897 show Stimson as still renting the farm but a new owner named G. Parsons. The 1915 rate book lists Ellen Stimson as occupier with the property owned by the executors of G. Parsons. In about 1930 the property passed into the hands of Jack and Gwen Bickley, who during their ownership built a new home and raised a family of four children there. Examination of the physical evidence on the building indicates an 1860s construction date which suggests that the house was built by Fairbrother rather than Miehe. This hypothesis is supported by the design of the house- the plan form of four rooms with the rear two under a skillion does not appear to follow the German form usually found in this area (Adapted from Gould Heritage Study). Stimson's house itself is a small building constructed of rough blocks of bluestone and mortar. It is built on a rectangular plan, with a corrugated iron gabled roof and skillion roofed section at the rear. The symmetrical form of the building is enhanced by it fenestration, with a door at the centre of the front facade and multi-paned sash windows and an even distance either side of it. There are two external bluestone and red brick chimneys to the right side of the house, while a third red brick chimney protrudes from the ridge of the roof on the left. Vegetation in the immediate vicinity of the house is largely overgrown, and includes a number of exotic trees. The bluestone house dates to a period much earlier than another dwelling on the property of timber construction, with a pyramidal roof and bullnose verandah, indicating a Federation era construction date. A

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook low wall and columns of clinker brick have since been added to the verandah, most likely during the Interwar period. Two brick chimneys are visible from the rear of the house. A small brick structure with gabled roof and skillion attachment was probably used as a garage or stables, as indicated by two large hinged timber doors that fill most of the building's front facade. A number of corrugated iron structures in various shapes and sizes are found on the property. Among these is a large barn with gabled roof, sliding timber door and mismatched windows unevenly placed. In the immediate vicinity of this building are a number of metal farm gates, a timber cattle race, a water tower with metal supports, corrugated iron tank, and two silos, one concrete with a metal top, and the other constructed entirely of metal materials. Fences cross the Stimson's House property, delineating both paddocks, and the boundaries of the two houses. Fence types include cyclone wire, timber post and rail, timber and wire, and a remnant dry stone wall. Why is it significant? Stimson's House is historically, technically and aesthetically significant as an example of an early vernacular structure built to a simple design using local materials (Criteria A, D, F & E). The timber Federation era house located nearby is historically and aesthetically significant because of its connection to Stimson's House and as an attractive example of a Federation era home (Criteria A, D & E). The property's various other elements are historically significant because they are connected to Stimson's House and because they illustrate the way in which the farm has evolved over 150 years (Criterion A). HO? HO169 source Hermes No 28809 Place Citation Report

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1850s-1860s Black Braes Farm, 60 CRAVENS ROAD, MERNDA

Figure 56

Description Blackbraes farm is thought to date from the late 1850s or early 1860s and originally formed part of the subdivision of Separation, a speculative development by Henry (Money) Miller. At the time of its construction Separation was a successful township, and boasted over 60 houses, a school and a church. However, by the mid 1870s, the township was in decline. By 1879, Blackbrae's was occupied by the farmer, John Shanks, who built up his landholdings in the area. In 1894 he is recorded as the owner of several allotments and as the lessee of others. Shanks' was a successful farmer. Described in 2009 as `Timber dwelling with cottage garden layout, dairy, outbuildings, well. ' Meredith Gould Architects 1991 City of Whittlesea Heritage Study cited: The farm comprises a weatherboard cottage with a series of brick and weatherboard additions and several sheds from the twentieth century. There is also a partly buried brick building just to the north east of the house, probably a dairy, which appears to be of fairly recent construction but perhaps with a reused corrugated metal roof. To the south east of the house is an outbuilding, which may have been used as a stable, constructed of vertical lengths of timber and corrugated iron. The building appears to be internally divided across its width, and there is a swinging door either side of the divide. A very large modern metal agricultural shed now completely screens the house form the west. Mature trees enhance the context for the structure from the east and north, in which direction the building looks down the valley to the open plains below and the distant hills. Immediately in front of the verandah is an intricate cottage garden layout formed with brick edging. Located as it is on a prominent knoll the house is a landmark for some considerable distance. Although the farm complex does not survive from the heyday of Separation, the early weatherboard house appears from external inspection to be particularly intact, and to have the potential to describe the development of the farm. External inspection reveals much of the significant information for the house. The early hipped roof cottage appears to comprise 3 front rooms possibly with a skillion to the rear. The front door gives access to a parlor and rooms to each side are accessed from this room. The detailing to windows here indicates a probably late 1850s or early 1860s date. .. (Google 2015 shows as pictured but with a new house adjoining the complex.)

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook The three roomed building probably had a freestanding kitchen to the rear, possibly now incorporated into the attached wing or a kitchen in an attached skillion. This arrangement was more substantial than the usual two room first settlers' establishment, and indicates a property with greater resources. Additions have been added over a period of 20-30 years including an unusual brick addition to the front and several in timber. HO? HO14 source Hermes No 28954 Place Citation Report

1853EUGLEBAR HOMESTEAD, 235 Bridge Inn Road MERNDA

Figure 57

Description In 1853 John Hunter purchased land at Wollert and constructed a three-roomed timber dwelling. This building, which still stands, was framed of hand hewn timber from nearby Arthur's Creek and clad with split wooden palings. The roof and verandah were of long wooden shingles, although these have since been covered by corrugated iron. The cottage had no ceilings. The middle room of Hunter's cottage was the family kitchen and the two rooms at each end bedrooms. Cooking in the kitchen was carried out in a large open fire place constructed of handmade clay bricks. Part of the early cottage survives. John Hunter later built a more substantial four-roomed bluestone homestead, using stone quarried on the property. The timber roofing frame consists of round hardwood rafter poles with sawn battens supporting a slate roof with heavy gauge iron ridging. The original timber cottage was subsequently joined to the new bluestone homestead by construction of a three roomed weatherboard building with a corrugated iron roof and verandah. Although the weatherboards of this connecting section have since been replaced with cement sheeting, the split wooden palings on the original cottage remain. The interior of the bluestone section is lined with thin pressed and patterned lead alloy metal sheeting (Wunderlich panels). Cedar cupboards have been built in each side of the open fire places. On John Hunter's death, Euglebar passed to his son James.

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook In the immediate area surrounding Euglebar homestead is a mature peppercorn tree. A number of farm buildings are also visible, including a barn constructed of metal materials and a cement silo Why is it significant? The Euglebar homestead is historically and aesthetically significant for its early date of construction (1853) and its use of local materials in its construction (Criteria A & E). The later additions to the property reflect the growing prosperity and needs of John Hunter, the homestead's original owner (Criterion A). The mature peppercorn tree contributes to the setting. (Google Maps 2015 shows as existing ) HO? HO117 source Hermes No 28944 Place Citation Report

1854-?? TIMMS HOUSE, 130 Bindts Road (east side) EPPING

Figure 58

Description (Google 2015 shows vacant land at this address) Timms' House was built by Friedrich Timm, a German who had arrived in Australia in 1850 aboard the 'Alfred' with his wife Maria and two children. Timm first purchased nine acres of land at Westgarthtown (now Lalor) in 1851. In 1854 he bought 258 acres in Section 16 Parish of Wollert from William Hedding and later moved there. Another 'Alfred' passenger, Christian Bindt, had bought 60 acres adjoining Timm at the same time. In 1864 Timm had leased 240 acres of his farm in Bindt's Road to his son-in-law Edward Louden. In 1869 Johann Froebel was the tenant, but by 1872 the land was occupied by Friedrich and Maria's son Friedrich Jr. Timm's House at Wollert has fallen into considerable disrepair - a tree and other shrubs have grown from within the building and destroyed part of its structure. Timm's House displays construction and design similar to other German houses in the Whittlesea are. It is a bluestone building with corrugated iron hipped roof and tall red brick chimney. Window openings in several walls have red brick architraves. Those walls unaffected by vegetation appear to be quite sturdy, though suffering some mortar deterioration. In one part of the

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook building a wall has been replaced in redbrick with a timber doorway. The remains of a corrugated iron extension abut the house. Parts of the interior of the building were accessible for inspection, and revealed that the interior bluestone walls have been whitewashed or plastered in some sections. The remains of timber casement windows with wide timber ledges are also visible. There is no ceiling; instead, the interior of the roof is visible, lined with timber planks. Notable elements in the immediate vicinity of Timm's house include a dry-stone wall, red brick well, and a below ground cellar with a corrugated iron gabled roof sitting above ground. At a slightly further distance is a large corrugated iron barn with double gabled roof and large fenced openings to accommodate animals. Why is it significant? Timm's House itself, as well as nearby 19th century elements including the cellar, well and dry stone wall, are historically significant for their capacity to demonstrate the lifestyle and domestic practices of early German settlers in the Whittlesea district (Criterion A). Timm's House is technically significant as an example of an early residence built using available materials and vernacular construction similar to other known German houses in the area. The relative isolation of the house and its setting, on top of a hill, make it a dominant feature of the landscape (Criteria D, G, F & E) Significance Level Local Relevant Historical Australian Themes Neighbourhoods & Townships, Dairy Industry Victorian Themes: 4.1 Living off the land 4.3 Grazing and raising livestock 4.4 Farming 6.7 Making homes for Victorians HO? HO162 source Hermes No 28421 Place Citation Report

1856Creed's Farm, 47 Farmhouse Boulevard, Epping, former 265E Harvest Home Road EPPING

Figure 59 Since rebuilt

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Description Creed's Farm was established on 158 acres of land first held by Irish migrant Michael Lynch, who purchased a large amount of land in the area in 1853. Michael Creed, also from Ireland, built the bluestone house soon after purchasing the property from Lynch in 1856. The Creed family lived on the property from 1856 until 1875 and the design and materials used for the house and barn are consistent with buildings constructed during this time. From 1878 until 1895 the property was held by Patrick Toole, another Irish migrant, who became a successful Melbourne grocer. (Adapted from Graeme Butler & Associates, Creeds Farm Architectural Assessment, 2003) ...Farmstead comprising a bluestone house and barn and a series of other outbuildings enclosed by sections of dry stone wall...The farmhouse, which sits at the centre of the remaining complex, has a hipped roof with a central valley covered in corrugated metal, although the deterioration of this material shows it to overlay an earlier roof of wooden shingles. The house has a central panelled door with a transom light in its eastern facade to either side of which is a six light over six light sash window. A brick chimney survives at the southern end of each of the two roof sections, whilst one which stood at the northern end of the eastern section has recently collapsed.‌.The westernmost structure in the complex, as defined by the existing fence, is a large barn with a truss built ridge roof. The southern portion of this building is enclosed and of bluestone construction, whilst the remainder is of wooden frame construction clad in corrugated metal, but open to the east to receive hay and/or farm machinery. The bluestone component has single doorways to the east and south, the latter of which had a loft opening above which has been blocked up. This part of the barn is in very poor condition and large voids have opened in the stonework... Why is it significant? Creed's farm is historically significant because it provides an insight in to the operation of a mid 19th century farm and illustrates the role that small scale dairy farming played in the district during the nineteenth and early part of the twentieth centuries (Criteria A). Creed's farm is historically, architecturally and aesthetically significant as a good example of a mid 19th century farm complex, constructed using local materials (Criteria D & A). The design and construction of the house, built in a symmetrical style with four rooms off a central hallway, illustrates the typical style of house favoured by British/Irish migrants to the area. The style of house offers a distinctive contrast to the rectangular form, with interconnecting rooms, built by German migrants to the area (Criteria A, F & E). The remnant garden to the north of the house demonstrates the settlers need for selfsufficiency as well as the practice of introducing European plants in to the landscape (Criteria A & E) Significance Level Local (Both main buildings have been restored as of 2015) HO? HO103 source Hermes No 124255 Place Citation Report 2009

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1856-, 1865-?? Wuchatschs Farm 74 Robert Street, Lalor

Figure 60

Gould: WUCHATSCH FARM AND QUARRY -Elements Victorian weatherboard house, bluestone milking shed, bluestone outbuilding, remnants of early bluestone house In 1853 Wuchatsch purchased 158 acres of crown land Carl, the eldest son of Johann Wuchatsch of Westgarthtown, intended to establish a dairy farm. Carl died in 1856. His land reverted to his father, who in 1864 passed title on to Johann Jr, the next eldest son. Johann Jr. married Johanna Graff of Westgarthtown and raised a large family of ten children on the dairy farm he established. He also took an active interest in community affairs being member of the local schools Board of Advice and founder of the local Salvation Army branch during the 1880s. Johann Wuchatsch Jr. died in 1892. His probate papers record that his stone house, which contained four rooms and stone dairy, cow shed and stye had been erected “about 28 years ago�. Johanna Wuchatsch died in 1923. A son Peter was a prominent member of the local dairying community and councillor for the Epping and Whittlesea shires. Victorian Heritage Register Ref No H950 image 2008 Statement of Significance Wuchatsch's Farm, comprising the main house, the stables, the milking shed, the dairies, the circular stone path, and extensive drystone walls and stone paths, is of outstanding historical significance to the state of Victoria as part of the Westgarthtown settlement, for its association with the state's promotion of German settlement in Victoria. As part of the Westgarthtown settlement, Wuchatsch's Farm has an important association with William Westgarth MLC, a notable pioneer of Victoria, who was directly responsible for the immigrant communities in Victoria. Johann Wuchatsch's bluestone farmhouse is believed to have been built in the late 1850s. The house and outbuildings form the most complete farm surviving from the original Westgarthtown settlement. The house today is owned by Mrs Muriel Wuchatsch, widow of Norman Wuchatsch, who was Johann's grandson. The buildings are obviously derived from

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook rural German architecture and they represent a transportation of German building techniques in Victoria. The quality of the stonework in the buildings reflects the craftsmanship of the early German settlement particularly in the working of bluestone. The Wuchatsch bluestone outbuildings are of note for their construction with very little mortar. HO? HO10 source Gould, 1990: 1.34; Victorian Heritage Register Ref No H950

1860sKAROOL FORMERLY FAIRVIEW, 305-307 Bridge Inn Road MERNDA

Figure 61

Description Karool, formerly known as Fairview, stands on land first purchased by John Aitken in 1853. Aitken sold the 78 acre block the following year to Robert King who owned several adjacent blocks. By 1856 King owned 640 acres between Bridge Inn Road and Mason's Lane. King, his wife and two children, arrived in Australia from County Tyrone, Ireland in 1841, aboard the Catherine Jamieson. He first moved to Preston and after a few years there, leased land at Merrilands, near where Ruthven Station now stands. King stayed there until 1854, when he relocated to Bridge Inn Road, having spent a year fencing and preparing the land for habitation. Funds to purchase and improve the land had mainly come from the cartage and sale of produce on the goldfields‌The construction date of Karool is not known, but was probably during the 1860s. Karool is almost identical to the former Scales homestead, which stood near the Darebin Creek at Epping. The bluestone outbuildings may be earlier than the house Bluestone 2 storey residence, 2 bluestone outbuildings. The house is a two storey bluestone structure with a double hipped corrugated metal roof with a brick chimney at each end. A single storey range extends to the north and west. This supports a very shallow hipped roof, abutting the main structure, which reaches out on wooden columns around this range to form a porch on its western, northern and eastern sides. The roof features a large mid twentieth century vent over its centre. The original sash windows of the house have been replaced by modern PVC casements of various sizes. The lower range on the western side of the house features inserted French windows‌ Why is it significant? Karool is historically significant as a rare example of a double storey c1860s homestead in the Whittlesea area (Criterion B). The use of bluestone in the house's construction reflected its availability locally and illustrates the use of local materials by early settlers in the region

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook (Criterion A). The size of the home is unusually large and reflects the relative affluence of Robert King. Karool is aesthetically significant as an imposing feature of the local landscape and an extremely rare two storey farmhouse in the City of Whittlesea. Although the house has had some alterations the overall form and bluestone construction demonstrates its construction date ofc.1860. The gable roofed bluestone outbuildings are fine examples of stonemasonry and contribute to the evolution of the farm complex(Criterion E). The smaller bluestone outbuilding is thought to have been used as King's first home and as such provides an important insight in to the conditions in which early settlers lived. The use of local bluestone in its construction is a reminder of the use of local materials by early settlers in the district (Criterion A). HO? HO118 source Hermes No 28945 Place Citation Report

1860sKIAMA, 2215 Plenty Road YAN YEAN

Figure 62

Description The homestead stands on Lot 21, Section 19, Parish of Yan Yean, first purchased by John Snowball at the 1850s land sales. It consists of 13 acres. Kiama Park was for many years the home of James Maxwell, the grandson of one of Whittlesea's earliest settlers John Maxwell. John Maxwell settled at Glenvale in the 1850s, and raised a large family, one of whom Samuel, was James' father. In 1887 railway survey map records Lot 21 and the adjoining 14 acre lot 2K as being occupied by S. Brain. The Maxwell's appear to have moved to the property during the 1890s. 1897 Shire of Whittlesea rate records list Mrs. Eliza Maxwell, James mother as occupier of a house and land at Yan Yean owned by a Mr. Nelson. By 1904 John and James Maxwell are listed as tenants, with Nelson still owner. In 1909 James was sole tenant of over 150 acres at Yan Yean. By 1916 he was listed as owner. .. Kiama is a mid 19th century homestead constructed of brick with a corrugated iron hipped roof with verandah. The house retains the appearance of an early -mid Victorian homestead and the roof form is complemented by two symmetrical chimneys of matching red brick with

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook simple string course decoration. The house has a timber posted verandah of simple early design to the front and south. This verandah would once have circled more of the house; however, it has been partially infilled by a modern addition in cream brick with a shallow pitched roof extending from the original building...the house retains its mid nineteenth century characteristics of simple form and architectural detail. The front facade of the house has a central door with transom light above. At the rear of the house is a gable roofed room that is detached and is also built from the red brick. This appears to be built at a similar time to the main house and may have served as a detached kitchen...A sunken well presumably once attached to the property is found across Plenty Road opposite the house. The well appears to have been lined with clay or terracotta bricks or tiles, and has a timber cover. Kiama is one of relatively few brick homesteads within the City of Whittlesea, and is a representative example of the earlier phase of farm settlement that also includes Bung Bong and Lyndoch Park and Karool‌ Why is it significant? Kiama is historically significant for its long association with the Maxwell family, who were early settlers in Whittlesea. Kiama is also significant as the former home of James Maxwell, a lifelong resident of Yan Yean who contributed to his community as trustee, secretary and caretaker of Yan Yean Cemetery for more than fifty years. (Criteria G & H) Kiama is historically and aesthetically significant as an excellent example of a mid 19th century homestead with a detached brick outbuilding that displays typical though largely intact elements of the style. These are illustrated by the timber post-supported verandah, face brickwork, roof form with integrated verandah, Victorian sash windows and central door with fanlight above. The well located opposite the house is associated with the property and has potential significance for its capacity to reveal something of the lifestyle of late 19th and early 20th century farming practices in the Whittlesea district (Criteria D & C). HO? HO180 source Hermes No 29280 Place Citation Report

1860s-, 1887? BUNG BONG or PEWSEY VALE, 1785 DONNYBROOK ROAD WOODSTOCK

Figure 63 Figure 64 (Gould 1990)

Description

The land on which the property is situated originally formed part of Lot 1, Crown Portion 15 within the Parish of Yan Yean, although its address is now 'Woodstock'. The land was granted to Thomas W. Downie of Melbourne in 1853 for 1264 pounds. The next owner of the property

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook was Henry Andrews, who lived there from the early 1860s until his death in 1914. The house dates to the time of Andrews' occupation and was probably constructed by him when he purchased the land. Over the period of his occupation, Andrews and his wife had 11 children (10 of the births are registered at Woodstock between 1863 and 1879). (Payne, The Plenty, 108-09). Following Andrews' death, the property was leased out by his executors (Andrews' wife pre-deceased him) until 1919 when it was purchased by Archie McArthur Smith. Smith remained at the property for 40 years, before selling (Whittlesea Shire Rates Records). During the 1960s, the property was owned by Thomas Hurrey (a member of the prominent local family). There are four stages of construction evident in the farm complex. The first stage is represented by the original house, thought to have been constructed in the early 1860s. The original portion of the building is constructed from roughly hewn bluestone, probably collected from nearby fields in the early 1860s. The second stage of construction is represented by an outbuilding (which possibly served as a dairy cool room). The building is undated but features more carefully cut bluestone blocks. The initials "A.A.W" which are carved above its door are likely to be those of the builder. The third stage of construction is represented by the bluestone barn, which is carefully built and dated 1887. The fourth and final stage is represented by a series of alterations to the house undertaken in the 1950s. Together the changes are an excellent illustration of the development of the site and the changing needs of its occupants. (Information from sources indicated, additional information from John Waghorn and the Plenty Valley Conservation Group)... Elements Bluestone house, stables, outbuildings, mature trees. Why is it significant? Bung Bong, formerly Pewsey Vale developed by Henry Andrews from the 1860s to c1919 is historically significant as a comparatively rare, visually attractive and architecturally sophisticated example of a c1880s farm complex within the City of Whittlesea (Criteria A, F & E). The stables are historically and aesthetically significant as particularly large and intact example of 19th century stables constructed from bluestone with timber doors and slatted timber openings. (Criteria D & E). The dairy cool room is historically significant as a reminder of the region's rural past and aesthetically significant as an attractive and visually important aspect of the farm complex. The two large timber and iron outbuildings contribute to the understanding of the farm complex and may have preceded the bluestone outbuildings. The mature pines provide evidence of early boundary planting and contribute to the farm complex. (Criteria A & E) Bung Bong illustrates several phases of development on the site including the construction of the c1880s house, the construction of the cool room and stables, and renovations to the house in the mid twentieth century. When viewed together, the changes provide a powerful and rare insight in to the changing needs of the Andrews family's long occupation of Bung Bong.(Criteria A & B). schedule: Tree Controls Yes Row of Pinus sp. Fences & Outbuildings? Yes Bluestone cool room and stables, timber and iron outbuildings

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook HO? HO172 source Hermes No 29227 Place Citation Report

WOODSTOCK MANOR, 910 Epping Road WOODSTOCK

Figure 65

Description ...said to have been in existence as early as 1858, and operated as a hotel. By 1875 the property, consisting of 513 acres, was owned and occupied by Joseph and Eva Cotchin (who arrived in the Woodstock district in 1856). The property was advertised for sale by Munro and Baillieu on 21 July 1897. However, the sale was unsuccessful and the Shire of Epping Rate Book for 1905 shows Joseph Cotchin as still being in possession, although the property had been reduced slightly to 489 acres. In 1911 Joseph's son, Joseph Jr. is listed as joint occupier, indicating his father was approaching retirement. Joseph Cotchin died in 1916 and probate was granted to Eva Cotchin (Widow) and Ernst Gibson (Agent). The land on which the house is situated was transferred to Joseph Cotchin (jnr) in December 1921. The remainder of the property (some 410 acres) was transferred to Joseph Cotchin (jnr) and John Cotchin in May 1923. Local themes: 3.1 Grazing and agriculture 5.1 Early pastoral and village settlements 7.1 Development of local government Wide beaded edge weatherboard residence, stables with loft well: Woodstock Manor is constructed on a rectangular plan with a hipped broken-back style roof and an intersecting gabled projection on one side. The old portion of the house is clearly constructed in two main parts. The hipped roofed portion is probably the earliest portion and a gable roof wing added a short time later. The elevation of the repeating double hung windows and long verandah on a structure built close to Epping Road is consistent with a hotel. The weatherboards on this portion are interesting being much wider than usual and having a beaded edge. The scale and detailing of the whole is consistent with an 1850s date. The stables and shed appear early and are also consistent with an 1850s date. Some split studs are used in the shed. The Plenty Valley Conservation Group note that the Manor features an external bluestone floor, which was used to stack hay and keep it at the right temperature, preventing mould. (Personal Correspondence, 18 November 2010). Why is it significant?

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Woodstock Manor is historically significant as a rare example of an early timber building within the Whittlesea area. Woodstock Manor retains elements of early building construction including the wide bead edged weatherboards and the hipped roof form that place it as a particularly early building dating from c.1860. Its design with the row of repeating windows and the long verandah is consistent with the building form of early hotels, lending weight to its history as a hotel. The evolution of the building is clearly visible in the later gable roof . The stables are of interest as an outbuilding contemporary with the house, and comprising some early building technology in the form of split timber. (Criterion B and E). The building appears to have served as a hotel at one point and would have been an important meeting place for members of the local community. It also served as the meeting place for the Woodstock district roads board (Criteria A & H). HO? HO173 source Hermes No 28836 Place Citation Report Lochaber, 45A Harvest Home Road, Epping

Figure 66

Description Lochaber (image Victorian-era, now part of school complex?) Lochaber, for many years the home of the Smith family, takes its name from the Lochaber Hills of Inverness in Scotland. Robert Smith, who purchased the property on 10th March, 1884, was born at Annat by the Lochaber Hills. The Smith family first arrived in Australia in 1854 aboard the Oliver Lang. Thomas Smith, Robert’s father, bought Rosehill at Mernda in 1869. After moving from Rosehill to Lochaber, Robert cut and sold red gum firewood to pay for the farm. Later he commenced dairying and cropping hay being carted and sold at the Haymarket on the corner of Flemington Road and Royal Parade, Carlton. Maize and mangles were also grown. Cows were hand milked in the bluestone shed which held twenty cows at a time - ten along each side..Lochaber originally had a slate roof and corrugated iron verandah but in recent years a tiled roof has replaced these. Although nothing is known of the property before the Smith family purchased it in 1884 the house and barn design and construction appear to be earlier and suggest a German influence. Attic storey bluestone house, large stone barn, underground tank, drystone walls and mature exotic trees. HO?

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook HO78 source Gould 1990: 1.24

1860s? Tower Hill, 145 SELKIRK ROAD WOODSTOCK

Figure 67

Description The house at 145 Selkirk Road is a Victorian farmstead of painted brick, with a hipped broken back roof in new corrugated iron. Its verandah sits on narrow timber posts, and has been partially infilled on one side with a timber addition. Another alteration has been the installation of skylights at intervals in the skillion verandah roof. Window fenestration is sparse, with individual sash windows placed at wide intervals. A pair of brick chimneys with stepped tops adorn the roof...outbuildings are extensive Why is it significant? Tower Hill is historically significant for its early date of construction (relatively little remains in the Whittlesea area from the 1860s) and for its long association with the O'Sullivan family who owned the property from the 1860s until 1936 (Criteria B & H). It is historically and aesthetically significant as an attractive example of a Victoria-era farmhouse in the Whittlesea district (Criteria A & E). The various outbuildings act as a reminder of the property's past as a farm and are an indication of the traditional importance of agriculture to the Whittlesea district. (Criterion A). The Garden is historically and aesthetically significant for its connection to the Tower Hill property (Criteria A). HO? HO174 source Hermes No 156727 Place Citation Report

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1860s? MacUliffes House 795 Epping Road Wollert

Figure 68

In 1855 Thomas MacUliffe and John Lloyd purchased part of portions 8 and 9, Parish of Kalkallo. Their holdings, which totalled 245 acres, had previously formed part of Daniel McKenzie's Medland Estate. In 1859 John Devine, a prominent local identity, leased Lloyd's 154 acres. By 1863 he had purchased both Lloyd's and MacUliffe's land, at a total cost of 887/10. Devine, a long serving foundation member of the Epping Roads Board, does not appear to have lived on the property, operating hotels at both Thomastown and Merriang during the 1850s and 1860s. He also owned land at Thomastown and Epping. Devine later moved to Bendigo where he died in 1875 and his property passed to his wife, Catherine. In 1877 she leased the farm to Patrick Reardon for five years at 80 pounds per annum, payable twice yearly. Reardon continued to lease and farm the land until the early 1900s. By this time it was owned by John Devine's son Peter, Catherine having died in 1891 at Williamstown. In 1908 Peter, a Melbourne Bank Manager, let the property to an Abbotsford dairyman, Alfred Cults. In 1909 it was let again, this time to another dairyman, William Horn, of Bundoora. A notable subsequent lessee was Alf Mason, who farmed the property for many years. An earlier study of the site reported that Arthur Yann, who was born, raised and still lives on an adjoining property, believed that the old wooden homestead originally stood further back from the Epping Road, possibly near the site of the old well. At some stage, probably before 1900, the house was relocated. Early title records reveal that soon after John Devine purchased the property in 1863 he closed off the northernmost extension of Bodycoat's road, which ran through his land, with a stone wall. This land was later transferred to Peter Devine by adverse possession. The date of this building remains unclear, but is possibly c1860s. Its form and proximity to the road, as well as the association with Devine suggest that it may once have operated as a hotel.‌. MacUliffe's house at Wollert is in an advanced state of deterioration. The site consists of two small timber structures both on rectangular plans. The house, which is closer to the front of the property, has a slatted hipped roof with simple red brick chimney. The rear structure has a corrugated iron gabled roof with two red brick chimney, and may have been used as a barn. This building also has a skillion roofed attachment, although whether or not this was previously an enclosed room is not clear. Doors and windows have been removed from both structures, although there is an evenly spaced fenestration of window openings in

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook the front facade of the house. Evidence of brackets formerly attached to the front facade of the house beneath the roof line suggest a veranda was once part of the building. A number of mature pine trees are sited on the property. Significance Level Local Why is it significant? MacUliffe's house is historically significant as a very early timber residence in Whittlesea, thought to date to the 1860s. The site is also of historic significance for its association with John Devine, who was a prominent local identity in the Whittlesea area during the 19th century. Although Devine did not reside on the property the possibility that MacUliffe's house operated as a roadside hotel under his ownership enhances the social and historic importance of the site (Criteria H & A) The mature pine trees are historically significant for their connection to MacUliffe's house and because they reflect the European adaptation of the Victorian landscape through introduced planting. (Criterion A). The pines are aesthetically significant because of their size and because they constitute a dominant feature of the local landscape (Criterion E). Notes

Google Maps 2015 shows collapsed ruins on this site and pine trees.

HO? source

Hermes No 28843 Place Citation Report

1860s? Lowry Farm, 521 Craigieburn Road East Wollert

Figure 69

Portion 4, of 150 acres 16 perches was sold to another Irish migrant, John Hamilton Lowry, in November 1853. The lot remained in Lowry's possession until his death on 20 December 1887. The stone portion of the house is thought to have been constructed during this time, possibly in 1855 when a mortgage of ÂŁ300 was raised. In 1887 when Lowry died an inventory of his estate noted "152 acres, Springfield's . house with 4 rooms and dairy, mortgage to the Land Mortgage Bank for the sum of ÂŁ500, valued at ÂŁ10 per acre.

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook The property was sold to John Jolley in 1889. Jolley died in 1904, his probate inventory noting "four room stone house, small cow shed and stable", which may mean that the stable was constructed during the time of his ownership. Following Jolley's death the property passed to his wife Eliza, his son Albert and then to Albert's son Thomas Leonard Jolley. In 1982 he sold it to Alan Bruce McKay, from whom it eventually passed in to the ownership of Yarra Valley Water... The extant farm house is a rectangular structure with a gable roof, but it is in a poor state of repair and its north eastern corner and roof gable have collapsed, as has the wall around its south eastern corner. The degree to which the building has deteriorated can be seen through comparison of its current state with that recorded in 2003 by Jennings and Sheehan for example, the veranda along the western (frontal) side of the house has been removed since then. However, owing to the building's poor condition, it has not been possible to conduct a comparable inspection of the buildings interior. The extant house is the result of two stages of construction, suggested by historic records to have occurred in the 1850s and 1930s or 40s. The original bluestone portion of the house comprises three rooms along the western (frontal) side of the house, the southern of which extends to the full width of the existing structure. The later extension involved construction of the north eastern (rear) portion of the extant structure in timber frame with fibre cement cladding, including an additional gable to the north and lean-to at its south eastern corner. The renovation also included construction of a larger overarching corrugated metal gabled roof, but the recent collapses reveal that the frame of the original L-shaped gabled roof has been retained in situ within the revised structure. Why is it significant? The property is historically significant as a relatively rare surviving example of a mid 19th century farm homestead (Criterion B). The gradual development of the farm reflects the changing needs of its occupants over more than 150 years (Criterion A). The use of a mixture of blue stone, field stone and brickwork in the construction of the house illustrates the use of locally available materials by early settlers in the district. (Criterion A). The milking shed with timber pole construction and byres is of significance together with the stone loading ramp and extensive drystone walls surrounding the farm complex. Other small outbuildings are of local interest and contribute to the understanding of the development of the complex and of the long period of occupation by the Jolley family.(Criteria A & E) The drystone walls and the planting of hedges are were once comparatively common in the Whittlesea area however their survival to this extent is relatively rare. (Criteria A & E). The remaining hedges and walls serve as a reminder of past farming practices and the agricultural history of the Whittlesea region (Criteria A & E). Significance Level Local Tree control? Yes Hawthorn hedgerow Fences & Outbuildings? Yes Milking shed, drystone walls, pens, loading ramp. HO?

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook None. source Hermes No 161949 Place Citation Report

1860s-1870s? Farm, 110 & 130 Springs Road DONNYBROOK

Figure 70

Description Located to the south of the Mineral Springs at 110 and 130 Springs Road, this plot is occupied by a house and a large bluestone barn.‌.The barn structure stands to the east of the house. It comprises a main central portion constructed in bluestone with a corrugated metal ridge roof featuring weatherboarding in its gable ends. Two bluestone skillion roofed extensions have been constructed to either side of its southern end, whilst a large modern metal shed structure with a flat roof now stands against its north east corner. Each of the bluestone extensions has its own external entrance, suggesting internal separation from the main structure. That to the east comprises a barn door flanked by awning windows with wooden lintels and jambs which are set high in the wall. Entrance to the main part of the barn would appear to have originally been gained at its southern end through a gap the full height of the walls - as indicated by wooden jambs which extend up to the roof gable, but a short wooden door has been inserted and the remainder of the gap is now filled with bluestone. A modern full length narrow fixed light window and an additional door which have been inserted into this wall suggest that this part of the building at least has been converted for residential occupation...The c1860s-70s bluestone outbuildings on the property are historically and architecturally significant as remnants of the early development of the property, and its agricultural function. (existing in Google 2015) HO? HO93 source Hermes No 28556 Place Citation Report

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1866-1880s PINE PARK FARM, 286A Epping Road, Wollert

Figure 71

Description Hehrs Pine Park Farm 286A Epping Road, Wollert – House, all outbuildings including milking sheds, dairy machinery shed, shearing shed, loose box, stables, drystone walls, mature pines and peppercorn trees and bluestone paving between buildings. (now adjoining large housing estate with retained outbuildings) “Christian Hehr, his wife Dorothea and several children, arrived in Australia from Wurttemberg, Germany in 1856, aboard the ship Electric. On naturalisation in 1860, Christian was working as a gardener at Brunswick however in 1866 he purchased seventy-six acres at Wollert and established a dairy farm. His bluestone homestead stables and milking shed [would have been constructed during the next twenty years]. On Christian’s death in 1892, aged 85, his property passed to a son Jacob and his wife Magdalena (nee Wuchatsch). Here Jacob and Magdalena raised a family of seven boys. Walter, the youngest of these died of influenza when only six, however the others all grew up to either farm at Pine Park, as the property became known, or purchase dairy farms nearby. Two sons, Henry and Ernie, were particularly interested in the breeding of Clydesdale horses and for many years were very successful in their classes at the Whittlesea Show. Ernie also exhibited at the Royal Melbourne Show for over fifty years and in 1959 gained first prize in the three year old colts class with his Scottish import, Craigie Leader… Hehrs farm is one of the most complete farms to survive from the nineteenth century in the City of Whittlesea. Not only are there a large number of farm buildings constructed here they are generally of the local bluestone which has ensured a long life. The complex of buildings and connecting pathways has a village quality not unlike the German farm towns from which Christian and Dorothea had emigrated. Not surprisingly the Henrs were part of the German community and although they did not come in late 1850 with Westgarth’s group to settle Thomastown, they were clearly attracted here by the presence of people with a similar background...Anglo saxon settlers in the Whittlesea region as elsewhere in Victoria placed greater emphasis on the residence than the outbuildings. Initially a simple house would be constructed with outbuilding of similar standard. When prosperity increased a new house would be built rather than more outbuildings. In

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook contrast the German settlers built a plain but more solid building initially. This is evidenced at the Thomastown settlement at Ziebell’s and Wuchatsch’s farms where the first houses built immediately on occupation were never added The German climate required animals to be housed in warm conditions for a considerable time over winter. Anticipating a similar need most German settlers built substantial barns etc., whereas the Anglo Saxon settlers coming from a milder climate and appreciating the gentler climate of Victoria did not generally construct such buildings...milking shed, which remains today little altered since construction. Facing east, it occupies an excavation in the side of a gently sloping stony rise with the result that the west wall appears half buried in the hillside. Of bluestone and hand hewn timber it remains structurally sound, although disused for many years, extensive bluestone paving completes the yard outside...The house is a simple building although extensively altered internally and added to at the rear it is possible to understand the relationship between the house and the outbuildings. The Victorian verandah to the front elevation is in contrast with the earlier plain German houses at Thomastown and reflects both the later 1860s/70s date and the time spent by the Hehr’s in Brunswick before settling at Wollert. The second major phase of development is represented by the extensive stabling and particularly tall drystone walls fencing the small paddocks facing Epping Road. These buildings and features are part of the Clydesdale horse breeding programme. Some of these buildings are remarkably intact including timber stalls, feeding boxes and bluestone flooring with elaborate drainage channels. This horse breeding facility is remarkable for the way in which the local materials have been used. Further evidence of this is seen in the extensive drystone walling to paddocks which stretches out across the landscape to adjoining properties to the west and south. HO? HO40 source Gould 1990: 1.18

1870sEwert Farmhouse , 90-100 Bindts Road Wollert

Figure 72

Ewert Farmhouse site `originally formed part of Crown Portion 16, within the Parish of Morang. Section 3 of the land, consisting of 159 acres was sold to Isaac Williams in August 1854 for 750 pounds. By the 1870s the

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook land was in the ownership of John Payne, who subdivided it into two sections 'A' and 'B', both of just over 79 acres. Section A was sold to Charles Ewert in c1876 for 550 pounds. Ewert was originally from Westgarthtown. He appears to have run a farm on the property and also leased 160 acres of Section 4, crown portion 16 (the adjoining block) from Richard Scale from 1874. Charles Ewert died in 1896; his wife Mary had predeceased him as a result of a buggy accident. Ewert's sons, William and Frederick inherited the farm, which they continued to run until 1911, when it was sold to Hugh Donald. Later owners included Patrick Cummins (1915-1919) and A. W. Saunders (1920- 37). By 2001, the size of the block had been reduced to 20 acres (Rental List, August 2001). The house on the site dates from the 1870s and was probably built by (or for) Charles Ewert. The scattered outbuildings have been constructed at various times to meet the changing needs of the farm. (Information from sources indicated, additional information from John Waghorn)...The house on the site is a vernacular building constructed of bluestone. It has an M-hipped corrugated iron roof and two corbelled brick chimneys. The front façade of the building features a central door and window on either side with red brick reveals. The current windows and doors are not original. The rear of the building has a skillion verandah. The rear wall has been painted over in white and modern windows and doors installed A number of outbuildings are found within the vicinity of the house, including a bluestone structure. This building has an attached bluestone and timber cattle race, suggesting it was formerly a stables or barn. A corrugated iron addition has been made to one side. The property features a variety of other corrugated iron outbuildings, some partially constructed of concrete, and a corrugated iron water tank or silo‌ Why is it significant? The farmhouse is historically significant as an example of a c1870s farmhouse within the City of Whittlesea. The various outbuildings act as a reminder of the property's past as a farm and are an indication of the traditional importance of agriculture to the Whittlesea district. (Criteria A & D). The mature trees are historically significant for their connection to the property. It was once relatively common to plant exotic trees on rural properties, either to line the driveway, to provide shelter or to introduce a familiar (European) element in to what was regarded as a harsh and alien landscape. However, relatively few such trees now survive within the City of Whittlesea (Criteria A & B). The trees are aesthetically significant because they are large mature specimens and form a dominant feature of the local landscape (Criteria A & E). The stone walls are historically significant as a reminder of the introduction of English style farming techniques to Australia and as an attractive and relatively rare feature of the local landscape (Criteria A & E).' HO? HO161 source Hermes No 28418 Place Citation Report

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

McCormack's house, 960 Epping Road WOODSTOCK

Figure 73

Description Peter McCoy leases CP21 (Little Bald Hill) to J.P. McCormack 1864-1869, with McCormack later taking up part CP20 as another former McCoy property. `McCormack's HOUSE 960 Epping Road WOODSTOCK (Context, 2013 )- `The old bluestone and timber house, which stands south east of the Woodstock crossroads, was for almost ninety years the home of the McCormack family. The house stands upon land first purchased in 1841 by John Hunter Patterson. By the early 1850s, John Whitty owned 320 acres south east of the crossroads. In 1858 he opened a two storeyed bluestone post office and store. A brother, Patrick Whitty had opened the two storeyed bluestone Sir Henry Barkly Hotel on the south west corner of the crossroads in 1855. By 1870 Eugene Quinn occupied John Whitty's home several hundred metres south east of the post office. He was followed soon after by Patrick and Bridget McCormack and their family, who moved from Little Bald Hill (CP21), just north of the Donnybrook Road, west of Merriang Road. Patrick and Bridget had eleven children. The most notable of these was Bartholomew, better known as "Bat". A loquacious extrovert, Bat served as a Councillor on the Shires of Epping and Whittlesea for over fifty years. He was first elected Epping Shire President in 1896. He served five terms as President of the Shire of Epping and two as President of Whittlesea Shire, in all a total of twenty two years as President. Bat was patron and president of many local community groups. His face can often be seen in early photos of sporting teams, church congregations and municipal groups. No meeting or social erect was complete without Bat, who more often than not was elected as Chairman. Bat, a bachelor, died in 1956 and the property passed out of the McCormack family's hands. The house has a typical early lineal form. Initially rooms were accessed by door to door connections with no internal hallway. The weatherboard wing is also early. Although the structure of the early building remains, its integrity has been compromised by alterations. Nonetheless the building remains locally significant for its early association with Wollert and as one of the oldest surviving buildings in Wollert. (Gould Study, 1991)...It appears that this place has been demolished as there is a new house in this location. ' (Not shown in as existing in Google Earth 2015 view) source Hermes 288841 Place Report 2009

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1870sUnmack’s Farm, 90C Harvest Home Road, Wollert

Figure 74

Description Weatherboard house, bluestone dairy, outbuildings, mature exotic trees and drystone walls: Unmack’s Farm dates from the 1850s when a German, Wilhelm Koch, purchased 75 acres in Section II, Parish of Wollert, and established a dairy farm. Wilhelm and his wife Pauline, who arrived in Australia about 1850, were married in Melbourne in 1853 and moved to Epping soon after. Five children were born on the farm before Wilhelm selected land at Waggarandall in northern Victoria in 1874, near a son and daughter. The homestead is believed to have been erected by 1870. Interestingly, three Koch children are officially recorded as having been buried on the farm - Wilhelm Jr. died 1856 aged 3 months (croup); Elizabeth died 1861 aged four years and Mary died 1861 aged 18 months. Both the girls died of septic tonsillitis within four days. Unfortunately the location of the graves is not known. In about 1875 Carl Louis Unmack purchased the farm and raised a family there. Louis, as he was known, had married Caroline Ziebell of Westgarthtown in 1863. Prior to moving to Epping he had been a gold miner at Bendigo. Louis was still active on his death in 1917 aged 87. Graeme Butler note: new house built in front of heritage house. HO? HO81 source Gould 1990: 1.23

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1880-? 1920? Springvale-Bodycoats Farm, 80 Bodycoats Road WOLLERT

Figure 75

Description William and Mary Bodycoat and their son Thomas arrived in Australia from Leicestershire, England aboard the ship Alberton on 22nd September, 1844. After living at Collingwood for several years, William purchased 143 acres at Wollert in 1853 and established a dairy farm which came to be known as Langton Lodge. After several years carting to the Ballarat, Bendigo and Ovens goldfields, William's eldest son, Thomas took up land nearby. Thomas' acreage gradually grew until he had acquired about 800 acres in one block, surrounded by four roads. That block had formerly been occupied by 14 small farmers, who all (with the exception of one) sold out to Thomas Bodycoat. Springvale, as Thomas Bodycoat's property was known, came to be regarded as a model dairy farm. Thomas was also a large breeder of horses, and at one time reared pigs for the market. He was also active in community affairs and held all honorary public positions available in the Epping district. A Justice of the Peace, Thomas Bodycoat served on the Council of the Shires of Darebin and Epping for over 30 years, including several terms as president. Thomas married a neighbour, Alice Hadfield, and raised four children - two sons and two daughters. A homestead was erected in 1878- this does not appear to survive. The bluestone barn and milking sheds were built c1880 and are all extant. The existing Homestead appears to date from the Federation era. A homestead, barns and other farm outbuildings are currently extant on the former Springvale-Bodycoat's farm. The house on the property is a Federation era building c.1880 bluestone barn and milking shed, both of which are unusually large for bluestone farm buildings in Whittlesea. Each of these has a steeply pitched corrugated iron roof with timber gable ends and bargeboards. Elements Bluestone house, bluestone shearers quarters, bluestone and timber milking sheds, bluestone and timber barns, bluestone stables, paving. Gould 1990: A small early house with only one original window survives at the rear of the existing weatherboard house c1920.

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Why is it significant? Springvale-Bodycoat's Farm is historically significant for its long association with prominent local identity Thomas Bodycoat, whose civic contribution to the Whittlesea district was extensive, and included 30 years service on the Council of the Shires of Darebin and Epping (Criterion H). The Federation era homestead at Springvale is architecturally significant as a reasonably intact example of a farming residence of the period. While demonstrating a number of characteristic elements such as the encircling veranda and hipped corrugated iron roof, the homestead is also unusually decorative and an indication of the Bodycoat's' relative prosperity (Criteria A, B, F & D). The bluestone barn and milking sheds are historically and aesthetically significant as impressive examples of stone outbuildings. They are also a reminder of the past (and ongoing) importance of agriculture within the Whittlesea district (Criterion A & E). HO? HO163 source Hermes No 28782 Place Citation Report

1880s Wildwood farm, 425 Wildwood Road WHITTLESEA

Figure 76

Description Wildwood Farm dates to the period shortly before the arrival of the railway in Whittlesea. The property originally comprised part of the Wills Estate of 3,218 acres. The Wills Estate was subdivided in 1886 and Lot 17, known as Wildwood Farm and comprising 354 acres, 3 roods and 21 perches was purchased by the prominent local farmer, James Coulthard for ÂŁ14, 10s per acre. (The Argus, 27 May 1886). It is likely that the house on the site was constructed at this time. It served as Coulthard's home until his death, in 1938, aged 97 years of age. (The Argus, 4 November 1938) Coulthard's farm was successful; and he regularly exhibited and won prizes at the Whittlesea show. In 1872, these included best yearling colt, best two year old heifer and best butter (The Argus, 3 October 1872, 5 August 1876).

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook Coulthard was also prominent in local affairs. ..looks to be a weatherboard cottage with hipped roof. A pair of corbelled brick chimneys are visible on the cottage in addition to a stand-alone external brick chimney. Why is it significant? Wildwood farm is historically significant for its association with the prominent local farmer James Coulthard, who lived at the property for over 50 years and contributed widely to the agricultural, political and spiritual life of Whittlesea. Coulthard pioneered a number of agricultural technologies in the district, including the first double-furrow plough, the first reaper and binder, and the first cream separator. He was also active in the local community, serving as a Councillor in the Whittlesea riding and assisting in the establishment of the Anglican Church in Whittlesea, where he was a vestryman and warden for more than 40 years. (Criterion H) Wildwood farm is aesthetically and socially significant because it occupies a dominant position in the landscape and, together with the remnant exotic trees that surround it, is a local landmark (Criteria E, G & H). Significance Level Local HO? HO159 source Hermes No 116517 Place Citation Report

1880s (1850s cited)? Bluestone cottage, 1 Cottage Boulevard EPPING

Figure 77 Similar design to house at CP21

Description `The house was constructed on allotment 3, Crown Portion 10, Parish of Wollert, although it now falls within the Epping township. The land, a total of 640 acres, was originally leased by Michael Mahon and Thomas Corbett. In 1853 Mahon applied to purchase 160 acres of land "from the south west corner of section number ten (10) to include my homestead and Improvements". The homestead referred to is likely to have been the house currently located

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook at 1 Cottage Boulevard. The total cost of the purchase was 529 pounds, 3 shillings and 3 pence. In 1857 Michael Mahon returned to Ireland and the land was sold to James Lewis for 2400 pounds. James Lewis was an active member of the local community and served as the representative for the Epping Riding of the Darebin Shire Council during the 1870s (the Argus, 4 August 1877) and on the local school board (the Argus, 6 June 1873). Lewis died in 1881 when he fell backwards off a verandah and injured his head (the Argus, 1 August 1881). Lewis' estate was subsequently sold in December 1887 (The Argus, 3 December 1887). ..the back of the house that now faces the street...The front facade of the building (now facing away from Cottage Boulevard) has a central doorway with stained glass transom light (not original) flanked on either side by multi-paned sash windows. Each window and the door has deep red brick reveals with a flat arch above, meaning that these openings stand out visually. A brick chimney is visible on one side of the roof... Why is it significant? The house is historically significant as a rare example of a c1850s home in the district (Criterion B). The house is aesthetically significant as a distinctive landscape feature amidst the recent suburban development that now characterizes much of Epping' Notes:

Existing in Google 2015. Building is later than estimated, given dry pressed bricks around openings (post c1882) HO? HO98 source Bluestone cottage Hermes No 156703 Place Citation Report 17-Feb-2011

1881? ROCKBANK, 355 MASONS ROAD, MERNDA

Figure 78

Description Samuel Jeffrey, his wife Eliza and two children, arrived in Australia from Country Tyrone, Ireland in 1840 aboard the bounty ship Coromandel. After managing Captain Harrison's station at Yan Yean for a time, Samuel moved to Preston in the mid 1840s. In 1853 Samuel purchased 320 acres of land in the Parish of Yan Yean at the Government Land Sales, he called the property 'Rockbank'. He gradually developed the property as an addition to his Preston farm, where he continued to live. In 1879 Samuel conveyed Rockbank to his son, Samuel Jr. A bluestone farmhouse and outbuildings were constructed and a substantial dairy farm established in 1881. Renovations were made to the property in 1890 when the bluestone kitchen to the west of the house and the extant bay window were added. The elm

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook tree immediately to the north west of the 1890 kitchen block dates to the original construction of the house and is now a large and significant feature of the property. .. Today, over 150 years after the land was initially purchased by Samuel Jeffrey, Rockbank remains in the ownership of the Jeffrey family. The farm, fenced with dry bluestone walls and richly dotted with magnificent red gums, represents an enduring link with the continuing dairying history of The City of Whittlesea. Bluestone house, extensive dry stone walls, early kitchen and shed (shingle roof) carriage shed, pig pens, post & rail fence, chaff cutter, tank stands, bluestone paving, mature trees, half log stock trough. The extant building comprises the original 1881 bluestone house and the 1890 bluestone kitchen block to the west connected by a weatherboard structure which, according to the current owners, replaced an earlier (mid-20th century)...The original house features what appear to be replacement sash windows to either side of the central doorway, and these are screened by a corrugated metal bullnose porch spanning the front of the house. The bay window on the rear wall of the house is apparently contemporary with the kitchen block, which building retains its original 4 light sash windows‌ Why is it significant? Rockbank is historically significant as an example of a 19th century farmhouse in the Whittlesea district (Criterion A). The property has been owned by the Jeffrey family for over 150 years. As such, Rockbank is one of only a handful of properties in the City of Whittlesea that has not changed ownership since the 1850s (Criteria B & H). The continued use of the property as a farm has seen many of the sheds and outbuildings retained. Together they provide an important insight in to the region's rural past. (Criterion A). Rockbank is aesthetically significant as an attractive example of a 19th century bluestone farm building with substantial Federation era alterations including the front verandah, roof and an extension at the rear. The bluestone walls and sash windows indicate the earlier origins of the homestead. The large elm tree on the property and the large poplar tree at the entrance to the driveway are both roughly contemporaneous with the property's construction and serve as a reminder of the once common practice of planting European trees in and around rural properties. Rockbank is an excellent example of a farm complex with the homestead, outbuildings and dry-stone walls.(Criterion E) Notes:

Google Maps 2015 shows as existing HO? HO120 source Hermes No 28800 Place Citation Report 2009

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1885-? Stone house, 30 Harvest Home Road, Wollert

Figure 79

Description ‌bluestone farmhouse ...best known as having been the house of the Fox family for many years. Lot 1, Section II, Parish of Wollert consists of 158 acres. It was first purchased by W.F. (William Ford) Cleeland at the 1853 Government Land Sales. Cleeland, who lived at Mill Park, was a large property owner, and leased out his land in Section II to tenants. Epping Roads Board rate records for 1869 list Cleeland as still owning the land, with Sydney Smith, a farmer, as lessee. Rate records do not clearly distinguish ownership or occupation of the land during the 1880s and 1890s but in 1900 John Fox, a farmer, is listed as owner and occupier. The Fox family had been amongst the earliest settlers at Wollert, family members farming various properties over the years. John Fox died in 1901 and was succeeded by his son William, who occupied it for many years. The farm remained in the Fox family until the 1950s... Bluestone house and outbuildings, mature trees, dry stone walls. AMG: 326825, 5834000 Whittle sea 25000 Notes: Heritage Inventory 2004 Quarry Hills basalt quarry site (off 5-61 Bindts Rd on Darebin Crk west of Quarry Hill) noted as source for stone house b 1885. Probate Wm Ford Cleeland Landed Proprietor Springfield died 25 Aug 1868 8/771 VPRS 28/P0, unit 98; VPRS 28/P1, unit 25; VPRS 7591/P2, unit 1 HO? HO79 source Gould 1990: 1.18

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

1886-90? PAYNES HOUSE OLD BODYCOAT FARMHOUSE, 715 EPPING ROAD, WOLLERT

Figure 80

Description

(Not farm house but associated with farming) Paynes House was built about 1890, as Wollert was flourishing, for George and Zillah Payne. George had arrived in Australia in 1828, aged four, aboard the Lady Peel. After taking various farming jobs, including fencing, he leased a farm at Preston for seven years. In 1854 he married Zillah Aldous and together they raised several children. In about 1873 George took the family from Preston to Woodstock, where they farmed until about 1890 (1886?) when he and Zillah retired to their newly erected stone house just north of the corner of Epping and Summerhill Roads. George died before 1893 (1891) when Shire of Darebin rate records list Zillah as occupier, the home being in the hands of George's executors. After Zillah's death (1914) the property passed to a son who later sold it to Daniel and Agnes Bodycoat, who retired there from their nearby dairy farm (Daniel Bodycoat was the third son of William Bodycoat, who arrived in Melbourne on the SS Alberton in 1844 and purchased 143 acres in the Medland Estate) (Payne, The Plenty, 89). Daniel Bodycoat died in 1927 and Agnes in 1933. In 1934 the house and its ten acres was purchased by another local resident, Arthur Yann, who was still living there during the early 1990s. Yann's longevity as well as his work with the Findon Harriers and as Trustee of the Woodstock Mechanics Hall also made him a significant figure in the district (Adapted from Gould Heritage Study and Payne, The Plenty, 165 and 169)‌ Unlike the majority of the bluestone houses in the Wollert Region, this building has a suburban quality, addressing the main road rather than a farmyard precinct. Its combination of rough faced ashlar blocks and bichrome chimneys is unusual. By the 1890s very few suburban buildings were using bluestone for walls. Polychrome brick, render or weatherboards were the favoured materials. This building carries on the local tradition of bluestone construction despite the change in fashion in the City and indicates the rural character of Wollert despite its close

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook proximity to Melbourne. The brick verandah with pillars is a later alteration. (Gould Heritage Study). Why is it significant? Payne's house is historically and socially significant because it was the home of a series of significant local figures: early settlers, George and Zillah Payne, then Daniel and Agnes Bodycoat and later, Arthur Yann (Criteria G & H). Payne's House is historically and aesthetically significant as an unusually late example of a bluestone home representing a continuity of bluestone construction in Whittlesea that began with the earliest settlements of the 1850s. The location of the house and its unusual construction also make it a significant feature of the local streetscape. Apart from the brick verandah the house is relatively intact. (Criteria B & E).' Notes

George Payne Probate states land purchased 1886, house 6 rooms stone, stable and buggy shed, 5 1/4 acres. Newspapers: The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946) Saturday 5 May 1900 WILSON-PAYNE.-On the 28th March, at St. Peter's Church, East Melbourne, by the Rev. Ernest Selwyn Hughes, B.A., Robert George, third son of William Wilson, Richlands, Whittlesea, to Zillah Rosine (Rose), youngest daughter of Mrs. George Payne, "Rockbank," Woodstock, late of "The Elms," Yan Yean. Evelyn Observer and Bourke East Record (Vic. : 1902 - 1917) Friday 16 January 1914- ` WOODSTOCK. (FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.) There passed peacefully away on the morning of Thursday, the 8th inst., at her residence at Woodstock, one whose life has been passed principally in the Valley of the Plenty, in the person of the late Zillah Payne, relict of the late George Payne, of "The Elms," Yan Yean. The deceased lady was highly respected by a very large circle of friends, and her sterling, upright character had endeared her to those who had the pleasure of knowing her. A resident of the district for about 60 years, being only a girl in her teens when she came to reside at "The Elms," although a wife, she was a very young one. With her indomitable spirit and pluck she set herself to do her part in carving out a home for her and her partner's old age, and so far succeeded that some 20 to 25 years ago they retired to the comfortable home on the Woodstock road, especially built for them to retire to. Shortly after the deceased lady lost her husband, and after his death she continued for a time to reside where she died. Then having let the house to Mr Lee, a local land owner, she, for a time, left her home and lived with her youngest daughter, the late Mrs Robert Wilson, at Richlands. Shortly after Mrs Wilson's death, Mrs Payne again took up her residence at Woodstock, where she remained until her death on Thursday morning. For some time the deceased lady had suffered from heart trouble, and for some weeks it was known that she would not recover, and despite all that medical skill and loving care could do, she gradually sank, and, after suffering much pain, passed peacefully away. Mrs Payne was the mother of 20 children, and a few years ago no one to look at Mrs Payne

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Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook would have thought that she had reared a large family and gone through so much hard work in rearing them. She was 76 years of age, and was another example of the sturdy British race that have done so much to improve the nations of the earth. A fond parent, a devoted industrious wife, she well earned her eternal rest. Many of her children are dead, but she has alive Mrs George Payne, of Alexandra, Mrs D. McDonald, of Yan Yean South, James Payne, Yea, George Payne, Alexandra, William Payne, of Meandarra, Queensland, ‌ There has been a sad breach by death of old identities in the valley of the Plenty recently. Among others, Mesdames Johnstone, McKenzie and Bassett, also Cr Bassett, and the late Peter Le Page. Mrs Payne was the mother of 20 children, and leaves direct children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren to the number of over 100. Her death creates one more gap in the number of those who have done so much in by-gone days to make our glorious country what it is, truly one of the choicest spots on God's earth to live in, if not marred by man's incapacity and selfish ideas. May we all die as honoured and respected as Mrs Payne was by those who knew her best. The late Mrs Payne was buried in the Yan Yean general cemetery on Saturday, the 10th inst.‌. HO? HO170 source Hermes No 28827 Place Citation Report

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 76


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Appendix 4: Heritage record key plan Plan: with photographic image key   

Image and element numbers are shown on the plan. North is to the top of the page PDF page is A0 in size

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 77


st o p r a t S

a w e n o t dry s y l r a e on

ce n e f e r i and w

ll

old timber post

213, 214

basalt pitcher drive, part

212

basalt footing

243

242

211

new large shed

218, 219, 220, 221, 222

215, 216, 217

204

basalt pit cher floor or base

223

254

cotoneaster

227, 228, 229, 230

224

253 231

basalt pitcher paving stables/cowshed area

Lombardy poplars around a stone bed

202

201

198, 199, 200

189, 190, 191, 192

i p lt a s a b

252

188

Italian cypress group

187

r e tch

on o sp

in a dr

232. 233

possible fireplace, brick hearth?

148

basalt pitcher edged drive

147

177 149

146 144, 145 162 163, 164, 165

rubble wall remnants

window remnant?

176

178 234

W15

underground tank 1

153

W14

pressed clinker red brcik trim to opening

C4

161

151, 152

173 159 143

D10 150

tank around It alian cypress

stone fireplace rebuilt wit h dry pressed clinker red bricks

wit h timber from stone over, set diam , carved gabled roof tank 5. 54m ated iron clad Underground fe brand corrug framed Redclif stone footing on rubble

158 174 160 172

130, 132, 133

141, 142 W12

155

169 170, 171

156, 157

pressed clinker red brcik trim to opening

W13

250

Italian cypress wilding 134, 135, 136

248

175 1

2

238 mature pepper tree

140

3

236, 237

wall remnant

179 7 6

241

W10

8

4, 5

139

C3- 3.85m apprx. long, 3.3m wide

129 W11

Doorway filled in wit h stone

stone kitchen, cottage

131 132, 133

128

D9

vert ical joint

127

137

138

239, 240

126 167

doorway-1.78m high x.9m wide, timber lintel

wall remnant

D8

117

109, 110, 111

elm

116 112, 113, 114

stone rubble walls in two leafs

elm elm

elm

w9

C2-3.259w x 4.325m

72

mature pepper tree

108

70, 71

115

elm

dry pressed clinker red brcik chimney, added inter-war?

e sump concrete drainag

73

124 122, 123

107 76

vertical joint-building st age

105, 106

99 brick and stone kitchen fireplace

cast iron air brick 230x85mm external face

255

concrete septic tank/t oilet floor slab base 1.75x1.15

77, 78, 79

with 220x150mm internal recess

stone W6- dressed 330mm x sill 1.15m x 160mm deep

74, 75

183 97, 98, 100

81

50

h H6-rear veranda 2.75m deep

46, 47

45

80 1.15m x d st one sill W5, dresse 150mm deep 360mm x

49

21, 57, 58, 59

11

part slate heart h 730x390 x50

259 12

D6

23 13 33

22

basalt rubble walls, 340-350mm

41, 42

thick

388

D5

264

wide

D4

265

56, 69

H0- 1.549m

34

D7 dressed old stone thresh 1.03m x 320mm x 170mm deep

182

25

40 24

pressed single 110 x brick (220x 70mm), partitions

256

20

FP arched brick rendered, slate hearth fragment 20x415 displaced

32

stone house

15

14

6m H4-2.89x3.

dressed basalt thesho ld 290mm wide, 200mm deep, 540mm over ground with 60x60mm or socket s f door case

17, 18

36, 37

26, 27, 28, 29, 30

9, 10

64 60

61, 65, 66

43

82 91, 94

lintol

44

cast-iron claw-foo t bath

92, 93, 168

257

D2

101, 102

cast-iron one-f ire stove added into fireplace, interwar?

Eucaplypt

W7

68 FP arched brick rendered, slate d hearth displace

51

H5-5.328x4.177m

104 103

apprx. C1- 3.979m wide x assumed 7.222m long, kit chen, for house

H1-5.222x4.16m

55

trim cream brick al window, segment t imber brick arch over

W1

48 95, 96

258

part slat e heart h 390x820 x50

stainless steel sink and drainer, former

180, 181

63

54

53

D1

125

W2

120

D3

w8

119

window opening 687mm wide, 895mm high to assumed lintel, burnt ?

118

121

pressed clinker red brcik trim to opening

ence wire f

203

206, 207, 208, 209, 210

rivetted sheet iron tanks, 1. 2m x12. m x 1. 1

nd post a basalt pitcher floor

felled tree

226 225

and red brick reveals (all 230 x cream brick , trim window 110 x 70) brick arch segme ntal lintel over timber

H2-4.19 6x3.6m

6m H3- 3.228x3.

19

184, 186

slate hearth 1.37m x 420x40mm

39

W3

185

W4

262 air brick

air brick

263 window, red brick trim brick arch segmen tal lint el, over t imber sill dressed st one x 1.15m x 310mm 160mm deep

window, red brick trim arch segmental brick lint el, over timber one sill dressed st x 1.17m x 310mm 160mm deep

cast iron air brick 220x150mm ext ernal face

261

260

87, 88, 89

85, 86 83, 84, 90 251

ash

86

249

Eucaplypt

245

246

244

underground tank 2


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Appendix 5: Heritage record photographic log This place was photographed by Graeme Butler September-November 2015 (Exchangeable image file format or Exif data provides capture time of each image) using:  Canon 6D digital SLR with a 21.1 mega pixels image resolution (image size 5616 x 3744 pixels),  24 bit colour;  Canon L series 24mm prime lens,  JPG and Canon Raw (CR2) images include the context, building and details.  Naming method with image number suffix, as plan key.  global positioning using camera GPS. Additional images of landscape and other elements were taken by Lesley Butler with a Canon digital camera at 16 mega pixels (24-bit colour): these have not been plotted on the key plan. Photographic log Notes Image and element numbers are shown on the key plan, Appendix 4: Heritage record key plan 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

Complex from north-east at edge of drive Mature elms east of house Elms east of house, to south new farm complex House from north-east Complex from north-east Yard from north-east, with tank and Italian cypress on west boundary, inter-war Yard north end Lombardy Poplar Avenue on east of yard and new shed House - east elevation: basalt blocks 600mm or 300mm wide, 325mm coursing; wall height 3.88m above ground. House - east elevation House - east elevation, threshold front door, D1- dressed basalt threshold 290mm wide, 200mm deep, 540mm over ground with 60x60mm sockets for door case House passage (H0) from east, all joinery burn or removed, some stucco (30mm), rubble basalt walls 350mm typically House passage (H0) from east, all joinery burn or removed, some stucco (30mm) House (H2) to front window opening (W2), brick trim, arch, splay for joinery- splayed stone and dry pressed red brick reveals and cream brick trim all 230x110x70mm, 84 course; 2 soft wood lintels over c130 x 60mm House (H2) to south wall, stone main walls single brick partitions House (H2) to south and west walls, stone main walls single brick partitions- arched fire place, potentially with cast-iron grate and timber mantel once fitted. House (H2) to south and west walls, stone main walls single brick partitions- arched fire place, potentially with cast-iron grate and timber mantel once fitted. House (H2) to south and west walls, stone main walls single brick partitions- arched fire place, potentially with cast-iron grate and timber mantel once fitted.- corbel top chimney over House (H2) to front window opening (W2), brick trim, arch, splay for joinery

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 78


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55.

House (H2) to door D3- 2 x 80x70mm charred soft wood lintels House (H1) to west wall, fireplace, arched fire place, potentially with cast-iron grate and timber mantel once fitted. House threshold front door, D1- dressed basalt threshold (margins, quarry faced) 290mm wide, 200mm deep, 540mm over ground with 60x60mm sockets for door case House (H0) to D4 House (H3) to south wall House (H3) to west wall, two timber Oregon grounds set in brickwork to attached dado? House (H3) to east wall, fireplace, slate hearth House (H3) to east wall, fireplace, House (H3) to east wall, fireplace House (H3) to east wall, fireplace House (H3) to east wall, fireplace, slate hearth House (H3) to west wall, flooring remnants- 130x30mm soft wood T&G boarding on 120x50 sawn HW joists @ 500mm ccs, also roof slate remnants House (H3) to south wall, W3- part timber lintel House (H0) to north wall, - part upper level wall, coat rack mounting? House (H0) to north wall House (H4) east, south wall, showing timber grounds House (H4) east, south wall, showing timber grounds House (H4) east, south wall, showing timber grounds House (H4) east, west, south walls House (H4) east, north wall, showing timber grounds House (H4) doorway (D5), north wall- charred timber lintel, stone displaced over House (H0) to D7, segmental brick arch, charred timber lintel, stone lintel on exterior (cracked) House (H0) to D7, dressed stone threshold 1.03m x 320mm x 170mm deep, margins and quarry faced House (H5) to W6, charred lintel, indications of picture rail House (H5) to W5 House (H5) to east wall, fireplace, one-fire stove added into fireplace, interwar? Opening supported on wrought iron arch bar House (H5) to east wall, fireplace, one-fire stove added into fireplace, interwar? slate hearth to one side House (H5) to east wall, fireplace, one-fire stove added into fireplace, interwar? House (H5) to east south walls House (H5) to D6, D5 south walls House (H5) dislocated slate hearth, joist remnant House (H5) to east wall, fireplace, one-fire stove added into fireplace, interwar? House (H5) to W5, timber lintel slightly charred, west wall House (H5) to W6, north wall House (H5) to D6, W5, west, south walls House (H5) to east wall, chimney corner

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 79


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81.

82. 83. 84.

House (H0) to east House (H1) to west wall, fireplace, arched fire place, potentially with cast-iron grate and timber mantel once fitted. House (H1) to west wall, fireplace- chimney House (H1) to west wall, fireplace, arched fire place, potentially with cast-iron grate and timber mantel once fitted. House (H1) to north wall House (H1) to north, east walls, W1, picture rail evident- splayed stone and dry pressed red brick reveals and cream brick trim all 230x110x70mm, 84 course; 2 soft wood lintels over c130 x 60mm House (H1) to north, east walls, W1, picture rail evident House (H1) to north, east walls broken hearth House (H1) to west wall House (H1) to north, east walls House (H1) to east wall House (H1) to W1 (assumed 3 light double-hung sash windows) east wall, floor joists, floor joists140x50mm HW @ 500mm ccs, 130 x30mm T&G SW floor remnant boards House (H1) to west wall, fireplace detail- dry pressed 220x110x70mm with 65x5mm arch bar; mantle line at 1.33m over brick hearth House (H0) to east to D1, W2-W2 splayed stone and dry pressed red brick reveals and cream brick external trim all 230x110x70mm, 84 course; 2 soft wood lintels over c130 x 60mm House exterior, north, east walls- W1, W2, D1, W6 House exterior, north wall- W6, immature elm Drainage sump/trap, concrete and brick, water closet base at rear adjoining house water closet base at rear adjoining house, with gsi waste pipe along south edge, cast-iron cistern nearby House exterior, north wall- W6 to H5, dressed stone sill 1.15m x 330mm x 160mm deep House exterior, north wall- W6 to H5, dressed stone sill 1.15m x 330mm x 160mm deep, margins, quarry faced water closet base at rear adjoining house, with gsi waste pipe along south edge, cast-iron cistern nearby House exterior, north and west walls, cast-iron bath on former rear verandah- wall recesses evident for rafters in former skillions/additions House exterior, north and west walls, cast-iron bath on former rear verandah- wall recesses evident for rafters in former skillions/additions House exterior, west wall, cast-iron bath on former rear verandah- wall recesses evident for rafters in former skillions/additions House exterior, west wall, cast-iron bath on former rear verandah- wall recesses evident for rafters in former skillions/additions House exterior, west wall, and underground tank, 5.54m diam , carved from stone with timber framed Redcliffe brand corrugated iron clad gabled roof over, set on rubble stone footing- fed from house roof and overflow via stone drain across yard to east North wall and brick and stone fireplace of detached kitchen, gun adjoining collapsed east basalt rubble wall House exterior, west and south walls House exterior, west and south walls

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 80


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94.

95.

96.

97.

98.

99.

100.

101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109.

House exterior, south wall, W4 -red clinker brick (Northcote brickworks?) trim window, segmental brick arch over timber lintel, dressed stone sill 1.15m x 310mm x 160mm deep House exterior, south wall, W3 red brick trim window, segmental brick arch over timber lintel, dressed stone sill 1.17m x 310mm x 160mm deep House exterior, south wall, W3 red brick trim window, segmental brick arch over timber lintel, dressed stone sill 1.17m x 310mm x 160mm deep House exterior, south wall, W3 red brick trim window, segmental brick arch over timber lintel, dressed stone sill 1.17m x 310mm x 160mm deep, also cast-iron wall brick vent with guilloche pattern grill House exterior, south wall, cast-iron wall brick vent with guilloche pattern grill Kitchen (C1) from south Kitchen (C1) from south, stone scatter Kitchen (C1) and attached cottage from south-west Bald Hill from kitchen Kitchen C1, north wall - 3.979m wide x apprx. 7.198m long, kitchen, assumed for both early and later houses- two fireplaces, one with iron rod or bar for suspending cooking utensils. Wrought iron arch bars over each opening Kitchen C1, north wall-- 3.979m wide x apprx. 7.198m long, kitchen, assumed for both early and later houses- two fireplaces, one with iron rod or bar for suspending cooking utensils. Wrought iron arch bars over each opening Kitchen C1, north wall-- 3.979m wide x apprx. 7.198m long, kitchen, assumed for both early and later houses- two fireplaces, one with iron rod or bar for suspending cooking utensils. Wrought iron arch bars over each opening (western fireplace may have had an oven fitted) Kitchen C1, north wall-- 3.979m wide x apprx. 7.198m long, kitchen, assumed for both early and later houses- two fireplaces, one with iron rod or bar for suspending cooking utensils. Wrought iron arch bars over each opening (western fireplace may have had an oven fitted) Kitchen C1, north wall- - two fireplaces, one with wrought iron 40mm diam pipe for suspending cooking utensils with raising/lowering mechanism east end. Wrought iron arch bars over each opening (western fireplace may have had an oven fitted), charred mantel shelf-beam. 3 x ms arch bars over brick section, 2 x 80x15 arch bars over stone section. Chimney bricks 220x110x70mm. Kitchen C1, north wall- - two fireplaces, one with wrought iron 40mm diam pipe for suspending cooking utensils with raising/lowering mechanism east end. Wrought iron arch bars over each opening (western fireplace may have had an oven fitted), charred mantel shelf-beam. 3 x ms arch bars over brick section, 2 x 80x15 arch bars over stone section. Chimney bricks 220x110x70mm. Kitchen C1, north wall- - two fireplaces, one with wrought iron 40mm diam pipe for suspending cooking utensils with raising/lowering mechanism east end. Wrought iron arch bars over each opening (western fireplace may have had an oven fitted), charred mantel shelf-beam. 3 x ms arch bars over brick section, 2 x 80x15 arch bars over stone section. Chimney bricks 220x110x70mm. Kitchen C1, west wall-window W7 opening, part, 800mm x 1.160m high, sill apprx 640mm over ground. Kitchen C1, west wall-window opening, part Kitchen C1, west wall Kitchen C1, west and north walls Kitchen C1, cottage C2-east wall with lime wash to basalt, ironstone rubble walls Kitchen C1, cottage C2-east wall with lime wash to basalt, ironstone rubble walls Kitchen C1, cottage C2, etc-east wall with lime wash to basalt, ironstone rubble walls, construction joints evident, old pepper tree adjoining Cottage C2, east wall window opening 687mm wide, 895mm high to assumed lintel, burnt Cottage C2, east wall doorway-1.78m high x.9m wide, timber lintel, slate threshold, construction joint adjoining on north

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 81


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook 110. 111. 112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. 119. 120. 121. 122. 123. 124. 125. 126. 127. 128. 129. 130. 131. 132. 133. 134. 135. 136. 137. 138. 139. 140. 141. 142. 143.

Cottage C2, east wall doorway-1.78m high x.9m wide, timber lintel, slate threshold, construction joint adjoining on north Cottage C2, east wall doorway-1.78m high x.9m wide, timber lintel, slate threshold, construction joint adjoining on north Cottage C2, south wall, rear of fireplace with added chimney built from Northcote pressed bricks at south-east corner, heavy gauge corrugated iron sheet on ground Cottage C2, south wall, rear of fireplace with added chimney built from Northcote pressed bricks at south-east corner Cottage C2, south wall, rear of fireplace with added chimney built from Northcote pressed bricks at south-east corner Cottage C2, south and west walls, rear of fireplace, heavy gauge corrugated iron sheet on ground Cottage C2, west wall W8 Cottage C2, south and east wall, D8 lintel Cottage C2, east wall, W9 Cottage C2, west wall W8, dry pressed red bricks, 230x70x110mm in cement rich mortar, part render remains Cottage C2, east and south walls, added chimney Northcote bricks Cottage C2, east wall, W9 Cottage C2, east wall, bricks including hand made and pressed Northcote , cast iron base, former stove? Cottage C2, near east wall, bricks including pressed Northcote Cottage C2 to north Cottage C2, heavy gauge corrugated iron sheet on ground Cottage C2, to D8 head, timber lintel in remnant of north wall Cottage C3, to north Cottage C3, to south Cottage C3, west wall W11 Cottage C3, east wall W10, filled in door opening? Cottage C3, west wall, washing machine remnant? Cottage C3, east wall W10, filled in door opening? Cottage C3, east wall W10, filled in door opening? Cottage C3, to north Cottage C3, to north Cottage C3, to north Cottage east wall to D9 filled in doorway Cottage east wall to D9, W10 Cottage east wall to W10, construction joint Cottage east wall to W12, construction joint Cottage east wall to W12 Cottage east wall to W12 Cottage east wall to D10

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 82


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook 144. 145. 146. 147. 148. 149. 150. 151. 152. 153. 154. 155. 156. 157. 158. 159. 160. 161. 162. 163. 164. 165. 166. 167. 168. 169.

170. 171. 172. 173.

Cottage east wall from north-east t W15 Cottage east wall from north-east t W15 Cottage C4 north wall remnant from north Cottage C4 north wall remnant from north, brick hearth of former fireplace? Cottage C4 west and north wall remnants from north, west wall lean. Cottage C4 west and north wall remnants from north, west wall lean. Cottage C4 west wall fireplace- stone fireplace rebuilt with dry pressed clinker red bricks (220x 110 x75, Northcote Brick Company? Cottage C4 west wall to W14, 390mm wide, as one of two fireside windows (trimming dry pressed bricks 230x110x70). Finer rubble base to squared blocks of upper level wall. Cottage C4 west wall fireplace- stone fireplace rebuilt with dry pressed clinker red bricks (220x 110 x75, Northcote Brick Company? Cottage C4 west wall fireplace-scatter near Cottage C4 west wall fireplace- stone fireplace rebuilt with dry pressed clinker red bricks (220x 110 x75, Northcote Brick Company? Wrought iron suspension cooking rod Cottage C4 east wall to W12, 700mm wide. Cottage C4 east and south walls part W12- east wall abuts onto south wall Cottage C4 east and south (remnant) walls to C3 east wall abuts onto south wall, heavy gauge corrugated iron sheets visible Cottage C4 east (remnant) wall, D10 and part W15 (destroyed)- wide door (1.16m) for cart shed? Cottage C4 east (remnant) wall, D10 and part W15 (destroyed) Cottage C4 east and south walls part W12 Cottage C4 east wall, D10 showing recesses in stone work for rails? Weathered timber stack, with mortises - potentially framing timbers Cottage, west wall showing brick trimmed window openings, added brick chimney and old water tanks Cottage, west wall, north end showing brick trimmed window openings, added brick chimney and old water tanks Cottage, west wall, north end showing brick trimmed window openings, added brick chimney and old water tanks Cottage, west wall, showing brick trimmed window openings, added brick chimney and old water tanks Cottage, west wall, south end -differing wall line and stone pattern, hand made bricks in original chimney, dry-pressed in opening trim and brick-on-edge chimney over added stove base. Cottage, west wall, south end, shows north wall lean and damage at south end Underground tank, covered with timber framed corrugated iron clad housing: rafters 75x50 hardwood @ 800ccs, 140x20mm soft wood ridge; 160mm soft wood weatherboards (painted), 60x65mm hardwood studs, 100x40mm bottom plate with mortises for studs @ 600mm ccs. Ledge & brace soft wood door leaning against west end; tank stone lined; corrugated iron screw-fixed. Probable hardwood pump stand suspended over tank on soft wood beams. Overflow stone lined drain to east. Underground tank, stone border, but lower sections carved from insitu stone? Probable hardwood pump stand suspended over tank on soft wood beams. Overflow stone lined drain to east. Underground tank, stone border, but lower sections carved from insitu stone? Probable hardwood pump stand suspended over tank on soft wood beams. Overflow stone lined drain to east. Underground tank, stone border, but lower sections carved from insitu stone? Probable hardwood pump stand suspended over tank on soft wood beams. Overflow stone lined drain to east. Underground tank, stone border, but lower sections carved from insitu stone? Probable hardwood

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 83


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook pump stand suspended over tank on soft wood beams. Overflow stone lined drain to east. 174.

175.

176. 177. 178. 179. 180. 181. 182. 183.

184. 185. 186. 187. 188. 189.

190. 191.

192. 193. 194. 195. 196. 197.

Underground tank, covered with timber framed corrugated iron clad housing: rafters 75x50 sawn hardwood @ 800ccs, 140x20mm soft wood ridge; 160mm soft wood weatherboards (painted), 60x65mm hardwood studs, 100x40mm bottom plate with mortises for studs @ 600mm ccs set on basalt rubble footings. Underground tank, covered with Redcliffe Crown brand corrugated iron - In 1888 the Redcliffe Crown Galvanized Iron Company of St Philip's, Bristol, applied to register two trademarks in Victoria, the Redcliffe and the Redcliffe Crown‌ Lysaghts by 1902 were marketing the Redcliffe brand as their second quality iron, using the version of the brand containing the words 'trade mark'. [Lewis] Underground tank, from north Underground tank, cottage and 2 x pepper trees from north Underground tank, from east, shows weatherboards, overflow and stone base. Underground tank, from south-east, shows weatherboards, overflow and stone base. From house down former elm avenue drive, wind mill stand, roller etc timber scatter near house, with part wrought-iron scrolling (from gate, fence?) Assumed verandah bressumer beam in front of house: 230 x 60mm soft wood and 150 x 60mm soft wood House: W1-cracked stone lintel, burnt timber lintel: cream bricks dry pressed 230x110x70mm, 84mm coursing. May be NBC brand (Northcote Brick Company), pressed reds on window reveal, 230x70x110 same origin. Basalt lines. Bases of round section posts in ground, part verandah support?.Northcote brickworks pressed reds at wall base 224 x108 x 74mm. House, south-east corner: W2- cracked stone lintel, burnt timber lintel, cream bricks dry pressed 230x110x70mm, 84mm coursing; elongated oval frog. Timber lintels- 2x 130x60mm softwood. Basalt lines. Bases of round section posts in ground, part verandah support? Basalt pitched floor apprx 10.6m x 4.9m, with adjoining section 2.7mx 8.1m for stable, cow shed? weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles Basalt pitched floor apprx 10.6m x 4.9m, with adjoining section 2.7mx 8.1m for stable, cow shed? weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles Basalt pitched floor apprx 10.6m x 4.9m, with adjoining section 2.7mx 8.1m for stable, cow shed? weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms strapping, bolts and anchors weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms strapping, bolts and anchors Basalt pitched floor apprx 10.6m x 4.9m, with adjoining section 2.7mx 8.1m for stable, cow shed? weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms strapping, bolts and anchors weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms strapping, bolts and anchors, basalt footing, bed log weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms strapping, bolts and anchors, basalt footing, bed log weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms strapping, bolts and anchors, basalt footing, bed log weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms strapping, bolts and anchors, basalt footing, bed log weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms strapping, bolts and anchors, basalt footing, bed log weathered timbers, some 200mm and 150mm diam hardwood poles, some mortised, also ms

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 84


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook strapping, bolts and anchors, basalt footing, bed log 198. 199. 200. 201. 202. 203. 204. 205. 206. 207. 208. 209. 210. 211. 212. 213. 214. 215. 216. 217. 218. 219. 220. 221. 222. 223. 224. 225. 226. 227. 228. 229. 230. 231. 232. 233. 234. 235.

Pole frame stumps and basalt footings for shedding Pole frame hardwood stumps and basalt footings for shedding Pole frame hardwood stumps and basalt footings for shedding Pole frame stumps and basalt footings for shedding, basalt pitcher flooring, wall plates, joists Pole frame stumps and basalt footings for shedding, wall plates, joists basalt footings for shedding, wall plates, joists c140x20mm, @ 800mm ccs. Clifton pressed cream brick scatter, north end of shedding area Clifton pressed cream brick scatter, north end of shedding area Clifton pressed cream brick scatter, north end of shedding area, with Lister pump base? Clifton pressed cream brick scatter, north end of shedding area. North end of shedding area, with ms strap hinges, wall plates with anchor bolts North end of shedding area, with ms strap hinges, wall plates with anchor bolts Pole frame stumps and basalt footings for shedding, wall plates, joists- north end of shedding. Welded steel framing set in concrete footings Northcote pressed red brick scatter near possible hut site with chimney at north end North yard fence, with dry stone base and added star post and wire, to west. North yard fence, with dry stone base and added star post and wire, to east. Felled tree north end of yard to south-east Felled tree north end of yard, and basalt pitched floor on west fence Felled tree north end of yard, and basalt pitched floor on west fence west yard fence to north North yard fence North yard fence to north-east Felled tree north end of yard to north-east Felled tree north end of yard to east basalt pitcher floor or base at west yard fence To south on west yard fence line to Italian cypress row Field stone paved pathway? Felled tree north end of yard to east Basalt pitcher pile, from stable yard? Basalt pitcher pile, from stable yard? Basalt pitcher pile, from stable yard? Basalt pitcher pile, from stable yard? Basalt pitcher pile with pressed red and cream Northcote bricks Cottage (C4) from north end. Cottage (C4) east wall from north end, with 2x mature pepper trees. Underground tank from north House (H0) D7 rear passage door with dry pressed red brick trim 230x110x70mm

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 85


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook 236. 237. 238. 239. 240. 241. 242. 243. 244. 245. 246. 247. 248. 249. 250. 251. 252. 253. 254. 255. 256. 257. 258. 259. 260. 261. 262. 263. 264. 265.

House from east, elm suckers? House and underground tank from east Underground tank from south-east Cottage east wall, pepper tree Cottage east wall, pepper tree Horse shoe Basalt footing View to north from basalt footing to possible building site with brick chimney Second underground tank south of complex, with new margin, from south-west. Second underground tank south of complex, with new cemented margin, from west. Rubble basalt lining View to north, house, from underground tank 2 View to north, cottage, house, from underground tank 2 To house from east yard with 3x mature elms (also immature specimens nearby) House south wall from east Larger of two mature pepper trees from east Ash south yard boundary, only fair condition Italian cypress row along west yard fence, inter-war origin? Basalt pitcher floor on west boundary from south Cotoneaster from west House north wall W6 basalt sill detail- 1.15m x 330 x 160 deep; red trimming bricks typical of side and rear elevations House D1-dressed basalt threshold 290mm wide, 200mm deep, 540mm over ground with 4 60x60mm mortises for door case House W1- dressed basalt sill (no margins), 1.73m x 270 x 150 deep House W1- dressed basalt sill (no margins), 1.73m x 270 x 150 deep, detail House D1- detail south jamb from north, dry pressed cream trimming bricks as quoining, red internally shaped for door case House, south wall W3, W4- red trimming bricks and margins to basalt sills House, south wall cast iron air brick 220x150mm external face House, south wall W3 - red trimming bricks and margins to basalt sills, 1170 x 310 x 160mm deep House, south wall W4 - red trimming bricks and margins to basalt sills, 1150 x 340 x 160mm deep House D7-dressed basalt threshold 1030mmlong, 320mm wide, 170mm deep, 540mm over ground with 60x60mm sockets for door case House D7 red dry pressed trimming bricks 230x110x70mm as quoining

Graeme Butler & Associates 2015: 86


Heritage Assessment 1145 Donnybrook Road, Donnybrook

Appendix 6: Heritage record contact sheets The following contact sheets include the JPG images obtained from Canon RAW or CR2 images of the place.

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Goss farm heritage, Donnybrook  

The place does possess cultural significance within the local context of the Donnybrook and Woodstock districts within the City of Whittlese...

Goss farm heritage, Donnybrook  

The place does possess cultural significance within the local context of the Donnybrook and Woodstock districts within the City of Whittlese...

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