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West HigH SENIOR PROJECT


West HigH SENIOR PROJECT


West HigH TABLE OF CONTENTS APPENDIX

Proposal & Pragmatic Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Construction Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Existing Site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Research Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Sustainability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Inspiration Images. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Concept . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Relationship Diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

Sketches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Criteria Matrix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Site Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Ergonomic Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96

Floor Plans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Prototypicals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

Classroom Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Case Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

Science Lab. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Literature Reviews. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

Reading Auditorium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Survey Monkey Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Atrium. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Interviews & Questionaire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155


“Schools can and ought to shape learners and ideas in ways that are ever expanding, leading to unpredictable and imaginative encounters with people and ideas.” —Rena Upitis

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PROJECT PROPOSAL Designing a sustainable high school (grades 9th to 12th) for 400-500 students in Denver, Colorado. FORM

High schools today are designed based on high security measures with limited funding which has created a prison environment causing barriers for students to independently grow as an individual. To create a welcoming and thriving environment for students, the outdoors will be incorporated into the interior design as well as using natural and healthy materials to decrease the chances of students becoming ill. The interiors will be lit by day lighting and most spaces will have access to the outdoors with the intentions of students exploring and relaxing in nature. The space will provide a safe, comfortable environment for students and teachers to expand their knowledge and thrive.

FUNCTION

Students, teachers, administrators and guest all spend countless hours in high schools. To create memorable relationships between peers and teachers, as well as the school, many collaborative spaces will be included. Furniture and building elements will be to full adult scale to emphasis a mature environment and prepare students for more a more advanced education. Hallways will be inviting and lead to the outside with the intentions of students using nature as a learning tool.

ECONOMY

To address the rapid enrollment rates for high schools, the classrooms will have flexible furniture plans so additional furniture can be added when needed. The school will use as many sustainable energy saving strategies to reduce the demand for expensive energy. All furniture and finishes will be durable, local, healthy and aesthetically pleasing to decrease the chances of needing replacement in the future. Classes on life skills will provide opportunities for the students to be included in the daily operations of the school requires, such as gardening, life machine samples, cleaning, cooking and furniture building.

TIME

The design of the building will grow with time through personal touches added by the users such as art, gardens, and making spaces more personal for the users. Consideration of future needs such as, laptops, advance technologies and innovative learning techniques can be easily be added in with the current design through moveable furniture, moveable walls, and durable finishes.

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EXISTING SITE PHOTOS

ADOPTED BUILDING CODES International Building Code, 2009 Edition International Residential Code, 2009 Edition International Mechanical Code, 2009 Edition International Plumbing Code, 2009 Edition International Energy Conservation Code, 2009 Edition International Fuel Gas Code, 2009 Edition International Fire Code, 2009 Edition National Electrical Code, 2011 Edition


KENT DENVER SCHOOL 4000 East Quincy Avenue Englewood, CO 80113-4916 (303) 770-7660 CLIENT PROFILE

Kent Denver High School USER PROFILE

400–500 students that range from 14-18 years old that will be divided into grade levels of 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grade. BUILDING AND SITE

From their website: The Kent Denver campus encompasses more than 200 acres, including two lakes. The five academic buildings house 50 classrooms and labs, three theaters (as well as two outdoor amphiteatres), and seven studios for music, dance, and art. Two gymnasiums, a fitness and sports medicine center, seven tennis courts, and 20 acres of playing fields — including DeSo Field, an articifical turf facility — complement the athletic program. Our LEED Platinum dining hall is a model of sustainability and energy efficiency. Extensive technology and wifi access are available campuswide.

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the TYPICAL HIGH SCHOOL

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

The Language of School Design, Design Patterns for the 21st Century Schools Prakash Nair, Randall Fielding, and Jeffery Lackney

Design Pattern 1: Principal Learning Areas- Classrooms, Learning Studios, Advisories and Small Learning Communities

• The traditional Ford Model for the classroom layout presents the assumption that: • All students are ready to learn the same thing at the same time in the same way from the same person. • Learning is passive. • One teacher can be all things (mentor, guide, lecturer, subject matter expert, caregiver) to 20-30 students simultaneously. • Learning happens under teacher control.

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• The learning suite consists of two self-contained, acoustically separate rooms that can be joined when desired for team teaching or large group instruction. The learning studio provides for large group seminars as well as small group work within a self-contained environment. The resource center acts as an on-site multi media resource room for students as well as providing a second self-contained learning environment. These two rooms can be joined through the opening up of a movable acoustical wall.


20 Learning Modalities the school must support:

1. Independent study 2. Peer tutoring 3. Team Collaboration 4. One-on-one learning with teacher 5. Lecture format - teacher-directed 6. Project-based learning 7. Technology with mobile computers 8. Distance learning 9. Internet-based research 10. Student Presentation 11. Performance- based learning 12. Seminar- style instruction 13. Inter-disciplinary learning 14. Naturalist learning 15. Social/emotional/spiritual learning 16. Art-based learning 17. Storytelling 18. Design-based learning 19. Team teaching/ learning 20. Play- based learning

Design Pattern 2: Welcoming Entry

• The welcoming should be welcoming, inviting and friendly and not institutional-looking or forbidding. The welcoming aspect has to be balanced by the need to secure the entry and separate its publicly accessible spaces from the student zones. • The area needs to have a signature element that provides pride and an element that speaks to what makes the school special. • Having a covered entry provides a comfortable transition zone when entering the school and provides the opportunity to create a ceremonial quality to the school. Also many students wait close to school after school and a covered walk way protects the students from rain, snow, and bad weather. • The main administrative office should be close to the entrance, so visitors do not have to wonder the school to find the offices. Also the offices serve as the connection between the

school and the community while providing security for the school and a public area for guests and students.

separates it from other local schools and creates a memorial element that helps visitors remember the school.

• Student display should be the first thing seen when entering the school, it is important for parents and guest to see what the students are doing in school. This place needs to also serve as a temple similar to a home. The stress associated with being in an overwhelming new environment can be reduced by creating a home scale entry that re-enforces safety and comfort.

• Having display cabinets, tack able boards, magnetic boards, a blank wall for painting and murals, gallery space and others are good ideas for student displays.

Design Pattern 3: Student Display Space

• Allows student to feel pride in their work and provides a sense of motivation that encourages students to work hard for their stuff to be displayed. • Creates a space for students to creatively display their hard work and feel that they have an impact on their school. • The display provides a unique authenticity for the school that

• Gardens are a unique way for students to authentically publicate their work and presents to the community that the students care about the environment. Design Pattern 4: Home Base and Individual Storage

• Provides a secure space for students to put their stuff and work that is different than the traditional metal locker. • The idea is to provide a storage space that is under adult supervision, designing out the tendency for locker areas to become bullying zones or general areas in which there is no accountability for time or behavior mishaps.

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

• L ocker sizes should be wider than the traditional 9” wide standard and should be ideally as large as 12”-15” wide and 18” deep to fit modern laptops and large stacks of educational books as well as overstuffed backpacks. To avoid having bunches of people gathering together to access their lockers at a single time, bunching the lockers into small groupings. Design Pattern 5: Science Labs, Art Studios and Life Skills Area

•H  aving a single space the is flexible for an active lab, messy projects, individual learning, a think tank gathering area and outdoor space. •T  his flexible space allows for multiple types of projects to take place in a single room while aiming to teach towards all the different learning styles. • F or the active lab space- the tables need to moveable with services located along the perimeter.

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• The student display- displays the students complete or process work for projects to show evidence of work being accomplished in the lab. • Space for messy projectsprovides opportunities for projects to get dirty and not limit the students to working on paper and computers. The space should be either outside or inside with large operable windows or garage doors. • Soft seating- allows for an area to break off from the hands on part and allows for students to think together in a quiet area. • Storage- needs to be accessed and attached to all the zones with enough area for materials and needed equipment. Space needs to be dedicated for projects that take a long time while still being able to operate a learning environment in the classroom. • A horticulture lab or green house is an interactive area that teaches important lessons of sustainability, ecology and an

exploration of living science. A living machine is a system designed to remove organic wastes, nutrients, and pathogens that can damage human health and ecosystems if discharged. • The Da Vinci Studio - Refer to book for examples and floorplan ideas! Design Pattern 6: Music and Performance

• Provide spontaneous opportunities for students to participate in art-related building features such as students being included with working with professionals to create art for the school. • Create a black box theater that can be used and reused for a variety of productions, connect the space to an outdoor area to encourage outdoor performances. • Provide space for students to create theatre props and costumes as well as a TV production studio and space for journalism and a weekly newspaper.

• Encourages students to independently work on art projects by having private rooms to work on their work while being able to spread out their materials. Design Pattern 7: Health and Physical Fitness

• Provide spaces that are alternative to the tradition P.E. class such as a holistic approach of; yoga, karate, etc. • By creating an activity that students are engaged in, they set personal goals which enhances students to motivate themselves to successful with school. • Dance, aerobics, yoga, kick boxing, pilates, fencing, juggling, Tai Chi, walking, hiking and bike riding. • Student gyms need to look like adult physical fitness center so that students are more likely to develop healthy, lifelong habits. • Doubling the cafeteria space to also be a physical space relations the importance between physical health and what you eat!


Design Pattern 8: Casual Eating Areas

•T  o break the rigid pattern of enforcing eating and having an over managed lunch period, redesigning the lunch room and system can create a stress free environment. •B  y creating casual eating ares, students have access to food at all times during the day with a centralized kitchen (cafe) situation and provides a more intimate area than a large cafeteria. •E  ating areas should have both booths and tables for different types of seating arrangements. Windows should be near the windows with views to the outdoors and have access to outdoor seating. •E  nhances opportunities for students to hold jobs as being responsible for the cleanness and arrangements and helps students take ownership for the space.

Design Pattern 9: Transparency and Passive Supervision

• The idea of developing a school with high levels of visibility in both formal and informal learning areas. This creates a sense of openness yet preserves acoustic separation, increases natural daylight in the building, and provides a sight for the entrance of the school. • Make the central and administrative offices as transparent as possible to improve the welcoming sight and creates a protective eye to overlook the student activities. • Where corridors are provided, provide glazing into the students work area to bring light into corridors, reduce the closed-in feeling of the classroom, improve security and create a feeling of openness. Create interesting sight lines from different parts of the school so that there is a sense of drama as people move from place to place in the building. Design a meandering path that creates

interesting nooks and crannies without sacrificing security. Design Pattern 12: Indoor-Outdoor Connection

• Utilize outdoor space for outdoor classrooms and learning spaces but also use the site to create relaxing retreats for the teenagers. • Create indoor paths that lead to the outdoors that encourage students to explore the outdoors and their surrounding areas to become familiar with their hometown. Design Pattern 15: Campfire Space

• The idea of a campfire space is to include multiple learning styles for one lecture that can be formal or informal. • The space needs a raised section of the room, (either audience or speaker) good sound reflectance behind the speaking area, if not doing auditorium style seating, the desk and chairs need to be functional and moveable for different lecture or project types.

• To include informal elements, bean bags, seat cushions, colors. etc should all be added to the space and a seat that is at a higher level than the audience seating is a key importance for the speaker to have signifcance. Design Pattern 17: Cave Space

• To make the library a friendly student place instead of the traditional adult set-up, comfortable spaces for refuge should be included for teenagers to privately engage in their readings. • Pull-out niches, nooks and crannies are all effective quiet independent study cave areas. Design Pattern 18: Designing for Multiple Intelligences

• The 8 intelligences are: • Linguistic; Word Smart • Logical/Mathematical; Number Smart • Musical; Music Smart • Bodily/Kinesthetic; Sports/Fitness

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

Smart • Spatial- Picture/3D Smart • Naturalist; Nature Smart • Interpersonal; Social Smart • Intrapersonal; Self Smart •W  hen properly applied in schools, these elements provide students with the opportunity to become engaged in subjects that may not otherwise have held their interest. Design Pattern 21: Learning, Lighting and Color

• To provide safe, clean and large restroom that are located sporadically through out the space plan, students do not have to walk long distances to get to the restroom. • Having private large restrooms rather than traditional linear rows of stalls, students feel more comfortable and this will decrease the number of students hanging out in bathrooms to skip classes or rally up a bullying fight due to the lack of supervision. Design Pattern 26: Teachers as Professionals

•D  irectional track light provides a varied pattern, contrasting with the even wash of fluorescent pendants.

• Multiple personal storage options; shelving, rolling storage, locked storage, desk drawer storage, closet storage, etc. for teacher to store their personal belongings.

•P  eople naturally stare into space to reinforce their attention and rest their tired eyes, to give them an appealing visual sight that will improve their concentration and regain their motivation.

• Teachers need space to meet in team groups, and facilities for lesson project preparation, as well as student teacher meetings.

•P  eople are naturally drawn towards light, use this as a way to draw people deeper into spaces and provide instincts for people to instantly follow paths.

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Design Pattern 25: Home Like Bathrooms

• One big staff room is not the solution to satisfy teachers, providing multiple different types of spaces for teachers to gather and relax and eat or meet up to discuss private matters.


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INSPIRATION

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CONCEPT

Right Brain

Left Brain

intuitive, thoughtful and subjective

logical, analytical and objective

• Recognizing faces • Expressing emotions • Music • Reading emotions

• Color • Images • Intuition • Creativity

“I am the right brain. I am creativity. A free spirit. I am passion. Yearning. Sensuality. I am the sound of roaring laughter. I am taste. The feeling of sand beneath bare feet. I am movement. Vivid colors. I am the urge to pain on an empty canvas. I am boundless imagination. Art. Poetry. I sense. I feel. I am everything I wanted to be.”

• Language • Logic • Critical thinking • Numbers • Reasoning

“I am the left brain. I am a scientist. A mathematician. I love the familiar. I categorize. I am accurate. Linear. Analytical. Strategic. I am practical. Always in control. A master of words and language. Realistic. I calculate equations and play with numbers. I am order. I am logic. I know exactly who I am.” 17


Design Statement The intention of the high school integrates creativity and logic, similar to the two hemispheres of the brain and left logical side and the right creative side. This concept is carried through in the space planning, finishes, and furniture selection, and designing architectural elements because students thrive in inviting and warm spaces. By incorporating both creativity and logic in the space planning, the school has a

unique floor plan that is flooded with day lighting and integrated with the outdoors. Unlike traditional schools, with their long and dark hallways, this space plan has “classroom wings� that are inviting and coordinate with way finding techniques. This is a way finding strategy that directs students to classrooms while also being apart of the main atrium activity. By offering the teacher flexibility of classrooms,

the teacher is able to move the class to spaces fitting for the lecture topic, and students can collaborate or work independently. The collaborative and independent work environment will help students develop their own habits as they grow, instead of having habits instilled in them by their school.

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SCHEMATIC SKETCHES

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SITE PLAN


FIRST FLOOR

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SECOND FLOOR

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THIRD FLOOR

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

CLASSROOMS

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Classrooms The classroom designs are focused around flexibility. The design intent is to give the students and teacher the freedom to organize the classroom to accommodate lecture collaborations. Research shows that many classrooms only have one option for desk layout, and is very traditional lecture style layout facing one direction in a straight line. To achieve a flexible design, the Steelcase Node chair provides an easy way for students and teachers to quickly and easily organize the desks according to their needs.

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Classrooms Dry marker paint is applied to all wall surfaces and allows the teacher to have the class face any direction. Natural materials and warm colors make the classroom inviting and provide accent colors to promote creativity within the students. Different spaces are provided with in the classroom setting, such as a cave space surrounded by windows that overlook landscapes creates a cozy place for students to independently work. The refuge space has soft seating and a low ceiling that provides a “hug-like� space that allows the student to decompress while still being apart of the class.

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SPECIFICATIONS

Reclaimed wood flooring Mobile Lectern

Soft seating upholstery

Soft seating

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Steelcase node

Cork wall tiles


Reclaimed millwork wood Mobile Desk

Ceramic wall tiles

Classroom Materials Warm and serene finishes and furniture create an inviting and comforting space. Built in stacked auditorium seating with easy to clean upholstery provides durable seating. A bold patterned and bright colored carpet tile emphasies the front of the room and creates contrast against the reclaimed wood flooring. A colorful accostic wall talll accents the linear color tinted windows.

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SPECIFICATIONS

Mimio Mimio innovation makes it possible. We put technology on the whiteboard, not in the whiteboard. You don’t need to buy and set up complicated and expensive equipment. With a MimioTeach™ interactive whiteboard you can: • Mount it to your whiteboard magnetically, so it’s easy to move it to different classrooms or remove it for safekeeping. • Concentrate on being a teacher, not a techie. • Create engaging, student-centered, interactive lessons with the included MimioStudio™ classroom software. • Enjoy all the tools you need to encourage active learning. • Be certain that its rugged design will help it last through years of classroom use. • Meet the requirements of your school budget. The patented MimioTeach stylus is a slender, ergonomic pen that: • Fits comfortably in hands of all sizes. • Lets you control the information on your computer from your whiteboard, without wires. • Works automatically, so there’s no learning curve. • Recharges automatically in the MimioTeach bar.

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Steelcase Node The Node chair is mobile and flexible. It’s designed for quick, easy transitions from one teaching mode to the next. With Node, a classroom can transition from lecture mode to team mode and back again, without interruption. • Casters lend mobility for quick, easy transitions between teaching modes • Swivel seat keeps open sightlines between student and instructor, whiteboard, and other students • Personal worksurface swivels in tandem with seat and is adjustable for users of all sizes. It accommodates left- and right-handed students and is large enough to support students’ digital and analog resources. • Tripod base keeps backpacks and valuable personal belongings out of the aisle • Five-star base provides seat-height adjustability • Optional cupholder and tablet stand free up worksurface area for books and other technology • Flexible seat, without pneumatic adjustments to worry about, keeps students comfortable in a variety of postures • Open seat design offers easy access, while arms serve as backpack hooks • Comfort without upholstery means easy maintenance • Steelcase warranty with elevated durability testing makes node an easy choice

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DESIGN DEVLEOPMENT

SCIENCE LAB

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This flexible space allows for multiple types of projects to take place in a single room while aiming to teach towards all the different learning styles.

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SPECIFICATIONS

Wall tile

Accent wood for lab tables

Soft seating upholstery Lab table stackable seating

Soft seating

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Stained concrete flooring


Wall tile Suspended lighting

Counter base wood

Science Lab Materials Complimetary colors, purple and orange emphasis the science lab. The inspiration was an industrial space that had a fun and inviting play for the students to become comfortable with the space. Bright and natural materials compliment the views from the landscape that is seen from the large windows. Everything in here is easy to clean and durable.

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Science Lab The science lab is a functional hub space for both brainstorming and science labs. Soft seating at the entrance of the room provides a flexible space for students to independently work or break out into groups. Dropped ceilings create three different designated areas within the large room, a brain storming area, sinks, and workstations. Next to the work stations on the wall are large writeable spaces, so desks don’t get cluttered with notes and pens. Soft seating allows for an area to break off from the hands on part and allows for students to thinnk together in a quiet area. The exsisting stained concrete floor is easy to clean and sutable for messy science projects.

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

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READING AUDITORIUM


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Reading Auditorium The reading auditorium is an open classroom lecture area with raised seating to create emphasis on the center stage. This space is ideal for English classes to perform classic plays speeches. This space can includes learning styles for one lecture that can be formal or informal. Raised soft seating for the audience creates an emphasis on the speaker or speakers. Felt wall cover provides accostic properties as well as pops of color to the space. Linear tinted glass provides a warm light to the space. The reading auditorium also serves as a relaxing space for students to work in groups with soft seating and serene lighting.

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SPECIFICATIONS

Accostical felt wall covering tiles

Soft seating upholstery

Moveable soft seating

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LED ceiling lighting

Modular Bench Seating Upholstery


Reclaimed wood flooring

LED wall sconce

Carpet

Reading Auditorium Materials Warm and serene finishes and furniture create an inviting and comforting space. Built in stacked auditorium seating with easy to clean upholstery provides durable seating. A bold patterned and bright colored carpet tile emphasies the front of the room and creates contrast against the reclaimed wood flooring. A colorful accostic wall talll accents the linear color tinted windows.

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

ATRIUM

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Atrium The Atrium is a welcoming area with natural materials and inviting warm colors. When visitors and students enter the building, acoustical wall covering line the top five feet of the walls, this provides a sustainable wall dĂŠcor as well as a bold color distinguishing property. This large and open atrium provides a gathering space for students during off periods as well as circulation for class transitions. The color tinted windows

were inspired by European designs and reflect warm colors into the interior to make the interior less sterile and provides a distinguishing factor that sets the school apart from other schools. Along the rounded interior walls, lockers are placed in sections of the school were there will be low circulation as to not cause congestion when students stop and use their lockers.

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SPECIFICATIONS

Accostical cardboard wall tile paint color

Modular Bench Seating Upholstery Casual dining table

Soft seating for eating area

Accostical cardboard wall tiles

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Modular Bench Seating


Reclaimed wood flooring Casual eating area lighting

Atrium Materials

Casual eating area table

The atrium is a large gathering area for students to have casual spaces to eat, chat, work on homework, and use their lockers. The finishes and furniture choices have bold colors that compliment the concept of creativty. The shapes of the furniture are organic, interesting and moveable for students to create spaces that fit their specific need.

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APPENDIX


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT

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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT

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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENT

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PROCESS

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SUSTAINABILITY

Sustainable Strategies for Denver, Colorado Passive Solar Water Heating

Faux Stone

Water Collecting Systems

Passive Solar Energy Cooling

• Looks like a natural stone and keeps the interiors cool in summer while warm in the winter.

• Rain barrel collecting systems, etc.

• Controls humidity

• South facing windows

•B  right shiny white roof to reflect summer solar radiation. • Green Roof with Xeriscaping • Natural Shade, etc. • L arge south facing operable windows to capture cool breeze from lake.

• Provides fresh ventilation Overhangs and Window Shelves

• Block the high summer sun while the low winter sun seeps through windows and warms the interior. • Clear story windows

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• Bioswales Day Lighting Strategies

• Light shelves •Light tubes Energy Conservation

• Solar Panels • Use radiant barriers-high fictive low emissivisty walls & roof, blocks 97% of solar heat.


LEED 2009 for Schools New Construction and Major Renovations

Project Name

Project Checklist

Sustainable Sites Y

Y Y X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

?

Y Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 4.1 Credit 4.2 Credit 4.3 Credit 4.4 Credit 5.1 Credit 5.2 Credit 6.1 Credit 6.2 Credit 7.1 Credit 7.2 Credit 8 Credit 9 Credit 10

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention Environmental Site Assessment Site Selection Development Density and Community Connectivity Brownfield Redevelopment Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access Alternative Transportation—Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms Alternative Transportation—Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles Alternative Transportation—Parking Capacity Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat Site Development—Maximize Open Space Stormwater Design—Quantity Control Stormwater Design—Quality Control Heat Island Effect—Non-roof Heat Island Effect—Roof Light Pollution Reduction Site Master Plan Joint Use of Facilities

Prereq 1 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 3

Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Prereq 3 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6

Y X X X

Prereq 1 Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 2

2 to 4 2 2 to 4 1

1 to 19 1 to 7 2 1 2 2

Possible Points: 13

Storage and Collection of Recyclables Building Reuse—Maintain Existing Walls, Floors, and Roof Building Reuse—Maintain 50% of Interior Non-Structural Elements Construction Waste Management

1 to 2 1 1 to 2

?

X X X X X

N Credit 3 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6 Credit 7

Materials Reuse Recycled Content Regional Materials Rapidly Renewable Materials Certified Wood

1 to 2 1 to 2 1 to 2 1 1

Indoor Environmental Quality Y Y Y X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Prereq 3 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3.1 Credit 3.2 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6.1 Credit 6.2 Credit 7.1 Credit 7.2 Credit 8.1 Credit 8.2 Credit 9 Credit 10

Possible Points: 19

Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Minimum Acoustical Performance Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring Increased Ventilation Construction IAQ Management Plan—During Construction Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy Low-Emitting Materials Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control Controllability of Systems—Lighting Controllability of Systems—Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort—Design Thermal Comfort—Verification Daylight and Views—Daylight Daylight and Views—Views Enhanced Acoustical Performance Mold Prevention

Innovation and Design Process

Possible Points: 33

Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems Minimum Energy Performance Fundamental Refrigerant Management Optimize Energy Performance On-Site Renewable Energy Enhanced Commissioning Enhanced Refrigerant Management Measurement and Verification Green Power

Materials and Resources

1 4 1 4 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 11

Water Use Reduction—20% Reduction Water Efficient Landscaping Innovative Wastewater Technologies Water Use Reduction Process Water Use Reduction

Energy and Atmosphere Y Y Y X X X X X X

Materials and Resources, Continued

Possible Points: 24

N

Water Efficiency Y X X X X

Date

X X X X X X

Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4 Credit 2 Credit 3

Possible Points: 6

Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title Innovation in Design: Specific Title LEED Accredited Professional The School as a Teaching Tool

Regional Priority Credits X X X X

Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4

Regional Priority: Regional Priority: Regional Priority: Regional Priority:

Specific Specific Specific Specific

1 1 1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 4 Credit Credit Credit Credit

Total Certified 40 to 49 points

1 1 1 1 1 to 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 to 3 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 110 Silver 50 to 59 points

Gold 60 to 79 points

Platinum 80 to 110

71


SPECIFICATIONS

CEILING LIGHT

SCONCE LIGHTING

ACCOSTICAL WALL TILE

MANUFACTURER: Tech Lighting

MANUFACTURER: Philips Consumer Luminaires

MANUFACTURER: Hive

PRODUCT: Large Glass Pendant SERIAL NUMBER: #:700TDCPSGP DESCRIPTION:Oval shaped glass pendant FINISH: Smoke color w/ Satin Nickel Finish DIMENSIONS: 12” x 20” SUSTAINABLE: Made in the USA & LED light

PRODUCT: Ledino SERIAL NUMBER:3604 DESCRITON: Thin, delicate wall light FINISH: Premium aluminum, white DIMENSIONS: 5” W x 7.7” H x 2.4” Extension SUSTAINABLE: Recycled aluminum

72

PRODUCT: Flock Felt Wall Tiles COLOR: All color ways CONTENTS: 100% Marino Wool Felt FINISH: Self-adhesive backing DIMENSIONS: 16 cm W x 26 cm H SUSTAINABLE: Stain resistance, made in the USA


WOOD FLOORING

CARPET

UPHOLSTERY

MANUFACTURER: Krantz Recovered Woods

MANUFACTURER: Shaw

MANUFACTURER: Kravet Contract

PRODUCT: Reclaimed Crypress

PRODUCT: Horizontal Edge Tile

PRODUCT: Mandarin

SERIAL NUMBER:41CRCY

PATTERN NUMBER:59115

COLOR: Harbor - 5

COLOR: Natural

COLOR: 67156, Paprika Margin

CONTENTS: 100% Recycled Polyester

FINISH: Smooth Sand Finish

CONTENTS: Eco Solution Q Nylong

FINISH: Crypton Green

WIDTH: 6” W x Random L x 1”

WIDTH: 19.7” x 19.7”

WIDTH: 54” Roll

SUSTAINABLE: Reclaimed wood, hand crafted to highest quality, Local company

DIRECTION: Vertical Continuation Striping

DIRECTION: Railroad

SUSTAINABLE: Ecoworx Tile, Cradle to Cradle, Green Label Plus

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

ADD. NOTES:Refer to Finish Plan for plank direction

73


SPECIFICATIONS

SOFT SEATING

SOFT SEATING

UPHOLSTERY

MANUFACTURER: ICF

MANUFACTURER: ICF

MANUFACTURER: Kravet Contract

PRODUCT: Base

PRODUCT: Oppo

PRODUCT: Seismic

SERIAL NUMBER:105000

SERIAL NUMBER:OPPOSM BK0 NWBZ ARMS

COLOR: Sunshinie - 34

DESCRITON: Simple soft seating for private or public areas, minialist elegant form.

DESCRITON: Fully upholstered lounge chair with arms.

CONTENTS: 100% Recycled Polyester

FINISH: Standard White features

FINISH: Available in 30 colors

DIMENSIONS: 19”W x 19” D x 19” H

DIMENSIONS: 27-1/2”W x 35”D x 30” H

FINISH: Crypton Green WIDTH: 54” Roll DIRECTION: Railroad SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

74


UPHOLSTERY

UPHOLSTERY

UPHOLSTERY

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

MANUFACTURER: Kravet Contract

MANUFACTURER: Kravet Contract

PRODUCT: Aria

PRODUCT: Seismic

PRODUCT: Atomic

COLOR: 016 Swerve

COLOR: Hibiscus - 97

COLOR: Alloy - 11

CONTENTS: 100% Cotton

CONTENTS: 100% Recycled Polyester

CONTENTS: 100% Recycled Polyester

FINISH: None

FINISH: Crypton Green

FINISH: Crypton Green

WIDTH: 55” Roll

WIDTH: 54” Roll

WIDTH: 54” Roll

DIRECTION: n/a

DIRECTION: Railroad

DIRECTION: n/a

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

75


SPECIFICATIONS

76

UPHOLSTERY

UPHOLSTERY

SEATING

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

MANUFACTURER: Herman Miller

PRODUCT: Highfield

PRODUCT: Highfield

PRODUCT: Magis Deja-vu Table

COLOR: 951

COLOR: 681

SERIAL NUMBER:MGD70.V7948YFH

CONTENTS: 100% Trevira CS Polyester

CONTENTS: 100% Trevira CS Polyester

FINISH: Crypton Green

FINISH: Crypton Green

DESCRITON: Extruded aluminum legs with medium density fiberboard top

WIDTH: 54” Roll

WIDTH: 54” Roll

DIRECTION: Railroad

DIRECTION: Railroad

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

FINISH: Standard White features DIMENSIONS: 79” x 48” - Oval & 21”H SUSTAINABLE: Made in USA


ACCOSTICAL WALL TILE

WALL TILE PAINT

SOFT SEATING

MANUFACTURER: Mio

MANUFACTURER: Mythic Paint

MANUFACTURER: ICF

PRODUCT: Acoustic Weave

PRODUCT: Classic Interior Flat Paint

PRODUCT: Base

COLOR: Florentine Flash 075-5

FINISH: Florentine Flash 075-5

SERIAL NUMBER:105000

FINISH: Recycled paper modules

SUSTAINABLE: Non-Toxic, ultra low odor, no VOC

DESCRITON: Simple soft seating for private or public areas, minialist elegant form.

DIMENSIONS:1-1/4” Think- Length & Height Varies SUSTAINABLE: Local resourced stone, weather durable and lasts a life time

FINISH: Standard White features DIMENSIONS: 19”W x 19” D x 19” H

77


SPECIFICATIONS

TILE

CASUAL DINING TABLE

LOCKERS

MANUFACTURER: Mutina

MANUFACTURER: Herman Miller

MANUFACTURER: Art Metal Products

PRODUCT: Dechirer (La Suite)

PRODUCT: Magis Deja-vu Table

PRODUCT: Hybrid Wood Lockers

PATTERN NUMBER:2010

SERIAL NUMBER:MGD70.V7948YFH

SERIAL NUMBER:UW158801MEW

COLOR: Net Calce

DESCRITON: Extruded aluminum legs with medium density fiberboard top

DESCRITON: Double Tier Unit

CONTENTS: Unglazed homogeneous porcelain stoneware. FINISH: Rectified and brushed slabs DIMENSIONS: 12” x 12” SUSTAINABLE: Hand Made from natural material

78

FINISH: Standard White features DIMENSIONS: 79” x 48” - Oval & 21”H

FINISH: Red Oak DIMENSIONS: 15” W x 18” D x 36” H SUSTAINABLE: Recycled metal, natural finish


WOOD FLOORING

iNTERIOR WALL MATERIAL

INTERIOR WALL PAINT

MANUFACTURER: What It’s Worth, Inc.

MANUFACTURER: Texas Quarries

MANUFACTURER: Mythic Paint

PRODUCT: Reclaimed Antique Flooring

PRODUCT: Riviera Stone

PRODUCT: Classic Interior Flat Paint

COLOR: Heart Pine- Old Reveal

COLOR: Cordova Cream

FINISH: Vanilla Frost, 085-1

FINISH: Antique Natural Existing Condition

FINISH: Sawned Front Finish

SUSTAINABLE: Non-Toxic, ultra low odor, no VOC

DIMENSIONS:2-1/2” W x 11-1/2”L x -1/16” D

DIMENSIONS:1-1/4” Think- Length & Height Varies

SUSTAINABLE: Reclaimed wood, hand crafted to highest quality, Local company

SUSTAINABLE: Local resourced stone, weather durable and lasts a life time

79


SPECIFICATIONS

PENDANT LIGHTING

SOFT SEATING & BENCH SEATING

WOOD INSTILLATION ON WALL

MANUFACTURER: Tom Dixon Lighting

MANUFACTURER: Nienkamper

MANUFACTURER: Krantz Recovered Woods

PRODUCT: Beat Light

PRODUCT: Linq

PRODUCT: Reclaimed Crypress

SERIAL NUMBER:TCX-BEAT-LIGHT-WIDE

SERIAL NUMBER:6162

SERIAL NUMBER:41CRCY

DESCRITON: Suspended pendant

DESCRITON: Pentagonal bench shape that modulate together with pentagonal tables.

COLOR: Natural

FINISH: Beated Brasss DIMENSIONS: 14”D x 6” H SUSTAINABLE: Made in USA, LED lighting

FINISH: G7111 & g7083 DIMENSIONS: 18” W x 18” H x 18” D SUSTAINABLE: Durable & easy to clean

80

FINISH: Smooth Sand Finish WIDTH: 6” W x Random L x 1” D SUSTAINABLE: Reclaimed wood, hand crafted to highest quality, Local company


WALL CORK TILE

WALL CORK TILE

SURFACE PANEL

MANUFACTURER: iCork Floor LLC

MANUFACTURER: Harvest

MANUFACTURER: PaperStone

PRODUCT: Orgbrick Corck Wall Tile

PRODUCT: #2041

PRODUCT: Solid Surface Panels

COLOR: Burnt Sienna

COLOR: Blue

COLOR: Mocha

CONTENTS: Prefinished Cork

CONTENTS: Ceramic

FINISH: Agglomerated

FINISH: Sky Blue Glaze

FINISH: PaperStone Sustainable Water Resistance Finish

DIMENSIONS: 11” W x 23” L x 1/4” D

DIMENSIONS: Custom Pattern

SUSTAINABLE: Natural Material & Durable

SUSTAINABLE: Natural Material & Made in New Mexico by a small business.

DIMENSIONS: Custom- 2’ W x 5’ L x 1-1/4” H SUSTAINABLE: 100% Post-Consumer Recycled Paper and Petro-Free phenolic resins and natural pigments, stain resistance

81


SPECIFICATIONS

ICESTONE SURFACE

UPHOLSTERY

LECTERN

MANUFACTURER: IceStone USA

MANUFACTURER: Schumacher

MANUFACTURER: izzy+

PRODUCT: Ice Stone Surface

PRODUCT: Yard Texture

PRODUCT: Dewey Lectern

COLOR: Fog Bound

PATTERN NUMBER:65363

SERIAL NUMBER:LNLECT2730SR

FINISH: Honed

COLOR: Fern

DIMENSIONS:52”W x 96”L x 1-1/4” D

CONTENTS: 100% Organic Cotton

DESCRITON: Mobile lectern Podium with storage

SUSTAINABLE: Non-Toxic, no VOC, gold cradle to cradle, zero-waste manufacturing, renewable energy manufacturing

WIDTH: 54” Roll

FINISH: Polished Aluminum base with Oil Walnut Laminate

DIRECTION: Up the roll

DIMENSIONS: 30”W x 27”D x 30”-42” H

SUSTAINABLE: Cradle to Cradle Silver certified, Finish is SCS Indoor Advantage Gold, Free of PVC, Anti-Bacte-rial, and Responsible Return Program

82


SOFT SEATING

UPHOLSTERY

DESK

MANUFACTURER: ICF

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

MANUFACTURER: izzy+

PRODUCT: Base

PRODUCT: Highfield

PRODUCT: Desk

SERIAL NUMBER: 105000

COLOR: 724

SERIAL NUMBER:LNDESK2323TR

DESCRITON: Simple soft seating for private or public areas, minialist elegant form.

CONTENTS: 100% Trevira CS Polyester

DESCRITON: Desk with storage on casters.

FINISH: Crypton Green

FINISH: Polished Aluminum base with Oil Walnut Laminate

FINISH: Standard White features DIMENSIONS: 19”W x 19” D x 19” H

WIDTH: 54” Roll DIRECTION: Railroad

DIMENSIONS: 30”W x 27”D x 30”-42” H

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

83


SPECIFICATIONS

DESK

MOBILE BOOKSHELVING

WOOD FLOORING

MANUFACTURER: Steelcase

MANUFACTURER: izzy+

MANUFACTURER: Krantz Recovered Woods

PRODUCT: Node 480 series

PRODUCT: Storage shelving

PRODUCT: Reclaimed Crypress

SERIAL NUMBER:480120 - S627

SERIAL NUMBER:LNLECT2730SR

SERIAL NUMBER:41CRCY

DESCRITON: Collaborative Chair with persoanl work surface.

DESCRITON: Mobile lectern shelving unit

COLOR: Natural

FINISH: Polished Aluminum base with Oil Walnut Laminate

FINISH: Smooth Sand Finish

FINISH: Varies to classroom DIMENSIONS: 24-3/4” D x 25-3/4” W x 32” 37” H SUSTAINABLE: Made in USA, easy to clean

84

DIMENSIONS: 30”W x 27”D x 30”-42” H

WIDTH: 6” W x Random L x 1” D SUSTAINABLE: Reclaimed wood, hand crafted to highest quality, Local company ADD. NOTES:Refer to Finish Plan for plank direction


TILE

STACKABLE CHAIR

INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARD SYSTEM

MANUFACTURER: Mutina

MANUFACTURER: ICF

MANUFACTURER: Mimio

PRODUCT: Tex

PRODUCT: Base

PRODUCT: MimioTeach

PATTERN NUMBER:3500-18

SERIAL NUMBER:105000

SERIAL NUMBER:105000

COLOR: White

DESCRITON: Simple soft seating for private or public areas, minialist elegant form.

DESCRITON: Simple soft seating for private or public areas, minialist elegant form.

FINISH: Standard White features

FINISH: Standard White features

DIMENSIONS: 19”W x 19” D x 19” H

DIMENSIONS: 19”W x 19” D x 19” H

CONTENTS: Glazed extruded body WIDTH: 11” x 5” triangle

SUSTAINABLE: Easy to move

85


SPECIFICATIONS

BENCH

UPHOLSTERY

UPHOLSTERY

MANUFACTURER: Arcadia

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

PRODUCT: Domo Benches

PRODUCT: Aria

PRODUCT: Aria

SERIAL NUMBER:6162

COLOR: 016 Swerve

COLOR: 097 Watch

DESCRITON: Pentagonal bench shape that modulate together with pentagonal tables.

CONTENTS: 100% Cotton

CONTENTS: 100% Cotton

FINISH: None

FINISH: None

WIDTH: 55” Roll

WIDTH: 55” Roll

DIRECTION: n/a

DIRECTION: n/a

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

FINISH: Polished Aluminum base DIMENSIONS: N/A SUSTAINABLE: Durable & easy to clean

86


UPHOLSTERY

UPHOLSTERY

UPHOLSTERY

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

MANUFACTURER: Maharam

PRODUCT: Aria

PRODUCT: Aria

PRODUCT: Aria

COLOR: 064 Burlesque

COLOR: 004 Float

COLOR: 091 Evergreen

CONTENTS: 100% Trevira CS Polyester

CONTENTS: 100% Trevira CS Polyester

CONTENTS: 100% Trevira CS Polyester

FINISH: Crypton Green

FINISH: Crypton Green

FINISH: Crypton Green

WIDTH: 54” Roll

WIDTH: 54” Roll

WIDTH: 54” Roll

DIRECTION: Railroad

DIRECTION: Railroad

DIRECTION: Railroad

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

SUSTAINABLE: Crypton green backing for a duratble finish as well as stain and moisture barrier protection.

87


RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAMS

Overall

Gym

88

Admin

Classrooms

Music Hall

Cafeteria


Academic

Academic (Detailed)

Restrooms

Lockers

Study Hall

Freshmen

Admin

Sophomores

Student Lounge

Classrooms

Teachers Lounge

Juniors

Outdoor Space

Seniors

Outdoor Space

Senior Area

89


CRITERIA MATRIX CLASSROOMS

LIBRARY/MEDIA CENTER

90

LOCATION/SPACE

SQUARE FOOTAGE NEEDS

Living Machine or Aquaponics

PUBLIC ACCESS

DAYLIGHT/ VIEW

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

850-950

Water Pump Station

Natural Lighting, Ventillation

Classrooms (50)

15 sqft. Per student

Projection Monitor, Storage

Natural Lighting, Ventillation, Break Out Zones, & Access to Outdoors

Large Group Rooms

1500-2000

TV

Movable Furniture

Team Learning Areas

150-200

Movable Furniture, Storage

Small Group Conference

200

Movable Furniture

Individual Learning Stations

40 sqft. Per station

Electricity for Laptops

Entrance, Circulation, Distribution

700-900

Welcoming, Space to display student work to bring students in to explore

Computer Access, Reference

3200

Try to interact books with this center or separate the spaces

Small Group Conference

150-200

Reading Garden

2000

Fountain

Relaxing getaway space, bench seating

Classroom

800

Projection Monitor, Storage

Natural Lighting, Ventillation, Flexible Space for different types of lectures and activities

Workroom

400

Copier, etc.

Storage

100

Professional Library

200

Cute antique latter set-up

Librarian Office

100

Some furniture should have access to plugs for ipads, etc.

Reading Areas

500

PRIVACY

PLUMBING

Available for student use

Cave zones


TECHNOLOGY

SCIENCE

SPECIAL EDUCATION TECHNICAL EDUCATION

ART

LOCATION/SPACE

SQUARE FOOTAGE NEEDS

Computer Lab (2)

1000-1400

Control and Headrooms

640-740

Window room

Closets

200

Ventillation

Copy Center

500-800

Access for students

TV/ Video Studio

1250

Classroom Labs (8)

1200-1500

Storage Lab Prep

350

Couches, comfy

Space for students to learn up on the projects before

Outside Space

1000

Garage door access

Messy space, so easy to clean up!

Classroom for 5 to 8 Students

600

Accessable furniture & Technology

Simple space plan, no corners, easy for parents to also interact with the

Classroom Lab

800-1200

Accessable furniture & Technology

Tech Lab

1800-2400

Lots of technical equipment

General Shop

2000-3000

Saws, drills, etc.

Special Computer Program Lab

1400-2000

Projector

Storage

250

Multipurpose Room

1200-1500

Projector

Cleanable furniture, storage for artwork in progress, access to outdoor space, critic area

Drawing & Painting Studios

1200-1700

Projector

Cleanable furniture, storage for artwork in progress, access to outdoor space, critic area

Ceramics

1500-1800

Projector, Kiln

Damp Room for clay storage

Photography & Dark Room

800

Film processing space, light projectors

Revolving door

PUBLIC ACCESS

DAYLIGHT/ VIEW

PRIVACY

PLUMBING

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Projection Monitor, Storage

Look into different computer table set ups

Cameras, green screen, etc.

Maybe this can be a multipurpose space shared with another tech studio Break out zones for group projects and individual projects

Move to ART- wood shop

91


CRITERIA MATRIX ART (CONT’D) MUSIC

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

92

LOCATION/SPACE

SQUARE FOOTAGE NEEDS

Storage

350

Office

120

Choir

2200

Accostics, Sounds technology, Sterio system

General Music

1000

Accoustics, Sound Technology, Sterio System, Projector

Band Hall

3000

Monitone(?), Accoustics, Sterio Set up like a traditional orchistra System, white board

Insturment Storage

600-800

Lockable storage cubbies

Access within the band hall and from public access

Uniform Storage

300-400

Small Practice Room

60-80

Sterio Equipment

Comfortable Space

Group Practice Room

100-150

Tables, Chairs, Sterio Equipment

Collaborative Space

Recording Control Room

100-150

Music Library

150-200

Office

100

Gymnasium

12000-14000

Multipurpose Practice Gym

4000-7500

Weight Room

2000-4000

Locker Rooms

1500-3000

Storage

300

Spectator Seating

10 sqft. Person

PUBLIC ACCESS

DAYLIGHT/ VIEW

PRIVACY

PLUMBING

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Comfortable Space

Flexible court system, Sterio equipment

Daylighting, natural ventilation, snack bar Multifunction court space

Showers, changing rooms

Private space

Easy to clean seats


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

OUTDOOR SPORT SPACE

ADMINISTRATION

LOCATION/SPACE

SQUARE FOOTAGE NEEDS

Training Room

200-400

Laundry Room

200-400

Pool

10000-12000

Multipurpose

12000

Track & Field

192000

Shot Put

4800

Discuss

1800

Football

57600

Soccer

81000

Softball

1024000

Baseball

129600

Archery

20250

Driving Range

60000

Tennis

5760

General Purpose

20000

Reception/Waiting

250-400

Principal

150-200

Secretary

100-150

PUBLIC ACCESS

DAYLIGHT/ VIEW

PRIVACY

PLUMBING

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Weights and equipment, Projector

Space should also function as a collaborative space to team to revive videos Energy efficient

Xeroscaping, low chemical grass

TV, comfortable seating, collaborative spaces for quick meetings Meeting Area

Spectator seating

Covered walk way to entrace, floor seating for little children, display area for public to see what the school is teaching! Incorporate into the school Views into school Views into school

93


CRITERIA MATRIX ADMINISTRATION (CONT’D)

94

LOCATION/SPACE

SQUARE FOOTAGE NEEDS

Assistant Principal

PUBLIC ACCESS

DAYLIGHT/ VIEW

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

150-200

Displinary person

Views into school

Work Room/ Mail Room

350-400

Cubbies

Conference Rooms

250-400

Large collaborative conference Views into school

Small Conference Room

150

Flexible furniture

In-School Suspension

200-400

Other Offices

100-150

Restrooms

120-180

IT

150-250

Student Services

150

Make available for students to easily access and welcoming

Book Storage

300

Have a space for students to check out books each year

Career Center

400-1000

Make it a separate entrace and welcoming and open to the school

Issolated Testing

200

Work stations

Administration supervision

School Nurse

600-800

Showers, changing rooms, Private RR

Easily accessible for students and parents

Storage Records

400-700

Advisor Offices

200

Break Rooms Work Areas/ Collaborative Space

20 sqft. Person

Kitchen

Relaxing

400-700

Coffee Areas through out

Spaces for faculty to stop and catch up with others

PRIVACY

PLUMBING

Private Restrooms

Views into school


CAFETERIA

MISCELLANEOUS

LOCATION/SPACE

SQUARE FOOTAGE NEEDS

Storage

200

Restrooms

120

Dining Space

16 sqft. Person

Outdoor Space

5000

Recycling/ Green Space

100

Serving Line

1500

Office

150

Kitchen - NIC

3000

NIC

Restrooms

5000

Low Water

Look into bully free restroom plans

Fountains

Students make the space theirs, outdoor classroom, etc

Flexible

Cave Zones

Outdoor Space

PUBLIC ACCESS

DAYLIGHT/ VIEW

PRIVACY

PLUMBING

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

NIC

Stereo Equipment

Flexible break out areas, bully free zone, cleanable finishes and furniture Access to garden

Sanitary Options

Relaxation Space

1000

Lockers

500

Auditorium

20000

Student Garden

1000

Green House

Art Display Gallery

300

TV

Science Display

200

Plugs and water access

Security

200

Monitors

Circulation

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Easy turn around circulation

Look into different types of locker options instead of the traditional lockers in a hallway set up

Flexible wall material

95


CODES

First  Floor

Second  Floor

96

Classroom  1 Classroom  2 Classroom  3 Classroom  4

Room

1,663 1,157 1,139 1,322

Sq.  Ft.  

Classification Education-­‐  shops  with  other  covational  areas Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area

Floor  Area 50  net 20  net 20  net 20  net

33 58 57 66

Coffee  Bar

644

Assembly  w/out  fixed-­‐  Unconcetrated

15  net

43

Office  1 Office  2 Office  3 Office  4 Office  5 Office  6 Conference  Room Work  Room

282 260 484 206 184 160 355 300

Business   Business   Business   Business   Business   Business   Assembly  w/out  fixed-­‐  Unconcetrated Business  

100  gross 100  gross 100  gross 100  gross 100  gross 100  gross 15  net 100  gross

3 3 5 2 2 2 24 3

Student  Restrooms Admin.  Restrooms

480 300

Business   Business  

100  gross 100  gross

5 3

Atrium  

1,945

Assembly  w/out  fixed-­‐  Concetrated

7  net

278

Room Classroom  5 Classroom  6 Classroom  7 Classroom  8 Classroom  9 Classroom  10 Classroom  11 Classroom  12 Classroom  13 Classroom  14 Classroom  15

Sq.  Ft.   867 832 537 961 858 896 373 873 829 885 1,200

Classification Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area

Floor  Area 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net

43 42 26 48 43 44 18 43 41 44 60

Reading  Aditorium  

624

Assembly  w/  fixed

Occ.  Load

Occ.  Load


Second  Floor

Third  Floor

Student  Restrooms Admin.  Restrooms

480 300

Business   Business  

100  gross 100  gross

5 3

Atrium  

1,945

Assembly  w/out  fixed-­‐  Concetrated

7  net

278

Room Classroom  5 Classroom  6 Classroom  7 Classroom  8 Classroom  9 Classroom  10 Classroom  11 Classroom  12 Classroom  13 Classroom  14 Classroom  15

Sq.  Ft.   867 832 537 961 858 896 373 873 829 885 1,200

Classification Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area

Floor  Area 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net

43 42 26 48 43 44 18 43 41 44 60

Reading  Aditorium   Janitors Atrium Teachers  Workroom Circulation  w/  lockers

624 96 578 328 2,029

Assembly  w/  fixed Business  

100  gross

1

Business   Assembly  w/out  fixed-­‐  Concetrated

100  gross

3

Student  Restrooms

596

Room Classroom  16 Classroom  17 Classroom  18 Classroom  19 Classroom  20 Classroom  21 Classroom  22 Classroom  23 Classroom  24 Classroom  25 Classroom  26

Sq.  Ft.   867 832 537 961 858 896 373 873 829 885 1,200

Classification Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area

Floor  Area 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net

43 42 26 48 43 44 18 43 41 44 60

Reading  Aditorium   Janitors

624 96

Assembly  w/  fixed Business  

100  gross

1

Occ.  Load

Occ.  Load

97


CODES

Third  Floor

Teachers  Workroom Circulation  w/  lockers

328 2,029

Business   Assembly  w/out  fixed-­‐  Concetrated

100  gross

3

Student  Restrooms

596

Room Classroom  16 Classroom  17 Classroom  18 Classroom  19 Classroom  20 Classroom  21 Classroom  22 Classroom  23 Classroom  24 Classroom  25 Classroom  26

Sq.  Ft.   867 832 537 961 858 896 373 873 829 885 1,200

Classification Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area Education-­‐  classroom  area

Floor  Area 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net 20  net

43 42 26 48 43 44 18 43 41 44 60

Reading  Aditorium   Janitors Atrium Teachers  Workroom Circulation  w/  lockers

624 96 578 328 2,029

Assembly  w/  fixed Business  

100  gross

1

Business   Assembly  w/out  fixed-­‐  Concetrated

100  gross

3

Student  Restrooms

596

Business  

100  gross

6

Classification Education

E

Occupancy

                               Water  Closets Male Female 1  per  50 1  per  50

                           Lavatories Male Female 1  per  50 1  per  50

Occ.  Load

Drinking  Fountain 1  per  100

99


PROTOTYPICALS

100


101


PROTOTYPICALS

102


103


ERGONOMIC REQUIREMENTS & HUMAN FACTOR DATA

104


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CASE STUDIES


CASE STUDIES

Orestad Danish School Project Description: New Construction Address: Ørestad Boulevard/Arne Jacobsens Allé, Copenhagen. Client: Copenhagen Municipality. Award: 1st prize in invited competition 200. Completion: 2006. Size: 12.000 m2. Budget: DKK 200 mio. (€ 27 mio or $32.5 mio). Architect: 3XN Architects, Kim Herforth Nielsen, Bo Boje Larsen, Kim Christiansen. Chami, Camille. “Orestad College by Denmark based 3xn Architects,” Archinnovations (October 2007)

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http://www.archinnovations.com/featured-projects/academic/orestad-college/


The School of the future with a focus on strengthening and renew students professional capabilities and to prepare students for attending college and the independent lifestyle. With a mall like box shape the school is built around an open area that can be seen from the interiors of every floor. Having a strong wireless connection, students are based on technology resources such as laptops, note pads, and up and coming educational technology aspects. A large common area with large over stuffed floor pillows provide students with a relaxing space

to hang out and bond with each other and their school. Open computer labs offer students a free space to work on homework in a quiet space. An open floor plan with a large galley allows for natural light to flood the interiors and provide a comforting space that is cozy yet large and open. Communication, interaction and synergy are the key focuses that drove the design and is reflected through out the final design. Having 4 individual private spaces allows for students to comfortably study on their own and

2 large conference rooms provides students a private space for students to work on teams on each floor. Four boomerang shaped floor plans are rotated to create the powerful super structure which forms the overall frame of the building – simple and highly flexible. Avoiding level changes makes the organizational flexibility as high as possible, and enables the different teaching and learning spaces to overlap and interact with no distinct borders. The rotation opens a part of each floor to the vertical tall central atrium and forms a zone that

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CASE STUDIES

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provides community and expresses the school’s ambition for interdisciplinary education. The storey decks are open towards a central core, where a broad main staircase winds its way upwards to the roof terrace. The main staircase is the heart of college educational and social life; the primary connection up an down, but also a place to stay, watch and be seen. Each floor has a few permanent elements to allow students and staff to rearrange furniture at their will.

The superstructure is supplemented by a series of newly developed ‘room furniture’, which accommodate the need for the flexible and temporary room arrangements and learning environments required by varying group sizes – from one on one to an entire cohort. The rotated decks are mirrored in the facades.

These outdoor spaces are connected from ground to roof. In front of the glass facades, a series of colored semi-transparent glass louvers can open or close to protect from the sun, while adding dashes of colour to the indoor environment.

Due to their rotation, the decks create openings double- and triple high while drawing lines on the facade. As a rule, the glass is smooth with the deck fronts, but on each floor, one façade is withdrawn to create an outdoor space.

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CASE STUDIES

Senzoku Gakuen School of Music

Project Info: Music building hall addition Program: Restructuring Location: Kawasaju Jabagawa, Japan Architect: Nihon Sekkei Interior Design: Terada Design Signage: Naoki Terada Time Line: Completed in 2009 http://www.teradadesign.com/ http://www.thecoolhunter.net/article/detail/1552/ school-of-music

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A neon pop scheme is the driving theme for the interior design for the black hall wing of the music building. Designer, Tereade Design, wanted a jazzy feeling to honor the school for having the only jazz and rock departments in Japan. Vertical and horizontal linear edges draw the eye to architectural elements that meet with bold colors.

Having a color coded system creates a way finding system, recording studios, lesson rooms, and practice rooms are all based on a color identical through out the entire building. A proper music environment has accustical baring elementswindows being a disattvating due to sealings- so a window free design was the challenge. To create a comfortable environment with out windows,

Tereade added bold neon colors illuminated by a lighting systems to create an environment that promoted creativity. A contrasting exterior of grey concrete and a silver plate screen surprise guests as they enter the interiors which promotes exploration and excitement.

Basic hallways, intense wall and ceiling colors have become the main design element, along with the large scale-painted signs on the wall is the main artwork that contrasts the pop colors.

An exposed staircase embraces the architectural elements and is also noted with the industrial railings and exposed ceiling details.

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Paul Valery Highschool Project Info: High school addition Program Type: Restructuration and extension of the high school Location: Menton, France Architect: n+b architects Floor Area: 900 sq. ft. restructured and 2800 sq. ft. of extension Time Line: Start of planning in Oct. 2004 and complication of construction in Aug. 2007 Cost: 5,9 m euro http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/8351/n-b-architects-paul-valery-

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highschool-france-restructure-and-extension.html

Architects were tasked with creating a flexible and sustainable solution for a school struggling in the sweltering Côtes d’Azur climate in France. The new design has turned Paul Valery into a cool and charismatic community more suitable to a comfortable educational environment, and as a stylish landmark for the town of Menton. With a site specific approach, the building is based on a slope which connects the exisiting building with the new building together through free flowing transitions that better the circulation.

The project took into account the notions of flexibility, environmental use functionality and to enable the programmatic entities to be linked together around exterior spaces. The ambition of the project was to offer a coherence set in a specific environment. The new addition expresses the school’s progressive education vision of providing multiple types of learning environments in a single room. The design was driven by the idea to create spaces within spaces, studios that could operate in a large variety of teaching scenarios from small group discussions to a large lecture setup.


CASE STUDIES

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CASE STUDIES

To achieve this flexible space, spaces needed to be able to divide quickly and the final design incorporated dramatic curtains that allowed team teaching to occur fluidly in response to the dynamic of the group. The teacher’s work areas are embedded into the studios, glazed and on show, impromptu and informal interaction between all is encouraged. Four large studio spaces were developed and the building carefully shaped so that they could accommodate a variety of learning modalities from open style lecture to small intimate gatherings. Canadian red cedar wooden louvres benefit the school with attractive detailing and as an effective and sustainable cooling solution for cross ventilation and solar shielding.

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CASE STUDIES

Francis Parker School Project Info: New construction Location: San Diego, California Architect: Lake|Flat Architects based out of San Antonio, TX Designers: Greg Papay and Joe Farren Time Line: 2002 Size: 122,000 sq. ft. Cost: $48.8 Million

http://www.architectmagazine.com/educational-projects/francis-parker-school.aspx

The Francis Parker school needed a new location and building to house their high school students that reflected their core values of school spirit, centered on the student experience, improved educational opportunities and practiced sustainable values. The school was founded on the values that engaging students with the environment increased the students awareness of their world and their place within it. The final design reflects a campus that embraces gardens and has a series of separate buildings with transition spaces incorporated with the outdoors provides am environmentally responsible and authentic circulation path. Social spaces for students and staff are satisfied with public rooms, a quad, and a large lawn.

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Classroom walls slide into pockets, directly linking the spaces to the outdoors and bathing them in filtered natural light. Incorporated between each building is a unique lawn setting with space for gardens, lounging room, and pervious surfaces for sports and nature paths that connect through out the entire site. All materials are reclaimed, recycled or sources sustainable. The concrete core structure is composed of high fly-ash content, decorative windows and tiles are made of recycled glass, the exterior wood is sustainable forested redwood. Successful daylighting is achieved through highlytuned light shelves and sun shades that filter and direct breezes and sunlight The landscape design uses drought-tolerant and native species that provide low care and easy for students to care after.


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CASE STUDIES

Outdoor areas such as the lunch seating room, is designed to feel as an interior space but is open to the outdoors, with a canopy ceiling and floor to ceiling windows that are fully operable, the students can create the environment for the space. Outdoor balconies for second story classrooms provide teachers with the option to turn their room into an outdoor space that encourages nature to incorporate itself with the interiors. By taking advantage of their warm climate, the school has saved over $300,000 in their first year on electricity. The school opted out of provided air conditions, so the large and strategically placed windows are the only source of capturing natural breezes. The two-story building captures more natural light and ventilation through single-load overhangs that bring in 15’ of sunshine through each window.

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Sustainable Building Materials TILT-WALL CONCRETE PANELS Vulcan Materials / vulcanmaterials.com

BRAZILIAN REDWOOD SIDING Atessco / atessco.com

CEILING PANELS Hunter Douglas / hunterdouglas.com

Locally sourced cement and aggregate contribute to the rich colors of the tilt-up concrete panels. Contractor Rudolph & Sletten performed the panel forming, concrete placement, and panel lifting and setting.

The buildings’ redwood siding comes from a sustainably managed forest in Brazil. It visually recalls the redwood and western red cedar that clads so many coastal California structures, with the added benefit of exceptional durability. The siding is eight times harder than redwood or western red cedar, important for a school environment. It is also decay, insect, and fire resistant.

Hunter Douglas’ large-scale Techstyle ceiling panels float between exposed steel beams in the classrooms, adding to the clean, loftlike look of the spaces. They have strong light reflection and acoustical properties, allowing the ceiling to diffuse both reflected daylight and indirect artificial illumination.

RECYCLED GLASS American Specialty Glass / americanspecialtyglass.com

Recycled glass was integrated into the project in three areas: as “aggregate” in select areas of the tilt-up concrete panels, where the glass was ground smooth like terrazzo; as a lens, wrapped in a stainless steel mesh, hanging directly underneath industrial fluorescent fixtures; and as a canopy at the entry to the science gallery.

ALUMINUM SLIDING & POCKETING DOORS Fleetwood / fleetwoodusa.com

Lake|Flato incorporated sliding and pocketing door systems in all 43 classrooms and labs. The doors promote natural ventilation, allow views out, and admit daylight. The school’s original 1912 classroom structures also used pocket doors to take advantage of San Diego’s benevolent climate.

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CASE STUDIES

Waldorf High School Project Info: Retrofit for an existing building Location: San Francisco, California Architect: 450 Architects, inc. Designers: David Bushnell Awards: LEED Gold Certified Time Line: 2008 Size: 23,000 sq. ft. Cost: $5.5 million

http://www.sfwaldorf.org/high-school/about-us/campus/ LEED-Certification

The principles of the pedagogical design and Waldorf philosophy and the actual building serve as a teaching tool for students, demonstrating how to become actively involved in today’s social issues. The previous house for the school needed improvements that made the school environmentally friendly and have a positive impact on the daily lives of the students, faculty, and staff. The school believes that education should extend outside of the classroom and has many programs to support that belief. They have a strong sports, creative and performing arts programs to give the students a well rounded education. The SF Waldorf School encourages community service and has students commit to 5 weeks worth during their years there. The architects created a design that connects the students to their environment by visually

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integrating the building with the surrounding eucalyptus grover. Through using high percentage of recycled and re-purposed materials and incorporating lighting strategies along with water reducing features, the building has created a better air and light quality that are conducive to learning. A new state-of-the art HVAC system monitors and controls the levels of carbon dioxide in every classroom, research shows that CO2 levels are known to directly affect brain function. This system also detects what rooms are not in use and creates a settle level that is energy efficient and safe. To connect the learning spaces to the exteriors, wooden operable windows in every classroom provide the option for natural ventilation and natural surrounding views. One teacher stated that working in the new


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CASE STUDIES

building was so remarkable and the quality of the light and air was so refreshing that she felt like she was teaching outside.

labs, art studios, a library and administrative and support spaces to be designed around a concrete call center.

Cork flooring, recycled paper counter tops and finishes with low VOC adhesives provide a safe indoor air quality and include some of the sustainable resources that school installed.

For the primarily new construction phase of design, a state-of-the-art multipurpose sports facility, performance space, additional classrooms and site development were included to the new school design.

The interior spaces are defined by a series of curved walls that soften and contrast with the existing hard-edged concrete structure and enhance the daily movement of staff and students. Adapting the 1970 existing structure, the project required space planning of classrooms, science

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formed into a multipurpose room which can be used as a yoga studio. The lighting design team wanted to use two rows of luminaires—the typical approach for lighting the common 30-ft. classroom size—but the Waldorf’s classrooms are as wide as 42 ft. with 13.5-ft. ceilings.

If budget allowed the school would have included rain-water harvesting systems, gray water permaculture, and solar ponds.

Instead of completely tearing down the existing structure, the architecture designed their space plan around existing features and reuses materials and architectural structures when possible.

The large lunch room, admitting daylight through clerestory windows, can be easily trans-

Choosing an existing building in a residential neighborhood located in the city, the school


provides alternative transportation options for students and an easily access campus for walkers or bicyclist. Their easy location and facilities allow the school to guide intelligent, imaginative and inquisitive students toward lives of conscience, creativity and consequence by incorporating their lectures with events taking place in their city.

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CASE STUDIES

Fitzroy High School Project Info: New Construction addition Location: Melbourne, Australia Architect: MCR Designers: Mcbride Charles Ryan Awards: IAA 2011, WAN 2011 and Dulux Colour Awards for Comm. Interiors 2010 Time Line: 2009 http://www.mcbridecharlesryan.com.au/#/projects/ fitzroy-high-school/ and sustainable PDF file

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This addition designed by Mcbride Charles Ryan with collaboration from the students and staff is a dedicated space for students in their senior year. This new addition spans out of the existing 100 year old building that houses the 9th to 11th grade school. The new addition expresses the school’s progressive education vision of providing multiple types of learning environments in a single room. The design was driven by the idea to create spaces within spaces, studios that could operate in a large variety of teaching scenarios from small group discussions to a large lecture setup.

To achieve this flexible space, spaces needed to be able to divide quickly and the final design incorporated dramatic curtains that allowed team teaching to occur fluidly in response to the dynamic of the group. The teacher’s work areas are embedded into the studios, glazed and on show, impromptu and informal interaction between all is encouraged. Four large studio spaces were developed and the building carefully shaped so that they could accommodate a variety of learning modalities from open style lecture to small intimate gatherings.


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CASE STUDIES

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Incorporated within the studios and learning spaces are welcoming spaces for student and staff lounges.

Energy saving sensor lighting and cloudy illuminated skylights help save on energy costs while providing brightly illuminated interiors.

A ground floor studio space has been designed to act at times as an exhibition and community meeting space.

Air wells incorporated into walls collect water which aides air flow and reduces cooling and heating energy usage.

A main feature of the exterior is the undulating wall of masonry, this wall provides structural advantages and helps with light and air circulation.

Minimum furniture was specified to reduce the need for unused furniture and all furniture is very flexible and non of it is built in.

Unlike traditional rectangular classrooms, these learning environments are based on having a focal point for the teacher so the entire class can be supervised.

Window coverings are installed to reduce excess heat gain and unnecessary lighting. Hydronic heating is used to reduce the carbon footprint and to reduce the cost of heating.

87 solar panels, that were funded through the solar grant, have been connected up to a general grid which reduces overall energy consumption for the school. Four water tanks that hold 60,000 liters of water total are connected to the toilets and used for watering the sites gardens. Students are involved in planting and maintaining the school’s garden that is sustainable harvested and used in the school’s kitchen. Shade sails have been erected to reduce soil erosion as well as providing UV protection for the students.


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LITERATURE REVIEWS

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

Biophilic Design: The Theory, Science and Practice of Bringing Buildings to Life Stephen R. Kellert, Hudith H. Heerwagen, and Martin L. Mador

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Dynamic natural light: experiencing the natural movement of day lighting passing by.

Placing windows in correct locations/orientations to invite as much day lighting into the interior as possible. Natural ventilation: circulating natural and fresh air through out the space. Orienting the building and opening windows and doors to bring fresh air in and circulate. Access to open &/or moving water: a natural element that we depend on for survival and brings a calming joy to landscapes.

Water areas serve as a functional hydrologic plan Habitat for local vegetation and wildlife Provide acoustical and symbolic comforts to a space Frequent opportunities for spontaneous interaction with nature,

including other species: connects the nature of the site to create a design that connects the natural elements of the site to blend with the interior to create a unique relationship between the exterior and the interior.

Designing outdoor spaces and rooms that connect and intertwine with the interior. Giving each room a view to remind the homeowner our special relationship with nature. Pervious surfaces allow nature to be seen and collection run off water. Sensory connection to nature: bring the experience of biophilic design to life through colors, materials, art, and patterns.

Using finishes and materials that will enhance and reflect the landscape and architecture. Complexity & Order: the natural complexity of the pattern of nature and the unity of the eco system and the connection with nature.

Natural patterns to scale and proportion, balance and harmony, novelty and familiarity.

Visual screening elements for the interior enhance the experience of prospect and refuge.

The finishes and materials for the interior and exterior reflect the natural/historical elements of the site.

Fundamental natural forms: using nature as a design model, similar to biomimicry.

Mystery: encourages exploration and education about the complexity of nature.

Taking the science, proportions, scales, forms, patterns, etc from nature and applying them to a design.

Space plan is complex enough to create mystery that leads into an unexpected discovery.

Naturally solves problems we face when designing sustainable environments.

Building located on the site plan to draw owners out to explore the surround area and their home.

Local natural materials: creates a unity between the landscaping, building exterior, and the interior.

Prospect & refuge: safe and protective space and ability to see the surrounding areas.

Using materials native to the site to create sensory connections between the built environment and the natural environment.

Having a room with windows on all sides. Lighting and furniture placement for the interior provides comfort and prospect elements.

Avoid using endangered materials and materials the surrounding habitat depend on for survival.

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LITERATURE REVIEWS THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN SELECTING A SITE:

Schools should be the center of neighborhoods and close enough to the majority of homes that students can make the trip back and forth by foot or bicycle. The school grounds should serve as a space for learning and for student activities before, during and after high school! The schools location should be in the students own neighborhoods so students can build friendships with their neighbors. THINGS TO CONSIDER WHILE DESIGNING THE SCHOOL:

Schools should be safe and healthy environments for students and the outdoors. School outdoor areas are still designated as “recess areas� where students are expected to expend energy before going inside for academic work. Schools should implement the outdoors as eco-educational

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resources, as health-promoting outdoor environments, and as places for students creativity to grow and explore with relationships with nature. Sadly, LEED does not include any of these outdoor education resources into their checklists and they are often overlooked. Green building design policies need to give equal prominence to both interior spaces and school grounds Schools need to give equal weight to the behavioral requirements of users as they do to the green technology requirements. To achieve the purpose of conserving the planet for the enjoyment of future generations, sustainable development practice must fully activate an educational role- especially in the design of institutions. Students need to learn not only about the natural world but also in and through the natural world! Research evidence strongly

suggests positive outcomes for students attending schools with naturalized sites.

strategy for building an ethic of caring and protection for the natural world.

Teachers will be able to extend their lectures into a rich outdoor environment, the school grounds, surrounding neighborhood, and learning sites in the broader community.

Schoolyard bullying has not improved, significantly because of symptoms of underlying childhood social psychological malaaise, and because the school yards are not socially inhabitable places.

Students with varied learning styles were more motivated to become engaged in learning when confronted by multiple handson opportunities because they triggered excitement and provided memorable grounding for later, more cognitive phases in the learning process. Students engaged everyday both during and after school hours, the natural richness of the school grounds provided a wellunderstood added value and sense of pride in their school as well as help develop a long-term affective relationship to their school. Hands on gardening and engagement with plants is a crucial


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LITERATURE REVIEWS

Guide for Daylighting Schools

Guide for

Daylighting Schools Developed by Innovative Design For Daylight Dividends Administered by Lighting Research Center Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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Developed by Innovative Design For Daylight Dividends Aministered by Lighting Research Center Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Daylighting strategies should be developed to provide superior lighting for two-thirds of the daylight hours during the year. Rooms and area of schools that do not require full time occupancies such as halls and gyms do not require blinds and window coverage because those space will not need to be temporarily darkened. Classrooms should have motorized roller shades or motorized vertical blinds which will provide an ease of operations and result in better performing day lighting strategies. In the classroom, the placement of the projection screen should be in the darkest part of the classroom to avoid the closer of blinds that remain closed for the entire day.

Design the day lighting strategy to provide natural lighting for at least two-thirds of the daylight hours in: Classrooms -Special need rooms -Gymnasium -Cafeteria -Media center & -Administrative Areas. Correct daylighting strategies can reduce:

• Electricity for lighting and peak electrical demand • Cooling energy and peak cooling loads • Maintenance costs associated with lamp replacement • Electrical service to building • The number of installed lighting fixtures in the school!


Layout the school on an east-west axis with the majority of spaces facing either south or north, this orientation enables maximum winter radiation and control summer gain. In the summer, the least amount of radiation hits the south, vertical surface of your school and in the winter, the most radiation strikes this surface. The more sunlight that enters the building to address lighting needs, the more heat will also enter the buildings, by placing apertures correctly, nature can with or against you! Skylights bring in too much radiation with a low amount of day lighting, so not worth it. Optimizing size overhangs on south-facing glazing with placing the outer point of the overhang on an angle about 45 angle degrees from horizontal, above the head of the window. For window placement, avoid eastwest facing windows at all cost!

Reduce the installed lighting by considering:

• How classroom usage changes from typical daytime conditions to nighttime uses. •Evaluate if there are different lighting requirements associated with different uses. • Determine the minimum day lighting contribution during school hours and determine if there if is a minimum amount of daylight that can be counted on to reduce the installed lighting. • However, if the space has the same nighttime function, installed lighting will need to be the correct amount of addressed foot candle. Windows used specifically for day lighting, clear glass has an advantage over glazing with a low-E coating. Because of the 10% to 30% reduction in visible light transmission characteristic of most low-E coatings, 10% to 30% more glass would be requried to produce the same daylighting benefit.

Select light colors for interior finishes along with highly reflective ceiling tiles and have correctly places photo sensors and continuous dimming control.

Incorporate a space for a darken area for a television and white board so glares will not reflect back onto the students.

Bounce light deeper into spaces with light shelves which causes the reflective sunlight to hit the ceiling and bounce down into the room. Elongate room to maximize glazing opportunity Avoid contrast between bright surfaces and darker surfaces when windows are present in a space, too many reflections can be cast. Use highly reflective ceiling tiles if rooms are overly lit and the tiles with absorb some of the light. To maximize the ability to bounce light deep into a space using a light shelf, you should consider the advantages of sloping the ceiling from the top of the south-side light shelf to the back of room. Elongate the space planning layout for the classroom in order to incorporate as many day lighting strategies as possible.

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

Joined Up Design for Schools John and Frances Sorrell Color- students want to brighten up their schools and use color to enhance the atmosphere and mood.

•C  hoosing a color should be based on the school’s surroundings as well as the school colors to enhance pride within the school and community. • Colors should be appropriate for each space, the cafeteria should not be a gross color and relaxing areas should be calm colors, etc. • A fun way to bring color into the interiors is through light, putting color films over the windows brings in bold aspects of color while not having to paint anything. Communication- Students want the community involved with what is happening at their school.

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• Schools are communication hubs, collecting and distributing education informa-tion as well

as organizing hundreds of pupils, staff, parents and visitors. • School communication is complex and multi-layered, and new ways are needed to provided effective formal and informal communication, which accommodates different languages and develops an appropriate tone of voice for each audience. • Having affordable and efficient message boards in random places in the school provide spaces for students to write sweet notes to each other or practice their writing skills. • Have large way finding prints on entire walls to direct students towards specific areas of the school. Using bold colors against neutral tones provides enough color that is not over bearing but enough to catch attention and make the school pretty!


Dining Halls and Cafeteria- Students want a civilized lunch time with less chaos and more time to relax.

•S  chools should provide more food options, a choice between cold snacks or hot means, students want options to serve themselves all in an appealing environment. •S  plitting the dining area into different areas, an internet cafe area with spill resistant keyboards, flat screens and plenty of seating, a snack zone with vending machines and stand at high tables while chatting, a main eating area with round tables with comfortable armchairs. Outside areas can be doubled as eating and studying space with tables and covered seating pods that have weather protection, implementing windmills provides aesthetic mystery and can bring in energy for the school.

Learning Spaces- Students was modern, inspiring places to learn.

• Creating functional and unique designs that bring pride to school and allows students to explore their campus. • The classroom needs to have practical storage space and can be easily cleaned. • Cupboards for coats and bags as well as lockable lockers, students should have multiple options for storage. • Having a fun hang out area in the classrooms provides students with a social space when the weather and outdoors are nasty and cuts down on littering because students will have easy access to both the interiors and exterior.

Reception Areas- Students want parents, new students, the local community, and visitors to feel welcome.

• The reception area is a highly multifunctional place and takes on the passage of hundreds of guests a day. • An idea is to create a reception space that also doubles as an art gallery with an area for an artistin-residence to work with the students and display their gallery work. • Administrative staff are placed at the heart of the school and should have privacy but should also have views for guests and students. • Comfortable seating for informal meetings should also double as a waiting area for parents.

Reputation and Identity- Students want to be proud of their school and sure of what it stands for and their education.

• The school design show represent the concepts and name of the school and provide a representation for the success of the students and the school. • Provide spaces for students to create products to sell to their community and build a positive creative reputation in the business or art world. • Incorporate identity markers that are well recognizable through out the whole community and that will provide a brand for the school which can provide school pride and a sense of identity with in the school.

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

School Architecture & Complexity Rena Upitis, Queen’s University The kinds of buildings that children and their teacher inhabit will affect not only what they learn but also the ways in which they learn. “Factory schools” embody the transmission model of learning: the teacher has the knowledge, and in assembly line fashion transmits the knowledge to the students. This does not provide a personal connection between the learning and the students which causes a lose of interest with school. Teachers frequently have indicated that they would like to do more with the arts curricula but are unable to because schools do not provide an available space for teachers to bring their class and teach the students through the arts. Research has demonstrated that the use of daylight in the context of a larger energy-efficient design is not only associated with higher

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levels of student performance but it also sustainable for the use of energy and reduces energy bills. Studies have also focused on the detrimental effects of too much noise in the learning environment, the importance of appropriate furniture, and the need for inviting outdoor spaces including green areas. People to continue studying:

• Henry Barnard • Rudolf Steiner • Reggio Emilia • Christopher Alexander Christopher Alexander Use the building as a second educator, both students and teacher rely on the building to learn and educate. The best environments for students are rich and complex and support

relationships between people and ideas, and have a strong aesthetic appeal for teachers and students alike. The Reggio education theory considers the physical environment in light of its educational potential, both in terms of the objects in the environment and in terms of the kinds of spaces for inquiry, such as the atelier. When no one is watching, people are interested in outdoor activities such as guitar playing, hiking, and bicycling and these are activities that have the potential to fully engage the body and intellect and that elusive part of us know as the spirit or soul. These kinds of activities and learning connects us with the earth and with what it means to be human.

The passion and seriousness with which people engage in the learning that they do when no one is watching is precisely the passion that is required to nurture and sustain meaningful learning in schools. Four things that are important to children are:

• Conversation • Inquiry • Making things • Artistic expression To achieve a “utopian” school, start with the physical space, bring in large grounds, gardens, and greenhouses. Use open-air interiors that have a variety of workspaces with easy access to books as well as having a feeling of a well-furnished home. The idea of combining the building


and natural environment is not to teach about the biology, etc. of the specific study but to provide a rich setting for exploration, and for discovering things that are unanticipated by students and teachers alike. Move away from teacher-centered to more learner-centered ways of teaching by knowing and rely on the concept of complexity science: the study of adaptive and selforganizing systems. Several key principles identified with complex collectives:

• Neighbor interaction • Redundancy among the agents • Diversity in the system • Pattern recognition • Feedback • Liberating constraints • Indirect • Controls and decentralized control structures

The learning process should not focus on the teacher and student learning but on collective possibilities for interpretation of the taught subject, challenging the pupils to think outside of the box. An issue that has been continually emerging is that teaching and learning are about expanding the space of the possible, and in doing so, creating conditions for things that have not yet been learned nor imagined, for surprise, for evolution through the known to the unknown. In order for complexity to emerge, there must be redundancy and diversity, as mentioned previously, but there must be opportunity for diverse ideas to interact, to harmonize, and to amplify one another. Foster not only individual learning, but also, learning by collectives, such as classrooms or groups of people interested in particular ideas, and learning about curriculum structures or

disciplinary knowledge another form of collective. Christopher Alexander developed a scale to measure school design based on patterns including green areas, quiet areas, promenades, play areas, flex zones, small group areas, large group areas, wet areas for science and art, outdoor rooms, circulation patterns, acoustics, windows, technology, pathways, living views, and natural light. The “bump into” concept of collaborating knowledge, can be achieved through presentation spaces, collaborative incubators, get away spaces and niches, and display spaces to engage a deeper though process and access for collaboration. The emphasize and importance of balance, order, symmetry, rhythm, form, space, volume and scale all create patterns that are easily recognized.

and guidance services and opening up the school to create physical environments that allow for teamwork and flexible learning to happen. Pay attention to the natural world means more than to provide outdoor spaces, it also includes consideration of aesthetic. Learning is enhances when the aesthetic elements are attended to, and indeed, that the aesthetic brings together a balance and order to daily life. The i dea that involving the community of the design process leads to the thought that the community should also be included with the teaching of the students. Upitis, Rena. “School Architecture And Complexity.” Complicity: An International Journal Of Complexity & Education 1.1 (2004): 19-38. Education Research Complete. Web. 20 June 2012.

Create an environment that students can discover themselves, by decentralizing administrative

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

Successful School Design Questions to Ask While Designing a School

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Identity and context: making a school the students and community can be proud of

School ethos and identity

Relationship with neighbourhood

Civic character

Is the educational vision successfully manifested in the design?

If the school has a specialism, how has this influenced the design priorities?

Is the school design inviting to the local community?

Does the design respond and contribute positively to its locality?

Does the scheme establish an appropriate civic presence for the school in the neighbourhood?

How does the design of entrance express regard for the school community?

How does the scheme promote inclusion?

How does the design address planning issues?

How does the design improve local movement routes?

How does the design communicate that this is a public building?

Will the design strengthen the image of education locally?

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Does the design help foster pride and ownership in the school?

How does the massing of the design contribute to the adjacent streetscape or landscape?

Does the design enhance the character of the neighbourhood?

Has the school ethos been defined? If so, how has this been expressed in the design?

How does the school relate to the street?

What will the first impressions of the building be?

Is there a welcoming view of the school from the street?

How does the design impact on local views?

How does the school relate to local buildings and landmarks?

How does the school improve social cohesion in the community?

Is there an element from an existing building that provides continuity of identity?

If the school is co-located do the individual schools require their own identity?

How does the design relate to a holistic vision for the area?

How does the proposal respond to the grain of the context?

How do the school’s community facilities respond to different patterns of access?

Is learning visible on arrival to give a good first impression?


2

Site plan: making the best use of the site

Enhancing the character of the site

Working with existing site constraints and opportunities

Strategic site organisation

Does the design foster a sense of place?

How does the scheme enhance the micro-climate and ecology of the site?

How does the scheme enhance the topography and existing landscape features?

How well does the design deal with site specific constraints and opportunities?

Are the buildings, grounds and facilities arranged well on the site?

Does the scheme make the most of its position and views?

How has the design responded to the acoustic constraints of the site?

If the scheme is a refurbishment, what is the rationale for the retention of any existing buildings?

Does the scheme provide shelter from the prevailing wind, rain and sun?

Does the phasing allow the school to function during the construction period?

Does the proposed phasing work sensibly without compromising the final design?

Are the external circulation routes clear and do they balance the needs of different users?

Does the configuration of buildings create positive internal and external spaces?

Does the scheme relate well to buildings outside the site?

Does the scheme approach existing services and utilities sensibly?

Is there a clear external circulation diagram?

Does the design provide safe on-site pedestrian routes?

Are there specific site issues that infringe on the site of the school buildings?

Are there discrete arrangements for deliveries and refuse collection?

What are the entrance sequences for users arriving by different modes of transport?

Is any car parking on the site unobtrusive?

Are routes to sports facilities safe throughout the year?

Have sensible routes to key areas of the grounds been planned to avoid disruption to learning spaces?

How does the scheme create identifiable boundaries and security zones?

Are the buildings placed to achieve optimum orientation?

Do the entrance routes to the school link to local movement routes?

Does the strategic vision for the site allow for future development?

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

4

Organisation: creating a clear diagram for the buildings

Accommodating the educational agenda

Is this successfully accommodated in the internal arrangement of spaces?

Is there a clear understanding of the school’s educational agenda and its organisational implications?

Is there a clear spatial diagram for the building?

Spatial organisation

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Is the plan legible for users?

Does the location on specialist facilities allow the design to accommodate different pedagogies?

Has the vertical circulation been designed to avoid congestion and encourage positive behaviour?

Is there a variety of circulation spaces which respond intelligently to any changes in level?

How does the design encourage a healthy food agenda?

What is the role of ICT in the educational agenda?

Does the spatial arrangement allow for natural ventilation and daylighting to the majority of spaces?

Is there a diagram showing which of the spaces will be timetabled?

Is there a clear movement and connection diagram?

Are links between indoor and outdoor spaces optimised?

Does the design identify the main social spaces?

What are the aspirations of the pastoral system?

Does the design provide opportunities for cross-curricular learning?

Are the learning spaces arranged well across the school?

Is there a clear hierarchy of circulation routes?

Movement routes

Will the design allow the delivery of the curriculum when the school opens?

Are the positions of key roof lights shown on the plan?

Can vertical and horizontal links be made between clusters?

Do movement routes into the school depend on signage?

Does the design provide opportunities for social interaction?

Does the circulation allow for short travel times between key spaces?

Does the internal circulation fit with the school’s proposed timetabling?

Are circulation routes accessible for all users?


3

School grounds: making assets of the outdoor spaces

Relationship between the grounds and building

Social spaces and play

Do the grounds and planting contribute to creating a sense of place?

Does the design respond to the existing topography, climate and ecology of the site?

Are outdoor spaces provided for a variety of different student social activities, interest ranges and group sizes?

Physical activity

Are there opportunities for a wide range of physical activities?

Does the scheme provide a rich sensory environment?

Have the maintenance and management implications of the design been considered?

Does the planting enhance the micro-climate to create habitable spaces?

Are external shelters well-incorporated with the design to provide robust and practical transitions?

Are there views out over the surrounding landscape?

Is external seating and storage provided?

Can food be grown in the grounds?

Are there clear links between the indoor and outdoor learning environments?

Are sports facilities integrated into the overall landscape strategy?

Are there opportunities for challenge and risk taking in the grounds?

Will the school grounds change with the seasons?

Does the design provide outdoor dining both formally and informally?

Are social spaces safe?

How do the learning spaces support the school’s pedagogy?

How do the outdoor learning spaces support the curriculum?

Do the grounds support a sustainability strategy?

Is there strong structural planting with a coherent hierarchy?

Are some social spaces sheltered from wind, rain and sun?

Are there spaces which allow imaginative and creative play?

Are there provisions for outdoor learning?

Outdoor learning

Have the outside spaces been designed in conjunction with the building form?

Has access to other local facilities been considered?

Does the design maximise the area for sports pitches?

Can the areas for physical activity be easily used during the winter months?

Do the grounds facilitate community use?

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LITERATURE REVIEWS

5

Buildings: making form, massing and appearance work together Is there a coherent design idea that relates plans, sections and elevations?

Concept

Form and massing

In refurbishment schemes, do the new elements relate well to existing buildings and make the school into a coherent whole?

Has the organisation diagram been convincingly translated into a coherent building?

Are the building’s form and massing appropriate to the site?

How does the massing support the daylighting strategy?

Does the building create well proportioned internal and external spaces?

Do the elevations reect the design concept to create an inspiring building?

How do the buildings on the site relate to one another?

Has the height of the building been considered from educational and massing perspectives?

How is the spatial organisation of the school expressed in the elevations?

How is the fenestration designed and detailed?

Does the roof plan support the resources strategy?

How do the elevations respond to orientation and site constraints?

How are colour, pattern, graphics and texture integrated?

Appearance Is the building good architecture in its own right?

Construction and materials

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Do the materials contribute positively to the quality of the scheme?

How is any exposed structure detailed?

Which details give the design value?

Will the fabric of the buildings be durable and easy to maintain?

How have the entrances been deďŹ ned through the building design?

Has the maintenance strategy been addressed?

Are any modern methods of construction used?

Is there elevational co-ordination of services and lighting?

How do the materials used support the sustainability strategy?

How do the materials contribute to the character of the scheme?

How do the elevation help deliver a low-energy internal environment?


6

Interiors: creating excellent spaces for learning and teaching

Variety and delight

High quality

Will occupants experience variety and delight as they move around the school?

How will the school stamp its identity on the building?

Are circulation and social areas inviting to students?

Will the internal environment help students and staff feel valued and motivated?

Will the building work well in full use?

The building in use

Is there a well considered strategy for the use of colour, pattern, graphics and texture?

Does the quality of the space encourage good behaviour?

Are learning spaces well proportioned and pleasant?

Do circulation and social spaces beneďŹ t from daylight and views?

Will the users be aware of the external environment throughout the day?

Are internal materials demonstrably robust?

Is the ability to display students work incorporated into the design?

Have the acoustic requirements of different spaces been dealt with?

Is dining seen as a social activity?

Is the furniture of high quality and robust?

Does the building enable staff to respond to the differing needs of the range of age groups?

Are the acoustics appropriate in all spaces not just the classrooms?

Is the incorporation of storage well-considered?

Will the use of outdoor courtyards cause disturbance to adjacent class spaces?

Will there be glimpses of the range of learning activities happening in the school to inspire pupils?

Will the use of outdoor courtyards cause disturbance to adjacent class spaces?

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SURVEY MONKEY RESULTS Results are from current and former high school students.


SURVEY MONKEY RESULTS

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SURVEY MONKEY RESULTS

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INTERVIEWS & QUESTIONAIRE


INTERVIEWS

Julia Clark Librarian Tim Walker Vice Principle Lakewood High School What is the number one problem students are getting in trouble for at school today?

Bringing marijuana and distributing it at school. With the Denver dispensaries located all around our school, students are having easier access to drugs. What keeps students motivated and out of trouble that is offered through your high school?

We offere dual college credit courses where students can get a jump start to gaining their college credits while finishing high school. To keep students motivated and feeling that they have a purpose and pride in their school. We offer many academic electives that

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participate in competitions and students must maintain a certain GPA level in order to participate in these activities. Do you think that having holistic approaches to teaching students, such as garden walking paths, outdoor classrooms and biophillic design elements would improve students behaviors?

No, I don’t believe in that stuff, students are going to act the way they do because of the pressure they face to fit in and are willing to do anything to be accepted by their peers. Do you like the open social space that runs through the school?

I love it, I feel that is creates a community space while allowing students to still branch off with their friends. Where do you think place at school students go to do stupid things?

Depends on how stupid the student is, one time a student smoked marijuana in an empty classroom, but mainly they leave campus dur-

ing lunch or hide in the parking lot. Do you like having the teachers lounge so open to the building?

No, I do wish it were more private. But, within our central office we have multiple lounge spaces that are always being used and we enjoy those spaces because they are more private from the students. Mainly, teachers stay in their classrooms or gather in a classroom together during their lunch. What would you add to this school if you could?

I would add a senior only space so seniors feel special and it motivates underclassmen to become seniors so they too can enjoy that space one day. I also wish we have a flexible room where students can gather to review videos, etc. of their extra circular activities. Do students use the outdoor space much or do teachers take their classes outside?

Not often, it is not coinvent for the students to go outside and there

are not many places or things for the students to do out there. What do students do when they have an off period?

They should be doing their homework, and if they are not, I will direct them to the ISS room. A lot of times students hang out in the social cafeteria space and hang out with their friends. Do you like having the academic offices right off the cafeteria?

Yes, we enjoy it because at many schools the offices are hidden and tucked away so the staff has no interaction with the students. With out offices right in the middle of everything we can keep an eye on things and we are more involved with the students day.


Leigh Rhysling Enrollment Coordinator Denver Waldorf High School What is the number one problem students are getting in trouble for at school today?

Bringing marijuana and distributing it at school. With the Denver dispensaries located all around our school, students are having easier access to drugs. What keeps students motivated and out of trouble that is offered through your high school?

We offere dual college credit courses where students can get a jump start to gaining their college credits while finishing high school. To keep students motivated and feeling that they have a purpose and pride in their school. We offer many academic electives that participate in competitions and

students must maintain a certain GPA level in order to participate in these activities. Do you think that having holistic approaches to teaching students, such as garden walking paths, outdoor classrooms and biophillic design elements would improve students behaviors?

No, I don’t believe in that stuff, students are going to act the way they do because of the pressure they face to fit in and are willing to do anything to be accepted by their peers. Do you like the open social space that runs through the school?

I love it, I feel that is creates a community space while allowing students to still branch off with their friends. Where do you think place at school students go to do stupid things?

Depends on how stupid the student is, one time a student smoked marijuana in an empty classroom, but mainly they leave campus during lunch or hide in the parking lot.

Do you like having the teachers lounge so open to the building?

What do students do when they have an off period?

No, I do wish it were more private. But, within our central office we have multiple lounge spaces that are always being used and we enjoy those spaces because they are more private from the students. Mainly, teachers stay in their classrooms or gather in a classroom together during their lunch.

They should be doing their homework, and if they are not, I will direct them to the ISS room. A lot of times students hang out in the social cafeteria space and hang out with their friends.

What would you add to this school if you could?

I would add a senior only space so seniors feel special and it motivates underclassmen to become seniors so they too can enjoy that space one day. I also wish we have a flexible room where students can gather to review videos, etc. of their extra circular activities.

Do you like having the academic offices right off the cafeteria?

Yes, we enjoy it because at many schools the offices are hidden and tucked away so the staff has no interaction with the students. With out offices right in the middle of everything we can keep an eye on things and we are more involved with the students day.

Do students use the outdoor space much or do teachers take their classes outside?

Not often, it is not coinvent for the students to go outside and there are not many places or things for the students to do out there.

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INTERVIEWS

Nicole Delmage Project Manager, Associate Barrett Studio Architects What are some things you wish you had known about before you designed your first school?

Acoustics are a major element for how students learn, too much means people can’t hear and too little means people still can’t hear. The placement of the highschool on its site and its distance from the streets has a major effect on the sound absorption and background noise. When you see something, you hear it louder than if you were to not see what you were hearing. Lots of indirect lighting also! How is the Waldorf incorporated into the architecture and design of schools?

The lighting and light quality is an important aspect for the Waldorf theory as well as color and the scale of furniture or ceiling

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heights. To create a comfortable environment for students to feel relaxed, we incorporated window seats scaled for children that look out to natural views. The Waldorf school needed a eurothearpy room that is scaled to students and has to be oriented to the human body needs. The space provides an area for moving and creating sounds to the alphabet for young children to become interactive with language. How do you create a sense of community while still providing students with the opportunity to blossom as an individual?

Emphasizing the circulation paths makes people not feel like they are being herded around like cattle and provide students with opportunities for spontaneous interactions and create friendships. Incorporate design elements that provide students to have pride and opportunities in their school. Some ways for students to be more motivated to enroll in activities are gardening, landscape design, operational building elements for the students to help make

the school work such as a living machine. The more students are involved with extra curricular activities, the more pride students have and are motivated to make something of themselves. How do you incorporate colors into the interiors?

Rodolph Stinner is a color theorist and you should check out some of his writings. I’ve worked with a client who was a color theorist and she wanted us to design our lighting plan around her colors. She was able to take 2 completely different colors and put them next to each other on different walls but at certain times of the day with natural light reflecting the colors, they looked the exact same color. I recommend playing with color and light and seeing how they interact together. How do you approach the layout of classrooms?

We did an Architecture for Humanity challenge and designed a flexible classroom in a protruding star shape that provides flexibility.

The space provides space for a lecture style layout, group learning and an intermingling space. Are there design elements that are innovative to bring the outdoors inside?

We recently did a project based on a biophillic concept, our floorplan was a wondering path that always lead guest outside to continue on the path by outside on a trail. We need to get people comfortable with the outdoors and educate people to have a love and passion to care for the outdoors.


Dick Weeks Vice Principle Catalyst High School I noticed many of the classrooms do not have windows or the blinds are closed, why is that?

The windows let in way too much radiant heat from the sun and the reflections created are blinding. It is not because of distractions or anything, its just due to the uneccessary excess heat. What is your teaching method?

We have a self pace program were students go to a math class but every student is learning at a different pace so everyone gets individual lectures with the teacher at their side working through problems together. Everyone sits together at a round table and there is about 4 or 5 students in a classroom with the teacher walking around the table helping them out.

What is the area students use most?

Since our school is so small and we have many flexible spaces, our library turns into a hangout room during breaks, our lunchroom turns into a social area sometimes and students just gather in areas that are available. We dedicate an area for the students to decorate and bring in furniture to make the space feel special and theirs.

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Colophon Title: Denver West High / Senior Interior Design Interior Designer + Author: © 2012 Grace Kirby Book Designer: © 2012 Andy Merskin Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design TYPEFACES Adobe Caslon Pro Source Sans Pro PAPER NewPage #403466 / Futura Dull Text, 100lb. White (96 Brightness) Printed at the Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design with handcrafted love, awesomeness, partying, tons of coffee, holiday milkshakes, Mexican food, wine, and laughter. Binding was also done at RMCAD using a square-punch book binder, and unbreakable wax book binding string from Kozo Fine Art Materials, Denver, CO. Support your local businesses and give them a visit, they’re nice!

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Senior Project