Page 1


o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o

THE LANGUAGE LEARNING PROCESS: LANGUAGE ACQUISITION & LANGUAGE LEARNING. MAIN PRINCIPLES OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING TO YOUNG CHILDREN. PLANNING FOR YOUNG LEARNERS. BEGINNING WITH CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. ORGANIZING THE CLASSROOM. ESTABLISHING DAILY ROUTINES. CLASSROOM RULES. CIRCLE TIME. FINGER PLAYS. ROUTINE SONGS & TRANSITIONS. REFERENCE CHARTS: WEATHER CHART- CALENDAR- HELPER CHART . DAILY SCHEDULE. VISUAL AIDS & MANIPULATIVE. INTERACTIVE BOARDS: FELT BOARD – MAGNET BOARD – POCKET CHART – WORD WALLS DRAMATIC PLAY & GAMES. TPR : TOTAL PHYSICAL RESPONSE. CRITERIA TO CHOOSE GAMES. RESOURCES FOR GAMES. MATCHING MATS & FILE FOLDER GAMES. USING & MAKING OUR FLASHCARDS. HOW TO USE POSTERS WITH LITTLE KIDS. WORKING WITH REALIA. USING PUPPETS WITH YOUNG LEARNERS. WORKING WITH MASKS & HEADBANDS. RHYMES, POEMS & CHANTS IN THE CLASSROOM. POEM ACTIVITIES. USING MUSIC WITH VERY YOUNG LEARNERS. HOW TO TEACH SONGS TO KIDS. ACTION SONGS. STORY TIME: STORY TELLING & STORY READING. PROCEDURE TO READ A STORY TO LITTLE KIDS. WAYS TO COMPLIMENT YOUR STORY. EMERGENT READERS. PERSONALIZED BOOKS. USING BIG BOOKS. IMPLEMENTING LEARNING CENTERS. A CONFLICT RESOLUTION PROGRAM FOR VERY YOUNG LEARNERS. ASSESSING STUDENTS’ PROGRESS. ASSESSING WITH WORD WALLS & PORTFOLIOS. COMMUNICATING WITH PARENTS. PARENTS MEETINGS. SCHOOL-HOME CONNECTION. OPEN CLASSES. SOME CONCLUSIONS: REMEMBER HOW CHILDREN LEARN. THE ROLE OF THE TEACHER. REFERENCES. RECOMMENDED WEB SITES & LINKS.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

2


MAIN AIM OF LANGUAGE TEACHING IN KINDERGARTEN AND EARLY PRIMARY GRADES: “Pleasant,

gradual and effective acquisition and learning of the English language through interaction and fun in whole meaningful situations”

From our main aim and principles, we infer that:

TEACHERS:

Teachers are “Facilitators”. They become observers and they interact with their students. Teachers should create a positive learning environment, surrounded by foreign language print. Expose students continuously to English and don’t translate if it is not necessary. They demonstrate and model, using body language, gestures, mime, etc… They should provide time according to students’ needs, interests, learning styles: give time to listen, understand and participate. Teachers should provide lots of learning opportunities: practical, meaningful and purposeful. Give same opportunities to everybody. Involve children in hands-on activities: children's minds are incredibly open and they learn by absorbing ideas and concepts directly. Children need to be actively involved: get students up and out of their chairs and moving around. “Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

3


How to teach EFL YOUNG Learners: THINGS CHILDREN LOVE TO DO: CHANGE YOUR ACTIVITIES every 5-10 minutes: this is vital because young children need variety as they get bored easily and have a very short attention span. VARY THE PACE DURING THE LESSONS: mixing up excitable games with quiet ones. You do not want your children getting bored but you do not want them getting over-excited either, so vary the pace according to the mood. R-R-R: Repeat, review and revise. Use short games to review vocabulary and phrases you have taught. If you neglect this, the children will have no recollection of the language you have covered! MAKE YOUR LESSONS PLAYFUL and full of physical movement. Children will enjoy them more, be more motivated and remember the language better. Teach in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere with plenty of encouragement. AVOID COMPETITION: It can be stressful and overwhelm them. Play games where everyone wins, or where you do not single out a winner. Everyone plays and takes part in harmony. ENCOURAGE AND SUPPORT YOUR YOUNG LEARNERS: Never tell them they cannot do it, they are no good at it or that they have failed. USE PUPPETS: Bring in puppets and have the puppet introduce the new vocabulary for the lesson. If you do not have a puppet you can make one from a paper bag, or by sewing a couple of buttons on a sock. USE A LOT OF CHANTS RHYMES AND SONGS. These are great for movement and frequent repetition of vocabulary and phrases. Do not burden your children with reading and writing. Preschoolers are still learning to write in their own language. There is plenty of time for that later. LANGUAGE SKILLS: Concentrate on listening and understanding, building vocabulary and the acquisition of short phrases. Concentrate also on speaking practice, starting with single words and short phrases, and gradually moving onto longer sentences and questions. AVOID ABSTRACT CONCEPTS and concentrate instead on concrete real items that the children understand and relate to. For example start with familiar topics such as colors, numbers, greetings, animals, fruit, food and drink, families, body parts, shapes, clothing, the weather, days of the week and short everyday sentences and phrases. “Teaching English to Very Young Learners�

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

4


BE POSITIVE: Use please and thank you. Rather than telling kids what not to do focus on positive behavior. BE PREPARED: practice telling the stories, playing games, using posters, etc… before you go into class and have your picture flashcards and materials ready. This will allow you to be relaxed and to enjoy the class and the children rather than frantically trying to organize your materials while the children become restless and bored. Mix up active participation and listening. If the children become restless do something active. BE FLEXIBLE: If something is not working then change the game or activity. INVOLVE SHY CHILDREN TOO: give them a central role and help them come out of their shell. USE REALIA& PROPS: Bring in real objects when you can, such as clothes to dress up in, or props for acting out little plays or stories. When you cannot bring in real items use whatever objects are available in your class, and use colorful pictures of real items in the games. USE STORIES: Stories are a fabulous resource for young kids, who will want to hear the same stories told over and over again. You can use games and activities to teach the key words in the story, inspire the children with colorful illustrations to help them understand, and act out parts of the stories or the whole story afterwards with role plays, games and make believe.

ESTABLISHING DAILY ROUTINES ROUTINES are established patterns of behavior, and teachers should have a clear plan: - For Circle Time. - To get children’s attention. - To greet children and the Flag. - To call the roll. - To check weather’s conditions. - To choose Classroom’s Helpers. - To schedule activities for the lesson/day. - To practice activities which involve movement (TPR / Action songs) - To give out & collect classroom materials. - To start and to stop “written activities”. - To tidy up.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

5


1- BEGINNING THE LESSON: - Always begin the lesson with the same routine (a song, a chant) that make your students realize that “the English lesson” has begun. Never start with something new! - Then revise a few items of vocabulary and add 1 or 2 new ones. - Check that everybody has got all the materials needed before starting.

2- EXTRA MATERIALS: - Have extra materials for those who always finish before the others: a child with nothing to do is a potential source of trouble. FREE CHOICE TIME: KEEP A BOX WITH EXTRA MATERIALS with:

Extra pictures to color

Easy puzzles to solve

Simple colorful books to look at

Picture cards to play with

Memory games Word searches Puzzles Crosswords

3- BRINGING WORK TO AN END: - If children are working on something and the lesson is soon going to end, warn them. 4- TIDYING UP: - It is very important that children learn to look after their things and tidy up at the end of the lesson/day. - have specific shelves and boxes for different things. - Create a Routine Song for this moment:

SONG FOR TIDYING UP (Tune: Arroz con leche) “It’s time to clean, To tidy up… Put everything in order, tomorrow we come back!

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

6


USING A BEHAVIOR CHART: Young children often need visual aids to help them judge their behavior. Behavior charts can be quite effective.

A COLOR CODED CHART: is a favorite for small children. 1- Each child has a pocket or hook containing three cards. 2- Use green, yellow, and red, as these are easily recognizable symbols of go, slow down, and stop. 3- Students will receive one verbal warning, and if negative behavior continues, the child will be asked to change his/her color to yellow. 4- This is an opportunity for the child to change negative behavior. It also allows the child to see his/her behavior in contrast to the rest of the class. 5- Finally, if inappropriate behavior continues, a child will change the color to red and the appropriate consequences will ensue.

NOTE: By physically changing the color themselves, students are taking responsibility for their actions, as well as processing the effects of positive and negative behavior.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners�

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

7


Young children often need “visual aids” to help them judge their behavior. • BEHAVIOR CHARTS can be effective visual aids!1

 CIRCLE TIME is when everyone sits together as a group for an activity. The activities can include games, music, movement, stories, puppets and finger plays. Generally, the same type of activities are done in the same order each day. “Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

8


FINGERPLAYS are a surefire way: - to capture children’s attention. - to focus the action on yourself. - to develop Fine Motor skills. -To help kids develop finger control, and hand stretch.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

9


Where is Thumbkin? Where is Thumkin? (Hide hands behind back) Here I am! Here I am! (Show L thumb, then R thumb) How are you today, sir? (Wiggle L thumb) Very well, I thank you. (Wiggle R thumb) Run away, run away. (Hide LH behind back, then RH) 2. Where is Pointer?.... 3. Tall man?.... 4. Ring man?.... 5. Little man (or Pinkie)?.... 6. Where is family? Where is family?.... (Hide hands behind back) Here we are! Here we are! (Show LH, fingers erect, then RH) How are you today, sirs? (Wiggle fingers of LH) Very well, we thank you, (Wiggle fingers of RH) Run away, run away. (Hide LH behind back, then RH)

CREATE YOUR OWN ROUTINE SONG: Think about: Key phrases / Vocabulary being taught. •

Suggestions / Permissions.

Identify a familiar tune: for example: “Arroz con leche”

Match the language with the rhythm.

Check the grammar!!!

Use TPR.

Use props.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

10


ROUTINE SONGS for: •

To get children’s attention

To line up.

To sit in a circle.

To be ready for the snack.

To put things away.

ROUTINE SONGS FOR CIRCLE TIME:

TO MAKE A CIRCLE: (Tune: Tres cocineritos) “Come…let’s make a circle, a circle…a circle… Come let’s make a circle a circle with me. A big one… a big one… A small one…a small one… Come let’s make a circle, A circle with me!”

TO BE IN SILENCE ( Tune: Twinkle, twinkle) “Flying, flying Little clip, It goes quickly To my lips…CLIP!”

TO SIT DOWN: (Tune: Mary had a little lamb) “Everybody sitting down, Sitting down, Sitting down. Everybody sitting down On the floor!”

SNACK TIME: (Tune: A guarder…a guardar) “Tea-time, tea-time,It’s time for tea… Everybody waits, everybody sits. Tea-time, tea-time, It’s time for tea… A cookie for you and a cookie for me… One…two…three!!

TO CLEAN UP: (Tune: Arroz con leche) “It’s time to clean, To tidy up… Put everything in order, tomorrow we come back!

TO MAKE A LINE: (Tune: Andar en tren) “Traveling by train… It’s the best way, The driver says… All aboard the train!”

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

11


 Make a simple circular chart with a spinning arrow and a selection of weather symbols  Use a large paper plate, place symbols (sun, clouds, rain clouds, wind, etc) around the outside of the circle.  Make an arrow shape half the width of the overall circle, and fix to the centre with a paper fastener, allowing for easy movement around the whole chart.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

12


VISUAL AIDS are TEACHING RESOURCES that teachers can use to support a learning activity AS A VISUAL AID YOU CAN USE:

YOURSELF FLASHCARDS

POSTERS

THE CHALK BOARD

INTERACTIVE BOARDS

REALIA: real objects

CHARTS

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

GAMES

PICTURES

PUPPETS

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

13


BAKING-SHEET - TRAY MAGNET BOARDS:  

Use a Non aluminum tray or a tin baking sheet. Add a self-stick paper background : - Light blue for the sky. - Green for the grass.

__ ______

MIME

SONGS RHYMES

MIME MIME CHANTS CHANTS CHANTS

SONGS SONGS

RHYMES RHYMES

PUPPETS PUPPETS ACTIVITIES SIMULATION SIMULATION SIMULATION ACTIVITIES ACTIVITIES

ROLE-PLAYS ROLE-PLAYS

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

14


The game should: - Be relevant linguistically. - Have an aim and purpose. purpose - Be simple to explain. - Easy to set up and play. - Easy to carry out. - Everyone should be able to participate in it. - It should be FUN !!!!!!!

1) Seat all the players in a circle, close together. 2) A player walks quickly around the outside of the circle gently tapping the seated players on the head saying “DUCK" each time until he or she decides to switch to “GOOSE!" 3) At this point, the child chosen as “The Goose” gets up and chases the child who tapped him round the circle, trying to catch him before he does a complete circle and sits down in the “Goose's" spot. 4) The “GOOSE" now becomes the “DUCK" and repeats the game as described above. TEACHING TIP: Every few rounds change the vocabulary, so if sticking to the animal theme play with : “Tiger, tiger, snake!” - “Cow, cow, pig!”, etc…

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

15


Use paper plates to prepare different activities to revise vocabulary, concepts, poems, chants, etc…

MATCHING STICKS are very easy and inexpensive to make and they can be used for many developing skills. You will need: craft sticks (these can be found in any crafts store)- white paint markers. The first step is to paint the craft sticks white and let them dry. Then use a marker to write on the skills you are working on. Use MATCHING STICKS for: Letters- Colors - Shapes – Numbers- Sight words Addition- Name recognition, etc. Children are given the sticks to match and they can sit on the floor or at the table and match the sticks together. You can also but velcro on the back and use on a felt board or magnets and use on a magnet board. “Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

16


Matching Mats are designed to build visual discrimination skills in children ages 3 to 6 years of age. They are perfect for group and individual use in either structured or free play. Each matching mat has 12 squares that are to be matched with the identical square piece.

____________________________________________________ “Teaching English to Very Young Learners�

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

17


a) Make a list of the flashcards. b) Use good quality cards. c) Make all the flashcards the same size. d) Make sure that they are big enough to be seen by all children in the class. e) Draw big and bold pictures f) Color them. g) Write the name of each word on the back and front of the flashcards. h) Protect the cards with transparent contact paper or wide scotch tape.

The word REALIA means using real items found in the world around us to help teach English. Using Realia, helps to make English lessons memorable, memorable creating a link between the objects, and the word or phrase they show.

Materials from the “real world” brought into the classroom for practice!!! __________________________________________________________

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

18


FOR MOTIVATION Children try to speak without inhibition

FOR CROSSCROSS-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES : Puppets can be used in most topics of the syllabus.

TO TEACH VOCABULARY Eg: parts of the face / clothes

TO TEACH LANGUAGE Commands when making puppets: Color the…

PUPPETS are a fun medium for teaching Very Young Learners different skills. The most commonly used form of teaching with puppets is using them with literature units.

Draw a face on your clenched fist By moving the thumb up and down you have a mouth to speak !

Draw a face on each finger

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

19


Slide your hand inside a sock. Poke the end of the sock into the hollow between your extended fingers and thumb Spread your fingers wide to make the puppet smile, move thumb and fingers together and away from each other to close and open the "mouth". Glue construction paper or felt facial features to the sock. Add some yarn hair.

Gardening gloves or colored gloves: - Glue Velcro fasteners onto the tips of both gloves. - Create story characters out of felt and glue Velcro circles onto their backs

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners�

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

20


Print the pages. Color and cut them apart. Staple them to a popsicle stick and use as puppets to retell the story.

A POEM is language in verse form with a clear emphasis on rhyme.

A RHYME is a group of words ending in the same sound. A CHANT is a short rhyme focused on particular aspects of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, structure, or functions of English.

Nonsense rhymes, funny words and sounds repetitive patterns and rhythms are wonderful for young kids to start working with “Poetry”.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

21


1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8)

Say the Rhyme yourself. Demonstrate the actions. Ask children if they can guess what it means. Practice saying the Rhyme with all the class. Explain difficult words on the board, with pictures. Copy the Rhyme on a POSTER (“Rebus Sentences”). Teach the actions. Ask students to do the actions as you/they say the Rhyme/ Chant/ Poem.

 When you use songs that can be taught through gestures, very little pre-teaching is necessary. Teachers can seat the students in a circle, teach some very simple gestures, and then play the music while everyone gestures along. Most kids will sing along right away, but even the kids who aren't ready to sing will be able to participate with gestures.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

22


Place chairs in a circle facing out. Put musical instruments on each chair. HOME-MADE: Shakers/Drums/ Bells/ Horns/ tambours Turn on music, each child selects an instrument Begin marching around the chairs playing with the music and singing a well-known song.

SONG Two groups: gardeners and plants. Act out the song: to sow, to water, to weed, to grow. Tune: “Old Mac Donald”

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

“I will plant a garden green Then I’ll watch it grow… I’ll dig some holes here in the dirt In a nice straight row. I’ll dig one here I’ll dig one there Here a hole, there a hole, Everywhere a hole, hole I will plant a garden green Then I’ll watch it grow.” (in the hole I drop a seed) (I’ll water each plant one by one) www.gracebertolini.com.ar

23


 Add a meaningful context for language.  Promote children’s interest in learning to read.  Provide a home connection.

STORY READING WITH LITTLE KIDS: TECHNIQUES to use with Young Learners: - PREDICTION - ANTICIPATION STORIES SHOULD BE: - Predictable. - Simple. - Age-appropriate STORIES SHOULD HAVE: - A good plot. - Wonderful pictures. - Repetitive patters with rhythm & rhyme.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

24


1) Select the appropriate book. 2) Discuss the book cover: Ask about what they see in the cover. 3) Point out the title and ask them to predict the story. 4) Point out the author, illustrator and dedication (a gift the author does). 5) At the beginning, point to each word - progression from left to right. - page sequence.

Provide SIMPLE PUPPETS representing each character of the story. CREATE BIG BOOKS reproductions. Create a new story (ALTERNATIVE BOOKS) - with different characters, setting, etc... - substitute nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc…

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

25


Printable Emergent Readers are a cost effective and a powerful tool to teach beginning reading skills. These MINI-BOOKS are quite simple with images that should appeal to young children and simple, repetitive words that children in Preschool through Grade 1 should be able to read themselves.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners�

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

26


Use INDIVIDUAL DRY ERASE BOARDS for each kid for: - Listening. - Checking Comprehension. - Physical-response activities. There are many activities children can do with these INDIVIDUAL

BOARDS: Children can: • draw pictures on them and retell what is happening in the pictures. • practice writing letters ... numbers ... shapes ... simple words. • copy or complete a pattern from the blackboard. • make a certain number of objects, for example "draw five circles" or "write three letters" • NOTE: To erase it: clean it off with just a dry paper towel …and continue drawing!!

MATERIALS: - Muffin tins in either six or twelve muffin cups per tray. - Foam sheets with different colors. INSTRUCTIONS: 1) Cut out a circle that is large enough to fill the bottom of each tray (a different color for each muffin space). 2) Cut twenty-five small squares of each color.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

27


Time for reviewing and assessing all that children have learned. Small groups of children have a chance to interact with the words. Students: - use the words in sentences, - talk about their favorite words, - draw pictures for some of the words.

“SHOW THE WORD”: Begin by showing the word card to your class. While holding the word card, slide your finger under the text, saying the word aloud. Adding the card to the word wall with the children (it helps them recognize the cumulative growth of their visual dictionary).

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

28


DON’T FORGET THE FAMILY!!

Through open communication, communication a partnership among teachers and parents can be established to support and encourage your students learning program. Give parents an article (in Spanish) describing how children acquire the 2nd language.

“A CLASS PHOTO JOURNAL” JOURNAL”: take pictures of the children involved in various classroom activities and send the album home.

“OUR MAIL BOX” : Write a letter or postcard to another family.

“OUR CLASSROOM NEWSPAPER” NEWSPAPER”: Write news, jokes, add pictures, etc…

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

29


Plan and rehearse a SPECIAL class with:

- CIRCLE TIME ACTIVITIES: Hello Song, Weather Song, Classroom Helpers, Daily Schedule, etc… - A Game, - A Parade, a simple Role-Play, - Word Wall Activities. - Reading a Story - Retelling of the Story - A “written” / Arts & Crafts activity together with Parents, - Etc…

SOME CONCLUSIONS: ALWAYS REMEMBER HOW KIDS LEARN!! CHILDREN: Naturally acquire oral language by listening, imitating and repeating (like babies do). They learn in a global way: from the general to the specific, from the whole to the part. They need instruction in all modes of communication: listening, speaking, reading, writing, observing, illustrating, experiencing, modeling: Children learn by doing! Children should be actively involved in meaningful functional language experiences. They progress through appropriate stages. Children learn in different ways, at different rates: learning a language takes time and practice “Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

30


REFERENCES: o Roth, Genevieve. Teaching Very Young Children- Pre-school and Early Primary. Richmond Publishing. o House, Susan. An introduction to Teaching English to children. Richmond Publishing. o Curtain and Pesola. Languages and children – making the match. Longman. o Clandfield, Lindsay and Foord, Duncan. The language teacher’s Survival Handbook. SBS Publishing. o Richards, Jack C. and Rodgers, Theodore S. Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching. Cambridge University Press. 2nd edition, 2001. o Thornbury, Scott. How to teach Grammar. Longman, 1999. o Amstrong, Thomas.The Multiple Intelligences of Reading and Writing: Making the Words Come Alive. o Amstrong, Thomas. Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, 3rd Ed. o Marcia Fisk Ong. Teaching English to Young Learners. Compass Publishing. o Goldish, Meish. “Thematic Poems Songs and Fingerplays”. Scholastic. o Gnojewski, Carol. “Music and Dramatics at Circle Time”. Totline Publications. o Mackie, Gill. Super Songs & Activities. New editions. o Sheldom, Ken. “Sing along and learn” Scholastic. o Diane C. Ohanesian – The Big Book of Pre-K Learning Centers. Scholastic. o Abby Barry Bergman- Learning Centers activities- Full Day Kindergarten. Center for Applied Research in Education o Renee Creange- Classroom Routines that really work for Pre-K. o McGlothlin, J. Doug .1997. A Child's First Steps in Language Learning. o Science Publishers. Literacy for early childhood: learning from the learners. Early Child -Development and Care. o House, - Susan. An introduction to Teaching English to children. Richmond o Curtain and Pesola. Languages and children – making the match. Longman. o Jack C. and Rodgers. Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching. Richards, Theodore S Cambridge University Press. 2nd edition, 2001. o Thornbury, Scott. How to teach Grammar. Longman, 1999. o Celce-Murcia,M. Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. Heinle and Heinle. United States. 2001 o Railsback, J. Project based Instruction: Creating Exciment for Learning. o Tom Hutchinson. Project work in Language learning. o Magdalena Říhová. Project work in ELT with young learners of mixed ability classes. o Hutchinson, T. Introduction to Project Work. Oxford University Press. o Michael F. Opitiz . Learning Centers: Getting Them Started, Keeping Them Going (Scholastic, 1994) o Science Poems and Songs for Young Learners (Scholastic, 1996) o Gardner, Howard. “Frames of mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences”. Powell, James E. – “Multiple Intelligences-Activating Young Minds”– McGraw- Hill. o Ulrich Tobias, Cynthia. “How your child learns and succeeds!” - Galahad Books. o Witkin, Herman and Goodenough, Donald R. “Cognitive Styles: Essence and origins”- International University Press. o Bromley, K- Irwin, L- Modlo, M – “50 Graphic Organizers for Reading, Writing and more” – Scholastic. o Robb, A- “40 Graphic Organizers that build comprehension during Independent Reading” - Scholastic. o “Teaching English to Very Young Learners” www.gracebertolini.com.ar 31


o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o

Nickelsen L- Glasscock, S- “Main Idea & Summarizing” – Scholastic. Shaw, D- “Retelling Strategies to improve comprehension” – Scholastic. Garvie, E. (1991) "An integrative approach with young learners" in Brumfit (1991) Williams, M. (1991) "A framework for teaching English to young learners“ Cameron, L (2003) ‘Challenges for ELT from the expansion in teaching children' in ELT Journal, April, Issue 57, Oxford University Press Fowler, J .“Quick & creative Literature response activities” -Scholastic. Emblem, Val. “Learning through story” - Scholastic. Wright, Andrew. “ Storytelling with children” Muno, Licciardo. “25 terrific Literature Activities” - Scholastic. Warren, Jean. “Story time ideas for Circle Time”- Totline Pub. Novelli, Joan. “Easy-to-make Books That target Specific Reading needs - Scholastic Ellis, Gail. “The Storytelling Handbook for Primary teachers” - Penguin Fowler, J .“Quick & creative Literature response activities” -Scholastic. Schmidt, Fran. Friedman, Alice. “Peacemaking skills for little kids” Pre K – Mades, Miriam. “Helping, not hurting” Teaching I-care Rules through Literature. “Peace Scholars: Learning through Literature” “Peace Scholars: Creative Conflict Solving” Pike, Kathy. Mumper, Jean. Fiske, Alice. “Teaching kids to care & cooperate” SCHOLASTIC

RECOMENDED STORIES: o o o o o o o o o o o o

Carle, Eric. “The very hungry caterpillar” Wood, Audrey. “The napping house” Tabak, Simms. “There was an old lady who swallowed a fly”- Caldecott Honor Book. Martin, Bill Jr. “Brown bear, brown bear…what do you see?” Martin, Bill Jr. “Polar bear, polar bear…what do you hear?” Unknown author. “The three little pigs”- 1840 Unknown author. “The mitten” Shannon, David. “David goes to school” - Scholastic. Brown, Laurie. “How to be a friend” - Little Brown & Company. Carle, Eric. “ The grouchy ladybug” - Harper Collins. McBratney, Sam. “ I’m sorry” -Harper Collins. Vaughan, Marcia. “Hands, hands, hands” - Mondo Publishing.

SOME VIDEO LINKS IN YOU TUBE: • • • • • • • •

TEDDY BEAR, TEDDY BEAR: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMYJCyRhXao THE ITSY BITSY MONKEY: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaGTAEFjyp8 TWINKLE TWINKLE TRAFFIC LIGHTS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRWSUx2j6B8 MAKE A CIRCLE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RERqAISUlt8 WALKING WALKING: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nrrA9j51tQ0 HELLO SONG: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8I9gz-5_h60 SONG FOR CIRCLE TIME: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6iWwLTS8IDI CLEAN UP: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1b4gSs0KhIU

RECOMMENDED WEB SITES: o o o o o o o

www.enchantedlearning.com www. preschoollearningonline.com www.activityschoolbus.com www. glitterfulfeltstories.com www.teachers.net www.kizclub.com www.teachervision.fen.com

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

32


o o o o o o o o o o o o

www.kindercrafts.com www.sparklebox.co.uk www.britishcouncil.org/kids-songs-music www.theteachersguide.com/Songs www.kididdles.com www.freekidsmusic.com www.bussongs.com www.prekinders.com www.ehow.com www.esl-galaxy.com www.jmeacham.com www.vickiblackwell.com

We strongly recommend hands-on learning activities for Very Young Learners from: www.childcareland.com www.earlychildhoodprintables.com SHELLEY LOVETTS has been creating original learning activities and resources for the early childhood community since 2000. She has also been working in the field of early learning for the past sixteen years as both a licensed child care provider and a pre-k teacher.

www.teachingenglishgames.com SHELLEY VERNON created a method that concentrates on enhancing listening and speaking skills through Language Games which involve repetition and through fluency activities which have genuine communicative value rather than artificial conversation. She created her best-selling "English Language Games for Children"

www.supersimplesongs.com Teachers of Knock Knock English School for Children in Tokyo, Japan. Several award-winning CDs later, Super Simple Learning materials are being used in classrooms and homes around the world to help children learn with confidence and a smile.

www.kinderplans.com ELAINE ENGERDAHL has taught a number of primary grades in her 26 years of teaching, specializing in the area of Reading Instruction. She created the Program called Early Learning Solutions that integrates many skills within the reading content books. Enter her web site and learn about her Full Year of Kindergarten and Preschool Curriculum-Based Lesson Plans and Activities.

“Teaching English to Very Young Learners�

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

33


“What a child creates through playful activity is never wrong” “Tell me and I forget... Teach me and I remember... Involve me and I learn !” Benjamin Franklin. “ Teachers should make a difference in the lives of children” “To To teach is to touch a soul forever” forever”

E-BOOK: “TEACHING ENGLISH TO VERY YOUNG LEARNERS” Copyright 2012 By Graciela Bertolini www.gracebertolini.com.ar All rights reserved. No part of this E-BOOK may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopying, recording, computer bulletin board (BBS), Internet, or by any information storage retrieval system, without written permission of the author. This legal protection not only applies to the name but also to the format and contents of this E-book. Any copying or similar publication, will be seen a breach of copyright and legal action will be sought. Please do not email “TEACHING ENGLISH TO VERY YOUNG LEARNERS” to anyone else, as I do not want free copies being emailed all over the Internet.

I appreciate your integrity on this point. Thank you! Grace Bertolini. “Teaching English to Very Young Learners”

www.gracebertolini.com.ar

34

Sample eBook 1  

Sample eBook 1 Bertolini, Grace. Teaching English to Very Young Learners!

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you