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GRACE MADER landscape architecture portfolio


GR ACE M A DER 785.691.5744

Passionately curious, I’d like to spend

gmader5@ksu.edu

all of my time in quiet places watching

http://bit.ly/gracemader

birds find dinner. Because of this, I strive to design landscapes that work to form relationships between natural systems and human interaction.


Building and Site Model Hand Cut Museum Board, Foam Core, and Basswood (2016) Photograph by Jon Hunt


SELECTED WORKS 6

Roots of McCall | McCall, ID

12 JC Harmon High School | Kansas City, KS 16 Grandmere Community Center | Manhattan, KS 20 Children’s Hospital Courtyard | Ann Arbor, MI 24 SE Commercial District | Coralville, Iowa 30 Leadership Involvement | Manhattan, KS


ROOTS OF MCCALL McCall, ID Planting Design Studio | Fall 2017 2018 Central States ASLA Merit Award

Payette Lake features improved water quality as permeable soils slow and filter runoff from the surrounding area

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A winding, accessible path leads visitors through the newly restored ecological processes of Payette Park


Located in McCall, Idaho, the project sought to rethink a key area near the tourist town’s bustling downtown. First Street provided the perfect opportunity to create an environment that encourages residents and visitors to notice and appreciate the natural environment alongside Payette Lake. Emphasizing stormwater management and native vegetation, the project helps to bring McCall back to its roots, immersing people within a series of spaces that use design to explain why well functioning natural systems matter. The four week studio project included regional inventory and analysis, concept development, diagramming, master planning, planting design, and stormwater calculations. The project was submitted to Central States ASLA in 2018 and won a merit award in the Design Unbuilt category.

An open, well lit plaza improves visitor accessability

Newly designed intersection at First Street enhances pedestrian and vehicular circulation

Illustrative Section of Payette Park in McCall, ID Adobe Photoshop (2017)

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The design was broken up into three core zones where visitors can learn about their surroundings while seeing tangible ways to respect ecosystems and water quality. These zones include Payette Park, First Street, and the First Street Parking Lot. The new Payette Park provides a soft transition from E. Lake Street down to Payette Lake. The park includes a winding path down the slope, densely planted native vegetation, and a series of signs illustrating the importance of protected ecosystems. First Street

E. Lake Street

includes slowed vehicular traffic, wide sidewalks and an ecology focused corridor. The First Street Parking Lot becomes an opportunity for stormwater retention alongside parking with a formerly blank wall hosting a beautiful community mural, showcasing the town’s best self.

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First Street

“Roots of McCall” Illustrative Site Plan Adobe Photoshop and AutoCAD Civil 3D (2017)


Wide sidewalks encourage pedestrian circulation and provide space to stop and interact

Low maintenance, native vegetation buffers the street, collecting stormwater runoff and filtering it as it moves downslope

First Street of McCall, ID Adobe Photoshop (2017)

Design Development Hand Drawn Marker on Trace (2017) 9


Native vegetation filters stormwater runoff and provides wildlife habitat opportunities

Payette Park in McCall, ID Adobe Photoshop (2017)

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Patio built from reclaimed local lumber immerses visitors in the park


Open views to Payette Lake and distant mountains engage the public in learning about the ecoregion

Permeable pavement helps with stormwater infiltration

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JC HARMON HIGH SCHOOL Kansas City, KS Site Planning and Design Studio | Spring 2018 Collaborative Design Project - 2 Person Team Grace Mader and Ryan Walker *all images by author unless otherwise noted

JC Harmon High School Concept Development Handrawn Marker on Trace Paper (2018) 12

Studio Sponsored by DLR Group


JC Harmon is an existing high school in the Argentine neighborhood of Kansas City, KS. The primarily turfgrass site does little to mitigate flooding or promote stormwater infiltration and has few trees. Students at JC Harmon have too many students per classroom and have few sight-lines to the outdoors. They spend limited time outdoors during the day and often struggle to focus on studies in the aging school. A new neighborhood revitalization plan focuses on creating a cohesive community and strengthening the relationships between neighbors and the surrounding urban environment. The diverse heritage of the community was considered a strength with the design improving local spaces and the connections between key points in the neighborhood. The proposed design for the high school and the surrounding property is organized with four key “stepping stones� that work to bring students, faculty, and the community from one side to the other. Programming is limited to one section of the site, defined by the building design, in order to emphasize the axial relationship of the design which features a retention pond, athletic fields, a private garden, and a series of walking trails. Overall, the proposed design provides ample parking, a variety of public and private zones, and opportunities for outdoor learning at several different scales. This semester long studio included extensive neighborhood analysis, research into learning environments and theories, and work with an architecture student (Ryan Walker) at both the small scale of individual classrooms and the larger scale of the school.

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JC Harmon High School Outdoor Learning Environments Sketchup, Lumion, and Adobe Photoshop (2018)

JC Harmon High School Site Plan Adobe Photoshop and AutoCAD Civil 3D (2018) 14


JC Harmon High School Site and Building Model Laser Cut Chipboard and Matboard (2018) 155


GRANDMERE COMMUNITY CENTER Manhattan, KS Construction Implementation | Fall 2017-Spring 2018

Grandmere Site Model CNC Cut from Rhino Model (2017) 16


The Grandmere Community Center is located alongside the proposed First Christian Church of Manhattan. The site includes ample parking, a small playground, a large bioswale with a nearby gazebo, and a pollinator garden. The project was completed from conceptual development through construction documentation. The final packet included a full grading plan, earthwork diagrams and calculations, stormwater drainage plans, watershed diagrams and calculations, lighting plans, and construction details. Construction details were done of the gazebo and deck, entry driveway and sign, detention ponds, bioswales, brick paving, an outdoor seating area, and a retaining wall.

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Grandmere Site Grading Plan AutoCAD Civil 3D (2017)

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Retaining Wall Detail AutoCAD Civil 3D (2018)

Wooden Deck Detail AutoCAD Civil 3D (2018)

Cut and Fill Diagram AutoCAD Civil 3D (2017)

Post and Joist Hanger Detail AutoCAD Civil 3D (2018)

Bioswale and Check Dam Detail AutoCAD Civil 3D (2017)

Stormwater Flow and Watershed Calculations AutoCAD Civil 3D (2018)


CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL COURTYARD Ann Arbor, MI Planting Design Studio | Fall 2017

Children’s Hospital Courtyard Planting Design Seasonal Studies Hand Drawing, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop (2017)

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Located in Ann Arbor, this theoretical design project emphasizes spatial definition through the use of plant material. Plants were chosen after extensive research and cataloging in order to provide the best possible experience within the site. Counseling spaces are located along the edge of the courtyard to provide a sense of privacy and comfort to users while maintaining views through the site. An allÊe along one side of the courtyard leads visitors alongside the central lawn. The courtyard design for Ann Arbor’s Children’s Hospital focuses on healing, play, and exploration. A wide variety of plant material is used to create different spaces within the courtyard, providing visitors with an array of experiences in a small area. Layering a mixture of native and non-native species creates a sense of wonder and excitement throughout the seasons. Designed linearly, the courtyard encourages children to explore their surroundings while maintaining a focus inwards to the open lawn. The courtyard provides children and parents with a natural healing environment to get away from the sterile indoor atmosphere.

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Counseling Spaces, AllĂŠe of Trees, Open Lawn Adobe Photoshop (2017) 2222


Children’s Hospital Courtyard Planting Plan AutoCAD Civil3D and LandFX (2017)

Children’s Hospital Courtyard Illustrative Plan AutoCAD Civil3D, LandFX, and Adobe Photoshop (2017) 23


SE COMMERCIAL DISTRICT Coralville, IA Community Planning and Design Studio | Summer 2018 Collaborative Design Project - 4 Person Team Morgan Dunay, Bridget Hake, Grace Mader and Madison Quincke

Studio Sponsored by TAB *all images by author unless otherwise noted

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The Southeast Commercial District in Coralville, Iowa sits alongside a 5-lane arterial street in a historically floodprone area. The mixed-use area includes many buildings that are functionally obsolete and some parcels exhibit evidence of neglect.

Spatial Organization

The design sought to create a framework for public space within the district. Located along a light industrial and commercial corridor, the redevelopment provides pedestrian and vehicular access to, and around, the site while simultaneously creating a unique and identifiable space within the community. The district provides affordable housing and commercial opportunities,

Pedestrian Circulation

allowing existing and future residents and businesses to thrive. The design uses a variety of open spaces alongside mixed-use building developments to create a highly organized neighborhood. This summer long urban planning studio resulted in a 600-page book titled, “Stitching the Strip� including work from every member of the course. The project

Vehicular Circulation

was designed and rendered as a four-person team, with much of my time being spent on project management, diagramming, plan rendering, small perspectives, and written communication. I was also the lead coordinator in design and organization of the overall book layout. The studio was sponsored by Technical Assistance to Brownfields (TAB) and projects were presented to the

Design Program

Coralville City Council with an informal presentation and review open to the public.

SE Commercial District Concept and Circulation Diagrams Adobe Illustrator (2018) 25


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SE Commercial District Illustrative Plan ArcGIS, AutoCAD Civil3D, Adobe Photoshop (2018) 26

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Waterfront Town Homes *Color denotes distinct areas but does not represent anything other than this separation

RAIL ROAD

Option A: Work With Lines in Existing Locations Across Site Limits costs of building new infrastructure but does nothing to limit separation of parcels within the overall site. Allows for fragmentation of the site into several small pieces.

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Option B: New Location Above Ground Creates more open space within the site and encourages a more cohesive overall design. However, it could be argued that the new alignment would interfere with the landscape around Clear Creek, limiting the aesthetic quality of the space.

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ure 1: Comparison of New Power Line Strategies S, 2018)

Existing Transmission Line Inventory and Analysis Rhino, ArcGIS and Adobe Illustrator (2018)

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Throughout the course of the semester, the class met with members of the Coralville City Council, business owners, and residents of the SE Commercial District. Through the community engagement process,

STITCHING THE STRIP 7 Visions for the Future of Southeast Coralville

students were able to design realistic proposals for the future of the mixed-use district. By the end of the summer long studio, students had given several video presentations to city engineers. The final deliverables included a formal presentation to the City Council, a gallery-style presentation open to the public, a website, and a 600-page book including Edited by Blake Belanger and Howard Hahn

inventory, analysis, and each team’s design proposal. I worked with two other students, Danielle Hodgson and Madison Quincke to design the layout for the

“Stitching the Strip” Book Cover Adobe InDesign (2018) Designed by Shelby Cooke and Danielle Hodgson

book and I created the template in InDesign for teams to follow when compiling their individual chapters. As the primary coordinator and project manager for the book design, I worked with the leads of each team to manage files, edit layouts, and compile the sections into a cohesive whole. The book, titled, “Stitching the Strip,” has yet to be published but work from the studio can be seen online at: https://stitchingthestrip.wixsite.com/coralvilleiowa.

“Stitching the Strip” Book Spreads Adobe InDesign (2018) Some Graphics by Morgan Dunay, Bridget Hake, and Madison Quincke 28


8 | Building Up

Organizing the New District to Encourage Community Interaction As the design developed, it was crucial to allow space for any proposal to be altered by the community as they come together. The new district has to provide opportunities for activities, and events while also providing opportunities for growth and change. Plazas and lawns are filled with tables, chairs, planters, and artwork as well as permanent seating and fountains. Instead of telling the community what to become, the district encourages the community to mold it into what is needed most. The neighborhood is organized to bring residents and community members of all backgrounds together. Buildings are made up of office, retail, dining, housing and parking space - encouraging communication and interaction amongst visitors and residents.

(Dunay, Hake, Mader, Quincke, 2018)

Medium Density Housing

Terrace Space

E Raised Pedestrian Crossing

Market Hill

Market Plaza

Market Lawn

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Figure 3 Power lines cut through the middle of a large parking lot, limiting spaces within the lot and preventing any new structures from being built. (Quincke, 2018)

Clear Creek

Strategy

Rectangular Plaza 2nd

Centralized Lawn 2nd

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Figure 1: A linear pedestrian mall could be paved or become a linear park. It has the potential to connect to the existing trail system, run alongside (or perpendicular to) roads, and meet Clear Creek. (Mader, 2018)

Ra il Lin e

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Ra il Lin e

Figure 8.17 Core Activity Space Set within the central four blocks, the Market District includes a unique overhead sculpture, an open lawn, and a variety of plaza spaces for the community to enjoy.

Figure 4: Arguably the most effective strategy, linear space, plazas, and green space can all be combined to use the site as efficiently as possible while also connecting it to the rest of the community. (Mader, 2014).

Figure 3: Lawn space could be positioned centrally on the site to provide green space to all surrounding buildings while still being protected from the vehicular traffic along the streets. (Mader, 2018).

Figure 2: An open plaza provides ample space for pedestrian movement as well as events and gatherings to occur. The plaza could be positioned adjacent to existing streets or near Clear Creek and should include several types of furnishings, seating options, and trees. (Mader, 2018)

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Inquiry: How could open space be implemented within the SE Commercial District? Key Extractions: Optional building masses, plaza spaces, and green spaces Methodology: Good locations for future open space were determined through case studies of precedents and visits to the site to determine important connections needed for future development. Conclusions: The placement and shape of future buildings on the site will hold a key role in determining how open space on the site can be developed. The two should be designed at the same time in order to effectively create spaces that move fluidly from interior to exterior. These spaces can be organized as linear pedestrian malls, rectangular plazas or lawns, or centralized plazas or lawns however the best use of space is to combine all three in order to make the most use of the site.

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Legend Green Space Paved Space Building Mass/Parking Garage Streetscape Site Boundary

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

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Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

8 | Building Up

Frameworks for Open Space: Circulation Boulevard

Community | Economy | Terrain

Perfor mance

Lawn

Entry

Figure 4 Transmission lines run alongside the north side of Clear Creek, taking up a wide portion of the creek corridor and obstructing views towards the Iowa River. (Mader, 2018)

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The boulevard is the primary road shaping the site and creating an intersection point connecting the two halves of the district. This road has a large median between two lanes which is lined with trees to create a grand entrance into the site.

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1 | Introduction

Aforementioned, the students are also enrolled in a seminar course which complements the studio. The first three weeks of the course are spent reading a variety of literature pertaining to landscape architecture and urban planning in an effort to introduce students to new concepts and frameworks. Figure 1.4 provides documentation of the seminar readings and a brief summary of the major ideas and concepts.

Mapping

Following initial background research, the studio embarked upon a site visit to Coralville, Iowa to become acquainted with the city, specifically the Southeast Commercial District. In an effort to approach the site with purpose and intention, Chistophe Girot’s “Four Trace Concepts in Landscape Architecture” was utilized for guidance. The reading presents four concepts used as tools for navigating the investigation of a new place. The four trace concepts are as follows:

Provides a basis for understanding the roles of mapping in the planning and design process.

“Critiques and Urban

The text is a critical examination of methods of planning and designing

Components”

at a city-scale. Krier looks at a variety of aspects from zoning to street

Krier, 2007

grids to block-by-block urban form.

Quintessential Social

An analysis of streets and how they influence not only vehicular

Public Space”

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

Finding: the act and process of searching the thing discovered

Founding: synthesizing landing, grounding, finding to bring new ideas to the surface

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1 The pedestrian mall is the only roadway dedicated exclusively to pedestrian access. The street connects the central four blocks, allowing for access through the mixed-use district.

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Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

9 | Critical Maps Opportunity

Open space could be integrated alongside existing trails, streets, or within the interior of the site W3_GM02_4K_OpenSpace.PDF

(Barragree, 2018)

Figure 2: Proximity to Clear Creek and the surrounding natural area helps emhasize natural beauty of the region. (Mader, 2018)

circulation but social interaction and community design.

The authors emphasized why density and intensity are important factors “Re-Framing Urban Space” while planning for the success of any urban space and how these two Cho, Heng, and Trivic 2015 factors influence the comfort and usability of a space.

“The New Urbanity: The

American population impacts housing, infrastructure, and amenities.

“Suburban Retrofits, Demographics, and Sustainability” Dunham-Jones 2005

An analysis of how existing developments can be revitalized to serve new and innovative purposes.

“Principles of Brownfield Regeneration” Hollander, Kirkwood, and Gold 2013

Figure 1.3 Southeast Commercial District (Google Maps, 2018)

Description of what a brownfield site is and outline for remediation techniques and processes.

“From Place to Site:

Dissecting how planners and designers approach space and begin

Negotiating Narrative Beauregard, 2005

narrative of the site.

“Landscapes as Social Infrastructure” Hood, 2004

The text is the development and explanation of a system of hybrid

Inquiry: Where are opportunities to create open space within the SE Commerical District? Key Extractions: Satellite imagery with key areas circled Methodology: Key locations were determined from site visits based on connection to the surrounding community through water bodies, trail systems, and streets. Conclusions: The Southeast Commercial District offers several locations that could work for structured open space. These open spaces can be formed through the use of building mass as well as using the edges of the site. Connections could be made to Clear Creek, to the existing trail system, or to one of the adjacent streets. The site is large enough to also offer opportunities to have some open space within the central zone of the southern portion of the site.

modifications: “sweeping, weaving, lumping, and stratifying.”

“Place Analysis and Planning Methods”

Figure 4: Existing open space is centralized within the site with the potential to be protected from nearby busy streets. (Mader, 2018)

Figure 1: Opportunites for Open Space (GIS, 2018)

to place labels on them which may or may not respect the previous

Complexity”

Social Considerations

Figure 3: Proximity to streets could lead to further connection between proposed open space to the rest of the community. (Mader, 2018)

An analysis of how the shifting demographics and preferences of the

Nelson, 2009

Urban Revitilization

Landing: initial reaction to the site Grounding: discovering and understanding the site after initial visit

Woonerfs are used to slow traffic using small, non-delineated lanes that weave between medians and buildings. The roads are designed to allow for easy pedestrian access while also providing parking along the edges.

Vikas 2013

Rise of a New America.”

• •

(Quincke, 2018)

“In the Street: A

Placemaking

Site Visit

“The Agency of Mapping” Corner, 1999

Figure 8.12 Pedestrian Mall

Walk, shop, laugh, or create - it all happens here in a community strip built for life and sharing experiences with each other. The sections of this strip are separated by function, but woven together through design and the actions of those who work, live, or visit this place. (Hake, 2018)

The SE Commercial District Has Opportunities for Structured Open Space

Figure 1.4 Seminar Reading Summaries

Seminar Readings

Pedestrian Mall

Figure 8.10 Woonerf (Quincke, 2018)

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Map 7.14b

The complete street system form the secondary roads within the district. These streets are two lane roads with bicycle and pedestrian ways alongside vehicular traffic. The streets provide parking along side the roadway and are framed with trees.

Figure 8.34 Life Happens Here

As the design for the new Coralville District developed it was critical that our proposal maintain the same feeling that the community already had. Instead of creating a downtown metropolis, an extensive public park, or a grand shopping district, our team wanted to design a neighborhood that feels like it’s always been there. Together, we designed a district that intends to fight against gentrification and instead pushes for a more subtle shift towards a denser community. Coralville was built by hardworking families from all backgrounds and, despite hardships, it has grown into a diverse and beautiful town. The district doesn’t attempt to become a grand gesture through the heart of Coralville. Instead, it builds up the community that was already there. It builds up the economy of existing and future businesses along the strip. It builds up the terrain to help prevent future disasters. The design has the potential to change the shape of Coralville, but that change will happen with the community’s input, feedback, and love - not without it. The district is designed, not to change, but to be changed by the people who will live and work within it. That’s what makes it special.

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

The Community Planning and Design studio performed a variety of methods in order to fully understand the conditions of the Southeast Commercial District as well as the wants and needs of the community. The information was synthesized and used to provide sensible and responsive design proposals. Initially, the studio researched the Southeast Commercial District, Coralville, and Iowa City to establish a bank of information pertaining to the site. Research topics included ecology, hydrology, economy, infrastructure, context, history, culture, demographics, health, transportation, and existing developments. Precedent research was also performed to identify successful mixed-use developments, riverfront projects, and brownfield sites. Additional research informed studio members of the existing comprehensive plan currently in place for the City of Coralville. From the beginning of the studio, a series of questions were asked about the site which guided students through critical mapping and design proposals. These questions include:

(Quincke, 2018)

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their children’s future.”

Methods

Figure 8.11 Complete Street

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must attempt, rather, to bring people back to... the warmth of the community, to the wor th of individual

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Complete Street

Figure 8.9 Boulevard (Quincke, 2018)

Robert F. Kennedy

Presents a variety of mapping strategies for placemaking and design.

Sepe, 2013

Introduction

Figure 5: The existing trail system that wraps along the edge of the site offers the opportunity to help connect new public space to the surrounding community. (Belanger, 2018)

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Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

1 | Introduction

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Map 5.1a

1 | Introduction Figure 1.2 Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Community Planning and Design Studio Timeline.” Adapted from Samantha Estabrook, 2017 in Delano’s Turn. Kansas State University LAR 646 2018.

Citations Book Cover Image Cooke, Shelby and Danielle Hodgson. 2018. “Cover Image.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator. Source Image: • Google Maps. 2018. http://bit.ly/2N8j388

Goals + Objectives

Figure 1.43 Creekside Walk (Quincke, 2018)

Enhance the cultural identity of the community with local art, businesses, and neighborhood events

Implement phasing strategies to encourage existing tenants and business owners to remain in the neighborhood after the project

Figure 1.8 Hahn, Howard. 2018. “Team Process Work.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018.

Powerlines Spread Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Team Powerlines Diagram Abstraction.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Diagrams.

Figure 1.9 Marshall, John P. 2015. Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel. Pioneers. In Bloomfield Hills Michigan Stake. Accessed May 23, 2018. http://bit.ly/2JhoKOZ.

Rail Spread Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Team Rail Diagram Abstraction.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Diagrams. Streets Spread Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Team Streets Diagram Abstraction.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Diagrams. Waterfront Spread Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Team Waterfront Diagram Abstraction.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Diagrams.

Figure 1.10 Brown, Tricia. 2014. “A Trip Back in Time: Coralville Strip during the Flood of 1993 #jocoflooding.” Coralville. Twitter. Accessed May 23, 2018. http://bit.ly/2Jld3Xu.

Figure 1.11 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. n.d. “Coralville Resevoir.” Accessed July 2018. Public Domain. http:// bit.ly/2NPVsdF

Figure 1.12 Parker, Caleb. 2018. “Brownfield Contaminants.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator Diagram.

Chapter Heading Drone Footage Aerial. 2018. “Photograph of Study Area.” Courtesy of the City of Coralville, Iowa.

Type A: Distribution Pole

STUDY

Building Up is proposing to create a framework for public space within the SE Commercial District in Coralville. Located along the strip, the redevelopment provides pedestrian and vehicular access to, and around, the site while simultaneously creating a unique and identifiable place within the community. The district will continue to provide affordable housing and commercial opportunities, allowing existing and future residents and business owners to prosper. The design uses a variety of open spaces alongside mixed-use building developments to create a highly organized neighborhood.

Figure 1.7 Mader, Grace. 2018. “Powerlines Critical Mapping.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and Rhino 3D Diagrams.

Mixed Use Spread Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Team Mixed Use Diagram Abstraction.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Diagrams.

Reorganize the site to provide spaces within the public and private realms focused various activities Provide vibrant gateways into the district at proposed intersections and pedestrian entrances Create a clear circulation system throughout the district and to surrounding areas

CLEAR

Figure 1.44 Core Activity Space

Land Use Metrics

2ND

(Hake, 2018)

Residential Summary Total Residential SF Total DU Avg DU Acre Total Residents Parking Stalls Needed

910,527 1,029 25 2,057 1,029

Commercial Summary Total Commercial SF Employees Parking Stalls Needed

440,247 587 616

415,485 831 582

Parking Summary Total Stalls Needed Parking Stalls Provided Surface Parking Stalls Streetside Parking Structure Parking

2,227 2,237 250 295 1,941

RY

(Hodgson, 2018)

(Dunay, 2018)

(Mader, 2018)

(Mader, 2018)

(Belanger, 2018)

(Dunay, 2018)

Type B: Transmission Tower

Transmission Tower B

Legend Symbol: Typical Height: approx. 65-80’ Typical Voltage: 70 kV or 138 kV Typical Material: wood or steel Expected Clearance Required: 15’

(Black Hills Corporation, 2018 and ISA, 2018)

Type C: Transmission Tower

Transmission Tower C

Legend Symbol: Typical Height: approx. 70-85’ Typical Voltage: 70 kV or 138 kV Typical Material: steel Expected Clearance Required: 15’

(Black Hills Corporation, 2018 and ISA, 2018)

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(Mader, 2018)

(Dunay, 2018)

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Distribution Pole A

Type D: Cell Tower Legend Symbol: Typical Height: approx. 100’ Typical Material: steel Expected Clearance Required: 20’

(Black Hills Corporation, 2018 and ISA, 2018)

Plaza Hardscape Green Space

(Mader, 2018)

45’

Figure 1.46 Building Performance

Figure 1: Power Lines and Poles Across the Site (GIS, 2018)

(Mader, 2018)

Inquiry: Where are the existing power lines and poles located? Key Extractions: Pole locations, buildings, paving, water, site boundary Methodology: GIS was used for the base layers and Adobe Illustrator was utilized to add lines and points. Power line locations were determined based on aerial imagery and the site visit. Pole types were determined from aerial imagery and site photographs. Voltages and easements were approximated based on online research from other areas and electric companies. Conclusions: Three large transmission lines, and several smaller distribution lines run within the site boundary. The lines are supported by different types of poles at varying heights and sizes. One cellular tower is also located within the site boundary. Many of the power lines lead towards an electric substation northwest of the site along the Iowa River.

Wrap & Enclose Activate & Experience

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Legend Pole Type A Tower Type B Tower Type C Tower Type D High Voltage Line Low/Medium Voltage Line Study Area Boundary

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Support & Frame Figure 3: Comparison of Pole Height (Mader, 2018)

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

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Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

9 | Critical Maps

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Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

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Building Mass in the SE Commercial Doesn’t Shape Open Space

Comparison

Building Up

Three successful precedents demonstrate importance of spatially-ordered buildings W3_GM01_3K_OpenSpace.PDF

Southeast Commercial District, Coralville, Iowa

Pedestrian Mall, Downtown Iowa City, Iowa

No Clear Organization

Belmar, Lakewood, Colorado

Linear Pedestrian

Community | Economy | Terrain

Leipziger Platz, Berlin, Germany

Rectangular Plazas

Centralized Open Lawns

80% Open Space

40% Open Space

50% Open Space

60% Open Space

1% Canopy

6% Canopy

2% Canopy

1% Canopy

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(Black Hills Corporation, 2018 and ISA, 2018)

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Office Summary Total Office SF Employees Parking Stalls Needed

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Figure 1.45 Open Space

Figure 1.14 Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Identity.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator Diagram. 62

Legend Symbol: Typical Height: approx. 35’ Typical Voltage: 12 kV or 35 kV Typical Material: wood or steel Expected Clearance Required: 10’

100’

Figure 1.13 Stoffel, Elsa. “100 and 500 Year Floodplain Levels.” 2018. Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. ArcGIS and Adobe Illustrator Diagram.

Figure 1.1 Hahn, Howard. 2018. “Students Mid Review.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018.

Figure 2: Images of Transmission Poles from Site

Concept

Figure 1.6 Belanger, Blake, Shelby Cooke, Howard Hahn, Grace Mader, and Madison Quincke. 2018. “Collection of Images from Coralville Community Meeting and Site Visit.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018

Placemaking Spread Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Team Placemaking Diagram Abstraction.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Diagrams.

RIVER IOWA POWER

Morgan Dunay | Bridget Hake | Grace Mader| Madison Quincke

Figure 1.5 Hake, Bridget. 2018. “Community Meeting Summary.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator. Data gathered in Coralville, Iowa.

FEMA Spread Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Team FEMA Diagram Abstraction.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Diagrams.

39

Classification

Towers within the SE Commercial District can be divided into four key categories W2_Mader01_4K_PowerLines.PDF

Community | Economy | Terrain

Figure 1.4 Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Seminar Reading Summaries.” Adapted from Samantha Estabrook, 2017 in Delano’s Turn. Kansas State University LAR 646 2018.

Brownfield Spread Barragree, Josh. 2018. “Team Brownfield Diagram Abstraction.” Kansas State University LAR 646 2018. Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop Diagrams.

9 | Critical Maps

Overhead Transmission Lines and Poles Vary in Type and Size

Building Up

Figure 1.3 Google Maps. 2018. “Southeast Commercial District.” Accessed July 2018. http://bit.ly/2meusIg

43

8 | Building Up

Building a Better Future

“It is not more bigness that should be our goal. We

Inquiry: How do the power lines and their easements affect where future developers can build? Key Extractions: Buildings and power line easements Methodology: Building footprints were imported into Rhino from GIS and extruded. Power line easements were estimated from research and were used to determine sizes of buildable area within the site boundary. Conclusions: The powerlines fragment the site into multiple small pieces, separating them from one another and from the street. The lines not only determine the sizes of buildable area on the site but also what functions can occur in different areas. Because few things are allowed under the lines due to safety and accessibility concerns, the extensive strips of easements are limited to paving with parking or mown grass.

419

Community|Economy|Terrain

Clear Creek

Stre et

ue en t Av 1s

Picnic Lawn

Figure 1: Division of Site by Power Lines and Easements (GIS, 2018)

High Power Transmission Line Low/Medium Power Distribution Line Removed Transmission Line Removed Distribution Line New Underground Power Line New Above Ground Power Line Site Boundary

(Hake, 2018)

Ra il Lin e

n

*Color denotes distinct areas but does not represent anything other than this separation

Legend

Hybrid 2nd

Clear Creek

Stre et

effor t and responsibility... and of individuals working together as a community , to better their lives and RAIL ROAD

E

8 | Building Up

Linear Pedestrian Mall

UE

ET

2ND STRE

LE SPAC

UE EN

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

The district could use linear, rectangular, or centralized open space with plazas and with green space

Figure 2 Existing transmission lines run along First Street on the southern side of the site. The transmission lines move East towards University of Iowa softball fields and off the site. The lines break off the sothern portion of the site, separating it from the northern pieces. (Belanger, 2018)

EK

T AV 1S

418

Dilemma

Power line easements fragment the site into small sections, separating parcels from the road and one another W2_Mader02_NoScale_PowerLines.PDF

UE EN

N

The SE Commercial District Should Use Future Building Masses to Shape Open Space

Stre et

BUILDAB

STR EET

E

Inquiry: How should the powerlines be handled in order to best allow for future development? Key Extractions: Site boundary, existing power lines, existing electric poles, proposed power lines Methodology: Maps were made from GIS and Adobe Illustrator with information gathered from the site and from satellite imagery. Conclusions: Because of how badly divided the site becomes with the power lines in their current positions, and because these lines will have to be taken down and rebuilt during any site grading, it makes sense to change where the lines are located on the site. Due to cost, only some of the powerlines should be buried with other lines being moved to a different location along the edge of the site boundary. This can be seen in Option D where the central line is buried and the line along the south side of the site is moved farther south.

Te

za

W3_GM03_NoScale_OpenSpace.PDF

2nd

Arguably the most feasible design strategy, moving some lines to a new location and burying others helps to open up the site while limiting excess expenses.

STR EET

Figure 1: Comparison of New Power Line Strategies (GIS, 2018)

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

512

Multiple Sets of Overhead Power Lines Define Spatial Organization

Open Space 47%

e

Morgan Dunay Bridget Hake Grace Mader Madison Quincke

FAR (excluding ROW)

Building Footprint 53%

50

Map 7.14c

Building Up

2,227 2,237 250 295 1,941

LE SPAC

T AV 1S

Spac

35

Parking Summary Total Stalls Needed Parking Stalls Provided Surface Parking Stalls Streetside Parking Structure Parking

Figure 8.30 Land Use Facts

rk

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

Map 5.1b

E

(Dunay, 2018)

Se

34

The breakdown of these uses can be seen to the right.

415,485 831 582

BUILDAB

Parking 30%

Office 16%

e

Support and Frame

Our design is focused on the Community, the Economy, and the Terrain of the site and how each is built up and improved upon. This proposal is a mixed-use plan that includes residential, retail and service, office, parking, open and green space.

Office Summary Total Office SF Employees Parking Stalls Needed

Commercial 17%

G arag

Wrap and Enclose

Making the Design Viable

Housing 36%

e nts

Purpose of Building Masses

Activate and Experience

(Dunay, 2018)

440,247 587 616

Reta n d il a

Creekside Play Area

ET

Commercial Summary Total Commercial SF Employees Parking Stalls Needed

ar tm

Botanical Garden

IL RA

AVEN

Site Metrics

Sp

KEY

RE

UE

1ST

Figure 8.29 Land Use Map

Open

W HA

D ST

LE SPAC

UE EN

SITE BOUN DARY

2ND

Ap

8

e

SITE BOUN DARY

2ND

ce

nc

e

rra

rie

fram

T AV 1S

Option D: Move Some Lines Underground and Some to A New Location Above Ground

Creates more open space within the site and encourages a more cohesive overall design. However, it could be argued that the new alignment would interfere with the landscape around Clear Creek, limiting the aesthetic quality of the space.

Road

S ur face

t and

UE EN

Parking Garage

Clear Creek

O ffi c e

pe

T AV 1S

Option B: New Location Above Ground

910,527 1,029 25 2,057 1,029

t

por

2N

Performance Lawn

P

Residential Summary Total Residential SF Total DU Avg DU Acre Total Residents Parking Stalls Needed

ee

ex

BUILDAB

Park Space

Transit

Parking Lot

ate

STR EET

P

CRE EK

sup

tiv

DARY

2ND

STR EET

Open Space

nho m es

ac

2ND

Office

P

se

SITE BOUN

DARY

Retail and Service

To w

clo

SITE BOUN

Removing overhead infrastructure helps to create a more desirable landscape within the site boundary while also protecting electrical lines from wind damage. Though more expensive than above ground lines, moving the power below ground allows for a more pedestrian friendly site design.

P P

Pa

d en

Option C: Move Lines Underground

Limits costs of building new infrastructure but does nothing to limit separation of parcels within the overall site. Allows for fragmentation of the site into several small pieces.

e

an

Option A: Work With Lines in Existing Locations Across Site

High Density Housing

The new development includes buildings with three sets of goals. Some aim to wrap and enclose the inner four blocks, creating a safer, and more neighborhood space. Buildings within those blocks activate the district, and encourage a wide array of experiences on site. The surrounding buildings support the inner district and frame the neighborhood for the rest of the community.

CLE AR

ap

Strategy

Cost of construction, effect on the landscape, and resulting buildable area should be considered in determining how to handle the lines W2_Mader03_NoScale_PowerLines.PDF

Legend

(Mader, 2018)

wr

9 | Critical Maps

Moving or Burying the Overhead Transmission Lines Allows for More Usable Space

Land Use Plan

ac

Figure 8.5 Diagrammatic Aerial Building masses are used together with open space to create usable public spaces throughout the district.

Map 5.1c

8 | Building Up Figure 8.6 Site Plan Process Sketches The final design came from an iterative process of researching the area, identifying problems, and working as a team to come up with solutions.

Creating a Framework for Public Space

nomy Eco

munity om

ain Terr

Framing spaces through the integration of public space with private development within a new and unique neighborhood

Figure 8.2 Conceptual Diagram The district is designed to build up community, economy, and terrain across the site but these ideas are manifested in the four main blocks. (Mader, 2018)

Stitching the Strip

Table of Contents

ce Spa een Gr

9% Parking

% 22

king Par

14 %

%

Medium Visual Penetration

The existing district lacks clear organization in open space and building mass. With this in mind, the site becomes difficult to navigate and access for vehicles and pedestrians. Though the site offers amenities that draw in the community, few people spend consistent amounts of time in the district if they don’t work or live there. Our design reshapes how public space and private space work together to create a small neighborhood feeling within a larger urban context while simultaneously providing residential, commercial, and transportation opportunities. The design uses a variety of open spaces alongside mixed-use building developments to create a highly organized neighborhood. The district limits the number of entries off of 2nd Street and utilizes a new network of streets to connect buildings to pedestrians and vehicles. Four small blocks are set within the core of the district providing visitors with a range of activities and experiences throughout the year. The blocks include a performance lawn, a botanical garden, and a market district for community events. These spaces come together in these four blocks to enhance the vibrancy of the larger neighborhood.

ape tsc ree St

7% Plaza

pe ca ets

20 %

St re

ape tsc ree St

2% Parking

Building Mass 34%

32 %

Figure 2: Iowa City, Iowa, (GIS, 2018) • Primarily 2-5 story buildings • Long, tree covered pedestrian malls connect arterial streets • Provides many pedestrian amenities • Limited exposure to vehicular traffic • High level of enclosure • High pedestrian traffic (Google Maps, 2018)

ing Mass Build 51%

53% Bu ildin gM ass

28% Str eets cap e

18% Buil ding Ma ss

Figure 1: Coralville, Iowa (GIS, 2018) • Primarily 1-2 story buildings • Wide open spaces with no formal organization • Doesn’t provide any pedestrian amenities • Exposed to vehicular traffic • Low level of enclosure • Low pedestrian traffic (Google Maps, 2018)

e pac nS ee Gr

Medium Visual Penetration

10% Pla za

15% Gre en Sp ac e

1

g rkin Pa

Low Visual Penetration

6% Pla za

9%

High Visual Penetration

Our team hopes to create a framework for public space within the SE Commercial District in Coralville. Located along the strip, the redevelopment provides pedestrian and vehicular access to, and around, the site while simultaneously creating a unique and identifiable place within the community. The district will continue to provide affordable housing and commercial opportunities, allowing existing and future residents and business owners to prosper.

40 %

3

Abstract

Figure 3: Lakewood, Colorado (GIS, 2018) • Primarily 3-5 story buildings • Open, tree covered plaza connects mall district • Provides many pedestrian amenities • Some exposure to vehicular traffic • Medium level of enclosure • Medium pedestrian traffic (Google Maps, 2018)

Figure 4: Berlin, Germany (GIS, 2018) • Primarily 10-20 story buildings • Formally arranged open lawn with paved edges • Provides limited pedestrian amenities • Exposed to vehicular traffic • Medium/high level of enclosure • Medium/high pedestrian traffic (Google Maps, 2018)

Inquiry: How does the open space in the SE Commercial District shape building mass in comparison to other locations? Key Extractions: Building masses, green spaces, plaza spaces Methodology: Precedent sites were determined based on recommendation and research in order to find a variety of space types and locations to compare. Plaza space, green space, building mass, parking, and overhead canopy was measured via satellite imagery retrieved from GIS. Building height, exposure to vehicular traffic, level of enclosure, and pedestrian traffic were determined based on Google Maps (aerial imagery and street view in combination with user posted site images). Conclusions: The SE Commercial District in Coralville has considerably lower pedestrian traffic than compared sites. Although reasoning is difficult to determine, noticable differences include the level of exposure to surrounding streets, the amount of structured pedestrian-oriented space and amenities, and building height.

Figure 8.1 Pedestrian Bridge Over 2nd Street The new pedestrian bridge crosses 2nd Street to allow for easier access from one half of the district to the other. With the new trees planted along the road and the additional public plaza spaces, the area becomes a vibrant space, perfect for businesses along the strip.

Legend Green Space Plaza Parking Building Mass Streetscape

23

Build up the community through the use of local art, businesses, and neighborhood events

Provide vibrant gateways into the district at proposed intersections and pedestrian entrances

Build up the economy of the district by creating easier access to buildings and allowing for a wider variety of businesses

Implement phasing strategies to encourage existing tenants and business owners to remain in the neighborhood after the completion of the project and create a clear circulation system throughout the district

Build up the terrain to ensure all new buildings are at least 1’ above the 100 year flood plain, helping to prevent future disasters Reorganize the site to provide structured open space within the public and private realms focused on a variety of activities

68

98

134

Organize outdoor space into eight types of public space - four focused on circulation and four focused on inhabitable space

170

206

The new development works to build up the community, build up the economy, and build up the terrain. The community is built up through the integration of mix-income housing with public transportation options, neighborhood events, and a connection to the greater Coralville area through a city-wide trail system. Economy is built up as businesses of all ages, shapes, and sizes bring together the mixed-use district. Incubator companies have space along-side successful businesses while restaurants and cafés sit near small town boutiques and chain pharmacies. Businesses and tenants on the existing site will have the option to be grandfathered in to the new development, ensuring they have a great location without worrying about a sudden hike in rental cost. Lastly, in order to ensure maximum protection against future flooding, the terrain across the district will be built up, raising all proposed buildings 1’ above the 100 year flood plain and limiting the fear of flood damage in the future.

236

270

304

Introduction

1

Regional Hub

2

District 1

3

Industrial Greenway

4

Horizontal Flows

5

Negotiating Boundaries

6

Strip Zipper

7

Building Up

8

Critical Mapping

A

Using Transit to Promote Social and Economic Connections within a Wide Range of Communities

Creating a Continuous Urban District Between Iowa River Landing and the Southeast Commercial District

Preserving Local Identity and Creating Opportunities Through Greenspace and Transit

2nd Street and Clear Creek

The “SOFT” and “HARD” Treatment for Coralville, IA

Integrating Resilience

Community | Economy | Terrain

(Mader, 2018)

N 0

508

Goals and Objectives

1500’

3000’

Edited by Blake Belanger and Howard Hawn

6000’

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

509

30

Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

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Kansas State University Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning | 2018

21


LEADERSHIP INVOLVEMENT LARCP Design Day 2018 | Poetry Crawl Project Manager with Harrison Dirks I worked with another student to design, and develop promotional materials for a department-wide event. On the day of the event I worked to organize students and faculty while moving around campus with visiting poet, Mary Pinard from Babson College in Massachusetts.

Poetry Crawl Book Laser Cut Chipboard and Watercolor Paper (2018)

Students Writing Poetry During Event (2018) Photograph by Lee Skabelund

THINK THINK THINK small

Considering Place from a New Perspective LARCP Design Day | 2018 Tuesday, August 21 | Regnier Forum Featuring Guest Poet Mary Pinard

Design Day Flyers Adobe Illustrator (2018) Designed with Harrison Dirks 30

small

Considering Place from a New Perspective LARCP Design Day | 2018 Tuesday, August 21 | Regnier Forum Featuring Guest Poet Mary Pinard

small small

Considering Place from a New Perspective LARCP Design Day | 2018

Tuesday, August 21 | Regnier Forum Featuring Guest Poet Mary Pinard


Open House 2018 | Augmented Reality Lead Sandbox Design Facilitator While collaborating with a Computer Science student, I implemented an augmented

A wooden case was modeled in Rhino and built with plywood in order to stabalize the sandbox

reality sandbox software onto a department computer. I also designed and helped to build a wooden box to surround the sandbox and provide further support to the structure.

The sandbox was used to teach families and incoming students about how landscape architects understand landforms during the annual Open House

Sandbox Setup, Design, and Implementation Rhino, AutoCAD Civil 3D, CNC Router, Linux, SARndbox Software (2018) 31


(785) 691-5744 gmader5@ksu.edu http://bit.ly/gracemader

GRACE MADER Education and Awards Kansas State University | Manhattan, KS Masters of Landscape Architecture Anticipated Graduation Date - May 2020 GPA: 3.97 | Deans List Minor - Geology Central States ASLA Merit Award | 2018 Putnam Scholarship | 2015 - 2018

Research Experience K-State Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional & Community Planning Research Assistant for Prof. Lee Skabelund Fall 2017-Spring 2018 •

Wrote outlines and papers synthesizing work from previous research on rain gardens and pollinator habitats

Research Assistant for Dr. Tim Keane Spring 2017 •

Researched and reviewed background literature on alluvial sediments and fluvial geomorphology

Leadership Experience LARCP Design Day | 2018 Student Organizer and Project Manager K-State Student Chapter of ASLA | 2017-2018 Professional Chapter Liaison AP Design Dean’s Student Advisory Council | 2017-2018 Landscape Architecture Representative AP Design Plot Club | 2016-2018 Treasurer and Representative K-State First Student Advisory Council | 2015-2017 Council Member


Grace Mader | Landscape Architecture Portfolio  
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