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Viewpark Conservation Group Beautiful Viewpark


Contents Contents..........................................................................................................................2 Horticultural...................................................................................................................3 Viewpark Gardens..........................................................................................................3 Strathclyde Business Park..............................................................................................4 The Viewpark Glen (Historic Douglas Support)............................................................4 Conservation and Biodiversity.......................................................................................6 Community Participation...............................................................................................6 Public Places...................................................................................................................8 Residential Gardens.......................................................................................................8 Recycling........................................................................................................................9 STV Local Report........................................................................................................10


Horticultural Viewpark Gardens These gardens are the obvious favourite by everyone who lives in viewpark. They are a popular facility used by the local schools for education purposes, residents for recreational reasons and brides wanting a beautiful background for the photos of their big day. They hold an annual Flower Festival for which the attendance numbers continue to grow each year due to the various activities on offer and the peaceful and beautiful setting. The Gardens include four large green houses in which you will find an extensive range of tropical, subtropical, cacti and also succulent plants. There are mature gardens areas, a Japanese garden, a highland garden, miniature waterfalls and ornamental ponds. The Gardens are home to many species of Scotland’s wildlife. And a large variety of birds, butterflies, insects, dragonflies, squirrels and amphibians can be found living here.


Strathclyde Business Park This business park which was established in 1990 is home to some of Strathclyde’s largest and well known organisations. It is built over 155 acres of beautifully landscaped parkland. The grounds are constantly maintained to a high standard with colourful and seasonal plants and shrubbery being introduced throughout the year. Many of the shrubs, trees, heathers and bedding plants would be found in Scotland’s natural environment. There are also many water features which give a peaceful atmosphere and also encourage local wildlife in the park.

The Viewpark Glen (Historic Douglas Support) For many generations the glen has been part of the

Douglas/Hamilton/Campbell Estates. There was


originally a large mansion house standing in the centre of the Glen but this burned down in the 1930s. The extensive grounds that form the estate are made up of landscaped gardens, ornamental ponds, pathways and avenues all leading back to the site of the original house these are still visible but have know become overgrown. A local conservation group formed by concerned residents from viewpark have been working continuously over the last decade to

protect and preserve the original features and regenerate the areas used by the local community. They hope that in the future some of this estate can be developed into a community and nature park and promote the history attached to the estate.


Conservation and Biodiversity Due to stronger laws and public awareness we are witnessing that in the past 4 - 6 years the local burns and the North Calder River have been slowly regenerating back to the point that they can now sustain the aquatic life that would have previously been found in uncontaminated waters.

Community Participation. The Central Scotland Forest Trust, The community police and the Viewpark Conservation Group held a public consultation meeting and asked the local residents what they suggested to improve their immediate environment. Most people wanted to see the local areas cleaned up, pathways and play areas repaired and more recreational areas for their children to play. Other issues rose was the amount of broken glass and dog fouling in park and play areas. These issues are being resolved by the introduction of Dog waste bins, frequent litter picking and street sweeping all provided from North Lanarkshire Council. Work has also been completed at Myrtle


Road and Douglas Crescent to clear away weeds and overgrown areas and also the removal of unused unsightly concrete structures giving these areas of the housing estate a more attractive appearance. The Central Scotland Forest Trust have been repairing the original pathways and creating new pathways in and around the local glen to make this area more accessible for recreational use. This has also helped the local wildlife by improving the habitat in which they live. The local residents teamed up with the Conservation Group and approached numerous grants schemes and secured enough funding for the development and extension of an original play area. North Lanarkshire Council are also proving a mobile play area on various dates throughout the summer break to encourage the children to “pop out and play�. The residents and the Conservation Group aided by the children from 2 of the local primary schools had a bulb


planting day and between them managed to plant 1000 bulbs donated by the Central Scotland Forest Trust. These will come into bloom in the spring time in along the pathways. It was such a successful and fun day for everyone involved another planting day is arranged for August/September 2010.

Public Places With the introduction of dog foul bins, more frequent street cleaning and litter picking along with of 3 tier planters in located in various public areas around viewpark the appearance of the public areas is greatly improving. The people using these areas seem to appreciate the new improvements and are helping keep the areas clean and free from vandalism.

Viewpark District Hall

One Stop Shop

Residential Gardens The introduction of the planters, flower beds and improvements to


the green spaces and play areas seems to be having a knock on effect in Viewpark. Many residents have always taken pride in their gardens and kept them clean and tidy and well presented, but more and more residents are improving their gardens, some just to keep them simple and easy to maintain but others excel themselves and put in a huge amount of time and effort resulting in some very beautiful gardens. This is encouraged by the Viewpark Gardens who hold a Best Garden Competition as part of its Annual Flower Festival.

Recycling The main recycling and waste disposal centre close to Viewpark is at Remma Road, Bellshill. This provides residents with a facility to dispose of unwanted items such as old tvs, old white goods, old carpets and other large items of household rubbish. This helps to cut down on fly tipping in the local area. This is a picture of the chandelier created by the children of Laburnum Road Nursery using recycled items.

Part of the work being done by The Central Scotland Forest to clean up the pathways in and around the local glen has been to recycle the dead and fallen trees by turning them into small chips and spreading them across the woodland floor. This along with the fallen leaves and other woodland debris will break


down to form natural compost, benefitting the plants, insects and animals of the Glen. STV Local Report By Nicola Dowds Source: STV Local 11 October 2010 17:34 BST Email Nicola Dowds

Viewpark residents are getting ready for a new arrival in the community – a play park. Earlier this year, around £80,000 was awarded in grant funding to revamp the Banyan Crescent site and now locals are hopeful work will get underway in the next few months. The Viewpark Conservation Group were behind getting locals involved in the process, and their chair, Grace McNeill told STV Bellshill that the park is a firm fixture in the community. She said, “It isn’t just a swing park, it’s a social network for the young mothers with children and the grandparents who sit in the house with the kids. "It's their only place of safety to play. The children are desperate for it, they want it tomorrow.”The current park was in need of repairs, and Grace explained it cheaper to remove it than replace it, “One day, it was taken away and we thought they’d give us a new


swing park. So we asked and they said we wouldn’t get a new one, it was costing more to maintain it and it was dilapidated.” Community in action Grace says, at this point the group kicked into action, adding, “The council told us if we proved there was a need for the park, they would consider it. “A couple of the girls went round the doors, we had petitions made up and proved there was a need and a want for it. “We applied for funding for it and once we got an idea that there might be money, we asked people want they would like to see in it and let the public develop it. “All the companies wanted the contract, the park’s being extended and I think it’s being improved dramatically. I think it has been a successful project.”


Beautiful Britain - Viewpark 2010