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NORDIC

2012 1

Greenpeace is an independent campaigning organisation that acts to change attitudes and behaviour, to protect and conserve the environment, and to promote peace, by: • • • •

investigating and confronting environmental abuse challenging the political and economical power of those who can effect change driving environmentallyresponsible and socially-just solutions that offer hope for this and future generations inspiring people to take responsibility for the planet

TABLE OF CONTENT MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD CHAIR & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 3 GREENPEACE GLOBAL PROGRAMME4 THE YEAR OF 20126

Greenpeace has been campaigning against environmental degradation since 1971 when a small boat of volunteers and journalists sailed into Amchitka, an area north of Alaska where the US government was conducting underground nuclear tests. This tradition of ‘bearing witness’ in a non-violent manner continues today.

LOTTERY MONEY PROTECTING OUR ENVIRONMENT14

To maintain its independence, Greenpeace does not accept donations from governments or corporations but relies on contributions from individual supporters and foundation grants.

ORGANISATION REPORT20

OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS16 FUNDRAISING18

FINANCIAL REPORT 21 ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT26

Greenpeace is present in over 40 countries across Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. Greenpeace International, registered in the Netherlands as Stichting Greenpeace Council, is the body that coordinates global Greenpeace policy and strategy. Greenpeace Nordic is part of the global organisation, with offices in Stockholm, Helsinki, Copenhagen and Oslo. The organisation is Swedish registered.

Cover image: Greenpeace activists staged a ‘vertical catwalk’ action in front of the Levi’s store in the biggest mall in Copenhagen, Denmark. The activists were taking part in a series of Greenpeace activities held in over 80 cities worldwide, demanding that Levis commits to eliminating the use of all hazardous chemicals throughout its supply chain. © Christian Åslund / Greenpeace Published by Greenpeace Nordic Box 151 64, 10465 Stockholm, Sweden t +46 (0)8 702 70 70 f +46 (0)8 694 90 13 www.greenpeace.se info.nordic@greenpeace.org

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MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD CHAIR & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

During 2012, our pivotal battle to Save the Arctic gained considerable momentum; almost three million people have joined our Arctic movement so far, alongside an impressive range of famous individuals determined to protect this important ecosystem from encroaching oil companies intent on short term profit. We are incredibly proud that our campaign has experienced some success already; recently Shell announced that they will not be drilling for oil in Alaska in 2013 after their failed attempt in 2012, Greenland also won’t be allowing drilling in 2013, and there are other signs that more companies are reconsidering their rush for Arctic resources. But there is plenty of work still to do; Norwegian state owned oil company Statoil is still storming ahead in the Russian Arctic and several others have their sights set on the frozen North. Several governments too remain to be convinced that the Arctic needs our protection not exploitation. Greenpeace International executive director, Kumi Naidoo, has called the question of the melting Arctic “the defining environmental question of our time”; it’s time to answer that question by moving away from our fossil fuel addiction and towards a future of efficient energy use and clean, renewable energy. Looking back through 2012, we are proud of other significant and tangible results of our work in the Nordic region. Our dedicated financial supporters continue to make it possible for the talented group of 80 staff in our four Nordic countries, alongside our international colleagues, determined street recruiters and several hundred activists and volunteers, to carry out inspiring and effective campaigns across the world. Several of our exciting joint activities will be featured in this annual report and others can be found on our website homepages.

KIRSTEN SANDER Board Chair Greenpeace Nordic

MADS FLARUP CHRISTENSEN Executive Director Greenpeace Nordic

Another cause for celebration is the fact that, despite the challenging economic times, we grew our total number Greenpeace Nordic financial supporters by almost 5,000 to a total of 143,997 in 2012, in addition to securing a higher rate of average donations. Combined with the generous contribution we received from the Swedish Postcode Lottery, this means we registered income growth of approximately 32 million Swedish crowns, giving us a total income of 155 million Swedish crowns. The extra income will be carefully put to work, further boosting our activities to change attitudes and behavior, protecting and conserving the environment, and promoting peace in both the Nordic region and around the world. Thank you all very much!

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Diver Joel Gonzaga of the Philippine purse seiner ‘Vergene’ at work using only a single air compressor hose to the surface, in and around a skipjack tuna purse seine net, in the international waters of high seas pocket No1. © Alex Hofford / Greenpeace

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GREENPEACE GLOBAL PROGRAMME

Greenpeace’s Long Term Global Programme sets out our view of the global crisis and how we will respond to it. But the Programme is more than a collection of campaigns, it also contains our fundamental and enduring values, our overall vision and mission, and the unique ways of working that underpin our campaigns. Taken together, the different components of our Programme enable us to influence the course of events in favour of a planet able to nourish life in all its diversity. Because it exists in different operational time frames, our Programme allows us to respond to immediate campaigning opportunities while maintaining overall direction towards our long term aims. It describes those aspects of Greenpeace that endure through time: our vision, mission and identity, the most fundamental description of who Greenpeace is and what it believes in. It also provides our analysis of the global crisis and then describes our long term campaigning direction – to 2050 – in response to the crisis. Finally the Programme looks in more detail to 2020, and sets out critical campaign goals that must be reached by that date if our long term aims are not to be compromised. These critical goals are our Programme priorities. Our Programme priorities Our climate and forest goals are the priority for Greenpeace, on the basis of urgency. Our goal is that greenhouse gas emissions peak by 2015 and decline thereafter. To achieve this we need to ensure a global energy revolution – moving away from fossil fuels and nuclear energy to renewable energy and energy efficiency; to see zero deforestation globally; and to ensure that an effortsharing framework exists for tackling climate change that is both equitable and has environmental integrity. Our goal for our oceans campaign is that global marine diversity recovers from a history of overexploitation. Substantial progress needs to be made towards achieving a global network of effectively implemented, no-take marine reserves covering 40% of the oceans. We also need to bring about an end to overfishing in the world’s oceans, and ensure that there is no commercial whaling, including its equivalent under the guise of so-called “scientific” whaling.

Our goal for our sustainable agriculture campaign is to see a halt to the expansion of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into the environment. As a priority in Asia and the Global South, we need to catalyse a paradigm shift from chemical-intensive agriculture to sustainable agriculture, by shifting policies and significantly reducing the use of chemical pesticides and fertilisers. And our goal for our toxics campaign is to reduce by half by 2020 the releases of hazardous chemicals of industrial origin into water resources in the Global South, with a view towards elimination of these chemicals within one generation. Our campaigns and projects To achieve our goals we work through short-term, two-to-three year campaigns and projects; short term initiatives and objectives that are designed to achieve these strategic goals. Our campaign and project objectives are agreed and reviewed annually, as well as on a rolling basis. Flexibility and rapid response Of course external events can impact our Programme at any level. Rapid response to such unforeseeable circumstances has been and will remain a hallmark of Greenpeace’s work. Examples of Greenpeace rapid responses in 2012 were supporting local protests halt clear cutting of the Ojnare forest on the island of Gotland in Sweden, and bearing witness to toxic leaks from the waste water pond of the Talvivaara metal mine in Finland. The following pages briefly highlight some of our campaigns and projects over the course of 2012.

2012

THE YEAR OF

6

20

100% RENEWABLE DENMARK JANUARY

© Michael Hedelain / Greenpeace

FEBRUARY

7

012

© Lars Bertelsen / Greenpeace

ON MARCH 22, the newly elected Danish government reached a broad energy settlement with all but one party,

committing Denmark to the most ambitious energy and climate targets for 2020 in Europe. It includes targets for wind to cover 50 % of the electricity consumption by 2020 and a 34% domestic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 (compared to 1990 levels). Greenpeace played a key role in this ambition, as the settlement is rooted in a Greenpeace facilitated agreement made by the four former opposition parties in May 2010. This is an important step towards the Danish government’s targets of 40% domestic greenhouse gas reduction in 2020, a phase-out of coal before 2030, 100% renewables in the electricity and heat sector by 2035 and in transport by 2050.

MARCH

APRIL

CAT AND MOUSE WITH SHELL IN NORDIC WATERS AT THE END OF APRIL, Greenpeace carried out an

audacious three-pronged action on the Shell-leased icebreaker Nordica; the activity commenced in Finland where the ship set sail towards Shell’s planned drillings north of Alaska, and continued throughout the icebreaker’s route in Swedish and Danish waters. These were peaceful protests in which, amongst other activities, teams of courageous swimmers were dispatched in the water ahead of the vessel to exhibit banners to draw international attention to Shell’s destructive oil rush in the Arctic. After a considerable delay, the icebreaker eventually continued on its way, but not before we’d shone a bright spotlight on Shell’s dangerous Arctic endeavours.

© Doerthe Hagenguth / Greenpeace

MAY

8

TAR SANDS; A HOT POTATO AT THE STATOIL AGM

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ON MAY 15, Statoil’s major shareholder, the Norwegian state,

was subject to massive criticism when WWF’s and Greenpeace’s proposal at Statoil’s AGM, to withdraw Statoil from the tar sands, received almost twice the support of previous years. This increased shareholder engagement was the result of Greenpeace’s closer collaboration with partner organisations, such as the Norwegian church and Grandparents Climate Action initiative, in addition to a Greenpeace-led information tour across Norway, with Canadian First Nation Chief Francois Paulette who spoke emotively about the damage caused by tar sands to communities and the environment. Tar sands oil is the most polluting oil in existence, its extraction is causing a huge increase in carbon dioxide emissions, the cutting down and fragmentation of ancient boreal forest, poisoning of local water supplies and disregard of Indigenous peoples rights.

MAY

JUNE

© Greenpeace

JULY

SHELL OUT OF THE ARCTIC IN THE SECOND WEEK OF JULY, several

groups of polar bears showed up to engage with Shell at four of the company’s petrol stations in Århus, Copenhagen, Malmö and Stockholm. They were asking for their vulnerable Arctic homes to be protected through the cancellation of the company’s drilling ambitions in the icy waters north of Alaska. The bear suited activists then conducted peaceful on site protests, attaching campaign materials to pumps and deploying banners on roofs as part of a worldwide polar bear protest in 110 cities across 19 countries.

© Uggi Kaldan/ Greenpeace

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012 AUGUST

NESTE OIL’S CENSORSHIP EFFORTS SPOILED AUGUST 6, brought a significant legal victory concerning freedom

© Henna Middeke / Greenpeace

of expression for Greenpeace Nordic. Nestespoil.com and nestespoilreturns.com were spoof websites we’d created of the world’s largest palm oil fuel producer Neste Oil’s sites, containing a parody version of the company’s Annual Report. The company employed every measure to have the sites shut down, but the WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) ruled in favour of Greenpeace, stating that criticism was an important part of freedom of expression and the sites stayed live. Greenpeace has long been campaigning against the phenomenal growth of the palm oil industry in the developing world, which is spelling disaster for local communities, biodiversity, and climate change as plantations encroach increasingly further into vital forested areas.

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201

AUGUST

Oil spill near Usinsk, Russia.

© Steve Morgan/ Greenpeace

ARCTIC INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AGAINST THE ARCTIC OIL RUSH

ON AUGUST 17, a three day conference in Usinsk, Russia, facili-

tated by the Pechora Committee and Greenpeace, ended in a declaration by a wide range of Russian Arctic Indigenous Peoples that it was ‘time (to) join forces and demand that the oil companies and the Arctic States change their path and start to listen to the voices of the Indigenous Peoples residing in these lands’. The conference was the result of a longstanding cooperation between Greenpeace and Indigenous groups in Arctic, which has also resulted in several media tours to Arctic regions in Russia, to document and bear witness to the hundreds of on-shore oil spills that take place every month. It is estimated that a shocking 300-500 million litres of oil leak into the Arctic waters through Russia’s rivers every year.

© Steve Morgan/ Greenpeace

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UNIQUE GOTLAND FOREST HABITAT PRESERVED

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ON SEPTEMBER 1, Greenpeace activists joined forces with

local NGOs who for months had been trying to stop the mining company Nordkalk from cutting down the highly biodiverse Ojnare forest on the island of Gotland. Greenpeace’s support of the ongoing resistance resulted in activists being able to access the exclusion zone and physically stop the deforestation activities. The logging company contracted to do the work withdrew from the job and the Gotland County Administrative Board subsequently issued an injunction against Nordkalk. This was followed by a Supreme Court decision to review the permissions given at lower instances for Nordkalk to mine for limestone in the area. Ojnare Forest is considered one of Sweden’s most important natural landscapes and consists of a mixture of old pine forests, springs, swamps and meadows which provide a habitat to several unique and protected species. There are two so-called ‘Natura 2000’ areas adjacent to the forest, making them part of a wider and much valued EU network of nature reserves.

© Tillman / Greenpeace

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SAFETY FAIL

ON OCTOBER 7, activists on bikes and others carrying ladders entered two Swedish nuclear power plants, Forsmark and Ringhals, to protest against the overall technical and security weaknesses of Swedish nuclear plants. 50+ activists made it into the plants, seven of whom managed to stay overnight, completely unnoticed. The following morning, they alerted the media to their presence and conducted live interviews from the site, highlighting two recent Greenpeace reports on the vulnerability of nuclear plants. The activities caused huge embarrassment to the government and plant operators, and ran in the Swedish media for days. Following the action the Environment minister called for a meeting with the nuclear industry and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority demanding a plan for improving the safety measures at Swedish nuclear power plants. Sweden currently has three operational nuclear power plants with ten reactors dating from the 1970s to mid-80s and have long been troubled by safety problems.

© Greenpeace

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ON OCTOBER 24, the Finnish

© Greenpeace

OCTOBER

20

E.ON SEES THE LIGHT

TOXIC SLUDGE LEAK AT THE TALVIVAARA MINE

ON NOVEMBER 7, a leakage from the waste water pond

of a metal mine in Finland, spelt disaster for the surrounding forests and provided a powerful call to action for the Finnish team. The leaking water, a cocktail of poisonous chemicals containing nickel, uranium, aluminium and cadmium, contaminated swathes of the the local ecosystem and caused great upset amongst concerned locals. Greenpeace immediately dispatched a campaign team to bear witness to the spill, collect samples and demand that authorities close the mine. The event was a reminder of the considerable risks associated with uranium mining; other countries in which uranium prospecting is currently taking place include Sweden and Greenland. © Aino Tuomi-Nikula / Greenpeace

nuclear energy campaign experienced a breakthrough when plans for a new nuclear power plant, Fennovoima, were jeopardised by the major shareholder E.ON withdrawing from the project. This decision has increased the likelihood that the 70 remaining investors, each with considerably smaller shares, will also pull out of the project. E.ON’s decision followed two years of intensive campaigning by our Finnish office, including the mobilisation of a week long protest camp on the site of the proposed plant. Finland currently has four nuclear reactors with a fifth under construction; the process of which has so far been riddled with safety problems, huge delays and budgets overrun several times by escalating costs.

NOVEMBER

© Timo Puohiniemi / Greenpeace

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ON NOVEMBER 9, Greenpeace launched a report on the dangers of shale gas extraction to the environment and local communities in Denmark. Despite adopting the most ambitious climate plan in the EU, the current Danish government has unfortunately chosen to keep the previous government’s concessions for highly polluting shale gas exploration in the country. Greenpeace has been highlighting the evident hypocrisy of this decision, supporting local protest movements to campaign for a moratorium on new licenses and the need for full Environmental Impact Assessments before any exploration takes place. Any gas sourced via hydraulic fracturing in Denmark, or fracking as it’s better known, will be traded on foreign markets. Fracking is controversial because it requires the use of toxic chemicals which risks poisoning ground and drinking water, in addition to leaking methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

012 NOT FOR SHALE

DURING DECEMBER LAST YEAR, typically a time

when the clothing industry sees huge sales in the run up to Christmas, we witnessed a renewed public scrutiny of the clothing industry’s unfortunate relationship with hazardous chemicals. For the second year in a row, Greenpeace led a month long campaign on the issue, with shopper engagement activities in Stockholm, Gothenburg, Oslo and Copenhagen, including a magnificent vertical catwalk. High Street brands Zara, Mango, Esprit and Levi’s all bent to public demands for a toxic free clothing future, and officially declared their commitment to textile production without use of hazardous chemicals by 2020. The toxic compounds used to dye and clean clothes cause huge hazards for local communities and the environment via leaks from factories into local rivers, groundwater and wider ecosystems.

© EcoFlight.org

DECEMBER

DETOX

© Christian Åslund / Greenpeace

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Activists from Greenpeace and Walhi bear witness to active clearance and drainage of peatland rainforest in PT Asia Tani Persada. The Sinar Mas group affiliated concession, which contains orangutan habitat, is a supplier of pulpwood to Asia Pulp and Paper (APP). Š Ulet Ifansasti / Greenpeace

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LOTTERY MONEY PROTECTING OUR ENVIRONMENT In February 2012, Greenpeace received 22 million SEK from the Swedish Postcode Lottery; this is their most generous donation to date and the funds have already been put to good use protecting the Arctic, the world’s threatened tropical forest and promoting a Chinese energy revolution. The Arctic under pressure The Arctic is under enormous stress from the effects of climate change, ocean acidification and increasing industrialization. The region is warming faster than the rest of the globe and the sea ice is disappearing at an alarming rate; late August 2012 saw the lowest ice cover on record. Sea ice underpins the entire Arctic marine ecosystem; when it shrinks and thins, it opens up the possibility for the extraction of previously inaccessible oil, mineral and fish resources, placing additional pressure on Arctic Peoples and wildlife. Governments of the countries that own land or marine areas in Arctic, have already begun the race for the North Pole and several large oil companies are lining up to get their slice of the cake. Greenpeace is working hard to establish a moratorium on oil and gas development, ending destructive fishing and for the creation of large marine reserves in the region. Amplifying the voice of Arctic communities Approximately four million people live in the Arctic region, a tenth of which belong to Indigenous groups with cultures that have existed for generations. Greenpeace and the Pechora Committee (a Russian organisation working for Indigenous rights), received an additional six million SEK from the Swedish Postcode Lottery, for a three-year project starting in 2012, to strengthen the rights of Arctic Indigenous communities and emphasise their voice in the Arctic debate. Working towards a greener China China has fast become an important and influential player on the world market; it has the largest population of any country on earth in addition to one of the fastest expanding economies. More than 70% of the country’s energy is supplied by coal, which in turn is responsible for 80% of it’s carbon dioxide emissions, placing huge pressure on human health, water systems and the wider environment. Despite these challenges, Greenpeace believes China can lead the world in transitioning from coal towards a green and sustainable and renewable energy system. Greenpeace is the only high profile international environmental NGO working on an anti coal campaign in China, encouraging

the country to raise its environmental ambitions and lead the way towards a greener energy policy. Protecting our rainforests The world’s tropical rainforests are habitats to more than half the planet’s plant and animal species and thousands of human communities. Apart from providing us with a variety of essential medicinal substances, the forests act as giant carbon sinks, storing carbon both in the trees and in the ground beneath them; when they are felled or burned, large amounts of carbon dioxide are released back into the atmosphere. According to the UN’s intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), tropical deforestation is responsible for up to a fifth of global carbon emissions. Greenpeace is working hard to protect the rainforests of the Amazon, Indonesia and the Congo Basin; our aim is for zero deforestation in these vital ecosystems by 2020. In February 2013 we experienced a long awaited campaign victory when Asia Pulp and Paper finally devised a new ‘Forest Conservation Policy’ ending their involvement in destructive deforestation.

THE SWEDISH POSTCODE LOTTERY

The vision of the Swedish Postcode Lottery is to help build a better world for humans, animals and nature. The Lottery secures its revenue from selling lottery tickets, and donates all profits to charitable causes. In 2012, the Lottery distributed funds to 40 charitable organisations; the funds are unrestricted, which means benefiting organisations decide for themselves how they are most effectively put to use. Since its inception in 2005, the Swedish Postcode Lottery has distributed 3.8 billion SEK to the non-profit sector. Together with its sister lotteries in Holland and Great Britain, the Lottery is the world’s third largest private donor to the non-profit sector.

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OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS

OUR GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE The Board of Directors of Greenpeace Nordic approves the annual budget and the audited accounts of Greenpeace Nordic, and appoints and supervises the Executive Director. Greenpeace Nordic’s board members are elected for a three year period at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) by the voting members of Greenpeace Nordic. Board members may be re-elected for subsequent terms. The Board reports annually to the voting members at the AGM. At the AGM voting members also appoint the auditor for the following year, they decide on questions regarding indemnity for the Board of Directors and on acceptance of the Annual Report. The day-to-day operations are carried out by an organisation, spread over four Nordic countries, headed by the Executive Director Mads Flarup Christensen. The members of the Board of Directors, as well as the voting members, fulfil their duties without any form of remuneration. Costs relating directly to Board meetings and AGMs are however reimbursed. In 2012, Greenpeace Nordic’s voting members counted 20 persons, coming from all over Europe and Russia. The Board of Directors of Greenpeace Nordic consisted of six members. Annukka Berg (Finland) and Jørgen V. Gjerdrum (Norway) stepped down at the AGM in April and were replaced by Meri Pukarinen (Finland) and Dag Kühle-Gotovac (Norway).

KIRSTEN SANDER, BOARD CHAIR (2002 – 2013) Kirsten Sander was elected to the Greenpeace Nordic Board of Directors in 2002, and elected Board Chair in 2010. She has previously worked for Greenpeace in Denmark as well as internationally for twenty years, with the whales, forests and Antarctica campaigns. She is an architect by profession and is currently running her own business, which focuses on sustainable construction and solar energy. Kirsten lives Denmark. Presence at board meetings in 2012: 4/4

DAG KÜHLE-GOTOVAC, BOARD MEMBER (2012 – 2013) Dag Kühle-Gotovac was elected to the Greenpeace Nordic Board of Directors in 2012. He has a background in accounting and humanitarian affairs, as a field officer for the Norwegian People’s Aid, more recently as a manager in an international IT company, and currently as Head of Administration at the Norwegian Nobel Institute. Dag lives in Norway. Presence at board meetings in 2012: 1/2

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AGNETA RYTHÉN MARTIN, BOARD MEMBER (2009 – 2015) Agneta became a member of the Greenpeace Nordic Board of Directors in April 2009. Before this she was one of the voting members of Greenpeace Nordic and also worked for Greenpeace on a project called Greenkids for five years until 1994. Agneta has done a lot of work in the field of education and is currently a consultant at Afema AB. Agneta lives in Sweden. Presence at board meetings in 2012: 4/4

MATS KNAPP, BOARD MEMBER (2010 – 2013) Mats Knapp was elected member of the Greenpeace Nordic Board of Directors in 2010. Mats worked for Greenpeace, mainly within the Toxic Campaign, as a campaigner and coordinator for seven years. He was also involved in establishing and then working for the International Chemical Secretariat (ChemSec). Mats’ background is as an electronical engineer and biologist and he is currently employed as Chief Technology Officer at Kommunicera Communications. Mats lives in Sweden. Presence at board meetings in 2012: 3/4

MERI PUKARINEN, BOARD MEMBER (2012 – 2014) Meri Pukarinen was elected to the Greenpeace Nordic Board of Directors in 2012. She is a trained Community Pedagogue and M.Sc. in Environmental Policy and Regulation. She has previously worked for Greenpeace Nordic’s fundraising department in 2007. With a decade of experience in the environmental movement, Meri currently leads the Big Ask climate law campaign at Friends of the Earth Finland. Meri lives in Finland. Presence at board meetings in 2012: 2/2

ARNI FINNSSON, BOARD MEMBER (2005 – 2014) Arni Finnsson was elected as member of the Greenpeace Nordic Board of Directors in 2005. Arni worked for Greenpeace between 1987 and 1996, focusing mainly on fishing, whaling, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and radioactive waste issues. In 1997 Arni was one of the founders of the Iceland Nature Conservation Association (INCA) and is currently its Board Chair. Arni has further worked for WWF’s Arctic Program (1998-2004), the Deep Sea Conservation Council and since 1998 as a consultant for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW). Arni lives in Iceland. Presence at board meetings in 2012: 3/4

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FUNDRAISING Individual donors – people just like you – are the lifeblood of Greenpeace Greenpeace donors are passionate about protecting our Earth – and it is our donors that allow us to remain truly independent from government and corporate influence, and that means we can tackle environmental problems at their source. In 2012 we received donations from 143,997 individual donors from across the Nordic region. Around 94% of our donors give to Greenpeace on a committed monthly direct debit, providing us with a unique financial stability over the long term. Creating change and winning campaigns can often take years – even decades – and we thank each and every donor for standing with us and supporting positive environmental change. Each campaign is different, but all are built on the energy, skills and dedication of the Greenpeace community putting their beliefs into action. DONOR FIGURES* Country

2012 2011 2010

Sweden

94 156

92 984

94 786

Denmark

26 112

22 576

21 687

Norway

3 023

1 251

1 420

Finland

20 706

22 101

23 298

Total

143 997

138 912

141 191

Through making donations, campaigning locally, taking nonviolent direct action and taking action online, our donors have played a pivotal role in every one of our campaign successes. Our gross income grew by 26% between 2011 and 2012, mainly due to a donation from the Swedish Postcode Lottery. We ended the year having raised 155 million SEK, and for every 1 crown spent on fundraising we raised 5.75 crowns. In 2012 six wonderful supporters left a bequest to Greenpeace in their Will. These very special gifts allowed us to take our campaigns one step further. In total, Greenpeace offices globally raised just over 250 million Euros during 2012. Over 2.8 million individuals chose to give to Greenpeace in 2012, which makes us confident that together with them we can face the enormous environmental challenges that lie ahead. A BIG THANK YOU… to all the amazing donors who make a regular donation, those that leave a gift in their will to Greenpeace, those that made specific donations to campaign appeals, those who loyally send us a donation every year, those who organised events and raised funds for us... and everyone who made a donation the Greenpeace Nordic in 2012. You make it possible for us to give this fragile planet a voice. *In 2012 we changed the way we count donors, from a time frame of 18 months to a time frame of 12 months, in order to adapt to Greenpeace International’s standards. All figures shown in this table reflect a 12-month time frame.

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Jónas Hrafn Kettel is one of the Greenpeace frontliners in the Nordic countries, who everyday talks to people on the street about Greenpeace’ environmental work and signs up new financial supporters. © Jason White / Greenpeace

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ORGANISATION REPORT Global Environmental Organisation Greenpeace is present in over 40 countries across Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. Greenpeace International, registered in the Netherlands as Stichting Greenpeace Council, is the body that coordinates global Greenpeace policy and strategy. Greenpeace’s funding structure is designed to reflect our aim to be “One Greenpeace”: a truly global organisation, since environmental problems and their solutions are not restricted by national borders. Each self sufficient Greenpeace office pledges support to the international organisation in order to finance environmental work where it is needed the most. The global strategy of Greenpeace is decided jointly at a global level with input from national and regional offices. Greenpeace Nordic is part of the global organisation. We are a non-governmental, non-profit organisation with offices in Stockholm, Helsinki, Copenhagen and Oslo. The organisation is Swedish registered. Greenpeace started in the Nordic region in the early 80s. In 1999 the Nordic organisations joined a Nordic structure with one governance body and common management. Our Core Values Greenpeace’s cornerstone principles and core values are reflected in all our environmental campaign work, worldwide. These are: • We ‘bear witness’ to environmental destruction in a peaceful, non-violent manner. • We use non-violent confrontation to raise the level and quality of public debate. • In exposing threats to the environment and finding solutions, we have no permanent allies or adversaries. • We ensure our financial independence from political and commercial interests. • We seek solutions for, and promote open, informed debate about society’s environmental choices. In developing our campaign strategies and policies we take great care to reflect our fundamental respect for democratic principles and to seek solutions that will promote global social equity.

Transparency and Accountability International Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs) play an increasingly influential role in shaping global policies. Global public opinion surveys show higher trust in NGOs than in government and business. At the same time the non-profit sector is coming under closer scrutiny, both from those who want it to flourish and those who seek to curtail NGO activities. The International NGO (INGO) Accountability Charter A group of international NGOs, including Greenpeace International, therefore came together to demonstrate that they deeply value public trust, do not take it for granted and are committed to sustaining and deepening it by ensuring transparency, and accountability for their operations. In June 2006 the NGOs publicly launched and endorsed the first global Accountability Charter for the non-profit sector. The INGO Accountability Charter sets out core values and operating principles for international NGOs, covering the following areas: respect for universal principles; independence; responsible advocacy; effective programmes; non-discrimination; transparency; good governance; ethical fundraising; and professional management. All members of the INGO Accountability Charter are required to submit an annual accountability report. Since 2010 the reports are produced according to the Global Reporting Initiative’s (GRI) NGO Sector Supplement. Greenpeace International reports on behalf of the global organisation. For more information see: www.ingoaccountabilitycharter.org Code of Quality Greenpeace Nordic is also a member of the Swedish Fundraising Council (FRII). Greenpeace Nordic reports annually on how it applies FRII’s Code of Quality through the Code Report. For more information see: www.greenpeace.org/sweden/se/ om-oss/FRIIs-kvalitetsrapport

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FINANCIAL REPORT Financial position and performance Figures are in thousands of Swedish Crowns (KSEK) if nothing else is stated. Greenpeace Nordic is financially sound and stable. Fundraising income is steadily increasing year by year.

INCOME X ‘000 SEK

2012

Income 155 179

Legacies Russia Support Postcode Lottery

The organisation does not take on any new obligations and does not enter into new commitments or activities without strictly evaluating the risks at hand.

For campaign reasons Greenpeace Nordic holds a small number of shares in some corporations thus enabling access to information and participation in shareholder meetings. Greenpeace also holds a few shares in a Danish wind power cooperative. Income Income, excluding income from the Postcode Lottery, increased by 7% from 122 946’ in 2011 to 131 593’ in 2012.

Operational Expenses

This Year’s Result This year’s result is a surplus of 110’. Allocation of the Result The Board of Directors of Greenpeace Nordic proposes that the 2012 result is allocated as follows: Opening Fund Balance 26 801 352 SEK 2012 surplus

110 219 SEK

Profit Brought Forward 26 911 571 SEK

119 646

-82,9%

1 400

2 598

36,8%

1 900

155 130

27%

110

-89,7%

1 066

Cash Balance

40 216

12%

35 891

TOTAL ASSETS

49 551

9,3%

45 343

122 167

NOTE

2012

2011

INCOME STATEMENT X ‘000 SEK Income

1

155 179

122 946

Campaign Expenditure

-125 964

-96 664

Fundraising Expenditure

-26 961

-23 618

Adminstration Expenditure

-2.205

-1 885

2,3,4

-155 130

-122 167

Result from Operations

49

779

Interest Income and Similar Items

5

908

846

Interest Costs and Similar Items

6

-725

-416

Result after Financial Items

232

1 209

Taxes

Income that came through the Swedish 90-accounts was 118 086’. Contributions to Greenpeace in Russia through the so called Russia Support program was 2 598’.

7,6%

239

1 586 0 0

Total Operational Expenditure

In 2011, the Swedish Postcode Lottery changed its payment cycle and distributed donations from their 2011 operations in 2012. This change in the payment cycle meant that Greenpeace did not receive any income from the lottery in 2011. The total income for 2012 (155 179’), which includes income from the Postcode Lottery (23 586’), is thus not comparable with income in 2011.

26,2% 122.946

22 000 0 0

Postcode Lottery, special project

Result

Greenpeace does not invest in shares or other financial instruments and thus does not jeopardise valuable donations by investing speculatively.

2011

Out of which: Donations 128 756

The high degree of direct debit donations, 94%, provides a good platform for planning and carrying out important work.

Variance

7 -122 -143

Result

110

1 066

22

BALANCE SHEET X ‘000 SEK

CASH FLOW STATEMENT NOTE

2012/12/31

2011/12/31

X ‘000 SEK 2012/01/01 2011/01/01 2012/12/31 2011/12/31

ASSETS Fixed Assets Intangible Assets

Indirect method

8

Capitalized Costs Supporter Database

2 427

2 966

Operating activities

2 427

2 966

Result after financial items

Tangible Assets

232

1 209

Adjustment for non-cash items

9

Furniture & Office Machines

1 867

1 735

Depreciation

1 917

1 713

Action Equipment

584

468

Income tax

-122

-143

Improvements of rented Premises

288

375

Cash Flow from operating activities

2 739

2 578

2 027

2 779

Financial Assets Shares

before working capital changes Cash Flow from working capital changes

10

49

49

Rent Deposits

1 557

1 245

Decrease of accounts receivables

51

8 190

1 606

1 294

Increase/decrease of accounts payables 4

4 230

-10 028

Total Fixed Assets

6 772

6 838

Decrease of allocations

-133

-385

Cash Flow from operating activities

6 176

557

Current Assets Investing activities

Short Term Receivables Receivables Greenpeace

11

368

205

Increase of intangible fixed assets

Other Receivables

301

259

Increase of fixed assets

-1 539

Tax Receivables

456

435

Increase of financial items

-312

-21

12

1439

1 715

Cash Flow from investing activities

-1 851

-1 161

2563

2 614 Cash Flow for the year

4 325

-604

Cash & Bank

40 216

35 891

Total Current Assets

42 779

38 505

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning

TOTAL ASSETS

49 551

45 343

of the year

35 891

36 495

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the year 40 216

35 891

Prepaid Expenses & Accrued Income

FUND BALANCE & LIABILITIES

0 0 -1 140

Fund Balance Fund Balance

26 802

25 736

This Year’s Result

110

1 066

Total Fund Balance

26 912

26 802

Provisions Provisions for Legal Disputes

13 633 765

Current Liabilities Accounts Payables

2 051

2 985

Paybles Greenpeace

5 668

6 909 1 488

14

Other Short Term Liabilities

15

6 557

Accrued Expenses

16

7 730

6 394

Total Current Liabilities

22 006

17 776

TOTAL FUND BALANCES & LIABILITIES

49 551

45 343

Pledged Assets

17

201

201

Contingent Liabilities

none

none

Cash equivalents are defined as bank balances and investments that can readily be converted into cash.

23

Accounting Practices and Policies The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the Annual Accounts Act and the guidelines issued by the Swedish Accounting Standards Board. If no guidelines have been issued by the Swedish Accounting Standards Board, guidance has been taken from the standards issued by the Financial Accounting Standard Council. Accounting practices and policies are the same as previous years. Income The Association’s income consists of supporter fees, donations, bequests and since 2008 also income from the Swedish Postcode Lottery. Income is shown as the real value of what has been received or will be received. Income in the form of gifts is booked as income during the period the gift was handed over in a legally binding way. Receivables Receivables are valued individually and booked to the amount with which they are estimated to be received. Project grants which are subject to repayment obligations are recorded as a liability. Revenue from such a project is recognised when the costs are incurred and recorded. Receivables and Payables in Foreign Currencies Receivables and payables in foreign currencies are recalculated to the exchange rate at closing day in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standard Council recommendation no.8. Exchange rate differences on receivables and liabilities relating to operations are included in the operational result, whereas exchange rate differences relating to financial items are included in the financial items. Prepaid expenditure in foreign currencies is valued at the exchange rate at the time of payment. Expenditure Expenditure is recognised in the period in which incurred. Costs for campaigns include salaries for campaigners, operations and maintenance of action equipment. Campaign costs also include contributions to Greenpeace Russia and to Greenpeace International. Fundraising expenditure includes salaries to staff, costs for recruiting new supporters and other costs to maintain and upgrade our supporter income. Administration costs include staff and system costs for supporting the organisation. Indirect cost such as office rent and other cost for running the offices is together with administration and depreciation distributed over campaigns, fundraising and administration on a head count basis.

Tax Greenpeace applies the Swedish Accounting Standards Board guidelines concerning reporting of income tax, BFNAR 2001:1. Total tax consists of current tax and deferred tax. Current tax is tax which should be paid or received concerning the current fiscal year. Included in current taxes are also adjustments of current tax from previous periods. Deferred tax is calculated according to the balance sheet method considering temporary differences between accounting and tax regulations on assets and liabilities. Intangible Assets The costs for developing a new supporter database have been capitalized. Depreciation started June 2007. Depreciation will be linear over ten years, the estimated lifetime. Tangible Assets Tangible Assets are valued at purchase price and depreciated evenly over the expected useful lifetime, a period of three years for computers and office equipment, and three to five years for furniture, cars, boats and other action equipment. Provisions for Legal Disputes A provision for legal disputes is made in accordance with the Swedish Financial Accounting Standards Council, RR 16. Liabilities, including legal disputes, are provided for in full when the amount can be assessed with reasonable certainty.

24

NOTES X ‘000 SEK

2012

2011

1 INCOME

X ‘000 SEK

2012

2011

Staff Costs per Country

Income

Sweden

19 813

17 975

Supporter Contributions

128 756

119 646

Denmark

11 382

10 817

Ear marked Russia Support

2 598

1 900

Norway

4 305

3 811

Legacies 239

1 400

Finland

4 572

4 741

0

Total

40 072

37 344

Contribution PostcodeLottery

22 000

Contribution

1 586

0

155 179

122 946

Income per Country

The ED has six months of notification, no special severance pay. Greenpeace has no items on the balance sheet referring to pension commitments.

Sweden

118 086

86 483

Denmark

20 462

19 840

Men / Women

Men / Women

Finland

15 171

15 765

Senior Management Team

2 / 3

3/2

Norway

1 460

859

Board of Directors

3 / 3

3/3

155 179

122 946

Greenpeace Board and SMT

4 DEPRECIATION 2 FEES AND CHARGES AUDIT FIRMS

Depreciation according to plan on:

Öhrlings PricewaterhouseCoopers

Capitalized Expenditure

Audit work

199

235

Development Supporter Database

-539

Other Assignments

6

11

Furniture & Office Machines

-798

-718

246

Action Equipment

-299

-341

205

Rebuilding office

3 STAFF

-539

-280

-115

-1.917

-1 713

Average Number of Employees

Men / Women

Men / Women

Sweden

18 / 17

18 / 16

Denmark

13 / 6

13 / 7

Interest Income

463

546

Norway

5 / 2

5/1

Exchange Rate Gains on Fixed Assets

442

295

Finland

4 / 6

5/5

Return on Current Investments

3

40 / 31

41 / 29

The number is calculated as fulltime and fullyear employements for fixed positions. Greenpeace is dependent on the many devoted volunteers who support the organisation with their time and passion.

5 INTEREST INCOME AND SIMILAR ITEMS

908

5 846

6 INTEREST COSTS AND SIMILAR ITEMS Interest cost on short term loan

-2

-7

Salary and Remuneration

Exchange rate losses

-723

.-409

Neither members of the board, nor voting members receive remuneration for their normal ongoing work.

-725

-416

7 TAXES

Salary and Remuneration Executive Director

965

997

This Years Taxes

-122

-143

Employees

30 905

28 705

Current Tax

-122

-143

Total

31 870

29 702

8 INTANGIBLE ASSETS Capitalized Costs for Development of Supporter Database

Pension costs Excutive Director

101

104

Opening Balance Purchase Value

5 393

Employees

2 720

2 535

Purchases during the Year

-

-

Total

2 822

2 639

Closing Balance Purchase Value

5 393

5 393

Opening Balance Amortisation

-2 427

-1 887

Other Social Charges Executive Director

9

8

Employees

5 372

4 995

Total

5 381

5 003

TOTAL STAFF COSTS

40 072

37 344

5 393

Amortisation -539 -539 Closing Balance Amortisation

-2 966

-2 427

NET BOOK VALUE

2 427

2 966

25

X ‘000 SEK

2012

2011

X ‘000 SEK

2012

9 TANGIBLE ASSETS

12 PREPAID EXPENDITURE & ACCRUED INCOME

Furniture & Office Machines

Prepaid Rent Premises

707

2011

689

Opening Balance Purchase Value

8 734

7 727

Accrued Legacy Income

-

11

Purchases during the year

930

1 007

Other Prepaid Expenditure

732

1 015

Closing Balance Purchase Value

9 664

8 734

1 439

1 715

Opening Balance Depreciation

-6 999

-6 281

Depreciation during the Year

-798

-718

Closing Balance Depreciation

-7 797

-6 999

NET BOOK VALUE

1 867

1 735

13 PROVISION FOR LEGAL DISPUTES In the closing balance a provision of 633 (765) is made for legal disputes.

14 PAYABLES GREENPEACE OFFICES

Action Equipment

Greenpeace Germany

17

Greenpeace Switzerland

17

91 -

Greenpeace United Kingdom

86

113

Opening Balance Purchase Value

4 642

4 558

Greenpeace Netherlands

-

36

Purchases during the Year

415

84

Greenpeace Poland CEE

8

-

Closing Balance Purchase Value

5 057

4 642

Greenpaece Hungary

8

-

Greenpeace Australia

-

33

Greenpeace Canada

435

0

Opening Balance Depreciation

-4 173

-3 832

Depreciation during the Year

-299

-341

Closing Balance Depreciation

-4 473

-4 173

NET BOOK VALUE

584

Greenpeace European Unit

- 46

Greenpeace International

5 096

6 591

5 668

6 909

468

15 OTHER SHORT TERM LIABILITIES Improvements of rented Premises Opening Balance Purchase Value

596

Staff liabibilities

49

76

546

Withholding taxes, social charges

2 094

1 412

Purchases during the Year

194

50

Repayable part Special project PkL

4 414

-

Closing Balance Purchase Value

789

596

6 557

1 488

Opening Balance Depreciation

-221

-106

Depreciation during the Year

-280

-115

Closing Balance Depreciation

-501

-221

Holiday Pay

6 644

5 769

Social Charges

290

219

Accrued Pension

15

98

Other Accrued Expenses

782

308

7 730

6 394

NET BOOK VALUE

288

375

10 CURRENT INVESTMENTS Shares Windmill Denmark Other Shares

48

48

1

1

49

49

Greenpeace Nordic has a few shares in forest and oil companies in order to get access to information. Greenpeace Nordic also has shares in a Danish wind mill coopertive.

11 RECEIVABLES GREENPEACE OFFICES Greenpeace China

294

Greenpeace Poland

-

177 2

Greenpeace France

-

15

Greenpeace Spain

-

1

Greenpeace Mediterranean

-

3

Greenpeace Cananda

-

1

Greenpeace Belgium

4

6

Greenpeace South East Asia

23

-

Greenpeace Austria

2

-

Foundation Greenpeace 45

368

205

16 ACCRUED EXPENSES

17 PLEDGED ASSETS Blocked Bank Accounts

201

201

201

201

26

ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Greenpeace Nordic is committed to ensuring that the environmental footprint of the organisation is kept as small as possible at all times; we have in place policies for green offices, travel, food and IT procurement. We strive to secure the best electricity suppliers with the lowest CO2 emissions and, where possible, our offices source their energy from 100% renewable energy. Office heating in three of four of Greenpeace Nordic offices is calculated as a share of the total heating for the building, which means that efforts to save energy are not necessarily reflected in the total consumption of the building. Greenpeace Nordic’s CO2 emissions for 2012 totaled 152 metric tons, which is 67 metric tons less than recorded in 2011. This decrease is due to stricter rules surrounding staff travel and improved video conferencing facilities and software. We continue our efficiency efforts to reduce our CO2 emissions; whilst increasing the size of our activities in 2012 by 27% (total expenditure), we managed to decrease our emissions by 31%. To ensure further improvements, we are implementing additional measures and aim to include more environmental Key Performance Indicators in the 2013 Annual Report.

GREENPEACE NORDIC CO2 EMISSIONS TOTAL EMISSIONS IN METRIC TONS

2012

2011

Scope 1 Emissions for fuel consumption of Greenpeace vehicles, ships and boats

17,6

20,3

Total Scope 1

17,6

20,3

Scope 2 Emissions for office electricity

0,8

1,5

Emissions for heating

28,4

17,8

Total Scope 2

29,1

19,3

Scope 3 Emissions for business travel

76,1

Emissions for paper consumption

29,4

148,7 31,2

Total Scope 3

105,5

179,9

TOTAL CO 2 EMISSIONS 152,2 219,5 The emissions methodology, emission factors and guidelines are taken from the Greenhouse Gas Protocol and from our relevant suppliers in the Nordic region.

27

The crew of the Greenpeace ship MY Arctic Sunrise construct a ‘heart, with the flags of the 193 country members of the United Nations on an ice floe north of the Arctic Circle. The ‘heart’ of flags is suspended by wires a few centimetres from the ice surface and symbolises an emotional appeal for united global action to protect the Arctic. © Daniel Beltra / Greenpeace

28

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Stora Robertsgatan 20–22 A 00171 Helsinki Tel 09 698 63 17 www.greenpeace.fi

PB 6803, St Olavspl 0130 Oslo Tel 22 20 83 79 www.greenpeace.no

Box 151 64 104 65 Stockholm Tel 08 702 70 70 www.greenpeace.se


Greenpeace Annual Report 2012 Nordic