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Lesson 4: The Performance Management Process

SMART Standards

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Participant Guide

Learning Points: • Performance Standards should be written as SMART goals that are specific to a given task and written according to the job requirements. o Specific — The performance standard should be stated as simply, concisely, and explicitly as possible. This answers questions such as: how much, for whom, and for what? o Measurable — What is used to determine success in achieving the performance standard. Writing measurable performance standards allows for a clearer, more objective evaluation. o Aligned — How the employee’s work fits into the organization’s goals and priorities. The organization’s mission and function statement and other strategic and project planning documents provide the basis and context for the work and its relationship to the greater DoD mission. Establishing the “line of sight” is important because it underscores the importance of duties and how they support the organization. o Realistic/Relevant — “Realistic” means that the achievement of a job objective is something an employee or team can reasonably be expected to do to support a work-unit goal. The job objective is achievable with the resources and personnel available and within the time available. “Relevant” means that the job objective is important to the employee and the organization. o Time-based — Where applicable, performance standards should outline specific time frames for the relevant performance appraisal period. Performance standards should not be written to September 2011

Performance Management for HR Practitioners

Performance Management for HR Practitioners Participant Guide  

Performance Management for HR Practitioners Participant Guide

Performance Management for HR Practitioners Participant Guide  

Performance Management for HR Practitioners Participant Guide