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Portfolio of design work by Dona McCullagh

Design work undertaken between 2009 and 2013 in the role of Personal and Research Assistant to Professor Jeremy Begbie Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts at Duke Divinity School, North Carolina, USA


Duke Initiatives in

THEOLOGY & THE ARTS

Logo Development


A Concert For

TWO PIANOS Tuesday August 28, 2012 • Admission Free

Cordelia Williams

“Presto” from Ravel, piano concerto Messiaen, Visions de L’Amen

Jeremy S. Begbie

7pm, Goodson Chapel, Duke Divinity School With an exhibition of photography by members of the School, inspired by the music Followed by a Dessert Reception, Refectory Terrace

Concert Poster US letter size


Gethsemane: Pressure and Presence A Sequence of Music and Poetry

In this meditative Gethsemane sequence we move from the Son’s prayer to the Father (‘let me go there’), through psalms of loss and exile, through poems exposing the pressure and presence of Gethsemane, through James MacMillan’s evocation of Love’s own journey through worlds of pain and passion, to reach at last the silence of the cross. Piecing together ‘our broken knowledge and our scattered arts’, we trace God’s journey into our places of pain and exile, and hear in music and poetry the echoes of his presence and promise.


Souvenir Concert Programme 16pp, A4 size, printrun 200


Illuminating Messiaen Photographic responses to the seven movements of Visions de l ’Amen


Souvenir Concert and ExhibitionProgramme 16pp, A4 size, printrun 300


MIDDLE MAN

Variations on the

Servant Songs

Micheal O’Siadhail


Souvenir Concert Programme 8pp, A4 size, printrun 200


Illuminating Messiaen

Photographic responses to the seven movements of Visions de l ’Amen Throughout his composing life, Olivier Messiaen thought in highly visual terms – he wanted his music to dazzle and overwhelm us like glorious light through stained glass windows.

At 8.00pm tonight, Olivier Messiaen’s stunning work for two pianos, Visions de l’Amen, will be performed in King’s College Chapel. Ahead of the concert, members of Duke Divinity School, North Carolina, were invited to submit photographs inspired by the music, whose movements trace seven biblical themes, from the “Amen of Creation” to the “Amen of the Consummation”.

Illuminating Messiaen is a project of Duke Initiatives in Theology and

the Arts, and evolved from a partnership between Duke Divinity School and the 2012 Easter at King’s fesitval of services and concerts. This exhibition features the winning photograph in each of seven competition categories, corresponding to the seven movements of the piece. The winning photograph overall (shown above) was by Kate Roberts. We invite you to discover this evening’s music through the camera’s lens, even as the music itself illuminates these exceptional photographs.

Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts and Duke Divinity School gratefully acknowledge the sponsorship of The Duke-Semans Fine Arts Foundation and the generous philanthropy of David Crabtree whose support has made this project possible.


Photography Exhibition Board Designs


Opening reception conversation & mus ic with frien

To celebrate the beginning

ds Holy Week in The MacMillan Cambridge Sund ay April 1st Consultation

of the 2012

Monday 2nd to Wednesday 4th April 1-7, 2012

Duke-Cambridge Collabor ation

(mornings only)

you are warmly invited to a welcome reception on the Sunday evening More details to follow

J. S. Bach Running alongside the public events of f Passion week will be private ConsultationRumours o pm St Matthewthemeetings Passion April, 5.30 in preparation for Duke’s nesday 4 commissioning of a new St Luke Passion Wed fromrd Scottish composer James MacMillan.

Tuesday 3 April 5.30pm King’s College Chapel

th

ge-Duke Voices The Cambrid ductor Toby Young, con reader hail, Micheal O’Siad

Delegates who met in September 2011 gs and music will continue conversations with the poetry, readin A sequence of ring Servant composer, who will be with us in strange and stir setting of the on ed bas Thursday, the imate Maundy 7.00pm int Cambridge for three days. in , Songs of Isaiah chapel. Clare College James Gilchrist, Evangelist They will be joined by Irish poet e four poems David Wilson Johnson, Christus lud inc l British pianist, composer and broadcaster Micheal O’Siadhail. al The evening wil sh poet Miche Iri David Owen Norris will give a pre-concert ed ish gu by distin missioned for King’s College Choir comde introduction to hai Messiaen’s Visions ecially esp l, iad et. O’S by the po Academy of Ancient Music d rea l’Amen. Photography displayed indthe the occasion an Stephen Cleobury, conductor “Illuminating Messiaen” exhibition iversity Du will be drawn into sin theger discussion. s from ke Un Begbie Featuring by Jeremy ritten setting and a newly-w

Illuminating Messiaen

During the Fall Semester Duke Divinity students, ros uores nost staff and alumni have been to lang submit a, Victoria s Victoriinvited laid out our skie whose lovefrom O you photographs that draw their inspiration Begbie, st, Nunc Dimittis one of the seven movements of Hol Olivier Messiaen’s mus eum ualdo, Ecce vidi d Ges wor ’ blin vibrant work for two pianos,He which said abemum never will itual, performed laterSpir in the evening by c Dimittis Tavener, Nun Cordelia Williams and Jeremy Begbie.

Winning photographs will be on exhibition for public viewing during Holy Week and will provide the backdrop during the concert itself.

Powerpoint Event Promotion

o pianos Music for tway 8.00pm

Distributed electronically by pdf

ursd Maundy Th ge Chapel King’s Colle ssiaen Bach and Me

le Prelude James MacMillan J S Bach Chora ch verlangen” erzlich tut mi Seven Last “HWords

ions de l’Amen Good Friday 7.30pm Messiaen Vis ms piano King’s College Chapel Cordelia Willia piano Jeremy Begbie

nd world war King’s College Choir midst of the seco spectacular Written in the Britten Sinfonia nce, Messiaen’s most in occupied Fra os is one of his pian two for ge en Stephen Cleobury, conductor Visions de l’Am sing a huge ran

es, encompas ity. well known piec pianistic virtuos of emotion and “Widely admired as one of MacMillan’s finest nd, orama in sou pan t vas a ts achievements, his Seven Last WordsMe promises an ion, ssiaen pain to its re-creat absorbing and moving experience infrom concert, for ld’s creation the wor ditation me nd fou centre a pro performers and audience alike. including at its in Gethsemane. on Jesus’ agony This is rightly regarded as MacMillan’s masterpiece. MacMillan’s conviction in this music, stemming from his deep faith, is passionately obvious and could not leave anyone unmoved by this experience. ...There are so many extraordinary and powerful effects in this work that it is invidious to single any out, but the final sighs from the violins at the end of the orchestral postlude with which the work ends actually bring to life the last breaths of the dying Christ.”

Celebrating

Holy Week

ge Chapel King’s Colle Services in Choir King’s College ry, conductor Stephen Cleobu

. beyond Good Friday.. And sd Maundy Thur

Holy Saturday

ay

g Eucharist and 5.30pm Sun Altar ipping of the Elgar The Apos Strtles

hard Hays

Chap er: Dean Ric achel 7.00pm in King’sPre

Mark Stone, St Peter ms, Christ Willia Fr RoderickGo od iday David Wilson Johnson, Judas munion and om m 10.30a Ante-C Cross eration of the Venus Philharmonia Chor Duke University with guest singers from l Evensong ora Ch 5.00pm BBC Concert Orchestra ctor Stephen Cleobury, condu

Easter Sunday 10.30am 3.30pm

Join u s!

Sung Eucharist Festal Evensong

Easter Monday

el Organ recital in King’s Chap (details to be announced)


Lloyd Morgan

McDermott

Michael Mofidian

James MacMillan

Welcome to Holy Week 2012

Banquet Place Cards

Thank you

Inside: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Dona McCullagh

Thank you

Your concert tickets Your schedule for the week An outline of the Consultation schedule Directions to the venues (referred to on your schedule) Information on what to do and see in Cambridge

James Robinson

Joelle Event Participant Gift Tags Hathaway

James MacMillan

Wednesday 4th April, 2012

(above) Event Welcome Packs

David Torrance (below) Event Directions Boards

Duke- Cambridge Collaboration Dinner

(right) Banquet Seating Plan

Thank you

Ellen Davis

James Cormack

Dan Smith James Robinson

Matthew Sandy

Marc Banka

Sarah Chambre

Thank you

Kay Johnson

Michael Mofidian

Caroline Banka

Chris Pilgrim

FIREPLACE

Caroline Banka

Ray Barfield

Ginny Weston

Paul Weston

Walker Robinson

Jessi Pywell

Sue Williams Barbara Smith Ellen Davis Deborah Ford

Richard Hays Ann Holt

Micheal O’Siadhail

Alan Torrance

Dona McCullagh Beth Parsons

Peter Hawkins Sarah Coakley Neil Williams James MacMillan Charles Smith David Ford Richard Hays Judy Hays Jeremy Begbie David Crabtree Chris Packman

David Torrance Joelle Hathaway

Toby Young

Felicity McDermott

Nate Jones

Richard Lloyd Morgan

Jane G. Brown

Jerry Zinn

Wesley F. Brown

Pilar Timane

Duke-Cambridge Collaboration

Thank you

Douglas Zinn James Cormack

Ray Barfield

Kate Roberts

Tim Keeler

Elizabeth Linnartz

Abi Gostick

Alex Berry

Cordelia Williams

David Ford

ENTRANCE

Thank you


ILLUMINATING MESSIAEN

VISIONS DE L’AMEN IN SEVEN MOVEMENTS FOR TWO PIANOS

Photography Contest and Exhibition • Call for submissions: Duke Divinity School students, faculty, staff, alumni and their immediate families are invited to submit up to 7 photos per person (1 per category) as a photographic response to the spectacular music of Olivier Messiaen’s Visions de l’Amen

7 winning photographs will be exhibited in the Great Hall of King’s College, Cambridge

• Grand prize: round trip to Cambridge, England for Holy Week 2012 (value $1900) to be present at the culminating concert and exhibition in King’s College Submission deadline: January 12, 2012. Submission guidelines and full information from joelle.hathaway@gmail.com or: www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts and the Divinity School gratefully acknowledge the sponsorship of The Duke-Semans Fine Arts Foundation and the generous philanthropy of David Crabtree whose support has made this project possible.

Photography Competition Poster US ledger size


ILLUMINATING MESSIAEN Duke Divinity School students, faculty, staff, alumni and their immediate families are invited to submit digital photographs for the “Illuminating Messiaen” DITA Photography Contest and Exhibition.

The winning photographs will be exhibited in the Great Hall of King’s College, Cambridge

Seven winners will have their photograph exhibited in the Great Hall of King’s College, Cambridge during a Maundy Thursday performance of Messiaen’s Visions de l’Amen. One Grand Prize winner will be awarded a trip to Cambridge, England for Holy Week 2012 (total prize value $1900). More details over... Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts and the Divinity School gratefully acknowledge the sponsorship of The Duke-Semans Fine Arts Foundation and the generous philanthropy of David Crabtree whose support has made this project possible.

The “Theme”... ... is Visions de l’Amen, Olivier Messiaen’s spectacular work for two pianos, comprising seven movements, from the “Amen of Creation” to the “Amen of the Consummation.” A short piece of text drawing out the theological themes in each is available on the DITA website or from Joelle Hathaway. Entrants are invited to listen to a recording of the work (available in the DDS library) and to offer a response to both text and music in the medium of photography.

VISIONS DE L’AMEN IN SEVEN MOVEMENTS FOR TWO PIANOS Photography Contest and Exhibition

Other Key Dates Judging will take place during January and February 2012. Winning photographs will be exhibited at a pre-concert exhibition in the Great Hall of King’s College, Cambridge on the evening of Thursday April 4, 2012.

Prizes

The Grand Prize winner will be awarded an economy round trip air fare to the UK, plus allowances for meal, accommodations and How many photographs can one person submit? transportation, and tickets to the main “Easter at King’s” concerts One photograph per person may be submitted in each of the seven during Holy Week, including the Maundy Thursday concert and categories. You do not need to submit photographs in all categories. exhibition (total prize value of $1900). Winners of each of the seven categories will be awarded gift tokens to the value of $100.

Submission Deadline

Contact

All entries must be submitted by 2pm on Tuesday January 12, : www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita 2012. Full details including submission requirements and forms areDetails For full details visit www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita available on the DITA website, or from Joelle Hathaway. or email Joelle Hathaway at joelle.hathaway@gmail.com

Photography Competition Postcard Colour Front and Reverse

Competition Promotion For use in e-newsletter


Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts

www.divinity.duke.edu/programs/dita

Promotional Display Printed on foamcore board DUKE INITIATIVES IN THEOLOGY AND THE ARTS Promoting the dynamic interplay of the arts and theology We offer: Contact:

A doctoral degree (Th.D.) with a concentration in theology and the arts New master degrees for those seeking a Christian perspective on their artistic calling

Dr. Jeremy Begbie Director, DITA Duke University Divinity School Box 90968 Durham, N.C. 27708 jeremy.begbie@duke.edu

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Duke Divinity School, Duke University www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita

Opportunities to work with world-class faculty within a vibrant research university and a school passionately committed to the arts Lectures, seminars, and workshops led by Duke faculty as well as celebrated artists, musicians, poets, and academics from the United States and abroad


he went ashore he saw them, “a prophet is not without honor except had compassion on them in his hometown and in his own household.” 58 15 and he did not do many mighty works there, Now when it was even because of their www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita unbelief. to him and said, “this Details: the day is now over; send into the villages and bu 16 But Jesus said, “they give them something to Lecture t Public that time herodwith the Makoto tetrarch Fujimura “we have only five loa 18 and he said, “Bring th heard about the fame the of Jesus, “Illuminating Gospels 2 and he said his servants, with theto Tears of “this Christ”he ordered the crowds t is John the Baptist. he has been and taking the five loav 5:30pm-7:00pm OO16 Westbrook raised from the dead; that is why these miracu­ looked up to heaven an 3 Public Lecture and BaginLunch For herod lous powers are Brown at work him.”discussion he broke the loaves and Makoto Fujimura will speak about his experience of 9/11 as an artist whose had seized John and bound him and put him in ples, and the disciples ga New York City home and studio is located a few blocks from Ground Zero. 20 and they all ate and w prison for the sake Alumni of herodias, his brother 12:20pm-1:20pm Memorial Common Room took up twelve baskets f Philip’s wife,1 4 because John had been saying to him, “It is not lawful for you to have her.” 5 and left over. 21 and those w though he wanted to put him to death, he thousand men, besides w Theology Event Poster feared the people, because they heldArt himand to be a 22 Immediately he m prophet. 6 But when herod’s birthday came, the US ledger size

14


&

Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts Duke University Department of Music

present

The Holy Sonnets of John Donne by Benjamin Britten In celebration of the installation of Dr. Hays as the twelfth dean of Duke Divinity School

Elizabeth Linnartz soprano Jeremy Begbie piano

7.30 p.m.

O might those Sighes and Te

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Since she whom I loved

Batter my Heart

With an introduction by Richard B. Hays

ADMISSION FREE

Death, be

Goodson Chapel, Duke Divinity School West Campus, Duke University

More details: www.divinity.duke.edu/programs/dita

Music, Literature and Theology Event Poster US letter size


Duke Chapel presents

Music and Theology Event Poster US ledger size


Engaging Eliot Four Quartets Presented by

Duke Initiatives in

THEOLOGY & THE ARTS

January 28 – February 9, 2013 An artistic celebration of T. S. Eliot

in

word, color and sound

Jeremy Begbie Makoto Fujimura Bruce Herman Christopher Theofanidis

You are invited to join Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts as we engage T. S. Eliot’s acclaimed poem Four Quartets through a multi-faceted exploration of art and faith. Events include: Opening Lecture and Performance Duke Chapel, Jan 28, 2013 at 7:30 pm

Makoto Fujimura, Bruce Herman, and Christopher Theofanidis will present their collaborative visual and musical work in celebration of the opening of the largest exhibition ever mounted in Duke Chapel – QU4RTETS (open to public visitors Jan 28 – Feb 9). Includes a performance by the Ciompi Quartet joined by DITA director Jeremy Begbie.

Colloquium on Eliot, Art & Faith

Duke Divinity School room 0016W, Jan 29, 2013 at 7:30 pm The artists will be joined by scholars Richard Hays, Ellen Davis, Michael Moses, and Gennifer Weisenfeld for an academic seminar focusing on the way in which Eliot’s poetic vision can be explored in word, color and sound.

All events are free to attend – please visit our website to register and for further details: www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita

Engaging Eliot is sponsored by Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts and Duke Divinity School, and made possible in part by the Duke Arts Council, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke Chapel, and John and Bobbi Augustine.

Theology and the Arts Event Postcard Colour Front and Reverse Greyscale

Event Web Logo


Engaging Eliot Four Quartets

word, color and sound in

January 28 – February 9, 2013 An artistic celebration of T. S. Eliot’s acclaimed poem

Qu4rtets Exhibition Paintings by Makoto Fujimura & Bruce Herman Duke Chapel Transepts, Jan 28-Feb 9, 2013; free entry 8am-10pm daily

Opening Lecture & Performance New piano quintet by Christopher Theofanidis

Herman

Fujimura

performed by the Ciompi Quartet with Jeremy Begbie Duke Chapel, Monday Jan 28, 2013 at 7:30 pm; free registration online Theofanidis

Colloquium on Eliot, Art & Faith Chaired by Ellen Davis, with Richard Hays, Gennifer Weisenfeld, and Michael Moses

Duke Divinity School room 0016W, Jan 29 at 7:30 pm; free registration

Moses

Weisenfeld

Brown Bag Discussion with Fujimura & Herman Duke Divinity School room 0015W, Tuesday Jan 29 at 12:20 - 1:20 pm Registration not required; faculty and students only please

Visit the DITA website for full event details and to register:

The Ciompi Quartet

www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita Engaging Eliot is sponsored by Duke Initiatives in Theology & the Arts and Duke Divinity School, and made possible in part by the Duke Arts Council, John Hope Franklin Center, and Duke Chapel.

Duke Initiatives in

THEOLOGY & THE ARTS

Theology and the Arts Event Poster US ledger size


Front cover colour

Engaging Eliot Four Quartets

Duke Initiatives in

THEOLOGY & THE ARTS

in

word, color and sound

Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts

is proud to present “Engaging Eliot: Four Quartets in word, color and sound,” a multi-faceted celebration of the interaction of art and faith. The centerpiece of this enterprise is a project (QU4RTETS) inspired by T. S. Eliot’s war-time masterpiece, involving artists Makoto Fujimura and Bruce Herman, and the composer Christopher Theofanidis.

Theology and the Arts Concert Programme 12pp, US half ledger size


Front cover colour

Engaging Eliot Four Quartets

Duke Initiatives in

THEOLOGY & THE ARTS

in

word, color and sound

Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts

is proud to present “Engaging Eliot: Four Quartets in word, color and sound,” a multi-faceted celebration of the interaction of art and faith. The centerpiece of this enterprise is a project (QU4RTETS) inspired by T. S. Eliot’s war-time masterpiece, involving artists Makoto Fujimura and Bruce Herman, and the composer Christopher Theofanidis.

The Qu4rtets Project is a unique venture begun in 2010, in which two painters – Mako Fujimura and Bruce Herman – and the composer Christopher Theofanidis, collaborated to forge artistic responses to Eliot’s remarkable Four Quartets. The result of this joint immersion in poetry is a touring exhibition of paintings, accompanied by Theofanidis’ piece for string quartet and piano, At the Still Point.

The collaborators write: “We have attempted . . . to respond, not illustrate. Eliot’s concerns are our concerns, and in Four Quartets tradition is translated into a contemporary idiom – one that more than a half century has done nothing to superannuate.” In addition to Duke and Baylor Universities, the exhibition and the Quintet will travel to Gordon College, Massachusetts, and other institutions around the globe.

Brown-Bag Class Discussion

ENGAGING ELIOT: The Events Thanks to the generosity of our donors, all events are free of charge.

Tuesday, January 29 at 12:20 – 1:20 pm Duke Divinity School, Room 0015W Fujimura and Herman will discuss with students and faculty the potential of learning from works such as Four Quartets for future theological engagement with the arts. Students and faculty only, please. Registration not required.

Colloquium on Eliot, Art and Faith

Qu4rtets Exhibition Monday, January 28 – Saturday, February 9 8 am – 10 pm daily Duke Chapel Transepts Registration not required.

Opening Lectures & Performance Monday, January 28 at 7:30 pm

Duke Chapel

Makoto Fujimura and Bruce Herman will speak at length about the paintings mounted in Duke Chapel’s transepts. The composer Christopher Theofanidis will introduce his piano quintet At the Still Point, which will be performed by the Ciompi Quartet with Jeremy Begbie. Dean of Duke Divinity School, Richard Hays, and Professor Ellen Davis will read short extracts from Four Quartets. Open to the public. Free registration strongly recommended.

ENGAGING ELIOT: The Artists Makoto Fujimura An internationally-renowned Japanese-American artist, Makoto Fujimura combines ancient traditional Japanese Nihonga with Western techniques, creating an art form that is unique, beautiful and compelling.

Fujimura served on the National Council on the Arts from 2003–2009, and his work is exhibited at galleries around the world, including the Dillon Gallery in New York, Sato Museum in Tokyo, the Contemporary Museum of Tokyo, Tokyo National University of Fine Arts Museum, Gallery Exit and Oxford House at Taikoo Place in Hong Kong, and Vienna’s Belvedere Museum. Much in demand as a speaker and lecturer, Fujimura is also the founder of the International Arts Movement and the Fujimura Institute.

Bruce Herman

Bruce Herman is an artist whose work has been collected and exhibited around the globe, including the Vatican Museum of Modern Religious Art in Rome; The Cincinnati Museum of Fine Arts; DeCordova Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts; and the Hammer Museum, Grunwald Print Collection, Los Angeles.

Herman currently holds the Lothlórien Distinguished Chair as a professor of art at Gordon College, Massachusetts and has had work published in numerous books, journals, and popular magazines.

Tuesday, January 29 at 7:30 pm Duke Divinity School, Room 0016W Panel presentations on the significance and potential of Four Quartets for the intersection of art and faith will be followed by open discussion. Chair:

Ellen Davis, Amos Ragan Kearns Distinguished Professor of Bible and Practical Theology

Panelists: Gennifer Weisenfeld, Associate Professor,

Department of Art, Art History and Visual Studies Michael Valdez Moses, Associate Professor, Department of English Richard Hays, Dean of Duke Divinity School, and George Washington Ivey Professor of New Testament

Open to the public. Free registration strongly recommended.

He has been the recipient of the Masterprize, the Rome Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Tanglewood Fellowship, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Charles Ives Fellowship. Theofanidis is currently on the faculty of Yale University and has taught at the Peabody Conservatory and the Juilliard School.

Ciompi Quartet

The Ciompi Quartet was founded at Duke University in 1965 by the renowned Italian violinist Giorgio Ciompi. All its members are professors at Duke and play a leading role in its cultural life, in addition to traveling widely throughout the year for performances. In a career that includes many hundreds of concerts and spans five continents, the Ciompi Quartet has developed a reputation for performances of real intelligence and musical sophistication, and for a warm, unified sound that is enhanced by each player’s strong individual voice.

Jeremy Begbie

Jeremy Begbie is the inaugural holder of the Thomas A. Langford Research Professorship in Theology at Duke Divinity School and founding Director of Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts. He previously taught in the Universities of Cambridge and St Andrews.

A professionally trained and active musician, Begbie is the author of numerous books and articles, including Resounding Truth: Christian Wisdom in the World of Music. He teaches systematic theology, and specializes in the interface between theology and the arts, particularly music.

Christopher Theofanidis

Christopher Theofanidis is an American composer whose works have been performed by leading orchestras from around the world, including the London Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Moscow Soloists, and many others. His work, Rainbow Body, which is loosely based on a melodic fragment of Hildegard of Bingen, is one of the most performed orchestral works of the past decade.

“life” of the image; in my work, it is the relationship of the surface music to the background pulse and tempo of each of the movements, which like Bruce and Mako’s grid, is constantly being dismantled as the work progresses.

In the first movement of At the Still Point, the varied refrain in Eliot’s work, “In my beginning is my end,” sets the large structural ideas into play. The musical figure which inaugurates the piece becomes a kind of “Ur-pattern” for the work – a generative shape permeating all of the subsequent material. It is a group of four notes: a single note followed by a lower note, then reversed lower–upper. To me, this figure has implicit in it already a kind of balance, and evocation of a central paradox of Eliot’s poem: And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time.

I found a strong artistic “connection with Bruce and Mako’s decaying sense of ‘the grid’

Detail, QU4RTETS No.1 (Spring), © Bruce Herman

The melodic idea that grows organically out of this sounds like Gregorian chant. And since Gregorian chant has an implicit sense of being “outside” of time (it is not locked to a grid of pulse, but sung freely), it also the free-ing agent to take us outside of our local sense of time. This melody also contains the intervals that are essential to both the melodic and harmonic fabric of the entire piece, a third and a second. These contours and shapes are then infringed upon by dismantling, temporal actors: the first is a dramatically widening vibrato, which seems to literally disrupt the pitch stability of the materials – this material appears as a kind of existential threat to what we feel we know about the harmonic and melodic language of the work; the second is a confrontation of pulse, putting a different speed of line on top of another one to challenge our understanding of the flow of time – first heard in the chant like melody, but then taking many other forms. In some small way, these actors for me represented opposites to the basic material – responding to the way opposites seem to confront and collide with each other in the Eliot. Over the course of the four movements, another metaphor guided my thinking as well – the idea of wave–particle duality in physics, and it was this that led me to try and reconcile all these opposing elements. In physics, that concept is about the paradox that light can act as both a particle and a wave – states which seem to be not possible by the same particle.

To this end, in the music, the disrupting forces of the widening vibrato and the layering of speed play the essential role in actually redeeming their own disruptive natures. By the fourth movement, the vibrato softens to become a slowed-down version of itself: pulsation without pitch variance – a kind of breathing. This is also the gradual effect of the layering of speeds: a freed pulse. Hopefully, the end result of these transformations reveal a kind of unity of purpose. The piece lasts approximately 30 minutes. Christopher Theofanidis

ENGAGING ELIOT: The Poetry T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets

Four Quartets is a set of four poems by T. S. Eliot (1888–1965), originally written and published separately over six years from 1936, when the first poem, “Burnt Norton,” appeared in an early collection of Eliot’s works. The remaining three poems were written during the trauma of the Second World War. All four were first published together as a set in 1943. The poetry received a lukewarm reception from some literary critics who compared it to his earlier masterpiece, The Waste Land. Some found its appeal to biblical and Christian tradition (especially Dante, St John of the Cross and Julian of Norwich) too overt. Yet more than three-quarters of a century later, the work is regarded as a major milestone in English literature, as fresh in our own day as Eliot’s.

At the very least, Eliot offers a compelling exploration of our immersion in time and history, and of the quest for integrity and wholeness in relation to the Creator of time who became incarnate in Jesus Christ. The titles of the four sections which make up the

ENGAGING ELIOT: The Colloquium Participants

For further reading on Four Quartets, see:

Cornelia Cook, “Fire and Spirit: Scripture’s Shaping Presence in T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets,“ Literature and Theology, 15, 1 (March 2001): 85–101 John Xiros Cooper, T. S. Eliot and the Ideology of Four Quartets (Cambridge University Press, 1995) Helen Gardner, The Composition of Four Quartets (Oxford University Press, 1978)

George Gopen, “The Music of T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets,” Ars Lyrica, 13 (Summer 2003): 29–75

Kenneth Kramer, Redeeming Time: T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets (Cowley Publications, 2007)

David Moody, “Four Quartets: Music, Word, Meaning and Value,” in A. David Moody (ed.), The Cambridge Campanion to T. S. Eliot (Cambridge University Press, 1994) Michael Valdez Moses, “Modernists as Critics,” in Peter Brooker et al. (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Modernisms (Oxford University Press, 2011) Barry Spurr, Anglo-Catholic in Religion: T. S. Eliot and Christianity (Lutterworth Press, 2010) Herman Servotte and Ethel Grene, Annotations to T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets (Universe Books, 2010)

Quartets are the names of places heavy with historical and theological overtones. Each poem is linked with one of the four elements: air, earth, water, and fire.

Many commentators regard the text as enacting a journey of sorts, albeit a complex and winding one, from the suggestive ruminations, tensions and paradoxes of “Burnt Norton” to the extraordinary evocation of redemptive purgation at the close of “Little Gidding.”

Christopher Theophanidis: At the Still Point For string quartet and piano (2012)

Richard B. Hays, Dean and the George Washington

Ivey Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School, is internationally recognized for his work on the letters of Paul and on New Testament ethics. His scholarly work has bridged the disciplines of biblical criticism and literary studies, exploring the innovative ways in which early Christian writers interpreted Israel’s Scripture. His book The Moral Vision of the New Testament: Community, Cross, New Creation was selected by Christianity Today as one of the 100 most important religious books of the twentieth century.

Gennifer Weisenfeld is Associate Professor and

Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University and the author of Mavo: Japanese Artists and the Avant-Garde, 1905–1931 and Imaging Disaster: Tokyo and the Visual Culture of Japan’s Great Earthquake of 1923. Her research interests include the impact of Japan’s modern sociopolitical transformations on artistic production and practice; the cultural formations of nation and empire building; Japanese modernism; and the visual culture of disaster.

Michael Valdez Moses is Associate Professor in

the English Department at Duke University, author of The Novel and the Globalization of Culture, and co-editor of the journal, Modernist Cultures. His main interests are in modern comparative literature (especially British, Irish and postcolonial), the history of film, and in the interdisciplinary study of literature, political philosophy, and economics.

Ellen F. Davis is Amos Ragan Kearns Professor of Bible

and Practical Theology at Duke Divinity School. The author of eight books and many articles, her research interests focus on how biblical interpretation bears on the life of faith communities and their response to urgent public issues, particularly the environmental crisis and interfaith relations.

Gratitude These events are made possible by the generous support of our sponsors, including the Council for the Arts, the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke Chapel, and John and Bobbi Augustine. At the Still Point was made possible by the Fujimura Institute through the generosity of Denise and Stephen Adams.

Our thanks are due to all the performers, artists, and speakers named in this program, as well as to their administrative staff, students, friends, and volunteers. We are especially grateful for the hospitality and courtesy shown by the Dean and staff of Duke Chapel, and for the constant support of the Dean, faculty, staff and students of Duke Divinity School.

Future Events Please join Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts for other events in the future. For full details of our activities, see: www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita

The next event is a public lecture to be given by James K. A. Smith of Calvin College, Michigan entitled “Beyond ‘Creativity’: Expanding the Intersection of Theology and the Imagination.” This is scheduled for the evening of March 5, 2013, in the Divinity School.

I. In my beginning is my end II. A condition of complete simplicity (costing not less than everything) III. Knowledge imposes a pattern IV. The world becomes stranger, the pattern more complicated

At the Still Point is part of a collaboration with the visual artists Bruce Herman and Makoto Fujimura, responding to T. S. Eliot’s great work, Four Quartets.

Each of us tried to pick up on the major themes of that magnificent set of poems and let them resonate in our work. One of the ideas that became meaningful to me was Eliot’s journey toward an understanding of (and even an ultimate harmony with) time and decay, found in his description of “the still point.” This movement toward reconciling the eternal with the transitory in his work became the foundation for the structure of my piece, a slow unfolding of the deeper meaning and relationships of the original, opening materials of the music. In writing At the Still Point, I found a strong artistic connection with Bruce and Mako’s decaying sense of “the grid” – a kind of representation of linear time. In both of their paintings, it appears in various states as a literal but only partially exposed background grid to the


SPRING Distinguished Lectures 2 0 1 0 in Theology and the Arts The arts and Christian faith in dialogue

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SPRING Distinguished Lectures 2 0 1 0 in Theology and the Arts The arts and Christian faith in dialogue

SPRING Distinguished Lectures 2 0 1 0 in Theology and the Arts Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts www.divinity.duke.edu/programs/dita

The arts and Christian faith in dialogue

Duke Initiatives in Theology and t www.divinity.duke.edu/programs

Thursday January 21, 2010

Thursday February 25, 2010

NICHOLAS WOLTERSTORFF

ROGER LUNDIN

Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale University

Clyde S. Kilby Professor of English, Wheaton College

“Through Beauty and the Aesthetic to Art in Life”

“Modern Literature and the Question of Belief”

5.30pm, Room 0014 Westbrook, Duke Divinity School

Brown Bag Lunch Discussion, 12:20-1:20 Room 0015 Westbrook: “Anglophone Philosophy of Religion Since 1960: A Conversation with Nicholas Wolterstorff”

5.30pm, Room 0016 Westbrook, Duke Divinity School


SPRING

Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts www.divinity.duke.edu/programs/dita

Lectures at 5.30pm, Room 0016 Westbrook, Duke Divinity School

2010

Distinguished Lectures in Theology and the Arts

Lectures at 5.30pm, Room 0014 Westbrook, Duke Divinity School

January 21, 2010 “Through Beauty and the Aesthetic to Art in Life” NICHOLAS WOLTERSTORFF

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Noah Porter Professor Emeritus of Philosophical Theology, Yale University

gh Beauty and the Aesthetic to Art in Life”

HOLAS WOLTERSTORFF

February 25, 2010

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“Modern Literature and the Question of Belief”

uary 25, 2010

ROGER LUNDIN

rn Literature and the Question of Belief”

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Clyde S. Kilby Professor of English, Wheaton College

March 18, 2010

Kilby Professor of English, College

“Early Visual Art as Patristic

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Visual Art as Patristic Theology”

ROBIN JENSEN

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Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts www.divinity.duke.edu/programs/dita

Lecture Series Publicity

SPRING Distinguished Lectures 2 0 1 0 in Theology and the Arts The arts and Christian faith in dialogue

Luce Chancellor’s Professor of the History of Christian Art and Worship, Vanderbilt University

Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts www.divinity.duke.edu/programs/dita

Thursday March 18, 2010

5.30pm, Room 0016 Westbrook, Duke Divinity School

ROBIN JENSEN Luce Chancellor’s Professor of the History of Christian Art and Worship, Vanderbilt University

“Early Visual Art as Patristic Theology” The Trinity, Christology, and the Economy of Salvation in Pictorial Form

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Distinguished Lecture

in Theology and the Arts

spring

2013

The arts and Christian faith in dialogue

Beyond “Creativity” Expanding the Intersection of Theology and the Imagination

James K. A. Smith Professor of Philosophy, Calvin College Tuesday, March 5 Public Lecture: 6:00pm – 7:30pm 0016 Westbrook Duke Divinity School

Brown Bag Lunch: Dr Smith offers an overview of his entire project on Cultural Liturgies

12:30pm – 1:20pm 0014 Westbrook Duke Divinity School

Over the past decade there has been an encouraging growth in the conversation between theology and the arts, often centered on the “imagination.” Often this is bound together with the theme of creativity, which tends to treat imagination as a largely romantic mode of expression. Drawing on the phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty, James K. A. Smith will articulate a philosophical account of the imagination that is less “romantic,” suggesting that this yields new frontiers for engagement between theology and the arts.

Visit the DITA website for further event details: www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita

Duke Initiatives in

THEOLOGY & THE ARTS

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Music, Modernity, and God Essays in Listening

also published by

oxford university press Theology of Transformation Faith, Freedom, and the Christian Act oliver davies A Theology of Higher Education Mike Higton Also available in paperback A Journey of Two Psalms The Reception of Psalms 1 and 2 in Jewish and Christian Tradition susan Gillingham

‘professor Begbie is now the foremost he both recapitulates his key insights and and music.this is Christian musical wisd of Western music through focused studie themes. it is also prophetic, hearing in this transformations and tragedies, and respon Begbie draws us into new theological pla meaning and alive with the spirit in disco DAVID FORD, regius professor of

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ROgER LuNDIN, Arth of faith and Learning

for an Oxford University Press publication

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sic at centre stage in the drama of late isciplinary range, it explores the feel of perience offers for unfolding theological m saint paul in the first century to Colin Music, Modernity, and God conducts a hristian thought, and it does so in a spirit in contemporary intellectual life. Begbie. Bravo!’

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Music, Moder nity, and God essays in Listening Jeremy BegBie

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Final proofs from the publisher


Duke Initiatives in

THEOLOGY & THE ARTS

The Word Made Fresh February 16-18, 2014

Renewing scriptural imagination through word, poetry and music Three days of public lecture-concerts, readings, and theological discussion, culminating in a final evening performance EVENTS AT: Duke Divinity School & Blacknall Presbyterian Church

Steve Bell

Singer & Song-writer Western Canadian Music Award winner

Malcolm Guite Poet, Singer, Song-writer and Theologian University of Cambridge

Theology and the Arts Event Postcard US trade size, front and reverse

Jeremy Begbie Theologian and Musician Duke Divinity School

Three friends gather to explore the possibilities of poetry and music, in compostion and performance, to make sense of the world, wrestle with Scripture, and reimagine Christian life. Three days of public lecture-concerts, readings, and theological discussion will culminate in a final evening performance.

Sunday, February 16 8:30 & 11 AM Worship at Blacknall Presbyterian Church “The Rhythm of Life: The Trinity in Poetry & Music” Public event

7 PM Blacknall Presbyterian Church Lecture, Poetry, & Music “Music You Never Would Have Known to Listen for” Pt. 1 Public event

Monday, February 17 11 AM Duke Divinity School, Room TBD Seminar with Malcolm Guite “Faith, Hope and Poetry” Duke community only

7 PM Blacknall Presbyterian Church Lecture, Poetry, & Music “Music You Never Would Have Known to Listen for” Pt. 2 Public event

Tuesday, February 18 12:30 PM Duke Divinity School, Room TBD Anglican Episcopal House of Studies Brownbag Discussion with Malcolm Guite “Gentle Exemplar: George Herbert and the vocation of the Priest-Poet” Duke community only

7 PM Duke Divinity School, Goodson Chapel Final Performance with Guite, Bell, and Begbie “Threefold Beholding” Public event

Full programme details and online registration at: www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita Registration recommended for evening events All events are free, and are sponsored by Duke Divinity School and Blacknall Lectures on Faith and Society, with additional support from the Anglican Episcopal House of Studies.


Duke Initiatives in

THEOLOGY & THE ARTS

The Word Made Fresh February 16-18, 2014

Renewing scriptural imagination through word, poetr y and music Steve Bell

Singer & Song-writer Western Canadian Music Award winner

Malcolm Guite Poet, Singer, Song-writer and Theologian University of Cambridge

Jeremy Begbie Theologian and Musician Duke Divinity School

Three days of public lecture-concerts, readings, and theological discussion, culminating in a final evening performance EVENTS AT: Duke Divinity School & Blacknall Presbyterian Church

Full programme details and online registration at: www.divinity.duke.edu/initiatives-centers/dita Registration recommended for evening events

Theology and the Arts Event Poster US ledger size


Dona McCullagh

dona@dmccullagh.co.uk

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Dona McCullagh - Design Portfolio  
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