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Annual Report 2010


Above: Conor Clear, Lucianne White and Angela Scanlon taking part in gorta’s Soup for Life 2010. Cover: Lilian Kerudong is a member of the gorta supported Mungulonyo Income Security Project in the Nebbi District, Uganda


gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland

Annual Report 2010

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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cont


tents Students at Early Childhood Development Centre in Malawi (l-r) Precious, Goosewell, Elisa, Vinwell, Ndaziwona, Skeva and Fisherman. The average number of years of education received by people in Malawi is 4.3 compared with an average of 11.6 in Ireland. (Source: UNDP Human Development Report 2010)

Our Vision, Mission and Values Foreword from the Chairman CEO’s Message Programmes Chairperson’s Address Council Members including Board and Sub-Committees

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Programmes Where We Work Case Study: Food Security Spotlight on AFARD Case Study: Water Security Spotlight on CODEP Case Study: Livelihoods Spotlight on NWDG Case Study: Education Case Study: Health Working in Partnership

16 18 20 23 24 27 28 31 32 34 37

At Home gorta Hunger Secretariat and World Food Day Donor Engagement and Communications Address from the gorta President Fundraising Case Study: Give: with Lifetime Gifts Networks Financial Review Financial Highlights

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41 42 43 45 46 49 52

Accounts

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7 8 10 12

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Alice Fazema farms a new plot with support from the gorta funded Centre for Alternatives for Victimized Women and Children (CAVWOC), Medrum Village, Malawi. In Malawi, 94% of economically active women work in agriculture (Source: FAO, 2010)


Kambani Sandulizani uses gorta-PRDO borehole, Pondapo Village, Malawi. Irrigation provides approximately 40% of the world’s food, from an estimated 20% of agricultural land. (Source: FAO, 2011)

Alfred Lawko of AFARD speaks at the gorta World Food Day Conference 2010

Vision and Mission Vision gorta’s vision is a world where there is no hunger or poverty and where the poorest communities have the means to create more prosperous futures for themselves and their children.

In so doing, gorta will develop and promote models of pragmatic and effective best practice to be shared with those individuals and groups with whom we work in a spirit of partnership.

Values Mission Through its work, gorta aims at empowering communities to eradicate hunger and poverty, with particular emphasis on food and water security, contributing to people’s unrestricted access to secure and environmentally sustainable livelihoods.

gorta will ensure that all our decisions, actions, and stakeholder interactions conform to the organisation’s moral and professional principles. These principles are the foundation for the organisation’s culture and values.

Our mission is:

Ethical

Businesslike

• To promote best practice in the area

Donor Focused

Caring

Partnership

Innovative

Inspiring

Advocates

of sustainable long-term development in communities, especially in sub-Saharan Africa

• To be a catalyst for the creation, safeguarding and transfer of best practice in food and water security • To be a facilitator in channelling goodwill, resources and expertise to communities most in need

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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gorta’s vision is a world where there is no hunger or poverty and where the poorest communities have the means to create more prosperous futures for themselves and their children. gorta recognises that we cannot achieve our vision on our own. It can only be realised through developing and working in long term, meaningful partnerships with local communities, local and national governments and with likeminded organisations, businesses and individuals who have skills which complement our own.

Foreword from the Chairman There are many challenges facing our world at present and it is becoming increasingly important for gorta to continue to adapt and grow as a 21st century organisation. During 2010, while the economic situation still had an enormous impact on all areas of our work, gorta continued to challenge the injustices of poverty in the countries where we work and will remain doing so in the years ahead. While we here in Ireland are facing difficult financial times, we know from our partners that they are facing into an even more challenging era with external factors such as climate change, food price volatility and water scarcity impacting on their livelihoods and their ability to care and look after their families. Our work is made possible due to the commitment and support of our donors and volunteers in Ireland, without whom gorta would not be able to carry out its programmes in east Africa. To them, I would like to extend our sincere and deepest gratitude. We hope to develop this relationship even further in

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the future, ensuring to continuously relay the positive impact of their support. This support base is vital to our vision, assisting in the creation of a prosperous future for rural communities in our countries of focus. I would also like to acknowledge the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and the Department of Foreign Affairs for their continued support. In particular, we are grateful to Irish Aid for contributing E450,000 to our work with the Agency for Accelerated Rural Development (AFARD) in Uganda. To conclude, I would like to thank my fellow Board Members, who committed their time, energy and expertise at the Board meetings, corporate evenings and other gorta events throughout 2010. To the many others who contribute to gorta, such as the Programmes, Finance, County and Shop Committees, I would like to acknowledge the hard work and dedication they have shown. With their support, we will continue to grow in 2011 and beyond. Go raibh míle maith agaibh go léir. Andy Cole Chairman

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


PM Group CEO Pat McGrath receiving the gorta Global Corporate Responsibility Leadership Award from gorta Chairman Andy Cole along with President Mary McAleese and gorta CEO Brian Hanratty.


CEO’s Message 2010 – Challenges and Successes

Partnership is at the heart of gorta’s work in the developing world, ranging from collaboration with UN FAO; Irish Aid; fellow NGOs; progressive businesses and our Government and Civil Society partners in the countries in which we operate – principally Kenya; Uganda; Tanzania; Malawi and Zambia. Central to the success of gorta’s work with some of the worlds poorest is the support we receive from donors and volunteers, and we extend a very sincere “thank you” to those many active and concerned citizens in Ireland and elsewhere. gorta Hunger Secretariat Chairman Professor Denis Lucey, Minister for Foreign Affairs Micheál Martin T.D., Minister of State for Overseas Development Peter Power T.D. and gorta CEO Brian Hanratty at the UN MDG Summit in New York.


2010 saw the consolidation of gorta’s field presence in sub Saharan Africa and the clustering of its programmes with a greater focus on capacity and capability building for local communities, small business opportunity diversification, partner-to-partner exchange visits and knowledge dissemination, all with growing emphasis on impact and innovation. A major initiative in April saw the launch by Micheál Martin T.D., Minister for Foreign Affairs of the gorta Hunger Secretariat. Chaired by Board member, Professor Denis Lucey – who has served on the Irish Government’s Hunger Task Force – the Secretariat was launched in the presence of Salil Shetty, Director of the United Nations Millennium Campaign and Dr. Stamoulis Kostas, Agricultural Development Economics Division, UN FAO Rome as well as other distinguished guests, recognising gorta’s longstanding experience in the area of hunger eradication and harnessing same to inform policy at national and international levels. Thanks to tens of thousands of committed donors, gorta has been able to significantly grow its Overseas Programmes. In 2001, gorta’s annual programme investment was E838,000; by 2010, this had grown to E7,208,000. Fundraising is critical for our ability to respond to the needs of the communities we support and to maintain that growth, we continue to seek out new funding mechanisms against an economic background that has adversely impacted on income. During the year, gorta secured approval of a E450,000 grant from Irish Aid and began to engage other institutional sources of funds. ‘Soup for Life’, a nationwide fundraising initiative was inaugurated, coinciding with the National Famine Commemoration event held by the Government at Murrisk, Co. Mayo in May, when gorta distributed a specially commissioned ‘Hunger Map’ to schools. In the field, gorta staff co-ordinated microfinance workshops and met UN Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon in Malawi. The International Alliance against Hunger (IAAH) – of which gorta is a member – met in Rome in June, and on the proposal of gorta, has been renamed the Alliance against Hunger and Malnutrition (AAHM), reflecting the growing realisation that nutrition is an important component of food security. In August, I travelled to Malawi along with the Director of Trócaire to review joint programming with community groups there, as well as meeting with gorta partners who, in the face of major challenges never cease to gain our respect. Indeed, we were proud to learn of awards presented to two of our partners – the Agency for Development of Women and Children (ADWAC) in The Gambia and the Tanzanian Forestry Conservation Group – during the year.

In September, at the invitation of the Irish Government, gorta was represented at the Millennium Development Goals Summit in New York, and at the joint US/Irish Government launch of the “1,000 Days: Change a Life, Change the Future” programme. In October, a unique custom built mobile ENT clinic, funded by gorta for ENT surgery was commissioned in Lusaka, Zambia in the presence of the Irish Ambassador. With the support of the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food – our Patron, President McAleese headed the distinguished speakers at gorta’s annual World Food Day conference in Dublin in October, addressing the theme “United against Hunger – how to feed a billion people.” In her presence, Pat McGrath, Managing Director and CEO of the PM Group was presented with the inaugural gorta Global Corporate Responsibility Leadership Award for the company’s support for gorta’s work with its main Indian partner – Social Change and Development (SCAD) based in Tamil Nadu who are developing a major centre for those deemed “differently abled” among the poorest in society there. Throughout the year, our staff worked closely with those who volunteer to help gorta ‘make hunger history’ including members of the Board and its sub-committees; county and shop committees and many others who fundraise for gorta at church gates; in their workplaces and among community and voluntary groups. The commitment of our volunteers, the generosity of our donors and the professionalism of our staff both in Ireland and abroad all combine to make gorta a growing force in the fight against hunger, transforming lives. As we approach gorta’s fiftieth anniversary in 2015, coinciding with the target date for the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals, it is clear that the world community must vigorously renew and deliver on its pledges to eradicate hunger and work towards prosperous futures for all – and gorta – with the continued support of staff, donors, volunteers and partners – is committed to fulfilling its role as the Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland. Sincerely, Brian Hanratty CEO

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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2010 saw significant strengthening and growth of gorta’s Programmes activities and further consolidation of the Programmes Department work and structure.

Programmes Chairperson’s Address Due to the work of the Committee and the Programmes team, the Department achieved many successes in 2010. There was further consolidation of gorta’s programme areas in the five principal countries of operation with a greater strengthening of the geographic and thematic clustering process which began in 2009. In the field, three large water management programmes were initiated in Malawi, Zambia and Tanzania. gorta was registered in Uganda and Kenya, with registration for Malawi in process. The Global Management Approach (GMA) is currently being piloted in Baraka Agricultural College in Kenya and a training session on the GMA was held by Agnes Gannon, a member of the Programmes Committee, for Head Office staff, the country representatives and some of gorta’s Malawi partners. Two regional multi-stakeholder workshops, one on Microfinance (Lilongwe, Malawi, May 2010) and one on Water Management and Irrigation (Mukono, Uganda, August 2010) were held. These saw the participation of gorta partners as well as Government and international development organisations’ representatives. A workshop organised by gorta, involving the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), on Nutrition in the context of Agriculture Responses to Food Insecurity was held in Dublin in March and attended by representatives from Irish Aid, the Department of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries and the Irish NGO sector. Also, a partnership programme with FAO was initiated in the Nebbi region of north-west Uganda, aimed at mainstreaming food and nutrition into district planning. During 2010 in-depth institutional assessments were conducted for many partners, while two evaluations were conducted with two of our

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major partners (AFARD and Baraka Agricultural College) and several group exchange visits were facilitated. The CEO joined Justin Kilcullen, Director of Trócaire, to assess the joint gortaTrócaire programme activities in Malawi in August. An intern from UCC was sent to Uganda to provide support to gorta’s office in Kampala, and the work of AFARD and to showcase some field case studies. gorta continues to be actively involved in food security and livelihoods dialogues with Dóchas (gorta co-chairs its Food Security and Livelihoods Working Group) and Irish Aid and has contributed to a number of policy initiatives at national and international levels, particularly in relation to food security and the right to food. Following the Board’s commitment of €250,000 in light of the Haiti earthquake, the Committee approved a project, with the Haven Community Foundation in February, which dealt specifically with improving access to water and sanitation. This was allocated under the Board’s humanitarian disaster pledge for Haiti. Finally, it remains for me to say a very big thank you to the gorta Programmes Team. Without their support the task of the Programmes Committee would be much more onerous. The gradual build-up, over the past two years to a full team of dedicated staff has enabled gorta to evolve into an organisation of which Ireland can be extremely proud. With a gorta presence in its five countries of focus, gorta is being recognised at regional and national level for the quality of the programmes which we support in reaching those most in need. I would also like to thank my colleagues on the Programmes Committee for the support they have provided to me as the new Chair since David O’Connor stepped down during the year. And, last but not least I would like to thank Brian Hanratty, CEO and all the staff for their excellent assistance, cooperation and enthusiasm at all times. Sincerely, Mary Buchalter Chairperson – gorta Programmes Committee

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


In Malawi, Margaret Malausa received a goat from the gorta funded Centre for Women and Social Development (CWSD). Smallholder farmers account for approximately half of the developing world’s undernourished. (Source: FAO,2010)


President Mary McAleese, who has been Patron of gorta since 1997


Council Members including Board and Sub-Committees Board

David Andrews

Chairman: Andy Cole

Mary Buchalter

Vice-Chairman: Brian Kehoe

Michael J. Butler

President of gorta: Kevin Higgins

Thomas P. Cannon

Mary Buchalter, Chairperson, Programmes Committee

Phil Conyngham

Liam Fitzgerald

Martin Crowe

Deirdre Fox Professor Denis I.F. Lucey, Chairman of the gorta Hunger Secretariat

Programmes Committee Chairperson: Mary Buchalter Tom Burke

Tom Conlon Sean Corrigan Michael Cunningham Martin Donnellan Brendan Donohue Paul Doran Carmel Fox Sean Gaule Joe Haughton Billy Holmes

Anne Fitzgerald

Liam Hyland

Agnes Gannon

Brian Kehoe

Sean Gaule

Aileen Kennelly

Tom Kirley

Tom Kirley

Dr. Joe Phelan

Eugene Leddy

Bob Sherriff

Professor Denis I.F. Lucey Monica McGettrick

Finance and Audit Committee

Pat Murphy

Brian Kehoe, Chairperson

Bernard O’Farrell

Michael Butler

Joe Phelan

Billy Holmes

Paula Slattery

Frank Keane

Maura Walsh Jeremy Woolwich James Wyse

(i) Dr. David O’Connor resigned as Chairman of the Programmes Committee in June 2010 (ii) Mary Buchalter was appointed as Chairperson of the Programmes Committee June 2010 (iii) Tom Kirley and Anne Fitzgerald were appointed Programmes Committee Members in February and September 2010 respectively

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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programm

Patricia Mpambaze who has benefitted from a new borehole in Mkhuma village, Malawi. Female farmers are less likely to have access to resources such as land, livestock, technology, education and finance and credit facilities are often limitied. (Source: FAO, 2010)


ammes


Pamela Nasimnu and William Keyah gorta Country Manager at the gorta funded Baraka Agricultural College, Kenya

Rosie Sambo, Zagwa Million and Dorothy Msonkho – past students of Bunda College of Agriculture, Malawi

Where We Work Kenya • Population: 40.9 million • Life expectancy at birth: 55.6 years Kenya’s population is largely rural based and relies on smallholder agriculture for livelihoods. Unpredictable rainfall due to climate change is having a significantly negative effect on the food security status of the country – droughts are on the rise, placing millions of Kenyans at risk of malnutrition and starvation. gorta recognises the need for training for smallholder farmers to adapt their farming methods to a changing climate. Having worked in the country since the mid-seventies, Kenya is now one of gorta’s principal countries of operation. gorta’s involvement was initially through small faithbased organisations but recently we have engaged with more strategic local partners with the potential to scale-up and scale-out. gorta’s main area of work in Kenya is centred on agricultural training and food security, through improved methods of agriculture production.

Malawi • Population: 15.7 million • Life expectancy at birth: 54.6 years The Republic of Malawi is currently ranked 153 out of 169 on the Human Development Index (2010). The majority of its population live below the poverty line and about 83% of the people live in rural areas with poor access to basic health and education services.

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Agricultural production is the mainstay of Malawi’s economy but landholdings are small, leading to encroachment on marginal lands and increased erosion. These conditions, combined with the high incidence of HIV/ AIDS, make the poor highly vulnerable to the effects of natural disasters and food insecurity. Initially, gorta began working in Malawi 1994 and became independently involved in 2005. Our focus of work is on water and food security, borehole rehabilitation, sanitation and hygiene, irrigation schemes, exchange visits, short training courses and the promotion of self help groups.

Tanzania • Population: 45 million • Life expectancy at birth: 56.9 years Climate change is already having an impact on Tanzania and is likely to further affect the country with increased temperatures and lower rainfall which affects agriculture, forests, water and coastal resources and human health. Tanzania became a country of focus for gorta in 2007 together with Kenya, Uganda, Malawi and Zambia. Since then, most of our programmes are concentrated in the Northern regions of the country from Lake Victoria to the Coast and include Mara, Arusha, Manyara, Kilimanjaro and Tanga regions. gorta’s programmes in Tanzania focus specifically on maintaining and improving forest conservation, water security and improving livelihoods through incomegenerating schemes.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Kenya Uganda

tanzania zambia

malawi

Uganda • Population: 33.8 million • Life expectancy at birth: 54.1 years Uganda has one of the highest population growth rates in the world and 26% of the population live in chronic poverty. As one of gorta’s programme countries since 1965, Uganda was designated as a gorta country of focus in 2007/8. The elimination of poverty and hunger, and the creation of prosperous futures for the poorest communities are part of gorta’s vision. As with each of our countries of focus, gorta recognises that it is essential to work with local district government officers and in line with the National Development Plan, in order to align their development efforts and to create sustainable programmes that are owned by the local communities. gorta’s main focus in Uganda has been on food security and integrated development with an aim to increase access to markets for smallholder farmers while also working with local partners on improving water and sanitation and increasing awareness and access to treatments of people living with HIV/AIDS.

Zambia • Population: 13.2 million • Life expectancy at birth: 47.3 years Decades of economic decline and neglect of infrastructure and services have impacted heavily on Zambia’s population of 11.5 million, with 45% of the population – 5.2 million individuals – undernourished (FAO, 2010). gorta’s involvement in Zambia has been in five target areas, where it is currently working with local organisations on training for beekeeping, watershed management, area rehabilitation, income generation and with differently-abled groups. During 2010, a specific healthcare initiative was also undertaken in the country.

Population and life expectancy statistics taken from the Human Development Report 2010, United Nations Development Programmes (UNDP). The Human Development Index (HDI) ranks countries by level of human development with the index ranging from 1 (Very High Human Development) to 169 (Low Human Development). The countries in which gorta focuses its work rank as follows: Kenya – 128; Malawi – 153; Tanzania – 148; Uganda – 143; Zambia – 150

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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In the Nebbi District, Uganda, members of the Mungulonyo Income Security Project are supported by gorta through the provision of training, seeds and tools. (l-r): Grace Cwinyaai, Jane Ongeira, Sam Beropamungu, Francis Ozelle and William Ocaya.


Food security is a challenge faced by many, not only in terms of production but also in terms of physical and economic access to food. gorta aims to address food security through improving agricultural practices that promote and increase crop production. gorta is also working with farmer groups to reduce their vulnerability to climate change by enabling them to adopt improved methods of farming. gorta recognises the importance of diverse crop production in improving nutrition at household level and also reducing over-reliance on a single staple crop in order to create long-term, sustainable food security.

Case Study:

Food Security Valid Nutrition, Malawi

local partner, The Kenya Freedom from Hunger Council (KFFHC), To tackle the problem farmers are given training and of almost 300 million monitoring on improved children suffering from agricultural practices chronic malnutrition, kenya which are benefiting 1,500 gorta partnered with Valid Uganda households. The project Nutrition to support its efforts targets the most vulnerable in increasing the production capacity malawi families, especially those of their Ready-to-Use Therapeutic that are female headed, Foods (RUTF) which are a groundaffected by HIV and those breaking innovation in the fight against caring for orphans. gorta and hunger and malnutrition. Over five million KFFHC are facilitating families to children die each year because of a lack cultivate a plot of land per household, of access to proper nutritional food and which includes the production of maize and gorta is providing solutions to this problem by bean intercropping. partnering with Valid Nutrition in Malawi which manufactures a range of nutritional pastes which treat malnutrition and stem childhood mortality. The upgrade to the factory, which was funded by gorta, increased Valid Nutrition’s capacity to produce RUTF for the treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition by over 100%. This means that the lives of a lot more children will be saved. Maize Crop Production, Kenya In the Kirinyaga East District of central Kenya, gorta supports a project which provides assistance to smallholder farmers by means of agriculture training and the provision of improved seeds. Started in March of 2010, the project has already seen an improvement of maize crop production. Through gorta’s

Agency for Accelerated Rural Development (AFARD), Uganda In north-west Uganda, gorta is working with AFARD to provide training on the use of improved high-yielding and drought resistant seeds and planting materials. Through this programme, farmers are provided with improved seeds which can withstand the prolonged droughts experienced in the area. gorta and AFARD understand that access to markets is an area where smallholder farmers need specific training. In conjunction with the local groups, during the harvest season in 2010 AFARD explored, on behalf of the farmers, methods by which they could build on their production for a market component

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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Selling honey in Musongole, Zambia, as part of a EDZ and gorta programme

to the programme, with the aim of increasing household incomes. Promoting bulk marketing was adopted as a feasible strategy by the farmers as it did not require them to transport their produce. One farmer, Demo Ejidio, explained:

“Before I joined our group, I was running a small business and practicing small scale farming. I used to produce, at most, 100Kgs of sesame; which I would sell and use for food. Although sales were an individual affair, the prices offered by my local traders were too low as no big buyer would come to our village. When I had the opportunity to produce more sesame because the WENDI programme promotes income security, I was able to plant many acres, care for the crops, and thus receive a high yield. Equally, when the opportunity came to sell at higher prices locally without the inconveniences of going to Arua, I could not hesitate. That is how I raised a good sum of money, part of which I used to buy a motor cycle. The balance I have used for adding my business stock.” “With the motor cycle, I have no transport problems these days. I can travel anywhere,

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any time. I have no stress of waking up to travel at night to Arua Town to restock my shop. Besides, I am also able to transport more of my commodities to the various weekly markets with ease. This is contrary to the past when I used to ferry small quantities of my commodities for sale using a bicycle to the nearby weekly markets like Rhino Camp, Okubani, and Miatangacia. My business is progressing on well” he added.

Dema Ejidio, who benefited from the WENDI Programme, supported by gorta and Agency for Accelerated Rural Development (AFARD).

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Maize grown by the Mungulonya Income Security Group, Mungulonya, Uganda. The group are supported by gorta through the provision of training, seeds and tools.

Spotlight on AFARD, Uganda The Agency for Accelerated Regional Development (AFARD) is one of gorta’s largest partners in Uganda. Situated in the north-west region of the country, gorta has been working with AFARD since 2002. Based on the vision of a prosperous, healthy and informed people of West Nile, AFARD aims to contribute to ‘the moulding of a region in which the local people, including those who are marginalized, can participate effectively and sustainably and take the lead in the development of the region’. Formed as a not-for-profit NGO in 2000, AFARD identified the local needs in the West Nile region, one of the poorest regions in Uganda with over 6 in 10 people living on less than $1 a day. A region which had seen many foreign organisations fail to bring about foreign driven development; the West Nile districts of Nebbi, Arua and Yumbe became the focus on AFARD’s drive to create sustainable futures for the people in the region. AFARD’s main focus is on the areas of food security, income security, health, education, and good governance and their target participants are the poorest and most vulnerable people of West Nile. After a series of small projects, in April 2009 gorta and AFARD partnered to implement the West Nile Development Initiative (WENDI) programme. Working with established Community Based Organisations (CBOs) and Village Groups, the programme is now in its third year of implementation. As an integrated area-based development programme, WENDI has benefited approximately 80,000 people through its community-wide projects. The first two years focused on food security at the household level, while Year 3 and 4 will build on these achievements with a larger focus given to access to markets and business development. 2010 saw the greatest progression of the programme, where results from Year 1 could be seen to have real effect on the lives of the communities in the West Nile region. Considerable positive impacts were made with respect to food security, health and education and, to some extent, income security. There was also an increase in the number of organisations participating, from 51 in Year 1 to 82 which had a direct increase in the number of benefiting households from 7,583 to 10,205 and direct beneficiaries rose from 49,067 to 73,958 people. Some of the key achievements include (as at Year End 2010): • Approximately 80,000 people benefited from the programme (73,958 direct participants and 6,000 indirect beneficiaries who are outside the programme but have benefited from access to safe drinking water and the provision of classrooms). • 57% increase in the number of households eating 3 meals a day as a family. • 78% of households are now running a business e.g., selling of cooked food by the road side and in schools, trading in agro-produce, fish mongering, all facilitated through the provision of loans. • Improved access to clean and safe water for the communities with three-quarters of all the participants now having access to safe water sources. • Malaria among children has been reduced from 65% to 40% due to awareness-raising on prevention methods and the introduction of mosquito nets. • Access to treatment for HIV/Aids has increased due to education and an increase in service provision. • 96% of children in the communities in the programme area are now enrolled and attending schools. This programme received funding from Irish Aid in October 2010, to the amount of E450,000.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

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Alefa Bwanaisa uses a borehole which was placed by the gorta funded CWSD, Zimba village, Malawi. 884 million people in the world do not have access to safe water (Source: WHO/UNICEF)


Codep participant collects building structures for the Watershed Management Plan in Chipata, Zambia.

Children benefitting from the Integrated Water and Sanitation Project, Twegatte for Health and Development (THAD), Uganda.

Water scarcity in sub-Saharan Africa is one of the key obstacles to social, economic and human development. The depletion of water, both underground and surface, is very concerning and requires a series of actions on various levels. Access to water helps fulfil basic needs at household level and allows agriculture and business to thrive. gorta aims to provide communities with well-managed water resources that are sustainable while also addressing the issue of long-term sanitation services which are adequate in terms of quality, sufficiency and long-term operation. Proper training is essential as it empowers the communities and allows them to gain ownership of their facilities.

Case Study:

Water Security Supporting and Maintaining Watershed management is National Resources, Tanzania one of the approaches that gorta believes can gorta is working with achieve sustainable the Tanzania Forestry results as it focuses Conservation Group (TFCG) Uganda on entire communities’ in the West Usambara usage and attitude to water Mountains to eradicate tanzania resources. On the practical zambia poverty and hunger among level, water resource management rural communities. This works to maximize water use efficiency, is done through focusing by increasing its harvesting and storage, on sustainable community increasing water productivity and management of the natural ensuring equal distribution to all users. resources. The comprehensive This approach works at the community programme runs over three years and level but also at individual level by increasing is improving access to clean safe water and the awareness and stimulating the action providing training on integrated water resource of people living in rural areas to reduce management to twenty-one villages within food insecurity and alleviate poverty at the the region. The water resource management household level. looks at the entire water supply and use from the perspective of sustainable development, including the allocation and monitoring of water uses within the context of social,

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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Bosco Msang and Mary Diluoga are technicians working on Ludewa irrigation project in Tanzania

economic and environmental protection. It aims to ensure the provision of water for all who require it from household to farmers, fisheries and the ecosystems. Through this programme, almost 51,000 people from the 21 villages are currently being supported. TFCG and gorta are also focusing on increasing farmers’ incomes through improving agricultural productivity while also promoting sustainable use and management of natural resources. Work began in 2010 on preventing deforestation by providing training and alternative livelihoods for local communities, through the promotion of fuel efficient stoves, reducing the demand for firewood, as well as widespread tree planting with approximately half a million tree saplings already being planted.

to protecting natural resources and improving livelihoods in order to alleviate the poverty of the communities within this specific watershed area. With water security and improving livelihoods as the main aims, gorta and CODEP are working on three main objectives of environmental protection, increasing agriculture production and reducing food insecurity while also improving water and sanitation. Implementation of the programme is carried out by the communities who are involved in the building of terraces on hilly areas, reforestation and the construction of gabions which help maintain and reinforce river banks. Other aspects include training farmers on conservation agriculture, the introduction of improved seed varieties and promoting poultry production and beekeeping.

Integrated Watershed Management Programme, Zambia gorta’s current work with Community Orientated Development Programme (CODEP) in the Eastern Province of Zambia has seen the introduction of an integrated watershed programme. Poor natural resource management practiced by farmers had led to a reduction in soil fertility, increased soil erosion and resulted in a decrease of the agricultural production in the Chiparamba area. This in turn has led to an increase in poverty and a temporary migration of farmers to seek employment during the dry seasons. In partnership with CODEP, an integrated watershed management project began in 2010. The first of its kind for gorta, the programme takes a comprehensive approach

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gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Codep Watershed Management Project in Chipata, Zambia.

Spotlight on CODEP, Zambia gorta has partnered with the Community Oriented Development Programme (CODEP) in Zambia since 2006. Involved in the areas of agriculture, water, primary health care and community development programmes, CODEP works together with families in the Chipata area of east Zambia to carry out agricultural activities that enable them to increase food and water availability at household level. CODEP identified that poor farming practices in the Chipata region had reduced soil fertility and erosion was causing lower yields, leading to increased poverty. After consultation with the local communities, gorta and CODEP began the implementation of an integrated watershed development programme. The first of its kind for both organisations, this programme focuses on agricultural practices and food production, improvement in health and protecting and ensuring water sources in a way which seeks to safeguard and nurture the local environment. The ultimate goal of the programme is to improve natural resources and the food security base of the people in Chiparamba, which is mostly affected by land degradation and has contributed to soil infertility in the area. The programme promotes environmental and natural resource management, for example forest conservation and terracing by targeting five specific villages within a water catchment area. The project’s other two objectives are increasing agricultural production and reducing food insecurity and also improving access to clean safe water and training on sanitation. Activities under the first objective include conservation agriculture and training and capacity building, while the second objective involves the creation of new boreholes and latrines. Members of CODEP have also taken part in a gorta exchange programme with our partner the Agency for the Development of Women and Children (ADWAC) in the Gambia where a similar gorta programme is underway. This exchange is a vital part of gorta’s training strategy and of building the capacity of our local partners. gorta and CODEP also work with communities to improve the health care, particularly for vulnerable groups. The main health problems, especially HIV/AIDS, in the community are addressed by providing promotive, preventive and rehabilitative services. Contributions of supplies are also made to the central health clinic in order to maintain previous efforts in HIV/ AIDS treatment, where gorta is working in close cooperation with specialist consultants and the local health authorities.

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The women involved in the building project in Chimunya Village, Eastern Zambia. Women make up 43.3% of the economically active population in Zambia (Source: FAO, 2010).


Participants planting tree saplings in a Tanzania Forestry Conservation Group tree nursery, West Usamba Mountains, Tanzania.

Rebecca Amukhoye, gorta Regional Director speaks to particpants at the Watershed Management Workshop in Mukono Uganda Aug 2010.

A secure livelihood greatly reduces people’s vulnerability to food shortages, poor health and poverty and within this area; gorta focuses on income security and enterprise promotion. We support skills training for income-generating activity and provide access to the necessary credit through micro-credit schemes while also creating opportunities for gainful employment.

Case Study:

Livelihoods Building Project, Zambia

the planning and implementation of community based initiatives.

2010 saw the success of a gorta supported Tanzania Forestry building project in Zambia Conservation Group, which saw a group of Uganda Tanzania women undertake the gorta is working with construction of a block of tanzania zambia the Tanzania Forestry houses for themselves and Conservation Group their families. This was part of a larger (TFCG) in west Usambara programme initiated by gorta and our malawi to provide tree nurseries, local partner CODEP in the Chipata education and water supplies area which saw the development of a in the region for people who water conservation plan to help local are struggling to generate a sufficient communities increase food security in a income for themselves as the living wage region that has been devastated by drought. amounts to about $1 per day. This project Part of this programme required the purchase aims to prevent deforestation and create of a block-making machine. A group, prosperous and sustainable livelihoods for predominantly made up of women, decided the local communities. gorta and TFCG are to use this machine in the construction of working with the local community groups a block of houses for themselves and their located in west Usambara to provide training families in the Chimunya Village in eastern and more understanding of the importance Zambia. The group worked as a team to plan of the forests to their native environment. The and erect the first house and once this was project provides participants with wood lots created and the first recipients had moved to use the branches of trees as firewood and in, they moved on to build additional houses. also training on how to build and use improved The project reiterates the importance of stoves which use less firewood. Fish ponds gender mainstreaming in programmes and and bee hives have also been introduced to the inclusion of both men and women in

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Wilfred Cwinyaai of AFARD speaks with WENDI participants in the West Nile Region, Uganda.

provide more diverse food sources which also facilitate participants selling excess food in the local markets, earning a wage which can be used to pay for schooling for their children. In recognition of its work, TFCG was awarded the 2010 Presidential Environmental Award for the best tree planting and water source protection project in the country. The award was set up by the Tanzanian Government in an effort to fight the challenges of environmental destruction and its overall aim is to stimulate communities and civil society to participate in protecting water sources, planting and managing trees. TFCG was the overall winner at national level and received TZS 5,000,000 (E2,500) for the organisation. Micro-Finance Workshop, Malawi In Lilongwe, Malawi, gorta facilitated a micro-finance workshop which was held to exhibit innovative micro-finance schemes which will be managed and implemented by gorta’s partners over the coming years. Attendees included gorta partners as well as senior Malawian government officials, representatives from Irish Aid and other major international NGOs. The workshop facilitated collaboration amongst the organisations represented and focused on small-scale loans for start-up family enterprises, with the aim of preparing them to avail of larger institutional funding in the future as they grow.

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Management and Irrigation Seminar, Uganda A Management and Irrigation Seminar organised by gorta was conducted in Mukono, Uganda which brought together participants from gorta’s partners in its five countries of focus, as well as representatives from Irish NGO’s Concern, Trócaire and Vita. The seminar aimed to share the insight and experience of gorta’s partners in a number of countries, and of other NGO’s who are practising water management and irrigation in their programmes. As well as training, participants held discussions on irrigation techniques and challenges in promoting and using the technology throughout subSaharan Africa. The result of the seminar was the development of practical guidelines and the formulation of water management action plans.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Nyamete Women and Development Group members feeding some of chickens at poultry shades in Musoma, Tanzania. The poultry keeping project is funded by gorta.

Spotlight on NWDG, Tanzania In northern Tanzania, gorta has partnered with the Nyamete Women and Development Group (NWDG) which is working to empower women to play an active role as equal partners in their community’s socio-economic development process. This is achieved by focusing on improving the existing poultry keeping scheme in the area and also by introducing a credit facility for women. Through providing women with access to loans and credit facilities, any profit made will directly benefit the lives of their families. Enabling women to become self-sufficient and empowered through the setting up of groups and providing access to loans for business startups is key to creating sustainable livelihoods. By implementing this poultry keeping programme and by distributing chicks to the groups, the women become producers and increase their income which in turn means that they are able to afford to pay school fees for their children, buy mosquito nets for the prevention of malaria and save funds for later use. Through the consumption of eggs and chicken meat, the groups and their families’ nutritional status also improves, particularly for those affected with HIV/AIDS and other related diseases. Having starting in early 2010, gorta’s programme with NWDG involves all stages of poultry, from hatchery and the rearing of the chicks to the production of chicken meat and eggs. Under the supervision of a local vet, members from the twenty-five womens groups process their own chicken feed and are provided with training on poultry health issues (disease, vaccinations and drugs). Some of the income raised from the sale of the feed, chicks and eggs is put back into the micro-credit services for use by the groups. This programme has improved the availability of marketing channels and provided training on poultry handling with the overall aim of creating a self sufficient community. The approach the group has towards developing themselves is to proceed slowly step by step ensuring the sustainability of each single activity before proceeding further. gorta’s work with NWDG will see the group move towards enhancing the business enterprise element of the programme, a vital element for them to become completely selfsufficient.

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Peter Chuma Aurelian at the Baraka Agricultural College in Kenya. Gorta sponsors an 18-month Certificate in Sustainable Agricultural Development.


Education is a key enabler to improve the prospects of those experiencing hunger and malnutrition. gorta, through the provision of agricultural training and life skills development, works to promote best practice in order to improve food security. gorta has a long-standing tradition of supporting vocational training, entrepreneurial skills and income generating activities.

Case Study: Education Baraka Agricultural College, Kenya Baraka Agricultural College (BAC) is gorta’s main long term partner in Kenya. In addition, BAC is one of the leading agricultural colleges in Kenya and pioneers sustainable agriculture and rural development. Annually, gorta provides scholarships to 28 students from rural communities in Kenya and adjacent countries to study the Certificate in Sustainable Agricultural Development as well as funding a number of smaller projects within the college including the construction of classrooms and provision of equipment. gorta continued the Global Management Approach (GMA) project which commenced in 2009 and is being piloted in BAC and the aim of the project is sustainable integrated area-based development. The first phase involves developing the capacity and capability of trainers/facilitators who will then lead the area’s development over the coming years. Once the GMA has become established in a particular area it can be replicated in adjoining parishes/regions. Access to Markets for Women Beekeeper Groups, Zambia In partnership with Environment and Development in Zambia (EDZ), gorta is supporting an initiative which aims to empower local Women Beekeeper Groups in five districts in the north western Province of Zambia. EDZ’s initial consultation with the established groups found that they had problems accessing markets to sell their honey and its other by-products. This programme is addressing the issues raised by improving the quality of life for the Women Beekeeper Groups through strengthening the enterprises of the groups. The programme focuses on building on the capacity of women beekeepers to facilitate them to raise issues that are affecting them at local and district level. This is done through awareness-raising and skills training on improved honey production skills, basic education for girls and a food and nutrition programme for women. EDZ works towards ensuring that the women are aware of their rights and that their socio-economic status is positively changed. The programme is

establishing a system of honey production and honey marketing which includes improving household level processing techniques, quality control measures, natural resources kenya management practices and organic beekeeping principles. gorta recognises the need to Uganda facilitate smallholder farmers to move from subsistence farming to access to markets and together with EDZ this is being achieved with the Women Beekeeper Groups. From Subsistence to Entrepreneurship, Uganda As part of gorta’s programme with AFARD, training is recognised as a key element in building on the capacity of community groups to become more self-sufficient. Training within the WENDI programme covers a number of areas including improved agricultural methods, livestock husbandry, income generation and marketing skills as well as health. In the north-west region of Uganda, where subsistence farming is relied upon by over 90% of the population, gorta and AFARD know that the way to improve livelihoods is through full participation and ownership of the communities. Each of the community based groups which are part of the WENDI programme identify the type of training that they require. The overall aim is to assist smallholder farmers to become self-sufficient and then enable them to enter into markets where they can generate an income from the sale of their excess products. Overseen by AFARD, the programme has also produced a training manual to assist member groups become more actively engaged in income generating activities. Developed to provide key guidelines to those involved in entrepreneurial development, the manual is used to encourage and foster the understanding of the basics of running a business. With understanding that through different activities, households can gain great access to finance, by the end of 2010 many members had secured assets such as cows (17%), goats (26%), bicycles (44%), and beds with mattresses (58%) and were able to pay for school dues and medical bills.

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Mercy Brighton received mosquito nets from gorta funded CWSD in Malawi. In Africa, a child dies every 45 seconds of Malaria and the disease accounts for 20% of all childhood deaths (Source: WHO, 2010).


Members of the Dei Post Test Club in Uganda.

His Excellency Tony Cotter, Irish Ambassador to Zambia, Jennifer Coyne, Head of Finance and Administration at gorta and Kieran O’Driscoll, Consultant ENT Surgeon,ENT, Zambia.

Poor health is both a cause and effect of poverty. gorta addresses this issue by working with partners on improving food and water security and providing community care, while also targeting the prevention of maternal and infant undernourishment. gorta has joined with a number of organisations to provide care for HIV/AIDS sufferers and their families. The promotion of health is a basic right of all individuals and a prerequisite to sustainable development.

Case Study: Health ENT Vehicle, Zambia In October 2010 gorta launched the first overseas mobile ear, nose and throat (ENT) vehicle in Zambia, after contributing almost e300,000 to develop an innovative solution to an unaddressed health need in the country. The vehicle functions as a mobile clinic, visiting rural locations around the capital city of Lusaka to offer out-patient services and treatments for ENT conditions. Patients can now be afforded an early and timelier diagnosis for conditions, which they previously would not have access to. gorta worked with Kieran O’Driscoll, a consultant Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) surgeon based in Tullamore Hospital, to develop the vehicle which benefits the local rural communities near the city, providing them with access to immediate care and life enhancing surgery. The mobile clinic also serves as a transportation vehicle for more serious cases to bring patients to the Beit Cure Hospital in Lusaka. Dei Post Test Club, Dei, Uganda Dei is a fishing community in north-western Uganda consisting of five villages and with a population of about 4,500 people. In Dei, the

fishing trade attracts a lot of casual workers who base themselves in the villages temporarily and while the rate of HIV and AIDS in Uganda stands at Uganda a relatively low 5.4%, the rate in Dei is 20–25% among zambia adults. To help deal with the social and economic consequences of this on the local community, gorta has been working in partnership with the Agency for Accelerated Regional Development (AFARD) to support the Dei Post Test Club, which has been in operation since 2004. Established by local community members, the Club was set up in response to rising numbers of people affected by HIV and AIDS, serves as a village level support network and provides membership to anyone who has undergone testing for the virus. Six of the founding members chose to declare their HIV status publicly and this brave step contributed significantly to breaking down the barriers of stigma and ignorance in the community regarding HIV and AIDS. In collaboration with the Club, gorta is working with AFARD on the creation of a revolving fund for the members which will provide funds for transportation to hospitals and clinics, food, funerals and the

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With support from gorta, bicycle ambulances are improving access to healthcare in the Chiparamba area of eastern Zambia

support of families of deceased members, many of whom may not have been able to cope without such a service. CD4 Machine, Zambia gorta recognises how essential early detection of HIV/Aids is to ensuring a person’s ability to cope and receive necessary treatment. With support from gorta, local Zambian community based organisation Community Orientated Development Programme (CODEP) was provided with a CD4 Machine which helps test for HIV/AIDS as part of a health programme. The machine enables the early detection and also indicates when a patient needs to start on a course of anti-retro viral (ARVs) treatment. In partnership with the Zambian Ministry of Health, tests are carried out by qualified government lab technicians. gorta understands the importance of education as a key to reduce the spread of HIV/Aids. It is working with CODEP carrying out social mobilisation campaigns to increase and raise awareness of HIV/Aids and the availability and effectiveness of ARV treatment. This has resulted in many people being enrolled on the Government’s National Free ARV programme, has helped to reduce stigma and discrimination and has also increased the number of people taking up Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT). CODEP has also introduced a mobile VCT service to the area to enable people to know their HIV status and also reduce the distance they have to walk to the nearest health centre where VCT service is offered. More than 4,500 people have undergone the VCT through the Mobile VCT programme, and in the past two years CODEP has trained 120 community HIV peer educators and 60 HIV counsellors.

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Bicycle Ambulances, Zambia Due to the long distances that need to be covered to reach a Rural Health Centre in Zambia, it is difficult for people living in the remote rural regions to receive proper medical assistance. For most people in the Chiparamba area of eastern Zambia, a medical emergency is something altogether more serious, with many facing long distances to health facilities. Family members are unlikely to own a bicycle, let alone a car, and public ambulance systems are virtually unheard of. In order to change this picture, CODEP with support from gorta sought to improve the referral of incapacitated patients to health centres by introducing bicycle ambulances into the area. Bicycle ambulances are dedicated to saving lives and improving access to healthcare by supplying safe, strong, effective and sustainable medical transportation to those in need. The bicycle ambulance is a locally produced and maintained, fuel-less vehicle that provides safe, affordable transport. They can ensure safer and quicker transport to nearby clinics and hospitals for those who are sick or injured. So far 20 bicycle ambulances are being used across 40 villages and were distributed to cover a population of 14,500. Though moving slowly but reaching far, the bicycle ambulance has proved a reliable partner in emergency health transport. CODEP has proven that the simple intervention of a bicycle ambulance is working as a part of an outreach programme in the remote rural areas of Chipata, eastern Zambia.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Children at a Social Change and Development (SCAD) supported school in Tamil Nadu, India.

gorta’s partnership with Valid Nutrition has enabled the expansion of the VN production plant for Ready to Use Foods in Malawi. Image courtesy of Valid Nutrition.

gorta has achieved much through the power of collaboration through working with local community groups in its countries of focus, exchanging knowledge and learning with other organisations, lobbying and consulting with governments and collaborating with private companies on pioneering projects.

Working in Partnership Working in partnership with local communities means that gorta works with groups who can understand and tackle the multitude of challenges faced by them. gorta’s food, water, health, education and livelihoods programmes are planned and carried out by local communities, which means that the people have meaningful input into developing their own communities for the better. This type of partnership also allows the organisation to maintain an excellent level of cost effectiveness and impact as the majority of goods and materials are sourced locally, providing value for money and is an added bonus for local business and economies. The support that is provided is both financial, which supports development initiatives, and technical in that gorta provides advice and assistance in project planning, watershed management, agriculture and micro-finance. Partnering with other NGO’s with similar goals offers the opportunity to combine forces, and exchange knowledge, expertise and learning. In each of gorta’s countries of focus, gorta seeks out and is open to opportunities for collaboration with other NGOs where it can add value and have a positive impact on community development.

gorta has partnered with Concern in Tanzania on a water and environmental health programme and in Malawi on a sustainable livelihoods programme, with Trócaire in Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia on a sustainable livelihoods programme and with Valid Nutrition in Malawi on the production of therapeutic foods. gorta plays a crucial role in acting as a catalyst, bringing groups together who would not otherwise be working together. This has been the case with regard to various Corporate Social Responsibility Programmes initiated by gorta that have proved particularly successful. For example, PM Group, a leading engineering, architecture and project management company which specialises in the delivery of highly complex projects, joined gorta in supporting a project in India. The company carried out ground-breaking work in assisting the group Social Change and Development (SCAD) in developing a major centre for people with disabilities in Tamil Nadu. Through this centre children and young adults from the poorest sections of community will have access to therapy, training and education – enhancing their chances for the future.

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at ho Mary O’Rourke, manager of gorta’s new shop in Bandon, with volunteers Gemma Ryan, Anne Doyle and Mary Wilmot. The new premises were made possible with the valued support of the Bandon Methodist Church.


ome


gorta CEO Brian Hanratty, Micheál Martin T.D. and Professor Denis Lucey, Chairman, gorta Hunger Secretariat at the launch of the Secretariat.

Isabella Rae, Senior Technical Advisor to the Hunger Secretariat meets Ban ki-Moon after his address to the Malawian Parliament

The gorta Hunger Secretariat was launched on the 27th April 2010 Minister for Foreign Affairs, Micheál Martin T.D., Salil Shetty, Director of the UN Millennium Campaign (New York) and Dr. Kostas Stamoulis, Director of the Agricultural Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the UN in Rome were also in attendance. The initiative was established, to add sustained focus on hunger for the next five years and to support the conversion of international pledges and promises into tangible and successful actions.

Hunger Secretariat and World Food Day The Secretariat which is chaired by Professor Denis Lucey, who was also a member of Ireland’s Hunger Task Force, believes that sustained efforts, political recommitments and delivery on the international promises are now needed across the globe if we are to make a serious dent in the problem of world hunger. In September 2010, CEO Brian Hanratty and Professor Denis Lucey Chairman of the gorta Hunger Secretariat travelled to the UN MDG Summit in New York. The highlight of the summit was the high-level meeting on global hunger, which was co-hosted by the Irish and U.S. Government. At the meeting Minister Martin and U.S. Secretary of State Hilary Clinton launched the 1,000 Days: Change a Life, Change the Future Initiative which announced details of a commitment to address the immediate need to ensure children all over the world receive adequate nutrition in the first 1000 days, from conception to the age of two. The Minister also praised the strong representation at the summit by Irish NGOs, working together under the Dóchas umbrella. The 30th annual World Food Day organized by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) took place globally on

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16th of October 2010. As the Irish affiliate to the organisation, the annual gorta World Food Day Conference took place on Friday 15th October in Dublin. The theme of the conference was ‘United Against Hunger: How to Feed a Billion People’ and coincided with the International Day of Rural Women. The event was attended by dignitaries, representatives of the non-profit, public and corporate sector and as well as Gorta’s board, council and staff. The conference included an address by the President of Ireland and Patron of gorta, Mary McAleese. Other speakers at the conference included Peter Power, Minister of State for Overseas Development; Gabriel Rugalema from the Gender Division of FAO (Rome); and Tony Simons, Deputy Director General of the World Agroforestry Centre in Kenya who all discussed some of the major challenges facing the developing world and the need for investment from both the public and private sectors. At the event, gorta Chairman Andy Cole presented a special Global Corporate Responsibility Leadership Award to Pat McGrath, CEO of PM Group, in recognition of the support that they provided in developing a centre for disabled people in Tamil Nadu in India. The conference was chaired by Karen Coleman, Newstalk presenter and was streamed live through gorta.org.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

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Dublin statues come alive as part of the Act Now 2015 campaign which calls on the Government to deliver on its aid promises

The National Famine commemoration Day took place in Murrisk, Co. Mayo on the 16th May 2010 with a number of events. gorta was involved in the memorial and engaged local communities at home and the diaspora abroad to remember Ireland’s past, and to reflect on how many people still live in chronic hunger today.

Donor Engagement and Communications gorta is a member of the Stop Climate Chaos coalition of NGOs and actively participates and supports its awareness raising events throughout the year. In June 2010, gorta participated in the Stop Climate Chaos Mass Lobby joining hundreds of people calling for a fairer climate deal from the Irish Government. The fight against climate change is vital to maintaining progress made under the Millennium Development Goals as well as sustaining long-term development projects in developing countries. In September, gorta took part in the Act Now 2015 campaign which saw the statues of Dublin come alive and call on the Government to act on its aid promises, and spend 0.7% of its national income on overseas aid by 2015. Since 2009, Ireland’s Overseas Development Aid Budget has been cut by nearly E250 million and the impacts of these cuts have been enormous in developing countries. ‘On the Ground’ gorta’s annual donor newsletter was distributed to almost 40,000 donors throughout Ireland and the UK. This sixteen page newsletter was sent out as part of the ‘GIVE: Lifetime Gifts’ campaign mailing and outlined the work that gorta does through a number of case studies, which examined the different projects that gorta funded in east Africa. The newsletter also detailed

gorta’s fundraising and campaigning activities throughout the year. Print and broadcast media interest in gorta events increased substantially during the year with noteworthy coverage received in national and regional outlets for a number of events including Charity Shops – Unwanted Christmas Gifts, Soup for Life and the National Famine Commemoration event, gorta Haiti Fundraiser, World Food Day and the PM Group award, GIVE: with Lifetime Gifts and church gate collections. During 2010, gorta continued to expand its online presence on social media platforms and developed further significant online fans and followers. The intention is to build on these followings through these various platforms, explore the most effective ones, prioritize resources on those, and use these channels to continue to build brand awareness, loyalty and support.

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Since gorta was established in 1965, thousands of volunteers throughout Ireland have been at the heart of its success in raising much needed funds to tackle the scourge of hunger in some of the world’s poorest communities. Our programmes especially target food and water security – and also education, healthcare and livelihoods. These are all basic needs we take for granted – but not so for those less fortunate. Nearly one billion people go hungry in the modern world – almost one in six people on the planet. Many more lack clean, safe water and adequate sanitation. gorta firmly believes change can happen and positive futures can be created – our volunteers’ enthusiastic response to the challenge is our strength.

Address from the gorta President Thanks to our volunteers and donors, gorta has been able to carry out its work in some of the world’s poorest communities for over forty years, where it develops longterm programmes to help families provide for themselves and realise their own potential in areas such as food production, water security, agriculture and enterprise. Throughout Ireland, gorta volunteers in County Committees and other groups assist with our Church Gate Collection Programme, vital to maintaining awareness of the organisation as well as raising much needed income to support the growing number of programmes which gorta implements, especially in subSaharan Africa. Volunteers also provide invaluable support in our network of charity shops located in Dublin (Capel St and Liffey St); Cork; Limerick; Portlaoise; Carlow; Bandon; Macroom; Mallow and Skibbereen. These shops rely entirely on donations of clothes and other items and always welcome new customers and supporters to ‘bring and/ or buy’.

launched during the year and saw thousands at work, school or in the home organising a simple meal on the theme of soup to reflect on ‘An Gorta Mór’ in Ireland in the 19th century, while contributing to help gorta “make hunger history” in the 21st century. We are deeply indebted to the members of gorta’s Board; its Committees; our County and Shop Committees and many others throughout the country who are so generous with their time as gorta volunteers. All share a passion to tackle the root causes of hunger and support the most vulnerable in their quest for social justice. Their continued support along with that of gorta’s tens of thousands of donors - is vital to enable us continue working towards a world where there is no hunger or poverty and where communities can create a more prosperous future for themselves and their families. Fittingly, in a time when civic participation in society is needed more than ever, the European Commission has designated 2011 as European Year of Volunteering. Central to the success of gorta is the immense dedication shown by our volunteers who offer their time and energy in order to achieve gorta’s vision. To all of them, I would like to extend a heartfelt and sincere thank you. Kevin Higgins President of gorta

Other volunteers support our annual campaigns such as our Lifetime Gifts (“GIVE”) Campaign or ‘Soup for Life’ which was

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gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Bobby Kerr, Broadcaster and Chairman of Insomnia Coffee takes part in Soup for Life 2010

Throughout 2010, gorta continued to lead strong and dynamic fundraising campaigns, in what was another challenging year for the sector. Attracting support has become increasingly competitive but gorta still enjoys strong and valued support from its regular donors and also from the gorta Council and network of dedicated volunteers.

Fundraising A new fundraising campaign – Soup for Life – launched on the 14th May 2010. The campaign saw over 70 restaurants in Cork, Dublin and Mayo taking part and donating €1 per bowl of soup sold to gorta. Homes, schools and businesses also got involved and raised money for gorta. Lots of well-known names came on board such as Insomnia Coffee Group, Trocadero and Cafe Paradiso and raised thousands of euro for gorta’s work overseas. It is expected that this campaign will grow from year to year, as will the revenue generated from it. The ‘GIVE: with Lifetime Gifts’ campaign 2010 saw a slight decrease in revenue from the 2009 figures, but incurred less fundraising costs. This is in line with the decrease in regular giving experienced by many charities. gorta redeveloped the Give: with Lifetime Gifts campaign website with the inclusion of a new shopping cart facility making it more straightforward for the donor to order gifts and personalised e-cards. Advertising for the campaign consisted of national radio

FRIDAY, 14 MAY

NATIONAL SOUP DAY EAT IT... DRINK IT... SLURP IT! Tuck into a bowl of soup to help make famine history. gorta is asking all you soup lovers and foodies out there to get involved to help deliver food security to sub-Saharan Africa.

Log onto www.gorta.org or call us now on callsave 1850 80 80 80 and put your name in the pot to get your Soup for Life pack with signature soup recipes from celebrity chefs and restaurants.

MAKE FAMINE HISTORY.

PUT YOUR NAME IN THE POT AT:

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gorta supporters Kevin, Audrey and Frank at a Limerick church gate collection.

Padraic Ryan, Manager of the gorta shop on North Main Street Cork

and TV using RTE 1 and TV3 respectively, online avenues and through gorta’s social media channels. The gorta shop network also sold lifetime gifts which helped in raising awareness of the gorta presence in the regions.

to lack of priests and attendance slacking off, gorta are still holding their own with regards to church gate collections. In 2010, ‘Merchandise Appeals’ were completed at churches in the counties of Dublin, Kildare and Limerick. This has been one of the successes of Community Fundraising, in tackling the challenge of securing valuable stock for the shops, particularly in the Dublin area. The uptake has been excellent and will be expanded to other shop locations during 2011. Sadly some of the long time volunteers that dedicated a huge amount to the organisation have passed away and to them gorta owes a debt of gratitude.

The retail sector has been thoroughly challenged in the last while and gorta’s shops have not been immune to this trend. While customer spending has reduced significantly in Ireland, with the support of its enthusiastic and committed team of volunteers has continued to work hard at making its shops more efficient and cost effective with management training and volunteer recruitment ongoing. On the 20 November 2010 a new gorta shop was opened at 16 Bridge Street in Bandon, after severe flooding had damaged the old shop. The official opening took place on Bandon Community Day with Manager Mary O’Rourke and volunteers Gemma Ryan, Anne Doyle and Mary Wilmot all present to celebrate the success of the new premises. Income from church-gate collections has remained steady, despite the recession. New parishes have come on board, some of which have not had a gorta church gate collection in over 20 years – mainly in the Dublin and country area. Counties such as Kildare have now become a very good stronghold for gorta and local parishioners participating at church gate collections are essential to the overall achievement of gorta’s church gate collections. With permits getting more difficult to obtain, the goodwill of the Parish Priest is vital but with more masses been cut due

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Case Study:

GIVE: with Lifetime Gifts The Literacy Action and Development Agency (LADA), in partnership with gorta, are working to reduce the burden on children and women in water and sanitation service delivery in Rukungiri, Uganda through education and support. This project is a direct beneficiary of the Safe Drinking Water for a Community gift, which is available through gorta’s Give: with Lifetime Gifts catalogue. On a field visit that the LADA Board Members made to Kikarara Parish, Mr Alex Kahundu, who comes from a family of 15, had this to share.

Children fetching water from a well in Kikarara Parish, as part of the LADA Project.

“I am now 24 years old, my father has nine children, two daughter in-laws and four grandchildren. We participated in the digging and installation of this shallow well, though many other people were busy during that season with rice and millet harvesting. However, when it was completed, every day, I have to come here to ensure children collect water peacefully, and carefully without damaging the pump. We did not expect, on daily basis that over 500 jerrycans are fetched from the well during holidays. During school days, around 800-900 jerrycans are fetched from the well…” This project has installed many other facilities, including tanks and wells, but the main benefits are felt by the women and children who can now fetch the water, without the need to compete with elephants, buffalo, and other wild animals for the same water source.

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Mutual support, such as the sharing of information, ideas and resources is an essential part of gorta’s work. Below is a description of each of the main organisations to which gorta is affiliated.

Networks Food and Agricultural Organisation The Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations leads international efforts to defeat hunger. Serving both developed and developing countries, FAO acts as a neutral forum where all nations meet as equals to negotiate agreements and debate policy and is also a source of knowledge and information. gorta has been the affiliate of FAO in Ireland since it was founded in 1965. The FAO aims to help developing countries modernise and improve their agriculture, forestry and fisheries practices, with a particular focus given to developing rural areas. It continues to highlight its strong commitment to the elimination of hunger through a global focus on World Food Day which is held in mid-October every year and on which gorta hosts a major international conference in Ireland.

The Alliance provides a space where governments and civil society organizations can find their similarities, build working relationships and increase their visibility, recognition and impact. It operates at two levels: • Internationally, as a global partnership that brings together a wide range of relevant stakeholders including UN organisations and international NGOs. • Nationally, at the country level through supporting the establishment and activities of National Alliances Against Hunger and Malnutrition and facilitating linkages among them. Further information can be found at www.theaahm.org

Further information can be found at www.fao.org Dóchas

Alliance Against Hunger and Malnutrition gorta is a member of the Alliance Against Hunger and Malnutrition (AAHM). The AAHM is a forward-thinking global initiative that links like-minded organisations and institutions that are involved in the fight against hunger and malnutrition. It provides a unique middle ground – a multi-stakeholder platform and forum where those in development can meet in a neutral and open environment, share ideas, learn from each other and establish supportive networks.

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gorta is a member of Dóchas, the association of Irish Non-Governmental Development Organisations. Dóchas provides a forum for consultation and co-operation between its members and helps them speak with a single voice on development issues. It was formed in October 1993, following a merger between CONGOOD - which represented the common interests of Irish NGDO’s since 1974, and the Irish National Assembly - which linked most Irish Non-Governmental Development Organisations (NGDOs) into a European Union NGO network. gorta has signed the Dóchas Code of Conduct on Images and Messages. The purpose of this Code is to provide a framework

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which organisations can refer to when designing and implementing their public communication strategy. The Code offers a set of guiding principles that can assist organisations in their decision-making about which images and messages to choose in their communication while maintaining full respect for human dignity. As a signatory gorta is committed to adhering to and promoting this code of conduct, which is based on the paramount principles of: • Respect for the dignity of the people concerned. • Belief in the equality of all people. • Acceptance of the need to promote fairness, solidarity and justice. Further information can be found at www.dochas.ie

The Wheel gorta is a member of The Wheel, which is Ireland’s support and representative umbrella network for community, voluntary and charitable organisations. The Wheel helps get things done, represents shared interests to Government and other decisionmakers and promotes a better understanding by the public of them and their work. Established in 1999, The Wheel has evolved to become a resource centre and forum for the community and voluntary sector and its mission is to strengthen this sector, focusing on organisations who seek to create a better world. It advocates for an environment that supports voluntary activity, and works to help this flourish by supporting organisations and by representing their shared interests.

Stop Climate Chaos gorta is a member of Stop Climate Chaos, which is a coalition of Ireland’s main development and civil society organisations calling on the Government and political parties to ensure that Ireland does its part in preventing climate change. The campaign aims to mobilise public support throughout Ireland to drive much-needed political action to meet this critical global challenge. The coalition has come together with a common vision - a world where human impact on the global climate has been contained to a level that enables social, environmental and economic justice for all. The Stop Climate Chaos campaign sets out three key demands for change to the government and opposition parties. • Ensure Ireland does its fair share to prevent climate chaos by immediately bringing in a climate change law which provides for an annual carbon budget and 3% year on year reductions in Irish green house gas emissions. • Push for an international agreement to keep the rise in global temperatures to 2 degrees Celsius or less. This means that global greenhouse gas emissions must reach their peak and begin to decline irreversibly within 10 years. • Support developing countries to adapt to the unavoidable effects of climate change. Further information can be found at www.stopclimatechaos.ie

Further information can be found at: www.wheel.ie

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Act Now 2015

Irish Charity Shops Association

gorta is also an affiliate of the Act Now on 2015 Campaign, which was launched with the support of 65 Irish anti-poverty organisations. It represents the continuation and rebranding of the We Don’t Care Less Campaign which had been launched a year earlier in response to a series of deep cuts to Ireland’s overseas aid budget. The primary aims of the campaign are:

The Irish Charity Shops Association (ICSA), of which gorta is a member, promotes the offering of desirable products in a clean, customer-friendly environment, with a high degree of professionalism. Members of the ICSA benefit from the sharing of information as well as the mutual support they give each other. At present, ICSA members operate over 200 shops throughout Ireland. The association produces an annual Benchmarking survey which provides an industry norm against which individual charities can measure their own performance.

• Binding annual targets for spending on ODA to deliver a minimum of 0.7% by 2015. • Pressure by Ireland at EU level to agree a further set of ambitious collective and individual targets between now and 2015 to monitor progress towards achievement of the 0.7% target by all EU Member States. In calculating these new targets, the current 2010 EU interim target was used as a baseline. • Legislation that ensures more predictable allocations in ODA spending, in place by the earliest date possible in order to guarantee Ireland’s aid commitment. Further information can be found at www.actnow2015.ie

Legacy Promotion Ireland Legacy Promotion Ireland is a partnership between Ireland’s leading charities. It was established in 2003 to spread the world about charitable bequests. The organisation now represents over 60 charities and provides useful, unbiased information to individuals, charities and solicitors about leaving legacies to charities. By leaving a donation to a charity in a will, a lasting legacy is left that will create a better future for others.

Further information can be found at: www.icsa.ie

The European Association for Philanthropy and Giving The European Association for Philanthropy and Giving (EAPG) is the unique membership network that seeks to ensure the best possible practice in charitable giving and philanthropy. The membership of the Association bridges the divide between charities, philanthropic intermediaries, and professional advisors such as lawyers, accountants, private bankers and investment advisors. EAPG believes that, as the gatekeepers to high net worth donors and philanthropists, professional advisors are central players in the development of an overall culture of giving in the UK and Europe, and they must have a closer relationship with and better understanding of charities and non-profits for philanthropy and giving to thrive.

Further information can be found at www.mylegacy.ie

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Francis Jalum, Secretary of the WENDI Programme in Gotlembe, Uganda gives a presentation on how funds have been used since 2009

Financial Review Governance:

Income

In line with best practice and early adoption of emerging standards gorta has produced the financial statements in line with the Charities SORP, the UK Statement of Recommended Practice – accounting and reporting by charities. This allows for the reporting of the activities of the charity in a clear and transparent manner. The stewardship of the organisation can be clearly seen, showing how gorta uses funds to effectively achieve it’s objectives.

Due to the difficult economic environment faced in Ireland, gorta’s total income has been adversely impacted, down 7.16%. However, due to the commitment and ongoing support of our donors, the effect on gorta has been less significant than other charities in the sector. Without this significant support gorta would not be able to maintain the same wide range of services to our vulnerable recipients in sub Saharan Africa.

During 2010, gorta continued to ensure internal controls were robust to manage the risks that the charity may be exposed to, including ensuring the highest standards of donor care and data protection compliance are adhered to, in the processes and systems that manage gorta’s regular income and improving the transparency and accountability of gorta’s international development work.

The Fundraising income has decreased by 8.9%. While the level of committed giving has fallen, many of our donors have provided additional support through our section 848a tax back campaign whereby if a PAYE tax payer has given E250 or more to gorta in the course of a tax year, gorta can reclaim the tax paid on the donations. This has raised a total of E123k during the year. Our campaign will continue into 2011.

The Trustee’s Report outlines further details of the work of the Board and sub-committees.

As well as the generosity of our donors’ funds and time we have also benefited from a gift of expertise and a media bursary gift in kind of E10k.

Financial Results:

gorta was successful in a grant application to the civil society fund of Irish Aid covering 3 years up to a maximum of E450k in total. gorta received E150k of this grant in 2010. gorta will match an element of these funds over the coming 2 years, therefore E300k has been designated for future spends on this programme in Uganda.

In 2010 gorta had an anticipated and planned deficit of E2.244m in line with our financial strategy to utilise our funds as per the reserves policy. gorta achieved a very good balance between accomplishing our charitable goals while minimising support costs, maintaining these at 4% of total costs.

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gorta also received support from the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food for the conference held on World Food Day which gorta hosts in its capacity as the Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland as designated by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). In addition an employment subsidy was granted under the Employment Subsidy Scheme Grant by Enterprise Ireland to assist with our retailing staffing. The support of statutory bodies is greatly appreciated by the Board, Council, staff and partners of gorta.

Expenditure The activities of the charity have continued in gorta’s five priority countries through the utilisation of gorta’s funds. In addition to this we have been able to assist those in need in other areas of the world through our related charity gorta UK including a commitment of E250k by the Board to fund programmes for those impacted by the earthquake in Haiti. Our charitable activities see us concentrating on five thematic areas as outlined below. After the allocation of support costs 79% of costs are spent on charitable activities. Food Security

39%

Livelihoods

31%

Water and Sanitation

20%

Health

6%

Education

4%

In order to support these programmes we need to continue to invest in our fundraising activities to raise funds needed by gorta resulting in a cost income ratio of 17.5% before allocation of support costs.

Fundraising Cost Income Ratio 17.5%

to increase this. The trading section of gorta does contribute to the programmes carried out overseas to the amount of E86k. gorta has endeavoured to reduce costs where possible, resulting in a 3% reduction. Without the many volunteers that give their time and efforts to assist in the running of gorta shops we would not be able to continue in the retail sector. In addition, the support from local communities through the donation of goods and by shopping in our stores is incredibly valuable and necessary for the survival of the shops. Without such generous donations the cost of running the shops would be unsustainable. gorta continues to review all expenditure to ensure savings can be achieved where possible, that value for money exists and that our programmes achieve the desired impact. The expenditure split before the allocation of support costs is as follows, Programmes Costs: 77%, Fundraising and Marketing costs: 10%, Retail Costs: 9%, Administration Costs: 4%.

Reserves Despite the current economic environment and the reduction in income, gorta remains in a strong position with over E11m of a reserve at the end of 2010. gorta will draw on this prudently in the coming years. gorta will continue its strategy to utilise an element of its reserve over the coming years to respond to the needs of our partners in the field for sustained programmes.

Future Activities: gorta is committed to work for a world free from the injustices of chronic hunger, poverty and disease. Through the ongoing support from our generous donors and by adhering to the internal protocols and controls in place, gorta will continue to work in partnership with local communities and our local partners, to design, implement, own and manage programmes in sub-Saharan Africa.

In line with the retail sector difficulties throughout Ireland, gorta has seen a reduction in sales figures. gorta has a margin of 9% on the shops and are looking at innovative ways

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Key Financial Indicators:

Mix Of Income

2010

2009

E’000 % E’000 % Fundraising Income 5,192 75.1% 5,712 76.7% Gift In Kind 10 0.2% - 0.0% Volunteering, Community Awareness and Trading 936 13.5% 970 13.0% Investment Income 596 8.6% 743 10.0% Grant Income 178 2.6% 20 0.3% Total Incoming Resources

Mix Of Expenditure

6,912

100%

2010

7,445

100%

2009

E’000 % E’000 % Direct Charitable Activities Costs 7,017 76.7% 8,139 80.5% Fundraising Costs 909 9.9% 657 6.5% Volunteering, Community Awareness and Trading 836 9.1% 857 8.5% Support Costs 352 3.8% 404 4.0% Governance costs and Currency Loss 42 0.5% 53 0.5% Total Expenditure

9,156

100%

10,110

100%

Jennifer Coyne Head of Finance and Administration

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75%

Financial Highlights 1 Where our Money Comes From Donations and Fundraising Income

936

Investment Income

596

Revenue Based Grants

178

159

Committee Income

106

General Donations

282

Gift in Kind

Costs of Generating Voluntary Income

75%

0.5%

E’000

6% 13%

89%

7,207

79% 850 42 1,057

3% 0.2% 2%

52

4 1% 1%

79% 89%

10

3 How Your Money gets Spent, after Support Cost Allocation

9%

13%

3% 0.2% 2%

Governance Costs and Currency Loss

44 1% 1%

6% 9%

3%

Legacies

9%

13%

E’000 4,645

Volunteering, Community Awareness and Trading

4 1% 1%

75% 79%

0.5% 3% 0.2% 2%

2 Breakdown of Fundraising Income

9%

5,192

Volunteering, Community Awareness and Trading

Programmes Costs Including Advocacy

13%

E’000

Committed giving

9%13%

3% 0.5%

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

6%

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

4


9% 4 Split of Grant 9% 13%Income by Donor 13% E’000 9%Irish Aid 150

3% 3% 3%

13% Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

5% 5% 5%

19

75% Enterprise Ireland 75%

0.5%

84%

13% 13% 5 Split of Programmes Spend 9% 13% by Country 9% Uganda

79% Malawi 79%

9%

E’000 2,276

2,053

Zambia

Tanzania

710

Kenya

285

India

89

Haiti

52

79%

3% 6 Split 6% of Programmes Spend by 0.2% 2% Thematic Area

E’000 2,407

Livelihoods

1,927

Water and Sanitation

1,247

Health

349

Education

295

89% Food Security 89%

4% 1% 4% 1% 1% 1% 4% 1% 1%

1,109

3% 6% 0.2% 2% 3% 6% 0.2% 2%

89%

11%

84% 84%

9

75%

0.5% 0.5%

11% 11%

11% 11%

17% 17% 17%

11%

31% 31%

35% 35%

31% 35%

20% 20%

6% 6% 4% 4% 6% 4%

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

20%

39% 39%

31% 31% 31%

39%

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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acco Water development has inspired Joyce Thomas to learn to read, Mtifu village, Malawi


ounts


Elizabeth Filmon was a participant in the Programme for the Attainment of Rights to Sustainable Livelihoods (PARL). A gorta-Concern partnership, this was an integrated programme covering a wide range of issues including addressing cultural discrimination against women, access to information, adult literacy and the confidence of village people to engage in planning for themselves. By promoting self-help initiatives, communities were encouraged to invest in agricultural inputs, while being supported though the provision of training on access to markets.


gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland

Reports and Financial Statements for the year ended

31 December 2010 CONTENTS

Pg.

Reference and Administration

58

Report of the Trustees Statement of Trustees’ Responsibilities

59 - 64 65

Independent Auditor’s Report

66 - 67

Statement of Accounting Policies

68 - 70

Statement of Financial Activities

71

Balance Sheet

72

Cash Flow Statement

73

Notes to the Financial Statements Supplementary Information

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

74 - 83 84

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Reference and Administration

Reference and Administration

58

TRUSTEES

Mr. Andy Cole (Chairman)

Mr. Brian Kehoe (Vice Chairman)

Professor Denis I. F. Lucey

Mr. Kevin Higgins

Dr. David O’Connor (Resigned 16th June 2010)

Ms. Mary Buchalter (Appointed 16th June 2010)

Mr. Liam Fitzgerald

Ms. Deirdre Fox

SECRETARY

Brian Hanratty

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Brian Hanratty

12 Herbert Street

REGISTERED OFFICE

Dublin 2, IRELAND

Gallagher Shatter & Co.

SOLICITORS

4 Upper Ely Place

Dublin 2, IRELAND

PRINCIPAL BANKERS

Bank of Ireland Head Office Branch Lower Baggot Street Dublin 2, IRELAND

Permanent TSB 2-4 Upper Baggot Street Dublin 4, IRELAND

EBS 13 Lr. Baggot Street, Dublin 2, IRELAND

AIB 1-4 Lower Baggot Street Dublin 2, IRELAND

AUDITORS

Deloitte & Touche Chartered Accountants Deloitte & Touche House Earlsfort Terrace Dublin 2, IRELAND

COMPANY NUMBER

28228

CHARITY NUMBER

CHY 5678

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Report of the Trustees for the Year Ended 31 December 2010 The Trustees present their annual report and financial statements of the charity for the year ended 31 December 2010. Vision gorta’s vision is a world where there is no hunger or poverty and where the poorest communities have the means to create more prosperous futures for themselves and their children. Mission Through its work, gorta aims at empowering communities to eradicate hunger and poverty, with particular emphasis on food and water security, contributing to people’s unrestricted access to secure and environmentally sustainable livelihoods. Our mission is: • To promote best practices in the area of sustainable long-term development in communities, especially in sub-Saharan Africa; • To be a catalyst for the creation, safeguarding and transfer of best practice in food and water security; and • To be a facilitator in channelling goodwill, resources and expertise to communities most in need. In so doing, gorta will develop and promote models of pragmatic and effective best practice to be shared with those individuals and groups with whom we work in a spirit of partnership.

Values gorta will ensure that all our decisions, actions, and stakeholder interactions conform to the organisation’s moral and professional principles. These principles are the foundation for the organisation’s culture and values. Ethical Businesslike Donor Focussed Caring Partnership Innovative Inspiring Advocates

Charter How we will achieve our Mission gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland (gorta) is an independent, international development NGO and the Irish partner of the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). We are a not for profit organisation working to the highest professional, business and ethical standards. Our intention is to contribute meaningfully to the eradication of the causes of hunger and poverty in the world. We are not an emergency relief organisation. Our approach to long term development is holistic, multi-disciplinary and creative. We encourage integrated solutions recognising the inter-dependent relationship that exists between food and water security, health, education and social enterprise.

Sustainable Development We support both small projects and large programmes, whichever is most appropriate to the challenge faced. We seek to leverage small projects into larger programmes to maximize the extent of their positive impacts. We are respectful of the culture, needs and wishes of the communities we work with and proactively seek out their views. We are committed to the principle of empowering communities and helping them help themselves, rather than simply providing funds. Put into practice this means communities making a contribution of some kind themselves. It may be in terms of labour, equipment, money, passing on help and advice to other projects, or other ‘in kind’ contributions. Only in the most exceptional cases will gorta fund 100% of a project or programme. Where appropriate gorta will work with local communities to set up businesses to help meet the needs of the programme. Our primary targets are the poorest, most disadvantaged communities in sub Saharan Africa. Our priority partner countries are Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia. gorta has full time, professional development workers, appropriately resourced, on the

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

ground, representing each of our target countries. We identify local partners and provide training and support to help them develop. In addition, gorta also supports a limited number of projects in South Africa, Rwanda, The Gambia and India. We will also support other potential partners in other countries on an exceptional basis in response to a request from other Irish or UK connections, other NGO’s, or where there is an opportunity to learn from or develop best practice that can be transferred elsewhere. We proactively support specialist academic institutions in priority countries focusing on agriculture, horticulture, hydrology and agro forestry to assist communities to tackle the challenges they face. We have a role in education and advocacy on behalf of communities needing long-term development. Whilst we are ‘apolitical’ we will be their voice.

Donor Partnerships We act responsibly in regard to our donors’ funds. We keep our costs to the minimum consistent with our need to be effective, ensuring the maximum amount can be used where it matters most. We are committed to being in communication with our donors, keeping them informed as to how their contribution is being used effectively. Wherever practical, and consistent with the responsible use of our donors’ resources, gorta will work with local community resources, skills and knowledge. We see ourselves as facilitators, providing opportunities for communities, businesses, workplace and social groups, families and individuals to make a contribution to the fight against hunger and drought especially in sub-Saharan Africa. We recognise that we can’t achieve our vision on our own. It can only be achieved through developing and working in long term partnership with local and national government, local communities, other ‘expert’ organisations, businesses and individuals etc who have complementary skills to our own. Meaningful partnership is central to our approach. We raise funds through a wide range of sources and will never become overly dependent upon just one source. We look to new technology as a way of cost efficient communication with our donors.

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Our network of volunteers across our retail and community fundraising infrastructure has been a source of great strength and resilience over the years. We are committed to maintaining and growing a strong, healthy community organisation including County Infrastructure and the gorta Council. We believe this keeps us connected to an important and influential constituency. Ethical Behaviour We are an open learning organisation, developing and sharing ‘best practice’ with our peers and partners. gorta believes in the importance of education and training. gorta will ensure that all our decisions, actions, and stakeholder interactions conform to the organisation’s moral and professional principles. These principles are the foundation for the organisation’s culture and values. The principles apply to all individuals involved in the organisation, from employees to members of the board of directors and council, and are communicated and reinforced on a regular basis. They ensure gorta’s mission and vision are aligned with its ethical principles empowering people to make effective decisions with confidence. Principal Activities The Company is a registered charity and therefore the report and results are presented in a form which complies with the requirements of the Companies Acts, 1963 to 2009 and although not obliged to comply with the Statement of Recommended Practice (SORP), “Accounting and Reporting by Charities”, as issued by the Charity Commissioners for England and Wales in October 2005 the Company has implemented its recommendations where relevant in these financial statements. The main activities of the Company are charitable. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the accounting policies set out on pages 68 to 70 of the financial statements. Financial Results Sustained fundraising in recent years, coupled with the recruitment of additional technical staff (both in Africa and Ireland) has enabled gorta to significantly increase its Programmes activity. In addition, a number of project applications received and assessed in the latter part of 2009 were approved in early

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

2010, adding further momentum to the year on year growth. Aside from the significant increase in Programme investment, other costs have been kept substantially in line with previous years. The current economic environment has seen a reduction both in donations received during the year and in sales at our ten charity shops. A reduction in deposit interest rates, coupled with a planned drawdown on reserves combined to reduce bank interest income. The financial results are outlined on page 71. Future Activities gorta is an international non-governmental, non-political, non-religious organisation created as a charitable legal entity in the Republic of Ireland in 1965. It is an independent charitable organisation constituted as a company limited by guarantee. The Memorandum of Association defines the organisation’s ‘Objects’ as being: a) The assistance and advancement of peoples in need in the less developed areas of the world with particular emphasis on the poorest of the poor, those suffering from hunger and those least capable of helping themselves. b) Advancing the objectives of the Food & Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) in matters of food security and long-term sustainable development. c) The empowerment of the local people in developing areas to own their own projects with a view to achieving self-sufficiency. d) The doing of all such other lawful things as are incidental to and conducive to the attainment of the foregoing objects. In striving to achieve its objectives, gorta works on empowering communities to eradicate hunger and poverty with particular emphasis on food and water security – especially in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi and Zambia. In so doing, gorta focuses on the areas of: • Food Security • Water and Sanitation • Health • Education • Livelihoods Combined, these programmes help create sustainable improvements to the living standards of poor communities especially in parts of sub Saharan Africa. Capacity

and capability building efforts remain key in gorta’s work with a view to creating gainful opportunities and prosperous futures for the people of Africa. Food Security and Nutrition. Food security is not only linked to the availability, production and preparation of food but also to access – physical and economic. gorta aims to address food security and nutrition through improving agricultural practices that promote and increase crop production and diversification. Projects are especially targeted at smallholder farmers and pastoralists with an emphasis on farm diversification. gorta also aims to reduce farmers’ vulnerability to the adverse effects of climate change and enable them to adopt improved methods of farming, thus creating sustainable, long term food security. Investing in forest restoration, tree nurseries and protection of biodiversity is becoming more prevalent in gorta’s food security programmes. Water and Sanitation. gorta’s aim is to provide the communities it supports with well managed water resources that are sustainable and productive and sanitation services that are adequate in terms of quality, sufficiency and long term operation and maintenance. Training of local water users groups is essential to ensure that the operation and maintenance is sustainable and the communities have been empowered and gained ownership of the facilities. Access to water helps fulfil basic needs at household level, and allows agriculture and local business to contribute to food security. gorta recognises the importance of water security as a basic human right and an essential step for development and is working with partners in sub-Saharan Africa to develop integrated water management schemes. This approach ensures that communities utilise their available resources to harness rainwater, protect existing water sources, maximize the use of superficial water sources, conduct efficient irrigation practices and contribute to the overall environmental conservation by specifically enhancing the recharge of ground water to conserve the environment and ensure long term water availability and prevent wells from drying up. Health. Poor health is both a cause and effect of poverty. gorta addresses health issues by focussing on improving food and water security and also working with partners in the provision of community care. Targeting the prevention of maternal and infant undernourishment is also central to gorta’s programmes. HIV/AIDS is prevalent

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

in sub-Saharan Africa and gorta has joined with a number of organisations to provide care for HIV/AIDS sufferers and for their families. The promotion of health is a basic right of all individuals and is a prerequisite to achieving adequate living standards and improved potential for self development. Education. Education is vital to improve the prospects of those experiencing hunger and extreme poverty. gorta, through the provision of agricultural training and life skills development, works to promote agricultural best practices in order to further improve the food security of households and communities. gorta has a long-standing history in supporting vocational training, entrepreneurial skills and income generating activities. gorta recognises the importance of linking farmers, especially smallholders, with trained extension workers and facilitating the transfer of knowledge with regard to sustainable farming practices. gorta’s overall aim is to strengthen the resources and capabilities of communities to facilitate longterm sustainable development. (gorta has also supported the provision of Early Childhood Development Centres and other education related projects, often with a focus on food security and nutrition). Livelihoods. Within livelihoods, gorta’s emphasis is on income generation, income security and enterprise promotion. Income security greatly reduces peoples’ vulnerability to food shortages, poor health and poverty. gorta supports skills training for incomegenerating activity, especially among womens’ groups, and provides access to the necessary credit. Wherever possible, gorta works with smallholder farmers to promote farming as a business, assisting in providing better produce storage, processing and marketing. gorta’s focus is on creating opportunities for gainful employment that enhance prosperity and wellbeing at household and community level. Partnerships gorta works with a network of local partner groups with objects similar to its own in the countries in which it operates. In addition, 2009 saw the commencement of new partnership arrangements, informed by the recommendations of the Government of Ireland’s Hunger Task Force, on which gorta was represented. This collaboration commenced in gorta’s five priority countries during 2009 when an initial sum of E2.4 million was allocated to such activities which are designed to maximise synergy and impact in the field.

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Hunger Secretariat In April 2010, gorta launched its Hunger Secretariat: as a ‘policy arm’ – an initiative aimed at capitalising on gorta’s 45 years of experience and harnessing it to inform policy processes at both national and international levels. The launch was officiated by the Irish Minister for Foreign Affairs, Mr Micheál Martin, FAO Director of the Agricultural Development Economics Division, Mr Stamoulis Kostas and the then Director of the UN Millennium Campaign, Mr Salil Shetty. The main objectives of gorta’s Hunger Secretariat are to: a) Be a catalyst for the promotion of a comprehensive and coordinated understanding of the interactions between hunger and poverty. b) Provide a forum – in Ireland and abroad – that facilitates sharing of best practices in relation to food and nutrition security. c) Contribute to the literature dealing with food and nutrition security in the context of the fight against hunger and poverty and the promotion of sustainable livelihoods and more prosperous futures for those least capable of helping themselves. d) Advance the recommendations of the Hunger Task Force. e) Support the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals, especially MDG1 (eradication of hunger and poverty), and contribute to policy development at the UN, including FAO, other international institutions, and the EU, in relation to 2015 and beyond. f) Contribute to gorta’s Strategy development and Programme activities gorta’s Hunger Secretariat is comprised of: Chairman: Professor Denis Lucey Senior Technical Advisor: Isabella Rae Policy Officer: Kate Mayne With contributions from gorta’s Chairman, Andy Cole, gorta’s CEO, Brian Hanratty, members of the Board and the Programmes Committee as required along with Council members and others. Grant making process Each proposal is reviewed by the responsible manager/officer. If it is in line with gorta’s strategy, it is sent to the Programmes Committee for review. Where the Programmes Committee recommends a programme the proposal is then sent to the Board for approval.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

Trustees and Corporate Governance

overseas programmes and partners.

The Trustees in office during the period and at the date of this report are set out on page 2. New Trustees are elected by the Council of gorta and each serve for a period of three years. They can be re-elected or replaced by newly elected Trustees from the Council of gorta.

The Board has created a procedure of compliance which addresses the Board’s wider responsibility to maintain, review and report on all internal controls, including financial, operational and compliance risk management.

The Trustees believe that committing to a high level of Corporate Governance is essential to achieving the optimal standard of operation of the Company’s Activities. To accomplish this the Board has a Competent Executive team. There is clear division of responsibility at the company with the Board retaining control of major decisions, with the Chief Executive responsible for devising strategy and policy within the authority delegated to him by the Board. The Board is responsible for providing leadership, setting strategy and ensuring control. The Company has a clear and detailed process for reporting management information to the Board. The Board is provided with regular information, which includes key performance and risk indicators for all aspects of the organisation. The Board meets regularly as required and met nine times during 2010. The Directors recognise their overall responsibility for gorta’s systems of internal control and for reviewing its effectiveness. They have delegated responsibility for the implementation of this system to the Executive Team. This system includes financial controls, which enable the Board to meet its responsibilities for the integrity and accuracy of the Company’s accounting records. Sub-committees established for good governance including but not confined to Board members are: Audit and Finance Committee The function of the audit committee is to review internal financial controls, treasury and risk management processes. It liaises with external auditors and reports directly to the Board. It also monitors and reviews the financial performance of the Company. It provides an independent review of the annual budgets, monthly management and financial accounts and makes recommendations to the Board where relevant. Programmes Committee This Committee is charged with considering key decisions relating to the support of

Environment As part of gorta’s vision we strive to achieve environmental justice for all. gorta’s programmes embrace the UN Millennium Development Goals which challenge all of us to respond to tackle poverty, hunger, disease, lack of shelter and exclusion – while promoting gender equality, healthcare, education, environmental sustainability and economic opportunity. We proactively support specialist educational institutions in priority countries focusing on agriculture, horticulture, hydrology and agro forestry to produce graduates equipped to tackle the challenges their communities face. gorta has a proactive approach to conducting our business in a manner that protects the environment. gorta is compliant with relevant environmental legislation.

Statement of Public Benefit gorta supports programmes that are concentrated in the most needy areas and are aimed at benefiting the poorest of the poor with emphasis on food security, nutrition, empowerment of women and improving the health of children to ensure growth and development.

Dividends and Retention The Company is precluded by its Memorandum of Association from paying dividends either as part of normal operations or on a distribution of its assets in the event of a winding-up.

Health and Safety gorta reviewed its Health and Safety Systems in 2009 and updated its safety statement and fire register. In 2010 the implementation of these were carried out successfully. The Safety Statement, in accordance with Section 20 of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005, outlines the policy of gorta in relation to the management of health,

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REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2010

safety and welfare.

Management and Staff

gorta is committed to managing and conducting its work activities in such a way as to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the safety, health and welfare at work of its employees, including fixed term employees and temporary employees and other individuals at the place of work (not being its employees).

We appreciate and acknowledge the committed work of our staff. The ongoing growth of gorta’s work is due to their dedication and commitment.

Voluntary Help and Gifts in Kind The Trustees are very grateful to the hundreds of volunteers throughout Ireland who helped the organisation during the year by membership of County Committees, staffing our shops and carrying out various fundraising initiatives, including Church Gate collections on behalf of gorta during the year. The public have been very generous in providing gifts in kind, particularly donations of items for resale through our network of ten charity shops in Ireland. Organisational Structure The charity was previously solely based in Ireland but gorta UK, a company limited by guarantee and a registered charity was incorporated in the UK on 6th September 2004. To achieve its objectives, the charity raises funds in Ireland through a network of charity shops, which sell second hand goods donated by the public. Further details of these activities are set out in note 1 to the financial statements. gorta also has a network of voluntary local community groups in a number of counties that raise money through fundraising events. gorta’s head office raises money directly for the organisation by organising fundraising events, promoting continuous giving and seeking subscriptions and donations from the general public. It also obtains funds from bequests. The Board of Directors who met nine times in 2010 retains overall responsibility for the strategic development of the charity in close liaison with the executive team. Brian Hanratty, Chief Executive, managed the operation of the charity with delegated divisional responsibility to the following:

We are committed to the continuing development of our staff and gorta allocate resources annually towards a comprehensive training and development programme. gorta is an equal opportunities employer and we recognise the need to ensure we have high calibre staff and volunteers to achieve our vision and objectives. Post Balance Sheet events There were no significant events affecting the company since the year-end. Companies (Amendment) Act, 1986 The reporting requirements of the Companies (Amendment) Act, 1986 relating to financial statements do not apply to the Company, as it is a company limited by guarantee not having a share capital. Books of Account To ensure that proper books and accounting records are kept in accordance with Section 202 of the Companies Act, 1990, the Directors have employed appropriately qualified accounting personnel and have maintained appropriate computerised accounting systems. The books of account are located at the company’s office at 12 Herbert Street, Dublin 2. Auditors Deloitte & Touche, Chartered Accountants continue in office in accordance with Section 160(2) of the Companies Act, 1963. Approved by the Trustees and signed on their behalf by: Signed on behalf of the Board: Andy Cole Trustee

Kevin Higgins Trustee

25 May 2011

Finance and Administration: Jennifer Coyne Marketing and Communications: Adrienne Dunne Programmes: Isabella Rae

64

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


STATEMENT OF TRUSTEES’ RESPONSIBILITIES

Statement of Trustees’ Responsibilities Irish company law requires the Trustees to prepare financial statements for each financial year which give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the company and of the incoming resources of the company for that year. In preparing those financial statements, the Trustees are required to: • select suitable accounting policies and then apply them consistently; • make judgements and estimates that are reasonable and prudent; and • prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis unless it is inappropriate to presume that the company will continue in business.

prepared in accordance with accounting standards generally accepted in Ireland and comply with Irish statute comprising the Companies Acts, 1963 to 2009. They are also responsible for safeguarding the assets of the company and hence for taking reasonable steps for the prevention and detection of fraud and other irregularities.

Signed on behalf of the Board:

Andy Cole Trustee

Kevin Higgins Trustee

25 May 2011 The Trustees are responsible for keeping proper books of account which disclose with reasonable accuracy at any time the financial position of the company and to enable them to ensure that the financial statements are

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

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65


Independent Auditor’s Report to the Members of gorta

Independent Auditor’s Report to the Members of gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland We have audited the financial statements of gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland for the year ended 31 December 2010 which comprise the Statement of Financial Activities, the Balance Sheet, the Cash Flow Statement, the Statement of Accounting Policies and the related notes 1 to 24. These financial statements have been prepared under the accounting policies set out in the Statement of Accounting Policies. This report is made solely to the company’s members, as a body, in accordance with Section 193 of the Companies Act, 1990. Our audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the company’s members those matters we are required to state to them in an auditors’ report and for no other purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other than the company and the company’s members as a body, for our audit work, for this report, or for the opinions we have formed.

Respective Responsibilities of Trustees and Auditors The Trustees are responsible for preparing the financial statements as set out in the Statement of Trustees’ Responsibilities, in accordance with applicable law and accounting standards issued by the Accounting Standards Board and published by The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Ireland (Generally Accepted Accounting Practice in Ireland). Our responsibility, as independent auditor, is to audit the financial statements in accordance with relevant legal and regulatory requirements and International Standards on Auditing (UK and Ireland). We report to you our opinion as to whether the financial statements give a true and fair view, in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Practice in Ireland, and are properly prepared in accordance with Irish statute comprising the Companies Acts, 1963 to 2009. We also report to you whether in our opinion proper books of account have been kept by the company and whether the information given in the Report of the Trustees

66

is consistent with the financial statements. In addition, we state whether we have obtained all the information and explanations necessary for the purpose of our audit and whether the company’s balance sheet and statement of financial activities are in agreement with the books of account. We also report to you if, in our opinion, any information specified by law regarding Trustees’ remuneration and Trustees’ transactions is not disclosed and, where practicable, include such information in our report. We read the Report of the Trustees and consider the implications for our report if we become aware of any apparent misstatement within it.

Basis of Audit Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing (UK and Ireland) issued by the Auditing Practices Board. An audit includes examination, on a test basis, of evidence relevant to the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. It also includes an assessment of the significant estimates and judgements made by the Trustees in the preparation of the financial statements, and of whether the accounting policies are appropriate to the company’s circumstances, consistently applied and adequately disclosed. We planned and performed our audit so as to obtain all the information and explanations which we considered necessary in order to provide us with sufficient evidence to give reasonable assurance that the financial statements are free from material misstatement, whether caused by fraud or other irregularity or error. In forming our opinion, we evaluated the overall adequacy of the presentation of information in the financial statements.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Independent Auditor’s Report to the Members of gorta

Opinion In our opinion the financial statements: • give a true and fair view, in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Practice in Ireland, of the state of affairs of the company as at 31 December 2010 and of the net outgoing resources of the company for the year then ended; and • have been properly prepared in accordance with the Companies Acts 1963 to 2009. We have obtained all the information and explanations we considered necessary for the purpose of our audit. In our opinion proper books of account have been kept by the company. The company’s balance sheet and its statement of financial activities are in agreement with the books of account. In our opinion the information given in the Report of the Trustees is consistent with the financial statements.

Deloitte & Touche Chartered Accountants and Registered Auditors Dublin 25 May 2011

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Statement of Accounting Policies

Statement of Accounting Policies The Primary Accounting policies adopted by gorta are:

Pg.

Basis of Preparation

68

Incoming Resources

68

Recognition of Expenditure

68

Fundraising Costs

69

Support Costs

69

Costs of Managing and Administering the Charity

69

Gifts in Kind

69

Operating Leases

69

Capitalisation and Depreciation of Tangible Fixed Assets

69

Funds Accounting

69

Reserves Policy

69

Investment Policy

70

Foreign Currencies

70

Pension Scheme

70

Basis of Preparation The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting standards generally accepted in Ireland and Irish statute comprising the Companies Acts 1963 to 2009. The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention and in accordance with the Statement of Recommended Practice (SORP) (Revised 2005) “Accounting and Reporting by Charities”. The financial statements are presented in euro (e) under the historical cost convention.

(iii) Grants from the government and other agencies have been included as income from activities in furtherance of the charity’s objects and accounted for on a receivable basis. (iv) Legacies are included when the amount is received by the charity or into an executor bank account for distribution to the charity at a near future date. (v) Interest income is recognised on a receivable basis. (vi) Revenue refunds in respect of tax relief on voluntary donations are recognised on a receivable basis.

Incoming Resources (i) Income from voluntary donations is recognised when received into the premises of the charity or lodged into one of the charity’s bank accounts. (ii) Proceeds from the sale of donated goods are recognised in the accounts in the period in which they are realised. Volunteer time is not included in the financial statements.

68

Recognition of Expenditure Expenditure is included when incurred, and includes attributable VAT which cannot be recovered. Grants payable for development projects are included in the Statement of Financial Activities (SOFA) when approved by the Trustees and agreed with the recipient organisation. The value of such grants unpaid at the year end is accrued.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Statement of Accounting Policies

A designated fund is established for expenditure which has been committed to projects, but remains unspent at the year end. The majority of costs are directly attributable to specific activities. Certain shared staff costs are apportioned to activities in furtherance of the objects of the charity support costs. Other overhead costs are not apportioned and are shown as full administration or fundraising costs. Fundraising Costs These include the salaries and direct fundraising expenditure to promote fundraising, including events. Support Costs Support costs represent the cost to head office of administering projects. The resources expended on charitable activities have been classified to comply with SORP 2005. Such costs include the direct costs of the charitable activities together with those Support costs (Finance and Administration cost) incurred that enable these activities to be undertaken. These have been allocated across the activities based on headcount. Costs of Managing and Administering the Charity These represent costs incurred running and managing the organisation, including managing and safeguarding the charity’s assets, organisational administration and compliance with constitutional and statutory requirements. Gifts in Kind Items donated for resale are included in shop income when sold and no value is placed on stock at the year end. Any other gifts in kind which are deemed non-material are not included in the accounts. Gifts in kind that can be valued with reasonable confidence will be included in the accounts. Operating Leases Rentals applicable to operating leases where substantially all the benefits and risks of ownership remain with the lessor are charged to the Statement of Financial Activities (SOFA).

Capitalisation and Depreciation of Tangible Fixed Assets Tangible fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation of fixed assets is provided on cost in equal instalments over the estimated useful lives of the assets. The annual rates of depreciation are as follows: Shop fittings

20%

Office Equipment

20%

Computer Equipment

33.3%

Motor Vehicles

33.3%

Funds Accounting Funds held by the charity are: Unrestricted general funds – these are funds which can be used in accordance with the charitable objects at the discretion of the Trustees. Designated funds – these are funds which have been set aside for particular purposes by the Association itself, in furtherance of the Association’s charitable objects. Restricted funds – these are funds that can only be used for particular restricted purposes within the objects of the charity. Restrictions arise when specified by the donor or when funds are raised for particular restricted purposes. Further explanation of the nature and purpose of each fund is included in the notes to the financial statements. Reserves Policy In order to secure the long term viability of gorta and to maintain the smooth operation of the organisation, it is critical to ensure that the organisation has adequate reserves. The level of reserves needs to cover the following activities of the organisation • Provide funding for sustainable Programmes. • Meet contractual liabilities such as lease agreements, statutory staff payments and payments to creditors. • Maintain a required level of funding available for overseas programmes during times of financial difficulty where fundraising income is diminished. • Meet unanticipated expenses such as repairs and maintenance, currency variances and legal costs.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

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69


Statement of Accounting Policies

• To facilitate programme/project continuation especially where a partner submits a new or additional phase proposal in advance of the current activity being completed, in order to meet seasonal requirements (i.e. farming season) and prevent development gaps

Foreign Currencies

• Cover day to day expenditure of gorta.

Transactions in foreign currency are recorded at the rate ruling at the date of the transaction. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated at the rate of exchange ruling at the balance sheet date. All differences are taken to the Statement of Financial Activities (SOFA).

• Ensure there is adequate funding should any winding up costs ever arise.

Pension Scheme

• Provide for any other unanticipated expenditure of significance. The Reserves have been categorised into separate funds as outlined below. Unrestricted funds are expendable at the discretion of the Board in furtherance of the charity’s objectives.

The charity operates a defined contribution scheme for employees. The assets of the scheme are held and managed separately from those of the charity by the pension company Bank of Ireland Life. The annual contributions are charged to the Statement of Financial Activities (SOFA) and the costs for the current year are disclosed in Note 17.

The Board may designate reserves for specific future expenditure such as Long Term Programmes, sinking funds to cover repairs to Fixed Assets (or as required under the terms of any lease relating to premises etc.) and any other potential future requirement(s). Restricted Funds are funds subject to specific terms which may be set out by the donor/ donors provided the activities are consistent with gorta’s objectives. gorta has a reserves policy based on foreseeable expenditure and in particular, long-term commitments to projects. In addition, a general reserve is specifically set aside to ensure the operation of the organisation for 12 months, based on historical running costs and programme expenditure. gorta will continue its strategy to utilise an element of its existing reserves over the coming years to help meet the funding requirements of partners. Investment Policy The Trustees of gorta are restricted from investing the funds of the charity in longterm investments as all monies held by the charity are deemed to be immediately available for charitable use. All cash balances for planned development work are held in deposit accounts at the highest interest rates available. Appropriate cash balances are also held for the essential purpose of expanding and consolidating the fundraising base.

70

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Statement of Financial Activities for the year ended 31 December 2010

Statement of Financial Activities for the Year Ended 31 December 2010 2010 Notes Restricted Funds

2010

2010

2010

2009

Unrestricted Designated Funds Funds

Total

Total

0’000

0’000

0’000

0’000

0’000

INCOMING RESOURCES Incoming resources from generated funds Voluntary Income Donations and fundraising income

1

176

5,016

-

5,192

5,712

Gift In Kind

1

10

-

-

10

-

Other Trading Activities Income Investment Income

2

64

872

-

936

970

22

-

596

-

596

743

3

178

-

-

178

20

428

6,484

-

6,912

7,445

Incoming Resources from Charitable Activities Revenue based grants Total incoming resources RESOURCES EXPENDED

9

Charitable Activities Programmes Costs

7

459

4,143

2,587

7,189

8,357

Advocacy

7

-

18

-

18

-

Costs of Generating Trading Income

2

-

850

-

850

873

Costs of Generating Voluntary Income

4

10

1,047

-

1,057

827

6

-

15

-

15

15

22

-

27

-

27

38

469

6,100

2,587

9,156

10,110

(41)

384

(2,587)

(2,244)

(2,665)

127

10,497

2,852

13,476

16,141

-

(319)

319

-

-

86

10,562

584

11,232

13,476

Costs of generating funds

Governance Costs Governance Costs Currency Loss Total resources expended NET MOVEMENT IN FUNDS Total Funds Brought forward Transfers between funds Total Funds Carried Forward

5

There are no recognised gains or losses other than the net movement in funds arising from continuing operations for the year. The financial statements were approved by the Board of Trustees on 25 May 2011 and signed on its behalf by: Andy Cole Trustee

Kevin Higgins Trustee

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

71


Balance Sheet as at 31 December 2010

Balance Sheet As At 31 December 2010 2010

2009

Notes

0’000

0’000

12

74

55

74

55

16,604

19,733

FIXED ASSETS Other tangible assets CURRENT ASSETS Cash in bank and at hand

13

Debtors

14

327

282

16,931

20,015

(4,979)

(6,331)

NET CURRENT ASSETS

11,952

13,684

TOTAL ASSETS LESS CURRENT LIABILITIES

12,026

13,739

(794)

(263)

11,232

13,476

CREDITORS - AMOUNTS DUE WITHIN ONE YEAR Creditors, accruals and deferred income

15

Long term liabilities Creditors ( Amount Falling Due after one year)

15

NET ASSETS RESERVES Accumulated funds - restricted

20

86

127

Accumulated funds - unrestricted

20

10,562

10,497

Accumulated funds - designated

20

584

2,852

11,232

13,476

Total Charity Funds

The financial statements were approved by the Board of Trustees on 25 May 2011 and signed on its behalf by: Andy Cole Trustee

72

Kevin Higgins Trustee

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Cash Flow Statement for the year ended 31 December 2010

Cash Flow Statement For The Year Ended 31 December 2010 2010

2009

Notes

0’000

0’000

18

(3,622)

(2,240)

Interest Received

22

596

743

Payments to acquire tangible fixed assets

12

(103)

(4)

493

739

(Decrease)/Increase in cash

(3,129)

(1,501)

Net funds at 1 January

19,733

21,234

NET FUNDS AT 31 DECEMBER

16,604

19,733

Net cash inflow from charitable activities Capital expenditure and financial investment

The accompanying notes form an integral part of this statement.

Reconciliation Of Movement In Funds To Net Cash Inflow/(Outflow) From Financial Activities 2010

2009

0’000

0’000

Opening Cash Balance

19,733

21,234

Movement in Funds in the year

(2,244)

(2,665)

Add back Depreciation Less purchase of Fixed Assets Less Change in Debtors Less Change in Creditors- amounts due within one year Less Change in Creditors- amounts due over one year Closing cash balance

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

84

63

(103)

(4)

(45)

(183)

(1,352)

3,206

531

(1,918)

16,604

19,733

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

73


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

Notes To The Financial Statements For The Year Ended 31 December 2010

Pg.

1. Voluntary income

75

2. Activities for generating funds: trading income

75

3. Incoming resources from charitable activities

75

4. Cost of generating voluntary income

76

5. Breakdown of support costs

76

6. Governance costs

77

7. Expenditure on charitable activities

77

8. Net incoming resources

77

9. Resources expended

78

10. Trustee expenses

78

11. Taxation

78

12. Fixed assets

79

13. Cash at bank and in hand

79

14. Debtors

80

15. Creditors and accruals

80

16. Commitments

80

17. Pension scheme

81

18. Reconciliation of new incoming resources to net cash inflow from charitable 81 activities

74

19. Legal status of the company

81

20. Restricted and unrestricted funds

82

21. Total funds

82

22. Financial risk management

83

23. Related party transactions

83

24. Comparative amounts

83

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

1. Voluntary income 2010 Restricted Funds 0’000

2010 Unrestricted Funds 0’000

2010 Total Funds 0’000

2009 Total Funds 0’000

28

4,617

4,645

5,061

-

159

159

285

Committee income

24

82

106

158

General donations

124

158

282

208

Sub Total

176

5,016

5,192

5,712

10

-

10

-

186

5,016

5,202

5,712

Committed giving Legacies

Gift in Kind

* Committed Giving includes 1123k of Tax Refunds for Annual Donations over 1250

2. Activities for generating funds: trading income 2010 0’000

2009 0’000

936

970

(713)

(735)

Support Costs (Note 5)

(14)

(16)

Management expenses

(123)

(122)

(850)

(873)

86

97

Turnover from donated goods Less costs: Operating expenses

Total net trading income

Trading income represents income from the sale of donated goods through the charity’s shops.

3. Incoming resources from charitable activities

Irish Aid Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Enterprise Ireland

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

150

-

19

20

9

-

178

20

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

75


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

4. Cost of generating voluntary income Cost of generating voluntary income represents fundraising costs to raise both restricted and unrestricted income, excluding trading sales. This is analysed as follows: 2010 0’000

2009 0’000

313

276

52

34

Support Costs (Note 5)

148

63

Other fundraising expenses

544

454

1,057

827

Salaries and pensions Standing order/direct debit fees

5. Breakdown of support costs The resources expended on charitable activities have been classified to comply with SORP 2005. Such costs include the direct costs of the charitable activities together with those Support costs (Finance and Administration cost) incurred that enable these activities to be undertaken. These have been allocated across the activities based on headcount. Total support costs for 2010 were 4.0% (2009: 3.9% of total costs.) This presentation format is a requirement of SORP 2005 paragraph 164/165. Headcount and Administration costs traditionally reflected in Support Services have been allocated to the activities based on direct headcount in the Direct Services as follows: Costs of Generating Voluntary Income 42% (2009: 42%) Programmes’ Costs 54% (2009: 54%) Costs of Generating Trading Income 4% (2009: 4%) These costs totaling 2352k are reflected in the Statement of Financial Activity as follows:

Support Cost Breakdown by Activity

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

4

7

1

12

7

5

5

-

10

6

25

31

2

58

49

5

8

1

14

67

106

136

10

252

268

3

3

-

6

7

148

190

14

352

404

IT/ Computer Postage, stationery and communications Premises Professional fees (Incl recruitment and legal) Finance, HR and Admin Support expenses

76

Programmes Costs 0’000

Costs of Generating Trading Income 0’000

Costs of Generating Voluntary Income 0’000

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A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

6. Governance costs

Professional fees

2010

2009

0’000

0’000

15

15

7. Expenditure on charitable activities Expenditure on charitable activities can be analysed as shown below. Many of these programmes achieve results in more than one of these categories, but are analysed for these purposes under the principal category only.

2,422

6

81

25

257

540

50

47

45

1,109

489

-

561

77

-

35

37

710

833

43

26

10

-

-

182

24

285

1,058

-

-

-

-

89

-

-

89

563

232 170

-

Zambia

Haiti

2,383

129

1,961

88

Kenya

2,276 2,053

49 529

74

Malawi

India

22 34

35 1,064

Uganda

Tanzania

Total 2009 1’000

Health 1’000

Food Security 1’000

Country

Total 2010 1’000

Management Costs 1’000

Water and Sanitation 1’000

Overseas offices 1’000

Livelihoods 1’000

Education 1’000

-

-

-

52

-

-

-

52

-

Field Visits and other expenses

61

-

-

-

-

-

154

215

183

Staff costs and consultancy

-

-

-

-

-

-

210

210

209

Support Costs (Note 5)

-

-

-

-

-

-

190

190

217

266

2,389

1,927

1,247

349

295

716

7,189

8,357

Sub Total Advocacy Total

-

18

-

-

-

-

-

18

-

266

2,407

1,927

1,247

349

295

716

7,207

8,357

8. Net incoming resources The net incoming resources for the year are stated after charging:

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

Audit fees

15

15

Depreciation

84

63

The auditor’s remuneration fee is in respect of audit only. No amounts were paid to the auditors in relation to advisory, tax advisory or other assurance services.

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A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

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Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

9. Resources expended Cost of generating voluntary income represents fundraising costs to raise both restricted and unrestricted income, excluding trading sales. This is analysed as follows: Included in resources expended are wages, salaries and pension costs comprising:

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

Wages and salaries

1,190

1,016

Social welfare costs

112

109

76

50

1,378

1,175

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

Pension costs

Employees The average number of people employed by the company during the year was calculated as follows:

- Operating shops (full and part-time)

23

23

- Managing shops

1

2

- IT/Operations

2

2

- Administration

4

4

- Programme support

9

8

- Marketing and communications

6

6

45

45

10. Trustee expenses Trustees are not remunerated.

11. Taxation As a result of the company’s charitable status, no charge to corporation tax arises under the provision of Section 207 of the Taxes Consolidation Act 1997.

78

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

12. Fixed assets

Shop Fittings 0’000

Lease Premiums 0’000

Office furniture and equipment 0’000

Motor Vehicles 0’000

Total 0’000

226

83

100

-

409

-

-

-

103

103

At end of year

226

83

100

103

512

Depreciation at beginning of year

200

74

80

-

354

25

9

16

34

84

225

83

96

34

438

1

-

4

69

74

26

9

20

-

55

Cost at beginning of year Additions

Change for year At end of year Net book value at 31 Dec 2010 At 31 Dec 2009

13. Cash at bank and in hand By fund designation:

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

Unrestricted

10,161

10,160

Designated

6,357

9,446

86

127

16,604

19,733

By account type:

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

Deposit accounts

16,346

19,579

Current accounts

144

48

County committee accounts

114

106

16,604

19,733

Restricted

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

79


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

14. Debtors Amounts falling due within one year:

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

37

66

290

216

327

282

Amounts falling due within one year:

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

Projects deferred expenditure

4,478

4,786

Suppliers’ amounts due at year end

26

55

Accruals

34

32

399

1,358

Prepayments and Other debtors Accrued Income

15. Creditors and accruals

Amounts due to connected charity (Note 23) Pension Liability

18

4

PAYE/PRSI Liability

24

96

4,979

6,331

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

794

263

CREDITORS: (Amounts falling due after more than one year)

Projects deferred expenditure

16. Commitments Annual commitments under non-cancellable operating leases for land and buildings which expire: - Head office - 1101k. This lease expires in 2022. - Total for ten shops - 1236k. These leases are held for periods up to 25 years.

80

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

17. Pension scheme The company operates an employer sponsored, defined contribution pension scheme. During the year, the company made contributions in respect of 11 of its employees. The assets of the scheme are held separately from those of the company, in externally managed funds. The pension expense for the year amounted to 176k (2009: 150k). Balance outstanding at year end 118k (2008:13k)

18. Reconciliation of new incoming resources to net cash inflow from charitable activities By fund designation:

NET INCOMING RESOURCES Depreciation

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

(2,244)

(2,665)

84

63

(Increase)/decrease in debtors

(45)

(183)

(Decrease)/increase in creditors

(821)

1,288

Adjustment for interest received or similar

(596)

(743)

(3,622)

(2,240)

NET CASH OUTFLOW FROM CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN CASH BALANCES

Cash at bank and in hand

At 1 January 2010 0’000

Cashflows 2010 0’000

At 31 December 2010 0’000

19,733

(3,129)

16,604

19. Legal status of the company The Company is limited by guarantee and does not have a share capital. Every member of the Company undertakes to contribute to the assets of the Company in the event of the same being wound up while he is a member, or within one year after he ceases to be a member, for payment of the debts and liabilities of the Company contracted before he ceases to be a member and of the costs, charges and expenses of winding up and for the adjustment of the rights of the contributories among themselves, such amount as may be required not exceeding 11.27. The Company is prohibited by its constitution from distributing any of its reserves by way of a dividend or otherwise to its members. In accordance with Section 24 of the Companies Act, 1963, the company is exempt from including the word “limited” in its name. As a company limited by guarantee is exempt from the reporting and disclosure requirement of the Companies (Amendment) Act, 1986.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

81


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

20. Restricted and unrestricted funds Designated Funds Restricted Funds

Unrestricted Fund

Committed Funds

General Reserves

Fixed Assets

Total Funds

0’000

0’000

0’000

0’000

0’000

0’000

Opening balance at 1/01/2010

127

10,497

2,587

210

55

13,476

Surplus for the year

(41)

384

(2,587)

-

-

(2,244)

-

(319)

300

19

-

86

10,562

300

74

11,232

Transfer between funds Closing balance at 31/12/2010

210

The Organisation has projects and commitments approved by the board subsequent to the year end totalling 1300k.

21. Total funds Restricted Funds 0’000

Unrestricted Funds 0’000

Total Funds 0’000

(a) Reconciliation of funds: Fund balance at 1 January 2010

127

13,349

13,476

Net movements

(41)

(2,203)

(2,244)

86

11,146

11,232

-

74

74

86

16,845

16,931

-

(5,773)

(5,773)

86

11,146

11,232

Balance as at 01/01/2010 0’000

Incoming resources 0’000

Resources expended 0’000

Balance 31/12/2010 0’000

127

428

(469)

86

Unrestricted funds

13,349

6,484

(8,687)

11,146

Total funds

13,476

6,912

(9,156)

11,232

Fund balances at 31 December 2010 (b) Analysis of net assets between funds: Tangible fixed assets Current assets Current liabilities Fund balances at 31 December 2010 (c) Movements in funds:

Restricted funds

82

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Notes to the financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2010

22. Financial risk management Much of the organisation’s costs, particularly overseas costs, are denominated in euro and local currency while most income is received in euro. A strengthening of the local currency against the euro could have an adverse effect on gorta’s ability to deliver its planned programme of work. These currency risks are monitored on an ongoing basis. The balance due to gorta UK is held in Sterling, the impact of the fluctuating exchange rates in 2010 has resulted in a loss of 127k (2009: 138k). gorta hold a number of bank accounts deposit in a number of different financial institutions ensuring the security of our funds and also endeavouring to maximise the return available. gorta earned interest of 1596k in 2010, (2009: 1743k).

23. Related party transactions During the year, the company incurred costs of 1355k and transferred funds of 1605k to gorta UK, related by virtue of mutual directors. The balance due to gorta UK at 31 December 2010 was 1399k (2009: 11,358k).

24. Comparative amounts Comparative amounts have been regrouped, where necessary to conform to the current year’s presentation.

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

83


Supplementary information

Supplementary Information (Not Covered By The Independent Auditor’s Report) APPENDIX A gorta Shop Income For The Year Ended 31 December 2010

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

Bandon

80

118

Carlow

56

50

161

124

Dublin – Capel Street

73

78

Dublin – Liffey Street

96

93

Limerick

87

86

Macroom

70

73

Mallow

80

89

141

158

Cork City – North Main Street

Portlaoise Skibbereen

92

101

936

970

2010 0’000

2009 0’000

APPENDIX B gorta County Committees’ and Church Gate Collection Income For The Year Ended 31 December 2010

84

Cavan

6

1

Donegal

-

6

Dublin

34

51

Galway

3

5

Kerry

-

23

Kildare

7

4

Kilkenny

-

2

Laois

13

29

Louth

11

11

Mayo

3

10

Meath

6

5

Monaghan

4

2

Offaly

1

1

Tipperary

7

-

Waterford

1

1

Wexford

8

5

Wicklow

2

2

106

158

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.

85


gorta offers its sincere thanks to Totem Visual Communications, who co-sponsored the design of this Annual Report. TOTEM Visual Communications www.totem.ie Printed on 100% recycled paper

86

gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland.

A nnua l Re p o r t 2010.


Lauren Burke, Aisling Smith and Rachel O’Hora of Dominican College Griffith Avenue, Drumcondra, Dublin at the gorta World Food Day Conference 2010


gorta – The Freedom from Hunger Council of Ireland. 12 Herbert Street, Dublin 2, Ireland. T +353 1 661 5522 F +353 1 661 2627 E info@gorta.org www.gorta.org CHY No. IRL CHY 5678 Registered No. 28228

Gorta Annual report 2010  
Gorta Annual report 2010  
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