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GORRY GALLERY


22. Richard Brydges Beechey H.R.H.A. 1808-1895 (Detail)

Front Cover: George Barret R.A. c. 1728-1789 (Detail) Catalogue Number 1


GORRY GALLERY An Exhibition of 18th-21st Century Irish Paintings 12th-31st October 2020 The exhibition can be viewed Monday to Saturday from 12-5pm (or by appointment) and online at www.gorrygallery.ie Due to the current restrictions, we are unable to have our traditional Private Opening but we look forward to your visit to view the exhibition which will run for three weeks. Our gallery is compliant with the current safety regulations Paintings can be purchased by email at gorrygallery@icloud.com, by phone 01 679 5319 or at the gallery where catalogues are available

All measurements in this catalogue are in centimetres (height precedes width) www.gorrygallery.ie Š Gorry Gallery


1. George Barret, R.A. c. 1732-1784 A Landscape with Figures Picnicking and the Ruins of Melrose Abbey, Roxburghshire in the Background Signed lower right Oil on canvas 107 x 147

George Barret, R.A. c. 1732-1784 A Landscape with Figures Picnicking and the Ruins of Melrose Abbey, Roxburghshire in the Background This large and impressive landscape painted by George Barret in about 1770 shows the presbytery and flanking transepts of the great monastery of Montrose Abbey in the Scottish borders. The picture is associated with a commission from the Duke of Buccleuch, one of Barret’s most important patrons in his early years in England, which resulted in what Sir Ellis Waterhouse judged ‘his most memorable surviving works’. Landscapes of this ambition, painted for the leading aristocrats of the day, help explain one of the most noteworthy aspects of George Barret’s career – his meteoric ascent within half a dozen years of his move from Dublin to an acknowledged position as one of the leading artists in London. In this short time the young artist from Dublin’s Liberties had made a sufficient name for himself to ensure selection as one of the foundation members of the Royal Academy, despite the fact that landscape painting was regarded as a notably lesser speciality within the academic hierarchy. In addition to his prodigious talents, one of the factors which without doubt helped

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in this rise to eminence was Barret’s ability to cultivate patrons. As a very young artist he had won the prestigious commission to decorate the Library at Russborough, County Wicklow, for Joseph Leeson, later 1st Earl of Milltown. He also won patronage from Lord Powerscourt, the Conollys of Castletown and the Taylours of Headfort. Social skills as much as artistic prowess were essential to a successful career (as Joshua Reynolds found to his great advantage and James Barry to his cost) and it seems clear that Barret was able to mix easily with his aristocratic clients. Barret moved to London sometime after February 1763 and his success was almost immediate with a Dublin newspaper reporting in April the following year that ‘Mr. Barret’s Landscape, which obtained the 50 pounds premium from the Society for the Encouragement of Arts, is purchased by the Marquis of Rockingham, for 100 guineas’. Rockingham would continue to be an important client, for whom Barret painted views for his Irish seat at Coolattin, County Wicklow. It is likely that in these early years in London, Barret was tapping into networks of Whig patronage centered on his friend and compatriot Edmund Burke who would become Rockingham’s secretary in 1765. He also painted twelve views of Welbeck in Nottinghamshire for the Duke


of Portland (another Whig grandee and friend of Burke). Yet another of Barret’s early clients was William Scott, the young 3rd Duke of Buccleuch, and, in, or about, 1769 he visited the duke’s estate of Dalkeith Palace near Edinburgh, en route sketching at Melrose Abbey. The fruits of this trip were exhibited at the Royal Academy in the inaugural exhibition in 1769 and the two following years and included Part of Melrose Abbey by Moonlight and A View of the Duke of Buccleugh’s Park at Dalkeith with part of one of the wings of Dalkeith House. Barret was lucky in his patron. The third duke (1746-1812) was an urbane and sophisticated collector with marked literary tastes and a man of sensibility as revealed by Thomas Gainsborough’s sympathetic portrait of him cuddling a terrier in a portrait of almost exactly the same date as Barret’s view. His name, according to his friend Sir Walter Scott, ‘was never mentioned without praises by the rich and benefactions by the poor’. The present work showing Melrose Abbey is closely comparable to another version of the painting still in the Duke of Buccleuch’s collection at Bowhill, the main difference being the charming vignette of a family picnic at bottom left. This figure group shows Barret at his most confident and dashing. A young boy carrying a fishing rod over his shoulder is showing off a fish he has just caught in the nearby River Tweed to the seated man with his back to the viewer. The facial expressions of the boy and the seated woman are caught with masterly economy. Behind, a rather Irish looking cottage, or cabin, contrasts in its modest vernacular architecture with the glories of the Gothic ruins. In the Bowhill picture this figure group is replaced with a somewhat mournful mother whose attention a child is trying at attract. There are numerous other differences in the disposition of the foreground and in the present work two additional figures are introduced at the foot of the Gothic tracery window. Barret also painted a charming gouache of the abbey seen from a distance showing its setting in a bend of the Tweed. Melrose Abbey in Roxburghshire was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks from Rievaulx in Yorkshire under the patronage of King David I. On the main route to Edinburgh from the south, it was destroyed by the English on several occasions. The abbey was the burial place of many of the kings of Scotland and in 1996 Robert the Bruce’s heart which had been buried in the church was unearthed, preserved in a conical lead container, and subsequently reinterred under a memorial stone. The abbey was long under the protection of the Dukes of Buccleuch, hence the attraction of it as a subject for Barret’s commission. In 1822, the then Duke paid for extensive restoration of the ruins under the supervision of Sir

Walter Scott. The abbey features in many of Scott’s works, notably The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805): ‘if thou would’st view fair Melrose alright, Go visit it by the pale moonlight…’. It is an intriguing possibility that Scott was here inspired by Barret’s view of the abbey by moonlight which he had exhibited at the Royal Academy. In 1918, the 7th Duke of Buccleuch gave the ruins of the abbey to the nation. Barret is not often thought of as a painter of architecture, though he portrayed a wide variety of buildings, from the late antique Tempietto at Clitumno (painted after an engraving by Piranesi) to the Georgian mansion of Castletown, County Kildare (both private collections). The closest parallel to the Montrose painting is a very fine view of the ecclesiastical site at Ballygarth, County Meath. This was painted before he left Ireland for the Pepper family who, like the Buccleuchs at Montrose, had close connections with the church depicted. Also before leaving Ireland, Barret had honed his skills as an architectural draughtsman working for the antiquarian Gabriel Beranger. The ruins of Melrose Abbey were a favourite subject for Romantic artists of a later generation than Barret, notably Turner and Thomas Girtin, who often exaggerated its scale for dramatic effect. Barret by contrast rather minimises the architecture within the picture, making it just one feature, if a prominent one, of an appealing landscape composition. Most artists selected the south elevation to portray, but the same view that Barret selected was drawn by Robert Billings in 1832, after the restoration by Scott. It would seem that Barret was particularly pleased with this work as, most unusually, he signed it. The gravestone on the foreground is inscribed with fictive lettering and beneath this Barret has added his signature. It is unclear if the placing of the signature had significance for the artist. His contemporary John Butts devised a memento mori signature on a tombstone on the reverse of his well-known Et in Arcadia Ego (c. 1760, private collection). Later, William Sadler signed a Dutch-inspired view of a church on a flagstone (1812, private collection). The linkage here is less contrived, but nevertheless the placing of the signature next to the tomb, evoking the artist’s own mortality, is in keeping with the reflections on transience which monastic ruins so readily provoke. This elegiac meditation on the cycles of history – of change and decay – is, however, firmly pushed into the background, and foregrounded instead, in the beautifully painted family group, is the cheerful enjoyment of the quotidian with Barret effortlessly combining the great themes of art – memory, the numinous and, in Melrose’s glorious architecture, the creative spirit – with the simple pleasure of catching a fish.

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George Barret, R.A. c. 1732-1784 A Landscape with a Man Leading a Horse across a Bridge Here we see a man straining to pull an unwilling horse across a narrow bridge towards a thatched mill (of similar form to that shown in Gorry Gallery Nov. 2014 catalogue no.12) which, though dilapidated, is clearly inhabited as smoke rises from a chimney. Another dwelling is set further back surrounded by dense woods while, above, the ridge of a steep cliff is topped by Fig.1 more trees outlined against the sky. The sky itself is divided between the rain clouds which cover about two thirds of the picture and the bright burst of sunlight which is just hidden behind the tree-girt cliff top. The overall setting and much of the details clearly echo Barret’s large painting, A River Landscape with Rainbow and Anglers (Gorry Gallery, Nov. 2014) (fig.1), and like that ambitious work it is almost certain to have been painted before Barret left Ireland in 1763. These correspondences helpfully illustrate Barret’s method of working by continuously shuffling different motifs, figures and natural effects – a rainbow, storm cloud or particular rock formation – which he had often observed, and sketched, directly 2. George Barret, R.A. c. 1732-1784 from nature, to create different, and A Landscape with a Man Leading a Horse across a Bridge often very varied, compositions. Oil on canvas 49 x 72

George Barret, R.A. c. 1732-1784 A Landscape with a Rustic Waggon Carrying Logs A waggon laden with logs is drawn by a train of horses through a landscape of trees which are beginning to turn to imbue the verdure with a rich autumnal palette. This is one of a small group of works of related subject matter including a large gouache, Timber Wain on a Rough Road in the Yale Center for British Art. Here Barret is working in direct competition with Thomas Gainsborough who produced works showing harvest wagons both during his Bath period – one was exhibited in 1767 at the Society of Artists (Barber Institute, Birmingham) – and in 1784, the year Barret died (Art Gallery of Ontario). Susan Sloman suggests that Gainsborough may have been ‘concerned that Barret was stealing his thunder’ given the positive reviews the Irish artists was receiving in the contemporary press. In 1775, for example, the Middlesex Journal wrote enthusiastically, praising: Everything that a warm imagination can produce. The groups of cattle are admirably disposed; the sunshine true; the plan well-conceived, and furnished with the most masterly brush possible. The vast productions of nature, when sporting in the

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fields, amongst rocks, trees, cattle, and rural figures of every sort, are subservient to [Barret’s] will, and he imitates them so well that it may with truth be said, he adds to their beauties, and not impoverishes her works. It is likely that Barret’s gouaches date from about 1774, but given the compositional similarities Barret must have studied Gainsborough’s Harvest Waggon in the exhibition in 1767. One of the reasons Barret may have been drawn to the subject matter was his move to Paddington, which was then a rural village outside London. As Henry Angelo describes it, there were ‘a few old houses on each side of the Edgeware-road, together with some ale-houses of very picturesque appearance, being screened by high elms, with long troughs for watering the teams of hay-wagons, on their way to and from the market’. Barret did not have far to walk from his front door to find the suitably picturesque subject matter that he paints here. Gorry Gallery is grateful to William Laffan and to Logan Morse, who is researching a PhD on George Barret, for their assistance in cataloguing the paintings by the artist in the exhibition.


3. George Barret, R.A. c.1732-1784 A Landscape with a Watermill Oil on canvas 49.5 x 59 Exhibited: An Age of Elegance, Irish Art of the 18th Century, Lyons Village, Kildare, 2008. Literature: An Age of Elegance, Irish Art of the 18th Century (London, 2008) pp 12-15 and introduction to volume by Desmond FitzGerald, Knight of Glin, p. 4 Provenance: Mallett’s, London and New York; Private Collection, UK

George Barret, R.A. c.1732-1784 A Landscape with a Watermill Rustic and relatively humble landscapes such as this are perhaps less familiar than the more grandiose and verdant Irish works of the 1760s, but they form an equally characteristic component of Barret’s art. Among the closest comparison within his oeuvre is a signed Landscape with Cattle which includes a similar mixture of humble buildings cattle and figures (Sotheby’s 28 Nov. 2002, lot 107). Even closer in both conception and detail – as the Knight of Glin pointed

out in the Introduction of the catalogue cited above – is a drawing by the artist in the Victoria and Albert Museum. In works such as this, Barret’s inspiration is ultimately from the Dutch school. In a letter to a young artist, he revealed his eclectic sources of inspiration, recommending the study of Rubens, Claude and Hobbema. Hobbema, in particular from about 1660, made something of a speciality of painting landscapes with watermills, and his work was available for the young Barret to study in the house at Newbridge, County Dublin, of his patron Thomas Cobbe. Even closer perhaps, is the example of Hobbema’s master Jacob van Ruisdael whose influence on Barret was noted by Crookshank and Glin (Ireland’s Painters, 2002, p. 136). Barret may have seen some of Ruisdael’s mill landscapes and there are distinct compositional overlaps between the present work and landscapes by Ruisdael in the Getty and the Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum in Rotterdam. Barret’s interest in Hobbema and especially Ruisdael echoes that of Thomas Gainsborough who as a young artist was greatly inspired by the Dutch master.

4. George Barret, R.A. c. 1732-1784 A Landscape with a Rustic Waggon Carrying Logs Gouache on paper 46 x 62.5 Provenance: Gorry Gallery, March 2007, no.44 In carved gilt wood frame

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Samuel Dixon fl. 1748-69 A Pair from the set of ‘Foreign and Domestick [sic] Birds, c. 1755 5. Goldfinch, Honeysuckle, Ranunculus and other flowers, dedicated to the Duchess of Dorset (bears Dixon’s original dedicatory label); this is hand coloured by Daniel O’Keeffe 1740-87 Signed on reverse 6. White Headed Parrot, dedicated to the Countess of Kildare (bears Dixon’s original dedicatory label); this is hand coloured by Gustavus Hamilton fl. c. 1739-75 Signed on reverse Both gouache on embossed paper 28.5 x 38

Samuel Dixon fl. 1748-69 A Pair from the set of ‘Foreign and Domestick [sic] Birds Samuel Dixon is justifiably acknowledged as ‘the greatest exponent in Britain or Ireland of the art of embossed bird painting’ (Nicola Figgis in A.A.I., Vol. 2, p. 234). His famous flower pictures in basso relievo – perhaps the defining image of Irish Georgian art – were created when ‘sheets of grey paper…were impressed on the reverse by copper plates, causing the image to appear in relief’ (ibid.) and were then hand coloured with gouache. In his memoirs published in 1826 the actor and playwright, John O’Keeffe, recalling his youth in Dublin many decades earlier, gives a delightful picture as to the circumstances in which the colouring was applied. Dixon was a busy entrepreneur, a picture dealer and artists’ supplier with a line in textile printing and so an effective division of labour was crucial to the successful production of his stock. At his shop on Capel Street, Dixon employed three talented young apprentices James Reily, Gustavus Hamilton and O’Keeffe’s brother Daniel: They lived in Dickson’s [sic] house, and had a table and everything comfortable. My brother, the youngest of the three, had often a number of boys, his acquaintances, both in and out of the house after him, (not those of the academy) allured by getting now and then a camel-hair pencil, or a bit of paint to colour their tops, and draw stars and moons upon their kites. I often made one in this noisy string of intruders, being then about six years of age… O’Keeffe goes on to note that these mischievous pupils of Dixon ‘who painted birds and flowers so admirably’ all ‘turned out distinguished painters in miniature’. The present pair of

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works by Dixon nicely corroborates this account of collaborative work in the Capel Street studio. One of them is signed on the reverse by Gustavus Hamilton and one by Daniel O’Keeffe and close examination detects the slightly different hands that each deploys. Both Hamilton and O’Keeffe – and indeed O’Keeffe’s brother John – continued to produce highly decorative gouache paintings of flowers under their own names, but they seem to have abandoned Dixon’s pioneering step of embossing the paper to creatively blur the demarcation between the two-dimensional art of painting and three-dimensional sculpture. The signatures here may reflect justifiable artistic pride in their creations, but also, and more prosaically, very likely were used to calculate payment on a piece work basis. This adds a very human touch to these fine examples, in particularly well-preserved state, of what are among the most distinctive – and prized – examples of the decorative arts of eighteenth-century Ireland.


7. George Mullins fl. 1756 – c. 1786 Landscape with Travelling Shepherds Oil on canvas 81.5 x 121.2

George Mullins fl. 1756 – c. 1786 Landscape with Travelling Shepherds This is one of three closely related landscapes (figs. 1&2) which with four upright scenes showing the times of the day (OPW), an upright painting in the National Gallery of Ireland and a handful of other works, constitute the tiny corpus of certain works (less than a dozen canvasses in total) by the landscape painter George Mullins. Despite this small oeuvre, Mullins is beginning to be better understood as an artist, subsequent to research on his pupil, Thomas Roberts. Clearly related are two landscapes, one in a private collection in the United States (fig.1), and one from the collection of the late Patrick Kelly of Fitzwilliam Square (fig.2) which include the same elements of an unusually stark crag silhouetted again the sky (this motif possibly taken from Salvator Rosa’s landscape repertoire) and round fortified tower of essentially Italianate form, though incorporating gothic elements. In all three works a group of figures approaches from the side framed by a repoussoir tree. Attached to the tower in the present work sits the remains of a chapel with a tracery window. Here, the precise handling of the foliage comes extremely close to that associated with Mullins’s great pupil Thomas Roberts in which the effect is suggested of each leaf being individually painted. This miniaturising technique is not, however, at the expense of an expansive grandeur of conception and attractive silvery tonality. Mullins married the proprietor of the Horseshoe and Magpie, a tavern on the Temple Bar side of Dame Street – Hugh Douglas Hamilton

married her sister – and a generation of young artists lodged there including Roberts, James Coy, and Robert Healy. It is becoming increasingly clear that the proximity in which Irish artists lived, worked and exhibited profoundly shaped the distinctive aspects of eighteenth-century Irish art, be in the charcoal drawings of artists like Healy or the landscapes of Mullins and Roberts. Mullins exhibited frequently at the Society of Artists close by in William Street but subsequently moved to London, exhibiting works such as a Portrait of a Spaniel Dog and a Portrait of a Beggar in Wales which hint at a wholly different type of subject matter, after which he disappears from the historical record. While it is certainly ‘testament to Mullins’s own skills as a landscape painter’ that ‘Roberts became arguably the best Irish landscape painter of the eighteenth century’ (Nicola Figgis in A.A.I., Vol. 2, p. 377), his own highly accomplished, and very rare, works present a distinctive and appealingly harmonious vision, and Mullins is one of the key, if least appreciated, figures within the Dublin Group of landscape painters.

Fig. 2

Fig. 1

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James Reily (c.1735-1778) Portrait of a Gentleman This portrait is typical of Reily’s clear and precise miniature painting technique which he developed by painting in tiny criss-crossing brushstrokes. The sitter is dressed in a stylish military-cut coat which is decorated with gold embroidered frogging. He has a very fashionable high hairstyle for the 1770s which is a mixture of natural hair and a powdered wig tied up at the back. The slightly exaggerated eyes and eyebrows are reminiscent of the work of Gustavus Hamilton (c.1739-1775) who was Reily’s friend and contemporary. James Reily is sometimes recorded as Riley, Reilly or Riely. He was from a poor family background and was educated at the Blue Coat School, in Blackhall Place, Dublin (1745-48). There he showed an aptitude for drawing and was awarded a studentship by the Dublin

Society (RDS) in 1748. This award paid his fees for lessons at Robert West’s figure drawing school in George’s Lane. At the same time he was also apprenticed to Samuel Dixon (active 1748-69) at his studio in Capel Street where he was employed to hand colour basso-relievo prints of birds and flowers. The Dublin Society awarded Reily a prize of £1 for his drawings in 1753 and half a guinea in 1754. Reily set up his own practice as a miniaturist on Capel Street and later, at a fine house of his own, on Grafton Street where he attracted a fashionable clientele. He exhibited portrait miniatures, pastels and historical subject pictures at the Society of Artists in Ireland exhibitions from 176573 and posthumously in 1779. His sudden death took place at Rochestown, near Slane, Co. Meath in August 1778. Reily’s obituary recorded that he had been the “most excellent painter in Miniature this country has produced”. Dr Paul Caffrey

8. James Reily (c.1735-1778) Portrait of a Gentleman Watercolour on ivory, oval, 3.8 x 3.1 Signed with initials and dated: JR/1772 Illustrated actual size

Peter Dillon (active 1802-1815) Portrait of a Gentleman This is an extremely rare work by Peter Dillon which records him working in the city of Waterford in 1810. Very little is known about his life. Strickland does not even record his Christian name. This portrait is evidence that he was a highly competent miniaturist. Dillon is recorded as living at 8 Eustace Street, Dublin, in 1802, when he exhibited four miniatures at the Society of Artist of Ireland exhibition held in the House of Lords, Parliament House during the period when the building was being converted into a bank. In 1804 he lived at 26 Upper Ormond Quay, Dublin, when he exhibited a frame containing three miniatures at the Society of Artists of Ireland exhibition at Allen’s gallery in Dame Street. In 1815, he exhibited at the Hibernian Society of Artists’ exhibition at Del Vecchio’s, 26 Westmoreland Street. Dillon may have worked at St Helier, Jersey. He was also an accomplished engraver and etcher. Dillon engraved his own miniature portraits of Sir John Newport bt and the Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson. A book-plate he designed and engraved for Michael H. Fitzpatrick is in the British Museum. Dr Paul Caffrey

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9. Peter Dillon (active 1802-1815) Portrait of a Gentleman Watercolour on ivory, 6.5 x 5.2 Unsigned and inscribed on the backing paper: Paint…[indistinct]/ Peter Dillon/ Miniature Painter/ and Engraver/ Grand Parade/ Waterford/ 1810 Illustrated actual size


Richard Bull (b. late 1750s, active 1770-1809) Portrait of a Gentleman

10. Richard Bull (b. late 1750s, active 1770-1809) Portrait of a Gentleman Watercolour on ivory, oval, 4.3 x 3.4 Set in a gold locket framed with woven hair, c.1790 Illustrated actual size

Horace Hone ARA (1754-1825) Portrait of a Lady This is a superb example of Horace Hone’s miniature painting technique. Painted in Dublin at the height of Hone’s fame he captures the elegance of his fashionable client. The sitter’s natural hair is powdered and loosely swept up and wrapped in a long white muslin or linen scarf. This is a display of Turquerie, or orientalist fashion, and would have been considered exotic in the 1780s. Artificial hair extensions fall over her shoulders. She wears a white chemise and delicate fichu (a type of scarf or what was then known as a ‘handkerchief’) over her shoulders. Large pearls decorate her décolletage. Hone paints using his characteristic technique of long curving parallel brushstrokes. The shading of the face and pink cheeks are painted in stipple. This miniature exemplifies Hone’s mature style of painting, it is a relatively large miniature, perfectly drawn. Hone fully exploits the ivory base by leaving as much of the ivory unpainted and exposed to allow the luminosity of the ivory come through. Horace Hone was the second son Nathaniel Hone RA (1718-84). Horace was taught miniature painting in watercolour

The sitter is presented in a military coat with his hair powdered and held at the back by a black ribbon. This would indicate a date of the late 1780s or early 1790s. Richard Bull was awarded a studentship by the Dublin Society to attend their landscape and ornament drawing schools on 26 October 1769. He is listed as a student in 1770 when he was studying under Jacob Ennis (172870). Bull exhibited miniature portraits and portraits done in hair at the Society of Artists in Ireland exhibitions in 1777 and 1780. In 1786 he charged two guineas for a miniature portrait which as at the upper end of the scale of fees for miniatures in the 1780s. He went to live in London in the 1790s. Bull had a distinguished list of patrons including: George, Prince of Wales; Frederick, Duke of York; Lord Nelson; Lord Moira; the 2nd and 3rd Dukes of Leinster; Emily, Duchess of Leinster; Lord Edward Fitzgerald; Thomas Conolly of Castletown and the actor, J.P. Kemble. He exhibited at the Royal Academy exhibitions from 1794 until 1809. Bull’s portrait was painted by Sir Martin Archer Shee P.R.A. (1769-1850) and was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1795. Dr Paul Caffrey

on ivory and on enamel by his father whose portrait showing the young artist sketching is in the National Gallery of Ireland (catalogue no. 1297). In 1770, Horace Hone attended the Royal Academy Schools in London, he exhibited at the RA from 17721822 and was appointed ARA in 1779. Horace Hone settled in Dublin in 1782 and worked almost exclusively in Ireland until 1804 when he returned to London. Hone was brought to Ireland by Lady Temple when her husband was viceroy. Lady Temple was Baroness Nugent of Carlanstown in her own right in the peerage of Ireland. Through her social connections and with the backing of the vice-regal court she ensured that Hone received ample patronage. Hone was so successful that he was appointed Miniature Painter to the Prince of Wales (later George IV) in 1795. He had an extensive practice which was badly affected by the Act of Union when many of his most important patrons moved to London. He spent 1804 in Bath. For some time afterwards he lived in London, in the house of his patron, Richard, 7th Viscount Fitzwilliam of Merrion (founder of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge), where he re-established himself as a miniaturist. Hone suffered from mental illness and died in London where he is buried in the grounds of St George’s Chapel, Bayswater Road. Dr Paul Caffrey

11. Horace Hone ARA (1754-1825) Portrait of a Lady Watercolour on ivory, oval, 5.5 x 4.5, set in a gold locket. Signed with initials and dated: HH/1788 Illustrated actual size

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12. John Faulkner R.H.A. 1835-1894 Glendalough, County Wicklow, Round Tower and Site of St Kevin’s Monastery in the Vale of the Two Lochs Watercolour on paper 62 x 101 Signed and inscribed: ‘The Valley of Glendalough, County Wicklow’ In original gilt frame

John Faulkner R.H.A. 1835-1894 Glendalough, County Wicklow, Round Tower and Site of St Kevin’s Monastery in the Vale of the Two Lochs This evocative view captures the essence of Glendalough and its surrounding uplands. The distinctive round tower, slightly off-centre, makes a prominent landmark and serves to divide the landscape into two. To the left are wooded grassy slopes leading gently down to the upper lake, while the background on the right-hand side offers a dramatic impression of the encircling mountains of the upper valley. Here the steep, almost vertical slopes display the shape of a characteristic U-shaped valley carved out by ice some 10,000 years ago. Glendalough’s famous monastic settlement, reputedly founded by St Kevin in about 600 A.D., is nestled into

the valley. The ivy-covered entrance arch stands starkly, with a few figures approaching across the river. The cluster of monastic buildings beyond, looking serene in what must be early-morning sunlight, includes St Kevin’s Kitchen distinguished by its tower, together with the old graveyard still in occasional use today. The round tower is seen without its conical roof, as it looked before its restoration in the mid 1870s. Glendalough has been a place of pilgrimage since medieval times; from the late 1700s onwards it has also been Wicklow’s greatest tourist attraction, with nineteenth-century parties travelling out from Dublin in carriages and jaunting cars. Faulkner’s painting shows this important medieval site as the approaching visitor saw it over the centuries. Mary Davies

Henry Wright Kerr R.S.A. , R.S.W. 1857-1936 13. The Shamrock -An Irishman decorating his hat with shamrock Watercolour on paper 68.5 x 43.5 Signed and dated 1893 14. The Open Hearth-An Irishwoman cooking by an open hearth Watercolour on paper 68.5 x 46.5 Signed and dated 1893

Henry Wright Kerr R.S.A. , R.S.W. 1857-1936 Born in Edinburgh, Kerr went to South Holland where he became heavily influenced by the Hague School. In 1888, he visited Connemara and painted many works depicting Irish life. He exhibited some 159 times at the Royal Scottish Academy.

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James George O’Brien (also Oben) fl.1779-1819 View of Fennor Rock on the River Boyne, County Meath The ‘experimental and inventive watercolour artist’ James George O’Brien (A.A.I., Vol. 2. p. 391), trained at the Dublin Society School and worked as an antiquarian draughtsman for Grose’s Antiquities and also for William Burton Conyngham of Slane Castle, County Meath. Conyngham introduced the artist to his neighbour, Charles Lambert MP, of nearby Beau Parc for whom in the later 1790s O’Brien painted the subject matter with which he is ‘particularly associated’ (ibid.) showing the River Boyne near the house with a focus on the local landmark of Fennor Rock. This haunting river landscape was much admired by contemporaries. Arthur Young wrote in 1780, not long before O’Brien visited, ‘under Mr Lambert’s house, on the same side of the river, is a most romantic and beautiful spot’ with ‘rocks on one side, rising in peculiar forms very boldly; the other steep wood, the river bending short between them like a land-locked bason [sic]’. A few years later Thomas Milton again described the scene as ‘very romantic’ noting the ‘great variety of rocks, wood and water’. The constantly changing light effects of the magical landscape of the Boyne Valley made it difficult to capture a definitive view in a single image which seems to have encouraged artists to work in series. O’Brien is almost certain to have known the earlier series

15. James George O’Brien (also Oben) fl.1779-1819 View of Fennor Rock on the River Boyne, County Meath Signed lower left ‘J OBrien’ The mount is inscribed with title and the date 1811 which relates to the exhibition of a work of this subject at the Royal Academy that year Inscribed on mount Watercolour on paper 40.3 x 56 Exhibited: Possibly, Society of Artists, Parliament House, Dublin, 1801; Royal Academy, London, 1811 Provenance: Cynthia O’Connor Gallery. Private Collection Literature: Nesta Butler, in Art and Architecture of Ireland, Volume 2 (Dublin, New Haven and London, 2014) Vol. 2, pp. 391-91; Peter Harbison, ‘Oben’s Scenic Tour’, Irish Arts Review (Winter Edition 2004), pp. 100-105; Anne Crookshank and the Knight of Glin, The Watercolours of Ireland (London, 1994) p. 92, illustrated in colour

of works of exactly the same landscape by Thomas Roberts one of which was engraved for Milton’s Seats and Demesnes of the Nobility and Gentry of Ireland (1785). Approximately ten works from O’Brien’s series are known including variants of this composition and A Ferry Boat at Fennor Rock on the River Boyne in the collection of the National Gallery of Ireland (NGI 6882) while a view from a similar angle but without the ferry is in the Ulster Museum. Anne Crookshank and the Knight of Glin, who illustrate the present work in the Watercolours of Ireland, rightly praise the ‘limpid…tone’ and ‘exquisite clarity’ of the Beauparc series of which this is one of the outstanding examples.

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16. Wiliam Ormsby M.P. of Willowbrook County Sligo (1718-1781)

18. Jane Ormsby (1750-1802)

17. Hannah Ormsby (?-1798)

19. Maria Susannah Ormsby (1745-1827)

Hugh Douglas Hamilton 1740-1808 Oval pastels on paper each 23.5 x 19.5 approx. In original Dublin carved giltwood frames

Hugh Douglas Hamilton 1740-1808 This collection of four pastels depicting members of the Ormsby family has previously been attributed to the artist Anna Tonelli (c.1763- 1846), a Florentine portraitist in miniature and pastel. They are pastel versions of a series of oil portraits by the artist Hugh Douglas Hamilton. Hamilton also worked in pastel and was in fact better known for his output in this medium. The group of pastel likenesses are now being reattributed to Hamilton himself; a fine addition to his known body of work. Confusion about the authorship of these pastels may have arisen as Tonelli is known to have copied works by Hamilton on at least two occasions. In June 1793, Rev. Thomas Brand wrote to the Earl of Ailesbury regarding a pastel portrait of Countess Cowper and her sister Emily Gore; ‘[Lady Cowper] has just sent for the copy Anna Tonelli made of her beautiful picture by Hamilton. I carry it this morning to the Quercia to show Lady Bruce, who has some curiosity to see her’. A signed copy of Hamilton’s full-length portrait of John David La Touche at Taormina also exists, inscribed ‘anna nistri tonelli copio’. Tonelli and Hamilton’s professional relationship may date from the time Tonelli is believed to have been Hamilton’s pupil, during the many years he spent in Italy. This arrangement is recorded in a review of the Royal Academy exhibition, published in the World newspaper on 28 April 1794; ‘Signora Anna Tonelli, the Florentine, and Pupil to the Crayon Hamilton of Rome, as many of our Readers may remember, has four crayons

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in the Anti-Chamber, which for an Improvisatore, promise much’ However, Hamilton also produced numerous variations of his own works, most often multiple pastels from a single sitting but also, on occasion, translating oil portraits into pastel. Pastel was a quicker, more informal and affordable medium in which to reproduce favoured pictures for distribution amongst family and friends. A good example of such practice is an oil painting by Hamilton of Edward Michael Pakenham, 2nd Baron Longford which was transformed, by Hamilton, into an attractive pastel portrait, on a reduced scale. Both portraits can now be seen together in the same private collection. The reattribution of the Ormsby group of pastel portraits to Hamilton is based on a close analysis of technique. While Tonelli may have done some of her training under Hamilton’s tutelage, her style is very different. Where Hamilton uses a more graphic approach - leaving strokes unblended, allowing the graphite under-drawing to show through in places and adding white highlights with chalk – Tonelli’s application is far smoother and more blended. Though very competent, Tonelli lacks Hamilton’s confidence and bravura in the pastel medium, so evident in the accomplished modelling of this group. In addition, the Ormsby portraits’ distinctive eighteenth-century gilt frames are typical of those used by Hamilton for a period of his career. They are of the type manufactured by George and William Hulbert, carvers and gilders who operated out of premises on Camden Street in Dublin. The frames, in concert with the handling of pastel in these portraits makes their attribution to Hamilton, rather than his pupil, secure. Dr Ruth Kenny


Nathaniel Hone R.A. 1718-1784 Engraved by Edward Fisher 1722- c. 1785 Jason, Portrait of a Racehorse Standing in Profile in a Stable, with a Jockey Holding the Reins and Another Watching from the Right Although Hone was a capable, if occasional, print maker, he also collaborated with most of the Dublin-trained engravers who dominated the London market for reproductive prints from about 1750, including the most famous of the group, James McArdell, who, like Hone, lived in Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. Here Hone works with Edward Fisher whom he almost certainly knew from Dublin; Fisher’s father was a hatter of Wood Quay which was also the location of Hone’s father’s business premises. In this rare print – a nice collaboration between an Irish painter and engraver – Hone shows the famous racehorse, Jason, owned by one of his most important patrons, Sir Nathaniel Curzon, later 1st Baron Scarsdale, of Kedleston Hall, near Derby, whom Hone would paint with his wife in a full-length double portrait of 1761, still in the State Apartments of Kedleston. The print was engraved in 1758 and reproduces Hone’s oil of three years earlier and was subsequently reissued in this more satisfactory version without the lengthy inscription giving details of Jason’s racing history on 20 June 1787.

20. Nathaniel Hone R.A. 1718-1784 Engraved by Edward Fisher 1722- c. 1785 Jason, Portrait of a Racehorse Standing in Profile in a Stable, with a Jockey Holding the Reins and Another Watching from the Right Mezzotint with some etching on paper 28.2 x 35.5 plate size

21. William Sadler II c.1782-1839 View of Westport House, County Mayo, with Croagh Patrick in the Distance Oil on canvas 56 x 80 Provenance: Cynthia O’Connor Gallery Private Collection

William Sadler II c.1782-1839 View of Westport House, County Mayo, with Croagh Patrick in the Distance Although he is more associated with depictions of Dublin and its surroundings, William Sadler also painted a few demesne landscapes (notably a series of Killua Castle, County Meath), and occasional exercises in the sublime. Here he combines these two normally very distinct sub-genres of landscape to include both the classical mansion of Westport House in its dramatic setting on the

edge of Clew Bay with the towering splendour of the holy mountain of Croagh Patrick in the background. Westport was designed by Richard Castle for John Browne, later the 1st Earl of Altamont, incorporating parts of an ancient O’Malley castle and decorated in part by James Wyatt. The house had been painted by George Moore in two works of 1761 which show the mansion in its new park, the creation of which had involved moving the town of Westport from its position close to the house to its present site about a mile away. The present work forms an intriguing link between these rather formal landscapes and the famous series of views painted by Sadler’s pupil, James Arthur O’Connor, for the Marquis of Sligo from about 1818 (National Gallery and private collection). Sadler cleverly positions the house, which is brightly spot-lit, so that despite its size it is clearly the focal point of the composition, while his rich chromatic range echoes an 1842 account by the scene by the novelist William Makepeace Thackeray: ‘the Bay [and] the Reek [Croagh Patrick], which sweeps down to the sea – and a hundred islands in it, were dressed up in gold and purple’.

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22. Inish Tearaght, West Coast of Ireland Oil on canvas 76.5 x 115 signed Exhibited: Royal Hibernian Academy 1883, no.18 (partial label with title verso) Provenance: Private Collection

Richard Brydges Beechey H.R.H.A. (1808-1895) Inish Tearaght, West Coast of Ireland 1883 Sybil Head, Near the Blaskets and Dingle, West of Ireland 1884 Holyhead Steamer leaving Kingstown 1871 Escaping from the Wreck (undated, probably 1870’s) Two re-discovered paintings by Richard Brydges Beechey, Inish Tearaght and Sybil Head are among the finest works by this artist to be seen in recent years. Both are oil on canvas, and both depict currachs braving the rough seas of the Atlantic ocean, off the Kerry coast. The first painting, exhibited at the RHA in 1883, bears a label, only part of which survives, identifying the subject as Inish Tearaght, the most westerly of the Blasket Islands. The second painting bears a similar original handwritten label, “Sybil Head, near the Blaskets and Dingle, W. of Ireland by R. B. Beechey”, Although they are a pair, each measuring 76 x 115cm, the subject of this second work relates to a canvas first exhibited by Beechey at the Royal Hibernian Academy in 1870, Off Sybil Head (West Coast of Ireland) Hookers, &c., running for Harbour. Inish Tearaght depicts two currachs in rough seas, below the twin peaks of the island. Each boat is rowed by three oarsmen, with a fourth at the stern, using a long sweep to steer. Currachs are made of cattle hide stretched over a light wooden frame, a form of boat-building that goes back thousands of years. In keeping with the traditional design, the oars depicted by Beechey are held by two wooden pegs, rather than iron oarlocks. Requiring exceptionally skilled seamanship, these light craft skim over the surface of the water, rather than ploughing through it, and can be launched from beaches. One of the currachs has a small sail, and is running before the wind. Both are close to the great sea arch that joins the two peaks of Inish Tearaght, which is being pointed out by one of

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the steersmen. While the oarsmen in the left currach are dressed in ragged clothing, the man at the stern wears an oilskin coat, indicating perhaps that the painting depicts Beechey himself, viewing this natural wonder off the Kerry coast. Seagulls flock above the sea arch, in between the two pinnacles of the island, which rear out of the water in a manner similar to nearby Skellig Rock. From the lighthouse station, a road winds up the left peak, towards a flagpole. A faint outline of the lighthouse itself is visible, to the left of the peak. The outline of the island had changed significantly over the preceding decade, as thousands of tons of rock were blasted, to make a platform for the lighthouse. In the distance, on the horizon, the silhouette of a paddle steamer can be seen, with smoke trailing in the strong wind. This may well be the Tartarus, the steamship on which Beechey served during his years surveying the Irish coast. In the foreground, a flock of black cormorants take wing, flying with the wind. As is usual in Beechey’s paintings, the sky is a tumult of clouds, with the sun breaking through and illuminating the precipitous rock face of the island. The second painting, Sybil Head, depicts three similar currachs, again braving rough seas, beneath jagged rocks at the northern tip of the Dingle Penninsula. To the left, a sailing vessel, perhaps a naval brig, bears down on the two currachs, while to the right a hooker approaches from Ferriter’s Cove. Cormorants take flight and seagulls land on the rough seas. A floating tree trunk lies in the path of the brig; through details such as these Beechey introduces a sense of danger to his paintings. To the right, in the distance, a mountain is silhouetted against the stormy sky. The subjects of these two paintings, and the Dingle peninsula itself, had become well-known to a wider audience in the 1840’s through the work of both the Ordnance Survey and the Geological Survey of Ireland. In June 1856, the geologist George Victor du Noyer surveyed the Dingle peninsula, incorporating watercolour views of Sybil Head in his maps. He also painted two dramatic views on Inishtooskert, an island near Inish Tearaght, of sharply


angled cliffs on the northern side of the island. (This watercolour map is in collection of the Geological Survey of Ireland). A third oil on canvas by Beechey, Holyhead Steamer Leaving Kingstown Harbour (1871), depicts a large paddle steamer, one

Ireland’s most accomplished marine painters. Aged thirteen he enrolled as a cadet at the Royal Naval College in Portsmouth, where art formed part of his training. After training on Espiègle and Owen Glendower, he was stationed in the West Indies on

of the quartet of ships operated by the City of Dublin Steam

HMS Seringapatnam). Joining HMS Blossom in 1825, he served as a midshipman under his older brother, hydrographer Captain Frederick William Beechey, for three years in the Pacific. During this time, Richard Brydges painted watercolour views of Mexico and California. Landing on Pitcairn Island, he sketched a portrait of John Adams, last surviving mutineer from HMS Bounty. They then sailed north, into Arctic waters, as far as the Bering Straits, but failed in their objective of meeting up with Franklin’s second expedition, which was making its way north-west around Canada. Blossom eventually returned to England, where Frederick William’s account of the voyage was published in 1831. After serving in the Mediterranean, Beechey was then invalided out of the navy. The reasons are not clear, but he may have been affected by the conflicts, storms, shipwrecks that were an integral part of naval service. Transferring to the more sedate Admiralty Survey of Ireland, he worked as an assistant to James Wolfe, who had also been a midshipman on HMS Blossom. This marked the beginning of years of Richard Brydges’ life where he lived in

Packet Company, named after the four provinces of Ireland. All were built in 1860 and had four funnels and side paddles. Beechey depicts the steamer passing the lighthouse at the entrance to Kingstown harbour (now Dun Laoghaire) and heading out into rough seas, bound for Holyhead in Wales. On the horizon, a sailing ship heels over in the strong wind, adding drama to the scene. A matching painting, of the mailboat Connaught, is in the National Gallery of Ireland, and as Beechey exhibited the mailboat Leinster at the RHA in 1869, this present work, signed and dated 1871, most likely depicts either the Ulster or Munster. Twenty years later, he showed a painting of Ireland, a fifth steamship that had entered service on the Dublin to Holyhead run. A fourth oil painting by Beechey, Escaping from the Wreck, is again based on the artist’s appreciation of the fragility of wooden sailing vessels, when overwhelmed by the fury of storms at sea. In the foreground, a ship’s lifeboat, overcrowded, and under sail, is driven by a gale force wind from a dismasted ship in the distance. Figures on board the lifeboat are struggling with the small sail, and attempting to put out oars, so as to bring the craft under control. Behind, a shaft of grey light breaks through the dark clouds, highlighting the churning seas around the lifeboat. Born in London in 1808, the son of artists Sir William Beechey RA and miniaturist Anne Jessop (Lady Beechey), Richard Brydges Beechey was a career naval officer who also became one of

Ireland, mapping its coasts and the river Shannon in detail. He married Frideswide Maria Moore Smyth, of Portlick Castle in County Westmeath, and they had one son and three daughters. Although it is generally stated that Beechey transferred to the Survey of Ireland in 1835, the chart of Lough Derg is clearly titled ‘Surveyed by Commander James Wolfe, Assisted by Lieutenant R. B. Beechey 1830’. Seven years later, the survey of Lough Ree was

23. Sybil Head near the Blaskets and Dingle, West of Ireland Oil on canvas 76.5 x 115 Signed and dated 1884 original label verso Provenance: Private Collection

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complete, and their attention turned to the more hazardous West of Ireland coastline. Prompted by dangers they had encountered in navigating the coast of Cork and Kerry, Wolfe’s report, published in 1846 “On the want of Lights, Buoys and Beacons on the Coast of Ireland” led to the building of new lighthouses on Sybil Head and at other locations. Although many Admiralty charts of Ireland, particularly of the east coast, are the result of surveys by his brother Frederick William, there are several, including the Shannon sheets, that bear Richard Brydges’s name. The 1848 chart of Westport Bay is by him, as is Achill Head to Roonagh Head (1851), Blacksod Bay (1851), Broadhaven Bay (1853), Killala (1854) Downpatrick Head to Achill Island (1854), and Tralee and Brandon (1855). Beechey also worked with other naval surveyors, including Lieutenant A. G. Edye and Mr. A. B. Usborne RN. Alongside his surveying work, Richard Brydges developed considerable skills as a painter of ships and marine views. Beginning in 1832, from an address in Plymouth, he began sending works to the Royal Academy, including HMS Madagascar off Gibraltar, Experimental Squadron under Codrington, and HMS Phaeton beating in Gibraltar. There followed a long gap in his submitting to the Academy, but in 1858 he showed Picking up a Lame Duck (a timber ship) and the following year Dutch galliot in a fresh breeze in the North Sea. In total, between 1832 and 1877 he exhibited nineteen works at the RA. He was also represented in exhibitions of the Society of British Artists, and at the British Institution, where he showed thirteen works between 1833 and 1859. Dating from 1834, H. M. Fisgard Weathering the Rocks off Ushant [Gorry Gallery 2010] depicts a naval vessel in heavy seas, with rocks and a headland in the distance. This is probably the canvas first shown by Beechey at the British Institution in 1834

24. Holyhead Steamer Leaving Kingstown Harbour Oil on canvas 41 x 56 Signed with monogram and dated 1871 Title inscribed verso Provenance: Rutland Gallery, London

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(No. 317): “The dangerous situation of H.M. ship Fisgard, Capt. T. Bryam Martin, endeavouring to weather the rocks off Ushant, having been embayed between that and Abreuvac, and carrying perhaps the greatest of canvas ever known under similar circumstances. (16th January 1801 at 8.00am)” Promoted in 1840 to the rank of Commander, Beechey continued to paint, a substantial number of his canvases depicting Irish scenes, including the work shown at the RA in 1868, “A water-logged and abandoned timber vessel being brought into Black Sod Bay, West of Ireland, by the coastguard, the natives in their “curraghs” (canvas-covered boats) profiting by the occasion; the cliff, upwards of 2000 ft., represented in the distance, forms part of the west coast of Achille Island”. The following year he exhibited The sea is His, and He made it, a painting of a dismasted ship floundering in heavy seas. As with many of Beechey’s paintings, the Biblical connection is evident, the title being taken from Psalm 95.5. At the British Institution, in 1858, he showed Hooker, off Cork Harbour. After first exhibiting at the Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin in 1842, Beechey did not show there again until 1861, and two years later showed a view of Doeega Head on Achill Island. In 1868 he was represented at the RHA with views of Clare Island and Killarney. Over the following two decades he consistently showed at the RHA, with many of his paintings clearly based on sketches made in earlier years. In 1843 he was also represented in Cork, at the third annual exhibition of the Art Union, where The Total Loss of the “Intrinsic” of Liverpool, in the beginning of the year 1836, near Kilkee, a few miles to the northward of the mouth of the Shannon, was described as full of “fearful grandeur and terrible sublimity”. [Cork Constitution, August 31st 1843] A decade later, this same painting was exhibited again, at the Great Exhibition in Dublin, where viewers were reminded the vessel had gone down ‘with all hands’. In 1843, he also painted a watercolour view of the Cove of Cork. [Whytes sale 2018]. A note on the reverse, “Cove / As you approach from the Cork Road - (House on the left) Richard B. Beechey 1843”, indicates he was stationed in Cove at that time. In 1858, at the Royal Academy, he exhibited The Stags—north-west coast of Ireland. After retiring from active service in 1864, Beechey settled for a time at 2 Belgrave Square North, Monkstown, Co. Dublin. Four years later he was elected an honorary member of the Royal Hibernian Academy. By 1874, he was living at 110 Pembroke Road, and in that year painted Eagle Island, off Erris Head, West of Ireland, a work exhibited a decade later at the RHA. [Exh. Gorry Gallery 2003] Evidently pleased by the response to this work, Beechey painted a second view of Eagle Island the following year, 1885, again showing it at the RHA. [Exh. RHA 1885, No. 215; Gorry Gallery 2006] In this scene of wild seas off the Mayo coast, the scene is again rendered in Biblical, almost apocalyptic, terms, the


25. Escaping from the Wreck Oil on card 17.5 x 24.5 Signed with monogram Provenance: Gorry Gallery Exhibition October 1987, no.40 where purchased by the present owner

grandeur of nature expressed by the force of waves, with jagged rocks in the foreground. A battered ship’s timber rears out of the water, while the lighthouse atop Eagle Rock is lit by diagonal rays of sunlight breaking through dark storm clouds. Moving first to Weston-super-Mare, and then to Plymouth, through the 1880’s Beechey continued to paint. Another late work, Bringing Home the Turf, County Kerry was shown in the Gorry Gallery in 2005. Signed and dated 1887, it depicts man with horse and cart struggling up a craggy mountain. Another work from that same year, his Heroine, Bay of Bengal, October 28th 1836 (private collection, Cork) depicts a dismasted ship, at the mercy of the elements, during a hurricane. According to a label on the reverse, ‘it was painted from the ship’s log’. Beechey had been aboard Heroine when it was dismasted, and was rescued by Sir Frederick Hughes, ‘for whom he later painted this picture.’ A third canvas from 1887, Wild Weather in the Sound (Plymouth), was shown at the Gorry Gallery in 2010. In 1888, some three years after the death of his first wife, Beechey married Frances,

26. Alexander Williams R.H.A 1846-1930 Coastal Scene with Boats and Figures Watercolour on paper 13.5 x 21 Signed and dated 1889

daughter of the Rev. Annesley Stewart of Trinity College, Dublin. That year at the RHA he exhibited Rounding the Tuscar Lighthouse in a Squall. After moving to Ryde in the Isle of Wight in 1890, he continued to paint and exhibit. His The Stag Rocks at Freshwater, Isle of Wight (Adams 2015) was painted in 1893, two years before his death. There are works by Beechey in several collections in Ireland and abroad. His Mail Boat “Connaught” is in the National Gallery of Ireland, while Yacht Racing in Cork Harbour, in the Royal St. George Yacht Club, Dublin, is probably the work shown in 1875 at the RHA, entitled The Rivals, at the Entrance of Cork Harbour: this spirited painting shows two yachts in close competition, rounding a buoy. Also in the Royal St. George is an oil painting of the Blasket Islands, and a panoramic view of Kingstown Harbour on regatta day. His Fastnet Rock, and Lights, off Cape Clear, shown at the RHA in 1877, is in the Royal Ocean Racing Club in London. There are works by him in the national library of Australia, the New York Yacht Club and collections in New Zealand. First Come, First Served is in the UK National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. Beechey’s life and career closely followed Britain’s imperial ambitions, and while he spent a lifetime documenting Ireland’s geography and landscape, it is telling that no significant exhibition of his work has ever been held, in either country. Peter Murray

27. Adam Buck 1759-1833 The Happy Meeting Oil on board 33 x 30 Signed and dated 1832 lower left Provenance: Sabin Galleries, Bond Street, London; Coyle Gallery, Dublin; Private collection Literature: A Regency, Buck, Adam Buck 1759-1833 ; An appreciation by Peter Darvall, published by Ashmolean Museum of Art Archaeology, University of Oxford 2015 (listed on page 174 appendix E, 1832)

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28. Erskine Nicol R.S.A. 1825-1904 The Visit of the Mother in Law Oil on canvas, 32.5 x 47 Signed and dated lower left E Nicol ’60 (title inscribed by hand and printed on label of Dominion Gallery, Montreal, verso).

Erskine Nicol R.S.A. 1825-1904 The Visit of the Mother in Law Originally from Leith in Scotland, Nicol is one of the best known, and most prolific genre and figure painters to have worked in rural Ireland, in the mid to late nineteenth century. He exhibited many Irish titles in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Liverpool as well as at the Royal Academy and the Royal Hibernian Academy. He also painted Scottish genre subjects, but his Irish paintings are easy to differentiate, because of his careful attention to authentic detail and his inclusion of objects and costume, typical of Irish farmhouses and cabins. Indeed his paintings are a colourful reminder of precisely how working peoples’ homes were arranged and furnished. Irish interiors varied regionally, and had distinct characteristics. This scene with its characteristic internal layout is strongly reminiscent of another of Nicol’s oil paintings O, I’m Not Myself At All Molly Dear, Molly Dear (Adam’s auction 01-06-2016, lot 98) published subsequently as Listenin to raison, as a book illustration. Both these paintings share the configuration of a wooden ‘jamb wall’ built against a naturally shaped timber post, which shelters the hearth from draughts from the front door (to the left). A ‘keeping hole’ containing various objects set into the wall on the far right, and a floor level turf fire set, with a stone hob, in the centre. Both scenes feature the same small empty, round-bellied cooking pot on the floor, and the young woman, with her apron tucked up to show off her red petticoat, could even be the same model. The red earthenware ‘pan’ with its pale shining glaze, (which would have been a multi-purpose crock for preparing food or setting cream if they made their own butter), is another item featuring in both pictures. This work, like many of his others, presents his three characters as if on a stage, as a conversation piece, inviting his audi-

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ence to explore, examine and unravel various narratives. Frequently marital bliss, or strife, provided the focus for his scene, so in common with other titles, such as Phew! caught again! (1858), The visit of the mother in law suggests an interruption to young married life. The husband turns his back on the scene, and is departing past the ‘jamb wall’ screening the hearth from draughts, and out into the sunshine. The wattle smoke canopy over the hearth, supported on a strong horizontal ‘brace tree’ (which sometimes incorporating small lofts), is deliberately denuded by Nicol here, using artist’s license to allow light from the chimney above to illuminate the scene. This hearth type predominated in the east and south of Ireland. An earthen floor is strewn with domestic paraphernalia: the tongs by the turf fire, the black-glazed earthenware pitcher and other glazed jugs for fetching well water, and the ubiquitous round potato basket, used to bring the crop in from the fields. Clothes and baskets, and the scattered peelings on the unswept floor, provide evidence for an altercation. The ‘woman of the house’ stands in defiant contemplation, her back to the disgruntled subject of the title; the mother in law, who sits angrily behind her. The arrangement of objects here tells us so much about the people involved; the older woman is in the traditional place of honour closest to the hearth, beside her a low table has been set with an earthenware crock, teacups and a teapot, and a white cloth in readiness for her arrival. Across the kitchen on the left, another table holds a wrapped traveller’s bundle, a man’s coat, and the wrought iron candle and rush light holder, would have provided light at night. People made their own lights, by collecting bog rushes, drying them, peeling off most of the skin, then dipping each in animal fat. Often they were then left to dry up on the loft, benefitting from the heat from the fire. The thin, pale line of the rush light is delineated by Nicol meticulously here, held aloft in the lever-like iron holder, which also holds a candle pushed into a cone at the top. Beside it is a bottle, and above is a flour bag, commonly recycled for storage, hanging on the wall. Dr Claudia Kinmonth MRIA References: Mrs S. C. Hall, Tales of Irish life and Character with pictures by Erskine Nicol R.S.A. (Edinburgh and London, 1909).


Thomas Pelham Hall fl. 1837-1867 Dean Swift and the Peasant Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), essayist, satirist, novelist, poet and cleric was considered one of the great wits of the early 18th century. In depicting Dean Swift and the Peasant, T P Hall portrays many of the character traits which so recommended him to his readership; a strong sense of moral propriety and courtesy tempered with an educationalists wit. A young boy is depicted in Dean Swift’s rooms, presumably in St. Patrick’s Cathedral, having unceremoniously dumped his delivery of dead game on the floor and is subject to a tutoring on good etiquette by the Dean. In turning the tables on the peasant boy, whose cause Swift had so successfully espoused in the satire A Modest Proposal, he gently but firmly shows the boy the error of his ways only to end up the victim of his own conceit as the boy presses him to pay him half a crown for the quality of Swift’s own presentation. 29. Thomas Pelham Hall fl. 1837-1867 Dean Swift and the Peasant “Sir,” roared out the Dean, as the boy flung the game on the floor, without removing his hat, or speaking a word, “is that the way to enter a room? I must teach you a lesson; here, sir, we will change places; take my chair… My master presents his compliments to Dean Swift, and asks his acceptance of this game; now, sir, what would you do?” Boy. “Eh, faith, I’d give him half a crown.” signed and dated 1855 oil on canvas 67 x 56 Exhibited: London, Royal Academy, 1867, No. 609

30. Thomas Rose Miles fl. 1869-1910 Unloading the turf, Connemara Oil on canvas 51 x 76.5 Signed, also signed and dated 1891 verso

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James Doyle Penrose R.H.A. 1862-1932 Lilies

31. James Doyle Penrose R.H.A. 1862-1932 Lilies Oil on canvas 43.4 x 22.8 Signed and dated ‘J. Doyle Penrose 1903’ Exhibited: Royal Hibernian Academy 1904, no.130

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Here Penrose, a ‘technically proficient artist who carried on working in a high Victorian manner well into the twentieth century’ (William Laffan in A.A.I., Vol 2, 419), paints a young woman dressed in white holding, and stooping to admire, a large lily. The precise meaning of the subject is, perhaps deliberately, left ambiguous. While it could easily represent ‘smell’, in the traditional iconography of the senses, the figure also has many of the attributes of the angel of the annunciation who is almost always shown approaching from the left, dressed in white and almost invariably holding a lily as symbol of the Virgin’s purity. However, as her girdle rather emphatically emphasises, the figure is less physically androgynous than appropriate for an archangel and, instead, the painting evokes the multiple, and rather more sensual, combinations of ‘young girl and flower’ – or en fleur – that abound in Pre-Raphaelite art, particularly in the fevered imaginings of Gabriel Dante Rossetti. In its juxtaposition of lilies with a pensive young woman dressed in white the subject also recalls works of ostensible pious or devout nature, but with an implicit suggestion of incipient sexual knowledge such as Charles Alston Collins’s Convent Thoughts (1851) or, and in this case anticipating by a few years, William Leech’s Convent Garden, Brittany (c. 1913). The picture may alternatively – or indeed as well – be considered as a purely painterly – art for art’s sake – exercise in exploring the subtlety of white as a pigment (fifteen years before Kazimir Malevich) again it may simply be an idealised portrait of a young woman called Lily, a very popular Victorian name. Perhaps the work partakes of all of these rich associations and arguably, this is one of Penrose’s attractive works, in large part because of the absence of the righteous ‘moral purpose’ that his son, the Surrealist artist Ronald Penrose, implied was an occasional weakness in the art of his father, a devout Quaker. (ibid., 420). Lilies was exhibited at the Royal Hibernian Academy in 1904, the same year that Penrose was included in Hugh Lane’s Guildhall Exhibition of Irish art in London.


32. Samuel McCloy 1831-1904 Flowers for the Teacher Watercolour on paper 38 x 24 Signed with monogram Provenance: Taggart, Jorgensen and Putnam, Washington; The Bell Gallery, Belfast; Private Collection

33. Rose Barton R.W.S. 1856-1929 Coming from the Dairy, Lancelot Place, London (Knightsbridge) Watercolour on paper 35.7 x 25.5 Signed and dated 1924 lower right

34. Letitia Hamilton R.H.A. 1878-1964 Windswept Trees, Newcastle, (Glenada Terrace) Oil on canvas 40.7 x 51 Signed with initials lower left Exhibition label with artist’s name and title verso

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35. Antonio Mancini 1852-1930 Double Self-Portrait White chalk and charcoal on paper 46.5 x 59 Inscribed: Drawn by Mancini, Dublin, Oct ‘07 Original label verso: Purchased 8th of the 8th ’32 at Lady Gregory’s Auction at Coole, Gort, Co.Galway

Antonio Mancini 1852-1930 Double Self-Portrait This exquisitely drawn double self-portrait acquaints the audience with two particularly distinctive representations of the Italian artist, Antonio Mancini, and was produced during his visit to Dublin in the autumn of 1907.1 Mancini made the journey to the Irish capital at the request of the art dealer and philanthropist, Sir Hugh Lane (1875-1915), who extended an invitation after he sat for his own portrait in Mancini’s Rome studio.2 During Mancini’s stay in Dublin, he spent many of his evenings drawing self-portraits, a number of which now reside in the Hugh Lane Gallery’s permanent collection.3 This engaging double self-portrait is another addition to the series. Lane’s aunt, Lady Augusta Gregory (1852-1932), was certainly taken with Mancini, and with this double self-portrait in particular, as she acquired it from the artist during his visit. It remained in Lady Gregory’s possession until her death in 1932, after which the contents of her estate were sold, and it was bought by a private owner whose collection it has remained in by decent. Besides his series of self-portraits, Mancini also painted a number of prestigious members of Dublin society throughout his visit. These included an oil painting of Lady Gregory, which is in the collection of the Hugh Lane Gallery. He also produced a pastel drawing of William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), sold by Sotheby’s in 2017 for £112,500, as well as a similar pastel of the artist Sarah Cecilia Harrison (1863-1941), now in the National Gallery of Ireland’s permanent collection after it was sold by the Gorry Gallery in 1981. During his lifetime, Mancini was highly regarded by his artistic

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contemporaries who admired his bold handing of both paint and charcoal, a technique illustrated superbly in this double self-portrait. Indeed, the eminent portrait painter, John Singer Sargent (1856-1925), was so taken by the work of Mancini that he bequeathed Mancini’s, The Maker of Figures (Portrait of the Artist’s Father), which was owned by Sargent, to Hugh Lane’s gallery project in 1904.4 This double self-portrait is an insightful example of Mancini’s work and perfectly encapsulates the artist’s skill and technique. It makes obvious the reasons for Mancini’s popularity amongst his peers and holds a prominent place in the history of the arts in Ireland. Hannah Baker Irish Research Council Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholar

1

Ulrich W. Hiesinger, Antonio Mancini: Nineteenth Century Italian Master (London: Yale University Press, 2007), 88.

2

Ibid, 87.

3

Ibid, 89.

4

Jessica O’Donnell, ‘Hugh Lane’s Vision,’ in Hugh Lane: Founder of a Gallery of Modern Art in Ireland, ed. Barbara Dawson (London: Scala Publishers, 2008), 56.

Hannah is a PhD candidate at Trinity College Dublin, her subject is the artist Sarah Cecilia Harrison (1863-1941). She is currently compiling a catalogue of works for Harrison and would be very grateful of any information on the artist. Email address: hbaker@tcd.ie.


36. Seán Keating P.R.H.A., P.R.A., P.R.S.A. 1889-1977 Self-Portrait (Study for a Painting) Charcoal and graphite on paper 54.7 x 40 Signed lower left

Seán Keating P.R.H.A., P.R.A., P.R.S.A. 1889-1977 Self-Portrait (Study for a Painting) It was Irish stained glass artist, Harry Clarke (1889-1931) who introduced his friend, Limerick-born Seán Keating, to the Aran Islands in 1912. The two met at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art the previous year and immediately became firm friends. As it turned out, the Aran Islands was to become the place of Keating’s artistic and political identity in the turbulent years leading up to the signing of the Treaty of Independence. He began as early as 1915 to portray himself on the islands and wearing the typical Aran clothing of the time; an oversized báinín jacket, multi-coloured woven críos (belt) and calf skin pampooties (soft leather shoes worn wet to climb over the island rocks). Keating was to become well-known for his paintings of the people of the Aran Islands, and for his self-portraiture. Elected an Associate of the Royal Hibernian Academy in 1919, he was elevated to full membership in 1923. Although he obtained a part-time teaching position at the School of Art in 1919, his mainstay was twofold; portraiture and self-portraiture in which he featured as a ‘man of Aran.’ Indeed, the importance of the Aran Islands, allied with his self-portraiture as an island man, is best described by the artist himself: ‘One of the advantages of a place like Aran is that you have to look into yourself and perhaps discover that you haven’t got a self,

a discovery that cannot be made too soon in the case of a painter.’1 This drawing is a study for a painting, possibly I Fein (Me Myself), a self-portrait which was exhibited in the RHA in 1924. In the original painting the artist is featured standing in the same position, but on the harbour of one of the Aran Islands, with a swathe of sandy beach in the background. He wears the same Aran costume, and his right hand is extended, rather than holding an oar as he does in this sketch. The painting features a woman kneeling under Keating’s outstretched hand, a composition that is highly reminiscent of what was a recently completed commission of a full set of Stations of the Cross for Clongowes Wood College in Kildare. The painting, now in a private collection, illustrates two Aran fishermen in the background, and a colourful sea and sky. This drawing, on the other hand, is a straightforward self-portrait bereft of extraneous detail with the exception of a group of Aran Island currachs floating in the water behind. It is a wonderful demonstration of Keating’s innate ability with pencil and charcoal through which he condensed pertinent particulars with a liveliness of touch and an eye for composition. Dr Éimear O’Connor HRHA 1

Seán Keating personal notes, quoted in Éimear O’Connor, Seán Keating: Art, Politics and Building the Irish Nation (Kildare: Irish Academic Press, 2013), p. 113.

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37. Maurice MacGonigal P.R.H.A. 1900-1979 Farmyard, Inverin, Connemara Oil on wood 30.5x40.5 Signed, also signed with title and address, Rock Road, Booterstown, Dublin, on original label verso Exhibited: Royal Hibernian Academy 1940, no.42 Provenance: Gorry Gallery, June 2000, no.65

38. William Crampton Gore R.H.A. 1871-1946 Interior, a Cottage in Donegal Oil on wood 33 x 41 Signed and dated 1915 Exhibited: The Royal Institute of Oil Painters, London, cat. No.2 Original label verso with the artist’s address: Montreuil-Sur-Mer, Pas-de-Calais, France

William Crampton Gore R.H.A. 1871-1946 Interior, a Cottage in Donegal William Crampton Gore R.H.A. landscape, interior, portrait and still life painter was born in Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh. He studied medicine in Dublin, qualifying in 1897 but abandoned medicine for art in 1901 studying at the Slade School of Fine Art,

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London under Henry Tonks and later in Paris. He was a friend of William Orpen and also Augustus John with whom he shared a studio. Gore exhibited more than one hundred works at the R.H.A. from 1905 until 1939 as well as the Paris Salon. On his return to Ireland in 1915, he painted in Donegal with George W. Russell and Dermod O’Brien-‘Interior, Cottage in Donegal’ in this exhibition which is dated 1915 is one of the fruits of this painting trip. He later exhibited in London at the Goupil Gallery, the Fine Art Society, the New English Art Society and the Royal Academy and was widely travelled.


J. Johnston Inglis R.H.A. 1867-1946 Coastal Landscape Dublin landscape painter. He exhibited almost seventy works at the R.H.A. from 1885-1903. He was appointed A.R.H.A. in 1892 and a full member later that year. He lived at Brighton Terrace, Monkstown then at Trenton House, Ballsbridge and later at Montrose, Donnybrook. He also exhibited at the R.A. London and in 1904, one of his works was shown in The Exhibition of Irish Painters held at the Guildhall of the Corporation of London organised by Sir Hugh Lane. 39. J. Johnston Inglis R.H.A. 1867-1946 Coastal Landscape Oil on canvas 92 x 128 Signed and dated 1903

40. Harriet Kirkwood 1880-1953 The Liffey at Lucan Oil on wood 33 x 40 Provenance: Private Collection Present owner by descent

Harriet Kirkwood 1880-1953 The Liffey at Lucan Harriet Kirkwood née Jameson was born at Sutton House, Sutton, Co. Dublin and studied at the Slade School of Fine Art. She married in 1910 and settled in Dublin exhibiting at the R.H.A. from 1920 until 1937. In the 1930s she studied with André Lhote in Paris and was a friend of Evie Hone and Mainie Jellett. She was a regular exhibitor at the Dublin Painters (President for a number of years), The Dublin Sketching Club, Water Colour Society of Ireland and the Irish Exhibition of Living Art. She died in Dublin in 1953.

41. Elinor M.Darwin 1879-1954 A mas in the Provence region of France Oil on board 27 x 34.5 Signed and dated 1921 also signed, dated and inscribed verso

Elinor M.Darwin 1879-1954 A mas in the Provence region of France Elinor M.Darwin née Monsell, book illustrator and painter was born in Limerick and was brought up by her uncle, the poet Aubrey de Vere of Curragh Chase, Adare. In 1897, she commenced her studies in London at the Slade School of Fine Art and began to illustrate books. She later stayed with Lady Gregory at Coole Park, Gort, Co. Galway, knew W.B. Yeats and the famous Abbey Theatre poster of ‘Queen Maeve with Irish wolfhound’ was from one of her woodcuts of 1904. She exhibited ten works at the R.H.A. and died in England in 1954.

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42. Edwin Hayes R.H.A 1819-1904 Mumbles Lighthouse, Swansea Oil on canvas 30.3 x 50.5 Signed and dated 1887, also signed and inscribed verso Exhibted: Probably Royal Hibernian Academy, 1887, No.92

44. Lady Elizabeth Butler (née Thompson) 1846-1933 Edward the Martyr Ink on paper 21.6 x 28.5 Signed E. Thompson lower left

Lady Elizabeth Butler (née Thompson) 1846-1933 Edward the Martyr Celebrated painter of battle scenes and military life. Studied London, Florence, and Rome. She was a frequent exhibiter at the R.A. Few artists have equalled her work in this field.

43. John Henry Campbell 1757-1829 Coastal Landscape with Cottages Watercolour on paper 13 x 17 Signed

Gearóid Arthur Hayes b.1980

46. Afternoon Shade Oil on board 30 x 40 Signed

45. Portrait of a Serbian Artist Oil on canvas 70.5 x 50.5 Signed Exhibited: R.H.A 2016 48. Twilight on the Iveragh Oil on board 19 x 23 Signed

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47. The Gallops neath the Galtees Oil on board 30 x 40 Signed


Harry Kernoff R.H.A. 1900-1974 Spring Sunshine, Harcourt Street, Dublin Dublin has changed so much in our time, that this light watercolour from 1931 is of another, gentler era of the capital, when Kernoff was the age of the century. That is him, in the broad-brimmed hat, slipping by the railings on a spring day, on his ‘perambulations’ around the city that became his adopted home. He set off most days from the nearby South Circular Road with his valise of paints to record what took his fancy, an ambling that became both a personal pilgrimage and a saga of Dublin, rivalled only by the prose-pictures in Ulysses, whose author also used another wandering pedestrian, Bloom, to celebrate the Irish capital. This view, though using light watery palette on card, is drip-

ping with nostalgia. The viewpoint from what is now Harcourt Square, which houses the specialist units of the Garda Metropolitan HQ, sometimes known as ‘The Puzzle Palace’. The Luas line runs now centre-street to the Green and outer suburbs, a living transport extension of the defunct, legendary Harcourt St. railway line. The hotels across the way are still there, much refurbished, some bopping at weekends with nightclubs. In the recent past, the Four Provinces, hence the name, was where many marriages began of country folk to the capital. Now Copper Face Jacks reflects modern mating practises. This gentle view is loaded and social history-as is the artist slipping by the railings. Kevin O’Connor Author Harry Kernoff, the Little Genius

49. Harry Kernoff R.H.A. 1900-1974 Spring Sunshine, Harcourt Street, Dublin Watercolour and pencil on paper 28.5 x 39.3 Signed and dated 1931 lower right Provenance: The Victor Waddington Gallery with original label verso Thence by descent to the present owner

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Index of Artists Artist

Page no.

Cat.no.

Ballagh, Robert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover

50

Barret, George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5

1-4

Barton, Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

33

14-17

22-25

Buck, Adam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

27

Bull, Richard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

10

Butler, Lady Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

44

Campbell, John Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

43

Darwin, Elinor M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

41

Dillon, Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

9

Dixon, Samuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

5, 6

Faulkner, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

12

Gore, William Crampton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

38

Hall, Thomas Pelham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

29

Hamilton, Hugh Douglas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

16-19

Hamilton, Letitia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

34

Hayes, Edwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

42

Hayes, Gearóid Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

45-48

Hone, Horace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

11

Hone, Nathaniel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

20

Inglis, J.Johnston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

39

Keating, Seán . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

36

Kernoff, Harry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

49

Kerr, Henry Wright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

13, 14

Kirkwood, Harriet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

40

MacGonigal, Maurice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

37

Mancini, Antonio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22

35

McCloy, Samuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

32

Miles, Thomas Rose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

30

7

7

Nicol, Erskine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

28

O’Brien, James George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

15

Penrose, James Doyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

31

Reily, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

8

Sadler, William . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

21

Williams, Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

26

Beechey, Richard Brydges

Mullins, George

28

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...........................

..............................................


Prices Cat.no. & Artist

Price in Euros

1. George Barret R.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

P OA

Cat.no. & Artist

Price in Euros

29. Thomas Pelham Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,850

2. George Barret R.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,000

30. Thomas Rose Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,500

3. George Barret R.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,000

31. James Doyle Penrose R.H.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,500

4. George Barret R.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,500

32. Samuel McCloy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,500

5, 6. Samuel Dixion (pair) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,500

33. Rose Barton R.W.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,850

7. George Mullins

34. Letitia Hamilton R.H.A.

........................................

45,000

6, 850

.............................

8. James Reily . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,400

35. Antonio Mancini . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,500

9. Peter Dillion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,850

36. Seán Keating P.R.H.A. , P.R.A. , P.R.S.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,500

10. Richard Bull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,950

37. Maurice MacGonigal P.R.H.A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,500

11. Horace Hone A.R.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,850

38. William Crampton Gore R.H.A.

12. John Faulkner R.H.A.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,500

39. J. Johnston Inglis R.H.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,850

13, 14. Henrey Wright Kerr R.S.A. , R.S.W. (pair) . . . . . . 2,400

40. Harriet Kirkwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 950

15. James George O'Brien . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,850

41. Elinor M. Darwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,250

16, 17, 18, 19. Hugh Douglas Hamilton (set of four). . . . 32,500

42. Edwin Hayes R.H.A.

20. Nathanial Hone R.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,400

43. John Henry Campbell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585

21. William Sadler (II)

9,500

44. Lady Elizabeth Butler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,450

22. Richard Brydges Beechey H.R.H.A.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55,000

45. Gearóid Arthur Hayes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,500

23. Richard Brydges Beechey H.R.H.A.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55,000

46. Gearóid Arthur Hayes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,450

24. Richard Brydges Beechey H.R.H.A.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,500

47. Gearóid Arthur Hayes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,450

25. Richard Brydges Beechey H.R.H.A.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,400

48. Gearóid Arthur Hayes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 950

26. Alexander Williams R.H.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 585

49. Harry Kernoff R.H.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,850

27. Adam Buck

50. Robert Ballagh

.....................................

.............................................

5,850

.....................

..................................

.......................................

3,500

4,850

15,000

28. Erskine Nicol R.S.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,850

Acknowledgements We are grateful to the following for their kind assistance in the preparation of this exhibition: Christopher Ashe, Hannah Baker, Gillian Buckley, Dr.Paul Caffrey, Mary Davies, Aisling Gorry, Dr. Ruth Kenny, Dr. Claudia Kinmonth M.R.I.A., William Laffan, Pat Mc Bride, Logan Morse, Emily Mulcahy Cullen, Peter Murray, Dr. Éimear O’Connor H.R.H.A., Kevin O’Connor, Colin Rafferty and Daniel Sheppard

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50. Robert Ballagh b. 1943 Sam Oil and mixed media on canvas 106.7 x 22.8

gorry gallery 20 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2 +353 (0)1 679 5319 gorrygallery@icloud.com www.gorrygallery.ie exhibition opening times Monday–Saturday 12–5pm Catalogue design by Ros Woodham ros@alkabir.org Printing by Print Run Limited

Profile for James Gorry

Gorry Gallery An Exhibition and Sale of 18th - 21st Century Irish Paintings October 2020  

Gorry Gallery An Exhibition and Sale of 18th - 21st Century Irish Paintings October 2020

Gorry Gallery An Exhibition and Sale of 18th - 21st Century Irish Paintings October 2020  

Gorry Gallery An Exhibition and Sale of 18th - 21st Century Irish Paintings October 2020

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