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W I T H O U T

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A L T E R N A T E

M O N T H

J U N E

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G O O D T A S T E . C O . Z A

WIN

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Miso: Packed with savoury flavour (p.28) Chocolate and wine pairing, the good and the bad (p.66) Natural attractions of Dubai (p.36) • Robertson: Wholesome & full of heart (p.40) The edible gardens of Babylonstoren (p.46) W I N E · F O OD · T R AV E L · H E A LT H · A R T & DE SIG N · C A R S


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GOOD TASTE C O N T E N T S

FOOD

20 Quick as Quince

A TASTY COMBO

Have you ever cooked with quinces? They offer varied flavours and colours. Go on, give it a try

26

26

A Tasty Combination Zucchini and Mint Soup, paired with a red wine, is just what the doctor ordered

28

More from Miso There are loads of ways to use miso paste. We bring you some inspiration

DUBAI

36

28

THE SAVOURY FLAVOUR OF MISO

TRAVEL

32 There’s No Place Like Home With the weak rand, you get more bang for your buck with a local holiday

36 Delving into Dubai

40

ROBERTSON

We take a look at Dubai’s floral gardens, conservation projects and marine rehabilitation

40 Roaming Robertson Robertson offers a multitude of wine farm activities, beautiful mountains, and small-town charm

WINE & DRINKS

64

HANNES NEL

64

66

20 J U N E

WINE AND CHOC

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An Appreciation for Quality We chat to Sandy Hyslop of Ballantine’s on what it takes to be a whisky master blender

66

T H O U S A N D

Couverture and Corks Wine and chocolate pairing can be tricky. Here’s some advice from the experts

74

COOKING WITH QUINCES

‘It’s all about balance’ Hannes Nel on what makes Lourensford stand apart from other wine estates

S I X T E E N


GOOD TASTE

WIN

6

GRAPES & GRIPES

Win a Trip to Bushmans Kloof You stand a chance to win a 2-night stay for two, at Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve and Wellness Retreat, worth R26 540!

8

69

Subscribe to Good Taste... And stand a chance to win one of five AMT Omelette Pans and Papillon Pot & Pan Protectors

LIFESTYLE

OENO FILE

10

6

WIN A TRIP TO BUSHMANS KLOOF

52 Bringing the Inside Out As the cooler months roll in, there’s no need to move inside and hibernate. Rather, bring indoor luxury and warmth to an outside space

REGULARS

8

GRAPEVINE

12

APPETITE

16

Grapes and Gripes Readers’ opinions, comments and criticisms

GOODTASTE.CO.ZA

19

10

Oeno File Your wine questions answered

12

News & Happenings What’s on and what’s new

16

Tickle your Taste Buds Products & ideas for all your foodie desires

44

BEST ART

19

Goodtaste.co.za What’s happening online

44

Squiggles & Scribbles Art, design and theatre happenings

62

Rev Rap Motoring matter-of-facts

62

REV RAP

BRINGING THE INSIDE OUT

52 J U N E

LAST ROUND

T W O

80

T H O U S A N D

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70

Latest Wines Our panel reports on the latest wines, All the Winning Wines, and the Editor’s Choice listing

80

Last Round The Ancient Grapevine

Assimilation 2 by Corné Eksteen (See ‘Squiggles & Scribbles’ on p.44)

S I X T E E N


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good taste P. O . B O X 3 0 · C O N S TA N T I A 7 8 4 8 · T E L 0 2 1 -7 0 9 - 6 4 0 0 FA X 0 8 6 - 6 74 - 419 9 · w w w.go o d t a s te . c o. z a

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF EDITOR ART DIRECTOR/DIGITAL MANAGER DESIGNER ONLINE EDITOR ADVERTISING ADVERTISING WINE TASTINGS TRAFFIC WINE BUYER/PUBLISHER

Colin Collard Shannon Latimer Astrid Rowe Lauren de Sousa Malu Lambert Matthew Brand Karen Naumann Tamlin Jethro & Chesray Apollis Lesel Haddon Natalie Collard

REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Articles —David Biggs, Irina von Holdt, Alex Latimer Car Reviews—Stuart Johnston Illustrations—Alex Latimer Photography & Styling—C&D Heierli News—Kari Collard Proofing—Bronwen Griffiths

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE Keri Harvey • Kim Maxwell Keli van der Weijde

HAVE A QUESTION? Here’s how to contact us:

• ADVERTISING call 021-709-6400. • SUBSCRIPTIONS call 021-709-6400 or email subscriptions@goodtaste.co.za. • WINE DELIVERY or WINE ORDERS call 086 111 WINE(9463), fax 0866 743 966, or email info@wineoffers.co.za. • WRITE TO THE EDITOR : Email us on editor@goodtaste.co.za or write to The Editor, Good Taste, P.O. Box 30, Constantia 7848. Send press releases via email to editor@goodtaste.co.za. All contributions are edited for space and style. FIND US:

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COMPETITIONS: The winners will be the first correct entries drawn after the closing date. The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into. The prize is not transferable and may not be converted into cash. If the winner has not responded to our announcement, via their contact details provided, within three months of the competition’s closing date, Good Taste will send the prize to the next available winner. Employees of Converge (Pty) Ltd, Good Taste magazine, their families, their agencies, Good Taste contributors, and any other parties associated with the competition may not enter. Entrants to regular competitions may only win once. Sms entries cost R1.00 each. Competitions are for South African residents only. Member

Iwca International Wine Clubs Association

Good Taste magazine is published every alternate month by Converge (Pty) Ltd, Capricorn Boulevard South, Capricorn Business Park, Muizenberg, Cape Town, 7945. © Copyright 2016. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Liability. While every care is taken in the preparation of this magazine, the publishers cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of the information herein, or any consequence arising from it. The views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Converge (Pty) Ltd, the publication or the publisher.


WIN

GOOD TASTE COMPETITION

WIN a 2-night stay for two people at the five-star Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve & Wellness Retreat in the Cederberg,

WORTH R26 540

TO ENTER: Go to .co.za/win. www.goodtaste ies if you sign Get 5 extra entr etter. And, for up to our newsl per social one extra entry , like us on media platform follow us on Facebook and ram (buttons Twitter & Instag e). on our homepag

Luxury Just Around the Corner

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enowned for its beautiful setting among wide open plains and rock formations at the foothills of the Cederberg, the

award-winning Bushmans Kloof is the perfect destination for an indulgent getaway, a mere 270km from Cape Town. This winter, guests may choose from a selection of gourmet food and wine weekends and rejuvenating wellness breaks at the Relais & Châteaux lodge. Packages start from only R2 450 per person sharing per night, with luxury accommodation, all meals and lodge activities included. Go to www.bushmanskloof.co.za for more information. The prize features: Two nights at Bushmans Kloof for two people sharing in a Deluxe Room, as well as Cape Town transfers to and from the lodge. Also included are all meals, early morning rock art excursions, evening nature drives and other lodge activities. In addition, the winner will be able to enjoy a candle-lit dinner for two at the secluded Kadoro cottage, plus two Cederberg ‘Soulution’ signature spa treatments.

Terms and Conditions: The prize is not transferable and cannot be converted to cash. Each SMS entry costs R1. Competition closes 17 June 2016. Any extra costs incurred such as transfers, beverages, telephone and laundry, curios and all additional expenses not mentioned will be for the winner’s own account. Lunch is not included on the day of arrival and departure. This prize is valid until 31 August 2016 and accommodation is subject to availability. Go to www. goodtaste.co.za/competition-terms for further T&Cs.


GOOD TASTE E D ’ S

L E T T E R

W

e all love the outdoors and festival spot, it also has plenty of summer weather. It’s part places to explore and tasty offerings of who we are as South to try. Moving out of South Africa, Africans. But, it’s also great when the we discover the beauty of DUBAI — it’s natural beauty (page 36). Mostly cooler weather creeps closer. We put known for its tall buildings and as on our scarves, light a fire and can a shopping mecca, we rather look at properly enjoy our favourite glass of Dubai’s natural offerings. red—without the forbidden thought of To keep your home dropping an ice block into entertaining outdoors it. And that time has finally this autumn, why not arrived. investigate the options for We celebrate autumn extending your outdoor with a peculiar fruit, the QUINCE (page 20). Not one area, by BRINGING THE INDOORS OUTSIDE (page of the more popular fruit 52)? This is a new and very choices for families, we popular décor trend. thought we’d introduce this Cooking with And, getting back to beauty to you and show you quinces enjoying fine wines, we how to cook with it too. look at PAIRING WINE WITH CHOCOLATE You won’t be disappointed. Keeping (page 66). It’s a debated topic, so we our ingredients slightly curious this find out who is doing it right and why, season, we also look at cooking with MISO (page 28). We encourage you to perhaps, it’s not for everyone. go out, buy the paste and start using We chat to the winemaker from LOURENSFORD (page 64) about this savoury flavour with your regular blending wines, find out how many dishes. whiskies BALLANTINE’S (page 74) On the travel side of things, we master blender can nose in one day, discover options for where you can go and why cover artist CORNÉ EKSTEEN for your autumn break. These HIDDEN GEMS can be found right around the paints portraits (page 44). corner, so there’s no excuse to miss There’s more, of course, not out (page 32). And if you’re down forgetting valuable information on all the best and latest in wine. in the Western Cape, don’t overlook ROBERTSON as a place to visit (page Enjoy! 40). It’s not only a popular wine J U N E

T W O

T H O U S A N D

A N D

Winner of the Best Bordeaux Blend of the Year 2013 and 2015

Not for Sale to Persons Under the Age of 18. Drink Responsibly.

S I X T E E N

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GOOD TASTE

B E S T

L E T T E R S

S

Love, Love, Love

end us your views on any topic raised in Good Taste, on any subject of interest to our readers, and you could win an Earthbound Organic R500. Hamper hamper worth R500 includes: gardening equipment, TO WIN! SEND YOUR LETTER TO: organic products including tea, editor@goodtaste. wine and spices.

I’m not a regular subscriber to your mag. I rather just buy a copy when the cover art appeals to me. But I do often go online to search through your recipes. I know Diane Heierli (who creates your

co.za

recipes) and her food is reliably tasty and simple to make. And what a surprise I got when I landed on the homepage. Your new website looks beautiful. Stylish and elegant, it is so nice to finally see your website reflecting your magazine pages—and so user friendly. I’ll definitely be searching more often now, and not just the recipe section. Keep up the great work. —Sharon Ellis, Hout Bay, CT

Cheese and Wine Make Me Feel Fine Cheese and wine are two of my favourite things. And I’ve always enjoyed them together—it’s the ultimate pairing. So, I was eager to read your article in the May issue. And what a delight. The article was so informative and gave such great pairing advice. After reading it, all I could think about was booking a ticket to Cape Town as soon as possible to pop into Culture Club Cheese. It’s a place, I’m sure, I could spend many hours. —Ruth Owens, Northcliff, JHB J U N E

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Wines that Care We know that ‘going organic’ is good for our health, and the high quality organic foods and wines available makes the choice an easy one. EARTHBOUND ORGANIC WINES, grown on the West

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GOOD TASTE O E N O

F I L E

Why are standard wine bottles 750ml and not a litre? What does ‘using chips’ in winemaking mean? What was bathtub gin and who made it?

made to contain 750ml of

liquid? Surely it would have been more logical to make them in one litre size? Does it make sense to have three-quarters of a litre as the industry standard?

Like so many wine traditions, this one goes back a long time. Before the invention of automated bottlemaking machinery, bottles were made individually by glass blowers. They placed a blob of molten glass on a long blow-pipe and skilfully blew it into a bubble, turning it all the while to make it as symmetrical as possible. Obviously shapes and sizes varied widely according to the glass blower’s skill. The usual bottle sizes varied between 650ml and 850ml, because that’s about the capacity of a glass-blower’s lungs. But in the 1970s the EU set standard sizes for containers and settled on 750ml as being

the natural size of a wine bottle. Every time you open a bottle, think of those old glass blowers and be thankful they had such conveniently-sized lungs.

A

friend recently tasted a red wine and remarked: “They obviously

used chips here.” What did he mean by that?

Oak barrels have been used for centuries for maturing red wines. The wood of the barrel gives the wine an added layer of flavour which wine lovers have come to associate with quality wine. In recent times, however, the price of barrels has increased enormously, owing to the scarcity of good timber and the high cost of skilled labour. Many winemakers cannot afford oak barrels for any but their most expensive wines. It has now become common practice to place chips of oak into the stainless steel fermenting tanks to give the wine the flavour of wood without the great expense of buying barrels. Connoisseurs claim to be able to tell the difference between wines matured in barrels and those treated with wood chips. Your friend was probably showing off his wine knowledge. The polite thing is to look impressed. The sensible thing is to shut up and enjoy the wine. Who cares how it got to be so good? J U N E

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I

’ve often read about “bathtub gin” in stories about the American

prohibition days. What exactly was bathtub gin and who made it?

So-called bathtub gin came in a wide variety of styles and flavours. The name actually covered any illegal spirit drink sold in speak-easy bars across America. It’s relatively easy to produce raw alcohol. All you need is sugar and yeast and a still. It’s rough and unpalatable in its neat form, so the makers used to add all kinds of flavours, using fruit, turnips, corn and anything else they could lay their hands on. It’s quite likely that some of these concoctions were actually made in a bathtub, but the name has stuck and refers to any rough, illegally-made spirit drink. It is also known, for obvious reasons, as rotgut.

ASK US A QUESTION Puzzled about wine? Bothered by etiquette or formality? Anything you would like to know about grapes or grape juice? Send your wine questions, which our panel will try to answer in the least pretentious way possible, to: The Editor, Good Taste, PO Box 30, Constantia, 7848 or email editor@goodtaste.co.za.

STOCK IMAGE: WWW.ISTOCK.COM

W

hy are standard wine bottles


THE ONEO FILE

GOOD TASTE B E S T

N E W S

W H A T ’S O N A N D W H A T ’S N E W

This Is a Man’s World

Reader Giveaway. Go to www.goodtaste.

It’s been suggested—by Yale University

co.za/win to enter and win a 6-month supply

scientists nogal—that women have a

of Viljoensdrift wines valued at R2 000.

quantifiably better sense of taste than

Answer this simple question: What is their

men. And yet, to this day, winemaking

riverboat’s name? Make sure to like and

remains very much a male-dominated

follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

industry. A 2015 survey from Santa Clara winemakers at California’s 3 400-plus wineries are female. However, there are signs this is slowly changing. The 2015 graduating class from UC Davis’s enology and viticulture program was about half female, up from just one-third in 1999. It’s not a drastic change but a change, nonetheless. Although this information is taken from the States, this seems to be a global trend. We’re hoping to see more and more South African women taking to winemaking.

Big Brother Is Watching

to receive extra entries, and share the

How ’bout a Boat Trip on the Breede River?

competition with your friends. Competition

Toast the good life with a glass of

and conditions online.

closes 31 May 2016. Terms

Viljoensdrift wine on board their flatbottomed riverboat named Uncle Ben 2. Lined with yellowwood and wild olive

DER REA WAY A GIVE

trees, the river is also home to a variety of bird species, allowing for a lovely riverside experience. Fill your picnic basket with foods from their deli, add a bottle or two of Viljoensdrift’s fine wines and you’re all set for your trip down the river. What better way to spend a laidback afternoon with family and friends? Go to www.viljoensdrift.co.za.

Certain premium estates overseas are beginning to look a little more like a

A Tasting Experience to Note

scene from Transformers than a wine

If you’re in the mood for a decadent tasting

farm. These top wine dogs are using

experience, make your way down to the KWV

drones, optical scanners, and heat-sensing

Wine Emporium. The tastings here were initiated

satellites to keep a digital eye on things

by the popular Brandy and Chocolate pairing,

from high above. These airborne drones

and it remains one of the most popular pairings.

collect data, which helps winemakers

Brandy and chocolate is a fool-proof combination,

decide on the optimal time to harvest

because the higher the percentage of cocoa, the

and evaluate where they can use more

better the match with a higher alcohol-content

or less fertiliser. Other ’bots roam in and

drink. Brandy is extremely complex, varied in

around the vineyard rows, collecting

aroma, taste and body and the combination with

information farmers can use to make

the chocolate enhances the characteristics of the

better decisions—soon they may even be

KWV brandies. The tasting pairs four of KWV’s finest brandies with Belgian chocolates

able to take over pruning. After that, the

created by Huguenot Fine Chocolates in Franschhoek. Drop in and taste them for yourself.

world…

Go to www.kwvwineemporium.co.za. J U N E

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TEXT BY KARI COLLARD • IMAGES BY KWV WINE, VILJOENSDRIFT WINE, YUPPIECHEF.COM

University revealed just 10 per cent of


GOOD TASTE

Goodies for Mom and Dad

Vacu Vin Rapid Ice Wine

Metrokane Rabbit Wine Tool Kit, Set

With Mother’s and Father’s Day

Bottle Chiller, R289

of 4, R399

approaching, make sure you’re not empty

Make keeping wine cool a

For the dad who loves a tool kit of any

handed. Here are some winey gift ideas to

thing of the past. Keep the

kind, here’s one stocked with the best

keep them happy—or to put on your own

gel pack in the freezer until

wine accessories. Includes: self-

gift list.

guests arrive or lunch is

pulling corkscrew, a foil cutter, a

served, pop it in the Chiller

pourer with stopper, and a wine/

and bam! in just five

champagne sealer.

Kitchen Craft Luxe Lounge Champagne Bottle Stopper, R199 If they really love bubbly then this gadget is indispensable.

minutes the contents will have chilled.

Although I’m sure there won’t be any leftover bubbly, you don’t want the bubbles to disappear between glasses. Sagaform Wine Carafe with Oak Stopper, 1 Litre, R349 Talk about elegant. This carafe is made from hand-blown glass and topped with an oak stopper. And it comes in a gift box,

All gifts available at yuppiechef.com.

now that makes gifting easier.

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The OneO File

Good TasTe

What the Label Says About Whisky So you’ve got quite a taste for whisky, eh? Well, best you know how to decode the information on the bottle’s label. Here’s the lowdown:

• Whisky vs Whiskey. It’s not two different ways of spelling the same thing. American varieties such as bourbon and rye, as well as the Irish version, keep the “e” and are spelt “whiskey”. And, the smooth stuff from Scotland, Canada and Japan are referred to as “whisky”.

• Warm Climate vs Cool Climate. Ageing for 18 years in Scotland is not the same as ageing for 18 years in Kentucky. The climates are completely different and

Your Next Wine Route to Visit Introducing South Africa’s 21st wine route. It’s in the beautiful town of Stanford, just 25km from Hermanus. Because of its positioning, Stanford is one of SA’s coolest wine-producing regions—offering good conditions for the production of top-quality and award-winning wines. At this stage, and with only eight members, the Stanford Wine Route is relatively small. However, expansion is on the cards as there are existing producers wanting to join and a number of new wine farms opening in the area. The present members include: Misty Mountains Estate, Springfontein, Sir Robert Stanford Estate, Stanford Hills, Walker Bay Vineyards, Vaalvlei, Raka and Boschrivier. So swing past Stanford soon.

ageing in Scotland may make the goods the soil, inhibiting weed growth; and

such as in Kentucky, could make whisky

Boschendal Receives Champion Status

overly oaky or even tannic.

As one of the oldest working wine estates

delicious, but 18 years somewhere warm,

• Tennessee Whiskey vs Bourbon.

preserving soil moisture with water-saving

in South Africa—and having celebrated

Both Tennessee whiskey and bourbon

its 330th year—Boschendal has now

whiskey are bourbons. Tennessee

received international recognition by

whiskey has to come from (you guessed

being awarded Conservation Champion

it) Tennessee and must undergo the

status by the Worldwide Fund for

Lincoln County process. Much like

Nature. This status is awarded to South

France’s champagne has to come from

African wine farms which are committed

Champagne.

to addressing environmental concerns

• Single Malt vs Blended Scotch.

and meet a set of rigorous conservation

A single malt Scotch means it’s made

criteria. Farming practices include: raising

entirely from malted barley. Whereas

free-range animals to reduce food miles

blended Scotch is made from a blend of

and contribute to soil productivity; the use

malted barley and unmalted grain spirits.

of cover crops in the vineyards to enrich j u n e

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strategies such as conservation-efficient irrigation systems for vineyards and fruit trees. The estate is currently in the process of developing the capability to generate sufficient alternative energy from hydroelectricity, solar and biomass to meet most of the farm’s energy requirements. Boschendal, you beaut!


GOOD TASTE

What’s on Where

1

brings a little whisky into the mix. This

CULINARY ARTS FOR KIDS, APRIL-NOVEMBER. The Table

delicious chocolate and whisky tasting

Bay’s Executive Chef Jocelyn Myers-Adams will again be

brings two well-loved indulgences

hosting monthly classes for aspiring young cooks. Mini chefs

together. Beats soap on a rope.

in the making will get to work side by side with this talented

R295pp. Email restaurant.reservations@

chef for two hours. R300 per child. Email TableBayDining@

oneandonlycapetown.com.

suninternational.com.

2

GRAND DESIGNS LIVE, 20-22 MAY. Want to learn about the latest design trends? Grand Designs Live is held at Jozi’s

6

TASTE THE HELDERBERG, 15

more than 100 premium wines to sip

Ticketpro Dome and focuses on gardens, interiors, DIY, builds,

on and dishes and artisanal produce to

kitchen and bathroom offerings, expert tips and demonstrations

try. Taking place at NH The Lord Charles

in each field. R95pp. Go to www.granddesignslive.co.za. Reader

Hotel in Somerset West. R100pp. Go to

Giveaway. We’re giving away a free ticket for Friday 20 May.

www.wineroute.co.za.

Enter online at www.goodtaste.co.za/win.

Putting on quite a show

JUNE. Celebrate the Helderberg with at Taste the Helderberg

7

FRANSCHHOEK BASTILLE FESTIVAL, 16 & 17 JULY. As winter

Taste the Helderberg

sets in, the festival’s Food & Wine Marquee is guaranteed to keep you snug while sampling some of Franschhoek’s finest wines and foods. Berets be everywhere! R200pp

DER REA WAY A GIVE

3

from www.webtickets.co.za. Go to www.franschhoekbastille.co.za.

8

CONSTANTIA GLEN’S CHOCOLATE & RED WINE PAIRING, NOW-DECEMBER. Enjoy a classic pairing of beautiful Bordeaux-

style red wines with handcrafted dark chocolate in the Constantia

THE SOUP, SIP & BREAD FESTIVAL, 3-5

Wine Valley. R90pp and served daily in the tasting room.

JUNE. Once again top wine farms from the Durbanville Wine

Go to www.constantiaglen.com.

9

Valley have been invited to participate in this fun festival. Each farm will be celebrating the start of winter by offering wines,

BOTTELARY HILLS’ ‘POP UP’

LUNCHES, FROM

soups, artisan breads and other winter inspired culinary treats. Go to www.durbanvillewine.co.za.

14 AUGUST. The

4

OLD MUTUAL TROPHY WINE SHOW PUBLIC TASTINGS,

Bottelary Hills Wine

3 & 10 JUNE. Since 2002, the Old Mutual Trophy Wine

Route is all fired

Show has been SA’s most prestigious wine competition. The public tastings in Cape Town, 3 June, and Joburg, 10 June, are must-do wine events. R165pp. Ticket sales via www.

up as chef Bertus Sunday lunches in style

Basson prepares for a series of Sunday

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lunches on an open fire. Bertus teams up with the wine folk of

5

FATHER’S DAY FESTIVITIES AT ONE&ONLY CAPE

the area to celebrate the flavours of fire, with a contemporary

TOWN, 9 JUNE. Spoil Dad with an afternoon tea, which

twist. R350pp. Email marketing@wineroute.co.za.

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THE ONEO FILE

GOOD TASTE B E S T

Add Some Funk to Your Feta

&

IDEAS FOR A LL YOUR FOODIE DESIR ES

Here’s a recipe to up your feta game in

A Turmeric Latte to Try

your favourite salads, or to spoon over

Over the past few years certain superfoods have reached ultra-trendy levels and turmeric is one of them. It is thought to be rather beneficial for our overall health—particularly as a potent antioxidant and powerful antiinflammatory, which is helpful for rheumatoid arthritis. Besides sprinkling some over savoury dishes you can also add fresh turmeric to boiled water with ginger and lemon for a healthy hot drink. Looking for something a little more decadent? Try this turmeric latte that’s ideal for the chilly winter days ahead. It’s packed with omega 3-rich hemp seeds, dates and, of course, immunity-boosting fresh turmeric juice.

crackers and serve as a delicious snack. You can also use the jar’s leftover olive oil to make a salad dressing.

200g of feta cheese, drained, patted dry and cut into cubes

• •

2 sprigs of fresh thyme or rosemary 2 wide strips of lemon zest, removed with a vegetable peeler

• • •

1 bay leaf 1 tsp of whole black peppercorns extra-virgin olive oil

Place the feta in a glass jar. Tuck the thyme, zest, bay leaf and peppercorns in the jar, and then cover contents with oil. Seal tightly and chill for at least two days or up to one week.

• 500ml water • 2 tbsp hemp seeds • 2 medjool dates • 1 oz fresh turmeric juice • small piece of vanilla bean • pinch of salt Blend together all the ingredients. Warm up and serve. Recipe Source: Cafe Gratitude

The Best Fats for Your Skin Ditch those chemical creams and harsh scrubs and, instead, nourish your skin from the inside out with a little help from Mother Nature. Include these three healthy fats in your diet and your skin care routine for a natural dewy look—a la Audrey Hepburn. Besides acting as a natural moisturiser, avocados are associated with anti-ageing due to xanthophyll, with its DNA damage protection. Avos are also a source of vitamin E, which stimulates collagen production and skin elasticity. Topically, avocado oil can treat a variety of skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. Slap on some coconut oil or slurp down a spoonful and see your skin glow. It’s antibacterial and anti-fungal, which is beneficial for maintaining clear skin. When ingested, the lauric acid contained in coconut oil also helps to balance gut bacteria by killing off excess yeast and candida, which can contribute to breakouts. Studies suggest omega-3 deficiency contributes to chronic acne. Adequate amounts of this anti-inflammatory fatty acid will help keep skin clear and will also increase cell hydration. Wild salmon, sardines and mackerel supply these omega-3 skin beautifiers. Not a fan of fish? A serving of walnuts has 2 776mg of omega-3. J U N E

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TEXT BY KARI COLLARD • IMAGES COURTESY OF VISUALHUNT.COM, FOODSHOT.COM, DELHEIM WINE ESTATE, PEXEL.COM AND REDCARNATIONHOTELS.COM

NEW PRODUCTS

B I T E S


GOOD TASTE

Foraging for Fungi

Ultimate Beauty Smoothie

If you love mushrooms, here is something

Candice Kumai, health blogger and author

to add to your diary. Delheim Wine

of Clean Green Drinks, has been causing

Estate opens its forest to avid fungi

quite a stir with her unusual smoothie

foragers during its annual Wild Mushroom

concoctions. This Beauty Smoothie

Hunts, on 16, 17 June and 1, 2 July.

recipe blends

These excursions are led by Delheim’s

coconut water’s

Nora Sperling-Thiel and field expert Gary

skin-quenching

Goldman, aka the Mushroom Fundi.

power and

Tickets are R650 per person, inclusive of:

lavender’s antiinflammatory

lecture on mushroom identification over

Go to the Bush for Good Food and Wine

a cup of coffee and rusks; the forest

Food and wine lovers can rejoice, because

antioxidant-rich

forage, as well as the mushroom-inspired

Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve

raspberries. Lads, we’re sure you could do

lunch and a glass of Delheim wine. Bring:

& Wellness Retreat’s popular ‘Food

with a bit of beautifying too, huh?

comfortable walking shoes and a warm

and Wine Weekends’ are back again this

Whiz the below ingredients into a blender

jacket. Book your tickets on Computicket.

winter. The five-star lodge will once again

and prepare to be beautiful:

play host to several not-to-be-missed gourmet events in the Cederberg, taking place on selected dates in May, June and July. You can expect nothing less than delicious food paired with top-rated wines. Go to www.bushmanskloof.co.za. A R A NTE GU

TE

E • GU

• NTE E

RA

U • G AR A

ZTRAN

properties with

• 1½ cups coconut water • 2 cups organic baby spinach • 1 cup organic frozen raspberries • 1 tsp fresh lavender (or ¼ tsp dried) • 2 tbsp cherry juice • 1 cup ice

Keep a Look Out

E

O ERS FAT N

A

a Delheim bottle of wine and two glasses;

When reading the nutritional label of your favourite foods, make sure the list includes zero calories from trans fat. Ideally, packages should have less than 300mg of cholesterol and less than 2,300mg of sodium listed.

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GOOD TASTE

Cauliflower’s Comeback With Banting in full bloom, form-

Three Mistakes to Avoid When Cooking Chicken Breasts

conscious folk have run screaming from

Chicken is often a go-to-meal most

carbohydrate-rich foods such as pasta,

nights—it’s quick, easy and reliable.

bread and rice. Instead, they’re getting

But things don’t always go according to

creative with veggies such as cauliflower

plan with chicken. Refresh your chicken-

and zucchini and using them to replace

cooking skills by avoiding these three

things such as pizza bases, spaghetti,

common mistakes:

rice and even mash. Another sneaky

1. Going boneless and skinless. Don’t

swap (your tummy will never know the

do it. If you’re not a fan of the skin, you

difference) is this Cauliflower Dumplings

can always remove it before serving or

recipe from The Diet Everyone Talks

give it to a salivating pet. Both the bone

About. For more recipes visit www.the-

and the skin help keep the meat moist

diet.co.za.

as it cooks and, with so little fat to begin with, the breast needs all the help it can

Cauliflower Dumplings Recipe

get.

1 small cauliflower

2. Skipping the marinade or rub.

3 eggs, beaten

Chicken breasts benefit greatly from being

salt, seasoning, black pepper, to taste

4. Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Add

marinated or treated with a rub. Add

5ml parsley

30ml salt.

more flavour with ginger, chillies, brown

5ml nutmeg

5. Drop balls into the boiling water. Once the

sugar (to help the meat caramelise when

200g cheese, grated

balls rise to the top, remove them with a slotted

cooked), vinegar (to help tenderise) and

butter or olive oil, for frying

spoon.

salt. The theory that a salted marinade

6. Heat butter in a heavy pan. Fry each ball till

extracts moisture from chicken is wrong.

1. Cook cauliflower till soft. Mash thoroughly.

brown on all sides.

In fact, if you skip the salt you’ll be left

2. Add all the ingredients, except the butter or

7. Delicious with soup, as a side dish or as

with a lame duck.

olive oil. Mix well.

a starter with fried mushrooms and small

3. Just accepting dry meat. So you

3. Shape into walnut-sized balls.

tomatoes on a bed of lettuce.

overcooked your chicken breast? Not all is lost. The easiest way to introduce some moisture into the meat is with a quick

The 4-1-1 on Radishes Always in season, this crisp and versatile veggie adds a tasty zing to a variety of main and side dishes. Here’s what you need to know about this rather (rad) veggie: Buying: Look for firm radishes that show no signs of softening. If the tops are attached, they should be fresh and lively rather than dull and wilted. Storing: Keep in the fridge unwashed and loose in a plastic bag with plenty of circulation. They’ll keep for a few weeks; wash and slice off the roots and tops just before using. Serving: Adding a bright pop of colour to any dish, radishes can be enjoyed pickled, cooked or raw and pair particularly well with bacon, watermelon and yoghurt. J U N E

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pan sauce, or to mix the meat with mayo, Greek yogurt or crème fraîche and add to a salad. If you’re not in the mood for something creamy, add the chicken to a soup.


GOOD TASTE GOODTASTE.CO.ZA

What’s Happening Online Can’t get enough? Visit www.goodtaste.co.za for more on food, wine, travel and lifestyle

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There are currently hundreds of free-range,

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A Wine Farm Cowboy

WIN

A TRIP TO MAURITIUS WORTH R30 000!

RSA R29,90 (INCL. VAT)

Eat Your Way Through Vietnam (p.18) Surprising and Unpredictable India (p.36) • Meet Sommelier Tinashe Nyamudoka (p.62) How to Use Art to Extend Living Space (p.46) • Cheese & Wine, the Perfect Pair (p.58) W I N E · F O OD · T R AV E L · H E A LT H · A R T & DE SIG N · C A R S

Wine Farm. We get to the meat

Recipe

How to Build a Wine List

of the story

Have you ever wondered about the science

with modern

behind building a wine list? We have.

day cowboy and

That’s why we corner restaurateur and

butcher, Mark

sommelier, Neil Grant, at one of his very

Muncer.

well-stocked bars and steal his secrets.

Go to www.goodtaste.co.za/blogs.

Go to www.goodtaste.co.za/features.

Diary of a Cheese-Maker We get to know a flock of free-range

Incredible India

Travel

dairy-goats in the eastern Free State. Barry Sergeant, of Beatrix Dairy, gives us a glimpse into his simple, honest world of

The thought of

artisan cheese-making.

travelling through

Go to www.goodtaste.co.za/blogs.

such a large and

Bahn Mi Chicken and Pork Sarmie

diverse country

Profile

as India can seem

Up your sandwich game by taking a lime

intimidating. Stop

leaf out of the Vietnamese cookbook.

thinking, and

No mere lunchbox filler, this delicious

read our story on

sandwich is an edible crossing of cultures

the things not to

as the French introduced the baguette to

miss instead.

the Asian nation.

Go to www.goodtaste.co.za/international.

Go to www.goodtaste.co.za/meat.

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Good TasTe

Best Dxxx

Lattice Quince & Apple Pie headline

Take a little time to make the lattice topping, it really is worth the ‘wow’ factor it produces. Recipe on p.23

Intro

xJxUxN EI S TS W U EO

2T H0 O TU WS AO N TDH

OA UN SD A SN IDx TA ENE DN F I V E

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GOOD TASTE

Quick as Quinces Cooked quinces offer varied flavours and colours. If there’s one new thing to try this autumn, it’s a quince dish

RECIPES BY DIANE HEIERLI PHOTOGRAPHY & STYLING C&D HEIERLI

A

utumn is a very underrated season—for most people it doesn’t compare to spring. But for me there is something about the cooler temperatures and the beautiful colours offered up by nature that makes this my favourite season.

And my very favourite moment of autumn is the arrival of quinces. Not dissimilar to apricots and figs, they seem to hit the shelves in January and, before you know it, by May they’re gone. Then you have to wait a whole year to see them again. Quinces remind me a little bit of apples J U N E

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and pears—it’s almost like they are a combination of the best of both fruits. When you cut a fresh quince, the smell almost resembles fresh artichokes and yet, when you start cooking them, they impart a strong aroma of rose water. And don’t get me started on the colours.

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GOOD TASTE

ROLLED PORK BELLY WITH QUINCE, SAGE AND PINE NUT STUFFING Serves 6-8 • 1.5kg pork belly • Maldon salt • crushed black pepper FOR THE STUFFING: • 20g butter • 1 medium onion, roughly chopped • 2 cloves garlic, crushed • 3 tbsp pine nuts, lightly roasted in a pan • 2 tbsp fresh sage, finely chopped • 1 tbsp lemon zest • 1 fresh quince, peeled and grated • 60g fresh white breadcrumbs • 1 free-range egg, lightly beaten • olive oil 1. Rub salt over the skin of the belly and leave, uncovered, in the fridge over night to dry out. 2. Pat the skin dry and score lengthwise (only score the skin and fat). 3. Set aside until ready to use. FOR THE STUFFING: 4. Melt the butter in a large pan, fry the onion for 10 min, until soft and pale, add the garlic and fry for another minute. 5. Stir the quince, pine nuts, chopped sage and lemon zest into the onions in the pan. 6. Remove from the heat and add the breadcrumbs and once cooled add the egg. Season with salt and pepper to taste. FOR THE PORK BELLY: 7. Preheat the oven to 250°C. 8. Place the pork belly, skin side down on a board. 9. Evenly spread the stuffing onto the surface of the pork. Roll up tightly and secure using string. 10. Rub with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Generously salt the dried skin to make delicious crackling 11. Roast the pork belly at 250°C for 30min or until the skin has turned to crispy looking crackling, reduce the temp to 180°C and continue cooking for an hour or until the meat juices run clear. 12. Allow to rest for 15 min before carving.

Rolled Pork Belly

with Quince, Sage & Pine Nut Stuffing The stuffing is what makes this dish special. So if you are going to be pressed for time, prepare the dish the day before

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GOOD TASTE

LATTICE QUINCE AND APPLE PIE Serves 8 • 300g cake flour • ½ tsp fine sea salt • 150g butter • 45g icing sugar, sifted • 90g pecan nuts, ground • 2 free-range egg yolks • 25ml ice water • 4 heaped tsp sugar • 2 cups water • 4 cloves • 1 vanilla pod • 1 long piece of lemon peel • 4 tbsp honey • 4 quinces, peeled, cored and cut into 6, lengthways (rub with lemon to keep from oxidising) • 3 granny smith apples, peeled, cored and quartered (rub with lemon) • 1 free-range egg, for egg wash • 20ml brown sugar FOR THE PASTRY: 1. Place the flour, butter and salt in a blender and combine until mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. 2. Fold in the pecan nuts and icing sugar. 3. Add egg yolks and gently bring together, adding water if necessary, to form a dough. 4. Wrap in cling film and store in the fridge for at least 2 hours. FOR THE PIE FILLING: 5. Put the sugar and water into a saucepan and bring to the boil. Add the cloves, vanilla pod, lemon peel and honey. 6. Place the quinces into the sugar syrup and let them simmer until tender. It should take about 20 min. 7. Remove the quinces from the liquid and place the apples in the saucepan. Allow them to simmer for 5 min. Remove immediately and allow to cool. 8. Reduce the poaching liquid until syrupy and reserve for later. 9. Preheat the oven to 200ºC. 10. Roll the pastry out (4mm thick) and line an 18cm pie tin. Prick the pastry base with a fork. Place baking paper over pastry and fill with baking beans.

11. Blind bake for 10-15min. 12. Remove from the oven and allow to cool. 13. Place the poached quinces and apples in the pie case. Cut strips from the extra rolled out pastry and arrange in a lattice pattern over the pie. 14. Brush with egg wash and sprinkle with brown sugar. 15. Continue to bake for 25-30 min until pastry is crisp and golden. 16. Serve warm with clotted cream.

Quinces Baked in Verjuice QUINCES BAKED IN VERJUICE Serves 6-8 • 500ml Verjuice • 600ml sugar • zest of 1 lemon • 1 vanilla pod, split down the middle • 1 cinnamon stick • 5 star anise • 5 quinces, halved • baking paper • tin foil 1. Preheat the oven to 150ºC. 2. Place the Verjuice, sugar, lemon zest, vanilla pod, cinnamon and star anise in a roasting pan, over a stovetop, and heat until the sugar dissolves. 3. Place quinces, cut side down, in the liquid. 4. Cut baking paper to fit over the quinces. Cover with a layer of foil to seal the pan properly. Covering the quinces properly allows them to turn a deep ruby colour. 5. Place in the oven for 3-4 hours, or until the quinces are cooked through and have changed their colour.

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GOOD TASTE

Membrillo Membrillo (quince jelly) is best served at the end of a meal with a bit of Manchego cheese and a cracker. Store leftover jelly in an airtight container in the fridge; it will last up to six months

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GOOD TASTE MEMBRILLO Makes 1 medium tray, about 21cm x 30cm • 1.8kg quince, washed, peeled, cored, roughly chopped • 1 vanilla pod, split • 2 strips of lemon peel • s4 cups granulated sugar • 3 tbsp lemon juice • butter for greasing • Manchego cheese, to serve • ciabatta, toasted, to serve 1. Place quince pieces in a pot and cover with water. Add vanilla pod and lemon peel and bring to the boil. 2. Reduce to a simmer and cook until quinces are tender. 3. Strain the quinces, keep the lemon peel but remove the vanilla pod. 4. Purée the quince in a blender. Measure the quince purée and match the amount with the same quantity of sugar (i.e. 400ml quince purée = 400ml sugar).

5. Place the purée in a large pan over a medium heat. Add the sugar and stir until completely dissolved. 6. Add the lemon juice, reduce the heat and cook until the quince paste is a deep orange/ pink colour and is very thick. 7. Preheat the oven to 50ºC. 8. Line a baking tray with baking paper and grease with a little butter. 9. Pour the paste into the lined tray and smooth the top. 10. Place in the oven for an hour to dry out slightly. 11. Remove from the oven and leave to cool. 12. Slice into squares and serve with Manchego cheese toasted sourdough or ciabatta.

PICKLED QUINCE Makes 2 sterilised, medium-sized jars • 750ml apple cider vinegar • 500ml golden brown sugar

Pickled Quince To extend the quince season just a little bit longer, preserve a few for the cold winter nights

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• 12 juniper berries • 8 pink peppercorns • 3 bay leaves • 3 medium quinces • big bowl of water with 1 sliced lemon 1.Place the vinegar into a medium pan. Add the sugar, juniper, black peppercorns and bay leaves and bring to the boil. Turn the heat down to a simmer. 2. Peel, halve and core the quinces, cutting them into six lengthwise, and store in the lemon water. 3. Drain the quinces and lower them into the simmering vinegar. 4. Leave to cook for 15-20 min, until the fruit is soft enough to pierce easily with a small knife. 5. Lift the quinces out with a slotted spoon and lower into clean storage jars. 6. Pour over the liquid, then seal and leave to cool. 7. The pickled quince will keep for several weeks. 8. Serve with cheese and crackers.


GOOD TASTE B E S T

P A I R I N G

Try this Zucchini and Mint Soup recipe—from The Healthy Life—and enjoy with one of these red wines

Zucchini and Mint Soup Serves 4—This warming soup gets a pop of flavour from the mint. • • • • • •

¼ cup cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil + extra to drizzle, optional 2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 leeks, pale part only, sliced 6 zucchini, sliced ½ tsp chilli flakes ½ tsp ground coriander

• • • •

• •

½ tsp ground cumin Himalayan salt and ground pepper 4 cups organic chicken stock 1/3 cup mint leaves, finely chopped + extra leaves, to serve 2 tbsp goat’s cheese, crumbled, to serve 2 tbsp roughly chopped almonds, to serve

1. Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat and cook the garlic and leeks for 5 min, or until softened. Add the zucchini, chilli flakes, coriander, cumin, salt and pepper and cook for about 5 min. 2. Add the chicken stock and enough water to cover the vegetables, then bring to the boil. 3. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 min or until the zucchini is tender. 4. Using either a stick blender or food processor, blend the soup until smooth. Stir through the chopped mint.and crunchy. 5. To serve, scatter the extra mint leaves, goat’s cheese and almonds over the soup. Season and drizzle the soup with olive oil, if desired.

The Healthy Life by Jessica Sepel Nutritionist and health blogger Jessica Sepel believes great health starts with positive lifestyle changes such as more sleep, less stress … but mostly it’s about food. She recommends whole foods, simply prepared. With meal plans, expert advice on the nutritional value of different ingredients, and over 120 recipes, this book will help you find the freedom to truly enjoy good food and great health. MacMillan, R368.

Try this recipe with one of these red wines—“Red wine is the healthiest alcohol option,” says Jessica Sepal in The Healthy Life:

For these wines go to: www.wineofthemonth.co.za

RAINBOW’S END CABERNET FRANC 2013

ERNST GOUWS & CO MERLOT 2012

KLEINE ZALZE CELLAR SELECTION CABERNET SAUVIGNON 2014

Bouquet of plum compôte and ripe cassis with touches of cigar box and cedar. Dry & full-ish in body, dry tannins on long finish. R199

Intriguing aroma of fresh fynbos, mulberry leaf and dark chocolate. Full-bodied and still tight, finishes dry. R94

Light oak backing to black plum and dark cherry fruit, hint of tobacco. Mid-weight rather than rich, nice dry finish. R71.99

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HEALTHY LIVING

THE

KIWI WAY!

Kiwi is an exotic fruit that originated in China, with a fuzzy outer skin and juicy flesh. Rich in trace elements, minerals and vitamins, the kiwi quickly conquered the global market with its unique, exceptional sweet and sour taste!

Why introduce kiwi into our daily diet?

How to enjoy kiwis

It is rich in vitamin C. Consumption of a single kiwifruit can cover the human organism’s daily requirement in this vitamin. It is also an excellent source of vitamins A, E and B complex, and it contains potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium.

There are several different ways to incorporate kiwis into your daily diet: • Serve your friends a refreshing fruit drink made with kiwi and melon. • Make delicious and healthy kiwi-based smoothies. • Enrich your breakfast by adding freshly cut slices of kiwi to yoghurt or to your cereal. • Enjoy chocolate kiwis! Cut the kiwis in slices and dip them in melted chocolate. The taste is a revelation! • Simply add kiwi to your favourite green salad.

European kiwis conquer the global market! European kiwi stands out for its quality, both in taste and in nutritional value, because it is harvested by hand. Kiwis are placed in suitable refrigerated storage areas within 24 hours from harvesting, thus guaranteeing that all of the fruit’s nutrients are preserved. European kiwis stand out and are sought after in many international markets, and are exported to over 51 countries in Europe, Africa, Asia and America.

www.hellokiwi.eu www.hellokiwi.eu

So let your imagination run free and pleasantly surprise your friends and family, by using kiwi in various recipes. The results will amaze you!

PROJECT CO-FINANCED BY THE PROJECT CO-FINANCED BY THE EUROPEAN UNION ANDAND GREECE EUROPEAN UNION GREECE


GOOD TASTE B E S T

I N G R E D I E N T S

MORE FROM

MISO RECIPES BY DIANE HEIERLI PHOTOGRAPHY & STYLING C&D HEIERLI

www.

FOOD ASSISTANT MARELI ER ASMUS

For the Miso Broth with Wild Mushrooms and Poached Egg recipe go to our website www.goodtaste.co.za/fish

Looking for an ingredient with loads of flavour? Miso is it. Created by Japanese monks to add umami—savoury flavour—to vegetarian food, there are loads of ways to use miso paste. The obvious being broths and stir fries, but why not try it as an onion relish or in a salad dressing? Or start with one of these recipes… J U N E

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GOOD TASTE 1. Preheat your oven to 160°C. 2. FOR THE BUTTERSCOTCH SAUCE: Spread the miso paste very thinly on a piece of baking paper with a palette knife and place in the oven for 5 min. FOR THE BUTTERSCOTCH SAUCE: 3. Place the cream and the brown sugar in a heavy • 4 tbsp miso paste bottomed saucepan on high heat. • 160ml single cream 4. Let the sugar and cream caramelise until a rich golden • 155g brown sugar colour, about 6 min, and then add the roasted miso paste. • 50g butter, cubed and 5. Remove the sauce from the heat and stir until well refrigerated combined. 6. Stir in the cold cubed butter until all the butter has FOR THE TARTS: melted. • 3-4 ripe oranges 7. Set aside to cool down. • 3 tbsp brown sugar 8. FOR THE TARTS: Preheat the oven to 190°C. • 6 tbsp butter 9. Wash the oranges, remove the peel and cut them into • 200g puff pastry dough thick slices. • 5 tbsp maple syrup 10. Then place 2 tbsp butter in a pan with the brown sugar on • 10ml vanilla medium heat and let it melt. 11. When melted, caramelise the orange slices in the sugar and remove when golden. ORANGE TARTE TATINS Makes 8 individual tarts

12. Grease 8 small tart tins (diameter of 8cm). 13. Place an orange slice at the bottom of each tin. 14. Roll out the puff pastry on a floured surface until about 5mm thick. 15. Cut out circles of pastry, big enough to cover the orange slices. 16. Place the dough circles over the orange slices and tuck them in at the sides. 17. Do this with all the tarts and then place them in the oven and bake for 30-35 min, or until the pastry is puffed and golden. 18. Meanwhile, place the remaining butter in a pan over low heat. Add the maple syrup and vanilla and stir until the butter is melted and everything is combined. Set aside. 19. When the tarts are done, remove from the oven and turn them out of the tins. 20. Pour the maple butter over them and serve with the butterscotch sauce.

ORANGE

Tarte Tatins

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GOOD TASTE

Miso-roasted

CAULIFLOWER WITH M A P L E PA N C E T TA MISO-ROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH MAPLE PANCETTA Serves 2-3 • 1 large head of cauliflower • 2 tbsp sesame oil • 1 tbsp miso paste • 2 red chillies, finely chopped • 1 tsp ginger, finely grated • 60g pancetta, sliced thinly • 2 tbsp butter • 2 tbsp maple syrup • 1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds J U N E

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1. Preheat the oven to 220°C. 2. Place the whole cauliflower in a greased ovenproof dish. 3. In a small bowl mix together the sesame oil, miso paste, chilli and ginger. Using your hands rub the mixture over the cauliflower, making sure you get it everywhere, even the bottom. 4. Roast the cauliflower in the oven for 45-50 min, or until it is soft and brown. 5. Fry the pancetta on high heat in a dry pan until crispy and almost see-through. 6. Then, heat the butter in a pan over high heat and add the maple syrup. 7. Remove the cauliflower from the oven, pour the maple butter over it and serve with the crispy pancetta and toasted sesame seeds.

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GOOD TASTE SHORT RIBS WITH A SPICY MISO GLAZE Serves 6 • 2kg short ribs, sliced lengthways in 10cm pieces • 1 cup coarse sea salt • knob of ginger • 1 onion, roughly chopped • 3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped • 8 star anise • 1 cinnamon stick • 10 black peppercorns • 100ml rice wine vinegar • 100ml white wine • 1,5l chicken stock • spring onions, sliced, to serve FOR THE GLAZE:

• 1 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce • ½ cup dark brown sugar • 1 tbsp sesame oil • 2 tbsp miso paste • 2 red chillies, finely chopped

1. Cover the short ribs with coarse sea salt and cure for 45 min. 2. Rinse the salt off and place the meat in a big pot with the ginger, onion, garlic cloves, star anise, cinnamon stick, peppercorns, rice wine vinegar, white wine and chicken stock. 3. Bring to the boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer for 45 min. 4. Preheat the oven to 180°C. 5. FOR THE GLAZE: Whisk together the soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, miso paste and chilli in a glass bowl. 6. Remove the meat from the liquid and place it in a roasting pan. 7. Pour the glaze over it, cover with aluminium foil and cook for 90 min in the oven. 8. Remove the foil and cook uncovered for another 30 min. 9. Serve with freshly sliced spring onions.

Short Ribs WITH A SPICY

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Good TasTe Mavela Game Lodge

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There’s No Place Like Home With the weak rand you get more bang for your buck with a local holiday By K ari Collard

Monate Conservation Lodge

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Good TasTe

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ith so much on offer, why not explore some of our prettiest provinces? We share some of our favourite places to visit in Gauteng, the Western Cape and KwaZulu Natal. GauTenG We know Gauteng is all about big business deals in-between visits to museums, galleries, restaurants, bars and shopping malls. But if the hustle and bustle of a cityscape doesn’t float your boat, you’ll find so much more beyond Jozi’s city lights and skyscrapers. As little as an hour’s drive from Joburg and you’ll be on the edge of the Magalies River or deep into the veld—which makes this province so special.

Email: info@theresidence.co.za Distance from OR Tambo Airport: 22km For French Flair: la Provence D’afrique

Arriving at La Provence D’Afrique, near Magaliesburg, looks like it’s straight out of the French countryside. A cobbled indoor street café leads off into seven chateaux-style suites, designed and decorated by owner and artist Charles Gotthard. Every room is full of French romance and decorated with antique furniture, Victorian bathtubs and wood-burning fireplaces. The best part? Breakfast is served under weeping willows beside the Magalies River. Website: www.laprovencedafrique.co.za Tel: 082-900-8205 Email: outofafrika@telkomsa.net Distance from OR Tambo Airport: 124km For the WilD ones: Monate

The Residence

For the city slickers: the residence

This blissful boutique hotel is situated in the historic suburb of Houghton, but be careful you may clean miss The Residence behind all its cascading bougainvillea blossoms. Take your pick and spend some time in the terraced gardens, on the tennis courts or enjoying the outdoor pools. Perhaps a spot of golf on the nearby Houghton Golf Course before your nap? Plus, there’s a luxury spa too and that’ll help melt away those stressful work woes. Website: www.theresidence.co.za Tel: 011-853-2480

conservation lodge

Monate Game Lodge is part of a 1839-hectare private reserve, near Mookgophong, in the Limpopo province within easy reach of the Gauteng area. An ideal break-away retreat where you can really sit back and soak up the tranquillity of the bush without having to drive too far. This malaria-free area is home to loads of wildlife such as buffalo, lion, giraffe, hippo, zebra, a large variety of antelope, and close to 50 per cent of all the bird species found in South Africa. Website: www.monatelodge.com Tel: 014-718-7000 Email: info@monatelodge.com Distance from OR Tambo Airport: 190km j u n e

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The WesTern Cape Ah, the Mother City. You just can’t beat beautiful Cape Town—the beaches, the mountains, the winelands, where do we even begin? One of the great things about the Mother City is it’s got a little bit of everything, making it fulfil a number of those holiday daydreams. A cocktail-fuelled weekend in the city? But of course. What about a cosy cottage for two in the mountains? You bet. A sleepy seaside escape to finally finish that memoir? Right this way. For the city slickers: cape cadogan Boutique hotel

Cape Cadogan is a rather quirky and chic boutique hotel in a VictorianGeorgian building which dates back to the 1800s. Now a national monument, its interior is inspired by Oscar Wilde’s bohemian lifestyle. So picture the big and bold furnishings Mr Wilde would be in to. And, it’s slap bang in a central location, making it an ideal base to explore the city’s nightlife and other attractions. Website: www.capecadogan.co.za Tel: 011-880-9992 Email: chanelle@morequarters.co.za Address: Upper Unions Street, Gardens Distance from Cape Town International Airport: 20km Cape Cadogan Boutique Hotel


THE ONEO FILE

GOOD TASTE Teremok Marine Boutique Hotel

Benguela Brasserie & Restaurant

Gelukkie

Gelukkie

FOR THE BEACH BUMS: Gelukkie

If you want to avoid Camps Bay’s bikiniclad rollerbladers, why not take a short drive up the West Coast to peaceful Paternoster? Gelukkie is a slice of serene pie, which is only a stone’s throw from the sleepy town’s beach and town centre. Run by a dedicated and experienced family team, this gem of a guesthouse promises to make your stay one to remember long after your tan fades. Owners Andrew and Ruth have spent over 12 years creating a place which sees visitors returning year after year. Website: www.gelukkie.co.za Tel: 022-752-2001 Email: info@gelukkie.co.za Distance from Cape Town International Airport: 162km FOR LAGOON LOVE: Benguela Cove Lagoon Wine Estate

The owners of Benguela Cove Lagoon Wine Estate near Hermanus also

Benguela Brasserie & Restaurant

own a cute little nine-suite five-star hotel in Sedgefield called the Lakeside Lodge and Spa. The quality of service, accommodation and appointments matches that of their excellent range of wines. The lodge’s resident restaurant, Benguela Brasserie & Restaurant, serves a fusion of French and Asian style cuisine and it’s where you can also enjoy educational wine tastings and wine pairing specials. Diners at the restaurant range from stay-over guests to cyclists and even visitors arriving by speed boat on the Swartvlei Lagoon. The lodge’s shallow-water jetty is equipped with complimentary kayaks and canoes for residents, and a pontoon and speed boat for skiing, wake boarding and water sports. If you’re planning a trip along the Garden Route it’s a good place for a stay over. Website: www.lakesidelodge.co.za Email: info@lakesidelodge.co.za Tel: 044-343-1844 J U N E

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Distance from George International Airport: 41.2km

KWAZULU NATAL Chilled surfer vibes, good-for-the-soul safaris and a midlands meander awaits you when you head on over to the Zulu Kingdom. For the sand-in-betweenyour-toes types, warm waters (unlike the icy Cape waters) means you can enjoy a leisurely dip while visiting the vibe-y beaches of Durbs. The big wide open stretches of bushveld up north also make this a heavenly place to braai a chop after ticking off your big-five bucket list. How about no WiFi and the wilderness in the province’s uKhahlamba-Drakensberg mountain range? It’s the highest in SA, with enough recreational activities to keep your mind far from your iPhone. FOR THE WILD ONES: Mavela Game Lodge

One of the only tented-style lodges in


The OneO File

Good TasTe Website: www.mavela.co.za Tel: 035-940-0996 Email: info@akasharetreat.co.za Distance from KingShaka Airport: 278km

The Cavern

For the Beach Bums: teremok marine Boutique hotel

the KwaZulu Natal area, this all-inclusive lodge is situated in the heart of the 23 000-hectare Zululand Rhino Reserve. Mavela offers daily game drives in a big five reserve as well as specialised birding safaris. The reserve falls within the Mkuze Valley Lowveld, which includes a variety of vegetation types, ranging from open savannah thornveld to riverine woodland, overflowing with acacias and marula tree species. This diverse habitat attracts numerous wildlife species and more birdlife than park statues.

With out-of-this-world views of the ocean, this spot is situated in the trendy setting of Umhlanga. The luxurious five-star boutique lodge’s name comes from the Russian word for ‘little hideaway’ and it’s exactly that. Over four decades, Teremok Marine Boutique Hotel has housed three generations of the Vladykin family, which began in pre-revolution Russia, and is now in the hands of a mother and her two daughters. The trio have worked hard to create a unique urban hideaway with every beautiful detail taken care of. Website: www.teremok.co.za Tel: 031-561-5848

Mavela Game Lodge

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Email: marine@teremok.co.za Distance from KingShaka Airport: 17km For the mountain Folks: the cavern

The Cavern is set in a secluded valley beneath the massive sandstone cliffs of the Northern Drakensberg. It’s named after the Cannibal Cavern, which is a 200-metre wide and 60-metre deep overhang, situated above the hotel. Way back, this was home to ancestors of the ancient Amazizi tribe. The Cavern is home to numerous rock paintings, over 200 bird species, around 70 tree species and other wildlife. The thatch accommodation and tucked-away facilities makes merging with those picture perfect natural surroundings a cinch. Website: www.cavern.co.za Tel: 036-438-6270 Email: info@cavern.co.za Distance from KingShaka Airport: 306km


GOOD TASTE B E S T

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DELVING INTO

Dubai BY K ER I H A RVEY

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Dubai Miracle Garden: A child’s wonderland

I

A beauty from Dubai Butterfly Garden Dubai Miracle Garden: It’s like something from a Disney movie

Gourmet fare at Atlantis Resort

t is indeed a miracle. Approximately 100 million blooming flowers are in the DuBai Miracle GarDen, on the edge of the city. This is no ordinary floral display; it’s all happening in a desert. That would usually be enough, but this is also a three dimensional garden with the millions of flowers creating a small village of homes, various global landmarks—including the Eiffel Tower and Burj Khalifa—and other whimsical creations. Dubai Miracle Garden was opened on Valentine’s Day 2013, and the entrance to the garden is along a tunnel of floral hearts. Inside the garden, giant peacocks with flower tails strut their stuff, a massive floral clock keeps time, and between it all onlookers walk in wonder. These gardens are indeed a miracle, and their creative splendour will take your breath away. The aim of Dubai Miracle Garden project is to create a tourist attraction with a positive environmental impact. The vast gardens are drip irrigated with recycled wastewater and require over 750 000 litres daily. However, the ultimate goal is still in keeping with Dubai’s culture of ‘est’ and Dubai Miracle Garden will ultimately be the world’s biggest floral garden, with restaurants, shops, rest and refreshment areas—and it will also be constantly changing. A recent addition is the indoor domed DuBai Butterfly GarDen, also the world’s biggest, and the first in the region. Inside are over 15 000 butterflies from 26 species. atlantis is imagination run riot. The fantastical water-world complex is on the furthest edge of the renowned j u n e

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Palm with views back to Dubai city and out onto the Persian Gulf. Here there are fresh and saltwater pools, a water park, lagoon exhibits, an open air marine habitat and, of course, lots of beach. It’s a vast complex with over 1 500 hotel rooms too, but it is the Lost Chamber Suites that are rather special. They have full views of the lagoon aquarium and its 65 000 inhabitants that include about 50 sizeable sharks. This aquarium hosts about 85 species and visitors may even see the stingrays being hand-fed by divers. If ever you’ve wanted to get close to a dolphin, Dolphin Bay at Atlantis offers just this. You can hug and kiss and play with dolphins in waist deep water or have a deep-water interaction with these friendly creatures. You can be propelled along by a dolphin pushing your foot, or pulled along by them underwater— both at high speed. Water from the Persian Gulf is pumped in and out of the dolphin pools to keep them healthy and happy. The dolphins—there are about 20 of them—are also known to deliver wedding proposals, ring and all. An underwater restaurant at Atlantis has divers with signs doing the same. What few people know is that Atlantis is also conservation conscious. The arapaima, a rare flat-nosed South American fish forecast to be extinct in two years’ time, is being protected here. The aquarium also boasts guitar or bow mouth sharks—an unusual creature said to be the link between sharks and rays—and feisty, toothy piranhas. In the complex basement, beyond the glass tanks of colourful tropical fish and parachute-like jellyfish, rare and

Images courtesy of DubaI butterfly garDen. PIxabay.com anD DubaI tourIsm

Good TasTe


The OneO File

Good TasTe strange species, is the fish hospital. Not only are any ailing fish removed from the aquarium and nursed back to health here, but the facility also breeds jellyfish, sea horses and coral. Twice a year, Atlantis releases about 3 000 fish into the gulf to repopulate the waters, and is renewing coral stocks regularly too. Dubai is in the desert after all, and in this habitat live extremely rare species— it’s certainly not devoid of wildlife. The large Dhab lizard that lives here never drinks a drop of water in its life. You’ll only see them at temperatures over 37ºC. They’re also a traditional Bedouin delicacy but are protected in the Dubai Desert Conservation reserve just a half-hour drive from the city. Idmees or Arabian mountain gazelles also live here and resemble pale-coloured springbok. And then there is the Arabian oryx—or Al Maha—which are the UAE’s flagship species and greatest conservation success story. In the 1970s these white oryx, that resemble small gemsbok, were virtually extinct. The conservation programme now boasts 500 of these elegant antelope and they’re regularly seen at the aptly named Al Maha Desert Resort within the vast Dubai Desert Conservation Reserve. The decadent Al Maha Resort is every desert lover’s nirvana, with

sweeping desert views from all suites which are Bedouin inspired and adorned with traditional Arabian furniture and artefacts. Morning and evening falconry displays here give magnificent insight into the lives of these hunting birds. It’s not hard to see why they are so prized and revered in these parts. It’s impossible to visit Dubai without seeing burj Khalifa. Virtually wherever you are in the city, the majestic spires of the world’s tallest building can be seen—it is, after all, visible from 95 kilometres away. At 828m tall—with an outside observation deck at level 124, at 452m above ground level, and the SKY lounge at level 148 at 555m—the building dwarfs any other skyscraper on the Dubai skyline. When you go up in the lift, it’s a literal lift off at 10 metres per second and your ears equalise like on take off in an aeroplane. The cement in Burj Khalifa is equivalent in weight to 100 000 elephants and the steel spire on top weighs 4 000 tons, yet this megastructure has the geometries of a delicate desert flower. And so one of the word’s greatest engineering feats has its foundation in nature too. Dubai is multi-faceted. Truly there’s something here for everyone, which is why the world remains enchanted by this city built in sand—naturally. GT

For more information on Dubai’s attractions:

Now that’s a cityscape

For easy access to all Dubai’s iconic attractions, you can stay at: • The Address, Dubai Mall: www.theaddress.com • The Manzil: www.vida-hotels.com/en/manzil/ t w o

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White oryx stand out in a sea of sand

Sunset over the Al Maha Desert

• Dubai Tourism: www.visitdubai.com Tel. 011-702-9600. • Dubai Miracle Garden (open October to April): www.dubaimiraclegarden.com • Atlantis: www.atlantisthepalm.com • Al Maha: www.luxurycollection.com/almaha • Burj Khalifa: www.atthetop.ae

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Roaming

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‘Robertson wears its charms innocently. It has all the appeal of a woman unaware of her beauty’

Taste the bubbles!

Jars of tasty fruit from Nerina Guest Farm

Mission olives ready for tasting at Marbrin Olive Farm


GOOD TASTE B E S T

W I N E L A N D S

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ROBERTSON BY SH A N NON L ATIMER P H O T O G R A P H Y K E L I VA N D E R W E I J D E

“T

housands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilised people are beginning to find out that going to

the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity…” wrote author John Muir way back in the early 1900s. These days his advice seems even more relevant. So, when you next feel the walls and spreadsheets closing in, turn your sights on Robertson—a valley ringed by mountains. You’ll breathe easier there, in the wide-open air. Robertson wears its charms innocently. It has all the appeal of a woman unaware of her beauty. Here, real farms are tended by real farmers. You’ll see cows regularly crossing the roads. Palm trees, cannas and roses line the roads and vineyards. The town is small and pretty, boasting some impressive earlycentury architecture. In season, you’ll find its

streets littered with purple jacaranda blossoms. It’s a place without pretence or guile—it’s unabashedly wholesome and full of heart. All of this is sandwiched between the Langeberg and Riviersonderend mountain ranges, with the Breede River—its lifeblood— running through it. Robertson is the Western Cape’s best-kept secret. It’s an affordable, genuine destination that has more than enough to keep everyone in the family occupied for a long stay. It is less

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Visitors Go o d are T most a s Twelcome e at the estates in Robertson

than two hours drive from Cape Town, along Route 62. While its scenic beauty is undeniable, it’s not all good looks; there’s plenty to do too. With over 50 wineries to visit, antique shopping, hiking, horse riding and more, all in close proximity. But what if you have just a couple of days? Here’s a taste of what you can expect. he sheer amount of wine experiences to be had here will leave any oenophile dizzy. You could begin your day with breakfast on a wine farm. Café Maude Restaurant at Bon Courage serves delectable farm breakfasts, under the shade of an old African pepper tree. Afterwards enjoy a tasting of their wines while the kids play on the jungle gym. Blend your own wine at Excelsior Wine Estate; then set sail on a wine cruise on the Kolgans River Boat at Nerina Guest Farm (another option is the Viljoensdrift river cruise). Many of the wine farms are places you could spend a few days exploring, such as Van Loveren Family Vineyards. Enjoy a simple wine tasting—or a not so simple one, of their wine and food pairings. Their bistro, Christina’s at Van Loveren, offers good country cooking. Plus, there are plenty of walks, hikes and mountain biking routes around the property. The Fish Eagle Hiking Trail will take you high up into the mountains. The 8,5 kilometre trail starts at the estate and crosses the Breede River, then climbs up the Rooikrans for spectacular views of the valley. No visit to Robertson is complete without a trip to Springfield Wine Estate. Sit on the banks of the river with

T

For those with a sweet tooth, pop in to Bodega de Vinho at Rooiberg Winery

Sheilam Cactus Garden and Succulent Nursery will wow you with their range of beauties

A Place to Lay Your Hat

There’s an accommodation option to suit most wallets and wants—from farm cottages and guesthouses to five-star hotels and camping. here are just three to take note of.

Walking the town delivers its own surprises

The Lemon Tree House with the Breede River a mere two kilometres away, visitors can enjoy evening strolls along its banks. situated at the foot of the Langeberg Mountains, this charming and well-equipped guesthouse has been designed for guest comfort. www.lemontreehouse.co.za Mo & Rose at Soekershof something of a legend, guests will love the secret garden packed with succulents and trees. The guesthouse boasts an excellent wine bistro, and the accommodation is faultless. www.moandrose.co.za The Robertson Small Hotel This boutique hotel is housed in an impressive Victorian house, down a suburban street. expect all the five-star niceties as well as fine-dining at Reuben’s Restaurant. www.therobertsonsmallhotel.com

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GOOD TASTE

Bodega de Vinho shows how a ‘pop’ of colour is a great décor tool

Now that’s not a view you see every day

Van Loveren offers a tasting platter with their Fiver wine cooler range

Get Your Diary Out for These Wine Festivals

Robertson Wine Valley plays host to a number of annual wine festivals. Offering a variety of different formats, there’s an event to suit everyone.

Take it slow on the Kolgans River Boat at Nerina Guest Farm

a bottle of one of their award-winning handcrafted wines, and feel utter contentment steal over you. Another iconic wine estate to visit is Graham Beck, who are famed for their Methodé Cap Classique. Sit at their tasting counter while you experience the range of wines and soak up the views through the wide windows, as well as admire their art collection. Before a full day of exploring, stop in at Bodega de Vinho at Rooiberg Winery for the best pastries in town (their wines are pretty good too). But it’s not all wine. Head to Marbrin Olive Farm to taste their incredible olives and olive oils, as well as discover their olive products . Also producing

olives are Owl’s Rest, which doubles up as a lavender distillery. It’s well worth a visit just to see this ancient practice in action. Another unusual experience to be had is at the Sheilam Cactus Garden and Succulent Nursery. The sheer amount of cacti, succulents, and cycads is staggering—take a stroll around this ‘alien’ world, and bring some plants home too. The Robertson Wine Valley is certainly no one-trick pony; from the sheer multitude of wine farm activities to experience and the warmth of the people, to the scenic mountainous splendour, it will have you breathing easier in no time at all. GT J U N E

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Hands-on Harvest The Valley celebrates the wine harvest in style— with two months of celebrations and vinous activities. Stomp grapes, blend your own wine, go on vineyard safaris, and more. The celebration takes place early in the year. www.handsonharvest.com Wacky Wine Weekend Now in its 13th year, this famed wine festival takes place this year between 2 and 5 June. Over four days, more than 40 wineries showcase the valley’s award-winning wines, with a programme that includes master wine tastings, wine and food pairings, educational wine presentations as well as private tastings with the valley’s winemakers. www.wackywineweekend.com Robertson Slow This is the most intimate festival of the year. Taking place in August, festival-goers are invited into surrounding homes for a food and wine experience. You can look forward to dinners at the homes of winemaking families, cooking traditional Robertson country fare such as Waterblommetjie Bredie, melktert, venison and Karoo Lamb. The weekend will also include special wine and brandy tastings, as well as outdoor activities. www.robertsonslow.com Wine On The River This spring festival takes place on the banks of the Breede River in the fresh, open air. 45 wineries from Ashton, Bonnievale, McGregor and Robertson showcase more than 300 wines. Add to that, local produce such as olives, cheeses, charcuterie and more are also on sale. www.wineonriver.com


Good TasTe G a l l e r i e s

a nd other cu ltur a l h a ppenings

Chatting to Cover artist Corné eksteen

responses. Ultimately, I’ve learned from portraiture that I love making art about

Mohau Modisakeng Untitled (Metamorphosis 3)

people, for people. So, it’s something I’m not quite done with yet.

Why the interest in portraits? The human form has always been central to my work. My intensified interest in

Is there a person, or artist, that inspires you?

portraiture itself started about four years

Local artists blowing my mind at the

ago after reading several studies on the

moment are Claude Chandler and Ryan

recognition of facial features by animals.

Hewett. The source of my inspiration is not

There is some set, universal, visual code

always limited to other visual artists’ work,

that makes it possible for every creature

though. I’m a self-confessed popular culture

on the planet to perceive a certain

junkie. Inspiration can come from a song, a

combination of features to read as a

CD cover, colours used in an advert, even a

apocalypse Now

‘face’. This was a revelation.

still taken from a TV show.

Now-29 May. Wits Art Museum

These articles gave me a ‘licence’ to break out of a tight, figurative, borderline

introduces When Tomorrow Comes,

Any upcoming exhibitions to take note of?

which is an exhibition made up of a

photo-realistic painting style. The intent of the work that followed was to see

A group exhibition at State of the Art

idea of ‘the end of the world’ and its

how far I could abstract faces before they

Gallery in Cape Town, “Beneath the

contraries. It is with this in mind that

became something else. In that process I

skin”, will open 2 June. Then, the big

curators have invited top local and

discovered the visual power of faces and

one for this year is a solo exhibition, titled

international artists to think beyond it

how viewers had emotional reactions

“Assimilation”, hosted by artSPACE Durban,

to forms of survival, regeneration and

to images instead of purely intellectual

opening 10 September.

rebirth. Go to www.wits.ac.za.

range of artists’ engagements with the

Go to www.corneeksteen.com to view more artworks

Yin Yang

Assimilation

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Fragmentation


GOOD TASTE

Quick, Look Busy!

Quotidian life: the importance of small things

6 April-7 May. The Mother City’s SMITH Studio announces the first solo show of acclaimed Cape Town-based artist Dale Lawrence. Lawrence’s work is a combination of linocuts and acrylic paintings but also includes a monotype, a screen print, two wax-print dyed fabric pieces and a hand-woven wool tapestry. Look Busy refers to the need for us all (and artists in particular) to fill our time

Seal Comes to SA 12-16 June. Seal has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide and released a total of nine studio albums so far.

with activity whether or not that activity has any utility or purpose.

Through Iris’s Eyes Now- 3 July. This solo exhibition at Pretoria Art Museum by photographer Iris Dawn Parker is an on-going series of portraits and stories

Go to www.smithstudio.co.za.

reflecting everyday life in South Africa.

With global smash hits like Kiss from a

Quotidian life: the importance

Rose, Seal has won many music awards

of small things exhibition gives the

throughout his career including three

viewer an opportunity to take a closer

Brit Awards, four Grammy Awards and

look at the small things which are a

an MTV Video Music Award. This one-

part of many South Africans’ everyday

of-a-kind musician will be performing

activities.

at Jozi’s Ticketpro Dome on 12 June, Durban’s ICC on 14 June and CT’s Grand

Making up things to do

Cezanne After Brunch

Email hanneliedp@tshwane.gov.za.

Arena on 16 June. Book at www.online. computicket.com.

Landscapes & Cityscapes

Feeding at Dusk

26 April-30 May. Cape Town-based artist MJ Lourens has established a career as a painter, sculptor and

The Perfect Date Night

filmmaker with a number of successful solo exhibitions

Now-14 May. From the star of Defending

behind him. MJ’s photo-realistic landscapes and

the Caveman, comes a brand-new

cityscapes explore the ways in which humans situate

exploration of the battle of the sexes (and

themselves within their surroundings, and the tensions

exes!) with a comic, honest

inherent in that relationship. See Proximity by Proxy

and often touching look at

at The Barnard Gallery in Cape Town. Go to www.

couples. Not to be missed

barnardgallery.com.

Love Factually sees Alan Committee continue to

The Parlotones Are Back

explore the

26 May. After a successful 2015, The Parlotones

differences

kick off with their first instalment of 2016, The

between men and women, and the quirks and

Parlotones Orchestrated. They’ll perform at venues across the country together with a chamber ensemble conducted by composer and acclaimed

foibles of marriage and

musician, Brendan Jury. Catch them at Pretoria’s

dating. Go to www.

Atterbury Theatre in May and keep an eye on

pietertoerien.co.za to

www.online.computicket.com to see where else

book your seat.

they’ll be playing.

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GOOD TASTE BEST GARDENS

We explore the gardens at Babylonstoren and meet the passionate team responsible for the enormous range it offers

BY SH A N NON L ATIMER PHOTOGR APHY C &D HEIERLI

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The OneO File

Good TasTe

I

remember walking through my grandfather’s vegetable garden when I was little. Balancing along the little brick paths one foot in front of the other, singing and holding his hand. He’d stop and tell me how all the vegetables were doing, what was new and what he would be serving with dinner. I would always choose my own carrot, wash it off at the mint tap, and we’d sit under his canopy of table grape vines and he’d tell me stories about far off places that didn’t exist. I’d pop the small, round grapes into my mouth, while he sat trying to convince me his stories were true. I haven’t been to many places since then, not where I could walk along a path picking and choosing which fresh fruit or veg to snack on—until

How's that for a fresh garden salad?

last month, that is. If this is something that appeals to you—if you have a love of fresh fruit, plants and nature, and you happen to be in the Cape—then you have to put aside a day to visit the gardens at Babylonstoren. It’s a must. The gardens are beautiful and vast, and you are encouraged to walk along, admire their beautiful plantings and eat while you look. This is what is so unique and appealing about Babylonstoren. We joined the morning garden tour and weren’t surprised at the many ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’ we heard—along with a lot of crunching into fresh fruit. Head gardener, Liesl van der Walt, told us to pick as we wish. “We encourage guests to pick and eat in the garden,” she said. “We want them to. They must

go harvest themselves. Some of the rooms have space for them to cook, and we want them to use the fresh fruit and veg.” What could be better? Well, perhaps dinner at Babel—and it will be just as fresh. All the fruit and veg from the garden is harvested for the farm’s two restaurants. “And when our guests get down to the restaurant,” she continued, “We want them to be able to recognise their food. This is important to us.” We spent the morning walking with Liesl, taking photos and trying out the produce. Set within eight acres of cultivated fruit and vegetables, the garden is the heart of the farm. What inspired these gardens? The historic Company’s Garden in Cape Town—the very ones that supplied

The paths and walkways go on and on, introducing wonderful plants at every turn

A warm, farmyard greeting from a beautiful creature

‘We will only spray when it’s needed and usually we use an organic spray. All the plants are grown as organically as possible and in a biologically sustainable manner’

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Good TasTe

The risotto rice paddy that the birds love This old fashion tool works well when picking a prickly pear. The tin is placed over the ripe fruit which breaks off easily, with a slight turn of the wrist—and no pricks!

Can you imagine a more peaceful place to stroll?

the Dutch East India Company’s ships with fresh vegetables and fruit during the days when the Cape was a halfway station between Europe and Asia. How romantic. One of the group stopped to ask what the little buckets, sitting at the base of some trees, along the route were. It’s a contraption to catch fruit flies. When the gardeners open the bucket and see more than two fruit flies, they know there is the possibility the fruit may have been infected. “Then we will react. We will only spray when it’s needed and usually we use an organic spray— Ludwig’s insecticides, which is very nice, or the Margaret Roberts brand. There are quite a few products you can get that are organic,” Liesl informed us. All the plants are grown as organically as possible and in a biologically sustainable manner. We stopped to try purple runner beans, saw peanut plants flowering above ground while sending their shoots below ground to grow the peanuts, and tasted the deliciously sweet carob pod. I got side tracked in the veg patch and made my own mini salad with two types of basil and a fresh tomato. Next time, I’ll be bringing some Mozzarella along. We continued our snacking and chatting while Liesl explained how the garden comprises 15 clusters spanning vegetable areas, stone and pome fruits, nuts, citrus, berries, bees, herbs, ducks, chickens as well as a prickly pear maze. Every one of the 300 varieties of plants in the garden is edible. “And children just love our gardens. They weren’t designed with children in J u n e

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mind, but they seem to just love it and have the most fun here. And in summer you’ll find them running happily in the many waterways.” An interesting planting on the go is of risotto rice, in one small paddy. “The birds have also just discovered the risotto,” Liesl said, “and now we have to have someone banging a drum to scare them away, all day long. We have to come up with another solution, but so far the drumming is working.” Why rice? No one else in South Africa is doing it. “Just plainly out of a curiosity of wanting to see our food grow. We also have Italian evenings on the farm every now and then, so why not serve our own rice?” Liesl added. We spent some time with Alta, chef at The Greenhouse, and she shared how much she enjoyed the prickly pears this season. They have three types they’re using at the moment, Gymno Carpo, Meyers and Algerian, all with their own unique flavour—you’ve got to give them a try. Once you get past being spiked, she assured us, they’re a fruit worth bleeding for. Alta’s tip for cleaning a prickly pair: “Throw the prickly pears into ice water for a few minutes. Then, with rubber gloves on, remove them from the water and rub the spikes off. It’s a bit of an effort, but well worth it.” The Greenhouse, at the rear of the garden, offers a great place to sit under the oak trees and enjoy an informal, picnic-style snack or a meal of breads with cheeses and meats served with homemade herb oils, chutneys, preserves and relishes. And, of course, fresh, unique garden salads.

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Liesl introduces us to an orange Turk's turbin pumpkin

A beautiful alley of speckled swan gourds and calabash

Ripe and ready, nectarines

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Prickly pears: A fruit worth bleeding for


Go oo od d T T aa ss TT ee G

Freshly-picked limes, now all we need is some gin and tonic

The view from the tasting room

The pathways here, when seen from the air, spell out the word Babylonstoren x x Mx A IRSCSHU ET W5 O0 TTHWO OU ST AH NO DU SAANNDD F AI FN TD E EF N I V E

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Good TasTe And, more importantly, The Greenhouse is where plants or varietals are brought when they struggle to make it in the formal garden. You’ll find exotic granadillas, ginger, cardamom, pineapples, dragonfruit, vanilla, guavadellas and even a baobab tree, are all growing happily here. My grandfather’s garden certainly didn’t look as grand as this one, but the love and passion for them are the same. They are made and cared for, with the intention of being shared with others. If there’s one new thing you do this year, make it a trip to Babylonstoren. For information on the garden tour and workshops offered, go to www.babylonstoren.com.

A New Home for the Wines Since the first grapes were pressed here in 2011, visitors to Babylonstoren have been introduced to the range of estate wines in a cosy tasting room in the old werf. Now, with the estate’s sixth harvest done and dusted, you can enjoy the tasting experience in the new wine-tasting centre. Floor-to-ceiling glass walls offer views over the vineyards towards the small rocky peak that gave the farm its name, while indoors the central counter is dressed in vivid green tiles that mirror the vineyards beyond. The wine tasting experience has likewise been revamped and you can enjoy a range of tasting journeys. Try five of the wines in the Babylonstoren range (R25), or the

Flagship range with individual tastings of the Bordeaux-style Nebukadnesar (R15 per tasting), Chardonnay (R10) and the recently released Méthode Cap Classique, Sprankel (R25). A range of snack platters—offering charcuterie, cheeses, pâté and fresh fruits and vegetables from the estate—are also now available (R150-R200). If you have a little more time to spare, informative hour-long tours will take you on a behind-the-scenes look at how the estate’s wines and olive oils are crafted. Open daily from 10am-5pm (in winter). The cellar tours (R50 per person, including tasting) take place on the hour between 11am and 3pm daily, reservations are recommended.

Delicious snack platters on offer, while tasting the fine wines

The tasting room's fresh and green look mirrors the life of the gardens

Winemaker, Klaas Stoffberg, loves the newlook tasting room

‘If you have a little more time to spare, informative hour-long tours will take you on a behind-the-scenes look at how the estate's wines and olive oils are crafted' j u n e

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GOOD TASTE B E S T

G A D G E T S

As the cooler months roll in, there’s no need to move inside and hibernate. With a little creativity you can bring indoor luxury and warmth to an outside space too

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OPENING IMAGE COURTESY OF WEYLANDTS, OTHER IMAGES FROM UNSPLASHED.COM, ON THE PATIO AND ISTOCK.COM

BRINGING THE INSIDE OUT


GOOD TASTE

CREATE AN OUTDOOR KITCHEN

AMBIENCE IS EVERYTHING Selecting the right lighting will help guests and family members linger a little longer outdoors. Permanent lighting fixtures such as a wrought-iron chandelier and cast iron fixed lanterns, for example, create a chic outdoor style. If you don’t want permanent lighting fixtures, you can also play around with options such as lanterns, candles, hurricane lamps, fairy lights and solar jars to create a softer light in and around your outside abode.

Tip: A small built-in fridge is a popular choice for outdoor kitchen areas. Having icy cold drinks conveniently located prevents guests (and you) from constantly going in and out of the house.

Why run back and forth when you can prep and cook outside in the fresh air? An outdoor kitchen expands your living space and allows you to cook outside among your guests and family. It also means you’ll never miss another one of your aunt’s crochet championship stories again. Depending on your space and budget, an outdoor kitchen can be as simple as a work counter next to your braai area, or as elaborate as a fully kitted-out kitchen, complete with built-in appliances and all the trimmings.

FIRE IT UP If you have a fireplace inside your home you probably spend most winter nights trying to squeeze in between family members and half-roasted pets. The same is true for outdoor living spaces—a source of fire keeps you warm and draws people around it. Nowadays, fire pits come in all different sizes and styles, so finding one that fits in your outdoor area is pretty easy. As a heat source, fire pits (and maybe a few blankets) also extend the amount of time spent outdoors on cooler nights.

Tip: Use strands of fairy lights rolled into a ball and capped with glass garden cloches. It’s a fun alternative to candles—and you don’t need to worry about them blowing in the breeze.

Tip: Take wind into consideration when deciding placement and type of fire bowl. Burning bits can get blown out of the fire bowl, so choose a protected area. J U N E

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GOOD TASTE

PUT A ROOF ON IT Installing an awning, pergola or trellis over your outside area will naturally make it more inside-like. A roof structure will cover you from a little drizzle and also provide shade in the hot summer months. A ceiling can also provide a spot to hang things from, such as outdoor furniture, lights and plants. Making things even cosier.

Tip: Adding a ceiling fan to your roof will provide a refreshing breeze, while giving the space more of an interior feel. It can also help keep mosquitoes and flies away.

Tip: Don’t include so many chairs that it becomes difficult for people to walk. Choose items such as ottomans and small side tables that can double up as seats too.

Trade Secret Rattan Stool/ Side Table R1,195, Cactus Chair R8,892 excluding Fabric from Leon at CCXIX, Wooden Coffee Table (Large) from Leon at CCXIX R5,643

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Seating is probably the most crucial part of the puzzle when it comes to planning an outdoor area. While a dining room style set up is great, why not opt for a circular or lounge-style seating pattern instead? A comfy couch paired with a couple of chairs can create a rather inviting outside environment. Benches are a flexible option too—either to sit on, nice and snug for an intimate chat, or to add around a table for a big outdoor dinner.

POOL IMAGE FROM CORRODI AND CEILING FAN FROM SARAH ORD

SIT TO IT


GOOD TASTE

ADD SOME COLOUR WHERE YOU CAN There is nothing like bold and bright colours to make your outdoor space pop. Yes, you can always play it safe and keep it neutral with earthy hues, but experimenting with pockets of colour will add depth and texture to your space. Now this doesn’t mean fifty shades of fuchsia, but rather something subtle like a turquoise blue bench, some colourful scatter cushions, or even a set of strategically placed colourful planters.

OPT FOR AN OUTDOOR RUG

Tip: If colour coordinating is not really your forte, layer hues in the same colour family such as shades of the same blue-green.

Like ceilings, an outdoor rug or carpet can provide warmth to an outside area. It also outlines the area as a definitive space. And just like furniture and lighting made for the outdoors, an outdoor rug or carpet is generally made up of more durable materials, which can withstand water and wear and tear better than household rugs. While acting to extend your interior, a rug can add an extra layer of colour and comfort too and can help to tie in the outside area’s furniture and décor rather nicely.

ADD ACCENTS TO WALLS IMAGES COURTESY OF ISTOCK AND WICKER PARADISE VIA VISUAL HUNT

Tip: Carefully measure the outdoor area you would like to cover with a rug before you shop. Fortunately, these days, outdoor rugs are available in many sizes and shapes so you shouldn’t struggle.

Tip: Use a trellis fastened to a wall to hang your garden tools or pot plants. This will create a chic spot to keep these, as well as add a rustic touch to an emptylooking wall.

Often walls are used as borders for indoor living areas. You can decorate them with photographs and art, making them a little less stark. However you’re often limited to what you can do with walls in an outside space. This doesn’t mean you can’t get creative and have a little fun dressing large slabs of stone or concrete. Items such as outdoor signage, wire decorations, hanging plants and mirrors all help to make it feel just as homey as the interior. J U JN UE N TE WTOW TO H TO HU OS UA SN AD N A D N AD N S DI X S TI XE TE EN E N

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GOOD TASTE BOOK REVIEWS

Why reading more than one book at a time can be a good thing B Y

A L E X

L A T I M E R

M

y father is one of those people who has a book to read in every room of the house. This way, he says, he doesn’t have

to worry about carrying books from room to room. There’s one

beside the bed and one in the lounge and one in the study and one in the kitchen. But for some people, the idea of being halfway through one book and three-quarters through another and only beginning a third would be terribly confusing. Characters might flit between books, or you might expect the detective from book one to figure out the clues in book two. You could get to the end of a book and think, “why didn’t they wrap up that mystery about the girl on the train?” only to realise she’s part of another ending entirely. Or over dinner at some future event you might find yourself arguing that Charles Darwin was born in Hodgenville, Kentucky, and was eventually assassinated by John Wilkes Booth. I take after my dad. I usually have a few books around the house. But unlike him, my habit is born out of necessity. I lose books all the time. In a house with small children, every shelf and drawer is pulled out and packed

away 20 times a day. The chances of my latest read being thrown in with a stack of magazines, or a tub of felt toys or simply stuffed under the bed, are pretty high. “Get a Kindle,” people said, “that way you won’t need all these books cluttering your house.” Well, having a Kindle is great—except when it gets stuffed under the bed or packed away with the felt toys, because then I’ve got nothing at all to read. The solution to all of this chaos is that I simply read a bunch of books at the same time, and my Kindle is just one of them. I can snatch one up, wipe the porridge off the cover, and get reading at a moment’s notice. This is very important, by the way, since reading time can occur at any point in the day—and it may last for between 20 seconds and half an hour. Spending precious seconds unpacking the medicine cabinet in search of ‘the book I’m currently reading’ might eat away at this window and by the time I’m settled, book-in-hand, the moment J U N E

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could well have passed and I could find myself dropping my book back into the revolving mess in order to rescue the carpet from a blue koki. Of course, this habit does occasionally get me confused. But other times, books complement each other. It’s a much rarer occurrence, but it happens. Sometimes having two books running in parallel can be wonderful. This happened recently while I was reading The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber, as well as The Shipwrecked Men by Cabeza de Vaca. On the surface you’d be hard-pressed to find two more dissimilar books than these. Size, for one. The Book of Strange New Things is a monster novel that could eat The Shipwrecked Men for breakfast. Next of course, one is fiction and the other a kind of memoir— so truth versus fiction. Then one is modern text written about a possible future and the other was published in 1905 and is set in 1528. But for all of their vast differences,


GOOD TASTE they share a common thread: colonisation. The Book of Strange New Things begins with a Christian pastor named Peter who is hired to spread the gospel to a group of indigenous creatures on a newly colonised planet. He considers the placement a privilege and leaves his wife Bea to spend several months very far away doing the Lord’s work. Peter has the best intentions in his new job, but he is ultimately just the friendly face of the organisation that hired him. Peter has to navigate a way of explaining The Bible to these aliens—who because of their vastly different anatomies cannot pronounce some English syllables. And not only that, he must find ways of translating parables that contain unfamiliar imagery— the creatures do not know what a sheep or a shepherd is. The Bible becomes their book of strange new things and Peter ‘The is their guide. Their world is a simple one and Peter becomes more and more immersed in their lifestyle, while Bea and the events occurring on Earth become gradually more distant and foreign. It took a while for me to get into this book—I think, simply because it’s just so long, but that’s actually part of the charm. Faber doesn’t spare the details and, while that can mean slow spots throughout the book, the level of detail really creates an immersive experience, which is key in describing another world. This planet, with its strange inhabitants, feels very real and the more

detail Faber paints, the easier it is to sympathise with Peter who, in turn, begins to struggle to empathise with Earth’s increasing problems. Now, on to The Shipwrecked Men. This is a documentation of an expedition of 600 Spanish men who set out to explore Florida in 1527. It is an account of disaster upon disaster, of shipwrecks and storms and disease— all of which left only four survivors

is no mention of gratitude to the actual farmers. The two books present very different accounts of God-inspired colonisation. Peter sets off as a servant to a strange and very alien civilisation, while de Vaca is a conqueror whose exploits, as horrifying as they may be, are justified because he and his men have the ‘one true God on their side’. And yet, in some peculiar way, they seem to amount to the same thing. A gentle conversion and a forced one are not very different. Both alienate the indigenous population from their history and culture, and both open pathways for future exploitation. The Native Americans and the creatures on this far-off planet seem destined for the same fate, all justified by faith in God. Of course this parallel two books present very different accounts was exactly what Faber of God-inspired colonisation’ had in mind while writing who somehow managed to cross Texas, The Book of Strange New Things. All of Arizona and New Mexico in a bid to us are aware, in differing degrees, of the return to civilisation. In every chapter outcomes of past colonisation, and it is dozens of men die and the original in this light that a novel like Faber’s can party is fragmented time and again, so have its full impact. Reading these two they disappear and re-appear later in books side-by-side really brought that the narrative. But the most interesting point home. So, there really is merit in aspect of this story is the depiction of reading more than one book at a time. I the Native Americans and the assumed hope you’ll try it. GT The Book of Strange New Things by superiority of the explorers. When de Michel Faber. Canongate Books Ltd, Vaca and his men are about to starve, R250 they stumble upon a crop of maize The Shipwrecked Men by Cabeza de and simply devour it all while giving Vaca thanks to God for His provision. There J U N E

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GOOD TASTE H E A L T H

N E W S

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW TO LIVE LONGER

Foam Rollers for the Win

M

ost serious exercisers jumped

muscle get more oxygen and water than

on the foam-rolling wagon

they would by simply stretching.

a while back. For those of

you who don’t know: foam rolling uses your body weight to roll on a

It can hurt like heck, but

3

however uncomfortable, take your time and focus on painful areas as

tube of hardened foam. This is a SELFMYOFASCIAL RELEASE TECHNIQUE to

they’ll need the

help overworked muscles

most attention.

recover, improve

4

flexibility, performance and reduce injuries.

1

Even though

If you think how our muscles

and ligaments are attached,

foam rolling

they’re not in a simple straight line

helps hydrate your

and some tissue and muscles run from

tissue, make sure to drink at least half a

front to back or in spirals. So move the

litre of water beforehand, which will help

roller around in different directions and

to prep the muscles before a roll.

angles to trigger all these areas.

2

Most of us wait until after a session to take a ride on the roller, however specialists

5

Health Tip: Pop Allergy Meds before Bed More than often ALLERGIES FLARE UP FIRST THING IN THE MORNING. If that's

the case for you or your family, make sure you take your allergy medicine at night so it will still be working when the sun comes up. Also, many allergy drugs can cause drowsiness, so it’s a good idea to lie back and relax, letting them help you on your way to a good night’s sleep.

Did you Know?

Even on days you’re taking

MALARIA will strike more than 200

a break from the gym, foam

million people this year, according to

rolling should be part of your

suggest using it during a pre-workout

routine. You’ll need to do it every day

warm-up too. The action increases

(even for just five minutes) to make a

circulation so connective tissue and

real difference.

the World Health Organisation, and will kill nearly half a million. Most of these deaths will occur in third world countries where malaria is high and treatment is scarce. Fortunately,

Drop it Like it’s Squat

place in California to introduce

into a gravity defying derriere. However, it turns out most of us

malaria-resistant genes into

are not doing them correctly—and not getting all those bum-

mosquitos. These mosquitos are then

firming benefits. So how exactly do you execute THE PERFECT

left to breed this resistance into the

SQUAT? Try this: stand with feet shoulder-width apart, toes

wild, and hopefully spread like crazy.

pointed slightly out. Keeping the natural curve in the lower

Although it’s still in the early stages,

back, push hips back, bend knees, and lower yourself down. Remember to go as low as you

scientists’ predications around the

can. By doing this you’re inviting your glutes and the upper part of your hamstrings to the

trial’s effectiveness are promising.

party rather than putting the emphasis solely on your quads.

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TEXT KARI COLLARD • PHOTOGRAPHS ISTOCK.COM

there are promising trials taking

So we all know daily squats can transform our saggy bottoms


GOOD TASTE

A Green Smoothie a Day…

G

A New Test for Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

Serves 1 • 1 small cucumber • 1 thick slice of ginger • 2 stalks of celery • 1 banana

pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer has

• 1/2 an avocado

already spread. However, a NEW TEST

• 1 tbsp of almond butter

appears to be very reliable and will be

• 1 tsp bee pollen (optional)

available in private clinics across the

• 1 tsp spirulina (optional)

UK shortly. It was positive in nine out

Juice the cucumber, celery and

of ten post-menopausal women with

ginger. Then pour the juice into

early ovarian cancer who showed no

a blender and add the banana,

signs of the disease. If diagnosed in the

avocado and almond butter

early stages, nine out of ten women

plus any of the optional ingredients. Finally blend until smooth and creamy. Either drink it

can be cured; at the moment less than

straight away or store it in an airtight bottle in the fridge for up to three days.

a third survive.

reen smoothies seem to be popping up everywhere these days, but buying one a day can take its toll on the bank balance. Why not give yourself a healthy boost at home with these this easy green smoothie recipe? And it tastes good too.

Like melanoma and one of the highest mortality rates. Sadly, by the time a diagnosis of ovarian cancer is made the disease has

Recipe Source: Deliciously Ella

The Malan Family Selection

www.simonsig.co.za

Simonsig Wine Estate, Kromme Rhee Road, Koelenhof, 7605 | Phone: 021 8884900 - 5 9 -

SimonsigWines

Simonsig_Wines

SimonsigWines


GOOD TASTE B E S T

H E A L T H

When a doctor or dentist charges more than the going rate, is it because you are being offered more expertise for your money—or is it simply greed? D R

A D R I A N

F O R R E S T E R

I

t used to be that doctors charged they were liable to be hauled up before either medical aid rates or private the Medical and Dental Council (now rates—tariffs set by medical and the Health Professions Council of South lay organisations in consultation. But Africa) for disciplining. in 2004 South African doctors struck If those conditions prevailed today, gold. Their Witwatersrand was a however, over 80 per cent of doctors decision by the Competition Board to serving the wealthy end of the market disallow what it considered Money matters or to be price fixing. The new health matters? ruling allowed doctors to charge what they liked. The competition chaps thought, perhaps naively, that an open and competitive market would drive prices down. Instead, they shot through the roof. Doctors serving the more affluent segment of the market increased their charges by up to five times the National Health Reference would be spending time in front of the Price List (NHRPL)—the new name Council. Instead they spend it riding for the “contracted in” or medical aidaround in their Porsches. recommended tariff. A year ago, our Minister of Health, In the old system, the private rate Dr Aaron Motsoaledi, tried to bring was more than twice the medical aid some sanity to medical tariffs by rate. Practitioners contracted out of reverting to the old system, but adjusted medical aid schemes could charge up for inflation. There were howls of to 20 per cent more than the private protest from the medical profession. rates. If they charged more than that, The dispute is still unresolved. Milton J U N E

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Friedman, winner of the Nobel Prize for economics, once called the American Medical Association the strongest union in the world. He’s right, of course; nothing quite beats the clout of a fraternity of respected, well-heeled and intelligent professionals. I used to think doctors were somehow special (well, my mother told me that), but the longer I was in practice, the more I realised that when it came to matters of money, members of the medical profession were no different from the rest of the population. One has only to recall the 2009 brouhaha over how the UK members of parliament fiddled their expense accounts to realise that if respected, well-heeled and intelligent people can get away with milking the system, they will. Why do doctors and dentists in affluent areas charge three to five times the NHRPL rate as a matter of routine? Simply because they can, and because they can get away with it. There’s no other reason for it. Don’t for a moment

IMAGES COURTESY OF VISUALHUNT.COM

B Y


Good TasTe think that because your doctor’s fees anaesthetist’s account reduced to the going rate. So if your non-NHRPL GP are so high, you’re actually getting NHRPL rate, but not the surgeon’s. says you need to see a specialist, insist more expertise for your money. You’re His opinion was that she should have on being referred to one who charges not. What it really means is that your negotiated prices with him beforehand. NHRPL rates. And if you need surgery, doctor prefers holidaying in Mauritius How could Anne have known that? make sure the surgeon operates at a instead of Margate, and driving a She belongs to the old school: what hospital contracted to your medical aid Porsche instead of a Corolla. the doctor advises you is always in and charges their rates. Many don’t. ake a case that recently came your best interests, and whatever rate When you’ve been diagnosed with to my attention. Anne is 70 he charges you is a fair rate for his something serious, you are not in the years old. She lives in Retreat services. And forget about the turmoil right state of mind to negotiate fees. and works in a bottle store. She’s your mind may be in with a cancer The key to all this is to have a family been healthy all her life but now, all diagnosis. doctor who charges NHRPL rates of a sudden, has postmenopausal Everyone agrees doctors should be and who refers you to specialists who bleeding. She’s on a hospital plan that paid well for their skills and their years charge NHRPL rates. You can find pays NHRPL rates. (Like most people, of study. But just as any system can out which doctors charge the lower and especially old people, Anne is get out of hand without the proper rates by phoning your medical aid or not au fait with the complex world checks and balances, medical charges, visiting your medical aid’s website. The of medical charges and payments.) too, need regulation. There’s no reason cheapest and best way to minimise Her GP sends her to his medical expenses is to choose a ‘One has only to recall the 2009 brouhaha preferred surgeon. The hospital-type plan that pays for surgeon does a D&C but tells all expenses incurred during over how the UK members of parliament her afterwards she urgently a hospital stay (some pay for a fiddled their expense accounts to realise that if needs a hysterectomy: she has defined range of other medical respected, well-heeled and intelligent people can cancer. Understandably, Anne expenses as well) and for you to is confused, alarmed and pay for most of your other outget away with milking the system, they will’ shaken, but does what she’s of-hospital expenses. That way told. After all, what else must she do; why a properly constituted panel of you seek medical attention only when where else can she turn? The surgeon’s informed professionals and lay people necessary, and you have expensive bill is R25 000. And the bill from the can’t decide what a fair reward is for investigations such as MRIs and CAT anaesthetist is three times the NHRPL skilled medical work. scans only when you really need them. rate. Her hospital plan covers her We need action in this regard, and In other words, you don’t subsidise hospital stay, fortunately, but pays only our health minister must do something members who run to doctors for every a quarter of the surgery costs. about it. Medical costs are a self-feeding little sniffle and cough and who expect Anne’s surgeon knew of her reduced monster. The more doctors charge, the multiple investigations done at the drop circumstances, but did it worry him? more medical aid contributions go up, of a hat. Seemingly not. The days of the kind and the more medical aid contributions Having said all that, there are still and noble deeds we remember from go up, the more doctors’ fees go up. plenty of Dr Finlays out there who Dr Finlay’s Casebook are all but gone. In the meantime, what can you do render wonderful and compassionate Anne, as was to be expected, until the “doctor” arrives? As a rule care and charge reasonable rates. Oh, didn’t want me to intervene on her of thumb, a GP charging more than and four years after her hysterectomy, behalf—her surgeon, after all, had the NHRPL rates will refer you to a Anne of Retreat is fine; her only worry “saved her life”. I managed to get the specialist who also charges above the now is making ends meet. GT

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GOOD TASTE B E S T

C A R S

MOTOR ING M AT TER-OF-FACTS

A Tough Task for a Tough Pick-up

I

t will be interesting to see how the battle-of-the-bakkies

unfolds in South Africa over the next couple of years. TOYOTA recently

introduced its all-new HILUX range after the

previous model had a run of over a decade. It was a much-needed launch too, as Ford’s Ranger has been challenging Hilux’s supremacy in the sales race to the point where, in some months, it has actually gained market leadership.

Will the new Hilux win the battle of the bakkies?

The new Hilux has a range of new diesel engines to back up

spring rear axle, but it has been improved

as it is under the skin, but from side on,

a strong petrol line-up. The body is new,

to offer a much better ride.

the nose looks just a little on the lengthy

Reaction to large and medium bumps

side—and this doesn’t match the tough

more room and comes with more modern

on dirt roads is much improved, thanks

He-Man appearance so beloved of Ranger

features.

to dual damping at the rear, and minor

adherents.

Apart from seven airbags in the top double-cab models, it has shift-on-the-fly electronic actuation of the drive systems to

irregularities on tar roads are also dealt There is a full range of single cab and

with more comfortably. The one question mark about the new

extra cab models. Pricing on the double

switch between two-wheel drive, four-

Hilux is whether it looks ‘macho’ enough

cab models ranges from R377 900 for

wheel drive and low range. It is interesting

to keep ahead, sales-wise, of the Ranger.

the 2,4-litre diesel model to R593 900

that the new Hilux still retains the leaf

From some angles the Hilux looks as tough

for the top-line 4X4 4,0-litre V6 Raider.

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TEXT BY STUART JOHNSTON

as is the chassis. And the interior has


GOOD TASTE

Welcome back, Tucson

T

he previous HYUNDAI TUCSON was popular, and a name change to the ix35 six years ago saw this Hyundai

‘soft roader’ gain legions of new friends. Now, the latest 2016 model has reverted to the Tucson nameplate once again. And while this is a tad confusing, the good news is the car is even better. The latest Tucson is by far the most mature, confidently-styled Hyundai to date—and it lays claim to a whole new level of mechanical and dynamic refinement. Cabin trim and fit has been raised to a new level of quality and

The new, even better Hyundai Tucson

refinement, but it is the areas of subtle ride control that the new Tucson now truly takes on its rivals from

Prices range from R359 900 for the entry-level 2.0 Premium

European manufacturers.

model to R499 900 for the range-topping 1.6T GDi Elite model with seven-speed dual clutch transmission and all-

Biggest news is the launch of a new turbocharged model. Apart from being offered in three variants with the 2,0-litre

wheel drive. (These prices are no longer as affordable as

normally-aspirated petrol engine, the new Hyundai 1,6 turbo

they were when Hyundai was playing catch-up in terms of

motor is now installed in the premium Tucson models. This

technology, unfortunately. But to soften the blow, Hyundai

engine, very similar to the one recently introduced in the sporty

has introduced an industry-first 7-year/200 000km drivetrain

Veloster coupe, produces 130kW and 265Nm—most of which

warranty, to go with its standard 5-year/90 000km service

will be available at the Highveld’s power-sapping altitude.

plan.)

door design of yore, the latest Clubman

a sense of Mini sportiness that has been

is the most sensible Mini variant you can

somewhat lost in the larger, bulkier

buy. The rear hatch still has a dual door

Countryman version.

arrangement, split vertically and swinging

Mini Clubman: practical and sporty

Mechanically, these new Minis come in

outwards like a van—which perhaps is

100kW three-cylinder form, or 2,0-litre

appropriate for a Mini—which is rooted so

141kW S form. If you opt for the S-mode,

strongly in its 1960s heritage.

you get a 141kW 2,0-litre four-cylinder

The new Clubman is longer and wider

engine. Transmission choices range

than before, and it has decent legroom

between six-speed manual and automatic

for the rear passengers, as well as a boot

transmissions to eight-speed automatics.

A More Mature Mini

capacity measuring 360 litres that expands

Prices range from R343 000 for the

The latest MINI CLUBMAN has grown up.

to 1 250 litres with the rear seats folded.

Clubman manual to R434 000 for the

Now with four doors, instead of the three-

This makes it very practical, while retaining

Clubman S Automatic.

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GOOD TASTE BEST WINEMAKERS

‘IT’S ALL ABOUT BALANCE’ We talk to Hannes Nel on what makes Lourensford stand apart from other wine estates

You’ve made an in-depth study of wine

Wine cultivars are similar to people—not

formula. We’ve eliminated the negative

microbiology; what exactly is it?

everyone is made to live out their lives on

flavours and claim our Merlot compares to

It’s the study of micro-organisms, such

their own. Like a good marriage, partners

the first growths of Pomerol and Languedoc-

as yeast and bacteria, with a focus on the

can bring out the best in their spouses,

Roussillon in France.

organisms related to winemaking. Yeasts are

balancing weaknesses with strengths, and

our allies as they convert sugar to alcohol.

so on. My favourite combination is where

Tell us about your Honey Liqueur, what

Knowing how they work has given me

a marriage of varieties complement each

prompted you to make this?

a great advantage in understanding and

other to become something that inspires

We have more than 700 beehives on the estate.

manipulating this vital process to produce

others.

The bees pollinate our deciduous fruit trees

The Lourensford Merlot is a fine example

flowering blue gum trees. I wanted to create

of a varietal that a lot of other winemakers

something unique with the sweet blue gum

are struggling with. What do you think is

honey they produce. The obvious choice

I don’t make wine according to a recipe, but

the secret to a good Merlot?

was to fortify the honey with a neutral spirit

rather with a minimal intervention approach.

South Africa is not famous for its Merlots.

that adds no taste or colour and that simply

This means to produce the best possible

Normally the complaints are about the

preserves the beautiful honey flavours. I also

wine I only do what is absolutely necessary

herbaceous and mint-like flavours. At

managed to find a way to produce a liqueur

to the juice. It means letting the quality and

Lourensford we have spent more than

that didn’t throw a sediment in the bottle,

balance in the vineyards guide me in making

ten years experimenting with vineyard

which most honey liqueurs on the market still

decisions on each individual block we harvest.

techniques on this varietal. Our secret:

do. It is a beautiful product because it is the

balance and harmony in the vineyard,

bees that are the true artisans.

Also, you’re into minimal intervention. Please explain that?

You say you believe in blending to produce a

combined with just enough sunlight

wine that is greater than its components. What

on the berries at the right time. We’re

Your wife Lieze plays the French horn. Is this

is your favourite combo?

confident we’ve found the perfect

for your entertainment in your down time?

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TEXT BY SHANNON LATIMER

in spring. During summer they forage on our

quality wine.


GOOD TASTE

Hannes’s Selection Lourensford Merlot 2013 Aromas of red berry fruit and plums along with subtle hints of tobacco leaf. The wine is dense, well-structured and smoothly elegant. Flavours of mulberry, dark chocolate and juicy dark berry fruit lingers. Pair with steak, kudu, ostrich or venison pie.

Lourensford Limited Release Shiraz Mourvèdre Viognier 2014

Lieze actually plays in various professional orchestras. We both love classical music but also listen to a wide range of genres. In fact, it was due to Lieze’s influence that Lourensford hosted the Stellenbosch City Orchestra for two events last year. It was probably the first time in South Africa a full symphony orchestra played in a fully-functional wine cellar. This will now be an annual event in the winter months.

Lourensford is nestled in the fertile bowl of the Helderberg Mountain. It was founded in 1700. Its long history combined with the dynamism of its staff means it has become a significant player on the South African wine scene. It utilises unique technology and that—combined with global expertise and excellent terroir—

Any time for hobbies? It is important to have balance in life. So I make time for hobbies like mountain biking, scuba diving and hiking. I get frustrated with sitting still, so I am always busy with something, even in my spare time. Recently, and to frame some of my favourite travel photographs, I started making frames from used oak wine staves.

JEWEL OF THE CAPE WINELANDS

GT

means the wines of Lourensford are becoming icons of style and quality. Tel. 021-847-2333. Email. info@lourensford.co.za Web. www.lourensford.co.za Opening times: 8am-5pm

Hannes and Lieze have a 4-month-old daughter, Carmiyah. He says since her appearance it’s been a bit more challenging to find time for various hobbies, but the proud father does not mind at all exchanging that to play and spend time with their new bundle of joy.

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Aromas of dark plums with ripe red cherries and wild spices, with subtle hints of cigar box. Firm fruit tannins are balanced by well-integrated soft oak flavours that promise age-ability, with both structure and length. Pair with ostrich steak or roast duck.

Lourensford Limited Release White Blend 2012 Aromas of delicate wild flowers, asparagus, white peach and pear. The crispness of the Sauvignon Blanc forms a sturdy backbone that is beautifully balanced by the lemon blossom and citrus flavours of the Chardonnay. Best enjoyed on its own, or with freshly prepared fish.

Give these wines a try. Call us on 086-111-WINE (9463) to order.


GOOD TASTE B E S T

P A I R I N G S

BY KIM MAXWELL

Wine and chocolate pairings— enjoying yourself in the winelands

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The OneO File

Good TasTe

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appreciating the wines per se. Gabriëlskloof offers a wine and honest Chocolate menu. Honest Chocolate sources raw, organic cacao in Ecuador. “It’s no coincidence we sought out honest Chocolate,” says tasting-room manager nicolene Finlayson. “these are the only chocolates that should be paired with our wines because they are dairyand sugar-free and, super-importantly, contain no soy-lecithin emulsifiers. This means you get a ‘clean’ chocolate flavour that with our wines creates magic in your mouth. We’ve even paired our Viognier with an orange-flavoured chocolate—and what a ‘wow’ combination that is.” Pairing PrinciPles

So are there pairing principles to consider? Von Geusau says it’s about matching strengths: if you have a robust Shiraz then you need a good, strong chocolate, upward of 60 per cent. but if it is over 80 or 90 per cent, the chocolate could overpower the wine (in which case a port or whisky would be more forgiving). “Then you should look at the chocolate and the wine’s sweetness. We do a milk chocolate with Waterford’s Natural Sweet. but with a dryer red wine you’d use a darker chocolate. It just opens up another element to the wine,” says Von Geusau. Thirdly, chocolate professionals often bring flavour to the party. That’s why you can’t just go to a supermarket and pick up a lindt bar. Von Geusau’s Masala Chai 70 per cent chocolate incorporates a gentle spice blend, to warm up alongside the Kevin Arnold Shiraz.

IMAGES BY PIXABAY.COM, CONSTANTIA GLEN WINERY

ean-to-bar chocolate-maker wine and chocolate tastings. If you’ve Pieter de Villiers says pairing ever been expertly guided through it wine and chocolate can be a on their Stellenbosch farm, you’ll know special experience, if you apply ample it’s a polished, pleasurable experience. thought and time. At DV Chocolates Kevin Arnold and chocolatier Richard outside Paarl he’ll offer wine and von Geusau collaborate on three dark chocolate tastings only on request. and milk chocolates paired with the “Each cacao bean has its own estate’s Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon and character and flavour profile, just like a Natural Sweet wine. any grape cultivar. The flavours reflected Says Von Geusau: “The Waterford are very similar to wine: you’ve got the tasting has had people flocking since varietals, the terroir of where the beans we started in 2003. I think what rattled are grown, and climatic variations things a bit is that other wineries got on affecting them,” he says. “From a country the band wagon and thought they’d do such as Venezuela alone, we’ve sampled the same but haven’t always applied their 12 different cacao bean origins. We’ve yet to find one identical to the This is how it’s done at Waterford others.” Pieter sees merit in customised pairings because he believes his single-origin chocolates from various global regions can easily outsmart the flavours in wines. “The cacao bean is much more complex and diverse with more than 600 individual flavour components. We get amazing natural flavours,” he minds to it properly. With the others, it’s says. often a marketing thing rather than a “I believe that in chocolate the flavour properly-paired tasting. nuances are much more amplified than “Kevin Arnold is a stickler for detail. they would be in say, red wine. If you We’ve spent hours fine-tuning the taste a Shiraz from the hemel-en-Aarde parings. Every new vintage also gets region compared to a Shiraz made by fine-tuned to make sure it’s still a match Fairview in Paarl, you’d pick up different made in heaven,” says Von Geusau. flavours from different temperatures and Chocolate and wine also changes the locations. but if I give you a chocolate dynamic. Two successful Paarl wineries from Madagascar and another from stopped artisan chocolate and wine Venezuela, you’ll notice the flavours are pairings because wine sales were lagging. much more amplified than they are in Most consumers probably leave the those two wines.” Magic or Just Marketing? cellar door focused more on whether Waterford was the first winery to offer they agree with the pairings than on


The OneO File

Good TasTe Nothing is supposed to dominate. With the Waterford Cab, 70 per cent chocolate partners rock salt crystals—because Cab works well with savoury elements such as salted roast lamb. And so on. This chocolatier also works with brandies and fortifieds, but sticks to milk and dark chocolate for any wine partnerships. “White chocolate is very creamy and doesn’t really work with any wine. It’s generally a no-go unless it’s with port,” says Von Geusau. Does It All Work?

where to Go for wine & Choc six places offering clever pairings of artisan chocolates with wine or brandy. CoNsTaNTIa GlEN, CoNsTaNTIa Chocolate tastings partner the farm’s three reds with three locally produced dark chocolates of varying percentages. R90pp. www.constantiaglen.com dUrbaNvIllE hIlls, dUrbaNvIllE Custom-made by a Knysna chocolatier with input from a winemaker. Five wines with five artisan chocolates. R70pp. www.durbanvillehills.co.za GabrIëlsKlooF, boT rIvEr The wine and honest Chocolate menu pairs five estate wines (mostly reds) with raw honest Chocolate free of dairy, sugar and emulsifiers. R65pp. www.gabrielskloof.co.za loUrENsFord, hEldErbErG Chocolats Marionnettes created four chocolates for three lourensford wines and a liqueur. R65pp. www.lourensford.co.za vaN ryN’s, sTEllENbosCh a brandy, coffee and chocolate pairing combines three von Geusau chocolates, three potstill brandies of varying ages and brazilian coffee. R75pp. www.vanryns.co.za waTErFord, sTEllENbosCh south africa’s first wine and chocolate experience, it combines flavoured von Geusau chocolates with three waterford wines. R55pp. www.waterfordwines.co.za

Meanwhile Pieter De Villiers makes a point about white wines and dark chocolate. “I believe you can pair white wines with a higher acidity single-origin chocolate,” he says. “It’s about high acidity in the wine and high acidity in the chocolate, so the wine doesn’t neutralise the chocolate flavours.” Pairings are punted aplenty at Creation Wines in the Upper Hemelen-Aarde Valley—you can taste wines with canapés, chocolate and even tea. “Crucially, we make sure guests have an informed experience. It’s not a few glasses of wine and chocolates with a piece of paper; it is interactive,” says Creation’s Carolyn Martin. For Creation’s Paradoxical Chocolate Pairing she consumed “copious amounts of chocolate, drank a huge amount of wine and tasted a myriad of spices, herbs, flavours and ingredients” to reach what she terms the “satisfaction point” for each chocolate with each wine. “We believe commercial chocolate does not pair with wine. If you’ve ever eaten chocolate with a chilled beverage you’ll be familiar with the way chocolate seizes up and goes waxy when it comes J U N E

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into contact with the liquid. This is a result of the tempering process that makes commercial chocolate hard and snappy,” Martin explains. So Creation commissioned artisan-tempered chocolate, its unusual crystal formation encouraging melting properties. Four wines were then flavour-profiled, and some of those flavours were infused into the chocolate. To match differing wine weights and tannins, chocolates were also chosen for their differing weight and tannin structures. But there’s a contrary view to wine and chocolate pairings. For MasterChef SA judge and consulting chef Pete Goffe-Wood it’s one or the other. “I don’t think wine and chocolate works,” he says. “Especially quality chocolate because there is an element of bitterness that really doesn’t do wine any favours. That lovely cocoa butter coats your mouth and that’s a killer for all wines— even a young, fruity Pinotage, which is often a recommended pairing.” He reckons the higher the cocoa content, the worse the effect—the flavour and complexity of most white or red wines is lost. So is it best to take Goffe-Wood’s advice and opt for distilled grapes, especially at home? Perhaps. “Brandy makes more sense because you’ve got the higher alcohol—it cuts through the fattiness of the chocolate,” he says. Maybe in the end it’s best to try De Villiers’s advice to simply enjoy yourself. “Wine and chocolate pairings usually start off all formal. But sometimes, and generally after guests have had several glasses of wine, the rules don’t really matter. It’s just about having fun.” GT


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GOOD TASTE O U R PA N E L R E P O RT S

In a single category we find at least two kinds of wine

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V O N

H O L D T

C W M

“Sit up straight, it’s Chardonnay,” says a wine wag, and we do. Some categories command more respect, even for the most jaded of palates. Not that any panel taster’s palate is jaded. Far from it. We’re still thrilled by wine, all wine. It’s just a timely reminder that some wines are, well, more important than others. So, why is that? There are several reasons, so here are two for starters. There’s history and most of it is French— magnificent wines with iconic names that go back hundreds of years, such as champagne, burgundy and claret, command respect. Somehow, that little rosé in the cupboard doesn’t quite crack it. Then there are certain varieties— some are noble and others are not quite so noble. Cabernet, Chardonnay, Riesling, Chenin Blanc, for example, are undeniably noble. Pinot Grigio doesn’t come close. Good fun, but not noble. Don’t bother to sit up. So when we taste Chardonnay we all sit up, very straight. Noble Chardonnay Chardonnay is a variety that is capable of greatness, but instead we find that, more and more, it’s being made into an easy-drinking style. Oh how the mighty have fallen.

“Just too many ordinary wines, not impressive enough,” complains Colin. Irina agrees, “There’s not enough complexity. And Chardonnay is worth more than mere lunchtime wine.” Margaret: “I was cruising, but I want to fly. No ‘wow!’ wines. I also found a lot of acid and bitterness on the finish in a lot of these. Maybe the grapes didn’t ripen properly?”

'Chardonnay is a variety that is capable of greatness, but instead we find that, more and more, it's being made into an easy-drinking style' Good point. Europe, right now, is generally looking for lower alcohol wines so our winemakers, ever eager to please, harvest earlier. But the grapes may not be properly, or phenolically, ripe. This approach is affecting winemaking and we see it across the whole wine spectrum. Christine believes the proper J U N E

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structure is not always there and complains of a shortage of new wood. More a ‘touch of oak’ than fully oaked. “Looks like if you need oak you’d better buy it now,” she says. She’s obviously referring to the crumbling exchange rate, which makes those very desirable and very necessary-to-import barrels increasingly expensive. It’s not all doom and gloom. At another tasting we’re impressed. “I picked up minerality on a couple of these for the first time in a long time,” says Clive with a satisfied grin, “And the use of oak was just great.” “I really liked this batch,” adds Winnie. “There was nice use of sugar.” “Especially those with a bit of sugar,” emphasises Dave. Irina disagrees, “No, sugar has no place in Chardonnay unless you want to cover up a fault, or are making a pop cheapie. Call me a purist, but … no, no, no!” Gosh she’s upset. Claude quickly defuses the situation, “This time around the unoaked ones


GOOD TASTE were disappointing,” he says evenly. We all agree and move on. Clive has a firm opinion. “Pineapples are not wanted here. We want that butyric acid flavour—the butteriness that comes from batonnage and oak— otherwise it’s not Chardonnay.” So, there we have it. There are Chardonnays complete with pineapples, tropical fruit and a spoonful of sugar for everyday quaffing. And then there are the more serious, dry, full-bodied and oaky Chardonnays for sipping and contemplation. You choose. True Bordeaux-Style Blends Is the Bordeaux-style blend category definitely a ‘sit up straight’ one, or not? Irina: “This category is very pricesensitive. You simply can’t compare cheerful everyday Cab Merlot blends to complex wines made with new oak.” Clive: “I really don’t mind. The wines I found appealing were balanced and had lovely fruit flavours—red and black berries, chocolate and liquorice. And they had great mouthfeel. When the tannins are clumsy I hate them. All we want is balance. But, it’s a bit unfair to do flagships vs Chateau Libertas.” “It’s hard to judge without prices, but these are supposed to be better than straight Cab. If in doubt, I’d go for Shiraz,” says Christine. “Good, honest wines,” says Irina. “Honest, until we see what the prices are,” says Colin. Apart from clumsy tannins in the wines, there is also uneven ripeness showing in the green (unripe) tannin that we do not like, and it gives bitterness to the finish, too.

The explanation? It comes from Clive: “It could be from the Merlot which lacks smoothness and generosity.” Oh dear, here we go, Merlot the troublemaker. Unfortunately, he’s probably right— we've commented on green tannins many times after tasting Merlots. It’s almost become a signature for the variety, a very unfortunate signature. Christine: “I’m enjoying these, even those simple Cab Merlot blends. They are price-point wines, but they have been made with some care and the oak has been managed so well.” “Not too much new oak here, though,” notes Clive. We talk about the economics of oaking. A new French oak barrel costs between R11 000 and R14 000. Sizes vary, but the usual one for ageing red wines are 225, 228 or 300 litres. So, take a 300-litre barrel costing R12 000 and it translates into an extra +/-R30 a bottle. That’s the initial cost, but the barrel can be used for, maybe, three trips—so the price does come down. As all barrels are imported, these figures change constantly and depend on the exchange rate. The comment about buying sooner rather than later is valid. Unless the rand strengthens, that is. Once again, with the Bordeauxstyle blends we are looking at two very different wines: firstly, a serious fine wine style, matured in oak, and, of necessity, rather expensive. Then, a more modest everyday Cab Merlot blend, fruity and easy to drink and, if made well, with charm that gives real pleasure. But the question remains, is it a true Bordeaux-style wine? GT J U N E

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WINE TASTED BY THE PANEL Shiraz – Winners out of 20 WINE-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB: Guardian Peak 2013 ALSO LIKED: Beau Belle Cooper 2013, Bon Courage Inkara 2013, Cloof The Very Sexy 2012, Zandvliet Hill of Enon 2012 WINES LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: Anthonij Rupert 2008, Bon Courage 2013, Bonnievale 2013, Cirrus 2011, De Morgenzon 2012, Ernie Els Proprietor's 2013, Holden Manz 2010, Joubert – Tradouw 2011, Lothian Horny Owl 2012, Lourensford 2011, Radford Dale 2011, Star Hill 2011, The Winery Of Goodhope Mountainside 2013, Waverley Hills 2011, Zonnebloem LTD Edition 2011

Chardonnay – Winners out of 20 WINE-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB: Sterhuis 2013 ALSO LIKED: Esona 2011, Lanzerac 2013, Meerlust 2013, Savanha Naledi 2013 WINES LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: Alvi's Drift Signature 2014, Ashton Kelder Limited Release 2014, Clos Malverne 2014, De Wetshof Limestone Hill 2014, Delaire Graff 2013, Edgebaston 2013, Glenelly Unwooded 2013, KWV The Mentors 2012, Lutzville Cool Climate 2014, Marklew 2012, Marklew 2013, Napier Saint Catherine 2013, Paradyskloof 2014, Radford Dale 2013, Withington 2013

Unusual Reds – Winners out of 20 WINE-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB: Rainbow's End Cabernet Franc 2012 ALSO LIKED: Balance Winemakers Selection 2014, Paul Cluver Village 2013, Treasure Hunter 2013, Withington Malbec 2014 WINES LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: Boplaas Tinta Barocca 2013, Boplaas Tinta Chocolat 2013, Boplaas Touriga Francesca 2012, Boplaas Touriga Nacional 2014, Boplaas Touriga Nacional Family Reserve 2012, Compagnies Wijn Mourvèdre 2014, Edgebaston 2013, First Sighting 2012, Glen Carlou Petit Verdot / Tannat 2011, La Couronne 2012, Limelight 2013, Mount Vernon 2012, Radford Dale Thirst Gamay Noir 2015, Steenberg Nebbiolo 2013, Waverley Hills Grenache 2014

Sauvignon Blanc – Winners out of 20 WINE-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB: Star Hill 2014 ALSO LIKED: Altydgedacht 2015, Cloof Unlabelled 2015, Leopard's Leap 2014, Simonsig Sunbird 2015 WINES LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: Ashton Kelder 2015, Barton 2012, Barton 2014, Cowlin 2014, Creation 2015, Dornier Cocoa Hill 2014, Esona 2013, Guardian Peak 2014, Hermanuspietersfontein NR. 5 2013, Hermanuspietersfontein NR. 7 2014, Highlands Road 2013, Highlands Road 2014, Kanu 2014, Ridgeback 2014, Warwick Professor Black 2014

Rhone Reds – Winners out of 20 WINE-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB: Bosman Adama 2013 ALSO LIKED: Black Pearl Mischief Maker 2013, Creation Syrah Grenache 2013, Strandveld Vineyards The Navigator 2012, Waverley Hills SMV 2015 WINES LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER: Compagnies Wijn Grenache Mourvèdre 2014, Compagnies Wijn Homestead NV, Compagnies Wijn Shiraz Grenache 2013, Dashbosch Plicatilis 2013, Guardian Peak Summit 2012, Hartenberg Alchemy 2013, Hermanuspietersfontein Die Martha 2011, Highlands Road Ruadh 2013, Hoopenburg Integer 2011, Leeuwenkuil Family 2011, Lourensford SMV 2013, Neil Ellis Ronados 2010, Radford Dale Black Rock 2013, Ridgeback SGMV 2012, Sijnn 2009


GOOD TASTE B E S T

W I N E S

Here is a listing of this issue’s club selections. For more information call us on 086 111 WINE (9463) THE PLATINUM CLUB—Top of the well-known brands

The Wine-of-the-Month Club Panel, from left to right: David Biggs, Margaret Fundira, Winnie Bowman, Colin Collard, Claude Felbert, PJ ‘Buks’ Nel, Christine Rudman, Gregory Mutambe, Clive Torr, Irina von Holdt, Tinashe Nyamudoka

• Fable Syrah 2013 Bottle Price: R369.00

• Jordan Cobblers Hill 2013 Bottle Price: R329.00

• Stony Brook Ghost Gum 2012

How the Panel Chooses the Wines

Bottle Price: R350.00

• Rust en Vrede Estate 2013

The Wine-of-the-Month Club panel conducts

Bottle Price: R395.00

more than 40 tastings in a year. A minimum of

• Steenberg Sauvignon Blanc/Semillon 2013

40 wines are assessed at each tasting. Before the

Bottle Price: R239.00

tasting of a particular category, producers are

• Rijk's Private Cellar Reserve Chenin Blanc 2011

requested to submit bottled samples of available

Bottle Price: R259.00

vintages. All wines are tasted blind. Each judge’s score is taken into account. Wine-of-the-Month Club selections are chosen from among those

THE RESERVE CLUB—Winning wines, regardless of price

wines which achieve the highest scores in their respective categories. If two or more wines achieve

This month’s favourite wine:

the same score, the wine with the lowest price is

Anura LB Cape Cuvée 2013

selected as the winner. Best Value Club wines are

Best Non-Bordeaux Blend out of 20 – Bottle

taken from entries that achieve high scores but

Price: R199.99

are priced below the average of their respective

Ripe blackberry, red cherry and blackcurrant

categories. Reserve Club wines must score an

flavours. Hints of mint and violet aromas, and

average of not less than 15 out of 20. Wines in

deep layers of dark chocolate. Drink now. Serve

restricted quantities are issued as limited-release

with grilled red meats with spice.

wines while Platinum Club selections are chosen from among premium-priced wines.

• Lomond Merlot 2013

Members of the panel give their comments

Best Merlot out of 20 – Bottle Price: R119.00

before knowing the name or origin of a winning

• Môreson Cabernet Franc 2012

wine. The rankings of entrants in a tasting are not

Best Unusual Red out of 20 – Bottle Price: R219.00

published although winemakers can request the

• Cederberg Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

scores achieved by their wines or their rankings.

Cabernet Sauvignon Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R155.00

Members of the panel are paid a fee for judging.

• Rudera Robusto Chenin Blanc 2011

The Wine-of-the-Month Club is an independent

Chenin Blanc Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R169.00

organisation and is not affiliated to any producer.

• Vuurberg White 2013 Best Dry White Blend out of 20 – Bottle Price: R179.00 J U N E

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GOOD TASTE

WINE-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB—Panel selections with

DID YOU KNOW?

price a consideration

Visit our blog for a peek at the Wine

This month’s favourite wine:

Club Panel’s top wine picks each week,

Journey's End Sauvignon Blanc 2016

interesting wine info, and much more. Go to www.wineofthemonth.co.za

Sauvignon Blanc Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R81.99 Melon and grapefruit on a bed of apple and Bosche pear, with a seam of freshness

BEST VALUE CLUB—High-scoring wines offering value

extending the flavours. Drink now until

for money

2020. Pairs well with lightly-spiced fish cakes.

This month’s favourite wine: La Couronne Portside Red 2013 Best Bordeaux Blend out of 20 – Bottle

• Glenelley Grand Vin 2009

Price: R71.99 Inky ruby; ripe plums, loganberries and

Non Bordeaux Blend Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R135.95

• Giant's Peak Merlot 2015

dark choc with a whiff of snuff. Full-bodied, dry and savoury, muscular with firm tannin

Merlot Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price:R114.99

• Cloof Shiraz/Viognier 2012

sinews. Long dry finish is tinged with nutmeg. Ready to drink, but will keep

Non Bordeaux Blend Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R99.99

• The High Road Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

until the end of 2018 or longer. Serve with springbok medallions.

Cabernet Sauvignon Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R115.99

• Mortons Reserve White 2015 Dry White Blend Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R76.99

• Jakkalskloof Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

• Reyneke Organic White 2015

Cabernet Sauvignon Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R79.50

Dry White Blend Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R65.00

• Kanu Merlot 2015

• Spier Discover Medium Sweet 2014 Off Dry/Sweet/Semi-Sweet Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R52.00

• Opstal The Mill Iron 2015 Off Dry/Sweet/Semi-Sweet Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R58.00

• Deetlefs Soet Hanepoot 2013 Off Dry/Sweet/Semi-Sweet Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R69.00

Merlot Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R79.99 • Roan Ranger 2014 Non Bordeaux Blend Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R75.99 • Martindale Chenin Blanc / Chardonnay 2015 Dry White Blend Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R61.99 • Dornier Cocoa Hill Sauvignon Blanc 2015 Sauvignon Blanc Selection out of 20– Bottle Price: R67.99 • De Meye Chenin Blanc 2015 Chenin Blanc Selection out of 20– Bottle Price: R62.99 • Sentinel Chenin Blanc/ Sauvignon Blanc 2014

DID YOU KNOW?

Dry White Blend Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R65.00

For corporate or personal gifting options, go to www. wineofthemonth.co.za/promotions/corporate-gifting. Choose from top wines & whiskies and we'll deliver

• Stellenrust Kleine Rust Semi Sweet 2015 Off Dry/Sweet/Semi-Sweet Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R45.99 • Opstal The Mill Iron 2015 Off Dry/Sweet/Semi-Sweet Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R58.00 • Deetlefs Soet Hanepoot 2013

them for you, in a velvet-lined box. J U N E

Off Dry/Sweet/Semi-Sweet Selection out of 20 – Bottle Price: R69.00

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Good TasTe B E S T

m a S T E r

B l E n d E r S

An Appreciation for

Quality

Did you always want to be a blender? Very early in my career—working in the laboratory of a small whisky company on the east coast of Scotland—I knew I had a real aptitude for nosing whisky, also an excellent memory for flavours, and a keen eye for detail. All these things are essential to becoming a master blender. What did you want to be at about ten years old? Probably to have my own antiques business, like my father.

I’ve read that you nose 250 samples a day—is that even possible? Yes, it takes time, practice and dedication to operate at this level. Today I have a very heavy schedule, and will be nosing nearly 800 samples. Are these the samples of what’s going into the different Ballantine blends? Yes, they are. I see samples every day from every stage of the whisky process, from new distillate at our distilleries all the way through to casks of 40 years old, which are malt and grain whiskies destined for Ballantine’s 40 Year Old. What do you think makes a good blender? J U N E

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You need to be passionate about whisky, have an extremely good sense of smell, a good eye for detail and, as I mentioned earlier, a good memory. Describe Ballantine’s style to us. In a nutshell, soft, sweet, delicate, complex and well balanced. Where is your favourite place to travel? I love to go home, to Carnoustie on the east coast of Scotland, where I was brought up. It’s a small town famous for golf and is right beside the sea, with a fantastic sandy beach. Do you have any time for hobbies?

text by Shannon Latimer

We chat to Sandy Hyslop of Ballantine’s on what it takes to be a whisky master blender.


THE ONEO FILE

GOOD TASTE

I love going to antique fairs and auctions, and have a large collection of wristwatches and fountain pens. I am sure all the years spent with my father in his antiques business has given me a passion for collecting, not to mention an appreciation for quality.

Sandy has a little boy of six who loves to go into work with his dad, if he pops into the office over a weekend. “He is fascinated by all the bottles in the sample room and loves to go and look at all the lorries parked up at the plant,” says Sandy. GT

LEFT: Glenburgie Distillery. TOP RIGHT: Old Customs House at Glenburgie Distillery. BOTTOM RIGHT: A touch of oak.

Ballantine’s DNA Ballantine’s has a heritage dating back to 1827. Its founder, George Ballantine, was not a man to pick the obvious route. What defined him was his belief that everyone should create their own path—even if it meant doing things differently. When George set up shop at the age of 19, it was in a completely different part of Edinburgh to most of the other grocers, but closer to his potential customers. It was this single-mindedness of purpose that drove the young entrepreneur to pioneer his own aged, blended whisky at a time when others were happy to sell it young and raw. George went on to expand his business and by 1869 was exporting his blended Scotch whisky to the four corners of the world. Today, Ballantine’s continuing success is supported by innovative, bold and dynamic marketing campaigns that stay true to George’s vision. Go to www.ballantines.com for more information.

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Master Blender’s

SELECTION

Ballantine’s signature style is elegant, soft, smooth and balanced. It is characterised by the use of a high proportion of firstfill American white oak barrels in the maturation process. This gives a vanilla, creamy sweetness to the flavour of the whisky.

Ballantine’s 12 Year Old Complex honey and floral flavours with a creamy oak sweetness in wonderful balance. Refreshing, long and sweet finish. Ballantine’s 17 Year Old Full and complex, vibrant honey sweetness and creamy vanilla flavours with hints of oak and spicy liquorice. Ballantine’s 21 Year Old Smooth, rich liquorice and aromatic spice flavours with traces of heather and smoke. Long and mellow with hints of dried fruits on the finish.


GOOD TASTE

A selection of highly-rated wines to try. Order them by calling the Wine Club on 086 111 WINE (9463)

Wild berry

Mulberry

1. RUPERT & ROTHSCHILD BARON EDMOND 2012

2. LOMOND MERLOT 2013

Focused, pure, fresh wild berry aromas with flinty, mineral, exotic herbal notes. Dense, fine tannin structure with exceptional length. 15 years aging potential. Serve with dry-aged beef sirlion. Single bottle price R385.99

Ripe mulberry and subtle mint opens onto a sweet, succulent palate of plums and a faint trace of smokiness. Finely-grained tannins and a good balance between fruit and wood. Drink now. Enjoy with a Puttanesca sauce over pasta. Single bottle price R115.00

Cassis

Red cherry

3. SARONSBERG PROVINCE ROOI 2012

4. ANURA LB CAPE CUVÉE 2013

Dark colour with flavours of cassis, red berry and integrated oak. The tannins are firm and well balanced with a full-bodied, elegant finish. Drink now. Pair with beef or lamb. Single bottle price R124.99

Loads of ripe blackberry, red cherry and blackcurrant flavours. Hints of mint and violet aromas, and deep layers of dark chocolate. Drink now. Best recommended with grilled red meats with spice. Single bottle price R199.99

Grapefruit

Goji berries

5. JOURNEY’S END SAUVIGNON BLANC 2015

6. ERNIE ELS BIG EASY CABERNET SAUVIGNON 2014

Melon and grapefruit on a bed of apple and Bosche pear, with a seam of freshness extending the flavours. Drink now until 2020. Pairs well with lightly- spiced fish cakes. Single bottle price R81.99

Nuances of red fruits, Chinese spice and damp earth. Loaded with raspberries and cherries. Dried goji berries on the finish. Drink now, or the next 3-5 years. Enjoy with hearty meat dishes. Single bottle price R74.99

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GOOD TASTE

Dried herbs

Tropical fruit

7. ERNIE ELS MERLOT 2014

8. DORNIER COCOA HILL SAUVIGNON BLANC 2015

Dried herbs, cherries, plums and a hint of dark choc. Red fruits and further complexity from notes of cigarbox. Delicate, fruity tannins and a long, spicy finish. Drink within the next 5 years. Try with seared tuna with miso sauce. Single bottle price R67.99

Aromas of Granny Smith apple and tropical fruits, with hints of blackcurrant. Flavours of pawpaw, grapefruit and a lingering minerality. Drink now or keep for 2 years. Pair with creamy pastas. Single bottle price R67.99

Wild rose

Earthy

9. STEENBERG 1682 PINOT NOIR MCC 2014

10. STEENBERG CATHARINA 2014

Fresh and savoury. Notes of wild rose, dried herbs, fynbos, toasted brioche and strawberries. Crisp acidity and subtle creaminess. Drink now, will age well over 5 years. Pair with strawberries or oysters. Single bottle price R185.95

Subtle earthy and spicy aromas. Juicy dark cherry palate. Well structured with a soft tannin texture. Drinking well now, will keep for up to 10 years. Pair with roast meat dishes. Single bottle price R255.95

Fynbos

Mocha choc

11. FABLE MOUNTAIN VINEYARDS SYRAH 2013

12.SAXENBURG PRIVATE COLLECTION MERLOT 2011

A powerful yet elegant wine of cranberries, ripe fruit, elderberries and spice. Hints of fynbos. Drink now. Pair with hard cheeses. Single bottle price R369.00

Refined and elegantly structured with layers of rich, supple berry fruit flavours, hints of mocha chocolate complemented by fine tannins. Drink now. Pair with rich, full-flavoured meat dishes. Single bottle price R164.99

Blackcurrant

Spicy

13. SAXENBURG PRIVATE COLLECTION CABERNET 2012

14. SAXENBURG SHIRAZ SELECT 2007 Selected from the best of Saxenburg, this wine is very complex and well balanced, spicy with a long finish and very fine tannins. Drink now and over the next 10 years. Pairs well with meat dishes. Single bottle price R769.00

Layers of ripe blackcurrant and cassis fruit combined with a ripe tannin finish. Drink now and over the next 10-15 years. Pairs well with red meat dishes. Single bottle price R199.99

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GOOD TASTE

Floral

Wood spices

15. OPSTAL THE MILL IRON 2015

16. RIJK’S PRIVATE CELLAR RESERVE CHENIN 2011

The ripe flavours and structure of the Viognier combine well with the floral Muscat notes, and the acidity of the Colombar. Drink now, and for up to 3 years. Pairs well with light Thai dishes. Single bottle price R58.00

Complex nose of tropical and yellow fruit. The wood spices complement the fruit and adds structure on the rich and creamy palate. Drink now and for the next 5 years. Pair with seafood. Single bottle price R 259.00

Vanilla

Tobacco leaf

17. CEDERBERG SHIRAZ 2014

18. CEDERBERG CABERNET SAUVIGNON 2014

Hints of sweet spice and vanilla. Red berries follow through on the palate, which finishes with a smooth lingering sensation. Cellaring recommended. Pair with game and powerful cheeses. Single bottle price R174.99

Blackcurrants with cedar wood undertones on the nose and a hint of tobacco leaf, creating a complex wine. A velvety finish on the palate. Drink now. Pair with a traditional chicken pie. Single bottle price R152.99

Asparagus

Red plums

19. DAVID NIEUWOUDT GHOST CORNER THE BOWLINE 2015

20. JORDAN BLACK MAGIC MERLOT 2013 Aromas of red plums and dark bitter chocolate. Drink now and over the next 3-5 years. Serve up to 15 years from vintage. Perfect with fillet or game meat such as ostrich or kudu. Single bottle price R157.99

Ripe asparagus notes from the Sauvignon Blanc complement the green fig and dusty elements from the Semillon. Enjoy now. Pair with roast chicken or fresh seafood Single bottle price R199.99

Passion fruit

Lead pencil

21. DE MEYE CHENIN BLANC 2015

22. STONY BROOK GHOST GUM 2012

Flavours of passion fruit, citrus, melon and dried apricot characterise this wine, backed by hints of minerals and fresh cut grass. Drink now. Best served chilled with fresh salads. Single bottle price R62.99

Cigar-box aroma, followed by ripe, dark cherry and blackberry fruit. A lovely balance between acidity and firm tannins. Drink now and over the next 3-5 years. Pairs well with beef, lamb and spicy food. Single bottle price R350.00

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GOOD TASTE Guide Digital Wine Appreciation Course

ONLY $0.99

PER MODULE

Download the Free Wine-of-the-Month Club App from iTunes (iOS) or the PlayStore (Android)


Good TasTe L A S T

R O U N D

The grapevine offers more than just sweet juice and wine B y

D A V I D

B I G G S

W

hen asked to name the king of plants, some people might choose the regal oak

tree and others may opt for the mighty sequoia or the giant redwood. The real ruler of the plant world, however, is the grapevine. The vine has been revered as part of history for millennia. It is mentioned time and again in The Bible. The Greeks, Romans and Egyptians

the family could pick any, but it provided

plucked a handful of cuttings from a

depicted the grapevine in murals.

much appreciated shade in the hot Karoo

bundle and said: “Here, take them and

summers and survived droughts and

bugger off. No charge.” He normally sold

dedicated to the vine and its products.

storms, frost and dust-storms. It is still

his vine cuttings in bundles of 50.

The Greeks called him Dionysus and

growing strong after almost a century,

the Romans referred to him as Bacchus,

and the main stem is now about 30

leaves. There may have been grapes too,

while the ancient Egyptians worshipped

centimetres in diameter.

but nobody was interested in them.

Shesmu and referred to red wine as ‘the

A Lebanese friend built a house in

The vines now produce a crop of dolma

Through all the centuries the grapevine

blood of the gods’. The Roman Catholics

Noordhoek and expressed a wish for

has fooled us humans into working for

pray to St Vincent as the patron saint of

some vines to plant in her garden. She was

it. We think it’s all about grapes and

wine and vinegar makers.

not particularly interested in grapes, but

wine, but the vine has a different idea.

wanted a supply of suitable vine leaves for

The grapevine’s primary object, like

sequoia as sacred. Why this respect for

making dolmades. So, I travelled to a vine

most living species, is to make more

one particular plant? The obvious answer

nursery near Wellington and asked the

grapevines. The grape pips are what

is in the wine produced from it, but

owner for some vine cuttings, selecting

Mother Nature sees as all important—

there’s far more to the vine than wine.

those I thought would produce the best

seeds for future vines. So she wraps them

dolma leaves.

in sweet flesh and waits until the seeds

Not many cultures held the oak tree or

I grew up on a Karoo farm called Grapevale, because there was a row of straggly grapevines in the garden when my grandparents arrived there in 1920.

“How many do you need?” asked the nurseryman.

are ready for distribution and planting. When the seeds are ripe, the flesh is

“Two of each variety,” I replied and

so sweet the birds can’t resist it. They

One of these vines had been trimmed and

he called to a labourer: “Bring out 2 000

swallow it and fly off to where they wrap

pruned, year after year, until it stretched

Chardonnay and 2 000 Pinotage.”

it in good fertilizer and deposit it on the

right round the gracious old farmhouse. It never produced many grapes because the birds got to them before

“No,” I said, embarrassed, “I want just two, not 2 000.”

sweet juice and wine. Nature knows it’s

There was a long silence and then he J U N E

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land. We humans think it’s all about

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actually about bird droppings.

GT

ILLUSTRATION BY ALEX LATIMER

Most ancient cultures worshipped a god


It lives

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June 2016  
June 2016  

This month, in our June issue, we cook with quinces and miso paste, to get you in the mood for the cooler weather. We travel to Robertson an...

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