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Shepherd’s Watch The magazine for and by the people of the Good Shepherd www.goodshepherdbrighton.org.uk

JUNE 2017

GOOD SHEPHERD FESTIVAL

Stewardship Update, pg 4 Self-led Retreats, pg 9 Inner Healing, (Personal Experience), pg 10 Beating the Bounds – Easter Monday, pg 12 Faith, pg 17 Mothers’ Union, Summer Calendar, pg 18 God in everything, pg 19 Are we being served? Community Engagement, pg 20 Variety is the Spice of Life pg 26 Our Regular Sunday Services, pg 30 Good Shepherd Festival Program 2017, pg 31

60p


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Vicar

Revd. Felix Mascarenhas The Vicarage, 272 Dyke Road Brighton BN1 5AE Tel (01273) 882987 vicar@goodshepherdbrighton.org.uk

Deacon

Reader

Helen Rawlings 6 Beacon Hill Ovingdean, Brighton BN2 7BN Tel 07967695753 hrawlings@sky.com

Michael Miller 68 Ainsworth Avenue, Ovingdean, Brighton BN2 7BG Tel (01273) 240287 michael.miller@tiscali.co.uk

Churchwardens David Stevens: 2 Shirley Road, Hove, BN3 6NN, Tel (01273) 555197; desandpms@yahoo.com Christine James: 22 Ranelagh Villas, Hove BN3 6HE Tel 01273.724802, cpjh22@googlemail.com

Parish Office The Parish Office is open on Wednesday and Friday mornings from 9.30 to 10.30. The Parish Office telephone number is (01273) 553747


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The church's Outreach and Investing in it Many of you have witnessed our church's innumerable Outreach events that have been organized year after year. Well, it is good to note, you have been not mere spectators, but active in organizing and generously giving your financial offerings, to support various charities through the church. You have been missionaries from where you are. The global wave of prayer "Thy Kingdom come" was a wonderful occasion to be united with others. Beginning on the Ascension day and closing on the day of Pentecost, we have prayed together with the whole world for various intentions. It has re-launched us in to the world as missionaries of today. Besides the liturgical celebrations inside the church, we continues to carry on a variety of social activities for the neighbourhood. Our Outreach and Social committees have been working hard to keep this outreach mission going. And we are proud to invest in this social aspect. The church is in a unique position to pool together the forces that work more by the energy of faith rather than by any other motivations. And one can find that many, even with their little or no faith, help carry on this precious work to build a better world. They share their joys and sorrows with the communities around . Shortly, we shall celebrate our Family Fun Day and other events during the week. All join in. And what a celebration it becomes! Every little helps and on such occasions of social celebrations, the help and even mere presence of every person counts and adds colour to the event. The feast of Pentecost has inspired us more than ever and the summer season offers us the opportunity. Let us go out and celebrate!

Fr Felix While every effort is made to ensure all information in Shepherd’s Watch

is correct, neither the Parochial Church Council nor the individual contributors can be held responsible or accept liability for any errors and/or omissions.The PCC does not endorse the companies, products and services that appear in Shepherd’s Watch.Responsibility for any loss, damage or distress resulting from the use of or reliance on any information in Shepherd’s Watch, however caused, is disclaimed by the Parochial Church Council.


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On Sunday, the 7th of May 2017, we celebrated our “ STEWARDSHIP DAY” Here below are the message from our Hon. Treasurer and the homily delivered by Michael Miller . STEWARDSHIP UPDATE, MAY 2017 Giving gladly – each according to their ability I am sorry to alert donors that our financial situation is not improving. There has been a significant reduction in contributions owing to recent deaths and people moving away. Demands for our share of diocesan expenses (the Parish Share), which includes our Vicar’s modest stipend, insurances and other support services, continue to increase. For 2017 it is now £70,000. Based on current levels of personal giving (both regular and from the collection plate), our income for 2017 is likely to be £50,000 – about three-quarters of what we need to meet the Parish Share alone, excluding the church and hall running costs. Consequently, unless we give more we shall have to draw heavily on income from the lettings of the hall, church and Curate’s house in Reigate Road. Our total yearly expenditure has now risen to over £100,000 and we shall have to dip more and more into our limited reserves. This is a red line which we must attempt to eradicate. It is vital that we increase our giving, each of us as generously as our personal income allows. The Good Shepherd Church has for many years relied primarily on the contributions of the congregation both in monetary terms and in undertaking various works. I thank you for the generosity you have shown in whatever capacity during my fifteen years Stewardship Secretary. For PGS Donors To make changes to your level of giving you can either: 1)

download a ‘change’ form from www.parishgivingscheme.org.uk/changes and post to Parish Giving Scheme, Church House, College Green, Gloucester GL1 2LY


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OR 2)

contact the PGS office by email at info@parishgivingscheme.org.uk or by telephone: 01452 835595.

You will need to quote your individual reference number which can be found on any letter to you from PGS. Please contact me on 01273 554183 if you have any difficulty or any other queries. David Nissen

Homily Sunday 7th May – Good Shepherd Sunday Readings: Acts 2.42-47; Psalm 23; 1 Peter 2.19-25; John 10.1-10 I was chatting to a local vicar at the licensing service for a new priest at St Matthias the other day – and mentioned that I’d be preaching on Good Shepherd Sunday. ‘Oh, when’s that?’ he enquired. So I explained that’s it’s not so much a particular day in the liturgical calendar, but rather the Sunday of Eastertide when the ‘Good Shepherd’ readings appear. And indeed here we are today with our wonderful and familiar readings – Psalm 23 with its theme of ‘The Divine Shepherd’ and ‘Jesus the Good Shepherd’ as told in St John’s Gospel. On reflection, though, why should others know when Good Shepherd Sunday is? But it’s important to us as a parish as we give thanks for the last 95 years since the initial consecration of the nave of the church on 31 May 1922 and 90 years since the church was completed on 23 June 1927. And we only have to look slightly up from our seats to see the very special image of Jesus the Good Shepherd gazing down on us from the east window. We have his assurance in the words from scripture that we’ve heard


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and from the representation that we see that Jesus is always with us; The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures; he leads me beside still waters; he restores my soul. The Gospel passage also gives us comfort that Jesus is always there for us but nevertheless highlights some dangers along the way. The context of this discourse follows questions about whether or not Jesus is indeed the Messiah, the ‘Son of Man’ whom God will set as judge over the world. And in this response Jesus is painfully trying to explain to his followers by way of parable how the fulfilment of the prophesies all fits together. Indeed, even in these short verses he has two attempts at elucidation – and if we read on we will find that there are several further efforts at explanation; the very next verse starts with ‘I am the Good Shepherd’ which we will hear at this time next year! But let us hope that it won’t take us a whole year to understand the message. Jesus leads us and calls us but we still have to get up and follow him. As sheep in the sheep fold do we respond to his voice or get led astray by the thieves and the bandits? It’s not an easy decision. If we look at our second reading from St Peter we see that God’s gift to us of his Son, the Good Shepherd is stained with blood of his sacrifice: He himself bore our sins in his body on the cross, so that, free from sins, we might live for righteousness; by his wounds we have been healed. The path of following the Good Shepherd may require some sacrifice from us too. As I was double checking the consecration dates that I referred to earlier, I came across a magazine article from the then vicar, Fr Allen, dated January 1921, the year before the church opened. Under the heading ‘A plea for funds’ he was seeking to raise ONE THOUSAND SHILLINGS (which he put in capital letters) in order to enable the congregation to be able sit on chairs, kneel on hassocks and for all sorts of other things needed in a new church. He goes on to say that the new church will be free and un-appropriated, rich and poor will be able to sit where they like, all equally welcome, and there will be nothing in the nature of pew rents. And his final comment: I shall try to arrange that the gifts could be brought to be offered at The Altar at a great service on Good Shepherd Sunday. Well things don’t change an awful lot. We are immensely fortunate to have had the church building gifted to us by Alice Mary Moore, widow


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of the Vicar of Preston at the time. But we continue to have ever increasing expenditure on our running costs, maintenance and upkeep as clearly shown on the yellow leaflet that you will have all received today. There are many improvements that we would love to make to the church; new lighting and sound system; more accessible loos; meeting rooms; finishing off the area at the back… But before that we need to make sure that we cover our parish ministry contribution, currently £70,000 – which includes our clergy remuneration, accommodation, pension and training, insurance for the church and all the Diocesan central staff and administration costs. At the moment we’re about £20,000 short of even that starting point – so we clearly have some serious thinking to do.

Back then to our first reading for today from the Acts of the Apostles. ‘Life among the believers’ is the heading to the passage: All who believed were together and had all things in common; they would sell their possessions and goods and distribute the proceeds to all, as any had need. Quite challenging for us to think about in today’s age. On Tuesday of next week in St Paul’s Cathedral, our own Cathedral choir and vergers will be participating in the Festival of the Sons and Friends of the Clergy, a charity formed in the 17th century to support destitute clergy. Again the history is worth looking at. Whilst originally clergy and church costs would have been funded by tithes, gradually these were commuted to lesser annual contributions – which themselves didn’t keep up with costs – and thus clergy either had to find other income or rely on grants such as these. And so as we celebrate this festival of the Good Shepherd and all that it stands for in this church, we need to think very seriously about how we are going to move into the next century of our church life and how we are going to fund that £20,000 gap. Any innovations and


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suggestions will be warmly received – and we already are investigating the idea of forming some kind of ‘Friends’ group for parishioners who may not be regular worshippers. But in the meantime it’s clear that each and every one of us is going to have to reach into the darker recesses of our pockets and handbags and contribute significantly more. If you’re not on our regular Parish Giving Scheme or PGS please do join it – and David Nissen will be pleased to provide further details. If you are on the scheme the yellow sheet tells you what to do next. How much more will of course depend on individual circumstances – but tithing is not such an old fashioned thing – and 10% of net income or 5% of gross may be possible for some of us. If we are to increase our income from £50 - £70,000 then on average that means a 40% addition – but of course this would be a lot to ask. Something else we may wish to think about is the provision that we’ve made for the church in our wills – again 10% may be a suggestion to consider. As St Paul reminds us in his second letter to the Corinthians You should each give, then, as you have decided, not with regret, or out of a sense of duty; for God loves the one who gives gladly. We’re going to have to work hard together to achieve the results that we need – and clearly this kind of change isn’t going to happen overnight. But we must start now and we must focus – otherwise if the red line that David mentions gets crossed, there may be consequences ahead for the funding of our ongoing ministry here that none of us will welcome. Other churches in the local area which have been unable to meet their costs have been asked to share a parish priest, or allocated a part time one, or even house for duty on a Sunday only basis. We have so much that together we can give and achieve – the splendid results of our Lent breakfast collections for our three charities this year (Christian Aid, Rett UK and Voices in Exile) and the great success of the Lovey Foundation poetry evening yesterday bear witness to this. But we do need to keep the home fires burning too! As Jesus says to us: I am the gate for the sheep. Whoever enters by me will be saved, and will come in and go out and find pasture. I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly. Amen Michael Miller, Reader


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YOUR LOVE & CONCERN FOR OTHERS IN THE FUTURE

Seasons come and go and so the years. With time, everything passes by. But you can make sure your love for others will continue. One can do this by making a will for a good cause. The church is a great community of people that could make good use of your intention. Please remember your church in your will. If you need help to write your will, please let the vicar or any one of us know. Let your love extend beyond your life-time! SELF LED RETREATS "Self led retreats" are a great way to enhance your relationship with God, to spend time in His presence and to rest in isolation separated from day to day concerns James & Emma invite anyone who is interested in spending some time in the Fens to stay in their ‘Retreat Annex’. Accommodation is simple but (hopefully) comfortable – a twin bedroom, bathroom and a sitting room with basic kitchen facilities. Guests are welcome to spend time in the garden, walking the local Fens or visiting nearby Ely Cathedral (15 minute drive) before joining us for an evening meal (with or without the dogs begging with their cutest faces). The local village church is also usually open and available for quiet contemplation. Some books and ideas are provided, but how you spend your time is up to you, as well as the length of your stay. If you are interested, please give us a call (01353 741337) or email James:jwsb888@yahoo.co.uk


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Inner Healing—A personal Experience For some months I had been experiencing depression and undue anxiety. This was not a new experience. From time to time in my adult life, times of depression would descend like a thick cloud, usually triggered by some event. In depth counseling had, in the past, revealed that my childhood experiences were at the root of this vulnerability. But this time was different. I was already on anti-depressant pills since the death of my husband eight years ago. They had been very effective, with no side effects. Furthermore there seemed to be nothing to trigger an episode of this nature. Why, then ,should this unwelcome dark cloud envelop me? The GP said the medication had lost its effectiveness and he would try me on another. Which he did. He would also refer me for NHS counseling, but to expect a long delay of several months. My hopes were up. A month passed and the depression/ anxiety only got worse. Very dark, self destructive thoughts began to haunt my mind. I was getting desperate, but I was determined to try to lead a normal life so that others would not see what was going on inside my mind. I was frightened. Even my heartfelt prayers seemed to bounce off the ceiling. Church attendance did nothing to alleviate the symptoms. I spoke to the GP again. To be told I had an imbalance in my brain was little comfort. In near panic I said I would be willing to pay to see a Psychiatrist. The doctor gave me a telephone number to phone and within three days I had an appointment to see a Consultant Psychiatrist at The Priory in Hove. That is when my downward spiral came to a halt and I began to turn a corner. His understanding ,kind approach was just what I needed. It was a tonic. He changed my medication, said it would take about a month to be effective and told me I could come each week until I felt better.


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At about that time,in February of this year, our church held one of its rather infrequent healing services.I had always gone forward before at these lovely reverential and peaceful services, but this time I went forward with a sense of urgency, very much aware of my need for inner healing but rather doubtful about receiving it. After a quiet prayer and the anointing of oil on my forehead at the altar rail in the side chapel, I went back to my seat in church, my eyes closed in reflective thought. And that was when it happened. In my mind's eye, I saw Jesus standing close by, his arms outstretched towards me. He looked at me and said quite simply, "Receive your healing. " That was all. I gulped, startled. Now I am not given to seeing visions. Was this real? Or was it my imagination? The answer came in the following weeks. Through the next week nothing much happened, but very gradually peace began to flow into me .The undue anxiety that had plagued me diminished ,then disappeared. Positive thoughts and renewed energy crept into my mind and body. Darkness was being overtaken by light. Yes, the new pills were beginning to work, but even more, God had heard my desperate prayers and through the power of the Holy Spirit activated a deep emotional healing through that special healing service. Four months on, and I feel truly well in mind and spirit ,even if my body creaks and groans sometimes ,and doesn't do as I tell it to! But with all my heart I thank God for His healing touch through Jesus ,and for the medical help He used to bring about my sense of normality and well-being. " Praise God from whom all blessings flow..." (name withheld , for reasons of privacy)


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“Beating the Bounds on Easter Monday” Well, we didn’t do much beating but we did manage a gentle perambulation around the far flung reaches of our parish on Easter Monday! 17 of us started and 9 finished, with the remainder taking well-earned rests at various points along the way before reconvening in the church hall for a fine lunch.

Much of our walk was along paths and through parkland and we explored the delights of Dyke Road Park, Hove Rec, Hove Park, Three Corner Copse and Withdean Woods. We stopped regularly for short breaks and refreshments; our scheduled 10-minute stop at Hove Park Café turned into well over half an hour as we explored the delights of the coffee, hot chocolate and cake selection! We were also greeted by certain unexpected delights; some sacred stones and a strange tree sculpture in Hove Park.


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We also encountered the Jubilee tree in Three Corner Copse where ‘Scout’ was determined to get rather too close and some of the group found particular amusement! Most of us made it as far as ‘Hill Top’ where the café was sadly closed for the holiday; but then an advance guard set off down Dyke Road Avenue to prepare lunch whilst the rest of us embarked on a rather steep descent through Withdean Woods. Fr Felix delighted in reminding us not to fall over on the ‘Patcham and Westdene Parish’ side of the path where we would undoubtedly be beyond rescue – although as an insurance policy we had Mathew and Susan Philip along…

Then back along Station Road on the side of the railway. And finally thanks to Felix and Susan for the delicious spicy chicken to finish! Michael Miller


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Faith Just a few days ago Father Felix reminded me that my article for our Church magazine was almost due and as I write this on Sunday 21st May it is overdue. My sincere apologies to all concerned. When Father Felix reminded me – I was at a loss as to what I should write. “What about Brexit?” he suggested and dutifully I began to write. Twice I started, wrote a paragraph or two, threw it in the wastepaper basket and started again. It is my view that our country’s withdrawal from the Common Market is unnecessary and a disaster. It’s been brought about by the lunatic fringes of the Conservative Party and lack of investment by all political parties in many areas of the country following the collapse of traditional industries. This has left a very large proportion of our people disenchanted, poor, and cross. Anyhow, after the failure of my second try I have decided to write about faith. By coincidence I received a long letter from a friend who lives abroad. Perhaps twice a year we write to each other and this year he wrote to me about faith, an appropriate subject for a Church magazine! My friend is a staunch Roman Catholic and a regular church-goer. He attends Mass and went to a Catholic primary school where he was taught by the Sisters of Mercy, fierce women who wore old-fashioned black habits, which, he tells me, were very like the habits worn by the Nuns in The Sound of Music. It was a long letter with a good deal of soul searching. My friend tells me that he is convinced that there is a purpose to life and hopes his faith will continue to provide him with an answer. Of course, like most of us, he has his doubts but I envy him in his near certainty that all will be well. For myself, I have some hope. I can be moved by Church music, an anthem, or a prayer. Church bells retain their magic. I have a lingering hope that we may, in some strange way, find a better world to come and I am a believer that humans try, often against the odds, to do its best. The stars gave me faith, particularly at night and at sea. They still do, but from urban Brighton they don’t shine as bright as they did. Faith, Hope and Charity, and of these, the last to die, is Hope. Tim Parker


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MOTHERS’ UNION SUMMER CALENDAR Sat 3rd June 9am Corporate Communion in church Thursday 8th June 12.30pm Talk Time hosted by Marguerite Harland at 7 The Paddock, Hove. Snack lunch Tuesday 20th June 11am - 3pm Outing to Ringmer Park Garden. Let Christine or Carole know if you would like to go so that lifts can be arranged. Thursday 22nd June The meeting scheduled for this evening has been cancelled. Saturday 1st July 9am Corporate Communion in church Saturday 8th July Diocesan family Fun Day at Amberley Museum and Heritage Centre. Tickets available Thursday 13th July. Summer event to be arranged. Christine James


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‘God in Everything’ This was the title of a quiet day that two of us from the Good Shepherd along with a catholic friend experienced recently. It was organised by the Chemin Neuf Community, ‘a Roman Catholic Community with an ecumenical vocation’. It has 2000 members in 30 countries, couples, families and single people, men and women who have chosen Christ and to serve the world. You may have heard of the group that is resident in Lambeth Palace and in the UK there are also groups in North London, Liverpool, Cornwall and in Hove at St Patrick’s Church. But we went to Storrington Priory that has recently been taken over by the community and where all sorts of events are held for a wide variety of people. It’s a beautiful, quiet situation with a cloister, gardens and right in the countryside. Our day was the third in a series of three and was led by Charles, a retired Anglican priest and his wife Felicity, who now live close by in the village and are members of the community. There are also other local community members living in the priory as well as some from France and Poland. Our day ‘God is everything’ took us on a gentle journey of reliance on God in our lives and included talks, silence, some relaxation, reading time and delicious food. A very restful and refreshing experience. Margy or I will be happy to tell you more; we hope to organise a parish quiet day (in addition to our regular retreat to Alton) sometime later in the year. Michael Miller


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Are we being served? – Community Engagement Integrity is the lifeblood of democracy. Deceit is a poison in its veins Dwight D Eisenhower It is evident that perceptions of the Church vary, ranging from deep suspicion, to “I think they do good work in the community”; to knowing absolutely nothing about the Church - and underwriting the whole situation is an overall impression that those attending church today, are old. Our ever-increasing average age is becoming a serious deterrent to younger people. The concept that “younger men and women are not interested in joining a club of their parents’ friends”, is very true and unfortunately that is how many view the majority of us! It is believed that younger generations are more interested in ‘causes’ than spending valuable time engaging in activities that do not interest them. Younger generations have a different attitude towards the giving of their time to ‘outside’ activities. Demographic studies reveal that the use of ‘leisure time’ is seriously affecting the membership of clubs and institutions. Most regard ‘leisure’ or, in the case of young families, time spent with their children, as a precious commodity; they do not want to commit to organisations that appear elitist or take up valuable leisure time, unless there are obvious benefits. Some people do not subscribe to collecting money; they prefer to give ‘practical’ services. They believe the community gets fed up with constant ‘fund raising’, with churches and other institutions falling over one another fishing in the same pond. The situation is not assisted by the fact that there is a perception that the Church of England, with its large property portfolio, is ‘rich’. In their view, ‘hands on’ projects create a better profile. It is believed that projects of this nature not only motivate existing members but also raise the profile of the Church and attract new members.


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Appeals for research funding, extending to skilled ‘legacy trawling’, for cures of serious diseases e.g. cancer, continue to gain momentum because we are all aware of their devastating effects on friends and/or relatives. Celebrities often enhance their ‘street cred’ by supporting charities and we are regularly bombarded with appeals for money. Local charities have to compete with national organisations many of which have skilled marketing teams – the church is in the same arena. Is it any wonder that collections are falling? The survival and success of organisations lies in their ability to comprehend the problems facing society; to solving their internal issues and adapting where necessary, while remaining true to core values. The essence of the Church is that it is rooted in the affairs of men and women; it is concerned with people living together in a harmonious relationship with one another and with our environment, and also with endeavouring to do something about it, when that harmony is disturbed or has not been allowed to develop. Few Christians would disagree with these sentiments. They would also acknowledge that the Church does not have all the solutions but its neutrality can enable it to foster the culture and climate of service and friendship to others and the human qualities of truth, fairness, tolerance and compassion; the ingredients needed to underpin a civilised society. Therefore it is to be expected that the Church should not only study the problems facing society but also consider their implications and look for remedies without entering the unsavoury domain of politicians. As I write this article the country is approaching a General Election on 8 June, which led me to consider the role of the Church in politics. In a recent letter issued by Scotland’s bishops, expressing their views and giving advice concerning issues relative to the election, they say: ‘As Christians, we have a civic and moral duty to engage with our


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democracy. As Catholics, we believe that the primary goal of society should be the common good; that is the good of all people and of the whole person. Indeed, the common good is the very reason political authority exists’. As would be expected they list human life, marriage and the family, poverty, asylum and religious freedom as just some of the main areas to be considered and ask voters to remind politicians that laws permitting the wilful ending of life such as ‘abortion, assisted suicide and euthanasia’ are always morally unacceptable. It occurs to me that many readers would agree these sentiments but it needs to be recognised that some of the issues concern affairs of the State. So where does this leave priests? As I see the position there is an expectation that priests should speak out against injustice, corruption, violence, greed and lust: they should speak out against genuine violations of human rights. It is also to be expected that they speak out against ungodly ideology e.g. Jihadism. However, the danger is that interpretations of the issues can vary and, for example, although the Left and Right care equally about poverty, there is no guarantee that priests will be objective or neutral when giving advice. We are all aware that once you tell somebody something about politics you may influence the way they think and possibly the way they vote.


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In the final analysis, it seems to me that it is reasonable to expect priests to share their personal views on issues and principles that inform people’s consciences, and then encourage them to vote responsibly. But on no account should they tell people who to vote for. It is essential that the Church retains its neutrality, if it is to be effective. The time is long overdue for the Church to be professional in promoting itself. It has become reactive and less proactive over the years, as its area of influence has been usurped by the State. It deals with problems as they arise, instead of trying to anticipate them and contentious issues are often side-stepped, which does not enhance its credibility against a background where Christians, young and old are crying out for leadership and example, as exemplified by Christ, which extends to challenging the Establishment.

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Without increasing membership – especially embracing youth – the Church will wither on the vine. Grandiose ideas and seeking to popularise itself seems to be achieving very little, with churches closing and congregations continuing to diminish. The Church needs to win trust and demonstrate its integrity. While accepting that there is a need to forgive those that trespass against us, this should not be seen as an excuse for inactivity. Difficult decisions have to be taken and on occasions this may mean confronting those that would cause us harm. Its goals must be clearly stated, progress measured and success promoted. We are so concerned about progress ‘inside’ that we forget progress ‘outside’. 

What are the values of our changing society and how does the Church fit into these?

What are the new issues facing society today which may not have been the issues of yesteryear?

Where is its catchment for members and how does it make itself relevant and attractive to them?

What projects should it be undertaking to extract the best value from resources, in the worldwide context, looking particularly to this century?

Every effort should be made to ensure that the rights of all people are respected, including vulnerable groups who lack the means of making their needs known, be it through immaturity, mental incapacity, imprisonment or detention or other circumstance. But professional judgement should be exercised as independently as possible and not influenced by political or religious prejudice. Neil Kelly 30 May 2017


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Variety is the Spice of Life As I sit and watch ‘Britain’s Got Talent’, waiting for another Subo moment, I thank God for the almost infinite variety of his creation. Wouldn’t it be boring if all the acts were same, not to mention that it wouldn’t be very good telly either. And the same goes for the world in which we live, even our country, if we expected all visitors to our shores to follow the maxim ‘when in Rome do as the Roman’s do’ , which I suspect only applies if you’re a white Anglo Saxon male anyway, life would be so dull. I have to admit I try and ‘do as the Romans do’ metaphorically of course, whenever I travel to other parts of the world. It’s the only way I believe, to use another maxim, that travel can broaden the mind. I remember being quite horrified by a couple I met on a tour in Singapore who refused to eat any local dishes but instead wanted to find a Big Mac. There may be comfort in the familiar but no adventure. I feel lucky to live in a country so full of diversity, embracing the opportunity to share with the many different races and creeds that our multicultural society gives us. I also believe we can all live in harmony without losing our cultural identity. With this in mind I would like to introduce you to the Quilt of Belonging, Invitation Project. I was lucky enough to see this on a visit to Saskatoon in 2006 when it was on tour and the sight of it left me dumb-struck. The Quilt of Belonging is a collaborative work of art whose mission is to recognize Canada’s diversity, celebrate her common humanity and promote harmony and compassion among people.


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

June 2017

It started as a community millennium project with textile artist Esther Bryan. She recognized that everyone has a story to tell, each culture has a unique beauty and that the experiences and values of our past inform who we are today. In this textile mosaic, each person can experience a sense of belonging and find a place in the overall design – there is “A Place for All”. Together they record human history in textile, illustrating the beauty, complexity and sheer size of the human story. I don’t think Esther ever envisaged her local community project would become so large, 120 foot long with 263 diamond blocks portraying the rich cultural legacies of all the First Peoples in Canada and every nation of the world (all being present in Canada’s multicultural society) at the dawn of the new Millennium. The blocks are mounted on a fabric of rainbow colours forming a richly hued portrait of the human family, a harmonious whole. The quilt has travelled throughout Canada and even visited other countries. I thought the quilt illustrated perfectly the hope for our humanity, that we can live in harmony while retaining our own individuality and culture and I would love to see something similar repeated here. To see it yourself and get the full impact of its size and beauty you will need to go to Canada; the next parish holiday perhaps? But you can see it on line at: https://www.quiltofbelonging.ca/ Deacon, Helen Rawlings


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

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The Good Shepherd Magazine

June 2017

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The Good Shepherd Magazine

June 2017

us OUR REGULAR SUNDAY SERVICES: 8am, Holy Communion 10.15am, Parish Eucharist; 5pm, “Time for God @5 ” informal worship for all ages, etc. please look at the details on our website. (Eucharist on Thursday at 10.30am followed by Coffee and on Saturday at 9am)

June 2017 3rd: Summer Gardening around the church-hall, 9.45-12.30 4th : PENTECOST, (THY KINGDOM COME” 5th: Tea Club, 1.30-3.15pm 10th :GS Festival begins with the Fam. Fun Day, Details on the next page. 11th : TRINITY SUNDAY-FESTIVAL EUCHARIST 13th: Programme of music & singing by local schools 2pm; Open air picnic on church grounds 6pm; Young Actors Group, performance 7pm. 15th: Corpus Christi Eucharist, in the vicarage garden; strawberries/wines 18th : All Age Eucharist, with Lancing Prep school, 10.15, with the theme of “The Wedding at Cana” July 2017 7th : Tea Club, Outing, 1.30-3.15pm 23rd: Healing Service, Preacher Dr Alison Green, 10.15 August 2017 13th : BVM, Eucharist at 10.15 and Hymns & Pimms, 5pm, in the vicarage garden/Hall. Please buy your tickets in advance.


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

June 2017

GOOD SHEPHERD FESTIVAL 2017 Saturday 10th June: FAMILY FUN DAY ... 2 - 5 pm

"Marvelous Mutts & Friends" Dog Show* Categories include: Prettiest Pet, Waggiest tail, Best Trick, Best rescued animal, Cutest cuddly toy pet, Best in show Entry for Dog Show £1 on the day. Admission Free! Bouncy castle, Live music, Local produce stalls, Books, Free Tea & cakes, Plant stalls, Tombola, Food stalls, Coconut shy, Games and competitions, Face Painting, Craft stalls, Bric a Brac Stalls, BBQ, and a Grand Raffle worth £100. WEEK-DAY PROGRAM Saturday 10th: 9 am: Eucharist

2 - 5 pm: Family Fund Day Sunday 11th: 10.15 am: Festival Eucharist; Preacher: The Archdeacon of Brighton & Lewes, The Venerable Martin Lloyd Williams Tuesday 13th:

2 pm: Neighbouring Schools' Musical Concert; 6.00 pm: Open air picnic (please bring your own to share) and Brownies' Games;

Young Actors Group, performance 7pm. Thursday 15th: Corpus Christi Eucharist, in the vicarage garden; strawberries/wines Sunday 18th: 10.15 am Festival "All age Service" organized by young people on the theme of " The Wedding Feast at Cana" *See www.goodshepherdbrighton.org.uk for details how to sign up


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The Good Shepherd Magazine

Our Service Times Sunday Worship 8am Holy Communion 10:15 Sung Eucharist 6.30pm: check on the web On the 1st Sunday of each month, at 5pm, there will be T4G@5 (TimeforGod@5) to which children are particularly welcome. Weekday Eucharist Thursday:10:30am Saturday: 9am =====================

Magazine Contributions to the magazine are welcome. Please leave copy at the back of Church by 15th of every Feb., May, Aug. and Nov. or e-mail daisy.kendall21@gmail.com or to The Vicar —————————————Tea Club Meets on the first Monday of the month at 1.30pm. We welcome all who are 50 years plus, and would like some company. Just come along. Tel. Sheena on 07932591172 or sheenarichardson7@icloud. com

June 2017

Hall Bookings: Tel. Sheena on 07932591172 or sheenarichardson7@icloud.com

Choir Choir practice: Sunday morning at 9. All are welcome. Please contact: Derek Froud (681007)

Flowers If you would like to donate an arrangement in memory of someone or help with the flower arranging, please contact church office 882987.

Stewardship Secretary David Nissen 1 Shirley Road, Hove, BN3 6NN Tel (01273) 554183 dnissen@btinternet.com

Bell Ringing Ringing practice every Tuesday evening in the Tower. New ringers are always welcome. Please contact Pat Hunter (555954)

Notice-boards Information (lists and posters) for the notice boards may be placed in the tray in the church porch windowsill or contact Martin Cruttenden (505225).

Shepherd's Watch, Summer 2017  

The Parish Magazine of the Church of the Good Shepherd, Brighton

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