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good company people

issue two

anchor

tools

ingredients

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They told us that the second one would be harder than the first. It‘s true—we wanted to throw in the towel. Everyday. “Is this even worth it?” we’d ask ourselves. “Are we having fun anymore?” Then, somewhere, we experienced a shift. We dug a little deeper, leaned on all of our peeps, and searched for why we should keep going. We found (and felt) the anchor: food. It seems so obvious, but that simple word becomes lost when your job description has expanded from Co-Creative Director of a magazine to full time messenger service, schedule-maker and dishwasher. It’s the food that anchors us, duh. Chopping vegetables after a hard day brings us back to equilibrium—before we know it we have conquered two goals: inner-calm and dinner prep. Making a quick sauce with cherry tomatoes is instant gratification. Pitting 6 pints of cherries is an act of love and serving that cherry pie—pure excitement. It may be a stretch to call food our religion, but both of us cannot think of a better thing to do on a Sunday morning than having brunch with friends or sitting down in the evening to dinner with family. Food is an anchoring force. It’s what we keep going back to and what motivates us to forge ahead. In this issue we travel to find kindred souls who share the same drive--anchored in their love of food. From cultivating salt, to teaching people how to shift their approach to food, to bringing clean water to impoverished communities— they strive to make things better, starting from within and affecting positive change around them. We hope this issue provides you with insight into some of the things that anchor our lives as well as the tools to make a positive shift in your own life and the inspiration to keep forging ahead. Cheers, Bobbi + Debi


people 05 contributors 08 pure dedication 14 more than a water project tools 24 TOOL BOX 28 5 favs 32 set your table ingredients 42 summer fruit 54 123 easy 58 simple shift 72 sweet freeze

3


people


photos steven mcdonald STyling bobbi lin

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PURE DEDICATION W H E N T W O D E D I C AT E D P E O P L E P U T T H E I R H E A R T S & S O U L S I N TO E V E R Y B O T T L E O F A R T I S I N A L S E A S A LT , W E G E T T O

SPRINKLE

T H E M A G I C O F W E L L F L E E T ’ S O C E A N S O N TO O U R P L AT E S . photos jim franco styling joe maer WORDS DAVID ANGER


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Willi Wear or InWear Matinique? The Style Council or The Smiths? Keith Haring or Jean-Michel Basquiat? These were the important cultural questions keeping me awake during my senior year of college. Career? Start-up company? Business plan? What are you talking about? A generation later today’s students speak a different language. Meet recent Skidmore College graduates Hope SchwartzLeeper and Zak Fagiano, who are the hearts and brains behind Wellfleet Sea Salt Company–a fledgling Cape Cod–based sea salt enterprise.

something ritzy. Salt cellars were symbols of wealth at the table. Mass production took over and eventually the prestige of salt diminished. Nowadays sea salt is enjoying a comeback, thanks to food connoisseurs who appreciate its coarse, crunchy texture and stronger flavor. Twenty years ago molecular gastronomy pioneer Heston Bluementhal helped revolutionize sea salt by pairing it with white chocolate and then Mark Bitterman furthered the mineral’s return to the limelight by publishing Salted, a reference guide for over 150 salts.

They came of age during the Millennium era, when reality television brought sophisticated concepts of food, fashion, and business to everyday America. When their alma mater hosted its’ annual business plan competition last year, Hope and Zak submitted their idea for Wellfleet and won. Placing second in the competition, the couple received a start-up prize of $5,000, a nest egg they nurtured with guidance from Wall Street investor Dan Antonelli and food mentor Nancy Wekselbaum of The Gracious Gourmet. Hope and Zak also have mentors on the homefront: Zak’s parents are heavyweights in the food industry and Hope’s father has been keen on harvesting Cape Cod sea salt for years.

Hope and Zak praise Wellfleet Sea Salt’s natural qualities, adding that it is iodine free and contains vital minerals, such as magnesium, potassium, and calcium. They also believe that sea salt possesses a lower sodium content than table salt, a notion that the American Heart Association refutes.

Hope and Zak quickly learned that connections only take you so far. Within the first year Wellfleet survived Hurricane Sandy and a production challenge. Initially their business plan called for procuring the sea salt via greenhouses on floating barges, first used for harvesting oysters. Hope and Zak soon found that these greenhouses were too cool and didn’t produce sufficient flavor. They now use a greenhouse situated on a mainland farm not far from shore.

Zak confesses he enjoys skateboarding and Hope loves horseback riding. They also both harbor food guilty pleasures. For sweet-tooth Hope, candy is irresistible and so is cooking with ramen noodles, while Zak is partial to zippy energy drinks. Despite these junk food cravings, this summer you can look for the couple eating fish and chips and clam chowder at The Land Ho restaurant in Harwich, Massachusetts. Does the restaurant stock Wellfleet Sea Salt Company? Not yet. But Hope and Zak must have a marketing strategy in mind.

They don’t remember salt cellars of yore, but in the olden days a glimpse of sea salt was thought of as

Nevertheless, Hope and Zak are tireless in their pursuit of business success. During their senior year they were full­ -time students and both worked part-time jobs—Hope in the college mailroom ten hours a week and Zak in construction for twenty hours a week, all while launching Wellfleet Sea Salt Company. Are they for real you wonder? What about fun?


11


opinel pocket knife rosewood folding knife

brookfarmgeneralstore.com

tool box [ BASICS ] FOR A LIFETIME

photos dane tashima STyling marie sullivan


HANDMADE wooden utensils

livewirefarm.com

25


5FAVS

with david and luise of greenkitchenstories.com


three

years

the

blog

ago

david

green

frenkiel

kitchen

and

stories.

luise

today

vindahl they

started

have

more

300,000 monthly readers and the their first book, vegetarian everyday – delicious & healthy recipes from our green kitchen was just released in stores in the U.K. & the U.S. than

we

fell

hard

not

named

for

their

stories tiny

for

after

their

the

blog,

green

green

wall

in

kitchen their

stories—

kitchen,

but

“green” approach to cooking and the personal

behind

kitchen,

every here

recipe. are

of

david

all and

the

tools

luise’s

5

in

their

favorites.

We have a tiny kitchen. The pantry doors hardly close because of all of the things we have crammed in there. Even though Luise denies it, I swear she must be secretly collecting gluten-free flours. I often tease her about it. Luise and I weren’t always this fascinated by food—it was a passion that developed over time. My interest in photography and food styling piqued when I worked for a Swedish food magazine; Luise’s began when she was a social psychiatrist and saw first-hand how nutrition affects our well-being. Now she is studying to be a nutritional therapist. As for me,

I wasn’t always conscientious of nutrition when it came to my own eating habits--Luise and I met on the streets of Rome at a point in my life when I was subsisting on nothing but pasta and gelato. When our two worlds happily collided, we had to learn to adjust to each other’s food habits. I cut back on refined sugar and started incorporating more whole grains, nuts and seeds into my diet, and Luise stopped eating meat since I am a vegetarian and have been for 15 years. Today, when we cook pasta it’s whole grain or gluten-free. Our small pantry, combined with our ever-expanding cooking repertoire as well as our commitment to buying food in its most natural form, means that we have to choose our kitchen tools very carefully. The tools we love are things that have multiple uses and help us transform raw ingredients into consumable products: turning nuts into milk (a high speed blender), squeezing fruit and vegetables into delicious juices (a juicer), and cutting zucchini and carrots into thin homemade raw vegetable noodles (a julienne peeler). That said, the one tool that we use most in our kitchen is our allin-one immersion blender. We use the mixing bar to blend soups, to turn dates into mash or rolled oats into flour, and add the whisk when we beat eggs. The next tool on our list? A dehydrator. It is great for making fruit rolls, vegetable chips and granola. An added bonus is that it would help us to further our “green” initiatives by saving energy—especially when compared to the tool we currently use to dry fruits and vegetables, an oven. Our problem is that we simply don’t know where we would put it. We. Need. A. Bigger. Kitchen.

29


Sealife Hand Towel

thomaspaul.com


set your table [ hook, line & sinker ] photos + styling bobbi lin

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haiku bowl + platter

domusnewyork.com soapstone bowls

canvashomestore.com


Scrimshaw Whale Tray Set

utilitieshome.com whale platter

johnderian.com

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CHERRY TOMATOes [

the abundant summer

]

FRUIT photos Burcu Avsar styling bobbi lin

recipe development + food styling chris barsCh

Linens & Glassware

couleurnature.com

Beer Coutesy of

Goose Island Brewery gooseisland.com


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Marinated Cherry Tomatoes Yield: 5-6 cups

2 1 5 1 1 1 2 2

cups extra virgin olive oil tsp. crushed red pepper flakes garlic cloves, peeled and smashed bay leaf sprig fresh oregano sprig rosemary sprigs thyme lbs. cherry tomatoes, (about 5 cups)

Combine olive oil, red pepper flakes and garlic in a medium saucepan and cook over low heat for 6-7 minutes to infuse oil with flavor. Remove from heat, stir in bay leaf, oregano, rosemary and thyme and cool to room temperature, set aside. Use a small serrated knife to score an “x� on the bottom of each cherry tomato being careful to just break the skin. Fill a large bowl with ice water, set aside. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Working in 3-4 batches, add tomatoes to boiling water for 15 seconds, until skins just split. Use a strainer to lift tomatoes from the pot and gently slide them into the ice water. In about a minute, when the tomatoes are cool enough to handle, peel and discard skins. Place tomatoes in a large jar, add infused oil and allow to stand 1-2 hours at room temperature; refrigerate overnight. Store tomatoes in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Serve over salad in lieu of salad dressing; over greens; with grilled meats or seafood; or with crusty bread.


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I have been making some iteration of herb pesto for as long as I can remember. You will need about 1 cup of the pesto for the zucchini pasta. The remaining pesto can be stored in the refrigerator for about a week and used as a condiment for raw, sautĂŠed or grilled vegetables or as a stuffing for lemon sole or chicken breast.

-CA


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photo shaun sullivan

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ISSUE 2•ANCHOR (preview)  

When people come first, memorable meals happen. The right tools turn a chore into an art. Recipes with seasonal ingredients that work.

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