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GOOD COMPANY people

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When people come first, memorable meals happen. The right tools turn a chore into an art. Recipes with seasonal ingredients that work.


A SMOOTH SEA NEVER MADE A SKILLED SAILOR issue 2 • anchor

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They told us that the second one would be harder than the first. It‘s true—we wanted to throw in the towel. Every day. “Is this even worth it?” we’d ask ourselves. “Are we having fun anymore?” Then, somewhere, we experienced a shift. We dug a little deeper, leaned on all of our peeps, and searched for why we should keep going. We found (and felt) the anchor: food. It seems so obvious, but that simple word becomes lost when your job description has expanded from Co-Creative Director of a magazine to full-time messenger service, schedule-maker and dishwasher. It’s the food that anchors us, duh. Chopping vegetables after a hard day brings us back to equilibrium—before we know it we have conquered two goals: inner-calm and dinner prep. Making a quick sauce with cherry tomatoes is instant gratification. Pitting 6 pints of cherries is an act of love and serving that cherry pie—pure excitement. It may be a stretch to call food our religion, but both of us cannot think of a better thing to do on a Sunday morning than having brunch with friends or sitting down in the evening to dinner with family. Food is an anchoring force. It’s what we keep going back to and what motivates us to forge ahead. In this issue we travel to find kindred souls who share the same drive--anchored in their love of food. From cultivating salt, to teaching people how to shift their approach to food, to bringing clean water to impoverished communities— they strive to make things better, starting from within and affecting positive change around them. We hope this issue provides you with insight into some of the things that anchor our lives as well as the tools to make a positive shift in your own life and the inspiration to keep forging ahead. Cheers, Bobbi + Debi


PEOPLE 05 CONTRIBUTORS 08 PURE DEDICATION 14 MORE THAN A WATER PROJECT TOOLS 24 TOOL BOX 28 5 FAVS 32 SET YOUR TABLE INGREDIENTS 42 SUMMER FRUIT 54 123 EASY 58 SIMPLE SHIFT 72 SWEET FREEZE

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DEBI KOGAN [ co-creative ] My morning coffee, brought to me and made before I wake up-by my husband. It reminds me every day that I am exactly where I want to be. debi@goodcompanymagazine.com

BOBBI LIN [ co-creative ] Annual Taiwanese Hot Pot dinners. It reminds me of who I am and where I came from. When I see all my friends embrace and enjoy the whole process of the communal dinner--laughing, enjoying the rituals, reaching over each other to get to the communal pot–I’m so filled with love and contentment and proud that I can share a little bit of my roots with them. bobbi@goodcompanymagazine.com

SPECIAL THANKS: Miriam Bouleanu, Monika Bukowska Marita Espinosa, Sandra Formento Susan Robohm and Peter Spiegler. Our families and friends for their never ending love & support.

PRINTED IN USA LAKE COUNTY PRESS lakecountypress.com Printed with vegetable oil based inks no VOC emissions

Cover credits: PHOTO STEVEN MCDONALD STYLING BOBBI LIN BLACK ANCHOR

jaysonhome.com “SEA CHANGE”

From The Art of Eating by M.F.K.Fisher Reprinted by permission of Houghton Harcourt Publishing Co. All contents copyright© 2013 Good Company Media Inc.

OUR CONTRIBUTORS, Our anchors. When we asked, they brought it and made this all possible. We wanted to know: what single food-related item, dish, act or place anchors them?


DAVID ANGER

JIM FRANCO

SHAWN KING

MARK ROBOHM

[ writer ] My partner’s chocolate chip cookies, Senap & Dill sauce from Ikea, Lingonberries, McVitties Digestives, French press coffee. A nicely set table too, including Arne Jacobsen cutlery, white Rosenthal plates, quality Iittala or Orrefors glasses. Wine, French. davidanger.com

[ photographer ] The Green Market at Union Square in NYC in August when it feels less like a Farmer’s Market and more like some huge, walkable, produce drawer. jimfranco.com

[ stylist ] Gatherings with friends and family are what really keep me anchored. I love hunting for new and vintage serveware that I can put to use at a party. Trays, cheese boards, and glassware are some of my favorite items to collect. shawnkingstyle.com

[ website developer ] I have been surrounded by excellent cooks and food lovers my entire life. I eat everything and I am fickle with my favorites, but a home-cooked meal is my anchor; if I had to choose just one, it would be the annual pilgrimage to VT, for the best Thanksgiving plate, not for its excess but for its team-cooked amazingness. juicyorange.com

BURCU AVSAR [ photographer ] I’ve always loved to cook for friends but now cooking for my son warms my heart especially when he says “mommy did you cook this for me? I love it!” burcuavsar.com

ADRIENNE BLUMTHAL [ food stylist+recipe developer ] My grandma Mary Ellen’s sweet deviled eggs. She’s 88, and still brings at least two dozen to every family gathering. They are the epitome of comfort, made with lots of love (and sugar). adrienne.blumthal@gmail.com

CHRIS BARSCH [ food stylist+recipe developer ] I love the smell of outdoor grilling in the summer time. It’s a smell I associate with great memories. christopherbarsch.com

RACHEL FAGIANO [ contributing editor + writer ] Not so unpredictably, my coffee anchors me. It allows me a quiet moment in the morning to stop and center myself for the day. rachel.fagiano@gmail.com

STEVE HAMILTON [ video director ] Whenever I fly from New York to San Francisco I book an early flight that arrives around 11:30 am. My mom picks us up and my friend from college, Larry, meets us at La Taqueria in the mission district for my favorite burrito on this earth. For twenty-three years I’ve engaged in this ritual and it includes family, friendship, food and a clear sense of “coming home”. SuperExtraLimo.com

JOCEYLN JOSON [ contributing market editor ] It’s a place that anchors me. Going to Blue Ribbon Sushi which is around the corner from our house; we know the managers, servers and sushi chefs. The warm greetings and camaraderie anchor me to my neighborhood and my life in Manhattan. And of course, it’s the best sushi in town. totallysuperdeluxe.com

RENEE LARSON [ contributing artist ] Picking fruit off a tree reminds me of home and family--plums and peaches. Then apples in late summer and finally oranges in early January. My mouth is watering just thinking about it. It is a reason to time my visits with the seasons. reneedraws.blogspot.com

STEVEN MCDONALD [ photographer ] Mis en place. stevenmcdonald.com

JOE MAER [ stylist ] GC: Joe, What food anchors you? JM: I love to shop at the outdoor flea markets and find one-of-a-kind serving pieces at bargain prices. GC: Joe, the question is about food, not shopping. JM: You need plates and silverware to eat. joemaer.com

STEVE METZER [ photographer ] The single act that keeps me anchored is making pasta by hand in the kitchen. As I do this, I almost always listen to Motown while drinking several glasses of red wine and cranking out beautiful long strands of egg yolk, salt and flour. It’s these simple ingredients and the very act of mixing them together by hand --physically being connected to the food I make gives me great pleasure. Then comes the drying of the pasta usually I use the backs of our kitchen chairs so the kitchen is littered with drying pasta, it’s a beautiful site to behold. stevenkarlmetzer.com

MARIE SULLIVAN [ stylist ] Sorting dry pinto beans grounds me. It’s almost a meditative process which makes me feel connected to the generations of women before me who have cooked for our family. missmariestyles.com

SHAUN SULLIVAN [ photographer ] Summer for me is full of so many wonderful memories... The most grounding thing is some kind of wheaty, nutty, seedy bread, toasted, with more butter than anyone can imagine, a thin trowel of Marshall’s honey and a cup of strong Assam tea. Yum or should I say ohm. shaunsullivanphotography.com

DANE TAKSHIMA [ photographer ] French press Kona coffee from my uncle’s farm in Hawaii. It makes my far away family feel a little bit nearer. danetashima.com

RICH VASSILATOS [ assistant stylist ] Burger & a beer. richardvassilatos.com

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PEOPLE


PHOTOS STEVEN MCDONALD STYLING BOBBI LIN

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PURE DEDICATION W H E N T W O D E D I C AT E D P E O P L E P U T T H E I R H E A R T S & S O U L S I N TO E V E R Y B O T T L E O F A R T I S I N A L S E A S A LT , W E G E T T O

SPRINKLE

T H E M A G I C O F W E L L F L E E T ’ S O C E A N S O N TO O U R P L AT E S . PHOTOS JIM FRANCO STYLING JOE MAER WORDS DAVID ANGER


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Willi Wear or InWear Matinique? The Style Council or The Smiths? Keith Haring or Jean-Michel Basquiat? These were the important cultural questions keeping me awake during my senior year of college. Career? Start-up company? Business plan? What are you talking about? A generation later today’s students speak a different language. Meet recent Skidmore College graduates Hope Schwartz-

something ritzy. Salt cellars were symbols of wealth at the table. Mass production took over and eventually the prestige of salt diminished. Nowadays sea salt is enjoying a comeback, thanks to food connoisseurs who appreciate its coarse, crunchy texture and stronger flavor. Twenty years ago molecular gastronomy pioneer Heston Bluementhal helped revolutionize sea salt by pairing it with white chocolate and then

Leeper and Zak Fagiano, who are the hearts and brains behind Wellfleet Sea Salt Company–a fledgling Cape Cod–based sea salt enterprise.

Mark Bitterman furthered the mineral’s return to the limelight by publishing Salted, a reference guide for over 150 salts.

They came of age during the Millennium era, when reality television brought sophisticated concepts of food, fashion, and business to everyday America. When their alma mater hosted its’ annual business plan competition last year, Hope and Zak submitted their idea for Wellfleet and won. Placing second in the competition, the couple received a start-up prize of $5,000, a nest egg they nurtured with guidance from Wall Street investor Dan Antonelli and food mentor Nancy Wekselbaum of The Gracious Gourmet. Hope and Zak also have mentors on the homefront: Zak’s parents are heavyweights in the food industry and Hope’s father has been keen on harvesting Cape Cod sea salt for years.

Hope and Zak praise Wellfleet Sea Salt’s natural qualities, adding that it is iodine free and contains vital minerals, such as magnesium, potassium, and calcium. They also believe that sea salt possesses a lower sodium content than table salt, a notion that the American Heart Association refutes.

Hope and Zak quickly learned that connections only take you so far. Within the first year Wellfleet survived Hurricane Sandy and a production challenge. Initially their business plan called for procuring the sea salt via greenhouses on floating barges, first used for harvesting oysters. Hope and Zak soon found that these greenhouses were too cool and didn’t produce sufficient flavor. They now use a greenhouse situated on a mainland farm not far from shore.

Zak confesses he enjoys skateboarding and Hope loves horseback riding. They also both harbor food guilty pleasures. For sweet-tooth Hope, candy is irresistible and so is cooking with ramen noodles, while Zak is partial to zippy energy drinks. Despite these junk food cravings, this summer you can look for the couple eating fish and chips and clam chowder at The Land Ho restaurant in Harwich, Massachusetts. Does the restaurant stock Wellfleet Sea Salt Company? Not yet. But Hope and Zak must have a marketing strategy in mind.

They don’t remember salt cellars of yore, but in the olden days a glimpse of sea salt was thought of as

Nevertheless, Hope and Zak are tireless in their pursuit of business success. During their senior year they were full­ -time students and both worked part-time jobs—Hope in the college mailroom ten hours a week and Zak in construction for twenty hours a week, all while launching Wellfleet Sea Salt Company. Are they for real you wonder? What about fun?


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[ more than ]

A WATER PROJECT DOMINGO MAIZ, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC PHOTOS JIM FRANCO WORDS RACHEL FAGIANO

Water is so intrinsic to our food system that we rarely think about its role in food production. Generally, we trust that the water we use is clean, that it will nourish and sustain us. But what happens when it isn’t? For the residents of Domingo Maiz in the Dominican Republic, clean water is rarely a given. Attracted by the large tourism industry in Puntacana, the neighborhood where Domingo Maiz is located has the largest worker community in the region— yet there are no potable water treatment systems in place and the waste collection system is unreliable, at best. Recognizing that this is an untenable living situation, the local community-in conjunction with the Puntacana Ecological Foundation--has decided to do something about it. Taking a comprehensive approach, the foundation, together with the community, has devised a multi-pronged plan—labeled the “Fuente de Vida,” or Source of Life project—for improving the quality of life for the Domingo Maiz community. The first step? Figuring out a way to treat wastewater that wouldn’t be an economic burden to the community or pose a risk to the surrounding environment. With the help of Peace Corps Engineering Volunteers, the Puntacana Ecological Foundation devised a plan: create a constructed wetland to deal with the community’s waste. What’s a constructed wetland? Well, “It’s essentially a hole in the ground with rocks and plants,” Ben Hulefeld, the foundation’s Logistics Coordinator, noted in a phone interview—and it’s true. In the constructed wetland, micro-organisms living in the roots of plants break down and consume harmful contaminants in water. Once constructed, the system requires little upkeep and has minimal impact on the environment—all that is required is occasionally trimming the roots of the plants in the system. With a plan in place, the Puntacana Ecological Foundation had to secure land for the wetland— which proved at once one of the most frustrating and most encouraging moments since the project’s inception. When Jake Kheel, the Environmental Director of Puntacana Resort & Club, approached the local government requesting land on which to build the constructed wetland on, the government denied the request. This essentially rendered the project dead in the water, so to speak. However, the Domingo Maiz community came together and rallied on the project’s behalf, applying a substantial amount of pressure on the local government to grant the project land for the constructed wetland—and they were successful. This was not only a huge coup for the foundation, but for the local community too—for the first time they experienced positive change as a result of successful mobilization. As a result of these efforts, the constructed wetland project is well underway with nearly the entire Domingo Maiz community invested in the project’s success.


Local kids look for water for household use

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NEVER DOUBT THAT A SMALL GROUP OF THOUGHTFUL, COMMITTED CITIZENS CAN CHANGE THE WORLD. INDEED, IT IS THE ONLY THING THAT EVER HAS. Margaret Mead

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Domingo Maiz resident cooks with well water


Ecological Foundation participates in Domingo Maiz neighborhood association meeting

Community members from Domingo Maiz learn how to process worm compost

Rich soil from the Ecological Foundations worm compost

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Environmental Director Jake Kheel

Ben Hulefeld & community members visit the compost facility.


The politics and science of water is complicated and both the Foundation and the Domingo Maiz community leaders recognize this. For instance, while many people avoid using grey water (domestic wastewater) for drinking, it is still used for activities such as washing vegetables and cleaning clothes—leading to a slew of health problems in the community. So, in addition to the constructed wetland aspect of the project, the Puntacana Ecological Foundation is also developing an educational initiative that trains community leaders in water safety. These leaders, in turn, educate the members of the communities they live in. The strategy of educating from within has been important in gaining the buy-in of the local residents—it eliminates any uncomfortable power dynamics that might emerge from outsiders trying to come into a community and re-educate its members on issues of hygiene. Lastly, the project has set out to create innovative ways of dealing with and managing waste. On a basic level this has meant increasing the number of trash receptacles in the community as well as creating an integrated waste-hauling program. Perhaps most interesting, however, has been the community’s desire to adopt sustainable farming practices. Specifically, farmers in Domingo Maiz are interested in using the worm composting practice originally developed for the Puntacana Resort & Club on a local level. Worm composting takes the organic waste from kitchens and gardens and converts it (using worms) into highly valuable liquid fertilizer. This fertilizer can then be used in the gardens and fields of farmers to produce high-quality products. This system is a simple fix for two problems: it diminishes the amount of waste that needs to be hauled out of the community and it also enriches the soil, allowing produce to grow in an area where the soil is not nutrient rich on its own. While the Fuente de Vida project may initially appear to be a project solely about water, it is ultimately an initiative aimed at improving the entire food chain in the Domingo Maiz community. By taking a comprehensive approach to improving the water system here, all of the actors involved in this project are ensuring that the local community has fresh food, clean water and the opportunity to live healthy lives.

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TOOLS


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OPINEL POCKET KNIFE ROSEWOOD FOLDING KNIFE

brookfarmgeneralstore.com

TOOL BOX [ BASICS ] FOR A LIFETIME

PHOTOS DANE TASHIMA STYLING MARIE SULLIVAN


HANDMADE WOODEN UTENSILS

livewirefarm.com

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STAINLESS COLANDER

ikea.com


STAINLESS PEELER

muji.us

29


5FAVS

with david and luise of greenkitchenstories.com


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david

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stories.

luise

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300,000 monthly readers and the their first book, vegetarian everyday – delicious & healthy recipes from our green kitchen was just released in stores in the U.K. & the U.S. than

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“green” approach to cooking and the personal

behind

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We have a tiny kitchen. The pantry doors hardly close because of all of the things we have crammed in there. Even though Luise denies it, I swear she must be secretly collecting gluten-free flours. I often tease her about it. Luise and I weren’t always this fascinated by food—it was a passion that developed over time. My interest in photography and food styling piqued when I worked for a Swedish food magazine; Luise’s began when she was a social psychiatrist and saw first-hand how nutrition affects our well-being. Now she is studying to be a nutritional therapist. As for me, I wasn’t always conscientious of nutrition when it came to my own eating habits--Luise and I met on the streets of Rome at a point in my life when I was subsisting on nothing but pasta and gelato. When our two worlds happily collided, we had to learn to adjust to each other’s food habits. I cut back on refined sugar and started incorporating more whole grains, nuts and seeds into my diet, and Luise stopped eating meat since I am a vegetarian and have been for 15 years. Today, when we cook pasta it’s whole grain or gluten-free. Our small pantry, combined with our ever-expanding cooking repertoire as well as our commitment to buying food in its most natural form, means that we have to choose our kitchen tools very carefully. The tools we love are things that have multiple uses and help us transform raw ingredients into consumable products: turning nuts into milk (a high speed blender), squeezing fruit and vegetables into delicious juices (a juicer), and cutting zucchini and carrots into thin homemade raw vegetable noodles (a julienne peeler). That said, the one tool that we use most in our kitchen is our allin-one immersion blender. We use the mixing bar to blend soups, to turn dates into mash or rolled oats into flour, and add the whisk when we beat eggs. The next tool on our list? A dehydrator. It is great for making fruit rolls, vegetable chips and granola. An added bonus is that it would help us to further our “green” initiatives by saving energy—especially when compared to the tool we currently use to dry fruits and vegetables, an oven. Our problem is that we simply don’t know where we would put it. We. Need. A. Bigger. Kitchen.

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five favorite tools and tips from green kitchen stories

HIGH SPEED BLENDER We bought our dream blender after signing our book deal. It is outstanding, not only for making smoothies, but also for making homemade plant and nut milk. crateandbarrel.com

JUICER Many people only use fruit in their juicers, but vegetables such as broccoli, spinach and kale work great in this appliance. Just balance more savory flavors with some lemon. surlatable.com


JULIENNE PEELER A tiny tool that makes a huge difference in our kitchen. It turns zucchini into thin noodles that you can use in place of pasta. Healthy vegetable pasta – life changing. williams-sonoma.com

DEHYDRATOR This is the first tool we will buy when we get a larger kitchen. It is a wonderful way to handle fruit and vegetables without draining them of nutrition, and great for making homemade fruit rolls, vegetable chips and granola. surlatable.com

IMMERSION BLENDER & FOOD PROCESSOR The ultimate all-in-one kitchen tool. Blends soups, mashes dates and beats eggs. It is the Swiss Army knife of the kitchen. crateandbarrel.com

33


SEALIFE HAND TOWEL

thomaspaul.com


SET YOUR TABLE [ HOOK, LINE & SINKER ] PHOTOS + STYLING BOBBI LIN

35


shown left to right: BALON CLOCHE

europe2you.com RECYCLED TEA GLASS

canvashomestore.com STEMMED GOBLET

johnderian.com

SMOKED GREY GLASS BOTTLE

canvashomestore.com

TULIA ANGLED TUMBLER

sprucedesigndecor.com RECYCLED SYRIAN GLASSES

johnderian.com


WHITE MANGO WOOD PLATTERS

lekkerhome.com

37


KEYTLERY BY SELETTI

breezysny.com

BRASS BOTTLE OPENER

pasanella and son 212.233.8383

GALVANIZED METAL TAG

europe2you.com

INDUSTRY WIRE TRAY

moon river chattel 718.388.1121

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HAIKU BOWL + PLATTER

domusnewyork.com SOAPSTONE BOWLS

canvashomestore.com


SCRIMSHAW WHALE TRAY SET

utilitieshome.com WHALE PLATTER

johnderian.com

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INGREDIENTS


43


CHERRY TOMATOES [

the abundant summer

]

FRUIT PHOTOS BURCU AVSAR STYLING BOBBI LIN

RECIPE DEVELOPMENT + FOOD STYLING CHRIS BARSCH

LINENS & GLASSWARE couleurnature.comxBEER COUTESY OF

Goose Island Brewery gooseisland.com


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MARINATED CHERRY TOMATOES Yield: 5-6 cups

2 1 5 1 1 1 2 2

cups extra virgin olive oil tsp. crushed red pepper flakes garlic cloves, peeled and smashed bay leaf sprig fresh oregano sprig rosemary sprigs thyme lbs. cherry tomatoes, (about 5 cups)

Combine olive oil, red pepper flakes and garlic in a medium saucepan and cook over low heat for 6-7 minutes to infuse oil with flavor. Remove from heat, stir in bay leaf, oregano, rosemary and thyme and cool to room temperature, set aside. Use a small serrated knife to score an “x� on the bottom of each cherry tomato being careful to just break the skin. Fill a large bowl with ice water, set aside. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Working in 3-4 batches, add tomatoes to boiling water for 15 seconds, until skins just split. Use a strainer to lift tomatoes from the pot and gently slide them into the ice water. In about a minute, when the tomatoes are cool enough to handle, peel and discard skins. Place tomatoes in a large jar, add infused oil and allow to stand 1-2 hours at room temperature; refrigerate overnight. Store tomatoes in refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Serve over salad in lieu of salad dressing; over greens; with grilled meats or seafood; or with crusty bread.


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QUICK CHERRY TOMATO SAUCE Yield: 1.5 cups

4 tbsps. olive oil, divided 3 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced 1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bay leaf Salt, to taste Heat 2 tbsps. of olive oil in a medium skillet on medium-high heat, coating the pan; add garlic and cook, stirring until the edges just begin to brown. Add chili flakes, cherry tomatoes and bay leaf and stir until tomatoes are evenly coated. Pressing with a wooden spoon cook tomatoes until they break down and release their juices, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in the remaining 2 tbsps. olive oil and season to taste with salt. Serve immediately over pasta.

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BONE IN CHICKEN WITH CHERRY TOMATOES ADAPTED FROM BARBARA FAIRCHILD, FORMER EDITOR OF BON APPETIT--A MUST IN ANY COOK’S REPERTOIRE. Yield: 2 servings

2 cups cherry tomatoes 1/4 cup olive oil 5 garlic cloves, pressed 1 1/4 tsps. crushed red pepper 2 tbsps. chopped fresh herbs (equal parts oregano, marjoram, rosemary, and thyme) 1/4 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. fresh ground pepper 2 (6 oz.) bone-in chicken breasts Preheat oven to 450°F Toss tomatoes, olive oil, garlic, crushed red pepper, fresh herbs, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Roast chicken in cast-iron pan, skin side up, for 10 minutes. Remove chicken from oven and add tomato mixture to pan, arranging tomatoes around chicken. Roast until chicken is cooked through and tomatoes are blistered, 25-30 minutes. Transfer chicken to plates; spoon tomatoes over chicken to serve.


51


RECYCLED TUMBLERS ROSEWOOD FLATWARE

lekkerhome.com


53


ADDITIONAL PROP STYLING PG 50 MARIE SULLIVAN


SAVORY CRUST

CHERRY TOMATO TART

Yield: 2 10” crusts

Yield: 1 tart

3 cups all-purpose flour 1 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. sugar 1 1/2 cups butter, cut into 1/2” pieces and chilled 2/3 cup ice water

1 disk savory tart dough, chilled 3 tbsps. olive oil 3-4 cups of cherry tomatoes 1 tsp. salt 4 oz. goat cheese, softened Fleur de sel, to taste Black pepper, to taste 2 sprigs fresh tarragon (for garnish)

Pulse flour, salt, and sugar in a food processer until combined. Add butter and process until the mixture forms course crumbs. Add ice water and pulse until fully incorporated. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, divide evenly into two balls and shape each into a 1” thick disk. Wrap each disk in plastic wrap and chill in refrigerator for a minimum of two hours before using.

CHERRY TOMATO POT PIES Yield: 6 pies

4 1/4 1 2 1/4 1/4 1 1/2 1 2

cups cherry tomatoes cup all-purpose flour tsp. fresh thyme leaves tbsps. minced shallots cup chopped parsley cup chopped chives tsp. salt tsp. pepper disk savory tart dough, chilled tbsps. butter, melted

Preheat oven to 375° F. On a floured surface, roll out dough to about a 1/4” thick and large enough in diameter to easily fit into a 9” removable-bottom tart pan. Using your fingers lightly press dough to inside of pan. Trim off excess dough with the back of a knife. Bake tart shell for 40 minutes or until the edges are golden brown. Set aside and let cool. Heat oil in a sauté pan on high heat, until it just starts to smoke. Add tomatoes and stir until well-coated. Add salt and cook 2 minutes. Transfer tomatoes onto a plate and let cool. Evenly spread goat cheese along the bottom of tart crust; top with tomatoes. Finish with fleur de sel and black pepper; garnish with tarragon leaves.

Preheat oven to 400° F. Rinse tomatoes in water, strain and place in a medium size bowl. Toss still wet tomatoes with flour until well coated. Add in thyme, shallots, parsley, chives, salt and pepper; toss until well combined. Divide tomato mixture evenly among 6 (6 oz.-8 oz.) ramekins; set aside. Roll dough out on a lightly floured surface to about 1/4” thick; using a knife, cut out 6 circles about a 1/2” wider in diameter than the ramekins. Cover each ramekin with a piece of dough and press around the edges to seal. Using a fork, poke a few holes in the dough to vent steam. Place ramekins on baking sheet lined with foil and bake for 20-30 minutes, or until the dough starts to brown. Brush dough with melted butter and bake for an additional 10 minutes. Let cool 30 minutes before serving.

55


MARBLE ROLLING PIN

williams-sonoma.com

1 “Pie dough is easiest to work with chilled— especially when it comes to shaping the dough. When it’s time to roll out the dough for crusts and toppings, I use a chilled marble rolling pin. In fact, I store the rolling pin in my refrigerator so that it’s ready to use at a moment’s notice.“-AB


123EASY WE ASKED ADRIENNE BLUMTHAL, PASTRY CHEF AND CREATOR OF PIE BOX, TO SHARE SOME OF HER TIPS FOR MAKING ONE OF HER FAVORITE PIES THIS SEASON. PHOTOS STEVE METZER STYLING SHAWN KING RECIPE DEVELOPMENT + FOOD STYLING ADRIENNE BLUMTHAL

REUSABLE RAW PINE BOX

piebox.com

2 All those loving hours spent pitting cherries and rolling dough! Don’t take any chances, safely and stylishly deliver your pie in a Pie Box. Handcrafted in Chicago and made from chemical-free raw pine, you’re going to be the most popular dude at the picnic when you show up with this box in hand. 57


3

SOUR CHERRY PIE WITH VANILLA BEAN + THYME INFUSION Yield: 1, 9” pie

“Sour cherries are such a wonderful flavor-intensive fruit. Sadly, they have a super short season. So, when you see them at the farmer’s market snatch them up - they’ll be gone before you know it! The good news is that many sour cherries are flash-frozen as soon as they ripen, so you can usually buy them year round.”- AB You can also order frozen tart cherries online. We like the cherries offered through NW Orchards. nwwildfoods.com


Filling 1/2 cup water 3/4 oz. (or 1/3 cup packed) fresh thyme, on stem 1 vanilla bean pod 5 cups fresh sour cherries, pitted.* (or frozen, fully thawed and drained) 1 tsp. orange zest 3 tbsps. quick cooking tapioca 1/2 cup sugar 1/3 cup brown sugar Egg wash 1 egg + 1 tablespoon of water Pie Dough 2 cups all-purpose flour 6 oz. (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, chilled and cut into small cubes 1/3 cup ice cold water

Filling Bring water to boil in a small saucepan; add thyme; continue to boil, stirring frequently, for 90 seconds. Remove from heat, cover and allow thyme to steep for 10 minutes. Strain water with a sieve and transfer to a large bowl. Strip cooked thyme leaves from stems to make 1 tsp. of leaves and return leaves to water. Cut vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape the insides into thyme-water infusion; reserve vanilla bean pod for later use. Add cherries, orange zest, tapioca and sugars to infused water. Toss the mixture with a spoon several times to ensure the cherries are well coated. Add the reserved vanilla bean pod and stir into the cherry mixture. Let stand at room temperature for 45 minutes. Pie Dough Add flour and butter to a large bowl. Using your hands or a pastry cutter, combine the butter and flour until it resembles coarse meal. Slowly add ice water, in thirds, stirring with a wooden spoon after each addition. Continue stirring until soft dough has formed. If dough seems too dry, add additional cold water by the tablespoon. Divide dough in half. Mold each half into a circular disk. Cover and refrigerate for at least 25 minutes. Prepare egg wash by whisking egg and water together; set aside until assembly.

Assembly & Baking Preheat oven to 375°F. Remove dough from refrigerator and let rest for 5 minutes. Roll out one disk on a lightly floured surface, about 10” in diameter and 1/4” thick; transfer to 9” pie pan. Using the back of a knife trim any excess dough. Remove the vanilla bean pod from the cherry filling mixture and transfer into dough-lined pan. To form a lattice top roll out second dough disk into a circle about 12” in diameter and 1/4” thick. Cut into 1” strips; arrange half of the strips horizontally and evenly spaced along the top of the pie. Fold every other strip back on itself to just beyond the midpoint of the pie. Lay a strip of dough vertically across the middle. Unfold the horizontal strips so that they lay over the vertical strips. Repeat on other side and work your way to the edges each time folding the horizontal strips back as far as the newest vertical piece of dough. Brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sugar. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until filling is rapidly bubbling. Check pie after 25 minutes and cover the edges with foil if the crust seems to be browning too quickly. Allow pie to cool for at least 1 hour before serving. *Can substitute with dark sweet cherries

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SIMPLE sometimes just a shift in mindset can change a dire situation into a positive challenge. the same goes for what you eat.

christine

ambrosino, founder of rasa holistic arts studio, helped us come up with simple “green” recipes for this issue. christine has been a practitioner and student of the healing arts for over 25 years. she currently guides clients on their own journey toward wellbeing, teaching conscious eating based in the six senses of taste. we knew we where onto something good

--

--

and unprecedented

when all of our recipe testers requested more of christine’s

recipes to try.

we hope these recipes will be a catalyst in your

own healthy shift this season.

SHIFT

PHOTOS STEVEN MCDONALD STYLING BOBBI LIN


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FARINATA WITH PEA TENDRILS + SPRING ONIONS Yield: 4-6 servings Farinata 1 1/4 cup chickpea flour 3/4 tsp. sea salt or Himalayan rock salt 1 1/2 cups water 2 tbsps. olive oil Pea Tendrils & Spring Onions 2 tbsps. olive oil, divided 2 spring onions, rinsed and thinly sliced Pinch of salt & pepper Pinch of nutmeg (optional) 3-4 cups pea tendrils or young spinach, rinsed and roughly chopped 1 cup micro greens (optional) Combine chickpea flour and salt in a medium bowl and slowly add water, whisking to eliminate lumps. Stir in 2 tbsps. olive oil. Cover, and let stand on countertop for a minimum of 1 hour and up to 12 hours. We like to do this step in the morning so it’s ready to go when you get home from work.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Heat 1 tbsp. olive oil in well-seasoned cast-iron skillet or 10” oven-safe pan. Add onions and sauté until translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Season with salt, pepper and nutmeg. Add pea tendrils or spinach and sauté until wilted. Taste and adjust the seasoning, as desired. Set aside onion mixture in a bowl. Wipe pan clean and add remaining olive oil. Pour Farinata batter into pan and evenly distribute. Bake on the middle rack of the oven for 20-25 minutes. Top with pea tendril mixture, micro greens and serve.


“Spring� onions actually begin to appear on the market in late spring and are available through most of the summer. They are long and tender and you can use a good portion of the stalk in your dishes. -CA

63


I have been making some iteration of herb pesto for as long as I can remember. You will need about 1 cup of the pesto for the zucchini pasta. The remaining pesto can be stored in the refrigerator for about a week and used as a condiment for raw, sautĂŠed or grilled vegetables or as a stuffing for lemon sole or chicken breast.

-CA


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ZUCCHINI PASTA + ARUGULA WITH HERB PESTO

HERBY GRAINS Yield: 4-6 servings

Yield: 4-6 servings Herb Pesto 1 clove garlic, peeled and coarsely chopped 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds 2 cups parsley 1 cup mixed fresh herbs, (equal parts oregano, chives and thyme) 1 tsp. salt 1/2 -1 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes, optional 1/ 3 cup olive oil Juice of 1 large lemon, about 3-4 tbsps. Zucchini Pasta 4-5 medium zucchini 4 cups arugula 4 tbsps. olive oil 1/2-1 tsp. sea salt Garnish Pumpkin seed oil

1 8 1/2 1/2 1/4 1/4 1/4 1/2 1/3 1 4 2

cup pearl barley cups water cup parsley leaves, chopped cup basil leaves, chopped cup mint leaves, chopped cup chives, minced cup olive oil tsp. sea salt cup almonds, toasted and roughly chopped jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely diced, optional scallions, white parts and a bit of the green, thinly sliced cups arugula, chopped

Bring barley and water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Immediately reduce heat, cover partially and simmer until barley is nearly tender, about 30 minutes. Drain and set barley aside. Combine parsley, basil, mint, chives, olive oil, sea salt, almonds, jalapeño, scallions and arugula with cooked barley. Mix well. Serve at room temperature.

Pesto Combine garlic, pumpkin seeds, parsley, mixed fresh herbs, salt and red pepper flakes in a food processor and pulse until mixture is the texture of course sand. With the machine running, add olive oil in a slow, steady stream and process until the oil is fully incorporated and the pesto is a slightly chunky puree. Transfer to a bowl and stir in lemon juice, adjusting to taste.

Alternative: Sprouted Wild Rice If you are feeling more adventurous use sprouted wild rice instead of barley. Wild rice is actually a seed that can be used as a toothsome and nutritious substitute for hearty grain-based salads.

Pasta Use a julienne peeler (such as the one seen on pg 31) or the blade of a mandolin to cut the zucchini into long thin spaghetti-like strips; transfer to a large bowl. Add the arugula. Drizzle with olive oil and 1/2 tsp. sea salt; toss ingredients until well combined. Taste, adding more sea salt if desired.

In a bowl or jar combine 1 cup of wild rice and 4 cups boiled water. Let sit, covered, 24 hours. Drain water and rinse wild rice in cold water; return rice to bowl and allow to stand for another day, rinsing it once or twice. The rice will begin to “crack” and will be soft enough to use in the salad on the third day.

Assemble Add 1 cup pesto, a few tbsps. at a time to zucchini pasta, gently mixing with your hands. Garnish with an additional drizzle of oil.

1 4

cup wild rice cups water


I often don’t follow recipes--as a result, the plethora of cookbooks that line my shelves are mostly for inspiration and to help me out of food “ruts”. This dish was inspired by one of my favorite cookbooks, Plenty, by Yotam Ottolenghi. I offer this variation, which uses barley or the more adventurous option of sprouted wild rice, on Ottolenghi’s recipe “Green Couscous.” -CA

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SAUTテ右D KALE WITH ALMOND-ANCHOVY DRESSING Yield: 2-4 servings Almond-Anchovy Dressing 2 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped 3-5 anchovy filets 1/2 cup almonds 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil Juice of 1 lemon, about 1/4 cup Sautテゥed Kale 2 tbsps. olive oil 1 large bunch Lacinato kale, Pinch of salt & pepper Dressing Crush garlic, anchovies and almonds with a mortar and pestle until they form a rough paste; stir in lemon juice and whisk in oil. Kale Heat olive oil in a large sautテゥ pan over medium-high heat. Add kale and cook, turning frequently, until kale is tender and wilted, about 5-7 minutes. Season with salt. Assemble Add dressing to pan and toss until the kale is well-coated. Add, taste and adjust seasoning, as desired. Alternative: Raw Kale Salad with Almond-Anchovy Dressing Prepare the dressing as above. Remove the woody stems and ribs from 1 large bunch of Lacinato kale. Thinly slice the kale leaves and place in a large bowl. Drizzle 1 tbsp. olive oil over the leaves and sprinkle with a 1/2 tsp. salt. Massage the kale with your hands for about 2-3 minutes until you feel the kale soften. Add the dressing to the softened kale and massage it into the leaves with your hands.


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One of my favorite warm weather meals, a generous bowl of green gazpacho, is both refreshing and satisfying. I prefer a more rustic, chunky texture, but it may be pureed to a smoother constancy. -CA


GAZPACHO GONE GREEN Yield: 6-8 servings 2 medium green peppers, seeded and chopped 2 medium cucumbers, peeled and chopped 1 jalape単o pepper, seeded and sliced 1 clove garlic 1/2 cup almonds, soaked in water for 1 hour 2 cups water 1 1/2 tsps. sea salt 1/2 tsp. cumin 4 cups spinach leaves 3 scallions, sliced 1/2 cup fresh cilantro 2 tbsps. sherry vinegar 1/4 cup olive oil 6 tbsps. full fat Greek yogurt Cilantro or micro greens, for garnish Combine peppers, cucumbers, jalape単o, garlic, almonds, 1 cup water, salt and cumin in a blender, pulsing until the ingredients are broken down. Add spinach, scallions, cilantro, sherry vinegar and olive oil; puree and add the remaining water as needed. Ladle into soup bowls and serve topped with a dollop of yogurt, cilantro and/or micro greens.

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a little more on christine and her philosophy...

About a dozen years ago I founded Art of Movement, now RASA Holistic Arts Studio, a creative space for the mind body movement practices of Yoga, Pilates and Gyrotonic. To this day, my workspace is a place where I can bring together my love of food, movement, music, Eastern philosophies and healing practices and share my passion with others. RASA is an ancient Sanskrit word that means, among many things, essence, taste and nectar. Since I primarily work with clients in my home when they come in for training sessions, they also experience the colors, textures, rhythms and aromas of my living environment, especially experiencing whatever is happening in my kitchen. Often I’m asked by clients how they can incorporate some of my personal habits into their lives, especially when it comes to preparing meals in a more holistic and integrated way. Their curiosity was my inspiration for creating the “Sunday Dinner Series,” where I invite students and friends to join me for dinners featuring simple, elegant dishes prepared with local and organic, seasonal ingredients. Through these meals we celebrate the beauty of the communal table–something I learned from my childhood–and also encourage a more thoughtful relationship with food. For as long as I can remember, food has been an anchor in my life—a shared experience. Growing up surrounded by a large Italian-American family, I learned very early on that food carries with it a sense of family and tradition, and has the power to connect, unify and heal. MY PHILOSOPHY A pivotal part of my own food journey has been about listening to my body and its changing needs over the years. I grew up on a Mediterranean diet, was a vegetarian for many years, and am now dedicated to being a healthy and generous-minded omnivore. Throughout my food journey, I have ultimately found that strict labels—and the fixed assumptions they embody—block us from our creative spirit and the potential we have to listen and respond to the needs of our own bodies over the course of each day, or lifetime. In my work, I’m interested in sharing ideas about how food nourishes us, not restricted to the nuts and bolts of minerals, carbohydrates or fats, but rather about how we are fed in ways that are more sensual, primal, and surely, more fundamental. I do this by using and playing with the palette of the six tastes: sweet, salty, sour, bitter, pungent and astringent. I use these tastes to guide me in formulating my own diet. I share this approach and awareness of food through my work as a way to encourage and support my clients to create their own food journeys. As Westerners we tend to be drawn to the sweet and salty tastes which over time can become imbalanced. In my own diet and when I work with others, I use herbs and spices and incorporate more greens in order to bring all six tastes into play. Greens tend to balance the taste spectrum by introducing bitter flavors into our meals. The bitter taste is traditionally considered cooling and also stimulates the appetite. Adding more greens and herbs to your diet opens your palate and your mind to a cleaner, simpler and more harmonious way of eating. I hope these recipe offerings will inspire you to see, smell, touch and taste your way from the garden, the market or the grocery store to your plate. -Christine Ambrosino rasalife.com


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SWEET FREEZE R E D E F I N I N G

F R O Z E N

The ingredients are easy to find and the techniques are tried and true, but the pay off is Asian inspired flavors and textures that dazzle and refresh.

PHOTOS JIM FRANCO STYLING JOE MAER RECIPE DEVELOPMENT + FOOD STYLING CHRIS BARSCH

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77


JASMINE TEA GRANITA

BASIL SHISO GELATO

Yield: 4 servings

Yield: 1 quart

3 3 1/2 3

2 1 1/2 1/4 6 2 1 1 1/4

cups water jasmine tea bags cup honey tbsps. lemon juice

Bring water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add jasmine tea, cover, and turn off heat. Let steep for 6 minutes; remove tea bags. Stir in honey and lemon juice. Pour tea mixture into 8”x 10” baking dish. Place baking dish in freezer for about 4 hours, or until tea mixture is completely frozen. Using the tines of a fork scrape the surface of frozen tea forming ice shavings. Scoop shaved ice into a serving bowl or cup and enjoy immediately!

cups milk cup cream cup sugar cup light brown sugar large eggs, yolks separated cups basil, packed cup shiso tbsp. lemon zest tsp. salt

Combine milk, cream and sugars in a medium saucepan, bring to a boil and immediately reduce heat to a simmer. Meanwhile, lightly beat yolks in a bowl and slowly add 1/2 cup hot milk mixture, 1 tsp. at a time, to temper yolks. Pour yolks back into remaining milk mixture in saucepan; remove from heat. Puree basil, shiso, lemon zest, salt and 1/2 cup of milk-egg mixture in blender or food processor. Stir basil puree into remaining milk mixture; allow to cool to room temperature. Strain into the bowl of an ice cream maker and freeze according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

AZUKI POPS

ROSE SHAVED ICE

Yield: 12 (6oz.) pops

Yield: 5 servings

4 2 1 3/4 1/ 3

1 cup brown sugar 1 cup water 1 cup Grenadine syrup 1/2 tsp. rosewater 1 cup fresh cut corn kernels (about 2 ears of corn) 1 tbsp. corn syrup (optional) 10 cups of shaved ice

cups dried azuki beans cups sugar (13.5oz) can coconut milk cup water cup grenadine syrup

Soak beans overnight in enough cold water to cover them by 2”. Drain and combine in a large pot with sugar and again with enough cold water to cover the beans by 2”. Bring to a boil; immediately reduce heat, cover partially and gently simmer until tender, about 1 hour. Drain and let cool to room temperature. Working in several batches, puree beans, coconut milk, water and grenadine in a blender. Taste, and add sugar as needed to make the mixture slightly sweeter than desired; the pops become less sweet when frozen.

To make simple syrup, combine brown sugar and water in a small saucepan and boil until sugar is completely dissolved. Set aside and let cool. Combine, Grenadine syrup and rosewater in a small bowl; set aside. Bring 1” water to a boil in a small saucepan; add corn and boil 1-2 minutes until just tender. Drain and place corn in an ice bath to stop the cooking. Remove corn from ice bath and combine in a small bowl with corn syrup.

Fill 12 (7oz) Dixie cups 3/4 of the way full. Cover with foil. Creating a hole in the foil, insert Popsicle stick or un-separated chopsticks into the cup.

Assemble Pack 1-2 cups of shaved ice into a bowl. Top ice with 2 tbsps. corn mixture, 1-2 tbsps. simple syrup and 1-2 tbsps. Grenadine mixture.

Freeze for at least 3 hours.

Serve immediately. 79


“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails.“

-Mark Twain

...and press on -GC

PHOTO SHAUN SULLIVAN

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CAMPFIRE COOKERY

Sarah Huck & Jamie Young FISH

Editors of Phaidon Press HOW TO BOIL AN EGG

Rose Carrarini

WHERE CHEFS EAT

Joe Warwick SALT

Valerie Aikan-Smith

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