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The
Global
Bulldog


 


Volume
1,
Issue
2


Summer/Fall
2013



 
 


Library
in
Mozambique



Words
from
Togo


Learn
about
Cheyanne
 Greer’s
experience
 opening
a
library
in
her
 community.




PCMI
student
Amanda
 Walsh
gives
first
 impressions
of
her
new
 host
country.



Page
2



Food
Talk



 


Frances
Peterson
offers
 insight
on
a
traditional
 Paraguayan
dish,
sopa
 paraguaya.



Page
3



 
 
 
 Coordinator
Corner

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 Hello
everyone!
My
name
is
Tyler
Wasson.
In
March
I
began

 
 
 
working
for
Gonzaga
University
as
a
Program
Assistant
II
for
 

 
 
 
 the
English
Language
Center.
I
am
also
a
Returned
Peace
Corps
 
 









 
 
 
 Volunteer. I
served
as
a
Community
and
Organizational
Development
Volunteer
from
August
 
 
 2007
until
October
of
2009
in
the
southeastern
European
country
of
Bulgaria.
 During
my
service
I
lived
in
the
town
of
Isperih
(population
~6,000),
and
I
then
 







 


Page
5


Publication
of
Gonzaga
University’s
Peace
Corps
Master’s
International
Program



 Learn
about
Cheyanne
 Tyler
Wasson,
PCMI
Coordinator Greer’s
experience
 opening
a
library
in
her
 community.



Updates
from
Campus
 Megan
McCann
was
the
first
 PCMI
student
to
graduate

 from
Gonzaga
last
May.






spent
another
year
living
and
working
in
the
Black
Sea
town
of
Burgas.

 
 
 


While
in
the
Peace
Corps
my
primary
assignment
was
working
at
a
small
business
 
 
 center,
but
I
found
myself
doing
a
lot
more.
I
co‐taught
business
English,
substitute
 
 
 taught
English
at
a
high
school,
volunteered
at
an
orphanage,
coached
children’s


Britt
Harmon
is
heading
to
 Macedonia
for
Peace
Corps

 training
in
early
September
 Kate
Barba
is
heading
to
 Ecuador
for
Peace
Corps
 training
in
January
2014
 


sports
teams,
coordinated
World
AIDS
Day
and
World
Water
Day
events,
assisted
 
 
 with
new
volunteer
trainings,
and
more.
I
returned
to
my
hometown
of
Spokane
 
 
 and
I
completed
my
MBA
here
at
Gonzaga
this
August.
I’m
very
happy
to
be
 working
with
such
a
diverse
and
interesting
group
of
people
here
in
the
 
 
 Schoenberg
Center.
I
count
my
years
in
the
Peace
Corps
as
some
of
the
best
years
of
 
 
 my
life
and
I
am
happy
to
be
in
a
position
to
provide
support
for
PCMI
students
 having
their
own
cross‐cultural
and
life‐changing
experiences.
 
 
 
 



 



 


1



 



 


The
Inauguration
of
the
 Children’s
Library

 Taken
from
the
blog
of:
 Cheyanne
Greer,
PCV
Mozambique



It
was
decided
that
we
would
 open
the
library
on
June
25th,
the
 Mozambican
Independence
Day.
 My
roommate
Theresa
had
been
 working
on
this
library
project
 all
year.
We
would
go
to
town
as
 usual
and
watch
the
ceremonies
 and
performances
for
the
 Mozambican
holiday.
The
crowd
 would
then
move
over
to
the
 library
across
the
street
from
the
 festivities
to
participate
in
the
 opening
ceremony.
All
the
major
 chiefs
would
be
in
town
already
 and
would
not
have
to
plan
this
 as
an
extra
event
in
their
 schedules.
There
would
also
be
 plenty
of
townspeople
and
 children
already
celebrating.


ceremony.
Then,
someone
from
 the
mayor’s
office
came
to
ask
us
 if
we
had
champagne
and
a
 ribbon
for
the
mayor
to
cut.
Of
 course
we
didn’t,
as
we
were
 unaware
those
things
were
 necessities.
My
counterpart
 Moises
took
the
lead
and
ran
 around
the
community,
Homoine
 with
Theresa
looking
for
all
 these
things
while
the
 celebration
in
the
village
started.
 Many
of
the
shops
were
closed
 for
the
holiday
and
things
were
 harder
to
find
than
usual.
After
 running
around
like
a
chicken
 with
its
head
cut
off,
she
finally
 managed
to
find
all
the
required
 supplies
for
an
opening
 ceremony
in
Mozambique.


My
student
helping
us
prepare


Theresa
and
I
in
front
of
the
bookshelves


Of
course,
this
is
Mozambique
 and
not
everything
goes
as
 planned.
We
got
to
town
and
 started
preparing
the
library
 when
Theresa
got
a
call
from
her
 counterpart
saying
he
would
not
 be
able
to
make
it
to
the
 
 



 The
celebration
moved
over
to
 the
library
where
all
the
chiefs
 and
Theresa
were
serenaded
by
 a
gaggle
of
children
.
The
mayor
 cut
the
ribbon
and
all
the
chiefs
 crowded
into
the
library
for
 speeches
and
champagne.
 Theresa
was
supposed
to
say
a
 few
words
in
Portuguese
and
 managed
to
do
well,
but
 thankfully
Moises
jumped
in
to
 help
her.

 After
the
champagne
toast
the
 chiefs
headed
back
outside
and
 everyone
watched
a
 performance
by
my
students’
 
 


2


group,
JUNTOS.
They
performed
 a
skit
about
the
importance
of
 reading
and
sang
a
song.
The
 students
had
only
a
few
days
to
 prepare
and
practice,
but
they
 did
an
amazing
job.
I
was
so
 proud
of
them
and
the
audience
 loved
it.
They
laughed
and
sat
 enthralled
by
the
performance.
 


My
students’
skit


After
my
students’
performance,
 the
children
were
finally
allowed
 to
go
into
the
library
and
explore
 the
books.
It
was
a
beautiful
site
 and
an
amazing
day.
Despite
all
 our
difficulties
in
getting
the
 library
going
and
getting
my
 students
prepared
to
perform,
 everything
went
very
well.
I
 went
to
sleep
that
night
 completely
happy
and
fulfilled
 with
the
past
few
months
of
my
 work.
Many
more
challenges
will
 definitely
come,
but
I
am
 prepared
to
face
them
head
on.
 


Time
to
read



 
 



 


From
Togo
 Taken
from
the
blog
of:

 Amanda
Walsh,
PCV
Togo


As
of
JuIy
9th,
I
have
been
living
 in
Togo
for
one
full
month.
 Crazy!
It
really
doesn’t
seem
like
 that
long,
but
it
seems
like
 forever
all
at
the
same
time.


 The
trip
here
took
more
than
a
 day.
We
stopped
in
Belgium
and
 Côte
d’Ivoire
before
arriving
 here
in
Togo
at
around
10p.m.
 The
first
difference
I
observed
 when
landing
in
Togo
was
there
 are
no
lights.
It
felt
like
landing
 in
a
black
pit,
a
very
exciting
and
 scary
black
pit.
From
the
airport
 we
headed
to
our
hotel
where
 we
would
be
staying
for
a
little
 less
than
a
week.
It
had
 electricity,
running
water
and
 sometimes
Wi‐Fi.
It
was
a
nice
 way
to
ease
into
life
here.

 Lomé,
the
capital,
has
 American/European
food
along
 with
a
huge
market
that
is
open
 almost
everyday.
We
didn’t
 really
get
to
explore
too
much
in
 Lomé,
which
was
probably
good
 since
we
were
all
sleep
deprived
 and
essentially
zombies.
The
 first
few
days
in
Lomé
consisted
 of
getting
oriented,
it
felt
like
the
 beginning
of
summer
camp.
It’s
 impossible
to
explain.
This
city
is
 like
nothing
I
have
ever
seen
 before.
There
are
so
many
 motorcycles!
The
streets
made
of
 mostly
clay
or
mud
and
are
 packed
with
motorcycles.

 
 


We
spent
a
few
days
in
Lomé
and
 then
we
all
moved
into
home‐ stays
in
three
different
villages:
 Tsévié,
Gbatobé,
and
Davié.
I’m
 living
in
Tsévié
with
a
family.
I
 found
it
surprising
to
not
have
a
 man
living
in
my
compound,
 since
Togo
historically
has
a
 patriarchal
society.

 My
family
is
great.
We
mostly
 speak
French
and
as
I
start
to
 learn
one
of
the
local
languages,
 Ewe,
they
help
me
with
that,
too.
 One
thing
that
is
really
 interesting
is
the
distribution
of
 responsibility.
My
younger
 sisters
do
a
ton
of
work,
like
get
 my
water.
If
I
tried
to
carry
the
 container
on
my
head
I
would
 most
likely
break
my
neck.

They
 help
me
with
my
laundry,
which,
 by
the
way,
putting
laundry
in
 the
machine
at
home
should
NOT
 be
considered
a
chore.
My
 knuckles
were
literally
raw
after
 my
first
attempt
and
I
had
help.

 Other
things
that
are
scary
and
 different
here:



thought
I
would
not
be
using
the
 bathroom
for
the
next
two
years.

 Turns
out
humans
are
adaptable
 and
I’ve
become
more
and
more
 used
to
it
everyday.
I
don’t
even
 need
my
flashlight
every
time
I
 use
the
latrine
at
night.

Goal
 accomplished.
 

 Bucket
showers‐
 I
am
pretty
obsessed
with
bucket
 showers.
First
off,
they
are
so
 much
more
practical.
You
only
 take
the
water
you
need
and
 that’s
all
you
use.
There
aren’t
 gallons
of
water
just
running
off
 of
your
body.
I’ll
admit,
after
a
 game
of
soccer
in
the
mud
a
hot
 shower
sounds
divine.
Bucket
 showers
are
also
great
because
 the
water
is
always
cold
unless
 you
want
to
boil
it.
There
is
not
a
 quick
way
to
heat
the
water,
 which
means
cold
showers
in
the
 morning
to
wake
you
up.
I’m
not
 sure
I’ll
ever
be
fully
clean
here
 and
shaving
is
a
pain
in
the
butt,
 but
hey,
I’m
only
using
a
quarter
 bucket
of
water
a
day.
Who
says
 we
have
to
use
20
gallons
for
one
 shower?


Latrines‐
 I’m,
for
the
most
part,
used
to
 
A
while
back,
a
few
of
us
played
 using
a
latrine,
but
I’m
not
sure
I
 soccer
with
a
bunch
of
the
 will
ever
be
fully
comfortable
 neighborhood
kids,
which
was
 with
the
idea.
It’s
kind
of
nice
 awesome.
The
kids
here
are
so
 just
pretending
like
that
stuff
 comfortable
in
their
skin
and
so
 doesn’t
have
to
go
somewhere.
I
 ready
to
run
around
and
play.
 almost
threw
up
the
first
time
I
 It’s
great.
Soccer
here,
as
you
 opened
the
door
to
my
latrine,
 may
have
guessed,
is
huge.
Next
 which
happens
to
be
connected
 week
we
are
going
to
Lomé
to
 to
my
shower,
aka
a
mudroom
 play/watch
a
match
between
the
 with
a
hole
in
the
floor.
I
know
 American
Embassy
and
the

 all
of
this
stuff
sounds
really
 scary.
To
be
honest,
at
first
I
 



























 (Continues
on
page
4)
 
 
 


3



 



 


Togolese
Embassy.
It
should
be
 fun
and
interesting.
 Lastly,
my
site
will
be
Adeta
in
 the
Plateaux
region.
My
 understanding
is
that
it’s
a
 


bigger
village
with
not
only
a
 post
office
but,
(everyone
get
 excited)
a
bank!
Yes,
those
two
 things
do
mean
a
bigger
village.
 Something
actually
exciting
is


that
I
will
have
electricity,
 internet
(most
likely)
and
a
 bucket
flush
toilet,
bittersweet.




 



 
 
 
 Want
to
learn
more
about
what
Gonzaga’s
PCMI
students
are
doing
as



Peace
Corps
volunteers?


Checkout
two
of
our
student’s
blogs:
 
 Cheyanne
Greer,
PCV
Mozambique
 http://timeinmozambique.blogspot.com/
 Amanda
Walsh,
PCV
Togo
 http://acodzdoestogo.blogspot.com/
 
 


Interested
in
what
other
PCVs
are
doing
around
the
world?
 Here
is
a
list
of
the
winning
blogs
from
Peace
Corps’
New
Volunteer
Blog
It
Home
contest:
 ‐peacecorps.gov,
August
22,
2013
 


Jedd
and
Michelle
Chang,
PCV
couple
in
Jamaica
 http://simplyintentional.wordpress.com/

 
 Joshua
Cook
and
Jennifer
Klein,
PCV
couple
in
Ethiopia
 http://jenandjoshinethiopia.blogspot.com/

 
 Sara
Kline,
PCV
Thailand
 http://klinesc.blogspot.com/

 
 Jessica
Lavash,
PCV
Mexico
 http://stonecactuses.wordpress.com/
 
 
 



 


4



 



 


Food
Talk



 Sopa
Paraguaya
 Frances
Peterson,
PCV
Paraguay


This
cheesy
cornbread
is
a
 Paraguayan
staple.
Depending
 on
the
cook,
it
might
be
filled
 with
layer
of
ground
meat
or
lots
 of
fresh
vegetables.
In
rural
 Paraguay,
most
of
the
 ingredients
are
casero
or
 homemade.
Corn
flour
made
 from
the
corn
in
your
garden,
 cheese
made
from
your
cow’s
 milk,
lard
from
your
pig
recently
 killed
for
someone’s
birthday
or
 an
upcoming
holiday
and
eggs
 from
your
chickens.


 
 
 
 
 


After
the
ingredients
are
mixed
 together,
they
are
placed
in
a
pan
 lined
with
banana
leaves.



This
prevents
the
delicate
dish
 from
sticking
to
the
pan.


Preparing
the
tatakua


When
the
sopa
is
done,
it
is
 usually
golden
brown
on
top
and
 moist
in
the
middle.
It
is
best
 eaten
warm,
fresh
out
of
the
 oven.



 
 
 Sopa
paraguaya
baking


Traditionally,
sopa
paraguaya
is
 cooked
in
a
tatkua,
or
a
domed
 brick
oven.

A
fire
is
made
in
the
 oven
with
wood.
When
the
 bricks
are
hot
enough,
the
 burning
wood
is
removed
and
 the
sopa
is
placed
inside
to
cook.





 
 
 
 
 



 
 Preparing
corn
flour



 


Fresh
sopa
paraguaya



 



 











Sopa
Paraguaya
Recipe:
 


Ingredients:



























































































Directions:���
 
 
 2
large
white
onions,
chopped
 
 
 
 


1.
Beat
lard
until
fluffy
 
 
 
 1
tablespoon
salt
 
 
 
 


2.
Add
eggs
and
cheese,
mix
well

 
 ¾
cup
lard
(or
butter)
 
 
 
 
 


3.
Beat
in
milk
and
add
onions
 
 11
ounces
Paraguayan
cheese
(or
soft
white
cheese)















4.
Add
flour
and
mix
well
 
 
 2
cups
milk
 
 
 
 
 
 


5.
Bake
for
about
an
hour
at
350F
 
 18
ounces
corn
flour

 4
eggs



 



 



 



 



 



 
 


5


Upcoming
Campus
Events
 


Peace
Corps
Visits
Gonzaga
 
 
 




















Sept.
19,
2013
10:30
a.m.‐4:30
p.m.
 












































Crosby
Hall
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




















Oct.
16,
2013
12
p.m.
‐4
p.m.
 
 
 














Cataldo
Hall
 
 
 Peace
Corps
Post
Graduate
Service
Fair


















Sept.

19,
2013
5
p.m.
‐6:30
p.m.
 
 





























Cataldo
Hall
 
 
 Peace
Corps
Information
Session

 
 





Sept.
19,
2013
7:30
p.m.
‐8:30
p.m.
 
 






























Crosby
Hall
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





Oct.
16,
2013
5:30
p.m.
–
6:30
p.m.
 
 
 















Crosby
Hall
 
 
 Peace
Corps
Panel
Discussion


 
 





Oct.
8,
2013
12
p.m.
‐1
p.m.

 













































Collage
Hall
 
 
 First
Friday
Forum

 


















































The
first
Friday
of
every
month

 






























Schoenberg
Rm201
 
 
 
 
 
 Visit
peacecorps.gov
for
more
information
on
Peace
Corps
visits
to
Gonzaga
campus


Contact
Information








 




 



 
 
 




 




PCMI
Students






























Gonzaga
Campus



 Stephanie
Dempsey,
PCV
 Peace
Corps

 P.O.
Box
208
 Lilongwe,
Malawi,
Africa
 sdemps80@hotmail.com


General
Information
 gonzaga.edu/pcmi
 pcmi@gonzaga.edu
 (509)
313‐6560
 Tyler
Wasson
 
wassont@gonzaga.edu
 (509)
313‐5593


Cheyanne
Greer,
PCV

 C.P.
31
Maxixe
 Inhambane
Province,
Mozambique
 chey82@hotmail.com


Melissa
Heid
 heid@gonzaga.edu
 (509)
313‐6560


Frances
Peterson,
PCV
 Cuerpo
de
Paz
 162
Chaco
Boreal
c/Mcal.
López
 Asunción
1580,
Paraguay
 South
America
 fmanring@zagmail.gonzaga.edu
 
 Amanda
Walsh,
PCV
 BP
31
 Adeta,
Togo,
West
Africa
 awalsh@zagmail.gonzaga.edu


Zach
Wegner,
PCV
 Peace
Corps
Samoa
 Private
mailbag
 Apia,
Western
Samoa,
South
Pacific

 wegner.zach@gmail.com


James
Hunter
 hunter@gonzaga.edu
 (509)
313‐6564



 Please
share
your
ideas,
events
and
articles

 for
our
next
newsletter.

 Email:
 fmanring@zagmail.gonzaga.edu



 



 


6



 



 



The Global Bulldog #2